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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 29, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. our headlines today. cancer campaigner dame deborah james — known to millions as bowel babe — has died at the age of a0. # when you hold me like that #. she challenged taboos and changed the conversation around bowel cancer — urging people to check their poo. we'll speak to those who knew and loved her about her life and her remarkable legacy.
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british socialite ghislaine maxwell has been jailed for 20 years by a new york court for helping jeffrey epstein abuse young girls. also, with petrol and diesel prices near record highs, pressure is growing on retailers and the government to step in. i'll be finding out the impact on people who rely on their vehicle for work. good morning, defeat for serena williams on her wimbledon return. when the covers come off later, we will see emma raducanu and andy murray back in action. good morning, we have rain pushing eastwards that will clear the east in the next couple of hours. behind it, sunshine and showers, some of them heavy and thundery but less windy today than yesterday. i will have the details throughout the programme.
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it's wednesday, 29th ofjune. our main story. the cancer campaigner, blogger and broadcaster, dame deborahjames, also known as bowel babe, has died aged 40. she had been receiving end—of—life care for bowel cancer at home. the host of the bbc�*s you, me and the big c podcast was given a damehood in may in recognition of her tireless fundraising. write to the very end of her life, dame deborahjames was determined to live every moment to the full. a few weeks ago she was at the chelsea flower show to see arrays that had been named after her. she wanted to make the most of whatever time she had left. in herfinal weeks, she published a book. she started a fund for cancer charities that has raised millions of pounds. she launched a range of clothes, the rebellious hope t—shirt, that has raise money for charity. and on father's day she posted this image with the words, my
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dad is brushing my hair because i have no strength any more. announcing her death last night, her family said... i was diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer at the age of 35. we are talking about life and death here. it is heart—wrenching at times. here. it is heart-wrenching at times. ., ., , ., times. come on, mummy, you can go fasterthan _ times. come on, mummy, you can go faster than that. _ times. come on, mummy, you can go faster than that. i _ times. come on, mummy, you can go faster than that. i have _ times. come on, mummy, you can go faster than that. i have the _ times. come on, mummy, you can go faster than that. i have the poo - faster than that. i have the poo cancer. there _ faster than that. i have the poo cancer. there is _ faster than that. i have the poo cancer. there is nothing - faster than that. i have the poo cancer. there is nothing pink. faster than that. i have the poo - cancer. there is nothing pink about my cancer, it is just brown. i was eventually diagnosed with a 6.5 centimetre tumour.— eventually diagnosed with a 6.5
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centimetre tumour. debra was always honest and open _ centimetre tumour. debra was always honest and open about _ centimetre tumour. debra was always honest and open about her _ centimetre tumour. debra was always honest and open about her cancer. i honest and open about her cancer. she shared her every step of her journey from endless rounds of chemotherapy to the terrible side—effects of the drug treatment she was on. but, through it all, she was determined to keep smiling, to keep dancing. fill" was determined to keep smiling, to keep dancing-— keep dancing. our podcast is about livin: with keep dancing. our podcast is about living with cancer. _ keep dancing. our podcast is about living with cancer. it _ keep dancing. our podcast is about living with cancer. it is _ keep dancing. our podcast is about living with cancer. it is about - living with cancer. it is about showing life goes on. so if cancer wants me twirling around on the stage and wearing sequins and if it means i have to do treatment and train and dance, that is what life is. let's dance through the rain. i love that sing, dance through the rain. prime minister boris johnson rain. prime minister borisjohnson said...
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james deborah leaves behind a large, loving family and two children. —— dame deborah. in herfinal days she was surrounded by her family at her parents home. in her last interview she said she was convinced new treatments will be found. cancer should become _ treatments will be found. cancer should become a _ treatments will be found. cancer should become a chronic- treatments will be found. cancer| should become a chronic disease. treatments will be found. cancer i should become a chronic disease. i hope it will be in my kids' lifetime. but, ithink, there are people doing amazing things and we need to support them and fund them. deborah was made a dame last month. the award presented in person by prince william at her parents' home. dame deborah wrote her own epitaph.
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posted on social media last night. it said... that is such an important message, check your poo. do not be embarrassed. it could save your life. there's been an incredible reaction on social media to her death. let's take a look at some of the tributes being paid. radioi dj adele roberts who had bowel cancer said:
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tv presenter gaby roslin wrote... so many tributes from people involved in medicine. chief executive of nhs england amanda pritchard said... someone like her sharing the message the way she has, it is different from a pamphlet coming through the
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door. and she shared her experience to change the conversation around cancer. last month she announced that she'd come to the end of treatment and would be receiving end of life care. she invited our reporter graham satchell to chat to her in what would be her last television interview. i've lived off, i suppose, rebellious hope. and i've always used that word, haven't i? rebellious hope for so many years. and rebellious hope is kind of, i suppose, given me the opportunity to park what, on paper, it says i should have lived for. and i kind of ignored the statistics and ignored every statistic and kind of forgot that, at one point, the big statistic
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might come to get me. i know i've smashed every milestone i can possibly think of. i don't feel rushed, i don't feel angry that i haven't tried anything. i don't feel like we've run out of drugs. we have been trying everything and you know i've always said to you i don't want to leave a stone unturned, i don't think there is a stone that we haven't tried to turn in order to make my liver work again in order to kind of get my body functioning. but, unfortunately, i'm exhausted. i am absolutely exhausted. i just want to be around my family. and i have a really loving family who i adore loving family who i adore and couldn't... i honestly... they are just incredible.
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and all i knew i wanted was to come here and be able to relax knowing that everything was ok. and you always want to know, as a mother, are your kids going to be ok? and my kids are going to be fine. but it doesn't mean that i'm not going to miss every chance that i could have had with them. i think that's what's... that is what i will never get my head around. it's amazing how many people have read my story. and i never realised the impact that it had. and then to have it shown up in this way, it's just... it'sjust so much. like, how can anyone
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comprehend that? it's notjust flattering, it's... i'm just gobsmacked and utterly humbled by people's generosity. one in two of us will get cancer in our lifetime. i think there are people doing amazing things and we need to support them and fund them and help them and give them the resources they need to do these incredible things, because it is the difference between life and death. deborah speaking with graham a few weeks ago. incredible to think how much she achieved, even since that was recorded. even at her lowest point she was making appearances on publishing and fundraising. millions of pounds, meeting a future king. she packed a lot in.
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let's speak to one of our regular gps, dr nighat arif, who met deborah through this programme. you cannot overstate the impact she has had on so many.— you cannot overstate the impact she has had on so many. good morning. it is difficult to — has had on so many. good morning. it is difficult to hear _ has had on so many. good morning. it is difficult to hear the _ has had on so many. good morning. it is difficult to hear the news. _ has had on so many. good morning. it is difficult to hear the news. even - is difficult to hear the news. even though we were expecting it. i connected with dame deborahjames over bbc breakfast. we were going through a difficult time in 2020 when rolling out the vaccine programme. i must have not looked at myself because normally i am cheerful. 0n instagram she reached out to me and said please do not lose your smile because you give us hopein lose your smile because you give us hope in your household, watching you on bbc breakfast through the pandemic. that is how she was. she knew how to reach out, she was aware of those about her. her emotional
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intelligence was fabulous. and that is how we connected. we have been both of us connected over tiktok because i was making women's health content and she was making her content. raising awareness. after 15 years as a clinician, when i know a patient has a diagnosis, i am shockedit patient has a diagnosis, i am shocked it has happened. and it will take time to sink in to know she is not with us any more. she take time to sink in to know she is not with us any more.— not with us any more. she had an important — not with us any more. she had an important mantra _ not with us any more. she had an important mantra which - not with us any more. she had an important mantra which was - not with us any more. she had an important mantra which was to i not with us any more. she had an - important mantra which was to dance through the rain. two live alongside and with an illness and not allow it to define you. i and with an illness and not allow it to define yon-— to define you. i think that is her endurin: to define you. i think that is her enduring legacy- _ to define you. i think that is her enduring legacy. we _ to define you. i think that is her enduring legacy. we have - to define you. i think that is her enduring legacy. we have to - to define you. i think that is her- enduring legacy. we have to applaud that as much as possible because what she did was show you can have a diagnosis of cancer and it does not limit you. we should think of it as a chronic disease as well as raising
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awareness and make sure people pick up awareness and make sure people pick up the signs better for better prognosis of their condition. through her charity, we know changes have happened. to share positive news about what has happened, the british gastroenterology conference happened last week in birmingham and a test we used to pick up bowel cancer in general practice, patients you do not have symptoms but we wonder if there could be a diagnosis of that cancer we give a test given to asymptomatic people. we look for blood in the poo, early detection is. the guidelines have been widened even more so hopefully towards the end of the year, we can give it out notjust end of the year, we can give it out not just to end of the year, we can give it out notjust to people who are middle—aged but to give it to younger people because this cancer is a disease much older people get booked deborah highlighted it can be
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when you are very young. this test is accurate. the fact we can now hopefully roll it out to younger people and pick up this cancer earlier means that people will not have to suffer and the outcome will be better. ., ,., , have to suffer and the outcome will be better. ., , ., , be better. that sounds really excitina. be better. that sounds really exciting. have _ be better. that sounds really exciting. have you _ be better. that sounds really exciting. have you noticed i be better. that sounds really - exciting. have you noticed people coming through the door and mentioning deborah and being inspired to get checked themselves inspired to get checked themselves in your surgery?— in your surgery? definitely. the symptoms _ in your surgery? definitely. the symptoms she _ in your surgery? definitely. the symptoms she put _ in your surgery? definitely. the symptoms she put across - in your surgery? definitely. the symptoms she put across our. in your surgery? definitely. the - symptoms she put across our simple. a change in bowel habit, blood in your poo. check your poo everyday. look in the pan and ask if there is any blood in there. unintentional weight loss. chronic diarrhoea constipation. and if something does not feel right to you, go on to your
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doctor. sometimes you might need repeated appointments and checks with the doctor. but at least you are getting that message across in saying this is something i am worried about and we are investigating. we know some tests are not 100% so it is going back when something does not fit with you. q when something does not fit with ou. ~ ., ., when something does not fit with 0“. �* ., ., . ., when something does not fit with ou.~ . ., when something does not fit with ou. ~ . ., ., ~ you. a good clear message. thank ou. i you. a good clear message. thank you- i hope _ you. a good clear message. thank you- i hope you — you. a good clear message. thank you. i hope you are _ you. a good clear message. thank you. i hope you are ok. _ you. a good clear message. thank you. i hope you are ok. thank - you. a good clear message. thank you. i hope you are ok. thank youj you. a good clear message. thank i you. i hope you are ok. thank you so much. m you. i hope you are ok. thank you so much- my deepest — you. i hope you are ok. thank you so much. my deepest condolences - you. i hope you are ok. thank you so much. my deepest condolences to i you. i hope you are ok. thank you so| much. my deepest condolences to the loved ones and friends and family of deborahjames. this might bring up feelings of grief in a lot of people but there is a lot of information out there and a lot of charity work for those who are grieving, because this will hit hard for a lot of people. she is a legend and we have lost and we will miss her very much. we absolutely will. she would text you now and say, give us a smile. she definitely would. lovely. thanks
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forjoining us. showing the ripple effects of deborah that patients have gone to the surgery and said because of her i have decided to get this checked out. a direct legacy. i am sure people watching this morning who have health worries, and have been putting it off and might be inspired to call the gp today. now the weather with carol. good morning. today's whether is different from yesterday. we have a weather front moving east bringing rain through the night. that will clear and then we are looking at sunshine and showers. it was windy yesterday. less so today. this weather front bearing the rain. that will move away. behind it sunshine and showers, some heavy and thundering. less windy, so they will
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be slow—moving. a small chance of a shower at wimbledon. be slow—moving. a small chance of a showerat wimbledon. here, shower at wimbledon. here, temperatures showerat wimbledon. here, temperatures 22. generally 15—23. 0vernight, showers will fade. then we look at the south because we have this system clipping the south—eastern quarter and showers moving northwards across scotland and northern ireland by the end of the night. not a cold night. temperatures between 10—13. tomorrow, showers move north into northern scotland and the northern isles. you could see more cloud across east anglia and kent because we have a weather front nearby. but there will be showers around and some could be heavy and thundering. temperatures 14—19. tomorrowjust that little bit cooler. ghislaine maxwell, a former girlfriend of the sex offenderjeffrey epstein, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison by a court in new york.
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she was convicted last december of helping epstein to abuse teenage girls. 0ur north america correspondent nada tawfik was at the hearing. a long—fought victory for annie farmer and all of ghislaine maxwell's victims. justice was slow. she was one of the earliest to report maxwell and the paedophile jeffrey epstein to police, in 1996. but today, annie said it was never too late for accountability. maxwell and epstein were predators who were able to use their power and privilege to harm countless individuals, and for far too long, the institutions that should be protecting the public were instead protecting them. and i still hope that we find out more about how that was allowed to occur. maxwell did not look at her victims, but she did address them. she said she was sorry for the pain they had experienced. she also said her association with epstein, who she described as a manipulative, cunning man,
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was the greatest regret of her life. her statement felt like a very hollow apology to me. she did not take responsibility for the crimes that she committed and it felt like, once more, her trying to do something to benefit her and not at all about the harm that she had caused. the court allowed others who were not a part of the trial to also confront maxwell. the pain and anguish she caused was plain to see, as several accusers emotionally spoke about the lasting impact of her crimes, such as liz stein. she had a wonderful, full, beautiful life. and so many of usjust didn't have a chance to have that. i think that the closure part of her sentencing is maybe the beginning for a lot of us to start having the life that we anticipated we might have if we had never met ghislaine maxwell and jeffrey epstein.
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the british daughter of the disgraced media tycoon robert maxwell ran in the most influential circles, rubbing elbows with presidents and princes. but in court, as she waited to hear her fate, she was supported byjust three members of her family. herfamily says her family says maxwell plans to appeal. 20 years less than prosecutors wanted but nevertheless, they said it sent a strong message that no one was above the law. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has said she wants a second independence referendum to be held in october 2023. the uk government said now was not the time to be talking about another vote — but ms sturgeon plans to ask the supreme court whether a referendum would be legal without westminster�*s approval. world leaders have gathered in madrid for crucial talks on the future direction of nato in the wake of russia's invasion of ukraine. later, borisjohnson will call on members of the alliance to increase their military spending
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over the next decade — warning that "the threats around us are only going to grow". mexico's president andres manuel lopez 0brador says poverty and desperation led to the deaths of at least 50 migrants abandoned in a lorry in texas on monday. 16 other people, including four children were found alive inside the vehicle. it's the worst case of migrant deaths due to smuggling in the us. the white house has described the deaths as horrific and heartbreaking. we're getting used to talking about rising fuel costs but anyone filling up their tanks over the past few days may well have had to do a double take when seeing the price at the pump. it takes less time to get to a big number. that's because diesel is very close to topping £2 a litre, while petrol is also at a record high. ben, is there any hope
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prices will go down? that is the big question everyone wants to know. we often talk about household energy bills because the price rises have been so steep. but for many people it's the reminder of what they are paying. every time we fill up we get a stark sign of the cost of living increase. on average, a litre of petrol will now set you back 191.1p. that record high was set on monday. it comes after countless other record highs set over the past few months since russia's invasion of ukraine pushed up wholesale costs. if you've paid more than this that's because this is just an average. the price at expensive motorway pumps is likely to be much higher. the price of diesel dipped ever so slightly on monday
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to just under 199p per litre. it's widely expected to top £2 within days. soaring prices might not be new. we know lots of people have already given up their car or are using it less. but each penny more makes life that bit trickier for people who need a vehicle to get to work. people like care worker danielle, who let us spend the morning with her on a visit to look after one of her clients, joyce. i get up every day and it doesn't feel like going to work. it's a lovely job. i was made redundant at the start of covid from a sales position. and i wanted to do something that made a difference to the community, so i thought care work was ideal and i absolutely love the job and the customers. hello, joyce. care is such a fundamental service in the community. these people, hundreds
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of people, rely on us every day to be able to live at home and give them some lease of life. i rely on four visits a day from various carers. and if i didn't have four visits, i wouldn't be able to stay in my own house. so it is brilliant for me. the clients rely on us, every day, to be able to live at home. so have to rely on our cars to get to and from clients' homes. without the incentives from the company, they have given us two pay rises and an increase in the mileage rate. in the mileage rate — without that it wouldn't be possible to do the job. just couldn't make ends meet with the fuel crisis. fuel prices. it is worrying. 0bviously, while driving around every day, you are at the risk of running out of fuel and with the prices so high, it is a worry.
