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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2022 5:00pm-5:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 5... the defence secretary ben wallace rules himself out of the race to become the next conservative party leader and prime minister. meanwhile, senior tory tom tugendhat explains why he's running. i have spent ten, 15 years serving our country in uniform, i have spent six, seven years now serving our community in parliament and you know, i would like the chance to serve again, because i think this country matters. i think the changes we can deliver are extraordinary. cheering elena rybakina, who was born in russia, but has represented kazakhstan since 2018, has become the country's first player to win a major singles trophy in a nail—biting women's final.
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i never felt something like this and ijust want to say a big thanks to the crowd for the support, it was unbelievable all these two weeks. cheering chanting. protesters in sri lanka storm the president's official residence over the handling of the country's worst economic crisis in decades. the country's prime minister says he's willing to stand down. elon musk is threatened with legal action after pulling out of a £36.5 billion deal to buy twitter. and "go for it all." naomi campbell gives her advice on modelling and motherhood after being awarded an honorary doctorate for her impact on globalfashion.
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one of the candidates tipped to be a possible frontrunner in the conservative leadership contest has ruled himself out. the defence secretary ben wallace said it had not been an easy choice but his focus was on keeping the country safe. four mps have entered the race so far, including the former chancellor, rishi sunak. number ten has said his resignation was a "real disappointment", suggesting he'd betrayed boris johnson. here's our political correspondent, david wallace lockhart. morning. he's the former chancellor, but could rishi sunak be the next prime minister? he certainly wants to be, launching his campaign yesterday evening with a slick social media video. soft piano music plays social media video. i've told you a little bit about my story, but i'm running to be our next prime minister because it's your stories that matter most. his supporters have taken to the airwaves, insisting he's the man to lead the country.
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he's got the experience, he's got the ability, he's got the vision and i think at this moment in time we need to move to someone who is going to walk into number ten and take over the reins of the country. they need to have that level of experience and ability. but there are elements of the tory party who are uneasy about the idea of rishi sunak as next prime minister. a number 10 source accused him of having a short memory and criticised how he'd handled resigning from the government. they added that the loyalty borisjohnson showed to him wasn't reciprocated. one prominent backbencher says that while he's fond of the former chancellor, he doesn't like his tax policies. i believe that taxes in this country are too high - at their current levels, _ so high that they'll be doing more harm than good at these levels. now, unfortunately, i because rishi's record is of saying he wants low taxes, but then putting them up, - he has now got to double down - on that record during his campaign. so who are the alternatives? joining mr sunak as official candidates are the select committee chair, tom tugendhat,
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and attorney general, suella braverman. former minister kemi badenoch launched her campaign yesterday evening, promising tax cuts and small government. the field could get crowded. sajid javid, liz truss, and nadhim zahawi could all run. defence secretary ben wallace has said he won't run. priti patel and grant shapps are all thought to be mulling bids. former leadership candidate jeremy hunt may well fancy another run, also. on monday, the 1922 committee, the body that represents backbench conservative mps, will announce the rules for the upcoming leadership contest. it's expected that tory mps will whittle the candidates down to a final two. that pair will then be put to the party membership, thought to be around 180,000 people. they'll pick the next prime minister, who is expected to take office by september. westminster may be quiet today, but the field in this leadership contest could get very busy indeed. david wallace lockhart, bbc news, westminster.
