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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 2, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm samantha simmonds. the headlines... warnings of further disruption for air travellers this summer, with more flights set to be cancelled in the coming weeks at heathrow, the uk's busiest airport. a vigil is held in east london, dedicated to zara aleena, who was killed as she walked home from a night out. hundreds of people are gathering to walk in her memory in the next half an hour. two more britons captured by russian forces in ukraine have have been charged with being mercenaries, according to russian state media. dame deborah's legacy — the nhs says it's seen ten times as many people search online for bowel cancer symptoms after the death of the charity fundraiser. president biden promises the federal government will safeguard womens�* rights to travel within the us to get an abortion. if extremist governors
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try to block a woman from travelling from her state and prohibits herfrom seeking medical help she needs to a state that provides that care, the federal government will act to protect her bedrock rights. and more than a million people are expected to gather on the streets on london today for pride, as the lgbt+ community marks 50 years since the first march. hello, and welcome to bbc news. there are warnings of further disruption for air travellers this summer with more flights set to be cancelled in the coming weeks at heathrow, the uk's busiest airport. the cuts are expected as airlines change their schedules ahead of the busy school holiday period.
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manchester airport's new boss has warned that peak—time queues will continue over the summer months. the department for transport said it is "focused on minimising disruption for passengers this summer", and that as part of this, it was working with airports on when it could be appropriate to allow additional night flights, which would be subject to consultation. our business reporter noor nanji has more. we've already seen big queues at airports this summer. now come warnings of more disruption with a new wave of flight cancellations expected to be announced next week. the cancellations are triggered by an amnesty on take—off and landing slots, which ends this friday. it compounds existing problems. we are now right in the midst of the peak summer travel season but we are still experiencing problems of lack of manpower, not only for airlines but across airports, ground handlers and even in some cases border control staff, so the mix of high volumes and lack of people is causing a tremendous dislocation at many airports.
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british airways services from heathrow are likely to bear the brunt of the cancellations. a spokesperson from the airline told the bbc that they welcome the new measures, adding "it would make it easier to consolidate some of our quieter daily flights to multifrequency destinations well in advance and to protect more of our holiday flights". add to that the threat of strikes from ba cabin and ground crews over a pay dispute. so what should you do if you are caught up in all this? crucially, i know what my rights are if anything's cancelled, and that's to get a replacement flight on the same day if there is anything available to take me there at the airline's expense. and then furthermore, hotel accommodation if need be and compensation if it's the airline's fault, which if it is technical issues or a staff shortage, it generally is. in europe, there is more bad news with strikes there, too, including by cabin crew at airlines
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ryanair and easyjet. after two years of covid rules, this should be a summer of escape. but for holiday—makers, there is fears of delays and cancellations are not going away. simon calderjoins us now with more on the travel disruptions faced by millions. simon, welcome to give. the chaos isn'tjust at heathrow, is it? it is across europe.— isn'tjust at heathrow, is it? it is across europe. yes, let's go for the hotots, across europe. yes, let's go for the hotpots, gatwick _ across europe. yes, let's go for the hotpots, gatwick airport _ across europe. yes, let's go for the hotpots, gatwick airport once - across europe. yes, let's go for the i hotpots, gatwick airport once again seen lots of cancellations today on what should be the first weekend, the first one for three years, of course, and we have seen how wafer flights cancelled by easyjet. mostly, they gave people a few days notice also from gatwick. heathrow
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continues to be the place where there are most cancellations, because british airways have been quietly cancelling and the next wave that we were cancelled sometime in the next week. but that will be for july and august. effectively, what the is they are trying to shrink their schedules so a certain stresses and strains, long queues, weights, delays building up, and is the place of the biggest problems, to the extent that, do not arrive and cabin baggage only, how is anyone with a flight booked over the next few months supposed to prepare? how much warning they getting? are theyjust how much warning they getting? are they just you how much warning they getting? are theyjust you hope how much warning they getting? are they just you hope for the how much warning they getting? are theyjust you hope for the best? the
