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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 30, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at eight. three people are given life sentences for the murder of five—year—old, logan mwangi, including a m—year—old, who has been named for the first time, as craig mulligan. the impact of his death and continues to have an all those who loved him and knew him with his local community is immeasurable. pledges of more money, more weapons and more aid for ukraine, from nato leaders, as britain says it will up, its defence spending. a growing shortage of family doctors. a quarter of a gp pull stunningly could be unfilled in less than a decade and that's according to new research. an inquiry begins into the charity established in honour of the fundraiser so captain
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tom moore. honour of the fundraiser so captain tom moore-— honour of the fundraiser so captain tom moore. and the ancient trees that have been growing since the middle ages, campaigners say we should do more to protect them. welcome to bbc news. the mother and stepfather of a five—year—old boy, whose body was found dumped in a river near his home in south wales, have been given life sentences for his murder. cardiff crown court heard that logan mwangi was dehumanised during months of abuse at the hands of members of his family. his mother angharad williams was told she must serve at least 28 years. john cole will serve a minimum of 29 years. a teenager was also convicted
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of killing the little boy, tonight he can be named as craig mulligan, after a judge lifted an anonymity order. he will be detained for a minimum of 15 years. this report from our wales correspondent hywel griffith contains some distressing details. a mother distraught, a son missing. he needs me. he needs warm clothes. he needs mum! but angharad williamson was desperate, not for him to be found, but to avoid being found out by the police. this is all my fault! logan mwangi was a playful, kind, caring little boy, his life cut short by those he trusted. his mother claimed the five—year—old had disappeared. she called the police. my son, my boy...not here.
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she knew logan was already dead, after being attacked in the house his body had been dumped in a river by his stepfather and a teenage boy. thejudge said williamson had never taken any responsibility or shown any remorse. her partner, john cole, was behind the ferocious attack. both were sentenced to life in prison. cole's stepson, craig mulligan, has been detained for a minimum of 15 years. it is incomprehensible that logan had his life cut short in such tragic circumstances at the hands of those very people who should be there to protect him. for logan's father, ben, who stands beside me, today's sentence is welcome news. however, no amount ofjustice can bring logan back or compensate for the grief that continues to be felt. logan had been punished and beaten
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within the walls of his home. after testing positive for covid, he was locked in his room and made to face the wall. the final attack was so brutal, his injuries would normally be seen after a car crash. jocelyn sellen was a member of the jury. it's rare forjurors to speak publicly. she wanted people to know about the impact it had on them. you just keep going to what was happening for that child, and how he must have been suffering. to see the defendants... you know, there's only three people in that house who know what happened. who dealt the fatal blow, who decided to cover up the crime may never be known. all three still blame one another. but what happened to logan here is still being investigated by a child practice review. he was known to social services. about a month before he died, his case was downgraded from being a child at risk to being a child in need.
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tonight, there are calls for a wider inquiry into children's services in wales. painful questions remain over whether any more could or should have been done to protect logan. hywel griffith, bbc news. and we'll find out how this story, and many others, are covered in tomorrow's front pages at10:30 and 11:30. this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the journalist and broadcaster james lewer and claire cohen, women's editor of the daily telegraph. the nato secretary general jens stoltenberg has said the security alliance has a �*core responsibility�* to prevent the war in ukraine escalating to other nations, as its meeting in madrid came a close. the prime minister borisjohnson promised to significantly increase britain's military spending, and there were pledges by other leaders to boost aid
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and send more weapons. let's go over to the summit in madrid now, and my colleague kasia madera. hi there. well, here in independence sc uare, hi there. well, here in independence square. the — hi there. well, here in independence square, the centre _ hi there. well, here in independence square, the centre of— hi there. well, here in independence square, the centre of madrid, - hi there. well, here in independence square, the centre of madrid, this i square, the centre of madrid, this is exactly what world leaders who have been that nato summit in the past few days one to preserve, the independence of nato's countries, a free nato alliance and the united nato alliance and that is exactly what the nsat stoltenberg promised, a transformative summit and it certainly what we got. in stoltenberg will be happy with the invigorated nature that we saw over the last few days. a change nato as well. think about it, the addition of two new countries with sweden and finland joining this alliance
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automatically doubling the border between nato countries and russia itself, exactly the opposite to what president putin ever wanted when he first launched that full invasion on ukraine on the 24th of february this year. so with a full update on all of the past days this crossover to hear from our political editor chris. salisbury plain is usually a place where british troops train. now those in ukrainian uniforms are here too, being taught to use the weapons and equipment are being given to them by the uk. this is the prime minister at the end of the nato summit in madrid, promising more money to help ukraine further. the best way for us to win the argument around the world about our values is for the ukrainians to win. that's why i'm pleased today that we've announced another £1 billion worth of military support.
