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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  June 27, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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g7 leaders promise to stand with ukraine "for as long as it takes" and announce more sanctions on russia. via video link, president zelensky told leaders he wanted the war to end before winter — and borisjohnson said western democracies had to resist tyranny, just as they'd defeated nazi germany. sometimes the price of freedom is worth paying. and just remember, it took the democracies in the middle of the last century a long time to recognise that they had to resist tyranny and aggression. world leaders demand the immediate and unconditional withdrawal of russian troops from ukraine and tell
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vladimir putin to end his war of choice. in ukraine, a bbc investigation has found evidence of occupying russian forces stealing thousands of tonnes of grain. moscow denies the claim. we'll be live at the g7 summit for the latest. also this lunchtime... a woman has died and a man has serious injuries after a gas explosion destroyed a house in birmingham. the former conservative prime minister sirjohn major tells the infected blood inquiry that what happened to thousands of patients in the 19705 and �*80s was "incredibly bad luck." and the crowds are back at swi9 — some tennis fans have been queueing since friday to get into the opening day of wimbledon. and coming up on the bbc news channel, england's women make early breakthroughs in their one—off test match against south africa in taunton.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the leaders of the g7 group of nations have promised they will stand with ukraine "for as long as it takes" — as they announced they would step up sanctions on russia. president zelenskyjoined the summit remotely and told the leaders he needed more weapons and air defence systems and wanted the war to be over by the end of the year. in a bbc interview, borisjohnson said western democracies had to resist tyranny today, just as they had defeated nazi germany in the last century. from the g7, here's our diplomatic correspondent, james landale.
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day two of the g7 summit, the leaders gathered to discuss the war in ukraine, how to step up their support for kyiv, how to reduce the impact on the global economy. but look who joined them, up there on that screen on the left. president zelensky, notjust addressing the leaders, but taking part in the discussion. after the cameras left, ukraine's leader told the g7 he wanted the war over by the end of the year, before the winter sets in. according to eu sources, he also asked for more anti—aircraft defence systems, more sanctions on russia and greater security guarantees. borisjohnson argued the g7 had to do more to help ukraine defend itself, rebuild its economy and export its grain. everybody came to the g7 in germany really hearing a lot about ukraine fatigue, the anxieties of other countries around the world about the continuing war, the effect on food prices and energy prices. and what really struck me in the last couple of days has been
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the amazing consistency of our resolve and the continuing unity of the g7. what borisjohnson is trying to do here is to remake the case for supporting ukraine. he is acknowledging openly there are anxieties about the impact of western sanctions on things like energy prices and food prices. but he is saying it is a price worth paying to avoid more pain down the track. and that argument involves history and the importance of defeating dictators. just remember, it took the democracies in the middle of the last century a long time to recognise that they had to resist tyranny and aggression. it took them a long time. it was very expensive. but what it bought in the end with the defeat of the dictators, particularly of nazi germany, it brought decades and decades of stability, a world order that relied on a rules—based international system.
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what's not clear is whether that argument convinces countries outside of the g7 club. today, the leaders of india, indonesia, senegal, argentina and south africa join the discussions. many in their countries and elsewhere are suffering because of western sanctions on russia. despite the warm feelings on show for their guests, the g7 leaders announced they would step up their sanctions, targeting russian gold and key industrial services and technologies. but the leaders do say they would take action to mitigate what they called the spill—over effect on low and middle—income countries. james landale, bbc news, at the g7 in bavaria. let's speak to our berlin correspondent, jenny hill, who joins us from southern germany where the g7 leaders are meeting. the leaders are expressing unity but what is the practical significance
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of what they are announcing? that is the difficult question. they've - the difficult question. they've released this strongly worded statement in which they have expressed very robustly their ongoing support for ukraine in its fight to repel the russian invasion. they are promising more military and financial support and so on. at the same time they've demanded vladimir putin withdraws his troops immediately from ukrainian territory as defined by internationally recognised borders which would include crimea, annexed by putin in 2014. this is a significant document, it puts paid to any suggestion any of the leaders who were starting to waver in their support for ukraine. some of them are in quite difficult political territory. back pain borisjohnson, emmanuel macron, president biden, and they have electorates starting to suffer from the increasing cost of living exacerbated by the ongoing