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headfines theyjust you hope for the best? tue: headlines about theyjust you hope for the best? tte: headlines about flight chaos are slightly wide of the mark. the idea of this is to give certainty. i have got four flights booked with british airways in the next couple of months. i imagine i will be told sometime next week that one or more of those flights have been cancelled. that will give me time to find an alternative, either on ba or on another airline on the same day if ba doesn't have anything available. the main problem is actually going to be available to for people who want to book late on, and the prices that are being charged. already, ba, between now and the 11th ofjuly, any short—haul flight anywhere in europe is absolute top price. athens, £750, rome £656, and even manchester, over £400 for a flight which generally takes about half an hour in the air. the reason ba are putting those fares up is to leave enough space so
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that if they do have to cancel flights, they can actually accommodate passengers on the surviving flights. my advice to anybody with a flight booked is just assume it will go 0k, be aware of your rights if the flight is cancelled, and of course be kind to front—line staff. we have seen terrible scenes with people desperately trying to get away and have been very frustrated, understandably, but the people working at the airport are doing their best, too, and they deserve everybody�*s respect. the their best, too, and they deserve everybody's respect. the department for transport — everybody's respect. the department for transport saying _ everybody's respect. the department for transport saying they _ everybody's respect. the department for transport saying they are - everybody's respect. the department for transport saying they are trying i for transport saying they are trying to help and looking at lifting night—time flights so they can ease off some of the delays and allow more flights to take off and land, but if there aren't the people to staff those flights in the airport, is that even going to work? that is exactly- -- i —
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is that even going to work? that is exactly... i mean, _ is that even going to work? that is exactly... i mean, the _ is that even going to work? that is exactly... i mean, the main - is that even going to work? that is exactly... i mean, the main placel exactly... i mean, the main place would be london heathrow... apologies, we have lost the sound to simon there. we will have more on the travel disruption, and we will be speaking to somebody who is stuck abroad later in this half hour. hundreds of people are taking part in a silent vigil this afternoon for zara aleena, who was murdered in east london while walking home. the 35—year—old was minutes from her front door when she was attacked in ilford last week. 29—year—old jordan mcsweeney has been charged with her murder. ayshea buksh is in ilford for us now. people have come together here this afternoon to remember zahra, 35—year—old aspiring lawyer who was murdered just across road from here last weekend. she had just secured a
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job at the royal courts ofjustice and was deeply interested, according to her friends and family, in equality and human right. her friends i have spoken to earlier have told me this is what she would have told me this is what she would have wanted, to ensure that the issue of violence against women and girls is being talked about. her family have said that they want to make sure that zara is remembered as a brave and fearless and very independent woman. they have said they want to talk to politicians about how changes can be made and how people can better work on solutions to this problem. as you say, jordan mcsweeney, a 29—year—old, has been charged with murder, attempted rape, and robbery. he appeared yesterday in court. her family have also said, and her friends, that they do not want her to be defined by her death, they want her to be remembered as the brave and fearless woman that she was.
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thank you. russian state media is reporting that two british men have been charged with "mercenary activities" by moscow—backed separatists in eastern ukraine. dylan healy is said to have been helping as a volunteer aid worker when he was taken prisoner in april. russia says andrew hill, from plymouth, surrendered to their forces in the same month. this afternoon, a spokesman for the foreign office issued a statement. it said, "we condemn the exploitation of prisoners of war and civilians for political purposes and have raised this with russia. we are in constant contact with the government of ukraine on their cases and are fully supportive of ukraine in its efforts to get them released." 0ur ukraine correspondentjoe inwood in kyiv had this update. so, it is most likely they are being held in the donetsk people's republic, one of the breakaway republics in the east of this country. and if this follows the same pattern as it did for shaun pinner, aidan aslin and brahim saaudun, the three men who were charged and sentenced to death, then they will be put in front of an unrecognised court