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prime minister, what is the overall objective of the uk's help and strategy for ukraine? we want to give them the means to repel the russians, to expel the russians from the territory that they have occupied because that's the right thing under international law. this gathering of the worlds biggest defence alliance has had a sense of urgency, even emergency. an invasion in europe, a hostile russia and an ongoing war without obvious end. huge human suffering, profound global economic consequences. president putin has been meeting his allies in turkmenistan. his decision to go to war in ukraine has spooked others close to russia's borders. for years, sweden and finland felt sufficiently safe to be neutral. no longer. russia's aggression meansjoining nato. translation: we don't have a problem with sweden and finland _ as we do with ukraine. ukraine and its people's well—being
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is not the aim of nato or the west. it is a means to defend their own interests. the prime minister has spent the last few days urging other countries to commit more to defence spending, while facing criticism at home that the british army is shrinking. nice to meet you. he's facing criticism from the scottish and welsh governments who feel, while helping is noble, they've been pickpocketed by the government at westminster to help pay for it. but he's set a big, long—term goal, saying that by the end of the decade the money allocated to defence will rise to 2.5% of national income, much more than most other countries. borisjohnson has been out of the country for eight days. a return to the domestic freight awaits. —— domestic freie. .. are you looking forward to returning home giving the ongoing speculation about your future? you know, there's no place
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like home, so i'm keen to get back. borisjohnson has clearly revelled being on the world stage over the last week, doing as prime minister what no other british politician can do, representing the country at three global forums, three summits, but he returns home to colossal challenges. a bleak economic picture and those questions about his own leadership. chris mason, at the nato summit in madrid. as those nato leaders spent the past few days talking about the direction that this alliance of 30 32 states were going to come and join this blueprint dry this alliance up a blueprint dry this alliance up a blueprint that needs to work over the next ten years and some that needs to be relevant and keeps this huge organisation together, of course, the constant focus on what is happening on the ground in
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ukraine. and of course today there was a strategically significant development with russian forces withdrawing from snake island and this is a strategic location in the black sea and the ukrainian government said that russian troops evacuated the silent in haste during a missile and artillery attack. our correspondent in kyiv has the latest on this development. this is a tiny place, but very big in terms of the strategic and symbolic significance and ukraine are claiming a victory today. it's important because it's at the heart of the story we've spoken about in recent days, the grain crisis in this particular part of the world. russia is accused of burning, robbing and crucially, blocking the exports of ukrainian grain. russia today saying it's leaving the island so that it cannot be accused of doing anything to block the passage of the grain. ukraine rejects that out of hand and the question is, will this make
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any difference to the sort of crisis that the un is talking about? hard to tell. experts are saying that if you look at the bigger picture, if you look at the black sea as a whole, the russian warships that are there are still in a dominant position, so actually, it may not have any impact on this food crisis. nick peak there explain the significance of or snake island,. this tiny dot in the black sea but when it comes to the movement of food and grain out of the black sea is usually important. i can speak now to former supreme allied commander of nato in europe, general philip breedlove. general, when you look at what this alliance has achieved over the past few days, the drawing up of the
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strategic concept will help guide this alliance over the next ten years potentially. i wonder, if you are still in position, would you agree to this, or would you want more to be done given what is happening in ukraine right now? thanks for having me on the show and i am happy with this new strategic concept and that is because it clarifies some things that we have needed to be clarified over the past year or so, needed to be clarified over the past year orso, ever needed to be clarified over the past year or so, ever since 2016 when russia invaded ukraine the first two times, seizing the ukrainian peninsula of crimea and then entering into the donbas and militarising the donbas, we have needed to clarify nato's position and russia and this document does that, recognising russia as one of the greatest threats, the greatest threat to europe and also
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recognising the problem of china and so this gives clarity to some of the things that we need to address, as well as some new and good words and other issues that we didn't have in the previous document. just focusing. — the previous document. just focusing. you _ the previous document. just focusing, you were - the previous document. just focusing, you were in that position while crimea was annexed and ijust wonder your position, you are guided by the political leaders, but i wonder whether moore should have been done and whether at that point when crimea was first annexed and whether nato perhaps could have brought ukraine into the fold and we would not be seen what we are seeing now. ~ ., would not be seen what we are seeing now. ~ . ,., now. well, let me agree with some thins now. well, let me agree with some thin . s and now. well, let me agree with some things and then _ now. well, let me agree with some things and then we _ now. well, let me agree with some things and then we will _ now. well, let me agree with some things and then we will talk - now. well, let me agree with some things and then we will talk about | things and then we will talk about it. first of all, we did not do enough. in fact, the reason that we are here today is because in 2008, the response of western nations was
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inadequate to the invasion of georgia. in 2014 the response of western nations was inadequate to the double invasion of ukraine and now we sit at crisis again in 2022 and history will nowjudge whether we have been adequate in response to this invasion of ukraine. if you allow bad behaviour to stand or are you rewarded as we did in 2008 and 2014, then you will get more bad behaviour. so if we let this invasion stand and russia sees more land r rate seizes more land, it is time now for the western nations and i say that because it is bigger than nato and it is eu and other nations that need to respond to this criminal, inhumane war that mr putin
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has pushed onto ukraine.— has pushed onto ukraine. general, when it comes _ has pushed onto ukraine. general, when it comes to _ has pushed onto ukraine. general, when it comes to this _ has pushed onto ukraine. general, when it comes to this kind - has pushed onto ukraine. general, when it comes to this kind of- when it comes to this kind of deterrent that nato exemplifies, it is expensive. we are hearing the pledge is being made, the uk, president biden earlier on today while you're listening to his announcement that he will be talking about an extra 800 million us dollars being is it enough? does it need to be more? when it comes to the cost of living crisis at home, can citizens, given the priority is that each individual nation has, do they, how do you make them understand that more needs to be spent? or does it need to be spent? ijust wonderfrom spent? or does it need to be spent? ijust wonder from your perspective, is the international community spending enough on all of this? it has been said much more eloquently, i will shorten it to the following. the best way to avoid war is to prepare for war, to be ready.