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conflict. nevertheless we get this message of unity that it will carry on for as long as it takes. significant for a second reason, and thatis significant for a second reason, and that is a number of experts, analysts and politicians had suggested the only way out will be for ukraine ultimately to hand over some of the territory that vladimir putin's troops have taken in order to secure an end to hostilities, fiercely resisted as an idea by ukraine and further afield. again, the leaders say it's for ukraine to choose its own future, they say there will be no outside pressure on ukraine when it comes to dictating or determining any future terms of any potential peace settlement. thank you. as we've been hearing, the g7 nations have also been discussing the worldwide problems caused by the disruption of wheat supplies from ukraine. fears are growing of famine in africa and the middle east as a result. and a bbc investigation has found evidence of occupying russian forces stealing thousands of tonnes of ukrainian grain —
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which moscow denies. 0ur europe correspondent, nick beake, is in kyiv. we know that russia continues to attack ukraine. no were in the sun strikes here over the weekend but it also continues to hit ukraine's economy, specifically targeting its grain supplies. this was a really important part of the economy here but also it has global implications, what is happening. if you look at the past few weeks there have been lots of talk of russian theft of ukrainian grain. it's been difficult to pin down, to provide the evidence, certainly evidence that it's happening on a very grand scale. what we've tried to do is to take satellite images, cctv and other video evidence and piece it all together. crucially, piece it together with the testimony of
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ukrainian farmers who are living under russian occupation, and this is our investigation. russian forces in ukraine are accused of war crimes, murder and rape. but they're also accused of stealing ukrainian grain on an industrial scale. they destroyed our premises, destroyed our equipment, everything they saw. everything they touch disappears. we tried to contact more than 200 farmers, whose land is now in russian occupied territory. the vast majority were too scared to talk, but one did agree to be interviewed. to protect his identity we've changed his name and are using an actor. they looted our offices, even pulled the wiring from the walls and took away the photographs of our relatives. and this was the moment the russians arrived at the farm. you can see their z symbol on the tanks. 0ne soldier tries to shoot the security camera, but misses. thousands of tonnes of grain were then taken and transported in stolen lorries.
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using its gps tracker, we followed the route of one truck travelling to crimea, which moscow annexed eight years ago, and then on to mainland russia, where it's feared ukrainian grain is being packed up and exported as russian grain. 0n the way the truck stopped here at this grain store, where a new z symbol has appeared on the roof. ukrainian officials fear the russians have stolen as much as 800,000 tonnes of grain since the invasion. it is bringing back memories of the great famine that josef stalin inflicted on this country nearly a century ago. ukraine's flag tells you all you need to know. a blue sky over a yellow field encapsulates just how important this fertile land is to people. it's the soul of the country. and so the russian occupation, and theft of ukrainian grain, has a profound effect on people here.
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but it's also having increasingly grave consequences for people in other parts of the world too. grain that isn't being robbed is being destroyed. this footage, posted by the ukrainian military, is said to show russian forces blowing up a grain store. moscow denies it is destroying or robbing ukrainian produce. but instead, it claims it's nationalising ukraine's grain. we obtained one document from a russian—installed authority, that says to ensure the food security of the area there's now in order to take the wheat and barley from the warehouse of a company. i think there are so many people in the world now sitting eating a sandwich, not realising that this grain has been stolen and that so many people are suffering. i don't understand why the world is silent and not doing anything to punish this injustice. the wholesale theft of ukrainian grain threatens to cripple this
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vital sector of an economy already under such strain. a russian crime targeting individual farmers will be felt by a whole nation, and beyond. nick beake, bbc news, ukraine. a deadline for an interest payment on russia's foreign currency sovereign debt has passed, with no sign that creditors have received the money. analysts say this is the first time russia is effectively in default since 1998. moscow says it sent the $100 million payment — but western sanctions have made it impossible to complete the transfer. the prime minister has brushed off continuing questions about his leadership, saying he's focussing on his work and the plans to get on with the government's agenda. borisjohnson says it is his job to "humbly accept" criticism and help people through the cost of living crisis. 0ur political editor, chris mason, has been talking to him at the g7 summit.
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chris, the pm is standing firm. he really is. he's faced questions about his future at the commonwealth summit in rwanda, they have followed him here to the g7 summit in germany and trundling alongside him, defiance and suitcases full of it. i've been to see him this morning in the beautiful bavarian alps and i've been speaking to borisjohnson. prime minister, what is it about your character that is repelling voters at the moment and repelling so many of your mps? look, i think that the golden rule of politics is, if possible, despite all the very polite invitations of brilliant journalists, resist comment on politics or personalising... but you know criticism is about your character from plenty on your own side, and they want to see some change. and you talked at the weekend about how there wouldn't be a psychological transformation. how are you going to change?