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in a process which could last any length of time, really. but it is possible they will plead guilty, as the other three men did, despite the fact they were not fighting, or at least one of them was not fighting, for the ukrainians. but i think probably what we need to do is read behind what's going on here. and there is a lot of speculation that actually this is being directed by the kremlin, and what they are trying to do is put these men's lives in danger as a sort of negotiating tactic. so, their families will be hoping that whatever the outcome of any trial, and we probably should expect that to happen, that acutally we will probably see a prisoner swap at some time. although, as ever, these things are very uncertain. a parliamentary watchdog is to examine allegations of sexual misconduct by the former conservative deputy chief whip, chris pincher. the mp resigned from his role earlier this week after being accused of groping two men at a private members club, and has now been suspended from the conservative party. the party says it would not pre—judge the investigation and
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urged people to respect the process. 0ur political correspondent helen catt has more in chris pincher�*s constituency of tamworth in staffordshire this morning, it was all quiet. mr pincher himself has not spoken publicly since he resigned as the deputy chief whip on thursday night, after being accused of groping two men at the private carlton club in london. he said in his resignation letter that he had "drunk far too much" and embarrassed himself. he remains the mp for tamworth. some constituents told us they were unhappy at his behaviour. very disappointed in him because we've always voted tory and we always will. and i love boris. and it's a shame he has to take the flak for all of it. it's not right, is it? it's wrong. he's there to look after the people in tamworth, and he does things like this. he is meant to be representing the town and that is not - representation that you really want. i think it's disgraceful and it is now time he left. a formal complaint has now been made
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to parliament's independent complaints and grievance scheme, which investigates allegations of sexual misconduct. the prime minister and the chief whip agreed to suspend mr pincher from sitting as a conservative while an investigation is carried out. there's been criticism from opposition parties and some conservative mps about the length of time it took to come around to a decision that many had felt was pretty inevitable. labour said it showed the prime minister had had to be dragged kicking and screaming to suspending christopher pincher, who has been one of his key allies. number 10 insisted that it had acted swiftly, as soon as a formal complaint had been made. it's the parliamentary watchdog who will examine the facts of the allegations, but it has raised lots more political questions for number 10. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. let's return now to our top story and the travel difficulties some passengers are facing. joining me now is matt holgate who is from ilfracombe on the north devon coast.
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he's stranded in geneva, after his easyjet flight has been rebooked four times since thursday. welcome to you. tell us about what has happened to you.— welcome to you. tell us about what has happened to you. well, we were booked for a — has happened to you. well, we were booked for a hiking _ has happened to you. well, we were booked for a hiking holiday - has happened to you. well, we were booked for a hiking holiday at - has happened to you. well, we were booked for a hiking holiday at the i booked for a hiking holiday at the beginning ofjune, the original flight was booked for the 4th of june. standing in the check—in queue, we got cancelled, got the flight cancelled, on the way out to nice. by the time we had rupert details into the app, all the flights had been cancelled. —— we had put the details into the app. we then decided to change our plans and then decided to change our plans and then fly into geneva instead of nice and do our holiday backwards. so, we managed to get out, we had a great
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time hiking around, we had a flight booked for the 30th ofjune to get backin booked for the 30th ofjune to get back in time for my son's birthday, which is today. and then for myself to get back to work on monday. consequently, we got the e—mail from easyjet to say that the flight had been cancelled, would you like to rebut? so we rebooked for the following day, on friday. —— rebook. we had to move hotels, dates, which gust us money. —— which cost us money. we then proceeded the next day and had another e—mail saying that the next flight was on friday and had been cancelled, would you like to rebut? they didn't offer flights either on site or the saturday for me to get home, so we
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cancelled the flight, and then found out via easyjet's website, rather than the app, that they were available flights, but they never offered them to us. so, i had to pay for a new flight, which was nearly £200 more than the original flight, which again, anotherfew £200 more than the original flight, which again, another few days before the flight we had confirmation that the flight we had confirmation that the flight we had confirmation that the flight had been delayed, cancelled. we then change the hotel booking that we had in geneva by the airport, which was yesterday. we had an e—mail the day before to say... have you got any hope of getting home? t have you got any hope of getting home? ., ., have you got any hope of getting home? . . ,., ., “ have you got any hope of getting home? . ., ,., ., ~ ., ., home? i had a flight booked again for tomorrow _ home? i had a flight booked again for tomorrow evening _ home? i had a flight booked again for tomorrow evening to _ home? i had a flight booked again for tomorrow evening to get - home? i had a flight booked again for tomorrow evening to get me . home? i had a flight booked again i for tomorrow evening to get me back to bristol. my partner and, who were