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as danielle told us, without her employer's help she'd have to give up her dream job. but how much more can companies increase wages and mileage costs? motoring organisations are looking to the government and petrol retailers to step in. of the £1.91 we're paying for unleaded at the moment, 53 pence goes on fuel duty and 32 pence goes to vat. could these be brought down? the prime minister and the chancellor this week appeared not to rule this out. but they pointed out they'd already cut fuel duty by 5p a litre back in march. the claim though is that retailers didn't pass on that cut in full. the competition and markets authority is investigating this and will report injuly. the rac wants it to look specifically at something called rocket and feather pricing. prices tend to go up like a rocket at the pumps and fall like a feather. now they go up like a rocket in a rising wholesale market and fall like a feather in a falling one. that's because the retailers are protecting themselves
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in a rising market by passing on the increased costs every single day. but in a falling market, they hold off and resist cutting prices and that is why they fall like a feather. and that's all about making extra money and making sure they benefit and they can do some headline—grabbing cut for some more media attention, generally. the group representing petrol retailers told us they were being unfairly scapegoated, that they do pass on falls in the wholesale costs to drivers and that they were operating on tiny profit margins. so what's the answer? a price cap could help drivers, but it would probably harm the small, independent retailers. employees may well ask their bosses for more help — mileage payments, car sharing support or higher charges for taxi drivers for example. are you in this boat? how are you coping? we'd love to hear from you.
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doing the usual things such as checking tire pressure, there is only so far that can go before bigger things need to be done. dicky people who need to use their car for work. roof boxes can slow you down and make it less fuel—efficient. things in the boot. emptying things you do not need to carry on the boot. children. hello, good morning, this is bbc london. i'm frankie mccamley. transport for london bosses will be quizzed by members of the london assembly at city hall today. it's part of an investigation into improvng the capital's bus network. earlier this month tfl launched a consultation on its bus action plan, warning services could be reduced by nearly 20%. a 16—year—old boy's been arrested
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on suspicion of terrorism offences as he waited to board a flight at stansted airport. scotland yard says it's part of an investigation into extreme islamist ideology and officers have searched an address in east london. next, the government has rejected claims its dragging its feet on the reopening of hammersmith bridge to vehicles. raising the issue in the house of commons, the mp for putney fleur anderson accused minsters of failing to engage properly with the council to get the project moving quickly. it's a national transport route that government must lead the way in funding it and reopening it. and if a toll is going to be made necessary because the government won't fund the bridge, has the impact on putney residents been factored in? more than half a million people in the uk have inflammatory bowel disease and almost 70,000 of them are in the capital.
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some people living with the condition say a lack of toilets is one of the hardest things about living here. bethany jacobs has crohn's disease and now lives with a permanent stoma bag. she says it's important to raise awareness of the condition. everyone can look at me and say, there is absolutely nothing wrong with you, you're really healthy but actually, on the inside, i'm not. and i've had massive health struggles in my life. so i think you do need to break down those barriers and open up these conversations where we talk about invisible illnesses such as crohn's disease because otherwise people wouldn't even know they existed. bethany�*s story is from our invisible disability series. tomorrow we'll be hearing about neurodiversity. and if you want to share your experience of living with an invisible disability, get in touch by emailing us at hellobbc london@bbc.co.uk the city of london is to double its film revenue this year. that's according to a report by the london corporation.
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the area is set to make more than £1 million by 2022, renting out streets and buildings. companies like netflix, marvel and warner bros have all recently been spotted filming in the square mile. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's severe delays on the piccadilly and a part suspension on the dlr to watch out for let's take a quick look at the weather. patchy rain early this morning but that will soon clear away, turning mostly dry with long sunny spells. maximum temperatures of 22 celsius. tonight will be cloudy with the chance of light rain. that's it from me for now. i'm back at half an hour. plenty more on our website.
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we're reflecting this morning on the life of dame deborahjames whose death was announced last night. since she was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2016 dame deborahjames has earned praise for her intimate, frank and often humorous account of living with the disease, famously dressing up as a poo. 0ur reporter graham satchell looks back at how she inspired a nation, raised millions for charity and connected with thousands of other cancer patients. as she approached the end of her life, deborahjames was honoured with a damehood. it was presented in person at her parents' house by prince william. recognition for an extraordinary woman who captured the heart of the nation. for more than five years, dame deborah recorded, documented and shared her life with cancer, she danced her way through most of it. the way she campaigned and raised awareness of bowel cancer was a real boost for other people living with the
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condition. hello, and welcome to you, me and the big c. we all have one thing in common, we all have or we have had cancer. deborah used this bbc podcast to connect with thousands of other people living with cancer, to share stories, to support and help. whooo, deborah's dressed as a poo! within the space of a minute we are laughing and crying hysterically all at the same time. and that is what cancer is like. i'm not going to look at you. a crying poo is not what we need right now. me talking about my cancer helps me get through it. it helps me rationalise the rubbish that i'm dealing with, and the people, the support that we get from people is helping us just as much as we helping them. hello, welcome back. thank you. nice to see you.
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i was going to say it's nice to be here, but not as a patient! absolutely. deborah tried every treatment available to extend her life. hello, this is the tiny. probe which is very thin. i've never seen this, i can't believe that actually goes inside of me! she was a former deputy head teacher and was endlessly curious about her condition. she was brilliant at communicating and never afraid to poke fun at herself. # i'm too sexy for my shirt # too sexy for my shirt, so sexy it hurts. she dressed up as a poo to tell people to check their bowel movements, to go to the doctor if there was anything unusual. her message, never be ashamed. more dancing, this time with her daughter. deborah had two young children. every moment was precious. it's been a privilege to just see them blossom into these kind of young adults or tweenagers or whatever we want to call 14—year—olds and 12—year—olds.
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what it's made me realise, actually, is just how much i've been able to witness them grow up since i've been diagnosed with cancer. the blessing of that five years is possibly the difference between them remembering me and not remembering me, and that is huge. # there were nights of endless pleasure # it was more than all your laws allow. deborah's openness, her honesty, her positivity, had a huge impact. deborah, thank you for everything that you've done, thank you for giving so tirelessly when you're going through what you're going through and i know how much that takes out of your body. you are amazing and like you, i shall dance through this, i will get my celine dion, especially for you. i can't shake my head,
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i've got no hair left but i'll do it for you. in the final days of her life, deborah started a fund for cancer charities. this is her daughter refreshing thejust giving page as it reached its first million. cheering. it is an extraordinary legacy. even at the very end, she was thinking of others. over the last five years, i've campaigned, i've spoken about awareness, i've shared my story for a reason. i don't want any other deborahs to have to go through this. it makes me feel like we are all kind of a bit in it at the end together, and we want to make a difference and say, you know what, screw you, cancer, we can do better. we can do better for people. and we just need to show it who's boss.
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deborah was charming and cheeky, profound and inspirational and she always wanted one last dance. it's almost too much to watch but yet what she achieved in those last few years and months is quite overwhelming. deborah's legacy, the bowelbabe fund, was set up to raise money for clinical trials and research into personalised medicine for cancer patients. in less than 2a hours it surpassed £1 million, smashing her initial goal of £250,000. it's now raised almost £7 million.
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let's speak to the chief executive of bowel cancer uk, genevieve edwards. thank you forjoining us this morning. we will get into how that money is going to be spent shortly but first of all, what will your memories of deborah be? deborah's star shone bright. _ memories of deborah be? deborah's star shone bright. she _ memories of deborah be? deborah's star shone bright. she was _ memories of deborah be? deborah's star shone bright. she was warm, i memories of deborah be? deborah's. star shone bright. she was warm, she was energetic, determined, she this incredible energy and humour. she brought that to everything that she did and she was really honest and i think she had this incredible power to connect with people. and above all, she never stopped campaigning to raise awareness, she never stopped, even in her difficult days, she never stopped supporting others, and she leaves a tremendous legacy behind her. 0ur and she leaves a tremendous legacy behind her. our thoughts, and she leaves a tremendous legacy behind her. 0urthoughts, my thoughts are with her family today. what difference has she made to your organisation commit your charity over the last few years? deborah's
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worked, raised _ over the last few years? deborah's worked, raised thousands, - over the last few years? deborah's worked, raised thousands, tens i over the last few years? deborah's worked, raised thousands, tens of| worked, raised thousands, tens of thousands, now millions of pounds. she became patron of bowel in the uk last year. she had a phenomenal impact on our charities and others i know. if you could find ways of connecting with people and inspiring people and making things happen, she had a marvellous knack of making things happen and we will miss her dreadfully. things happen and we will miss her dreadfull . �* ., .., . things happen and we will miss her dreadfull . �* ., . , dreadfully. bowel cancer is the most treatable, one _ dreadfully. bowel cancer is the most treatable, one of _ dreadfully. bowel cancer is the most treatable, one of them, _ dreadfully. bowel cancer is the most treatable, one of them, if _ dreadfully. bowel cancer is the most treatable, one of them, if it - dreadfully. bowel cancer is the most treatable, one of them, if it is i treatable, one of them, if it is caught early, so how will this money be spent, raising awareness or treatment? if be spent, raising awareness or treatment?— be spent, raising awareness or treatment? , ., ., ., treatment? if it is diagnosed at an early stage. _ treatment? if it is diagnosed at an early stage, stage _ treatment? if it is diagnosed at an early stage, stage one, _ treatment? if it is diagnosed at an early stage, stage one, pretty i treatment? if it is diagnosed at an i early stage, stage one, pretty much everyone will survive that. later it is diagnosed, the more difficult it is diagnosed, the more difficult it is to treat so deborah was so keen
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to urge people to not be squeamish, check your poo, go and see your gp because it could save your life. she has done that endlessly. the fun that she has left behind, it is right that deborah's family can take the time that they need to decide how that can make the biggest impact. i know that they wanted to fund projects close to deborah's heart and causes that she supported. we are looking now at the bowelbabe fund page, it is up to £6.8 million. it says its 2727% more than she ever hope or dream she would raise which is incredible. i was struck what you said about her ability to communicate with people and get messages across. before she was a cancer patient and a campaigner and fundraiser, she was a teacher. i wonder to what extent deborahjames,
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teacher, helped her in the role she took later? i’m teacher, helped her in the role she took later?— took later? i'm sure you are right. she was a — took later? i'm sure you are right. she was a phenomenal _ took later? i'm sure you are right. i she was a phenomenal communicator, they think itjust looked at she was a phenomenal communicator, they think it just looked at that title there, she sets out to raise 250,000, she has raised almost 7 million now because so many people have taken her and her story to her their hearts and it's a phenomenal legacy he leaves behind. it's a very special gift, not many people want to talk about bowel cancer and she has made it ok to do it. the fact that we are having these conversations now and we have been for the last several months will continue with her life—saving work. genevieve edwards, ceo of bowel cancer uk, thank you for your time
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and highlighting how important it is to make sure people here that message about checking your poo, it is so much embarrassment about it and it is literally life—saving. h0 and it is literally life—saving. i157 embarrassment here, you will hear the word poo several times, it is what deborah would have wanted, she said it in herfinal message last night on social media. there's been an incredible reaction on social media to her death. let's take a look at some of the tributes being paid. the prime minister has written... we have heard that already from others. bbc newsreader george alagiah, who is living with cancer, wrote...
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and tv presenter davina mccall paid tribute to deborah on instagram saying... well said, there. lots of people takin: in well said, there. lots of people taking in the — well said, there. lots of people taking in the news _ well said, there. lots of people taking in the news this - well said, there. lots of people | taking in the news this morning. john has the sport for us and he's on centre court at wimbledon. a big day a british action ahead? yes, we will come to that in a moment. certainly what unfolded here last night which was a big talking points. serena williams, the 23 time
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grand slam champion is out, only twice have we seen her go out in the first round here at wimbledon. last year when she was forced to retire injured. she lost in a three—hour epic last night to harmony tan and afterwards, serena williams said she did not know if she would be back here at wimbledon again. tan earning here at wimbledon again. tan earning her own slice of wimbledon history last night. we will be looking forward to the british contingent out here on centre court later, including emma raducanu and andy murray. few knew her name at the start of the night, but by half past ten, harmony tan was the star, serving to beat serena after three extraordinary hours. has there ever been a better round match at wimbledon? has there ever been a better first round match at wimbledon? for tan and herfamily it meant so much, to win on this court against this player. williams was back here at a0.
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in 12 months, she had not played one singles match. this is what tennis had missed for a year. made it! by that point they were in a decider and williams was ascending. willed on by the emotion of her emotion of her return, just to break tan's serve brought her close to tears. the frenchwoman is ranked 115th in the world but in her first match at wimbledon, here was harmony conducting centre court sound. she fought back not just then but four points down in the tie—break to win in a match where even she feared the worst. when i saw the draw, i was really scared, i mean... because, yeah, it's serena williams. she's a legend and, yeah, i was like, oh, my god, how can i play? and if i can win one game or two
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games, it was really good for me. williams stays on 23 major titles. one more would match the record but even she can't play forever. rafa nadal has 22 but in round one, he was tested. eventually through in four sets. today britain's grand slam winners back for round two. emma raducanu plays caroline garcia then andy murray plays the man who has his name on a court. game, set, match, isner. john isner played the sport's longest match. 12 years on, he still has the same tools. he got 5a aces in round one. now isner serves into the noise. there could be more gripping nights to come on centre. joe lynskey, bbc news.
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there are nine british players in the second round and it could be ten if harriet dart wins today. ryan peniston had a dream wimbledon debut. he's through after beating henri laaksonen in straight sets. he's ranked 135th in the world and has been in terrific form coming into the grass—court grand slam, reaching the quarterfinals at eastbourne, queen's and nottingham. british number two dan evans fell at the first hurdle. evans was beaten in straight sets by jason kubler of australia. there was controversy in a match involving one beaten briton. australia's nick kyrgios won in five sets against pauljubb, but kyrgios spent much of the match irritated by the behaviour of some spectators. he even called a line itjudge his snitch in his victory. when he won, kyrgios appeared to spit in the direction of someone in the crowd. he could face a fine for that.
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england's women will restart this morning with a lead against south africa after a brilliant recovery on day two. they'd looked in trouble chasing down south africa's total of 284 when captain heather knight was run out. but thanks to the brilliant batting of nat sciver and debutant alice davidson—richards they fought back. both made centuries, davidson—ricards did fall in the final over of the day but england will resume in taunton on 328—6 with a ali—run lead. formula 1 has condemned three—time world champion nelson piquet for using racially abusive language about lewis hamilton. the 69—year—old brazilian used an offensive term while referring to hamilton on a brazilian podcast. f1 says that discriminatory or racist language is unacceptable in any form and has no part in society. hamilton says archaic mindsets need to change. two matters today, the court is
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still covered here at the moment. what awaits emma raducanu in january, a huge reception but they don't want to have the same fate that befell serena williams last night, the big surprise seeing the 23 time champion go out. the way that andy murray and emma raducanu played, in the first round, they have got to be confident. the hours in the leader— have got to be confident. the hours in the leader must _ have got to be confident. the hours in the leader must be _ have got to be confident. the hours in the leader must be so tense i have got to be confident. the hours in the leader must be so tense no l in the leader must be so tense no matter how well—trained you are. yes, especially if there are any rain delays, we don't want that. we will find rain delays, we don't want that. - will find out with carol. later on. for many towns and villages, tourism is vital to the local economy, but it can come at a cost to those who live there. a bbc investigation has found that the number of holiday lets in england has risen by 40% in the past three years and there are concerns residents are being pushed out of some areas
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as a result. let's speak to our correspondent helen catt, who's on the north devon coast this morning. lovely spot for a holiday but not necessarily for people who live there? , , ., necessarily for people who live there? , , , necessarily for people who live there? , , there? yes, you can see why people want to come _ there? yes, you can see why people want to come here. _ there? yes, you can see why people want to come here. the _ there? yes, you can see why people want to come here. the issue i there? yes, you can see why people want to come here. the issue we i there? yes, you can see why people | want to come here. the issue we are talking about is particularly acute here in north devon, an area with lower wages, very reliant on tourism, high numbers of second homes and are now increasing numbers of holiday lets and that has led to some people who live around here saying they feel like they are being squeezed out. they come to croyde for the sea, the sand and the sir. they come to croyde for the sea, the sand and the surf. tourism isn'tjust welcome in north devon, it's vital. for us, it is everything. it is literally how we operate as a business. we pretty much only open through march till end of october and that is the tourist season. there is nothing here in winter, really.