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our political correspondent jonathan blake has the latest on the announced contenders and those yet to declare. rishi sunak, the former chancellor, saying this is a moment that needs to be grasped, emphasising his experience, and the and the need for truth over fairy tales, as he put it in a campaign video that went online yesterday. then, there is the attorney general suella braverman, who is promising to cut taxes, and then kemi badenoch, who is emphasising the need for a small state. and then tom tugendhat, and our colleagues have caught up with him at a small fete, earlier today. this is my community, this is my first_ this is my community, this is my first event— this is my community, this is my first event i— this is my community, this is my
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first event i did and i proud to be back— first event i did and i proud to be back here — first event i did and i proud to be back here today because this is who i am _ i'm very proud of our community, i'm very proud of our country, as you know i have spent... you have heard me say this, ben, ten or 15 years serving our country, and i've sent six or seven years serving our community. i think the changes we can deliver are extraordinary, i think the innovation and opportunity... these people demonstrate every day is what we need to champion, and to make that new deal, because there is a new deal for britain. i think it is fair to say that a lot of the contenders would be relying or counting on the support of ben wallace, who decided not to run today? yes, he has been talked about as a serious contender for some time, he is popular among conservative party grassroots members, and his profile has risen recently, due to the war in ukraine as defence secretary, i think
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he is seen as a straight talker, but in terms of what sort of a leader of the party he would have been, it is pretty hard to tell. although he has been an mp for some time, he hasn't had any of the other big jobs in cabinet, and so it would have been a bit of an outside choice, let's put it that way, but as you say, earlier today, he ruled himself out of the running, saying that was a very difficult decision to have made. all eyes will be on who he throws his weight behind, will it be one of the candidates who have already declared, or some of the others who we are expecting to be seriously considering it, foreign secretary, liz truss. jeremy hunt among other. the newly installed education minister andrea jenkyn has issued a statement over social media footage of her rudely gesturing towards crowd of protesters outside downing street. the conservative mp who has remained loyal to borisjohnson wrote on twitter that she could have
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"shown more composure," but claimed she was faced with a "braying mob" while on the way to hear the prime minister's resignation speech on thursday and said public abuse of mps had become "all too common." let's talk more about the leadership contest with former conservative party donor and brexit party mep, ben habib. good to see you. after a very interesting week. i suppose the first question for you is, who does it need to be out of who we know so far as running or could be running, who would you like to see as the country's next prime minister. mil country's next prime minister. fill pointers as far as i'm concerned pointers as far as i'm concerned point towards suella braverman. she is an incredibly erudite individual. she is well educated, a lawyer which i think is particularly important at this point in time. we have got real issues with the northern ireland protocol, dealing with illegal migrants trying to cross the north
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sea, all of these require a legal mind. she stands for values i believe in, to cut taxes which i think is important. and critically, she is also a non—divisive individual. she was very straightforward about her desire to run and she did not dump boris johnson in it, she's not going to have half the conservative party against her because of the way she has handled her position in cabinet so i think she will not be divisive. she will do a greatjob, her values are mine and of course she was a brexiteer and i think it's important that the next prime minister is a brexiteer because there is a lot of work to be done to get brexit across the line. ., �* work to be done to get brexit across the line. . �* ., ., ., ., the line. haven't we all moved on a bit? peeple — the line. haven't we all moved on a bit? people are _ the line. haven't we all moved on a bit? people are facing _ the line. haven't we all moved on a bit? people are facing the - the line. haven't we all moved on a bit? people are facing the rising - bit? people are facing the rising cost of living, i agree there is work to be done but when it comes to the person running the country most people watching at home right now what a prime minister that is going to help their bank balance, put food on the table right now.—
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on the table right now. finally enou~h, on the table right now. finally enough. they _ on the table right now. finally enough, they are _ on the table right now. finally enough, they are all - on the table right now. finally enough, they are all kind - on the table right now. finally enough, they are all kind of. enough, they are all kind of interlinked. one of the problems with the trade cooperation agreement we signed is it foisted all sorts of rig literary burdens in the united kingdom and actually one of the big things we do to get out of this is to deregulate and cut taxes and she stands for both of those. we need to dilute this obsession with net zero which is going to cost the economy 1.4 trillion until 2050. that effectively a regressive tax on the working and middle classes. we got to get off the bandwagon, cut that vat, not raise the threshold, to neuter that mistake. cut corporation tax, not put it up. we had the private sector hit by 2.5 years of stop start lockdowns and it needs a leg up and suella braverman is very clear on all of that. i have not heard... clear on all of that. i have not heard- - -_ clear on all of that. i have not heard... . , , , heard... can i enter up because we have heard. .. can i enter up because we have another— heard... can i enter up because we have another name _ heard... can i enter up because we have another name to _ heard... can i enter up because we