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supposed to carry on the holiday, is having to stay with me because i don't have any available funds to pay for anything. easyjet have said they will refund me any expenses but i can't pay for anything at the minute. 50 i can't pay for anything at the minute. ., , ., i can't pay for anything at the minute. . , ., ., ., , , minute. so what is going to happen? all we are doing _ minute. so what is going to happen? all we are doing now _ minute. so what is going to happen? all we are doing now is _ minute. so what is going to happen? all we are doing now is sitting, - all we are doing now is sitting, jumping between hotels, having to try and find places to buy food, which is a bit of a problem for me because i am coeliac so i can'tjust dive into a restaurant or something and get food. we actually spoke to a human being at easyjet this morning, who assured us that the flight tomorrow might be cancelled, although we have already had four flights cancelled. that although we have already had four flights cancelled.— flights cancelled. that is part of the problem. — flights cancelled. that is part of the problem, it— flights cancelled. that is part of the problem, it is— flights cancelled. that is part of the problem, it is so _
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flights cancelled. that is part of the problem, it is so hard - flights cancelled. that is part of the problem, it is so hard to - flights cancelled. that is part of i the problem, it is so hard to speak to somebody, to find anybody who will answer a phone.— to somebody, to find anybody who will answer a phone. well, that was the second — will answer a phone. well, that was the second time _ will answer a phone. well, that was the second time we _ will answer a phone. well, that was the second time we actually - will answer a phone. well, that was the second time we actually found, | the second time we actually found, and to be honest, we got three pretty quick this morning, but he just had no answers for us. —— we got through pretty quick. he said the flight is not scheduled to be cancelled, so that is all we can do. we asked if we could change airlines, are there any other flights going out?— airlines, are there any other flights going out? have you try to net a fliuht flights going out? have you try to get a flight with _ flights going out? have you try to get a flight with another - flights going out? have you try to get a flight with another airline? l get a flight with another airline? yes, we have. it has been... there aren't many that fly to where i need to be, but again i've got to front the cost of the flight.— to be, but again i've got to front the cost of the flight. yeah, yeah. do ou the cost of the flight. yeah, yeah. do you have _ the cost of the flight. yeah, yeah. do you have any _ the cost of the flight. yeah, yeah. do you have any sympathy - the cost of the flight. yeah, yeah. do you have any sympathy with i the cost of the flight. yeah, yeah. | do you have any sympathy with the airlines? they are all in crisis, post covid they don't have any staff. it is difficult for you but do you have any sympathy with those who are trying to sort this out for
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you? who are trying to sort this out for ou? ~ ,., ., , ., �* you? well... personally, i don't know who _ you? well... personally, i don't know who is _ you? well... personally, i don't know who is trying _ you? well... personally, i don't know who is trying to _ you? well... personally, i don't know who is trying to sort - you? well... personally, i don't know who is trying to sort it - you? well... personally, i don't know who is trying to sort it out for me. we have had no real help, other than, you know, yourflight is cancelled, here is another one, that is cancelled, that is cancelled. you know, i've got my son at home, it is his birthday today, which is why i was supposed to be home on thursday, so i had plenty of time to get myself sorted and get back to see him on his birthday. i've got work on monday, am i going to get there? i don't know. tt is on monday, am i going to get there? i don't know-— i don't know. it is very difficult. have i got _ i don't know. it is very difficult. have i got sympathy _ i don't know. it is very difficult. have i got sympathy for - i don't know. it is very difficult. have i got sympathy for them? | i don't know. it is very difficult. - have i got sympathy for them? not particularly — have i got sympathy for them? not particularly. 0h, have i got sympathy for them? not particularly. oh, and that is understandably, as well. matt, would you like to say happy birthday to your son? you like to say happy birthday to our son? ., ., , . your son? yeah, i would very much like to. if your son? yeah, i would very much like to- if he _ your son? yeah, i would very much like to. if he watching _ your son? yeah, i would very much like to. if he watching are - your son? yeah, i would very much like to. if he watching are not - like to. if he watching are not playing his xbox, then happy birthday, aj, iwill playing his xbox, then happy birthday, aj, i will be soon, buddy.