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can you convince people you are going to change? so what we are going to do is get on with our agenda. as i said i think at the weekend, in times like this, of course there are going to be criticisms of political leaders. it's myjob to humbly accept those criticisms. the lesson that i think that i, people like me, need to learn from what is going on, inflationary pressures that we are facing around the world, number one, we need to help people through the current pressures. and you know, at the pumps people are thinking, you know, this government could do more to help me with the cost of fuel. people are thinking, what are they doing to help me with the cost of food? so, we are doing as much as we possibly can. people have heard you say that, prime minister, but they will also think when you think about serving three terms, when you talk about policy rather than character, will your critics not think you are walking around with your fingers in your ears, you are not listening? i think the job of, of a government is to get on with governing.
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but do you actually have the authority now to deliver that policy? i not only have the authority, i've got a new mandate for my party, which i'm absolutely delighted about... 40% of them want rid of you? ..which is, which is... i got more... ..a higher percentage of... anyway, that's done. it was, it was, it was a couple of weeks ago. no, it's not done. they are still talking about it, it's still a live question. can you deliver the policy platform you're talking about with your authority clearly weakened ? of course we can. and we're going to continue to do that. and we're focused on that 1,000%. that's the agenda for the government. and you carry on to the 2030s? look, we are going to... we are going to get on with the agenda on which i was elected. it's a massive agenda. we are coping with the, dealing with the big problems that have been left behind by the pandemic. and that is the priority.
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it's worth emphasising that the reason people like me continue to ask borisjohnson questions like those when he is on the international stage, those when he is on the internationalstage, or those when he is on the international stage, or wherever years, is because, as i said there, this is an ongoing conversation within his own party, among his own colleagues, including at a senior level. and clearly, how long this prime minister continues for whom i'd replace him is an important topic to scrutinise. and it's a topic to scrutinise. and it's a topic of the prime minister hasn't managed to shake off a months on end. chris, thank you. chris mason. a woman has died and a man is being treated for life—threatening injuries following a gas explosion that tore through a street in birmingham. 0ne house was destroyed in the blast and several others were badly damaged. neighbours risked their lives to clamber through the burning wreckage to pull out the injured man. phil mackie reports from the scene. a scene of devastation in dulwich road. a sunny sunday evening and a
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home blown apart. it road. a sunny sunday evening and a home blown apart.— home blown apart. it 'ust exploded. it was home blown apart. it 'ust exploded. n was reauy. h home blown apart. it 'ust exploded. it was really, really — home blown apart. itjust exploded. it was really, really scary. _ home blown apart. itjust exploded. it was really, really scary. i - it was really, really scary. i thought something had happened to my car. the airbags came out of the car, all the windows broken and the roof. it was really, really scary. try to explain how bad it was. bravely, a group of ten people run into the burning house to try to save those people inside, including kira organs and's partner. it save those people inside, including kira organs and's partner.— kira organs and's partner. it was 'ust a kira organs and's partner. it was just a day _ kira organs and's partner. it was just a day of _ kira organs and's partner. it was just a day of sadness _ kira organs and's partner. it was just a day of sadness because i kira organs and's partner. it was l just a day of sadness because look what happened. a complete tragedy. we are so proud. of literally every single person that risked their lives to go in there and help somebody else.— lives to go in there and help somebody else. lives to go in there and help somebod else. ., . ~ somebody else. heroic. when fire crews turned _ somebody else. heroic. when fire crews turned up _ somebody else. heroic. when fire crews turned up police _ somebody else. heroic. when fire crews turned up police and - somebody else. heroic. when fire i crews turned up police and members of the _ crews turned up police and members of the public and started to mount a rescue _ of the public and started to mount a rescue of— of the public and started to mount a rescue of the individual. and i was the one _ rescue of the individual. and i was the one our— rescue of the individual. and i was the one our cruz turned up we took over from _ the one our cruz turned up we took over from that. but here, the community has been great, notjust in the _ community has been great, notjust in the immediate aftermath, but owni does well_
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in the immediate aftermath, but owni does well in _ in the immediate aftermath, but owni does well in terms of supporting us. they know_ does well in terms of supporting us. they know it— does well in terms of supporting us. they know it was a gas explosion but don't know what caused, which is what you have the gas company, police and fire investigators all down there their investigations. neighbouring homes were badly damaged. the street remains cordoned off. 0nly damaged. the street remains cordoned off. only now can you see the full scale of the wreckage. 21 people had to be evacuated. many of them spend the night in a local pub.— the night in a local pub. there's nothin: the night in a local pub. there's nothing you _ the night in a local pub. there's nothing you can _ the night in a local pub. there's nothing you can do. _ the night in a local pub. there's nothing you can do. the - the night in a local pub. there's nothing you can do. the only i the night in a local pub. there's i nothing you can do. the only thing we've got is clothes are now bags. all the money is in the house. the cards in the house, everything is in the house. cards in the house, everything is in the house-— cards in the house, everything is in the house. some people have been allowed bagon _ the house. some people have been allowed bagon to _ the house. some people have been allowed bagon to collect _ the house. some people have been| allowed bagon to collect essentials. 0thers allowed bagon to collect essentials. others may not get back into their homes for several days, if ever. so, from here you can really see how extensive the damage is to those other houses. you side of the house that is completely gone, and two this way, they look in a really bad condition. these guys