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have another name to throughout i heard... can i enter up because we i have another name to throughout you that has just emerged well you have been talking. a lot of people arguing we need experience in downing street, what about grant shapps, transport secretary because mickey has just announced he will be running for the conservative party leadership. not a surprise. i running for the conservative party leadership. not a surprise.- leadership. not a surprise. i don't think grant _ leadership. not a surprise. i don't think grant would _ leadership. not a surprise. i don't think grant would be _ leadership. not a surprise. i don't think grant would be a _ leadership. not a surprise. i don't think grant would be a divisive - think grant would be a divisive individual, i don't think the prime minister supporters have anything against them, but he did vote remain, i'm sorry to go back to brexit but i think it's important and of course the prime minister's majority came because he promised brexit and got those red wool seats. i don't really think grant shapps has got the character to do it. suella braverman is straight talking, knows her stuff, suella braverman is straight talking, knows herstuff, i suella braverman is straight talking, knows her stuff, i don't not if you have seen her debate but she is erudite and everything she, and she has put policies forward already. another... a number of candidates have declared and with the exception of rishi sunak you don't know what the others stand
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for. ~ ., don't know what the others stand for. ~ . , ., , don't know what the others stand for. ~ ., , , for. what you see the bookmakers favourite? i— for. what you see the bookmakers favourite? i think— for. what you see the bookmakers favourite? i think richey _ for. what you see the bookmakers favourite? i think richey talks - favourite? i think richey talks about being — favourite? i think richey talks about being serious _ favourite? i think richey talks about being serious and - favourite? i think richey talks - about being serious and responsible but if there is one person to divide the party right now it is rishi sunak. there is clearly bad blood between the prime minister and himself and to stand now is first of all to turn his back on a hugely important task of fixing the economy, he was chancellor of the exchequer, partly got us into this mess, he should be helping get us out, so that is not responsible. he has divided the tory party because of split loyalties and he wants to raise taxes which is absolutely the antithesis is what the united kingdom should be doing right now. finding out a bit kingdom should be doing right now. findin: ou . , ., kingdom should be doing right now. findin ou: ., , ., ., kingdom should be doing right now. findin ou . , ., . . finding out a bit more about what grant shapps _ finding out a bit more about what grant shapps has _ finding out a bit more about what grant shapps has to _ finding out a bit more about what grant shapps has to say, - finding out a bit more about what grant shapps has to say, he - finding out a bit more about what grant shapps has to say, he has l grant shapps has to say, he has launched his bid in the times newspaper. he says he has launched a conservative party should leadership bid saying he will end tactical
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government by an often distracted centre. bearwith government by an often distracted centre. bear with me because i'm getting more on that, that all i can tell you so far. what we have had therefore in grant shapps but also from sajid javid in his resignation speech in the commons earlier this week was some insight into what seemed to be according to them a chaotic government where the right hand did not do what the left hand was doing and so i ijust go back to my point that there is a case to be argued here for experience and familiarity and trust. it is argued here for experience and familiarity and trust.— familiarity and trust. it is a bit rich that rishi _ familiarity and trust. it is a bit rich that rishi sunak, - familiarity and trust. it is a bit rich that rishi sunak, sajid - familiarity and trust. it is a bit i rich that rishi sunak, sajid javid, grant shapps, attack central government as part of it, sajid javid perhaps not as long as others but he has significant experience in it and he did join the government having had a contretemps with the prime minister so i don't think it is fairfor them to resign prime minister so i don't think it is fair for them to resign seats and poking back at the very institution they were at the heart. suella
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braverman has not done that, she is not divisive. from grant's opening comments to be an attack on the government of which he was senior member, that's not serious, that is not responsible and effectively richey has done the same thing so has... he richey has done the same thing so has... , richey has done the same thing so has. . ._ because - richey has done the same thing so has..._ because he l richey has done the same thing so i has..._ because he was has... he did resign. because he was not ha - has... he did resign. because he was not happy of — has... he did resign. because he was not happy of it- _ has... he did resign. because he was not happy of it- he — has... he did resign. because he was not happy of it. he did, _ has... he did resign. because he was not happy of it. he did, but _ has... he did resign. because he was not happy of it. he did, but a - has... he did resign. because he was not happy of it. he did, but a lot i not happy of it. he did, but a lot of people were saying it was contrived and the timing was less than elegant you might say. i'm not convinced at all by those three candidates. suella braverman was straight, she did not resign but she was asked the night before all of the events kicked off will you stand and she was absolutely straightforward. she said yes, absolutely i will. and i like that honesty. we need politicians who are prepared to come out and see what they have got in their mind. fine they have got in their mind. one very quick _ they have got in their mind. one very quick final— they have got in their mind. one very quick final thought, do we perhaps need someone who had very little if nothing to do with boris johnson? that will be tough because