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hopefully, somebody has recorded it if he is stuck on a screen. good worries —— good luck getting home. no worries, take care. president biden has promised the federal government will act to protect women's rights if us states seek to prevent them travelling to get an abortion. speaking at a virtual meeting with democratic state governors, mr biden said he believed some states would attempt to arrest women who crossed state lines for abortion access. he went on to say that only democratic victories in the mid—term elections would give congress the power to restore federal abortion rights. i think people are going to be shocked when the first state, the first state that tries to arrest a woman for crossing a state line to get health services. and i don't think people believe that's going to happen. but it's going to happen and it's going to it's going to telegraph to the whole country that this is, this is a gigantic deal that goes beyond i mean,
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it affects all your basic rights. if extremist governors try to block a woman from traveling from her state that prohibits herfrom seeking medical help she needs to a state that provides that care, the federal government will act to protect her bedrock rights through the attorney general�*s office. thousands of people are marching through london today for the city's first pride parade since 2019. celebrations were postponed for two years because of the coronavirus pandemic. it's also the 50th anniversary of london's first pride back in 1972. and joining me now is daniel lul, co—founder of parapride, a charity focused on normalising the social opportunities and experiences for lgbtq disabled people. tell us more about what you feel the significance of today is, 50 years since the first pride. t significance of today is, 50 years since the first pride.— since the first pride. i think
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london pride _ since the first pride. i think london pride is _ since the first pride. i think london pride is such - since the first pride. i think london pride is such an - since the first pride. i think i london pride is such an iconic since the first pride. i think - london pride is such an iconic event and it has been founded by the gay liberation front 50 years ago marching across the streets of london, and we definitely want to continue advocating for the lgbt plus community, we don't want it to go anywhere, and stay with us for many years to come. i think it is important to be reminded and celebrate how far we have come since then. but it is also important to be reminded of how much more work we have got to do. there is still a lot of resistance towards the lgbt+ inclusion. the lgbt+ population is still target of hate crime and being lgbt+ is still considered illegal in many countries across the world. tell us more about your organisation and the work that you do. well. tell us more about your organisation and the work that you do.— and the work that you do. well, we are an empowerment _ and the work that you do. well, we are an empowerment charity, - and the work that you do. well, we are an empowerment charity, we i are an empowerment charity, we advocate for the ability, education,
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and awareness of lgbt+ disabled people. as an organisation that focuses on the intersection of being disabled and lgbt+, we were able to identify from a very early stage, the very evident need to address the lack of inclusion for disabled people within the lgbt+ community, and of course i need for more accessible lgbt+ spaces. and most importantly, a need to promote body positivity and be able to celebrate that. the gay community often focuses on looks and status and that can be very isolating experience for anyone who doesn't feel that they can identify with that. hoe? anyone who doesn't feel that they can identify with that.— anyone who doesn't feel that they can identify with that. how can the visible people _ can identify with that. how can the visible people this _ can identify with that. how can the visible people this allit _ can identify with that. how can the visible people this allit is - can identify with that. how can the visible people this allit is in - can identify with that. how can the visible people this allit is in the - visible people this allit is in the lgbt community be increased, do you think? can you repeat that. how can
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the visibility of disabled people in the visibility of disabled people in the lgbt community be increased? there are different ways we can increase visible at he. of course, one of the ways is to create more accessible lgbt+ spaces and continue raising debility awareness but i think that as it is very important that we start changing the narrative for disabled people. the disabled community is often misrepresented by the media, it is generally portrayed as a charity case, and that society often looks at our impairment is the main cause of disabled people being unable to participate fully in society. and what we really would like is the support from our lgbt+ community, but society as a whole, to see that we are only disabled by the barriers created by society and not by our impairment. share the barriers created by society and not by our impairment.— the barriers created by society and not by our impairment. are you going down to the — not by our impairment. are you going down to the parade? _ not by our impairment. are you going down to the parade? i _ not by our impairment. are you going down to the parade? i won't - not by our impairment. are you going down to the parade? i won't be -