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here, they've got the lettering on the back of theirjackets, search and rescue, specially trained firefighters. we think they are about to go in and start going through the rubble. we are expecting an update on the condition of the man brought out with life—threatening injuries last night. we are expecting that in the next half an hour or so. but for this area and for kingstanding, this particular part of birmingham, it is a very sad day knowing that at least one person has died, others were injured, and this whole area remains utterly devastated. thank you. phil mackie. the time is 19 minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime. g7 leaders meeting in germany have promised to stand with ukraine as long as it takes. promised to stand with ukraine and promised to stand with ukraine coming up, i am at where and coming up, i am at wimbledon where the rain has stopped and plays back on the way on day one. nine british players in action today, among them emma raducanu and andy murray. coming up on the bbc news channel — eoin morgan, one of england's most
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successful cricket captains, is expected to announce his international retirement. the former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, has been giving evidence at a public inquiry into what's been described as the biggest medical disaster in the history of the nhs. nearly 5,000 people with haemophilia and other blood disorders were given a treatment infected with hiv or hepatitis in the 19705 and 805. sirjohn, who's been questioned about the level of financial support and compensation offered, described what happened to the patients as "incredibly bad luck". 0ur health correspondent jim reed reports. i suppose the biggest impact is i'm not the person i was meant to have been. you can't erase the darkness, you can't erase the fear.
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it's always lurking. mark was just a child when he was warned about a medication he'd been given. his parents were told his new treatment for a blood disorder had been contaminated with hiv. i can't really describe the feeling, because it was, well, first of all, you question, why are you going to school to take exams for a future and a life you're not going to have? when your doctor says, "if you're lucky, but i don't think you will live long enough to leave school," why bother? why? mark's life was saved by new hiv drugs. 0ther5 died before they could be made available. in total, 5000 people with haemophilia were left with hiv, hepatitis or both. many more were exposed after a blood transfusion in the 705 and 805. this morning, the former prime minister, john major, has started giving evidence at the long running public inquiry into the disaster.
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i swear by almighty god. he was working in the treasury in the late 19805, and described a growing sense that public money would be needed to support the families affected. it was becoming apparent how serious the issue was, and how widespand it was, and how unsustainable it would be for the people who were suffering without some form of practial compensation. but his description of the disaster as bad luck drew ga5p5 from the families watching, who've always believed more should have been done to understand the risks. i mean, there's no amount of compensation you can give that could actually compensate for what had happened to them. what had happened to them was incredibly bad luck. gasps awful. and it was not something that anybody was unsympathetic to. i was falling asleep, i was being sick. melanie was another of the thousands infected when she was just 17. she was diagnosed with hepatitis c,
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a disease which can slowly destroy the liver, and has suffered from health problems ever since. as soon as i found out what hepatitis c was, and realised that it was impacting on my life, and that i was possibly not going to see my children grow up, it has been like living without being alive. it's had a huge impact on every single victim. that feeling of, it could have been avoided. you melanie is now on a different, modern treatment to control her blood disorder. like thousands of others, though, she is still living with the consequences of what happened three decades ago, and still looking for answers so many years later. jim reed, bbc news. south african officials have ruled out a crush as an explanation for the death of 22 teenagers at a nightclub in the city of east london. forensic experts are investigating those who died had breathed in or swallowed a poisonous substance.
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mp5 are due to vote on controversial new legislation to give ministers powers to override some post—brexit trading arrangements for northern ireland. if passed, the law will allow the government to unilaterally remove checks on goods travelling to northern ireland from the rest of the uk. ministers say the change is needed to protect the good friday agreement — but the eu's ambassador to britain called the plans illegal and unrealistic. people who've been waiting for more than two years for nhs surgery in england are being offered hospital treatment in a different part of the country. the health service says it will pay travel and accommodation costs, because it wants to end all two—year waits by the end of next month. more than 400 patients have already said they'd be prepared to travel to have their operation. criminal barristers in england and wales have begun strike action which is expected to delay trials.