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a lot of people would like to see that. that's certainly what they are telling radio stations and news reporters. telling radio stations and news re orters. ., , telling radio stations and news reorters. ., , ., telling radio stations and news reporters-_ reporters. that is one of the challenges _ reporters. that is one of the challenges the _ reporters. that is one of the challenges the party - reporters. that is one of the challenges the party has i reporters. that is one of the | challenges the party has got. reporters. that is one of the i challenges the party has got. if they were going to ditch boris johnson, they should have done it much earlier. it was one of the things ice, they are team team themselves and now they have all been slightly tainted with the brush of borisjohnson. some more than others, not to go back to rishi sunak and others but they have been part of that government from the beginning. forthem part of that government from the beginning. for them to resign at the last second, it's difficult it's difficult for the conservative party but if they want to win the next election they must focus on non—divisive candidates. and suella braverman is the standout candidate in that respect and many others. indeed, absolutely fascinating to talk to you and good to have you on as we got the news about grant shapps running for conservative party leadership but many thanks for your time.
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party leadership but many thanks for yourtime. let's party leadership but many thanks for your time. let's get more, jonathan blakejoins me. blake joins me. this blakejoins me. this was expected. it's very interesting what we were hearing, time after time we are hearing, time after time we are hearing these people that worked with borisjohnson, not all of hearing these people that worked with boris johnson, not all of them with borisjohnson, not all of them resign, with boris johnson, not all of them resign, attacking the way he was running government.— running government. yes, grant sha- -s running government. yes, grant shapps was — running government. yes, grant shapps was said _ running government. yes, grant shapps was said to _ running government. yes, grant shapps was said to be _ running government. yes, grant shapps was said to be seriously | shapps was said to be seriously considering running and interview with the sunday times published online this afternoon, that is confirmed. he is someone with considerable cabinet experience, transport secretary at the moment, he was one of those we understand who went to the prime minister last week when it looked like the game was up to tell him to his face that the right thing to do might now be to resign but he did not go himself, he stayed in post and from what he has had to see to the sunday times remains loyal to borisjohnson. he stresses that, "i have not spent the last few turbulent leap year plotting against the prime minister, mobilising a campaign behind his
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back. i will tell you this, for all his flaws, i like borisjohnson, i never doubted his love of this country." perhaps trying to endear himself to those in the party and there are some who think boris johnson did not deserve to have his premiership cut short in the way that it was. premiership cut short in the way that it was-_ premiership cut short in the way that it was. �*, . , ., that it was. he's a capable media performer. _ that it was. he's a capable media performer, often _ that it was. he's a capable media performer, often the _ that it was. he's a capable media performer, often the minister- that it was. he's a capable media | performer, often the minister sent out in the most difficult times for the government to do those interviews first thing in the morning when they are on the ropes and up against it.— and up against it. rarely drops the ball. he and up against it. rarely drops the ball- he will— and up against it. rarely drops the ball. he will be _ and up against it. rarely drops the ball. he will be a _ and up against it. rarely drops the ball. he will be a key _ and up against it. rarely drops the ball. he will be a key key - and up against it. rarely drops the l ball. he will be a key key contender whether he can command the support needed amongst mps to get through to the final two and get on to win a vote among the party membership as all across the country, we will have to see. it all across the country, we will have to see. ., , , i. ., all across the country, we will have tosee. ., , , ., ., , to see. it goes beyond that really because at _ to see. it goes beyond that really because at some _ to see. it goes beyond that really because at some point _ to see. it goes beyond that really because at some point the i to see. it goes beyond that really because at some point the public| because at some point the public would have a say, not now, that is just the way it works. grant shapps will be remembered for some
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controversy. and also for being the transport secretary at a time that airlines were cancelling people's holidays, chaos at the airport in recent weeks and then there has been other troubling times during the pandemic where people were not getting their money back. people were very divided over how well he has done in that role serving under borisjohnson. it is has done in that role serving under boris johnson-— has done in that role serving under boris johnson. it is a double-edged sword, as boris johnson. it is a double-edged sword. as well— boris johnson. it is a double-edged sword, as well as _ boris johnson. it is a double-edged sword, as well as saying _ boris johnson. it is a double-edged sword, as well as saying he - boris johnson. it is a double-edged sword, as well as saying he has i sword, as well as saying he has considerable experience doing one of the biggestjobs in government and can point to a record as a capable minister who has got things done, he is also coming to this with baggage as you suggest and that is what comes with experience, he was part of boris johnson's comes with experience, he was part of borisjohnson's administration, of boris johnson's administration, one of borisjohnson's administration, one of the most public faces alongside the prime minister and that may count against him, for others it will be seen as a selling point. he is a previous party chairman so knows how the conservative party works and that will... . , conservative party works and that will... ., , to conservative party works and that will- - -- to say _
