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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 14, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. attorney general is out of the race for the conservative leadership leaving just five candidates left to be the next prime minister. the italian prime minister has offered his resignation after losing political support by the countries president says he should stay on. train drivers from eight railway companies will strike on the 30th, three days after a 2k hour walk out the rmt. after days in sri lanka, economic crisis, the president has resigned. ambulances in england of 51 minutes to respond to an emergency like a attack or stroke last month and far longer
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than an 18 minute target time. the bbc documentary reveals that hundreds of british dentists treat patients with serious complications after they travel abroad to get cutprice crowns. will come to the programme. first, attorney general has been knocked out of the conservative race in the second round of voting. receiving just 27 both some tory mps. now, the five remaining hopefuls progress to the third round on monday. once again, rishi sunak has the number of votes and conservative mps and penny mordaunt came second with the
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support of 83 and it's just been reported that she has thrown her weight behind liz truss. before today's voting, it was the last of the big campaign launch events. , ., ., ., , ., events. times are going to be tough but i know that _ events. times are going to be tough but i know that i _ events. times are going to be tough but i know that i can _ events. times are going to be tough but i know that i can get _ events. times are going to be tough but i know that i can get us - events. times are going to be tough but i know that i can get us on an i but i know that i can get us on an upward trajectory by 202a. we can get that by delivering our promises, ensuring spades or in the ground, people are on the ground and delivering. people are on the ground and delivering-— people are on the ground and deliverinu. ., . , ., delivering. you have set on boris johnson's cabinet _ delivering. you have set on boris johnson's cabinet table _ delivering. you have set on boris i johnson's cabinet table throughout johnson's cabinet table throughout his time as prime minister and how will we argue that your campaign is being trampled was white there was no direct answer about her arrival
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in this on being a senior minister under mrjohnson? i in this on being a senior minister under mrjohnson?_ under mrjohnson? i was critical within cabinet _ under mrjohnson? i was critical within cabinet and _ under mrjohnson? i was critical within cabinet and the _ under mrjohnson? i was critical within cabinet and the proposed national insurance rights. as a cabinet minister and spoke against it at the time. but i'm a loyalist and i believe in collective responsibility and the prime minister has stood down and i am honest in my views on the economy. is liz truss doing enough? i was second to _ well, i was second to last when i started and i ended up winning. so all i can say to you is, it ain't over. by lunchtime, the focus switched to parliament and more voting. so from a campaign launch this morning to a polling station open just up the stairs there, conservative mps voting on day two of this contest. and one of the candidates is there, suella braverman. at three o'clock came the result, and bad news for the attorney general for england and wales.
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suella braverman is eliminated from the contest and the others are able to go forward to a further ballot on monday. i don't feel disappointed or that something's gone wrong, actually. it is what it is, and i'm very glad that i had a go and put my policy platform forward. once again, the former chancellor rishi sunak got the most votes. penny mordaunt, seen here at her campaign launch yesterday, came second ahead of liz truss. kemi badenoch was fourth, and tom tugendhat, speaking here this morning, was fifth. where will this go? i don't know, i can't tell you. but i offered to serve, that's what i'll do. it's up to others to decide whether or not they wish to have me. i'm afraid that's how democracy works. but i don't quit. and so six have become five, as the race to move in here continues. as that race continues, let's get a
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bit more on the thoughts of young conservatives with me is the unconservative network george holt and conservative member and penny more than support her, evening to you both. young conservatives backing penny mordaunt as the most popular leadership contender we can see a little bit of that poll result there and mason, i believe you are backing penny, what is it about her thatis backing penny, what is it about her that is appealing to younger conservatives, do you think? i think penny mordaunt _ conservatives, do you think? i think penny mordaunt is _ conservatives, do you think? i think penny mordaunt is inspiring - conservatives, do you think? i think penny mordaunt is inspiring young i penny mordaunt is inspiring young conservatives for a fresh start of the country. we think borisjohnson first time in the country but it was time for him to go and penny was right saying that a fresh start, we need to go with the way they used to be. we weren't around and the stakes, but residents in conservatives.— stakes, but residents in conservatives. ~ ., , �* ., conservatives. with doesn't resonate with ouna conservatives. with doesn't resonate with young conservatives _