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the dispute is about how much they're paid in legal aid to defend people who can't afford a lawyer. the government says the walk—outs will only slow down justice for victims. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, is at the old bailey in london. so so what sort of impact will this strike have, do you think, tom? dozens of barristers turned out here at the old bailey instead of going into court, notjust here, but around london. here, it is being claimed by the criminal bar association, eight out of ten courts are not really doing any work other than perhaps some administrative work. and that's a claim which the government is yet to respond to. but the situation at bristol crown court and other gear we have heard about, similarly, seven out of ten courts not operating normally for possibly a variety of reasons. i spoke to four barristers who had all walked out of court add —— and those trials
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have been halted for the day. as you say, it is about legal aid pay. how much air —— are barristers paid? according to an independent review last year, a junior barrister can earn as little as £9,000 a year. that can rise to something like 48, £50,000 a year after seven years. at the big concern is aboutjunior barristers. they are not staying in the profession, the criminal bar association says, and it's bringing thejustice association says, and it's bringing the justice system to a standstill. there is a long backlog of court cases. ., ., , there is a long backlog of court cases. ., ., ~ there is a long backlog of court cases. ., ., tributes have been paid to the dad's army actor frank williams, who's died at the age of 90. 0h, oh, i 0h, isay. bless oh, i say. bless you. 0h, isay. bless you. that oh, i say. bless you. that has rather taken the wind out of my sails. i came in here to be very cross with you. frank williams was best known for his recurring role as the whisky—loving, petulant vicar
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timothy farthing in the sitcom set during the second world war. he also played clergymen in other bbc comedies, including you rang, m'lord? and hi—de—hi. the queen has travelled to scotland with members of herfamily the queen has travelled to scotland with members of her family for their traditional week of events north of the border. the 96—year—old monarch, who has cut back on public engagements because of mobility issues, was in edinburgh for the ceremony of the keys. the ceremony sees the monarch are traditionally handed the keys to the city and seat are welcomed to arrange and an hereditary kingdom of scotland. —— sees her welcomed. the clean—up is under way at glastonbury to return the site in somerset to a working dairy farm, after 200,000 music lovers attended the festival there. 0ur correspondent john maguire is there. it isa it is a big job, john? yeah,
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absolutely _ it is a big job, john? yeah, absolutely huge _ it is a big job, john? yeah, absolutely huge job. i it is a big job, john? yeah, i absolutely huge job. effectively turning a city of 200,000 people, albeit a temporary one, back pristine dairy pasture land for worthy farm, which is a working farm. look at the rigours taking early lighting gantries is under sound gantries from the pyramid stage. you will have seen the pictures over the weekend and hopefully tuned in to some of the performances by sir paul mccartney, billie eilish, diana ross. the show was closed by kendrick lamar last night. a hugely successfulfestival, but this is perhaps an aspect of it you don't see on the television, all of the behind the scenes work. look across the site. watching over the weekend, you would be used that looking like a sea of humanity, hundreds of thousands of people waving their flags enjoying the concert. the vast majority of them have gone home. one of the things the organisers have been keen to
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emphasise is to tell people to take their kid home. arriving here this morning seeing bedraggled festivalgoers heading back either north, south or east with all kit packed away, it sounds as if that message has been very much heeded. in the next couple of weeks this will be returned to pristine pasture land. and the next appearances here will be by the glastonbury cows. they will take over the farm for the next ten or 11 months, until he gets reopened once again for the world was my biggest musical festival in the round 359 days. —— around. john the round 359 days. -- around. john mauuire, the round 359 days. -- around. john maguire. thank— the round 359 days. —— around. john maguire, thank you. rain has delayed the start of play on the final day of the test match between england and new zealand in headingley. better weather in taunton, where england's women's cricketers are taking on south africa. england are in control and there have been debut wickets for izzy wong and lauren bell. south africa are currently 83 for four. wimbledon fortnight is getting under way.
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the reigning us open champion, emma raducanu, will be on centre court later this afternoon, as will andy murray. there's been some controversy about the organisers' decision to ban players from russia and belarus, because of the invasion of ukraine. let's cross to sw19 and our sports news correspondent, laura scott. hi, laura. hi,jane. wimbledon hi, laura. hi, jane. wimbledon is backin hi, laura. hi, jane. wimbledon is back in full force this year. many fans that means the return of one of the highlights of the championships, the highlights of the championships, the queue, where they can camp overnight to get their hands on tickets to one of the main chords. there is a stellar line—up of players this year, including serena williams and rafael nadal. there is no world number one, daniil medvedev, because of the ban on russian and belarusian players, and no ranking points either. instead, the top seed in the men's draw will be novak djokovic, who will shortly be novak djokovic, who will shortly be opening centre coordinates its
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centenary year. he is the defending champion. he has not been beaten here since 2017.

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