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conservative party works and that will. . .- to say the - conservative party works and that will. . .- to say the least i conservative party works and that will. . .- to say the least in | will... handy. to say the least in the next few _ will... handy. to say the least in the next few days _ will... handy. to say the least in the next few days and _ will... handy. to say the least in the next few days and possibly i the next few days and possibly weeks. �* , , ., , weeks. i'm sure there will be many more updates _ weeks. i'm sure there will be many more updates as _ weeks. i'm sure there will be many more updates as the _ weeks. i'm sure there will be many more updates as the weekend i more updates as the weekend progresses. thousands of protesters have stormed the official residence of sri lanka's president in colombo, demanding his resignation over the country's economic crisis. huge crowds, enraged by gotabaya rajapaksa's handling of sri lanka's worst economic crisis in decades — overwhelmed the security forces. reports say the president has been moved to a safer location. the prime minister says he is willing to resign to make a way to appoint an all—party government. we are hearing from journalists on the ground that sri lankan residents
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have stormed the private residence of the prime minister. this comes just a few hours after storming the president's house, protesters have broken in and have set the house on fire so there is no letup in this protest and we have to remember this follows years of economic turmoil for so many people living there. our reporter has more on that. clashes in colombo. thousands of anti—government protesters took to the streets of the sri lankan capital. they are angry about rising inflation and shortages of food and fuel. people travelled from across the country to join demonstrations, after attempts to impose a curfew failed. soldiers and police pushed protesters back with water cannon jets and clouds of tear gas as they broke the barricades. at least 21 people, including two
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police, have been injured. a crowd stormed the presidential palace, pictures posted online showed people inside splashing about in the private pool. the protesters want the president, mr rajapaksa, to resign. they hold him responsible for sri lanka's growing economic emergency. the country has run out of foreign currency to import vital goods and inflation is rising rapidly. food, fuel and medicines are running out, leading to long queues and rolling blackouts. sri lanka is looking far and wide to ease the economic crisis. this week, the president had a phone call with russia's vladimir putin to get hold of cheap fuel. discussions were described as very productive. emily unia, bbc news. there are more updates on the bbc
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news website on the developing story. to wimbledon now and elena rybakina has become the first woman from kazakhstan to win a grand slam singles title. and again, there she is, a new name, a new champion... the 23—year—old beat the tunisian ons jabeur on centre court after coming back from being a set down. when asked how she felt about her achievement, she said she was relieved that it was over. i was super nervous before the match, during the match and obviously i am happy that it has finished, to be honest... laughter really, i never felt laughter really, i neverfelt something like this. ijust want really, i neverfelt something like this. i just want to see a big thanks to the crowd for their support, it was unbelievable, all the way through it. cheering chetan pathak followed
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the match for us from sw19. ina year in a year where tennis band russia and belarusian players, it is still and belarusian players, it is still a russian born woman who has won. elena rybakina is not a name we were talking about before the start of this tournament and get she walks off with the venus rosewater dish. she started nervously against ons jabeur, the world number two and third seed, who back in her homeland of tunisia the minister of happiness. her rise through the game across last 18 months has been extraordinary. she was the favourite going into this final, she talked about how desperate she was to win the title. for the people back, on the title. for the people back, on the first day of eat. she gave her self the best chance but nerves and fatigue set in and rybakina found her serve. to get herself over the
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line. rybakina makes history, the first kazakhstan player to win a grand slam singles title. she gave a muted response when she won at the end, something we have gotten used to seeing from her. she often talks about her poker face but even she could not hide her smile when she lifted that venus rosewater dish. wimbledon has often given us unexpected winners, especially in the women's draw, but with her all—round game, rybakina is someone we should expect to see here time and again. some news from japan some news fromjapan now some news from japan now after the awful news of the assassination of the country's former prime minister. the local police chief injapan's nara prefecture has said there were flaws in the security provided to the former japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, who was assassinated on friday. the official admitted the security plan for mr abe's visit was formulated the day before his arrival and it was possible not enough security was placed behind the former leader as he spoke to a crowd.