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conservatives. with doesn't resonate with young conservatives are - conservatives. with doesn't resonate with young conservatives are known l with young conservatives are known across the country is that no one knows her face. across the country is that no one knows herface. doesn't worry across the country is that no one knows her face. doesn't worry you from a democratic point of view that we could have, if you get your way, a prime minister that virtually no one knows? does that feel democratic to you? it one knows? does that feel democratic to ou? ., , �* one knows? does that feel democratic toou? ., to you? it doesn't because for the leadership. _ to you? it doesn't because for the leadership, we had _ to you? it doesn't because for the leadership, we had the _ to you? it doesn't because for the leadership, we had the exact - to you? it doesn't because for the l leadership, we had the exact same argument and it's a closed thing we probably got to the statement since margaret thatcher in this country. in a parliamentary democracy be voted for mps and address the prime minister that's exactly what we respect the vote for a leader and we think penny mordaunt is a lot more in this department i think should get away with that. you in this department i think should get away with that.— get away with that. you are not convinced _ get away with that. you are not convinced by — get away with that. you are not convinced by penny _ get away with that. you are not convinced by penny mordaunt? | get away with that. you are not - convinced by penny mordaunt? let's make it clear— convinced by penny mordaunt? let's make it clear that _ convinced by penny mordaunt? let's make it clear that any _ convinced by penny mordaunt? let's make it clear that any candidates who get — make it clear that any candidates who get and will make a brilliant prime _ who get and will make a brilliant prime minister and the party is to -et prime minister and the party is to get behind them for the good of the country— get behind them for the good of the country but for me, it is rishi sunak. — country but for me, it is rishi sunak, i actually think is much more
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experience _ sunak, i actually think is much more experience guides. the sunak, i actually think is much more experience guides.— sunak, i actually think is much more experience guides. the more we learn about the culture _ experience guides. the more we learn about the culture of _ experience guides. the more we learn about the culture of number _ experience guides. the more we learn about the culture of number ten - experience guides. the more we learn about the culture of number ten and l about the culture of number ten and the government, do you really want someone who stood by that? for the five remaining _ someone who stood by that? for the five remaining candidates _ someone who stood by that? for the five remaining candidates were - five remaining candidates were in boris _ five remaining candidates were in borisjohnson's five remaining candidates were in boris johnson's government and so, would _ boris johnson's government and so, would buy— boris johnson's government and so, would buy being fined for breaking a law that his government was introducing, do you want that in the next prime minister? i introducing, do you want that in the next prime minister?— next prime minister? i don't think it causes me _ next prime minister? i don't think it causes me to _ next prime minister? i don't think it causes me to much _ next prime minister? i don't think it causes me to much bother. - next prime minister? i don't think it causes me to much bother. i i next prime minister? i don't think. it causes me to much bother. i think rishi sunak— it causes me to much bother. i think rishi sunak is a bit further away from _ rishi sunak is a bit further away from that— rishi sunak is a bit further away from that stuff but what about raising — from that stuff but what about raising taxes, does that bother you? the tax _ raising taxes, does that bother you? the tax rate — raising taxes, does that bother you? the tax rate is, if you lookjust two _ the tax rate is, if you lookjust two weeks _ the tax rate is, if you lookjust two weeks ago, we had a massive tax cut and _ two weeks ago, we had a massive tax cut and thinks about £330 that people — cut and thinks about £330 that people will be saving and look, we spent _ people will be saving and look, we spent so _ people will be saving and look, we spent so much money during covid—19, it was— spent so much money during covid—19, it was incredible amount of money
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and there — it was incredible amount of money and there was no way to really pay for it _ and there was no way to really pay for it. a, ,., and there was no way to really pay forit. �*, and there was no way to really pay forit. ., for it. mason, let's come back to ou and for it. mason, let's come back to you and penny — for it. mason, let's come back to you and penny morden. - for it. mason, let's come back to you and penny morden. he - for it. mason, let's come back to - you and penny morden. he referenced the old tunes i was referencing a part of her speech and send me that you think will appeal and many economists line—ups saying tax cuts is a very dangerous thing to be doing in the current economic stage. economics is a point of view, there is no strong economic fact, i don't believe you can tax rate of prosperity, not a government that was the economy, its business and individuals and that's exactly what penny mordaunt is talking about. individuals of the main thing and you cannot have the state dictating and that is exactly what she believes in and that's i feel like young conservatives are backing her. we know you both stand and it's really interesting and it's unfair to ask you to predict i'm going to ask you, anyway. when this vote does