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so it is the main time of year that everyone comes down. we welcome everyone down. the pandemic boosted staycationing in places like this, and the number of holiday lets has grown, too. by too much, say some locals. we've got holiday lets. it's a holiday let, holiday let. if we are standing here, give me a sense of scale. looking down this road. looking down this road, you have three holiday lets there. there are a further two there. there is a further three right in front of us. well, so that's in not a very large area. it sort of gives you an idea ofjust how bad things have got. charlotte grew up in the village of georgeham a mile or so from croyde. she and her children have moved back in with her parents because she can't find anywhere to rent. it does put a whole stop on your life. you can't plan anything. everything comes back to... well, we don't know where we are going to be living. so my children don't know where they are going to go to college. my youngest son, do you put him into nursery, do you not? i can't start back at work. charlotte's friend emma
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set up a campaign group after she, too, was served with a no—fault eviction notice. ijust think it's really unfair that in an area where you have grown up and you have lived, being part of the community, you have been to school, all your friends and family are here, to feel that you are being pushed outjust so somebody can have a holiday, or that somebody can have a second home just doesn't really resonate as fair. and we have both said we understand that people want to move to the area. we understand that people want to have holidays, especially after being locked up after covid. but there has got to be a balance. figures obtained by the bbc show that here in north devon, the number of holiday lets went up by a third in a period of three years up to november last year. but this isn't just an issue facing the south west of england. other tourist hotspots across england are facing similar issues. in scarborough, which includes the resort of whitby, the number of holiday lets rose by 43%. 0n the isle of wight,
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the number went up by 39% and there have been significant rises in norfolk, including in great yarmouth, where there was an increase of 44%. high saturations of holiday lets can also have a knock for local businesses, like here in keswick in the lake district. there aren't enough local people here to work in the businesses, because they can't live here. and if they can't live here, they can't work here. the community is crumbling and it's a crisis, it's a real crisis. the government is now launching a long promised call for evidence on the impact of holiday lets in england. there are many benefits to having more accommodation provision in uk. it's good for our tourism industry, there is a variety of accommodation offers there. but it can come with a downside, as well. so we want to get the right balance and one of the options is to licence accommodation, at one extreme. or, we could end up doing nothing. and we want to get the evidence base together in order to decide what to do. the challenge for ministers will be finding a balance between harnessing the economic benefits
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without communities feeling like they are being washed away. iamjoined by i am joined by someone who knows the property market around here very well, you have been an estate agent here for 20 years, charles. is it really accelerated that but in the last year? really accelerated that but in the last ear? ~ ., ., ., , ., last year? without a doubt, i have been in this _ last year? without a doubt, i have been in this business _ last year? without a doubt, i have been in this business over - last year? without a doubt, i have been in this business over 40 i last year? without a doubt, i havel been in this business over 40 years been in this business over a0 years and i have never seen anything like it. it really has, since the pandemic, things have got out of hand gradually. bud pandemic, things have got out of hand gradually.— hand gradually. and this is not a case of people — hand gradually. and this is not a case of people changing - hand gradually. and this is not a case of people changing their i hand gradually. and this is not a i case of people changing their second homes into holiday lets? ida. case of people changing their second homes into holiday lets?— homes into holiday lets? no, it's not. homes into holiday lets? no, it's not- people _ homes into holiday lets? no, it's not. people come _ homes into holiday lets? no, it's not. people come down, - homes into holiday lets? no, it's not. people come down, they i homes into holiday lets? no, it's. not. people come down, they have been saying to me they have been coming down for many years, and they wanted to have their second home in aquitaine. 50 wanted to have their second home in a: uitaine. wanted to have their second home in acuitaine. , ., wanted to have their second home in aquitaine-_ it. aquitaine. so it is good to you? it is if ou aquitaine. so it is good to you? it is if you can _ aquitaine. so it is good to you? it is if you can get — aquitaine. so it is good to you? it is if you can get the _ aquitaine. so it is good to you? it is if you can get the property i aquitaine. so it is good to you? it is if you can get the property -- l is if you can get the property —— they want to have their second home in equity. but there is not a lot of property to sell. there are three properties i am selling at the
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moment from where we are standing and that is all to second home buyers. and that is all to second home bu ers. . , , , and that is all to second home buers. ., ,, ., q buyers. that is pretty standard. as someone who _ buyers. that is pretty standard. as someone who sells _ buyers. that is pretty standard. as someone who sells property i buyers. that is pretty standard. as someone who sells property for. buyers. that is pretty standard. as someone who sells property for a l someone who sells property for a living, what do you think about other areas you have done the things they are put in bans on selling new homes as second homes over holiday let's? i homes as second homes over holiday let's? . . , homes as second homes over holiday let's? . ., , , ., homes as second homes over holiday let's? .. , , ., ., let's? i can see the benefit from a local perspective. _ let's? i can see the benefit from a local perspective. the _ let's? i can see the benefit from a| local perspective. the government let's? i can see the benefit from a i local perspective. the government in 2016 have tried to make buying a second home as unattractive as possible by increasing the stamp duty by an extra 3%, they have changed the rules on offsetting mortgage interest against tax for income. so they are taxed when they go in and along so i can see the benefit, but that is the central government. if we can get something for the local people, to make it more local like increasing council tax, keep money local, and help the locals that way. figs tax, keep money local, and help the locals that way-— locals that way. as someone who lives there. _ locals that way. as someone who lives there, what _ locals that way. as someone who lives there, what is _ locals that way. as someone who lives there, what is the _ locals that way. as someone who lives there, what is the impact i locals that way. as someone who l lives there, what is the impact you have seen on the community, how has
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it changed? have seen on the community, how has it chanced? ., , have seen on the community, how has it chanced? .,, , it changed? there was this originally _ it changed? there was this originally of _ it changed? there was this originally of north - it changed? there was this originally of north devon, | it changed? there was this i originally of north devon, keep people out, but that has changed tremendously. i think people who are coming down decent people. they have come into the community and they want to be part of the community. so they spend money when they come down which is good for business, of course. but the other side is, they are paying big money on properties and pricing the locals out.— and pricing the locals out. charles, thank ou and pricing the locals out. charles, thank you very _ and pricing the locals out. charles, thank you very much. _ and pricing the locals out. charles, thank you very much. that's i and pricing the locals out. charles, thank you very much. that's the i thank you very much. that's the problem in a nutshell here, everyone on all sides tell me this is about balance. yes, people want to have a lovely time on the coast but also respecting the local community and the entitlement.— respecting the local community and the entitlement. some villages when ou to the entitlement. some villages when you go there — the entitlement. some villages when you go there in _ the entitlement. some villages when you go there in the _ the entitlement. some villages when you go there in the winter _ the entitlement. some villages when you go there in the winter and i the entitlement. some villages when you go there in the winter and there | you go there in the winter and there is no one living there because people just go there in the holiday season. we will have the headlines in a moment. and we will be reflecting on the life and legacy of dame deborahjames whose death was
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announced last night. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, good morning. this is bbc london. i'm frankie mccamley. the government has rejected claims its dragging its feet on the reopening of hammersmith bridge to vehicles. raising the issue in the house of commons, the mp for putney, fleur anderson, accused minsters of failing to engage properly with the council to get the project moving. it's a national transport route that government must lead the way in funding it and reopening it. and if a toll is going to be made necessary because the government won't fund the bridge, has the impact on putney residents been factored in? a 16—year—old boy's been arrested on suspicion of terrorism offences as he waited to board a flight at stansted airport. scotland yard says it's part of an investigation into extreme islamist ideology and officers have
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searched an address in east london. more than half a million people in the uk have inflammatory bowel disease and almost 70,000 of them are in the capital. some people living with the condition say a lack of toilets is one of the hardest things about living here. bethany jacobs has crohn's disease and has a permanent stoma bag. she wants to raise awareness of the condition everyone can look at me and say, there is absolutely nothing wrong with you, you're really healthy but actually, on the inside, i'm not. and i've had massive health struggles in my life. so i think you do need to break down those barriers and open up these conversations where we talk about invisible illnesses such as crohn's disease because otherwise people wouldn't even know they existed. the city of london is to double its film revenue this year — that's according to a report by the london corporation. the area is set to make more
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than £1 million by 2022, renting out streets and buildings. companies like netflix, marvel and warner bros have all recently been spotted filming in the square mile. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning —— 0nto the weather now with carol. good morning. today we have rain pushing eastwards. it will be followed by sunshine and showers. we will see a few of those showers. and it will be less windy than yesterday. there goes the rain. a drier period, there will be sunshine. and then just one or two showers passing by. we mightjust see a shower at wimbledon today. only about a 5% chance of it. and temperatures in london getting up to 22 degrees. this is the front that is clearing, but the tail end overnight could clip the far south—east. as we head into tomorrow, still some showers around. tomorrow we have said goodbye to the rain in the morning. then we are looking at brighter
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skies but more showers tomorrow than we are looking at today. so a greater chance of catching one at wimbledon and it is likely to be to be heavy and thundery. the only thing about tomorrow is it is going to be slightly cooler than it is today. as we head through the next few days, still some showers at the weekend, but looking drier, and a bit but looking drier and a bit warmer for next week. that's it from me. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website or follow us on social media. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. 0ur headlines today. cancer campaigner dame deborahjames — known to millions as bowel babe — has died at the age of a0. # baby, baby, baby. # when you touch me like this when you hold me like that #.
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she challenged taboos and changed the conversation around bowel cancer — urging people to check their poo. we'll speak to those who knew and loved her about her life and her remarkable legacy. british socialite ghislaine maxwell has been jailed for 20 years by a new york court for helping jeffrey epstein abuse young girls. it is defeat for serena williams on her wimbledon return. when these covers come off later, andy murray and emma raducanu will be back in action. good morning, rain pushing east. it will clear in the next hours and then sunshine and showers and some of the showers will be heavy. but it will be less windy than yesterday. all the details throughout the programme. it's wednesday, the 29th ofjune. our main story.
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the cancer campaigner, blogger and broadcaster, dame deborahjames, also known as bowel babe, has died aged a0. she had been receiving end—of—life care for bowel cancer at home. the host of the bbc�*s you, me and the big c podcast was given a damehood in may in recognition of her tireless fundraising. right to the very end of her life, dame deborahjames was determined to live every moment to the full. just a few weeks ago, she was at the chelsea flower show to see a rose that had been named after her. cheers! she wanted to make the very most of whatever time she had left. in herfinal weeks, deborah published a book. she started a fund for cancer charities which has raised millions of pounds. she launched a range of clothes, with a rebellious hope t—shirt, that has raise money for charity. and then on father's day, she posted this image with the words,
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"my dad is brushing my hair because i have no strength any more". announcing her death last night, herfamily said... i was diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer at the age of 35. we are actually talking about life and death here. it is heart—wrenching at times. come on, mummy, you can go faster than that. so, i have the poo cancer. there's nothing pink about my cancer, it's just brown. so, i was pooing blood and eventually got diagnosed with a 6.5 centimetre tumour up my bum, basically. deborah was always honest
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and open about her cancer. she shared her every step of herjourney from endless rounds of chemotherapy to the terrible side—effects of the drug treatment she was on. but, through it all, she was determined to keep smiling, to keep dancing. # singing in the rain. 0ur podcast is about living with cancer, right? and it is about showing life goes on. so if cancer wants me twirling around on the stage and wearing sequins and if it means i have to do treatment and train and dance, then, actually, that is what life is. let's dance through the rain. i love that saying, dance through the rain. prime minister borisjohnson said...
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dame deborah leaves behind a large, loving family and two children. she says she was lucky to have five extra years to see them grow up. in herfinal days, she was surrounded by her family at her parents' home. and in her last interview she said she was convinced that new treatments will be found. cancer should become a chronic disease. i hope it will be in my kids' lifetime.come a chronic disease. but, i think, there are people doing amazing things and we need to support them and fund them. deborah was made a dame last month. the award presented in person by prince william at her parents' home. dame deborah wrote her own epitaph. a message posted on social media last night. it said...
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remembering deborah this morning. and that message about checking your poo, also inspiring her message about living alongside an illness, to have a full life, even with a terminal diagnosis. she made use of every moment in her personal life and also what had become her public life. she never expected to be in this position. she was a teacher but that diagnosis changed everything. particularly the last few weeks. what she crammed into the last month is astonishing. looking at social
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media now, dame deborahjames is trending on all social media platforms. a look at some of the comments out there... lorraine kelly wrote: tv presenter gaby roslin wrote...
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dame deborah touched the lives of so many people and someone she had a huge impact on was herfriend lucie kon — a former executive producer for bbc�*s panorama programme. the pair met after lucie was diagnosed with breast cancer, and they went on to make a documentary about the impact of delays in cancer diagnosis and treatment during the pandemic. luciejoins us now. good morning and thank you for joining us. we are sorry to you and all of deborah's friends and family on this sad morning. we knew this would happen but somehow it is hard to believe. , ., , to believe. yes, good morning. it is 'ust... it to believe. yes, good morning. it is just- -- it was _ to believe. yes, good morning. it is just... it was the _ to believe. yes, good morning. it is just... it was the middle _ to believe. yes, good morning. it is just... it was the middle of - to believe. yes, good morning. it is just... it was the middle of may i just... it was the middle of may when deborah messaged. a few days before she announced it publicly. she sent a message saying she had weeks to live and how horrendous it
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was. having to tell her beautiful children and that she would come off social media and go quiet and do her own thing. and the weekend that followed, i spent the whole weekend just wondering. sending her messages. a few of us sent her a little gift. did not want to send flowers. we sent her lipstick. and just wondering how she was. and messaging her mum. bowel grand. and then deborah went public and she went back on social media and she did the most extraordinary thing. i suppose only she could, which was she turned her death into something positive. she turned it into a
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legacy. she wanted to make sure, i think it was the words she said herself to graham on this programme which was she did not want there to be any more deborahs so she set up a fund and she wanted to make sure that in future, as she said, people did not have to die with cancer, they could live with cancer, to become a chronic disease. my goodness, she showed us we could live with cancer. i had an early stage cancer, and she showed me that instead of giving into the sad faces and terrified feelings, that you can do anything when you have cancer, pretty much, until those final weeks. even in the final weeks deborah was doing things. things need to change. we did the panorama together about cancer during covid
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and i contacted her about it and she said i don't mind doing it but i don't want to be a victim. i said i want you to be the reporter. she was an amazing reporter. she made me laugh so much when we were doing such a difficult programme. sometimes i felt it was wrong we were laughing so much but it was right because it was deborah and the way she handled things. and her finger about cancer during covid was if we can find a way of getting out of covid, we have to find a way of getting out of cancer and that is what she has done through her fund. and i hope the numbers will go even more insane because that is her lasting legacy to all of us and we all have a responsibility, i think, to make it go crazy and change the record on cancer. we to make it go crazy and change the record on cancer.— record on cancer. we will look at that -a~e record on cancer. we will look at that page in _ record on cancer. we will look at that page in a — record on cancer. we will look at that page in a moment _ record on cancer. we will look at that page in a moment and i record on cancer. we will look at
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that page in a moment and see i record on cancer. we will look at i that page in a moment and see how it is doing. you said about sending her lipstick rather than sending flowers. it is not an exaggeration to say she has changed the image of what it is to have cancer. i am guilty at having looked at her and thought she does not look like someone with terminal cancer. it has mixed u- someone with terminal cancer. it has mixed up the — someone with terminal cancer. it has mixed up the stereotype. _ someone with terminal cancer. it i:s mixed up the stereotype. when you say i have cancer, i had cancer, i don't like saying to people i have had cancer because i do not like the reaction i get. it is no one's fault. it is oh, really sorry. if you say you are having cancer treatment, i was having treatment when we were working on the film. and carried on working, doing bits and bobs, doing programmes during covid. ifelt very and bobs, doing programmes during covid. i felt very poorly, to and bobs, doing programmes during covid. ifelt very poorly, to be honest. but i did not lose my hair. because of the kind of treatment i was having. deborah did not lose her
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is because of the treatment she was having. you might feel rubbish inside, but itjust depends. it is so different. there are so many different cancers and cancer does not look like anything, it looks like all of us in one in two of us will have cancer. some people unfortunately lose their hair. i found it difficult the last couple of weeks in particular. i have loved seeing pictures of deborah but found it difficult seeing pictures. it has been painful see how she looked. she changed the whole thing. she had this thing, during the first lockdown, when people on the vulnerable list were told to stay indoors. 0f vulnerable list were told to stay indoors. of going, i've got to stay indoors. of going, i've got to stay indoors because i need to be safe. but i want to be able to wear my nice clothes. so it was like put on
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a fancy outfit to take out the bins and arms and deborah started this whole thing on instagram. that drew me to her. like for so many people during covid, you had no reason to put on anything that made you feel nice but deborah made sure she felt nice but deborah made sure she felt nice every day she wanted to feel nice. she used to post on instagram that if she was in hospital and putting on make—up it must mean she is starting to feel better. better. it it is different for everybody, we all have a different experience of cancer so i have no right to say to anyone how you should feel but if you have options, you have hope. cancer does not have to be a life sentence. deborah was at her happiest when she was talking about things that were not herself and the
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pain and fear and sadness she had about having cancer. it was more about having cancer. it was more about what can we do to cure cancer? what can we do, like her amazing producer of the podcast, she was very into the science. very clever, so clever. did not understand half of what she was saying. but she she tried to create this thing last year with cancer research uk. they said deborah had so many tumours but the one she had to go to save her life, that did not. it is so unfair. she was the most amazing human being and the most a live human being out of anyone i know. she showed you could be alive and have cancer. she will be alive and have cancer. she will be alive in my mind forever. thank ou so be alive in my mind forever. thank you so much _ be alive in my mind forever. thank you so much for— be alive in my mind forever. thank you so much forjoining _ be alive in my mind forever. thank you so much forjoining us - be alive in my mind forever. thank you so much forjoining us this i you so much forjoining us this
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morning. it must be tough to come on the telly and talk about this a few hours after finding out that i know you and so many others wanted to share those memories and keep that message of deborah's going. thank you so much. we appreciate your time. so true, for lots of people who live with cancer, for somebody to be so alive but living with a terminal diagnosis is huge. almost all those pictures of deborah, she is smiling. and glamorous. even talking about poo. i said we would have a look at the fundraising page. deborah wanted to raise a quarter of £1 million. it is almost 7 million. here's carol. good morning. today we have a
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weather front moving towards the east bringing rain. as it clears, sunshine and showers and not as windy as yesterday. this is the weather front with the rain. and windy as yesterday. this is the weatherfront with the rain. and one behind it will fizzle and if anything enhance the showers we have. the lack of isobars tells you it is not particularly windy. the rain has been heavy in parts of the country overnight. at the moment heavy across the north—east especially. some cloud around it. some of us starting with sunshine. the rain clears the south—east. moving up into the northern isles and showers follow behind. for wimbledon, a small chance of a shower later. a 5% chance. these are the average wind speeds. not particularly strong. temperatures up to 23. 15-16 in the
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particularly strong. temperatures up to 23. 15—16 in the north. 0vernight, many showers but not all will fade. the tail end of the weather front clips the south—east and pushes into the north sea. and there will be showers moving north and by the end of the night, getting into central scotland and northern ireland. clear in the south with temperatures falling away between 8-13. temperatures falling away between 8—13. tomorrow this weather front pushes northwards taking showers with it. this is the tail end again in the north sea. it means there will be rain in the north sea but it looks like it will be close enough to east anglia and kent to throw in more cloud. as it moves northwards taking the rain into northern scotland and the northern isles. showers follow behind. they could be thundery and a small chance again we
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could see some at wimbledon compared to in the north and west. but you will find it will be cooler. as we head into friday, the weatherfront still across the far north—east. more showers across the north and west and some will be heavy and thundery. a breezy day on friday. the next rain waiting to come into northern ireland. temperatures 1a-22. northern ireland. temperatures 14—22. high northern ireland. temperatures 1a—22. high pressure builds but we will still have fronts moving around the north of it. it means in the north and west we are more prone to showers. sunday is looking drier. next week, looking drierfor many and also a little bit warmer. thank you. did you stay up to watch the serena williams match? i tried. i looked at the result first thing. i know. it was hard to switch off.