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preparing for war is expensive, but let's compare the cost of running nato for the past decade, as opposed to the cost of world war ii or world war i. and what we have to do, i completely understand the challenges that you outlined, but what we need to do is ask what purpose and at what cost we can avoid a next war by being ready�*s and that is the decisions that i think the leaders of nato have stepped up to over the last two days. we do not want another world war. but if we are unprepared, if we are unready and if we are undetermined, then we will have that war and it will be much more costly than what we are doing now to avoid it.— now to avoid it. general, it is really good — now to avoid it. general, it is really good view _ now to avoid it. general, it is really good view to _ now to avoid it. general, it is really good view to speak - now to avoid it. general, it is really good view to speak so | really good view to speak so frankly
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about this. thank you very much for joining me and when it comes to what summit has achieved, as the general there was saying, this is a complete reconfiguration of what russia means. 12 years ago, russia's president was at the summit and now russia has been classified as the greatest threat to the nato alliance. a complete gear shift when it comes to nato and when it comes to its direction for the next years. were going to catch up on the sport now and crossed to the bbc sport centre and is isaac. good evening. let's start at wimbledon, where it has been another busy day at the all england club. two—time winner rafa nadal is through to the third round, as is women's world number one iga swiatek. plenty of success too for the remaining brits
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in this years competition. on centre court this afternoon there was a a stunning victory for wild card katie boulter. she produced a fantastic fightback to beat last years runner—up karolina pliskova. she lost the first set but came back to seal a 3—6, 7—6, 6—4 win. she was very emotional afterwards, dedicating the win to her gran, who she revealed died just two days ago. oh, god. i'm going to get emotional. my gran passed away two days ago and i would just like to dedicate that to her today. cheering. it's very difficult for anybody in that circumstance but having a centre — that circumstance but having a centre court match look forward to as a way— centre court match look forward to as a way you can put your head in the place — as a way you can put your head in the place and come out with a performance like that, but her grandpa — performance like that, but her grandpa and mother were there today and it_ grandpa and mother were there today and it gives _ grandpa and mother were there today and it gives her every extra special meaning _ and it gives her every extra special meaning to — and it gives her every extra special meaning to get the win today. heather watson is also safely
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through to the third round, matching her best wimbledon singles performance. she beat wang qiang earlier, needing only one game to wrap up a 7—5 6—4 victory in a match halted by darkness yesterday. she will now face slovenian kaja juvan on friday. it was a great day too for liam broady. he's also a wildcard at this years competition, but he saw off argentine 12th seed diego schwartzman to continue his best run at a major. this is happening in court right now. jack draper is taking on an australian opponent. draper has taken the first set there so things are going pretty well for him so far. are going pretty well for him so far. england have completed their playing preparations ahead of the women's european championship, with an impressive win over switzerland in zurich. they won 4—0.
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the lionesses took the lead midway through the second half, alessia russo finally breaking the deadlock. georgia stanway added a second from the spot and beth england added a third in front of a swiss record crowd for a women's game of 16,000. jill scott then added a fourth in injury time for a comfortable victory. england's euros campaign kicks off next wednesday night at old trafford when they face austria it's been a really frustrating day at taunton. the rain bringing an early end to the final days play in the one—off test between england's women and south africa. the match was drawn. two heavy showers meant only 43 overs of play were possible, leaving south africa 181—5, 48 ahead and with england denied the opportunity of a run chase. elsewhere, in the last hour, jos buttler has been confirmed mainly it has been rain that meant that the test matches we have played recently have not come to a big crescendo that you kind of want. in
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camera it was a good crescendo because both teams wanted to push the game forward. asthma can bbbrrr... i'm clare on my opinion that when we play tests so fastly it can be... elsewhere, in the last hour, jos buttler has been confirmed as england's new white—ball captain. the wicketkeeper replaces world cup—winning captain eoin morgan, who retired from international cricket this week after injury and struggles with his form. buttler was morgan's vice—captain and has previously led england in nine one—day internationals and five twenty20s. the culture secretary nadine dorries has been described as " a little bit disrespectful", after her speech at a rugby league world cup event this afternoon. reminiscing about her favourite rugby league moment, she went on to describe the moment england won, the rugby union world cup in 2003. have a listen. i've always quite liked rugby league. but from what i've heard, i mean, my most fondest memories is that 2003 drop goal.