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go out and those are the final two, we should emphasise they're not the final two at the moment when the final two at the moment when the final two at the moment when the final two names go forward in the country, who do you think will capture the imagination and people will vote for? i capture the imagination and people will vote for?— will vote for? i definitely say penny mordaunt _ will vote for? i definitely say penny mordaunt is _ will vote for? i definitely say penny mordaunt is in - will vote for? i definitely say penny mordaunt is in the - will vote for? i definitely sayl penny mordaunt is in the final will vote for? i definitely say - penny mordaunt is in the final two and appeals and i live in wales and is authoritarian socialist plan is working, and with penny mordaunt policies, will definitely be able to grow our economy get people back to work. do grow our economy get people back to work. , ., ~ grow our economy get people back to work. i. ~ i. �* grow our economy get people back to work. ~ �* , grow our economy get people back to work. , work. do you think you'll be those to two in the _ work. do you think you'll be those to two in the final _ work. do you think you'll be those to two in the final interview- work. do you think you'll be those to two in the final interview think| to two in the final interview think will win if it is? i’m to two in the final interview think will win if it is?— will win if it is? i'm sure rishi sunak is— will win if it is? i'm sure rishi sunak is going _ will win if it is? i'm sure rishi sunak is going to _ will win if it is? i'm sure rishi sunak is going to make - will win if it is? i'm sure rishi sunak is going to make it - will win if it is? i'm sure rishi| sunak is going to make it into will win if it is? i'm sure rishi - sunak is going to make it into the final two — sunak is going to make it into the final two. as you mentioned earlier, there _ final two. as you mentioned earlier, ihere seems— final two. as you mentioned earlier, there seems to be a race for second place _ there seems to be a race for second place with— there seems to be a race for second place with referring her support behind — place with referring her support behind liz truss, liz truss may take second _ behind liz truss, liz truss may take second place — behind liz truss, liz truss may take second place from penny and i think
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it is rishi _ second place from penny and i think it is rishi sunak versus penny or liz it is rishi sunak versus penny or liz truss — it is rishi sunak versus penny or liz truss~ i— it is rishi sunak versus penny or liz truss. i think party members will probably want to go with someone more experienced, some and they can _ someone more experienced, some and they can trust in someone who handled — they can trust in someone who handled the crisis very well and will go — handled the crisis very well and will go for— handled the crisis very well and will go for rishi sunak.- handled the crisis very well and will go for rishi sunak. great to have ou will go for rishi sunak. great to have you on _ will go for rishi sunak. great to have you on and _ will go for rishi sunak. great to have you on and hear _ will go for rishi sunak. great to have you on and hear your- will go for rishi sunak. great to - have you on and hear your thoughts and we will see of those predictions do come true. some news about braverman being knocked out of the contest, she is now backing liz truss. liz truss in the conservative leadership campaign. drivers for eight rail companies will strike on 30thjuly in an ongoing dispute over conditions and pay, their union aslef has announced. it comes after strikes were announced for 27th july too. the assistant general secretary of aslef says its members
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have no choice but to go on strike. we don't want to be doing this. we don't want to take strike action, our members lose pay we do not deliver the service we should be delivering. but we've been forced to do this. we've not had a successful negotiation and as i said, this is the first weekend where we can take, lawfully take action because of the anti—trade union laws. but it is never a good time to take strike action, it's never a good thing to do and we want to try and avoid it and that's why we're saying to the operators involved, come and talk to us, have meaningful negotiations and let's get a resolution so that we don't see another pay cut for the third year in a row. the rail delivery group, which represents train companies, say they're hugely disappointed with the planned strike. no one wins at strikes and the people are most affected are obviously going to be the
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passengers, particularly when the strikes are finished on a saturday, when the biggest days of the commonwealth games and also, the start of the football in the championships in these areas are only going to impact and damage the district further on the lost of further revenue and maintenance takes longer for them to close the funding that they would've seen. losing support of the 5—star movement, key party and the government coalition. they have invited him to appear before the parliament to gain political support. earlier, he survived a confidence vote in the senate part of the backing of 5—star.