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an unbelievably tense game. thanks. she does look fabulous without getting in her eight hours. ghislaine maxwell, a former girlfriend of the sex offenderjeffrey epstein, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison by a court in new york. she was convicted last december of helping epstein abuse teenage girls. 0ur north america correspondent nada tawfik was at the hearing. a long—fought victory for annie farmer and all of ghislaine maxwell's victims. justice was slow. she was one of the earliest to report maxwell and the paedophile jeffrey epstein to police, in 1996. but today, annie said it was never too late for accountability. maxwell and epstein were predators who were able to use their power and privilege to harm countless individuals, and for far too long, the institutions that should be protecting the public were instead protecting them.
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and i still hope that we find out more about how that was allowed to occur. maxwell did not look at her victims, but she did address them. she said she was sorry for the pain they had experienced. she also said her association with epstein, who she described as a manipulative, cunning man, was the greatest regret of her life. her statement felt like a very hollow apology to me. she did not take responsibility for the crimes that she committed and it felt like, once more, her trying to do something to benefit her and not at all about the harm that she had caused. the court allowed others who were not a part of the trial to also confront maxwell. the pain and anguish she caused was plain to see, as several accusers emotionally spoke about the lasting impact of her crimes, such as liz stein. she had a wonderful, full, beautiful life. and so many of usjust didn't have a chance to have that. i think that the closure part
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of her sentencing is maybe the beginning for a lot of us to start having the life that we anticipated we might have if we had never met ghislaine maxwell and jeffrey epstein. the british daughter of the disgraced media tycoon robert maxwell ran in the most influential circles, rubbing elbows with presidents and princes. but in court, as she waited to hear her fate, she was supported byjust three members of her family. maxwell, herfamily says, plans to appeal. 20 years was less than prosecutors wanted, nevertheless, they said it sent a strong message that no one was above the law. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has said she wants a second independence referendum to be held in october 2023. we're joined now by our scotland correspondent lorna gordon, who's in edinburgh.
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she wants the referendum. in october of next autumn. mm she wants the referendum. in october of next autumn.— of next autumn. will she get it? big cuestion. of next autumn. will she get it? big question- she _ of next autumn. will she get it? big question. she is _ of next autumn. will she get it? big question. she is trying _ of next autumn. will she get it? big question. she is trying a _ of next autumn. will she get it? big question. she is trying a three i question. she is trying a three pronged approach and two aimed at october next year. a complicated 0ctober next year. a complicated mixture of politics and law we will now see unfold in the months ahead. the first approach is to ask the uk government to give the scottish government to give the scottish government temporary powers to hold a referendum which is unlikely to happen. at the same time that is going on she has asked the lord advocate in scotland to lodge papers with the supreme court asking them to test the legality of holding a referendum, testing the legality of the bill published yesterday. they will likely look at that in september, october next year, although it has not yet been
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scheduled. if the court accepts this, experts say the issue will be whether the referendum relates to the union. if the court says it can go ahead the referendum will be in october next year, if they refuse 0ctober next year, if they refuse it, the third approach suggested is to treat the next general election as a de facto referendum, a single issue election campaign. potentially, that means around possibly 800 days of campaigning ahead. still, many questions about what that would mean and how it would unfold and what a mandate for a yes vote would entail. would it be the number of mps, a share of the vote? many questions to be answered. i think it is a big gamble, a bold strategy, very high risk. aha, i think it is a big gamble, a bold strategy, very high risk.- i think it is a big gamble, a bold strategy, very high risk. a long way to no but strategy, very high risk. a long way to go but not _ strategy, very high risk. a long way to go but not impossible. _ strategy, very high risk. a long way to go but not impossible. thank i strategy, very high risk. a long way. to go but not impossible. thank you. world leaders have gathered in madrid for crucial talks
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on the future direction of nato in the wake of russia's invasion of ukraine. later, borisjohnson will call on members of the alliance to increase their military spending over the next decade — warning that "the threats around us are only going to grow". mexico's president andres manuel lopez 0brador said poverty and desperation led to the deaths of at least 50 migrants abandoned in a lorry in texas on monday. 16 other people, including four children, were found alive inside the vehicle. 0ur central america correspondent will grant has more. this desolate stretch of road between train tracks and junkyards is no place to die. yet more than 50 people lost their lives after being smuggled across the us—mexico border in unbearable conditions. trapped inside a stifling—hot trailer with no air vents or water, more than 20 mexicans and others from honduras and guatemala were among the dead. everybody is looking
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for something better. the only place is here in the united states. some locals came to pay respects. visibly upset by the terrible loss of life on their doorstep. we are not animals, we are human beings. and the way they left them here, it is not a proper thing to do. it's not... it's not human. even as a small prayer vigil was held for the victims in san antonio, this tragedy has fast become political. the republican leadership has accused the biden administration of failing to clamp down on undocumented immigration, while president biden said it underscored the need to dismantle the criminal smuggling industry that preys on migrants. yet cross—border migration is as old as the state of texas itself, and the answer to preventing such awful incidents transcends party boundaries.
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this is exactly what i'm seeing in my district, the carnage, day after day. it has to stop. we all have to come together and secure our border for the sake of helping innocent people. many of them are trying to come over here for a better life for themselves and their families. still, the likelihood of this tragedy bringing the two sides together to find a common solution, especially ahead of the november midterms, is extremely remote. the investigation into who abandoned the truck on this road and left these migrants to their deaths is now in federal hands. but in truth, the criminal organisations who operate the people smuggling routes into texas are so powerful that no one of any real significance is likely to face justice over their deaths. will grant, bbc news, texas. in the next half hour we will reflect on the incredible life of
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deborahjames and the positive messages she wished to take with her as she passed away. time to get the news where you are. hello, good morning. this is bbc london, i'm frankie mccamley. in the last hour detectives investigating the death of zara aleena in ilford at the weekend have charged a man with her murder. the aspiring lawyer was attacked as she walked along cranbrook road in the early hours of sunday morning. 29—year—old jordan mcsweeney will also face charges of attempted sexual assault and robbery. the government has rejected claims its dragging its feet on the reopening of hammersmith bridge to vehicles. raising the issue in the house of commons, the mp for putney, fleur anderson, accused minsters of failing to engage properly with the council to get the project moving. it's a national transport route that
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government must lead the way in funding it and reopening it. and if a toll is going to be made necessary because the government won't fund the bridge, has the impact on putney residents been factored in? more than half a million people in the uk have inflammatory bowel disease and almost 70,000 of them are in the capital. some people living with the condition say a lack of toilets is one of the hardest things about living here. bethany jacobs has crohn's disease and has a permanent stoma bag. she wants to raise awareness of the condition. everyone can look at me and say, there is absolutely nothing wrong with you, you're really healthy but actually, on the inside, i'm not. and i've had massive health struggles in my life. so i think you do need to break down those barriers and open up these conversations where we talk about invisible illnesses such as crohn's disease because otherwise people wouldn't even know they existed. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now.
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there's severe delays on the piccadilly and a part suspension on the dlr to watch out for. 0nto the weather now with gillian. hello, good morning. another bit of a soggy start to the day across the capital today, a soggy start to the day across the capitaltoday, but a soggy start to the day across the capital today, but there will be some element of brightness, particularly a little bit later on this afternoon. i will come back to that in a moment. this low pressure is dominating over the last couple of days, it is gradually shifting to the north so something a little joy will come in behind it but today is going to be a little unsettled and this is how we start. the rain, showers pushing through the morning, a bit of a soggy start if you are heading to wimbledon but in the afternoon we start to see a bit more sunshine, the odd risk of a shower but 22 or 23 degrees for many of us. as we had three into the evening, some clearer skies for time, some patchy cloud, then the next pulse of
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rain comes from the south, not everyone saying that but some of us will have some rain overnight. temperatures in double figures. a mild night to come and as we head into the rest of the week, the temperatures should touch to increase as we head towards the weekend and the beginning of next weekend and the beginning of next week but that being said, there is still a risk of a few showers in the forecast. that's it from me for now. i'm back in an hour. plenty more on our website. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. we're reflecting this morning on the life of dame deborahjames, whose death was announced last night. deborah's family said she shared her experience of cancer to "raise awareness, break down barriers, challenge taboos and change the conversation around cancer". last month, she announced that she'd come to the end of her treatment
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and would be receiving end of life care. she invited our reporter graham satchell to chat to her in what would be her last television interview. i've lived off, i suppose, rebellious hope. and i've always used that word, haven't i? rebellious hope for so many years. and rebellious hope is kind of, i suppose, given me the opportunity to park what, on paper, it says i should have lived for. and i kind of ignored the statistics and ignored every statistic and kind of forgot that, at one point, the big statistic might come to get me. i know i've smashed every milestone
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i can possibly think of. i don't feel rushed, i don't feel angry that i haven't tried anything. i don't feel like we've run out of drugs. we have been trying everything and you know i've always said to you i don't want to leave a stone unturned, i don't think there is a stone that we haven't tried to turn in order to make my liver work again in order to kind of get my body functioning. but, unfortunately, i'm exhausted. i am absolutely exhausted. i just want to be around my family. and i have a really loving family who i adore and couldn't... i honestly... they are just incredible. and all i knew i wanted was to come
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here and be able to relax knowing that everything was ok. and you always want to know, as a mother, are your kids going to be ok? and my kids are going to be fine. but it doesn't mean that i'm not going to miss every chance that i could have had with them. i think that's what's... that is what i will never get my head around. it's amazing how many people have read my story. and i never realised the impact that it had. and then to have it shown up in this way, it's just... it'sjust so much. like, how can anyone
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comprehend that? it's notjust flattering, it's... i'm just gobsmacked and utterly humbled by people's generosity. one in two of us will get cancer in our lifetime. i think there are people doing amazing things and we need to support them and fund them and help them and give them the resources they need to do these incredible things, because it is the difference between life and death. what a difference she made. it was really interesting, we heard from a friend of deborah, lucy, if you minutes ago, and she said when deborah received a terminal diagnosis and she knew she only a
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few weeks immediate reaction was, come on social media and go quietly but then she thought, no, i have a message, so she went back on social media and launched the fundraising and she went for it.— and she went for it. because she said, like she _ and she went for it. because she said, like she said _ and she went for it. because she said, like she said in _ and she went for it. because she said, like she said in that - said, like she said in that interview, she did not want to be other people like her. the very last thing she wrote which was signed off ljy thing she wrote which was signed off by herfamily was, thing she wrote which was signed off by her family was, check your. it was very important to her to get that message out. —— check your poo. the woking and sam beare hospice has been providing end of life care for deborah. 0ur reporter fi lamdin is there for us this morning. she had a huge impact there, didn't she come on patients, and the staff? -- didn't —— didn't she, on patients and the staff? -- didn't she, on patients and the staff? , , ., , ., , staff? yes, dame deborah showed us how to live well _ staff? yes, dame deborah showed us how to live well with _ staff? yes, dame deborah showed us how to live well with cancer _ staff? yes, dame deborah showed us how to live well with cancer and i staff? yes, dame deborah showed us how to live well with cancer and die . how to live well with cancer and die well with it. this hospice was very
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involved in her end—of—life care. hayley and her team looked after deborah. how are you this morning? it is so soon, less than 2a hours, thank you for talking to us. it is so soon, less than 24 hours, thank you for talking to us. that's ok. it's thank you for talking to us. that's 0k- it's been _ thank you for talking to us. that's ok. it's been a _ thank you for talking to us. that's ok. it's been a very _ thank you for talking to us. that's ok. it's been a very hard - thank you for talking to us. that's ok. it's been a very hard and i 0k. it's been a very hard and emotional— 0k. it's been a very hard and emotional 24 hours since she passed away _ emotional 24 hours since she passed awa . �* , , ., , away. and tell us when you first met deborah, away. and tell us when you first met deborah. and _ away. and tell us when you first met deborah, and your _ away. and tell us when you first met deborah, and your first _ away. and tell us when you first met deborah, and your first impressions | deborah, and yourfirst impressions of her? we deborah, and your first impressions of her? ~ ., , deborah, and your first impressions ofher? ., , , of her? we have been supporting deborah for— of her? we have been supporting deborah for the _ of her? we have been supporting deborah for the last _ of her? we have been supporting deborah for the last few - of her? we have been supporting deborah for the last few weeks . of her? we have been supporting l deborah for the last few weeks and days of— deborah for the last few weeks and days of her life. she is a force of nature, — days of her life. she is a force of nature, she _ days of her life. she is a force of nature, she liked to do things her own way, — nature, she liked to do things her own way, she wasn't always the easiest— own way, she wasn't always the easiest patient, but that was good, thcat's— easiest patient, but that was good, that's always a challenge. and we do like a _ that's always a challenge. and we do like a challenge. and that's always a challenge. and we do like a challenge.— like a challenge. and it was mainly ou auoin like a challenge. and it was mainly you going in. _ like a challenge. and it was mainly you going in. you _ like a challenge. and it was mainly you going in, you had _ like a challenge. and it was mainly you going in, you had a _ like a challenge. and it was mainly you going in, you had a very i like a challenge. and it was mainly you going in, you had a very close| you going in, you had a very close connection with her, tell us your role, what sort of things, what you would look after? we role, what sort of things, what you would look after?— role, what sort of things, what you would look after? we generally look after patients _ would look after? we generally look after patients with _ would look after? we generally look after patients with symptom - would look after? we generally look| after patients with symptom control, making _ after patients with symptom control, making sure that they are pain—free, but it_ making sure that they are pain—free, but it is_ making sure that they are pain—free,
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but it is a _ making sure that they are pain—free, but it is a wider team so i am suriported _ but it is a wider team so i am supported by my colleagues, nurses, doctors. _ supported by my colleagues, nurses, doctors, gps, and the district nurses — doctors, gps, and the district nurses. �* ., , doctors, gps, and the district nurses. �* .,, nurses. and in those last few weeks, she did such — nurses. and in those last few weeks, she did such a _ nurses. and in those last few weeks, she did such a huge _ nurses. and in those last few weeks, she did such a huge amount. - nurses. and in those last few weeks, she did such a huge amount. we - nurses. and in those last few weeks, she did such a huge amount. we saw her at the chelsea flower show, we saw her with her clothing brand, books, so much. how was that possible, was she just an extraordinary individual? she was absolutely extraordinary. - extraordinary individual? she was absolutely extraordinary. she - extraordinary individual? she was| absolutely extraordinary. she was determined to do something, if she was, she _ determined to do something, if she was, she would do it. you determined to do something, if she was, she would do it.— was, she would do it. you helped because you _ was, she would do it. you helped because you are _ was, she would do it. you helped because you are managing - was, she would do it. you helped because you are managing her i was, she would do it. you helped i because you are managing her pain? yes, we looked after pain symptom management, generally, once she was discharged _ management, generally, once she was discharged into our care in the community. discharged into our care in the community-— discharged into our care in the community. discharged into our care in the communi .~ ., ~ ., community. what was it like for you? you are a man. _ community. what was it like for you? you are a man, younger— community. what was it like for you? you are a man, younger than - community. what was it like for you? you are a man, younger than her- community. what was it like for you? you are a man, younger than her but| you are a man, younger than her but she was incredibly young, what was that like new —— you are a mum, what's that like for you? it is that like new -- you are a mum, what's that like for you? it is very hard looking _ what's that like for you? it is very hard looking after _ what's that like for you? it is very hard looking after someone - what's that like for you? it is very hard looking after someone who l what's that like for you? it is very| hard looking after someone who is what's that like for you? it is very - hard looking after someone who is so young _ hard looking after someone who is so young and _ hard looking after someone who is so young and full of life and possess and wants —