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i think we were drinking bloody marys at the time, it was a seven o'clock in the morning. but, wow, what a moment that was. all the sport for me for now and i will have more later on. we can bring you breaking news from our seniorjournalist we can bring you breaking news from our senior journalist who has reported that the deputy chief whip has resigned and this is from the conservative party. he has resigned from government saying that last night he drank far too much and "embarrass myself and other people" and in the letter he apologised to borisjohnson and two others concerned and that he owes it to you and the people and i have caused upset to do this. he says of the prime minister will continue to have his full support from the
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backbenches. that is all we have at the moment. hopefully getting more and this with a bit more detail from jonathan blake within the next half hour or so. jonathan blake within the next half hour orso. i hope jonathan blake within the next half hour or so. i hope you canjoin us for that. a quarter of gp posts in england could be unfilled in less than a decade, according to a study by researchers at the health foundation. it says it's concerned about a "growing shortage" of family doctors — and is warning that the number of nurses based in doctor's surgeries will also decline over the next ten years. our health editor hugh pym has more currently there are 27,000 fully qualified gps in england. the health foundation think tank says even with existing plans to train new doctors, the total may only go up to about 27,100 by 20 30, thus because the number of people leaving will match the number of people being recruited. and the think tank says that'll mean in the health system
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will have a shortfall of nearly 11,000 needed to keep up with changes in the population. the demand for gp services over this decade is due to increase by about a fifth. we have many more all people and we need general —— old people... practice to do more. we need high vaccination rates, we need to detect all the cancers that were sadly missed during covid. andrew, from dorset, spotted damaged skin tissue on his head back in february, but since then he has struggled to get through to his local practice. he has in one online consultation and a cancelled appointment, even though the doctor said checks were needed. it has been very frustrating. it's a lot of telephone calls. the individuals involved are doing their absolute best they can, but the fact of the matter is it is under resourced and that is a threat to the general population, me included. he has a lump in his stomach as well and although nhs111 said he needed an urgent gp appointment,
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he couldn't get one for three weeks, so today he had an emergency hospital appointment. how can i help? the government has a target of 6000 more gps in england over the course of this parliament. medically urgent for today? but ministers admit that be hard to achieve. the department of health said the overall number of doctors in general practice was increasing and there was investment aimed at creating extra appointments. many surgeries like this one in hull are using paramedics and other health professionals to help reduce the pressure on gps. but even so, doctors say there is a heavy workload which can make things difficult for patients. most people in health care come into health care - because they want to help people and when you can do that - —— can't do that... as well as you'd like to, due to a lack of time, . lack of capacity, that is quite i stressful and unfortunately that means we are losing people in our profession due - to stress and burn—out.
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now, it's notjust overall numbers of gps in england. there are regional variations. recent research by the bbc and the trust said that depending on where you live in england, it can affect your access to a gp. the darker the colour on this map, the fewer gps available relative to the local population. there is no comparable data for scotland, wales and northern ireland but they face similar challenges with gp cover and patient needs. the government has announced more interim compensation for postmasters wrongly convicted of stealing money in the horizon computer scandal. more than 500 people affected will each receive about £40,000. it means that around £30 million has now been paid out in compensation. a report into how police forces in england and wales deal with allegations of domestic abuse against their staff has been published. it follows a super complaint made by the centre for women's justice. watchdogs have found that police need to improve how they respond
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to domestic abuse cases where the suspect is a serving officer, but denied perpetrators within the force were "getting away with it". the report identified �*systemic weaknesses' in police response to these cases, and found that victims lacked confidence in the impartiality of the police. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, has been looking at the report. this was a strongly worded report which was launched here by the watchdog at canary wharf, and it followed what is called a super complaint, which had been brought by the campaigning women's charity, the centre for women's justice. they had become concerned about the number of stories they were hearing from women who had made allegations of domestic abuse against police officers or police staff and the treatment they had received. for example, one woman said that her statement had been read by the suspect, who was her husband. now, the report says there needs to be improvements
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in a number of areas, including around impartiality, as that case illustrates. also, they say there needs to be a much sharper focus on victims and the challenges they face when they make complaints against police officers. and also, they say that if there isn't going to be a criminal prosecution, there needs to be a better way of conducting misconduct investigations, which they say is not happening at the moment in some cases. now, in terms of criminal prosecutions, they found that the rate of prosecutions against police officers is only slightly lower than it is for the general public. having said that, the rate generally is very low. and as for the future, they make a number of recommendations, including, they say, some cases could be passed to outside forces. now, the centre for women's justice wanted all cases to go to outside forces, but the watchdog say they don't think this is necessary. were going to catch up with the weather now. hello, another ray of
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sunshine and showers are some of you tomorrow and even though we have many showers fading away some will continue through the night. parts of central and north—eastern england will be especially aware but it could become nasty and they will be having persistent rain towards the shetlands as it goes into friday morning but most places with a dry start and bright enough with temperatures into single figures at about ten or 12 degrees. as for friday, while many will start to dry a few missed of it will be north tasting england initially that we could see heavy and thundery downpours developing in eastern scotland as well and more persistent rain in shetland and then you could see the slats of blue and a shower is getting going for the rest of the country through the second half of friday, particularly across central, eastern and northern parts and further south and west you have fewer showers compared with thursday, although northern ireland will finish with more persistent rains spreading its way into the evening. that works is getting going for the rest of the country through the second half of friday, particularly across central, eastern and northern parts and further south and northern parts and further south and west you have fewer showers