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well to talk it through further i'm joined now by the rome correspondent for politico europe, hannah roberts. thank you for coming on the programme. we are going to come back to this extraordinary idea that someone office the resignation and thatis someone office the resignation and that is told no, you cannot resign. i have another idea for you. we'll come back to that butjust starting off, talking this through, why he felt he had to resign in the first place. felt he had to resign in the first lace. , , ., , ., , place. these tensions have been buildin: place. these tensions have been building op _ place. these tensions have been building up for— place. these tensions have been building up for weeks, _ place. these tensions have been building up for weeks, if - place. these tensions have been building up for weeks, if not - building up for weeks, if not months. you have a grand coalition those put together 17 months ago for the emergency of the pandemic and to organise the post pandemic recovery and it's a grand coalition spanning from left to right in the party is very different and now that we have this legislature is coming to an end, they'll be elections in italy next year but the parties are trying to assert their identities and gain
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visibility within the government and the starting to quarrel and making a very difficult. mi the starting to quarrel and making a very difficult-— very difficult. all the individual arties very difficult. all the individual parties are _ very difficult. all the individual parties are looking _ very difficult. all the individual parties are looking ahead - very difficult. all the individual parties are looking ahead of. very difficult. all the individuall parties are looking ahead of the election thinking right, we need to look after our own image and their own support here and that leaves the prime minister draghi in a position where he feels he does not have the support to carry on and he goes to the president and says, i would like to resign and the president says no. what happens now? absolutely, the resident what happens now? absolutely, the president has _ what happens now? absolutely, the president has sent _ what happens now? absolutely, the president has sent draghi _ what happens now? absolutely, the president has sent draghi back- what happens now? absolutely, the president has sent draghi back to i president has sent draghi back to parliament to have a confidence vote and i'll happen on wednesday in the main reason for this is, we don't normally have elections in italy in the autumn of them sound a bit strange, but the system we do the budgeted text quite a few months and the elections can take a long time to form of government and they would
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like to delay elections in the next year and draghi, like to delay elections in the next yearand draghi, it's like to delay elections in the next year and draghi, it's difficult with the economic cost of living crisis thatis the economic cost of living crisis that is really fighting fuel costs which have risen in the pandemic is researching and so, if he can continue his work until 2023, it will be a win for everyone. haifa will be a win for everyone. how likel do will be a win for everyone. how likely do you — will be a win for everyone. how likely do you think— will be a win for everyone. how likely do you think it _ will be a win for everyone. how likely do you think it is - will be a win for everyone. how likely do you think it is to - will be a win for everyone. how likely do you think it is to hold because there's so many divisions of the politics, and the country with so many policies and areas dealing with how much support we should give to ukrainians, italians and other politicians arguing about that. given we've had this offer of resignation, do you think the government can hold it together until that time period you are talking about and later elections? by talking about and later elections? by no means certain that the government is going to win the confidence vote next week, even if the 5—star movement, for her to
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rebel today in support draghi, other parties are getting a bit of a taste for earlier elections and that seems not to be in favour of that. by no means certain that draghi will win the confidence of next week and. that could really lead to that destabilising potential that you are referencing earlier on and i'm afraid we must leave it there but really sincere thank you because you explain that so clearly to us, which can be politically very difficult explanation to give us, so thank you for your time. we appreciate it. the headlines on bbc news... out of the reach of the conservative leadership leaving just five candidates left to be the next prime minister. she says she will now back liz truss. train drivers from eight rail companies will strike on the
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30th three days after a walk—out by the r into union. and italian prime minister draghi loose political support and resigns but the president says he should stay on. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre. the man to catch heading into the second round, needs to leave the field on mcelroy, the competition is returned to st andrews regarded as the home of golf at a time of deep division within the sport with the golf series recruiting many leading players. here is our correspondent, joe wilson. 290,000 spectators are expected over the four days at 150th open. at st andrew's, more than anywhere, they follow tradition.