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young and full of life and possess and wants to live, was positive right _ and wants to live, was positive right until— and wants to live, was positive right until the very end. he said even with _ right until the very end. he said even with all— right until the very end. he said even with all of— right until the very end. he said even with all of your _ right until the very end. he said even with all of your expertise, | right until the very end. he said - even with all of your expertise, she was still lecturing you, check your poo? was still lecturing you, check your 00? , ., , was still lecturing you, check your 00? ,., . was still lecturing you, check your poo? yes, always, check your poo. and she was _ poo? yes, always, check your poo. and she was curious, _ poo? yes, always, check your poo. and she was curious, she - poo? yes, always, check your poo. and she was curious, she wanted l poo? yes, always, check your poo. | and she was curious, she wanted to know everything?— and she was curious, she wanted to know everything? yes, every drug we recommended — know everything? yes, every drug we recommended she _ know everything? yes, every drug we recommended she would _ know everything? yes, every drug we recommended she would look - know everything? yes, every drug we recommended she would look up - know everything? yes, every drug we recommended she would look up and | recommended she would look up and she was— recommended she would look up and she was also very involved in her care _ she was also very involved in her care all_ she was also very involved in her care all throughout her disease jenny. — care all throughout her disease jenn . . .. care all throughout her disease jenn . ., ~' ., care all throughout her disease jenn. ., ., ., ~ ., care all throughout her disease jenn . ., ~ ., ., ~ ., , jenny. thank you for talking to us. -- disease — jenny. thank you for talking to us. -- disease journey. _ jenny. thank you for talking to us. -- disease journey. you _ jenny. thank you for talking to us. -- disease journey. you are - jenny. thank you for talking to us. -- disease journey. you are in - —— diseasejourney. you are in charge here, marion, dame deborah chose to die at her parents home and do you supported that but you also support people here? yes. do you supported that but you also support people here?— do you supported that but you also support people here? yes, 8096 of our care is in the — support people here? yes, 8096 of our care is in the community _ support people here? yes, 8096 of our care is in the community in _ support people here? yes, 8096 of our care is in the community in the - support people here? yes, 8096 of our care is in the community in the way . care is in the community in the way that we did with deborah through our amazing team led by hayley, but we
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also have 20 inpatient rooms here, we have the garden here, some patients will have rooms overlooking it, they will choose to end their life here, some will come in for symptom control and go out again and live life as best they can and make —— may come back later. and people change their mind, people have a different view on to what life in a hospice is like and that is a stigma we have to overcome. there is a film on our website which we have tried to show patients what it's like, it can be a joyous place full of inspirational people like hayley and her team. find inspirational people like hayley and her team. �* ., i. inspirational people like hayley and herteam. �* ., ., her team. and would you say that dame deborah _ her team. and would you say that dame deborah changed _ her team. and would you say that dame deborah changed the - dame deborah changed the conversation about cancer but also about how we perceive hospices and end of life from your point of view? i hope so, i hope he did. i hope she has lifted a veil on what it is that we do. —— i hope she did. and the environment that we create, we care for patients but also the family,
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and that a really significant model of care, holistic model of care that we provide. we are often told that what we do for families is we stop them being carers, we take over that role so they can go back to their role so they can go back to their role of being husbands and wives and daughters and sons. that makes a huge difference to what we do, and i'm very proud that we are able to do it. . .. i'm very proud that we are able to do it. ., ~ i. i'm very proud that we are able to do it. ., ~ , i'm very proud that we are able to doit. ., , . ., do it. thank you both very much for 'oinin: do it. thank you both very much for joining us- — do it. thank you both very much for joining us- we _ do it. thank you both very much for joining us. we knew— do it. thank you both very much for joining us. we knew that _ do it. thank you both very much for joining us. we knew that dame - joining us. we knew that dame deborah, this news was going to come but it does not make it any easier when it does come. and certainly from this morning from this hospice, it is a very difficult day and this team will have to go out and look after many other patients today, so thank you so much forjoining us. the last message, tell us, what were some of your her last words to you? yes, check your poo. but i want to say it _ yes, check your poo. but i want to say it was— yes, check your poo. but i want to say it was an — yes, check your poo. but i want to say it was an absolute privilege to
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look after — say it was an absolute privilege to look after deborah and her family in her last— look after deborah and her family in her last weeks and days of life. thank— her last weeks and days of life. thank you _ her last weeks and days of life. thank you very much, that everything from here. thank you so much, deborah would be so pleased we are saying the word poo so many times this morning, that is what she wanted. essen poo so many times this morning, that is what she wanted.— is what she wanted. even to the clinical staff _ is what she wanted. even to the clinical staff who _ is what she wanted. even to the clinical staff who were - is what she wanted. even to the clinical staff who were with - is what she wanted. even to the clinical staff who were with her| clinical staff who were with her towards the end, she was saying to them, are you checking your poo? that was her message to the end. she did to tirelessly fundraiser over the last few weeks in particular, trying, she hoped, to reach £250,000.— trying, she hoped, to reach £250,000. have a £250,000. she smashed it. have a look at this- — £250,000. she smashed it. have a look at this. how _ £250,000. she smashed it. have a look at this. how is _ £250,000. she smashed it. have a look at this. how is your _ £250,000. she smashed it. have a look at this. how is your eyesight? | look at this. how is your eyesight? when i put my glasses on its mind. —— it is fine. 2737% of what she planned to raise, she wanted to get a quarter of a million and got
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nearly 7 million, unbelievable and every penny will go towards helping people with bowel cancer, more research, better treatment, and end of life care as well. she was so passionate about living well and dying well. find passionate about living well and d in: well. �* . ., dying well. and targeted individual care as well _ dying well. and targeted individual care as well because _ dying well. and targeted individual care as well because cancer- care as well because cancer treatment keeps on moving along so she was quite keen for some of that money to go towards research. we can now speak to broadcaster tony livesey who was a close friend of deborah's and interviewed her while she was receiving end of life care at home. good morning, tony, good to see you, although on such a sad occasion. he interviewed dozens of people every single week, some of them are special and some become friends? yeah, debs definitely became a friend. she is one of the most remarkable women i have ever met in my life. as an aside, i was just listening in, i havejust broken the records on the radio fours today programme for saying poo. melt records on the radio fours today programme for saying poo. well done! i am ha- programme for saying poo. well done!
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i am happy to — programme for saying poo. well done! i am happy to where — programme for saying poo. well done! i am happy to where that _ programme for saying poo. well done! i am happy to where that medal. - programme for saying poo. well done! i am happy to where that medal. i - i am happy to where that medal. i was doing five live with rachel bland and she introduced me to debs through the podcast and we have had a relationship ever since. she asked me to do her last radio interview and i chatted to her in her garden and i chatted to her in her garden and she reflected on an amazing but short life. and all the fame she is getting there, last night i was looking, the prime minister was on twitter, rylan, angela rayner, and all she would have said to them was never mind that, check your poo. fame was a by—product, was given this platform on five live and all he wanted to do was save lives. i'm telling you now if one person goes away from this interview and check their poo and save their life then debs would be very happy. she was remarkable. i did this interview in
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her garden, and she was questioning herself, this is where her humanity came out, she said, had i cut through? i said, came out, she said, had i cut through? isaid, that came out, she said, had i cut through? i said, that was the morning prince william was tweeting about her. she said, right at the end, i have done a deal with the devil but i am now frightened of death and that spoke volumes because thatis death and that spoke volumes because that is striking a chord with people because we will all think that. i put the phone down and i thought, that was it. subsequently she ranged —— had a flower named after her, she wrote a book, she had a clothing range, she raised 7 million quid, so she conned me into thinking she would be around forever but last night, we knew it was coming. but i gave the interview —— a eulogy for rachel bland when she died and i am so proud to have given the last
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interview for debs. aha, so proud to have given the last interview for debs.— so proud to have given the last interview for debs. a friend of hers said when she _ interview for debs. a friend of hers said when she realised _ interview for debs. a friend of hers said when she realised it _ interview for debs. a friend of hers said when she realised it was - interview for debs. a friend of hers i said when she realised it was almost the end of last month, her immediate response was, no more public profile, social media, i am going to go quietly and then something changed and she wanted to do interviews and get the fashion range and do the fundraising. what was it? it was almost like she could not help herself, she had to keep communicating, what is your sense? that could be mistaken of, debs on the front page again. i tell you now, all she wanted to do was save lives. and that catchphrase, check your poo, it was not an affectation, it was a reminder. the first thing she said to me was, by the way, i am the one with the poo cancer. she wanted the stigma gone. there were no euphemisms, i have got a tumour
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up my no euphemisms, i have got a tumour up my burn, she told me. how can you not love someone who is that honest? a couple of anecdotes about her. she was so courageous, we did an outside broadcast at the francis crick institute in london where they do a lot of research into cancer and we were live and the scientists that, in this bridge, —— fridge, we have 1000 tumours. and ijust tried to nudge debs away but she pushed me out the way and said, show me, she got in the fridge, she was videoing them to put them on social media. she wanted to confront what she had. she wanted to confront what she had. she had a sense of curiosity, we all know she had an amazing sense of fun. she came from london to manchester dressed as a poo which is challenging for any hen do, she ordered a costume for a child aged eight so she came to salford excrete into an eight—year—old's poo strin.
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i am throwing in random stories now but another one about her strength of character, injanuary, we had done many interviews, we put the phone down and she immediately collapsed. she had success, she almost died, she subsequently talked about it, literally putting the phone down on me on the radio. she was being treated for it in hospital and still dictating passages of her book to people. she lived longer than she expected to, thank god, she said to me in her garden in that last interview, my time is up. but she was driven on by a love for her family but this inner drive to save lives, all of the front pages today and tribute about her, she would read them and say, check your poo. i keep going back to the blinking obvious. fame was a by—product for debs, shejust wanted
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obvious. fame was a by—product for debs, she just wanted to save lives, extraordinary. find debs, she just wanted to save lives, extraordinary-— extraordinary. and for you as a pal, ton , extraordinary. and for you as a pal, tony. you — extraordinary. and for you as a pal, tony. you have _ extraordinary. and for you as a pal, tony, you have referenced - extraordinary. and for you as a pal, tony, you have referenced the - tony, you have referenced the humour, courage, the pain threshold she must have had, but there was a moment where she said, i am scared now. what is it like hearing that from a mate?— now. what is it like hearing that from a mate? .,, ., ., from a mate? people have asked me. that interview. _ from a mate? people have asked me. that interview, by _ from a mate? people have asked me. that interview, by the _ from a mate? people have asked me. that interview, by the way, _ from a mate? people have asked me. that interview, by the way, is - from a mate? people have asked me. that interview, by the way, is still - that interview, by the way, is still knocking around on iplayer. i'm hopeful they will play it today on the radio. subsequent to that interview going out, people who were saying, how have you managed? to me, all i thought is we were just having all i thought is we were just having a conversation on a park bench and he was a mate, breaking her heart to make, and i did what i could. metaphorically i put my arm around her. and what can you say to someone who knows they are dying and says that frightened? my mum died when i was 13, and i didn't know she had cancer, she sat down one day and said, i don't think i will ever get better. i have to process that for the rest of my life. all i could do with that is to say, i'm here if you
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want me. but it breaks your heart. her and rachel, they were fighters and they were determined to laugh at cancer, ridicule it, call it out, knowing in the end, probably, it will get them. never, eversay someone is fighting cancer, battling cancer. they were adamant about that, rachel used to shout at me and she knocked it out of me. it's not one person against the disease, they have a condition which many of us in life will have to cope with. itjust happened that rachel and debs coped with it like heroes, debs showed a bit of vulnerability at the end and my god, she was allowed to do that. the answer to the question, nina, i just that, i'm here for you if you want because it's a journey we all have to go on ourselves ultimately but debs did it in the glare of the
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public eye. the strong, powerful, the breadth of people paying tribute to her today, i will repeat myself, it's all right saying that, but save your own lives, check yourself. whether it is poo, breasts, everything, go to the doctor, check yourself. we can help ourselves, don't sit in silence. men in particular are just sitting at home nursing condition saying, it's all right, but debs and rachel are up there going, bashing your heads, saying, go and get it checked and make sure you are all right. tony, thank you- — make sure you are all right. tony, thank you- he _ make sure you are all right. tony, thank you. he does _ make sure you are all right. tony, thank you. he does that _ make sure you are all right. tony, thank you. he does that last - thank you. he does that last interview with her.— thank you. he does that last interview with her. when that is on bbc sounds _ interview with her. when that is on bbc sounds we _ interview with her. when that is on bbc sounds we will _ interview with her. when that is on bbc sounds we will let _ interview with her. when that is on bbc sounds we will let you - interview with her. when that is on bbc sounds we will let you know i bbc sounds we will let you know because it is incredibly powerful. thank you forjoining us. carol cannot cope with the stress and strain of wimbledon any more and she is back in the studio with a
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rainbow, that is what we need this morning. thank you, good morning. someone is pushing east but behind that we will see a return to sunshine and showers. the other thing you will notice is today's weather will not be as windy as yesterday. here is that weather _ be as windy as yesterday. here is that weather front _ be as windy as yesterday. here is that weather front the _ be as windy as yesterday. here is that weather front the rain, - be as windy as yesterday. here is that weather front the rain, it - be as windy as yesterday. here is j that weather front the rain, it will clear off into the north sea, is weather front behind it fizzling out in situ but producing some showers. the first weather front, heavy rain through the night, the cloud is coming on now and there is some sunshine around this morning. the cloud, but back towards the west, we are looking at showers. that will continue through the day, some showers will be heavy and thundery. a low chance of seeing them at wimbledon this afternoon. the weather front brings some rain into the north—east of scotland and the northern isles. these are average wind speeds, not particularly strong. these are the temperatures,
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ranging from 15 in the north to 23 as you push down towards the south—east. this evening and overnight, many showers but not all of them will fade and then cast your eyes to the south—east, we have got a front moving north, clipping the south—east, east anglia, and if you follow that round, bringing some showery outbreaks of rain northwards across england and wales, into central and southern england and scotland by the end of the night. it will not be a cold night, temperatures falling away to ii and 13 degrees. tomorrow, the set of fronts continues to push north. this one is out in the north sea but close enough to eat only an attempt to give you a bit more cloud at times. as it curls around, it brings further into the northern isles, into northern scotland as well and we will see some further showers across northern ireland. in between, still some showers, a slightly higher chance at wimbledon tomorrow but they could stillness them.