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compared with thursday, although northern ireland will finish with more persistent rain spreading its way into the evening. that works three people are given life sentences for the murder of five—year—old logan, including a 14—year—old who's been named for the first time. registered for more aid from ukraine from nato leaders as the uk says it will up its defences. a growing shortage of family doctors, quarter of gp posts could be unfilled in less than a decade. an inquiry begins into the chair st the tablets in honour of the fund might —— fundraiser captain sir tom moore. let's return to the breaking news that the deputy chief
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with chris pincher has resigned from government, saying last night he drank far too much and embarrassed himself and other people. with more detail is our political correspondentjonathan blake. what correspondent jonathan blake. what can correspondentjonathan blake. what can you tell us? it correspondent jonathan blake. what can you tell us?— can you tell us? it appears this result is -- _ can you tell us? it appears this result is -- this _ can you tell us? it appears this result is -- this is _ can you tell us? it appears this result is -- this is a _ can you tell us? it appears this result is -- this is a result of. can you tell us? it appears this result is -- this is a result of a| result is —— this is a result of a complaint of chris pincher�*s behaviour. frequented by conservative mps. he has as a result offered his resignation to the prime minister, and in his letter, he said very simply that he drank far too much and embarrassed himself and other people. just to go on to read you a little bit more. he said it was the last thing he wanted to do and that he wants to apologise to
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you, the prime minister, and those concerned. he goes on to say the right thing to do in the circumstances is for him to resign as deputy chief whip. he goes on to say that borisjohnson will have his full support from the back benches and it has been the honour of his life to have served in her majesty's government. we're told this does relate to and into —— an a club last night. a senior downing street source describe chris pincher as a loyal conservative who wrecked resigned his —— recognises he has behaved badly and on the right thing and resigning. as things stand, mr pincher will not face any further action and will keep the party whip. he will not be suspended or excluded from the conservative party in any way, but as deputy chief whip, he was in charge of keeping discipline
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around conservatives. it seems he believes he was left with no other option but to resign. and he has done that this evening.— done that this evening. quite a full ent for done that this evening. quite a full entry for the _ done that this evening. quite a full entry for the prime _ done that this evening. quite a full entry for the prime minister when l done that this evening. quite a full i entry for the prime minister when he returns. thank you very much. let's returns. thank you very much. let's return to one of our top stories today. the nato summit has been concluded in madrid. joining me is admiral lord west. thank you forjoining us here. i wonder if i can first get your reaction to some of those commitments we've been hearing from madrid, the leaders today, commitments of more money and standing by ukraine. how realistic is all of that?— is all of that? there are a couple of questions- — is all of that? there are a couple of questions. i'm _
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is all of that? there are a couple of questions. i'm delighted - is all of that? there are a couple of questions. i'm delighted that l of questions. i'm delighted that they're saying the right things. i'm not quite sure that they'll be able to meet the commitments they're talking about. for example, the increase of forces that readiness that they can place in eastern europe, i think the prime minister promised 2000, is far short of the 300 or 400,000 people he was talking about. similarly, the talk of the money that's going to be found for defence and for equipment and weapons for the ukraine, we've said weapons for the ukraine, we've said we we would find 1 billion. and i'm very glad that we are providing those weapons to ukrainians, but i'm not quite so sure that some of the other nato nations will be able to stump up the money as rapidly as they've been talking about. so i do have concerns there, but these are
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the right messages —— that these are run right messages, but i'm concerned about how quickly these what happened and the reality of providing some of these, particularly in terms of numbers of troops, because i have no doubt whatsoever our army is too small. you said stumping up the cash, have the members been meeting their commitments they're expected to by the end of the decade? the commitments they're expected to by the end of the decade?— commitments they're expected to by the end of the decade? the 2% figure was a . reed the end of the decade? the 296 figure was agreed to — the end of the decade? the 296 figure was agreed to by _ the end of the decade? the 296 figure was agreed to by nato _ the end of the decade? the 296 figure was agreed to by nato some - the end of the decade? the 296 figure was agreed to by nato some years i was agreed to by nato some years ago, and most nations in europe, i'm afraid, were not coming up to that 2% level. we were, but onlyjust. including things such as benches and things like that. it's very difficult with pensions. but that put us over the nato 2% mark. i think the danger with these percentages is the reality is you
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need to have what you required to ensure the security and safety and the alliance. i think we need to look at that and more day till —— detail. i'm glad we are telling the other and nations they need to go up, but it'll be interesting to see how quickly they do that. finland and sweden, who weren't nato nations but are now coming in, one of the great announcements about this meeting, they have done well in terms of ensuring that they have forces that readiness properly equipped with proper stockpiles of ammunition. they are a very good addition to nato. i ammunition. they are a very good addition to nato._ ammunition. they are a very good addition to nato. i was going to ask on that subject. _ addition to nato. i was going to ask on that subject, what _ addition to nato. i was going to ask on that subject, what did _ addition to nato. i was going to ask on that subject, what did they - on that subject, what did they bring to the table in terms of a threat to mr putin? i to the table in terms of a threat to mr putin? ., �* ~' to the table in terms of a threat to mr putin? ., �* ~ ., ~' to the table in terms of a threat to mr putin? ., �* ~ ., ~ ., mr putin? i don't like to think of it in terms _ mr putin? i don't like to think of it in terms of— mr putin? i don't like to think of it in terms of a _ mr putin? i don't like to think of it in terms of a threat _ mr putin? i don't like to think of it in terms of a threat to - mr putin? i don't like to think of it in terms of a threat to putin, l it in terms of a threat to putin, but i would like to think in terms of what putin has to think he's facing should he do something