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mr abe's body has been taken to tokyo. an unemployed 41—year—old man has admitted the killing, using a homemade gun. speaking at a news conference, police chief tomoaki onizuka said they will review their security procedures. translation: former prime minister shinzo abe - was shot whilst under police guard. the consequences are extremely grave and serious. the fact that such an incident has happened is a matter of utmost regret. i cannot deny there were problems with the security detail which led to such a serious outcome. police must consider concrete steps to strengthen security arrangements, or review existing measures.
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twitter and elon musk are in an extraordinary standoff over his £36.5 billion deal to buy the social media company. the world's richest man wants to pull out of the deal, claiming he's not received the data he asked for about the number of fake or spam accounts on the platform. i spoke to the technology journalist shona ghosh, who explained more and about twitter�*s board who say they will sue mr musk to enfore the deal. i think this is probably a case of the richest man in the world bending the rules as he sees fit. he doesn't tend to go with the established modes of doing things, and in part, that is what has made him the richest man in the world. i don't think it's ever been that clear from the very beginning of this whole saga that elon musk�*s offer to buy twitter was ever that serious, so anyone who was watching it closely expected there might be a number
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of different outcomes, one of which might be musk trying to pull out of the deal, or trying to consider whether this is a play to lower the price of twitter. as it stands, he is on the hook to buy it for $44 billion, i think there is a question as to whether twitter is worth $44 billion, so this is potentially him trying to lower the price through unconventional means. if this did go to court, if this was a concrete done deal, which is what twitter�*s board seem to think, is his argument good enough? would that stand up in court? i think the concensus is it's not. elon musk as a personality has a tendency to overcome incredible
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odds, having said that, he did agree to buy twitter, and it feels difficult to me to see how he is going to say, "i didn't have enough information to go on." part of the agreement to buy twitter was him saying "i do have enough information to go on, or i am comfortable not having that information. i'm comfortable with the bot scenario," which is the major part of why he is pulling out of the deal. i suspect a court battle will be protracted. it is partly, as i say, whether this may be an attempt to settle out of court, do the deal, but in a slightly different way and at a cheaper price which seems slightly more feasible. certainly, i don't think it is going to be simple for elon musk to pull out of the deal. why do you think he wanted to, or may still want, to buy it? there are other social media
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platforms, and some come and go. i think there is a couple of things, he is very active on twitter for a man who runs many companies, and he seems to have a lot of time to be on twitter. the other thing, i think, and this is a theory of why twitter may be undervalued, is that if you look at twitter in terms of the round of the media landscape, it is as powerful as newspapers, if not more powerful. perhaps this is a way of elon musk are doing that billionaire thing, where he buys a media platform, and maybe it is more powerful than a tv empire or nework of newspapers. this is one way that he could control something that is very powerful. let's return to our breaking news, the home of sri lanka's prime minister ranil wickremesinghe has been set on fire.
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over the past hour the unrest between protesters and police has intensified outside wickremesinghe's private residence in the country's capital colombo. bbc tamal�*s ranga sirilal is in colombo. what more can you tell us of the storming of the prime minister's because this game dry shortly after the prime minister said he would step down in the interest of the country. step down in the interest of the count . , ., , ., , country. yes. he offered to resign, to find a peaceful _ country. yes. he offered to resign, to find a peaceful solution - country. yes. he offered to resign, to find a peaceful solution to i country. yes. he offered to resign, to find a peaceful solution to the i to find a peaceful solution to the current political crisis. this follows the meeting of the parliament which decided that the prime minister should resign. the speaker had informed the president
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that the party leaders had

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