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temperatures a bit lower than today, 14 to 19. into friday, the dregs of the weather front producing some rain across the far north—east. more showers coming in, a lot of those will be in the north and west and a breezy day, temperatures back up again. 14 to 19 —— 22 degrees. in high pressure starts to build in. still whether france around the top of it will produce showers in the north and west but for many of us especially on sunday it is going to be dry. thank you very much, see you later. driver wimbledon at the weekend, brilliant. —— it is dry at wimbledon. it was a belt at last night, john? yes, and with the showers forecast, they have disclosed to the roof which means we will be staying dry. —— just closed the roof. serena
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williams went out in the first round last night. she says defeat has motivated herfor last night. she says defeat has motivated her for more success in the future although she says does not know what the future holds. it was a thriller last night, an epic match. she was up against it but some of the magic of serena williams on display last night before she was finally beaten by france's harmony tan who could not quite believe what unfolded and her own slice of wimbledon history last night. the question everyone is asking, is that the last time we see the great champion here on centre court? i don't know. i mean, obviously summer, we are in the summer now, so, you know, right in the swing of it. like i said, coming into this, i'm just playing for right now
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and seeing how i feel and just go from there. i don't know, i'm so emotional now. i don't know how to say now. because it's a superstar. and when i was young, yeah, watching her so many times on the tv, and, yeah, for my first wimbledon, it's, wow, just wow. nine brits into the second round, we will talk about emma raducanu and andy murray in a moment. there was an emotional win for heather watson. she had to come back on tuesday afternoon for the deciding set against tamara korpatsch but was in fine form when she did, taking it 6—2. rafa nadal is aiming for a record extending 23rd grand slam here at wimbledon and came through a tough battle with francisco cerundolo on centre court. she has had —— he has had a niggling foot problem recently.
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the 36—year—old was two sets and a break up before the argentinian fought back and took the third. he was on crutches a few weeks back after a procedure to ease the pain in his foot. cerundolo broke early in the fourth but nadal regained momentum to eventually win by three sets to one. he is going to a record extending 23rd grand slam title. ryan peniston had a dream wimbledon debut. he's through after beating henri laaksonen in straight sets. he's ranked 135th in the world and has been in terrific form coming into the grass—court grand slam, reaching the quarterfinals at eastbourne, queen's and nottingham. disappointment for dan evans who fell at the first hurdle. at the brits are going well at the moment. it could be turned into the second round today. all eyes will certainly be on two names, andy murray and emma raducanu. a tough match for
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her, up against caroline garcia, although she looked so relaxed after that opening—round victory. he felt that opening—round victory. he felt that some of that pressure and expectation had eased on her shoulders. and then it is andy murray up against the big serving john is now. he played at that —— john is now. he played at that —— john isner, he paid the ii john is now. he played at that —— john isner, he paid the 11 hour epic match at wimbledon, the longest match at wimbledon, the longest match in history. andy murray will want to avoid that because he said after his latest victory, at the age of 35, he is not sure how many times he will be back on this court. he has won this tournament twice before but he will want to conserve some energy. ii but he will want to conserve some ener: . , ., ., . but he will want to conserve some ener: . , . ., . ., ., energy. if he gets a match that long he will be nearly _ energy. if he gets a match that long he will be nearly 40 _ energy. if he gets a match that long he will be nearly 40 by _ energy. if he gets a match that long he will be nearly 40 by the - energy. if he gets a match that long he will be nearly 40 by the time - energy. if he gets a match that long he will be nearly 40 by the time it l he will be nearly 40 by the time it is finished. ., he will be nearly 40 by the time it is finished-— is finished. you might want some -o corn is finished. you might want some popcorn for— is finished. you might want some popcorn for this _ is finished. you might want some popcorn for this one. _ popcorn for this one. emma raducanu looks like she is enjoying it again. when popping out for a quiet pint, and a spot of wedding planning,
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you probably wouldn't expect to be serenaded by the artist you are planning to have your first dance to, who also happens to be one of the most famous musicians in the world. that's exactly what happened at the stag inn near bath this weekend, when coldplay�*s lead singer chris martin stopped in on his way home from glastonbury. laura jones has the story. back in the pubjeremy and fiance hannah, still trying to process what has been a crazy 48 hours. since chris martin walked in here on sunday afternoon whilst they were having a meeting about their wedding. and i said, we're getting married on the 28th of august and you will never believe it but we have decided to go for coldplay as our first dance song. he just turned to chris the landlord and jeremy and said, well, you want me to play some? as soon as he said, "do you want me to play a little bit," i was moving the tables out of the way so that he could get to the piano. # you're a sky full of stars, i
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i'm gonna give you my heart. yeah, it was amazing, a very emotional moment, i was very emotional, me and my mum. and it was a very intimate, magical moment that we will rememberforever. so, yeah, no pressure for the first dance! # you get lighter- the more it gets dark. since posting the video on social media, it's been watched more than a million times. i'm just with the bbc now, they're doing a tv thing, if that's all right. for landlord chris, fielding calls from the world's media, it's simply been surreal. have i got two minutes in the next five minutes to speak to this guy? he knew the value of what he was doing, he knew what he was doing was going to affect everybody in the room, you know. i was conscious of letting him be, but no, he kind of obviously wanted to give something back and he just sat down and did it and he was gone,
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just like that, really. it was an incredible moment for everybody. # you get lighter- the more it gets dark. and before he left, a word of wisdom for the groom ahead of the big day. as he was walking out the door, he said, he said, his bit of marriage advice was, "make sure you listen to her". and that was the last thing he said and he turned around and walked out of the door. so there you have it, sage advice and a song from a superstar, all for the price of a pint at the stag inn. # in a sky full of stars, i think i saw... - bit high for me, that! laura jones, bbc news. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. our headlines today. cancer campaigner dame deborah james — known to millions as bowel babe — has died at the age of 40. # baby, baby, baby # when you touch me like this when you hold me like that #. she challenged taboos and changed the conversation around bowel cancer — urging people to check their poo. we'll speak to those who knew and loved her about her life and her remarkable legacy.
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british socialite ghislaine maxwell has been jailed for 20 years by a new york court, for helping jeffrey epstein abuse young girls. also... with petrol and diesel prices near record highs, pressure is growing on retailers and the government to step in. i'll be finding out the impact on people who rely on their vehicle for work. serena williams says she is not sure if she will play at wimbledon again after her opening—round defeat. good morning from wimbledon where we will see andy murray and emma raducanu in action later on centre court. good morning, we have a band of rain pushing east which will clear and thenit pushing east which will clear and then it will be a day of sunshine and showers, some of which will be thundery, but not as windy as yesterday. more throughout the programme. it's wednesday, 29th ofjune.
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our main story. the cancer campaigner, blogger and broadcaster, dame deborahjames, also known as bowel babe has died aged 40. she had been receiving end—of—life care for bowel cancer at home. the host of the bbc�*s you, me and the big c podcast was given a damehood in may in recognition of her tireless fundraising. right to the very end of her life, dame deborahjames was determined to live every moment to the full. just a few weeks ago, she was at the chelsea flower show to see a rose that had been named after her. cheers! she wanted to make the very most of whatever time she had left. in herfinal weeks, deborah published a book. she started a fund for cancer charities which has raised millions of pounds. she launched a range of clothes, with a rebellious hope t—shirt, that has raise money for charity. and then on father's day, she posted
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this image with the words, "my dad is brushing my hair because i have no strength any more". announcing her death last night, herfamily said... i was diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer at the age of 35. we are actually talking about life and death here. it's heart—wrenching at times. come on, mummy, you can go faster than that. so, i have the poo cancer. there's nothing pink about my cancer, it's just brown. so, i was pooing blood and eventually got diagnosed with a 6.5 centimetre tumour up my burn, basically. deborah was always honest
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and open about her cancer. she shared her every step of herjourney from endless rounds of chemotherapy to the terrible side—effects of the drug treatment she was on. but, through it all, she was determined to keep smiling, to keep dancing. # singing in the rain. our podcast is about living with cancer, right? and it is about showing life goes on. so if cancer wants me twirling around on the stage and wearing sequins and if it means i have to do treatment and train and dance, then, actually, that is what life is. let's dance through the rain. i love that saying, dance through the rain. prime minister borisjohnson said...
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dame deborah leaves behind a large, loving family and two children. she says she was lucky to have five extra years to see them grow up. in herfinal days, she was surrounded by her family at her parents' home. and in her last interview, she said she was convinced that new treatments will be found. cancer should become a chronic disease. i hope it will be in my kids' lifetime.come a chronic disease. but, i think, there are people doing amazing things and we need to support them and fund them. deborah was made a dame last month. the award presented in person by prince william at her parents' home. dame deborah wrote her own epitaph. a message posted on social media last night. it said...
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that important message about checking your poo she never missed an opportunity to reiterate. there's been an incredible reaction on social media to her death from family, friends and fans of deborah — let's take a look at some of the tributes being paid. deborah's mum heather — known as bowel gran on instagram — has posted a photo and video of her daughter with the words my heart is broken. love you forever.
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tv presenter gaby roslin wrote... what is striking looking at social media, it is notjust herfamily and celebrities and charities, it is many people living normal lives over the uk whose lives have been affected by cancer. hejust the uk whose lives have been affected by cancer. he just got something from deborah over the past years, who got strength or a public health message. we heard from our gp
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earlier saying she had patients coming to her specifically because of symptoms deborah had flagged up. and we have heard from people living with cancer and deborah inspired them to live a full life with the illness. let's speak to emma campbell, also known on social media as limitless em, who was a close friend of deborah and is herself a cancer patient. how are you doing this morning? i am 0k. hard to find the words, but an emotional time. i think we feel so strongly about shining a light on deborah's brilliance and her spirit. she would love the fact you are wearing one of her t—shirts with that's rebellious hope emblazoned on it. . , ,., y that's rebellious hope emblazoned on it. . , ,., , ., that's rebellious hope emblazoned on it. absolutely. no other option this morninu. it. absolutely. no other option this morning. nothing _ it. absolutely. no other option this morning. nothing else _ it. absolutely. no other option this morning. nothing else in _ it. absolutely. no other option this morning. nothing else in the - morning. nothing else in the wardrobe _ morning. nothing else in the wardrobe would _ morning. nothing else in the wardrobe would manage -
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morning. nothing else in the wardrobe would manage it i morning. nothing else in the l wardrobe would manage it this morning. i would like to play a clip of you with deborah. we know she made use of social media in her campaigning and getting her message across. but you were very much part of that. we will play the clip first and see you together and then we will talk to you about the story behind it. we will find that in just a moment. but the fundamental thing about it. and we've talked about this throughout the morning, perception. she was never without lipstick, neverfarfrom sequins. and her aim was to get that message out, every cancer is different and every person is different and the way we live with this illness is different for every individual. yes. different for every individual. yes, absolutely- _ different for every individual. yes, absolutely- it _ different for every individual. yes, absolutely. it is _ different for every individual. yes, absolutely. it isjust _ different for every individual. yes, absolutely. it isjust the _ different for every individual. l913 absolutely. it isjust the feeling absolutely. it is just the feeling of she just wanted to live and spread the message that you can live
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a full life. the passion to raise awareness on early detection and to show as long as there are options and hope you can continue to find reasons to smile in life and to look for the joy. reasons to smile in life and to look for thejoy. and on a personal level that was the biggest thing she taught me. it was possible to find a life with lightness and laughter and magical moments despite the fragility of what might lie ahead. we have that clip ready. talking about embracing it and having a laugh. music: swan theme from swan lake by tchaikovsky. was she just great fun? i am just
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asking, it looks like she was great fun, even in the darkest of times. she was. i am not a dancer and she is the one person who could get me up. on the days when we were fortunate enough for our chemotherapy days to collide and we always try to negotiate it so we could sit side by side. she was always right, what are we going to do? you could not help but follow one. that clip is one of the most precious moments. i am so grateful to have the memory of that day. she is in trainers, i have flip—flops. we are floating around. it was a beautiful moment. again, behind that, before or after, there might have been tears. and anxiety about results. just sharing where we were both at. she was the full range of
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human emotion and was never afraid to show all of it and that made us drawn to her. to show all of it and that made us drawn to her-— to show all of it and that made us drawn to her. ., , ., drawn to her. how did you meet her? we met shortly _ drawn to her. how did you meet her? we met shortly after— drawn to her. how did you meet her? we met shortly after her— drawn to her. how did you meet her? we met shortly after her diagnosis. l we met shortly after her diagnosis. we met shortly after her diagnosis. we were involved in a stand up to cancer campaign. dressed up in ridiculous costumes. our kids were there. i remember early on being struck by her determination. we got to know each other and started running together. we ran the virtual london marathon. and the 3am chats when neither of us could sleep. the 3am club as we called it. when i got my third diagnosis in 2019 she was the first person i called and the first thing she said was you have
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options, right? and it was yet, and she said right, ok. wejust need to know there is a plan. and that is what she said. as long as there is a plan we can put one in front of the other. i plan we can put one in front of the other. ., plan we can put one in front of the other. . , ., ., . other. i imagine you got all the su ort other. i imagine you got all the support in _ other. i imagine you got all the support in the _ other. i imagine you got all the support in the world _ other. i imagine you got all the support in the world from - other. i imagine you got all the i support in the world from friends and family if you are fortunate enough to have that but to have somebody who knows how you are feeling because they have been there must be so important.— must be so important. exactly. she was straight _ must be so important. exactly. she was straight talking. _ must be so important. exactly. she was straight talking. she _ must be so important. exactly. she was straight talking. she would - must be so important. exactly. she was straight talking. she would cut | was straight talking. she would cut to the chase in a way that when people around you do not know what to say, or they might be sensitively tilting the head, lost for words, but with her it was this is what we are going to do. it was that relief of she gets it, she really does get it. at the same time, knowing she was also dealing with dark moments
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herself. in spite of that she always managed to find the time for those of us who reached out. and managed to find the time for those of us who reached out.— managed to find the time for those of us who reached out. and you were there for her— of us who reached out. and you were there for her in _ of us who reached out. and you were there for her in return, _ of us who reached out. and you were there for her in return, over- of us who reached out. and you were there for her in return, over the - there for her in return, over the last few years and weeks. i started talking about your t—shirt, rebellious hope, her clothing range she has sold for charity. some up what rebellious hope means to deborah and to you. i what rebellious hope means to deborah and to you.— what rebellious hope means to deborah and to you. i think hope, like i say. — deborah and to you. i think hope, like i say. she _ deborah and to you. i think hope, like i say, she was _ deborah and to you. i think hope, like i say, she was always - deborah and to you. i think hope, like i say, she was always looking j like i say, she was always looking for the plan, option, like i say, she was always looking forthe plan, option, light like i say, she was always looking for the plan, option, light at the end of what might feel like a dark tunnel. the rebellious aspect is pure debs. the kind of right, we are going tojust do pure debs. the kind of right, we are going to just do this. and the silliness. the mad moments of let's do it, life is short. let's go on that last minute holiday, do spontaneous things and seize the
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moment. and i guess dancing around the chemotherapy ward is not for everybody but there was kind of like, i am going to live this every moment. 50 there has always been a rebellious streak in deborah, the zest for life. you could see the glint in her eyes, the ready smile. rebellious hope is something we can hold onto it and whatever it means to us personally. i would like to channel more of the rebellious side. it would do me good and that is my plan. good for you. how are you doing? are you good at the moment? i am ok. i am in you good at the moment? iamok. lamina you good at the moment? i am ok. i am in a stable place. ironically i am at the royal marsden today having targeted chemotherapy and strangely, today i feel strangely comforted by the fact i will be there for the day and will be able to chat to the nurses and see familiar faces. be able to chat to the nurses and see familiarfaces. i be able to chat to the nurses and see familiar faces. i will probably
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shed a tear at various points but i am comforted today by knowing i will be in a building that meant so much to deborah. that she was loyal to. and it feels like the right place for be today. a, and it feels like the right place for be today-— and it feels like the right place for be today. a little dance in a auiet for be today. a little dance in a quiet moment? _ for be today. a little dance in a quiet moment? 0h, _ for be today. a little dance in a quiet moment? oh, gosh, - for be today. a little dance in a quiet moment? oh, gosh, that for be today. a little dance in a - quiet moment? oh, gosh, that would be ste ed quiet moment? oh, gosh, that would he stepped one _ quiet moment? oh, gosh, that would he stepped one of— quiet moment? oh, gosh, that would be stepped one of my _ quiet moment? oh, gosh, that would be stepped one of my rebellion. - quiet moment? oh, gosh, that would be stepped one of my rebellion. i - be stepped one of my rebellion. i need you, debs. i cannot do without you. maybe i will do a self—conscious wiggle. do you. maybe i will do a self-conscious wiggle. do it, that would be enough. _ self-conscious wiggle. do it, that would be enough. we _ self-conscious wiggle. do it, that would be enough. we wish - self-conscious wiggle. do it, that would be enough. we wish you i self-conscious wiggle. do it, that. would be enough. we wish you the best. thank you so much. emma campbell, a close friend to deborah. it has been great to hear she has been that person, texting late at night, offering support when she has gone through a terminal diagnosis. what a woman.