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stupid. and attack a nato country. and there's no doubt, you have to think very carefully about countries like finland and sweden, they are good fighters and they have got modern equipment and weapons, they're maintained high standards. they know what the threat is like, and i think them joining natojust absolutely shows what a terrible mistake putin is making where i think he thought nato was weak because our country was were not spending money —— our countries were not. what happened because of his terrible error and appalling behaviour is nato has actually pulled together and is more cohesive now than it has been for a while. when we see what happened in terms of the missile attack on kyiv and
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also the supermarket during the g7, does mr putin take organisations of the western allies seriously? i think there's an element of the fact he doesn't care. he hasn't thought this through very well, i don't think. he made it very clear he didn't think ukraine would exist as a separate nation and he was very, very adamant of the thought it could never join very adamant of the thought it could neverjoin nato, although we might know that it's an offensive alliance. there's no doubt in and russia, the average russian is taught from infant school that nato is an offensive alliance, and they're nervous about it. i think as talking casually about countries joining nato like georgia, ukraine, recently moldova, that is prodding them with a stick. i think we should've thought about it more carefully. but it doesn't excuse him for what he has done, and he said he
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thought ukraine should exist separately, he thought he'd walk in and it would be a very easy operation for him to take it over. he's got a lot of people on the ground who are able to ferment trouble. itjust didn't happen. ukraine rallied and have been incredibly brave and stubborn. this has shown to be a real mistake and a crime like invading is bad, but a mistake in geostrategic terms is even worse, and he has made a major mistake and this is a real problem for him and we need to keep ukraine able to fight until there is some sort of agreement that ukraine is happy. sort of agreement that ukraine is ha 0 n _ g , , . ~' , sort of agreement that ukraine is ha.-- , ~ ., happy. just very quickly, admiral west, if happy. just very quickly, admiral west. if mr _ happy. just very quickly, admiral west, if mr putin _ happy. just very quickly, admiral west, if mr putin has _ happy. just very quickly, admiral west, if mr putin has made - happy. just very quickly, admiral west, if mr putin has made this| west, if mr putin has made this terrible mistake, from your experience, how do you deal with a man like him? how do you see this ending? i man like him? how do you see this endin: ? ~' ._ .,
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man like him? how do you see this endin: ? ~' ., ., ending? i think the way to deal with him is show — ending? i think the way to deal with him is show that _ ending? i think the way to deal with him is show that you're _ ending? i think the way to deal with him is show that you're robust - ending? i think the way to deal with him is show that you're robust and l him is show that you're robust and that you are willing to stand up for your rights and the rights of those people in your organisation. i think the fact that we have not sent enough money on defence in the west for a considerable time, particularly in europe, but also here, but was —— was a message to putin that we didn't take this seriously. in terms of how this will turn out, i have no doubt. all wars end with an agreement of some type, and there will have to be some sort of agreement. but we mustn't try and force ukrainians to an agreement whereby there is no security. that's why providing them with weapons, making this a painful experience for putin will hopefully lead to people getting round the table at some stage and coming out with a way forward in some form of of agreement. because we didn't get that in the minsk agreement. but i do think spending more money on our
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own defence is very important. i'm delighted that boris has said... but the reality is we should be spending it now. it's no good having a perfectly owned army and the ships we need by 2035, which is what it looks like, i'm afraid our enemies might well want to fight tomorrow. we need to be spending money now, not least in the factories that are producing the weapons and the ammunition that's been used by ukraine and depleting our stock files. i'm amazed that that hasn't happened already. i'm absolutely amazed. it's good stuff talking about the future, but we have to get our pleated forces up to speed as quickly as we can because things might go wrong rather more quickly than the 2030s.— might go wrong rather more quickly than the 2030s. admiral lord west, thank ou than the 2030s. admiral lord west, thank you very _ than the 2030s. admiral lord west, thank you very much _ than the 2030s. admiral lord west, thank you very much for _ than the 2030s. admiral lord west, thank you very much for your - than the 2030s. admiral lord west,
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thank you very much for your time. | anyone with monkeypox symptoms is being urged to stay away from this weekend's lgbt+ pride events. the head of public health in london says that gay and bisexual men in particular need to be aware of unusual rashes, blisters or swollen glands. there have been more than 1,000 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the uk since early may, and it is men who have sex with men who are most affected. here's our global health correspondent, naomi grimley. a warning, her report contains some flashing images. london draped in rainbow flags, but this year's pride takes place against the backdrop of a monkeypox outbreak, with the vast majority of infections in men who have sex with men. i didn't know much about monkeypox but, when they told me, i thought the worst. it's a difficult subject to talk about, but dan, who is 31, wants to speak openly about the symptoms, which include a rash. i was starting to get swollen
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down my genitals and then also my glands in my throat, so my throat started swelling up and, for a couple of days, ifound it quite hard to breathe at times. symptoms are usually mild, but anyone can catch monkeypox through close contact. because so many of the current cases are in gay and bisexual men, health officials say clear messages are needed ahead of pride. if you think you may have monkeypox, blisters, fever, swollen glands, please don't go out over the weekend. stay at home, contact nhs 111 or your local sexual health service for advice. if you are out and socialising and mixing, please be on the lookout for any signs and symptoms. before this spring, monkeypox was exclusively circulating in these african countries, where it's been endemic for years. since may, however, cases have been found in several countries which wouldn't normally expect to see the virus, and the uk has the most cases, with over 1,000 recorded.
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there is a vaccine, and queues have been forming outside new york's pop—up clinics. the uk is also offering it to men at higher risk. for some, pride is about having a party, but health officials want to be frank about a disease new to the uk. naomi grimley, bbc news. three people are given life sentences for the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi, including a 14—year—old who's been named as craig mulligan. pledges of more money and weapons and aid for ukraine from nato leaders. britain says it all up its defence spending. growing shortage of family doctors. a quarter of gp posts could be unfilled in less than a decade.