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listen to the reaction of coming to the first tee. he is one of several players here who is also part of the saudi financed golf series which is according to the open organisers, undermining the sport. are you aware of those comments, ian? purposely haven't looked at all, so i don't want to know. you can tell me, i'm not going to listen. rory mcilroy has stood firmly against the new liv golf. he navigated this old course expertly in his first round to finish six under par. tiger woods has prioritised playing here again over everything else. but when the dust cleared on the first, he watched his ball bounce into the burn. water, in other words. many sympathised. you know where tiger woods is on the course even when you can't see him, because you can't see him — look, he's surrounded by crowd. everyone's still trying to catch a glimpse of him. what they saw was the former champion struggling through the opening holes
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of his round. commentator: no, it'sjust gone by. suddenly, it seemed like a youngster�*s game. earlier, another american, cameron young, aged 25, walked off the 18th, eight under par. get your round done and let the others try to catch you. it's what tiger would do. a group of players on four under, including englishmen leave us just beating india by a hundred runs in the second international lowest level of the series and 246 all out and 49 overs and top scoring with 47. fourwickets and 49 overs and top scoring with 47. four wickets for india but their betters really struggled and never
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recovered. six wickets and finally all out for 146. tom has one stage 12 of the tour de france becoming the second british rider to claim victory on the famous area. the olympic mountain but —— mountain bike rider, from the finish, he held on to win by 48 seconds to win his first grand tour stage win. pretending the yellow jersey, carrot thomas moved. italy were looking to bounce back, losing 5-1 were looking to bounce back, losing 5—1 from the they had a point after the due from belgium after their opening game and took an early lead with a long throat eventually breaking to carry. trying level through valentina and
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they hit the post too finished the draw. and france are looking to extend their lead at the top of group d, there 1—0 up against belgium he can catch them on bbc one and the bp bbc sport website. the sri lankan president gotabaya rajapaksa has formally resigned after days of huge anti—government protests. demonstrators are celebrating on the streets of colombo defying a curfew in place. mr rajapaksa fled to singapore on wednesday as protestors took over government buildings. the governor of sri lanka's central bank says the country now needs a stable government as soon as possible if it's to stand any chance of tackling its economic crisis. from colombo, rajini vaidyanathan reports.
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under curfew. streets once packed with protesters, now patrolled by the military. outside the prime minister pots soldiers back on guard, authorised to use force to maintain order. a day ago, it was different. security forces were overrun by protesters, who stormed the gates and entered. one of a number of government buildings taken over by the masses. the streets outside the presidential palace are now virtually deserted. it's a contrast from a few days ago, when this place had been occupied by protesters. they have now handed it back to the authorities, and, while there is a sense of calm here right now, this island's problems are far from over.
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tempers are running high as the basics are in short supply. only a few weeks of fuel now left in the country. in an exclusive interview, the governor of sri lanka's central bank told me that without a stable government, the suffering will continue. we don't see a way forward on how to get enough foreign exchange to finance essential petroleum for this country. if that doesn't happen, then it will be like the whole country will be closed down. no one will be able to do any activities. the pace of the protests has slowed, the goal achieved. president gotabaya rajapaksa has now resigned. i met this man as he stormed the prime minister's house yesterday. he wants an interim government with new faces to be installed.
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we need an interim government for six months to one year to settle all this and ease the problems as much as possible. after that, elections should happen and people can select who they want to rule the next country next. tonight, they are celebrating the exit of the man who last ruled the country. the end of a chapter in a protest movement where people—power won. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, colombo. the hollywood actor kevin spacey has appeared in court at the old bailey charged with five sexual offences dating back 17 years. he pleaded not guilty to the offences which are alleged to have taken place in london and gloucestershire between 2005 and 2013. the double oscar winner "strenously denies" the charges. the trial date has been set forjune next year. the first of the money from the government to help with soaring energy bills will start hitting bank, building society and credit union
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accounts from today. 8 million households getting means—tested benefits will get £326 by the end ofjuly. a second payment will come later this year. pressure on nhs emergency services is getting worse, with patients in england waiting longerfor ambulances, many staff off sick and record numbers of people going to a&e. the royal college of nursing says the situation is bleak. our health editor hugh pym has been looking at the latest figures. a&e at a surrey hospital this morning. hello, how are you? the challenge, as usual, is finding new space for new patients and transferring those who need it to the wards. we are often coming in in the morning with 25 to 35 patients waiting for a bed. they say there are no longer seasonal differences. there would be a winter and a summer in hospitals, and that's something we haven't seen for many years.