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since she was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2016 deborah has earned praise for her intimate, frank and often humorous account of living with the disease — famously dressing up as a poo. telling us to check our poo. our reporter graham satchell looks back at how she inspired a nation, raised millions for charity and connected with thousands of other cancer patients. as she approached the end of her life, deborahjames was honoured with a damehood. it was presented in person at her parents' house by prince william. recognition for an extraordinary woman who captured the heart of the nation. for more than five years, dame deborah recorded, documented and shared her life with cancer, she danced her way through most of it. the way she campaigned and raised awareness of bowel cancer was a real boost for other people living with the condition. hello, and welcome to
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you, me and the big c. we all have one thing in common, we all have or we have had cancer. deborah used this bbc podcast to connect with thousands of other people living with cancer, to share stories, to support and help. whooo, deborah's dressed as a poo! within the space of a minute, we are laughing and crying hysterically all at the same time. and that is what cancer is like. i'm not going to look at you. a crying poo is not what we need right now. me talking about my cancer helps me get through it. it helps me rationalise the rubbish that i'm dealing with, and the people, the support that we get from people is helping us just as much as we helping them. hello, welcome back. thank you. nice to see you. i was going to say it's nice to be here, but not as a patient! absolutely. deborah tried every treatment available to extend her life. hello, this is the tiny.
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probe which is very thin. i've never seen this, i can't believe that actually goes inside of me! she was a former deputy head teacher and was endlessly curious about her condition. she was brilliant at communicating and never afraid to poke fun at herself. # i'm too sexy for my shirt # too sexy for my shirt, so sexy it hurts. she dressed up as a poo to tell people to check their bowel movements, to go to the doctor if there was anything unusual. her message — never be ashamed. more dancing, this time with her daughter. deborah had two young children. every moment was precious. it's been a privilege to just see them blossom into these kind of young adults or tweenagers or whatever we want to call l4—year—olds and l2—year—olds. what it's made me realise, actually, is just how much i've been able to witness them grow up since i've
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been diagnosed with cancer. the blessing of that five years is possibly the difference between them remembering me and not remembering me, and that is huge. # there were nights of endless pleasure — # it was more - than all your laws allow. deborah's openness, her honesty, her positivity, had a huge impact. deborah, thank you for everything that you've done, thank you for giving so tirelessly when you're going through what you're going through and i know how much that takes out of your body. you are amazing and, like you, i shall dance through this, i will get my celine dion, especially for you. i can't shake my hair, i've got no hair left but i'll do it for you. in the final days of her life, deborah started a fund
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for cancer charities. this is her daughter refreshing thejust giving page as it reached its first million. cheering. it is an extraordinary legacy. even at the very end, she was thinking of others. over the last five years, i've campaigned, i've spoken about awareness, i've shared my story for a reason. i don't want any other deborahs to have to go through this. it makes me feel like we are all kind of a bit in it at the end together, and we want to make a difference and say, you know what, screw you, cancer, we can do better. we can do better for people. and we just need to show it who's boss. deborah was charming and cheeky, profound and inspirational and she always wanted
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one last dance. always manage to dance. 50 many pictures of smiles and dancing. that piece put together by graham who got to know deborah well over the past years. he kept in touch with her until the very end. i know that was an ordeal that something he wanted to make for us this morning. it has been wonderful hearing from people who knew her so well. deborah came to fame hosting the bbc podcast you me and the big c. that was along with rachael bland who died a couple of years ago. her husband stevejoins us who died a couple of years ago. her husband steve joins us now.
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good morning, are you ok? not really. but holding it together. incredibly proud of everything she achieved and everything she was and all the amazing work she has done. you could see when she and rachael hosted the podcast the energy between them was incredible. it was. and lauren. — between them was incredible. it was. and lauren. the _ between them was incredible. it was. and lauren, the three _ between them was incredible. it was. and lauren, the three of _ between them was incredible. it was. and lauren, the three of them - between them was incredible. it was. and lauren, the three of them were i and lauren, the three of them were incredible. from the moment they started and sat at the microphone the first time, the chemistry was instant. our producer mike will tell you. he did not know that the first time they recorded was the first time they recorded was the first time they recorded was the first time they had actually met. this podcast they thought would be a trial and see how it went, itjust grew and grew. the impact. five years later. deborah is a dame. it
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is extraordinary. i remember seeing the three of them in reception here at the bbc when they made the podcast. i did not realise who it was to start with and i thought a hen night had come into the building with laughter and screaming and hugging one another. all this energy and optimism. i thought oh, it is those three from the podcast. it was magical, that combination. yes. rachael, when _ magical, that combination. yes. rachael, when she _ magical, that combination. yes. rachael, when she had - magical, that combination. yes. rachael, when she had the - magical, that combination. ies rachael, when she had the podcast, it was clear she wanted lauren to do it was clear she wanted lauren to do it with her. i do not think in her wildest dreams she could imagine it would turn out the way it did. we always said if it helped only one person it would be worth doing but in the fourand person it would be worth doing but in the four and a bit years it has been running it has helped so many people. the big thing is making people. the big thing is making people think they are not alone in
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what they are going through. and i think... �* ., y what they are going through. and i think... ., , ., . , think... don't worry. you are trying to find the — think... don't worry. you are trying to find the camera _ think... don't worry. you are trying to find the camera button. - think... don't worry. you are trying to find the camera button. peoplel to find the camera button. people are t in: to find the camera button. people are trying to _ to find the camera button. people are trying to call _ to find the camera button. people are trying to call this _ to find the camera button. people are trying to call this morning. - are trying to call this morning. it's a little bit manic. but all wonderful, because it is all because of what she achieved and people want to talk about her and pay tribute to her. just so, so proud of what she has done and so sad. we have known what is coming for five years but probably in the back of our minds, she seemed indestructible. every time she was told she only had a certain amount of time, even going back to the start of may, she was told she only had probably days or weeks left. and seven weeks on, she
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was made a dame and a bestselling book and raised millions of pounds. and the clothing line. who does that? it is extraordinary what she achieved. because she was clear on this, it is notjust what she has donein this, it is notjust what she has done in the past seven weeks, it is what she has been doing for five years and there are so many people all over the world who are alive now because she fought for a drug, for something they needed to keep them alive, or she banged the drum and educating people about the symptoms of bowel cancer. it is an extraordinary legacy that thousands are alive because of her. just lookin: are alive because of her. just looking at — are alive because of her. just looking at some _ are alive because of her. just looking at some cracking pictures of you with deborah and the rest of the team, making the podcast over the years. and so many smiles. so much fun had by all of you even though
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you are going through such difficult times. you lost rachael a couple of years ago and have been through personally a horribly difficult time. i know you will be thinking of deborah's husband and children today. deborah's husband and children toda . ~ ., , deborah's husband and children toda .~ . , deborah's husband and children toda. . ., deborah's husband and children toda . ~ . , ., today. what is your message to them? i think... today. what is your message to them? lthink--- first — today. what is your message to them? i think... first of— today. what is your message to them? i think... first of all, _ today. what is your message to them? i think... first of all, you _ today. what is your message to them? i think... first of all, you are _ i think... first of all, you are right, we had so much fun. every recording was a laugh a minute. we never stopped laughing when we started recording for every single one. just fall on the floor laughing. deborah and lauren are amazing company. if i had one think it would be the next couple of weeks for them, to think of her family, her wonderful parents. and her sister and brother. it will be really hard and overwhelming for
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them. i thinkjust to take time to listen to stuff like this and to the tributes, to read all the things people will write over the next week or two macro and i think that will bring home what an extraordinary person she was. i do not need to tell them they should be proud of her but they will be so proud. and her but they will be so proud. and bearinnin her but they will be so proud. and beginning a _ her but they will be so proud. and beginning a life without that person in it. then these are women, the three of them, completely changed the perception of what living with cancer is. they taught all of us cancer is. they taught all of us cancer can be part of your life but does not define you. i cancer can be part of your life but does not define you.— cancer can be part of your life but does not define you. i think that is exactly right _ does not define you. i think that is exactly right and _ does not define you. i think that is exactly right and that _ does not define you. i think that is exactly right and that is _ does not define you. i think that is exactly right and that is what - does not define you. i think that is exactly right and that is what the i exactly right and that is what the podcast was all about. if you go back five years, now there is a vibrant cancer community on instagram, young people sharing their stories, sharing their lives and showing you can live with cancer
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and showing you can live with cancer and have a wonderful life with cancer. if you go back five years, that did not exist. debs and lauren and rachael started that. they have opened up the conversation for so many people to say it is all right, it is not a dirty secret. i many people to say it is all right, it is not a dirty secret.— many people to say it is all right, it is not a dirty secret. i am proud of what they _ it is not a dirty secret. i am proud of what they achieved. _ it is not a dirty secret. i am proud of what they achieved. rightly - it is not a dirty secret. i am proud | of what they achieved. rightly so. well chosen words and be proud of what you have achieved because uk present the podcast now and you are continuing that message and legacy. all the best to you. and to all debs' friends and family. we are thinking of all of you today. i am sure rachael would have been incredibly proud of deborah's fundraising. time to get the news where you are. hello, good morning. this is bbc london,
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i'm frankie mccamley. the family of zara aleena who was found dead in ilford at the weekend have released a statement this morning describing her as "a joy to all of us" and "everybody�*s friend". the aspiring lawyer was attacked as she walked along cranbrook road in the early hours of sunday morning. 29—year—old jordan mcsweeney has been charged with her murder, attempted sexual assault and robbery. he will appear in court today. the government has rejected claims it's dragging its feet on the reopening of hammersmith bridge to vehicles. raising the issue in the house of commons, the mp for putney, fleur anderson, accused minsters of failing to engage properly with the council to get the project moving. it's a national transport route that government must lead the way in funding it and reopening it. and if a toll is going to be made necessary because the government won't fund the bridge, has the impact on putney residents been factored in? more than half a million people
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in the uk have inflammatory bowel disease and almost 70,000 of them are in the capital. some people living with the condition say a lack of toilets is one of the hardest things about living here. bethany jacobs has crohn's disease and has a permanent stoma bag. she wants to raise awareness of the condition. everyone can look at me and say, there is absolutely nothing wrong with you, you're completely healthy but actually, on the inside, i'm not. and i've had massive health struggles in my life. so i think you do need to break down those barriers and open up these conversations where we talk about invisible illnesses such as crohn's disease because otherwise people wouldn't even know they existed. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's severe delays on the piccadilly and a part suspension on the dlr to watch out for. onto the weather now with gillian. hello there, good morning to you. another bit of a soggy start to the day across the capital today, but there will be some elements of brightness, particularly a little bit later on this afternoon.
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i will come back to that in a moment. it's this low pressure that's been dominating over the last couple of days, it's gradually shifting to the north so something a little drier will come in behind it but today is going to be a little unsettled and this is how we start. you can see that rain, those showers pushing through the morning, a bit of a soggy start if you are heading to wimbledon but through the afternoon we start to see a bit more sunshine, still the odd risk of a shower but 22 or 23 degrees for many of us. as we head through into the evening, again some clearer skies for a time, some patchy cloud starts to come in, then this next pulse of rain comes from the south, not everyone seeing that but some of us will have some more wet weather as we head into the overnight period. those temperatures staying in double figures. a fairly mild night to come and as we head into the rest of the week, those temperatures should touch to increase as we look towards the weekend and the beginning of next week but that being said, there is still a risk of a few showers in the forecast yet.
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that's it from me for now. i'm backjust after nine. plenty more on our website or follow us on social media i'll hand you back to nina and jon. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. ghislaine maxwell, a former girlfriend of the sex offenderjeffrey epstein, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison by a court in new york. she was convicted last december of helping epstein abuse teenage girls. a long—fought victory for annie farmer and all of ghislaine maxwell's victims. justice was slow. she was one of the earliest to report maxwell and the paedophile jeffrey epstein to police, in 1996. but today, annie said it was never
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too late for accountability. maxwell and epstein were predators who were able to use their power and privilege to harm countless individuals, and for far too long, the institutions that should be protecting the public were instead protecting them. and i still hope that we find out more about how that was allowed to occur. maxwell did not look at her victims, but she did address them. she said she was sorry for the pain they had experienced. she also said her association with epstein, who she described as a manipulative, cunning man, was the greatest regret of her life. her statement felt like a very hollow apology to me. she did not take responsibility for the crimes that she committed and it felt like, once more, her trying to do something to benefit her and not at all about the harm that she had caused. the court allowed others who were not a part of the trial to also confront maxwell. the pain and anguish she caused was plain to see, as several accusers emotionally spoke about the lasting impact of her crimes, such as liz stein.
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she had a wonderful, full, beautiful life. and so many of usjust didn't have a chance to have that. i think that the closure part of her sentencing is maybe the beginning for a lot of us to start having the life that we anticipated we might have if we had never met ghislaine maxwell and jeffrey epstein. the british daughter of the disgraced media tycoon robert maxwell ran in the most influential circles, rubbing elbows with presidents and princes. but in court, as she waited to hear her fate, she was supported byjust three members of her family. maxwell, herfamily says, plans to appeal. 20 years was less than prosecutors wanted, nevertheless, they said it sent a strong message that no one was above the law. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york.