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there could be ten times as many ancient trees in england around since the middle ages than currently known. that's according to scientists who say as many as 2 million may be unrecorded. and campaigners say are calling for them to be protected, as our environment and rural affairs correspondent, claire marshall, reports. here on the ashton court estate in bristol, there are trees that were patiently growing at the time of richard the lionheart and the crusades. this might be a really good route in. shall we have a look? we followed steve marsh from the woodland trust, looking for one called the domesday oak. it's a jungle to get to it. but instead, we found a secret. we're nearly there. mind the stumps. wow, look at this! amazing! almost 700 years old, this hidden tree is nameless and a revelation. that is a living cathedral, a literal living legend. what kind of legal protection does this kind of tree have? this tree only has protection
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because the landowner looks after it, in this sense, so it's by proxy. trees like this don't have any legal status. we think trees like this should have the same heritage status as our ancient buildings, and why wouldn't they? 700 years old or plus. and today, a university of nottingham study shows there could be ten times as many ancient and veteran trees as we thought, many around london and the historic hunting parks and forests, but also across england, from hereford to northumberland. but they aren't all loved. near peterborough, we filmed the last day of this lone oak, the remains of a wood centuries older than the estate that's risen around it. an insurance company said it was damaging a nearby house. the council decided to fell it. it's trees like this one that perfectly illustrate the conflict between the very ancient world and the modern, and the difficulty in finding a balance between the two. today, the oak finally lost. any potential threat to a home
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is gone, but a unique habitat and, for locals, a skyscape of memory and imagination has been taken apart. as biodiversity levels crash, these living beings are a haven. they also cool a heating climate. perhaps, armed with the new map of old trees, we can help to keep more of them alive. claire marshall, bbc news. joining me now is dr tom reader from the university of nottingham and one of the researchers on the project. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. my first question is what is an ancient tree?— news. my first question is what is an ancient tree? excellent question. not as simple _ an ancient tree? excellent question. not as simple as _ an ancient tree? excellent question. not as simple as you _ an ancient tree? excellent question. not as simple as you might - an ancient tree? excellent question. not as simple as you might think. i an ancient tree? excellent question. | not as simple as you might think. an ancient tree is obviously old, but not quite as simple as that, and it depends on the species. there are both veteran and ancient trees, and all entrant trees are veteran but other way around —— not the other around. a veteran tree has a lot of
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very interesting characteristics. it might have dead branches, open crown, and of those, some are classified as ancient if they are a months of very oldest individuals —— amongst the very oldest. i’m amongst the very oldest. i'm fascinated, _ amongst the very oldest. i'm fascinated, i— amongst the very oldest. i'm fascinated, i know you can map vegetation using senescence of the foliage, but how did you discover these ancient trees? it’s foliage, but how did you discover these ancient trees?— foliage, but how did you discover these ancient trees? it's thanks to these ancient trees? it's thanks to the hard work _ these ancient trees? it's thanks to the hard work of _ these ancient trees? it's thanks to the hard work of an _ these ancient trees? it's thanks to the hard work of an army - these ancient trees? it's thanks to the hard work of an army of - the hard work of an army of volunteers from the woodland trust to have built up an amazing database of records of ancient trees. even that's only scratching the surface. what it allows us to do is take those records and using clothe clever models, use of predictive model that shows where ancient trees might be in the landscape. once we
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got that map, we can start making some sensible decisions about how to conserve those trees. find some sensible decisions about how to conserve those trees.— conserve those trees. and how do ou? conserve those trees. and how do you? how — conserve those trees. and how do you? how do _ conserve those trees. and how do you? how do you _ conserve those trees. and how do you? how do you preserve - conserve those trees. and how do you? how do you preserve it? - conserve those trees. and how do | you? how do you preserve it? yes, but it might — you? how do you preserve it? yes, but it might mean... _ you? how do you preserve it? yes, but it might mean... in _ you? how do you preserve it? yes, but it might mean... in case - you? how do you preserve it? yes, but it might mean... in case of- you? how do you preserve it? is: but it might mean... in case of the oldest for written. look for millennial, during that time, it's going to support a wealth of biodiversity. there are lots of threats from trees.