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not by our impairment. are you going down to the parade? i won't be going| down to the parade? i won't be going down to the parade? i won't be going down today. — down to the parade? i won't be going down today, unfortunately, _ down to the parade? i won't be going down today, unfortunately, no. - down to the parade? i won't be going down today, unfortunately, no. all. down today, unfortunately, no. all right, daniel, have a great day, thank you so much for being with us. the amount of people in the uk falling victim to fraud is expected to increase sharply according to her majesty's inspector of constabulary, matt parr. mr parr described an "ever increasing tide of damage being done to people" — with no realistic plans to stop it. we'll be speaking to our reporter dan whitworth in a moment. but first let's hear a clip from that money box interview. we've done a couple of reports into the way policing deals with fraud and they haven't been very complimentary. there are some great people doing their best as ever but they simply haven't got the resources and we saw lots of examples of packages put together by the national fraud intelligence bureau that then are sent out to police forces around the country, and then nothing happens. and even when it does, the chances of it resulting in a conviction are extremely low. and so that is the frustration. it has been pointed out before that fraud is probably best estimated between a third and two fifths
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of all crime. if you are an adult, you are much more likely to be a victim of fraud than any other crime type. but despite that magnitude of offending, it attracts less than i% of police officers, fraud investigators. and i think we've said quite clearly in the past that just seems far too low. joining me now is money box reporter — dan whitworth. just how bad is it? really bad, is the short answer. fraud is an epidemic in this country. just a few days ago, there were figures released by the trade industry business body for the banking and financial sector and it described how a certain type of fraud where victims are tricked and manipulated into transferring money to criminals themselves, that was up by 46% in
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themselves, that was up by 46% in the course ofjust one year. to put it another way, that is £500 million that was stolen from 200,000 people in just the last year, so within those numbers, investment scams are up, 60% £266 million stolen, romance fraud scams, so notjust the financial hit but the emotional hit as well, they are up as well, a 77% increase in the face of the year, to see £30 million stolen from just over 3000 victims. fraud is a big, big problem in the uk.- big problem in the uk. staggering fiaures. big problem in the uk. staggering figures- why _ big problem in the uk. staggering figures. why has _ big problem in the uk. staggering figures. why has it _ big problem in the uk. staggering figures. why has it gone - big problem in the uk. staggering figures. why has it gone so - big problem in the uk. staggering figures. why has it gone so bad? | figures. why has it gone so bad? criminals, _ figures. why has it gone so bad? criminals, fundamentally, - figures. why has it gone so bad? criminals, fundamentally, are i criminals, fundamentally, are extremely good at theirjob. they are ruthlessly efficient at many plating people, they are very good at social engineering, and social engineering is when, for example, they have data from people, that people might put up online voluntarily, on social media. also,
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you might get a scan text, oh, you missed a delivery from royal mail, or here you can get details of the covid vaccine. if you enter any details in there, a week later you might get a call from someone pretending to be your bank, they have your name and address, it is easy for them to manipulate people into thinking you are calling from their bank. so, these kernels are a must at their craft. there are not enough resources going into what is such a significant crime for so many people. i know, certainly, the banking sector and law enforcement indeed want greater collaboration between technology companies, social media sites, the telecoms industry, but it is a big problem because criminals are so good at it and there is not enough prevention in this country. t there is not enough prevention in this country-— this country. i had nearly fallen for so many — this country. i had nearly fallen for so many of _ this country. i had nearly fallen for so many of those _ this country. i had nearly fallen for so many of those tags - this country. i had nearly fallen for so many of those tags in . this country. i had nearly fallen | for so many of those tags in the past, asking for details, or money for a payment from royal mail. you say there are not enough resources going into preventing it, what can be done? t
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going into preventing it, what can be done? ~ ., ., ., , , be done? i think a lot of response but he lies — be done? i think a lot of response but he lies on _ be done? i think a lot of response but he lies on the _ be done? i think a lot of response but he lies on the individuals - be done? i think a lot of response but he lies on the individuals and | but he lies on the individuals and to do with awareness. you almost full for these things but luckily you don't but they can catch people when they are vulnerable, so a lot is to do with awareness, and people have to be aware that there are horrible people out there trying to steal your money. and as the uk goes more digital, as we get banking apps, smartphone, that money can be stolen in a matter of minutes. the government is putting 100 mini pounds and trying to tackle fraud. it has launched a review into how to tackle this. —— the government is putting £100 million. many of us will be hoping there are some real concrete moves in their that will see this epidemic of fraud tackled. we all need to be on the alert, don't we? dan, thank you for taking us through that story. let's get the weather now. some more
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widespread rain and northern scotland, this wet weather sinking eastwards across england, that is where it is now, it will continue to journey south—eastward through the afternoon, although the far south—east corner is likely to stay dry. further north and west, sunshine and showers and more widespread rain in northern scotland. temperatures, north to south, 16 to 23 degrees in parts of east anglia, before the rain arrives. it will arrive in the evening and claire, my spaces will be dry overnight with clear spells. more showers in western scotland and northern ireland on a strengthening breeze. quite windy across northern areas tomorrow, sunshine and showers again but for northern ireland, wales, the south—west, it will dry out in the afternoon, more sunshine, not too many showers, 16 to 22 degrees. goodbye for now.

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