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world leaders have gathered in madrid for crucial talks on the future direction of nato, in the wake of russia's invasion of ukraine. our security correspondent frank gardner is there and joins us now. frank gardner we frank gardner expect to hear from the prime minister we expect to hear from the prime minister later, he will address nato members, what will be his message? stay the course, basically, is what britain is saying. i think the brits and the americans and the border state countries like poland and the baltics are, i think, pushing to keep supporting ukraine for as long as possible, for whatever it takes. there are other countries here at this summit will be tempted, i think, to go for some kind of a ceasefire deal. the border states, and i spoke to the prime minister of estonia yesterday, they are concerned that putin is not to be
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trusted, that if you have a deal, a peace deal that leaves him in possession of part of ukraine, that he simply is going to come back and try and take more at a later stage. 50 beneath the veneer of unity, and so beneath the veneer of unity, and its very much the big key word here, unity, they are trying to present a very much united front to the world and in particular to the russians, there are differences of opinion about how this war should end and how much pain and sacrifice western economies and their populations should take. economies and their populations should take-— economies and their populations should take. ~' , . , ., ., should take. turkey has agreed to su ort should take. turkey has agreed to support finland — should take. turkey has agreed to support finland and _ should take. turkey has agreed to support finland and sweden - should take. turkey has agreed to support finland and sweden for. should take. turkey has agreed to i support finland and sweden for their nature ship —— membership of nato, why is that significant? nature ship -- membership of nato, why is that significant?— why is that significant? these are two hue why is that significant? these are two huge democracies _ why is that significant? these are two huge democracies part - why is that significant? these are two huge democracies part of- why is that significant? these are two huge democracies part of the west, sweden has been mutualfor 200 years, finland has been neutral since the second world war, and for them tojoin nato, they since the second world war, and for them to join nato, they have done this because they have a look
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ukraine invasion and thought, wow, what if that happened to us? we will be safer off inside the nato tent. they have done the exact opposite to what president putin wanted, which was to push nato away from his borders. now he has got this massive great big 800 mile border with finland which is now going to be a member of nato, that he considers to be an aggressive, hostile institution. that's not how nato sees it. those two countries, sweden and finland, bring a lot of technology with them, and sophisticated modern armies, and it means eight countries in the baltics are nato countries further isolating russia with st petersburg and kaliningrad is a little outpost on the baltic. ., ., ., ., ., the baltic. part of the narrative of the baltic. part of the narrative of the kremlin _ the baltic. part of the narrative of the kremlin is _ the baltic. part of the narrative of the kremlin is that _ the baltic. part of the narrative of the kremlin is that nato - the baltic. part of the narrative of the kremlin is that nato is - the baltic. part of the narrative of the kremlin is that nato is an - the kremlin is that nato is an aggressor seeking to encircle russia. , ., ., . ., .,
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russia. the big mood change here at this summit. — russia. the big mood change here at this summit, and _ russia. the big mood change here at this summit, and remember - russia. the big mood change here at this summit, and remember this - this summit, and remember this summit has been described as the most important one nato has had in many years, it's the biggest security crisis facing europe since the second world war, according to the second world war, according to the nato secretary general. the whole idea of this summit is that instead of the current strategy of placing a small number of multinational troops, of which britain is a part, in countries like estonia, they need to bolster and boost those forces so that putin is not tempted to have a go at crossing the border. the idea up until now has been that these will act as a tripwire, if russia invaded, nato would have to spend a few days sending troops, that is going to pay too late and you would have to retake territory and then you are into world war iii. 50 the idea now is more money and effort is going to have to be spent in allocating many more forces, troops and planes as i
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want to nato's eastern flank which in a way could be provocative to president putin but the idea is to deter him from ever being tempted to have a go at swallowing up a country like estonia which is to be to the soviet union. that's the fear in those —— it used to be part of the soviet union. that's the theory in those countries and nato wants to deter russia from attacking. thank ou, we deter russia from attacking. thank you. we will _ deter russia from attacking. thank you, we will follow _ deter russia from attacking. thank you, we will follow events - deter russia from attacking. thank you, we will follow events during i you, we will follow events during the day. nicola sturgeon has said she wants a second independence referendum to be held in october 2023. scotland's first ministerjoins us now from edinburgh. in the morning. thank you for being with us. i am thinking back to the last referendum in 2014 when you said that was a once in a generation opportunity. eight years is not a generation, is it? let opportunity. eight years is not a generation, is it?— opportunity. eight years is not a
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generation, is it? let me take point head on, generation, is it? let me take point head on. the _ generation, is it? let me take point head on, the last _ generation, is it? let me take point head on, the last referendum, - generation, is it? let me take point| head on, the last referendum, eight years, close to a decade ago, people like me said, sure you don't lose this opportunity, we might never get the chance again. what we didn't say is that any politician can stand in a way of democracy. no politician can say, you get one chance and you will never get it again. democracy is not a fixed point in time, people have a right to change their minds when circumstances change. that's the other key point here. circumstances have changed significantly and dramatically in the uk since 2014. most notably scotland has been taken out of the european union and the single market, completely against our will. ironically, in 2014, we were told that we would lose eu membership if we became independent, that has happened because we are not independent. we were told boris johnson would never become prime minister, it was a ridiculous prospect, it may have been a ridiculous prospect but it is the reality. we have yet another
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westminster government that we did not vote for and is taking us in the wrong direction, the worst cost of living crisis in the g7, the lowest gross g20 with the exception of russia, children plunged into poverty at the stroke of the chancellor's pen. —— lowest gross in the 620 chancellor's pen. —— lowest gross in the g20 with the exception of russia. countries like scotland do better independently across the world. it is about having the levers, the powers and resources to better navigate all of the challenges we face and fulfil our potential. if you went to any other independent country in the world and suggested that it might be better for them not to be independent, they would look at you askance because independence is how countries make sure they chart their own course in the best way possible. so sure they chart their own course in the best way possible.— the best way possible. so much of this is about _ the best way possible. so much of this is about timing. _ the best way possible. so much of this is about timing. we _ the best way possible. so much of this is about timing. we have - the best way possible. so much of| this is about timing. we have given a list of the way in which, the ways in which things have changed
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dramatically, unforeseen over the last year, but people this morning will be saying, the pandemic, the cost of living crisis, a war in ukraine, at a time like this, independence isn't what scotland should be thinking about, this is a time for stability, may be holding off for a while, what do you say to them? i , ., �* off for a while, what do you say to them? i , i, �* ~' off for a while, what do you say to them? i , .,�* ~'., _., , them? firstly, i don't think anybody seriously could _ them? firstly, i don't think anybody seriously could look _ them? firstly, i don't think anybody seriously could look at _ them? firstly, i don't think anybody seriously could look at the - them? firstly, i don't think anybody seriously could look at the uk - them? firstly, i don't think anybody seriously could look at the uk right| seriously could look at the uk right now and say it represents stability. i do think that is a serious point. but your general point, i accept, one of the things i have to convince with colleagues and persuade people of, because independence is not a distraction from these big issues that we are facing. independence is even more necessary in the face of these challenges because it equips us to provide the response to these challenges that is in line with our values, aspirations and our interests. right now many of these things are being made worse here in scotland, and, iwould things are being made worse here in scotland, and, i would argue, across the uk, because of the wrong—headed
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decisions that uk governments are taking. why does the uk right now have the highest inflation in the g7 7 have the highest inflation in the g7 ? inflation here about double what it is in france. it's because of brexit. it's something that's got against our will. why is it our business, hospitals, public services right now are generally struggling to get the stuff they need? freedom of movement has been ended, done to scotland completely against our will. why is it despite the fact the scottish government is investing billions to try to help you with the cost of living and lift children out of poverty, we are seeing some of that going the wrong direction? because we have a uk government taking support away from the lowest income families, being done to scotland completely against our will. 50 independence is about equipping ourselves to navigate the challenges. and in terms of the global situation, challenges. and in terms of the globalsituation, it challenges. and in terms of the global situation, it is not being independent which has taken scotland out of europe, i would want to see an independent scotland back in europe, cooperating with others, to
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help make the world a better place, standing up for those principles of liberal democracy and freedom. 50 these are the arguments, that yes, those supporting independence and i will put to seek to persuade people but the key point of democracy here is that these are not decisions for politicians. these are decisions that the people of scotland should be able to make in a democratic way. what some of your political opponents would say that the problems you are outlining, some of those problems with health and other environmental issues, that you have to take responsibility for ink scotland as well. let's deal with the referendum question. you ask in the referendum question. you ask in the uk supreme court, if it is legal for you to call referendum without the support of the uk government in westminster. a lot of the legal commentary on this over the last 24 hours suggests that they think that you are unlikely to win. this is a big gamble for you personally and politically, isn't it?—
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politically, isn't it? well, look, i believe scotland _ politically, isn't it? well, look, i believe scotland would - politically, isn't it? well, look, i believe scotland would be - politically, isn't it? well, look, i| believe scotland would be better served by being independent and i think in line with the mandate that exists in the scottish parliament where a majority of msps support a referendum, that it should be for people to choose. it's not about me personally or my career, it's about seeking to do the right thing for scotland. and in terms of the supreme court, the lord advocate here has decided to refer this matter to the supreme court at my request because the ability of the scottish parliament to legislate without a transfer of power by the uk government is contested. and perhaps unlike borisjohnson, who is trying to renege on the northern ireland protocol by breaching the law, i respect the rule of law. i think it's vital that the referendum must be lawful, that's a matter of principle but also of practical reality. an unlawful referendum would not deliver its purpose, would not even be deliverable. i'm acting in a responsible way, respecting the
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rule of law, asking the supreme court to put this matter beyond legal doubt. i hope we get an outcome from the supreme court which allows us to get a referendum on the timescale i set out yesterday and haveit timescale i set out yesterday and have it on the 19th of october next year. but the people in scotland must have the ability to express their views on independence. otherwise we have a situation where the uk is not a democratic, voluntary union of nations that we have always been told it is, it becomes a construct in which scottish democracy becomes a prisoner of the uk whatever you think on independence, that cannot be right. and what we are now seeing in scotland is not just an independence movement, it's a democracy movement, because whether you are yes or no to independence, i think the vast majority of people accept that that is a decision that can only be taken by the people of scotland, and if there is a mandate for it. no prime minister should block it. so if there is a mandate for it. no prime minister should block it.— minister should block it. so if you lose in the _
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minister should block it. so if you lose in the supreme _ minister should block it. so if you lose in the supreme court, - minister should block it. so if you lose in the supreme court, if - minister should block it. so if you | lose in the supreme court, if they say you cannot call referendum without the uk government agreeing to it, what happens then? would you consider having a referendum going it alone, and having an advisory referendum vote of some kind? i would have hoped before interviewing me this morning you would have read what i said yesterday... i me this morning you would have read what i said yesterday. . ._ what i said yesterday... i know, i know you — what i said yesterday... i know, i know you are _ what i said yesterday... i know, i know you are talking _ what i said yesterday... i know, i know you are talking about - what i said yesterday... i know, i know you are talking about using j what i said yesterday... i know, i- know you are talking about using the general election. ida. know you are talking about using the general election.— general election. no, no, no. no. can ou general election. no, no, no. no. can you please — general election. no, no, no. no. can you please listen _ general election. no, no, no. no. can you please listen to _ general election. no, no, no. no. can you please listen to me? - general election. no, no, no. no. - can you please listen to me? because if you read what i said yesterday, you would know the answer to that question. what we are posing as it was in 2014, a consultative, advisory referendum. that is what referendums are in the uk. after a yes vote, and this was true in 2014 as well, the parliament in the uk and scotland have to pass legislation to give effect to it. what we are seeking through the reference to the supreme court is to establish whether the scottish parliament can lawfully hold even an
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advisory referendum. i am not going to move forward with a referendum which is unlawful. what i said yesterday also, if the supreme court, and i hope this doesn't happen, but if the supreme court judgment it would not be a fault of the court it would be a reflection of the legislation, says there is no lawful route for the scottish government to do that, and the uk government to do that, and the uk government continues to block a referendum, then yes, the general election becomes, as far as i'm consent, the de facto referendum because people cannot be blocked from having their say on this issue. my from having their say on this issue. my question was very specific... 50 you would not consider having any other kind of separate vote, it would be about the general election, but we all know that general elections are very different from referenda, aren't they? people are voting on all kinds of issues. you might say that it would then be an issue of, vote on scottish independence, that people are going to be voting on everything in complex ways, different
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constituencies, maybe tactically, it's not that simple. let constituencies, maybe tactically, it's not that simple.— constituencies, maybe tactically, it's not that simple. let me unpack that question- _ it's not that simple. let me unpack that question. firstly _ it's not that simple. let me unpack that question. firstly i _ it's not that simple. let me unpack that question. firstly i want - it's not that simple. let me unpack that question. firstly i want to - that question. firstly i want to underline the first point, it was very clear what i said yesterday, that a referendum has to be lawful, that a referendum has to be lawful, thatis that a referendum has to be lawful, that is why i have asked the lord advocate to refer this matter to the supreme court. there is no question of an unlawful referendum. i respect the rule of law and as i say as a matter of practical reality, an unlawful referendum would not deliver independence. it's not my choice in this issue to be put to people in the general election. i want unlawful referendum. if that is blocked at every turn —— i want a referendum. and if that is blocked at every turn, my only option is to say to people, use the general election as a de facto referendum to express your views on independence and i would be putting that very clearly to the scottish people. there are two things, one a matter of principle on a matter of practical reality, i have set this
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out in more detail if we are in this situation which i hope we will not be because i wanted to have a lawful referendum. i have always said that scotland can only become independent if a majority of people vote for that proposition. secondly, when a majority of people vote that position as a matter of practical reality, and this would be true after the referendum, we have to negotiate that with the uk government. a chilly it's the uk government. a chilly it's the uk government which should be getting pinned on the what if? a. i'm trying to respect democracy and the rule of law and to work away —— they should be getting pinned on the what iss here. i am trying to work on a referendum that is lawful and if thatis referendum that is lawful and if that is blocked at every turn, what does that say about the nature of uk democracy? not unlawful democracy of equals. i am a democrat trying to do the right and responsible thing and i am only having to find these different ways of doing it because i
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face a uk government which is denying democracy and seeking to block it. not in the interests of scotland, incidentally, they are seeking to block democracy because they are scared of the substantive debate on independence and they are absolutely terrified of the verdict of the scottish people. we absolutely terrified of the verdict of the scottish people.— absolutely terrified of the verdict of the scottish people. we have to leave it there _ of the scottish people. we have to leave it there but _ of the scottish people. we have to leave it there but thank _ of the scottish people. we have to leave it there but thank you - of the scottish people. we have to leave it there but thank you so - of the scottish people. we have to i leave it there but thank you so much forjoining us this morning. thank ou. forjoining us this morning. thank you- let's — forjoining us this morning. thank you- let's get _ forjoining us this morning. thank you. let's get the _ forjoining us this morning. thank you. let's get the weather - forjoining us this morning. thank you. let's get the weather with i you. let's get the weather with carol. good morning. today we have a weather front pushing east which has producing some rain and still is, but behind it, sunshine and showers and it will not be as windy as it was yesterday. through this morning the weather front will continue to push east, clearing is seen in england and lingering across the north—east of scotland and for wimbledon, the rain that we currently have will move away and thenit currently have will move away and then it will be largely dry, only a 5% risk of a shower at wimbledon with highs up to 22 and light winds. here is the weather front as we head
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through the afternoon, again producing some showery outbreaks of rain in the north—east, further showers behind, some will be heavy and country, especially in the north and country, especially in the north and west but many of us will miss them. and there will be few in the something. it will feel quite nice outside. the pollen levels today because england and wales are high or very high, but for scotland and northern ireland, they are moderate. through the evening and overnight, many of the showers but not all will fade. we have a weather front coming up fade. we have a weather front coming up across east anglia and kent bringing in some rain and it will not be a cold night, showery rain continuing to push north. it will continue doing that through the course of tomorrow. behind it, more showers will develop, still the potential to be heavy and thundery, more cloud at times in east anglia and eastern parts of kent. tomorrow's top temperatures are likely to be up to about 21 degrees. thank you, we will see you later.
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the clouds will be lifting it in the day on centre court, and john is there. yes, and what a special day we have again on centre court, not least for andy murray and emma raducanu. the river song and it was last night as serena williams went out in her round last night. —— the roof is on. she had a year away from the sport but she said afterwards she is not sure if she will be back and coming back to wimbledon after that defeat. there were flashes of the usual brilliance from serena williams as you would expect from the 23 time grand slam champion, the 3—set much was gripping, and she was eventually eaten by france's harmony tan who could not quite believe it. —— she was eventually beaten. is this the last time we will see the great
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champion here on centre court? i don't know. i mean, obviously summer, we are in the summer now, so, you know, right in the swing of it. like i said, coming into this, i'm just playing for right now and seeing how i feel and just go from there. heather watson almost had a memorable victory over serena williams seven years ago. she had an emotional win yesterday. she had to come back on tuesday afternoon for the deciding set against tamara korpatsch but was in fine form when she did taking it 6—2. these are the moments that you dream of as a little girl, and, sorry, i don't know why i'm getting emotional! cheering. i think i've just had a really rough couple of years, like so many people have, so this means a lot. and watson will be joined in the second round by katie boulter who saw off clara burel in straight sets.
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that's nine british players through to the second round of wimbledon, the most since 1997. and that's with harriet dart still to play. rafa nadal is aiming for a record extending 23rd grand slam here at wimbledon and came through a tough battle with francisco cerundolo on centre court. the 36 year old was two sets and a break up before the argentinian fought back and took the third. he was on crutches a few weeks ago, after an intense procedure on his foot to ease pain. no doubt use all of his big—game experience —— nadal use all of his big—game experience to take it to four. he then won it. ryan peniston had a dream wimbledon debut. he's through after beating henri laaksonen in straight sets. he's ranked 135th in the world and has been in terrific form coming
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into the grass—court grand slam, reaching the quarter—finals at eastbourne, queen's and nottingham. dan da n eva ns dan evans was one who went out. we will see andy murray and emma raducanu later, novak djokovic gets under way first. the pressure looked to have eased on emma raducanu after her victory in the early round and how many more times will we see andy murray in centre court? you how many more times will we see andy murray in centre court?— murray in centre court? you will keep going! _ you're watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news. i'm lewis vaughanjones and these are the latest headlines... tributes are paid to cancer campaigner, blogger and broadcaster dame deborahjames, who died aged 40 yesterday after receiving end—of—life care for bowel cancer. crucial talks on the future direction of nato are getting under way in madrid — borisjohnson will call on his fellow leaders to increase their military spending. a former white house aide gives damning testimony about donald trump's actions during the storming of the us capitol building last year, saying he knew people in the crowd were armed but he didn't care. ghislaine maxwell is jailed for 20 years in a us prison for recruiting and trafficking teenage girls for her then boyfriend jeffrey epstein. a 29—year—old man has been charged with murdering 35—year—old zara aleena in east london
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as she walked home from a night out in the early hours of sunday morning.

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