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it sounds as if this is something of a challenge. there are some particular protections for treason. why does it appear there are challenge to these trees? these trees don't _ challenge to these trees? these trees don't have _ challenge to these trees? these trees don't have any _ challenge to these trees? these trees don't have any so - challenge to these trees? these trees don't have any so special i trees don't have any so special protection if the moment. we are talking about ancient trees, which is only a small population, but they have a disproportionately important value. it might be reasonable to give those trees the kind of protection that we give culturally
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important old buildings. we don't see that as anything unusual and i think we can do something similar. i'm afraid there's nothing to stop something with these trees —— stop imaging. something with these trees -- stop imauuin. ~ �* ., something with these trees -- stop imauiin.~ �* ., ., , imaging. we've run out of time, my roducer imaging. we've run out of time, my producer said- _ imaging. we've run out of time, my producer said. i've _ imaging. we've run out of time, my producer said. i've had _ imaging. we've run out of time, my producer said. i've had so _ imaging. we've run out of time, my producer said. i've had so many - producer said. i've had so many questions! doctortom, thank producer said. i've had so many questions! doctor tom, thank you very much indeed. it's his fault! an inquiry has begun into the chill d —— charity established into the army bettering captain tom moore. the charity commission has concerns about the management of the captain tom foundation — and potential conflicts of interest between the foundation and a private company run by members of his family. john maguire explains. inches to go, and there he is. captain sir tom moore's challenge
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to walk 100 laps of his back garden before his 100th birthday earned him global recognition, that money has been distributed and is without any issues. but the charity commission has announced a statutory inquiry. the most serious level of investigation — looking into the captain tom foundation set up by his daughter and her husband, and a company they control called club nook limited. we're concerned that whether or not the trustees, governance and decision—making has been up to scratch, if you like, and just to make sure there is no personal benefit or conflicts of interest in relation to the charity and the private company. one concern is over intellectual property and trademark variations of the name captain tom. in a statement, his daughter, hannah ingram—moore, and her husband, colin, said they welcomed the fact that the commission had approved the charity's accounts in february
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and that the trademark applications were made by club nook before the foundation was created. well, this is the family home and the location, of course, for captain tom's famous exploits. the foundation that was set up in his name aims to continue his legacy and to help people struggling with some of the issues that were closest to his heart. the regulator says the charity sector the charity sector must be transparent and that when people make the decision to donate, they do so knowing that the money will go to help those most in need. john maguire, bbc news, bedfordshire. a source at buckingham palace says an inquiry into the handling of bullying claims made against the duchess of sussex will remain private and won't be published. lawyers for the duchess strongly denied the allegations when they were made about bullying of staff. the palace says the investigation has led to reforms in the way it's run. our royal correspondent, sarah campbell, reports. meghan, the duchess of sussex, back in the uk at a royal event
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for the first time in two years. thejubilee weekend was a rare opportunity for the royals to get together in public, and in private. over the four—day weekend, prince charles met his granddaughter, lilibet, for the first time. the meeting was, according to a palace source, very emotional. while the sussexes were building a new life in california, over the past year an independent review was carried out over the past year, an independent review was carried out by the palace's hr department using an outside legal team, after allegations surfaced that meghan had bullied two former members of staff while she was a working royal. while she was a working royal — allegations she strongly denied. the review, which was not paid for using public funds, has led to improvements to working practices, according to a senior royal source. but to maintain the confidentiality of all those who took part, no further details will be released. the sovereign grant is the annual report detailing the running costs of the working members of the royal family, including travel, staff costs and the upkeep of buildings.
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security costs are excluded. for 2021—22, the grant totalled £86.3 million of public money, a slight increase on the previous year. the biggest spend, almost £55 million, was on the continued renovation of buckingham palace, a ten—year programme of works. it was the focal point of the platinum jubilee celebrations, and the costs were 40% higher than the previous year, as work was accelerated to get it ready for the jubilee weekend. foreign travel was also back on the books after a lull during the pandemic. the cambridges' at times controversial nine—day trip to the caribbean in march, was the most expensive royal trip, costing £226,000. despite her mobility issues, the queen has still managed to carry out 201 engagements over the past year, many of them virtual. but as was evident in scotland this week, she appears determined to get on with the job.
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sarah campbell, bbc news. let's catch up with the weather with matt. hello. it continues to be a bit on the cool side here in the uk out of the sun. but in the sun across central and eastern europe, a blistering heat wave at the moment. you can see the amber and red colours here, all the way from north africa through the arctic circle, these areas as much as 20 degrees above normal in a few spots. blue colours with us indicating temperatures below normal for this time a year, the dividing line, this area of cloud, which stays to the east through tonight, but will bring persistent rain into shetland. on the back edge of it, we're seeing further showers at times, whilst many will see them fade, parts of the midlands, eastern england, more downpours come here. some quite nasty into the morning for the most places dry, temperatures into single figures that we start friday morning. almost in between weather systems on friday, this one producing persistent rain in the northeast with the next moving off the atlantic so it means
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we're in a fairly unstable air mass and we'll see shower clouds bubble up. there could be some coming to wimbledon, much of the time dry, but i'm expecting one or two interruptions through the day. we will see showers brew quite widely through the morning for the after dry start for many the more persistent rain will be northeast england, scotland and especially in shetland put up as showers get going into the afternoon, they're going to be focused on northern and eastern areas and the heaviest with the greatest risk of thunder. for the south and west, fewer showers than we've seen through today. may feel a touch warmer although the breeze will be picking up later. more persistent rain for the evening across northern island spinning its way from west to east. one band of cloud and outbreaks of rain pushing southeastward across england, wales followed by sunshine a few showers showery day again.
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northern ireland more persistent rain will be to the far into sunday, the quieter of the two days in terms of showers. there'll be a few bring it here and they are more especially to the north or west of the country, where there will be a stiff breeze, winds lighter further south. it could actually feel a touch warmer. as we go into next week, there are signs a high pressure will only slowly build from the south, keeping things a little on the cool side, scotland and northern ireland, plenty of cloud, one or two showers but increasing sunshine in the south and temperatures climbing into the mid—20s.
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hello, i'm maryam moshiri. you're watching the context on bbc news. the nato summit wraps up, with the alliance set to be bigger and stronger. nato members agree a significant funding increase — president biden calls the summit historic. before the war started, i told putin that if he invaded ukraine, nader would not only get stronger, but we get more united. that is exactly what we are seeing today. a message from zelensky to putin, hand—delivered by indonesia's president, who offers to start communication between the two countries. and president putin hit backs at g7 jibes, saying it would be �*disgusting' to see its leaders strip off. tonight with the context, president of the confederation

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