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covid and the heatwave just make it even worse. i've been at this hospital for 16 years and i've never seen it as busy as it is now. ambulance services across england are on the highest state of alert and under extreme pressure, with covid staff absences a factor. we're not performing anywhere near where we should be. and i know from my own experience that lives are being put at risk, and have been all the way through this period of time. how i could have had a fall as bad as it was, i don't know. there i was, in torture. angela had a serious leg fracture after a fall downstairs at night. her husband jamie spent hours repeatedly calling 999. the frustration of not being told when an ambulance was going to come, that's what got me every hour ringing, and they would not tell us when. and no ambulance ever did turn up. the next morning, a local doctor took angela to hospital.
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the south—western ambulance service apologised and said it was taking too long to get to patients because of delays at hospitals. so is there anything england's new patient safety commissioner can do about problems across the system? if concerns were raised to my office or to me directly, i would ensure that they go to the right part of the system and that people get the response they need. i absolutely can see that there are huge problems at the moment. we are still in unprecedented times. hospitals are close to full. it's hard to discharge medically fit patients because of social care problems. a new survey reveals more patients putting off booking gp appointments because it's too difficult, the new realities on the front line. hugh pym, bbc news. let's speak now with will broughton, paramedic and spokesperson for the college of paramedics. good evening. how bad is it, let's focus on ambulances and those delays
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in getting an ambulance when you needed, how bad is that the moment? it's terrible at the moment. patients across the country are waiting for too long for emergency ambulance to arrive we just cannot respond people quickly enough or in the correct amount of time and so, at the moment, the situation is pretty terrible. at the moment, the situation is pretty terrible-— pretty terrible. why can't the ambulances _ pretty terrible. why can't the ambulances get _ pretty terrible. why can't the ambulances get there - pretty terrible. why can't the ambulances get there in - pretty terrible. why can't the | ambulances get there in time pretty terrible. why can't the i ambulances get there in time in pretty terrible. why can't the - ambulances get there in time in your view? . ., , ambulances get there in time in your view? . . , ., ., ambulances get there in time in your view? . ., ., ., , view? increased demand and ambulance services. view? increased demand and ambulance services- lots — view? increased demand and ambulance services. lots of _ view? increased demand and ambulance services. lots of people _ view? increased demand and ambulance services. lots of people are _ view? increased demand and ambulance services. lots of people are calling i services. lots of people are calling 999 because of delays whether or not spaces to off—load patients and to the emergency department so, ambulances are unable to respond to patients in the community and this is also having a profound effect on staff and staff going off sick across front lines emergency operations centres and so, we have staff shortages and hospitals and
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increased immensely, a number of people calling is very high at. 1th people calling is very high at. as three main factors coming together meaning that this big demand and you call 999 and you're having these huge wait times, how scary, how dangerous is that kind of risks of patients facing because of that? is incredibly dangerous me know on a day—to—day basis, because these delays, ambulance services and all those people who work within them are doing everything they can respond to patients as quickly as possible and maybe we just aren't getting the people as quickly as we would like to in some cases and it is taking too long. haifa would like to in some cases and it is taking too long.— is taking too long. how do you fix it emotionally _ is taking too long. how do you fix it emotionally does _ is taking too long. how do you fix it emotionally does he _ is taking too long. how do you fix it emotionally does he change i is taking too long. how do you fix it emotionally does he change to | is taking too long. how do you fix i it emotionally does he change to try to speed up those times? i it emotionally does he change to try to speed up those times?— it emotionally does he change to try to speed up those times? i think we had to see real— to speed up those times? i think we had to see real acknowledgement i to speed up those times? i think we i had to see real acknowledgement from government about the seriousness of government about the seriousness of government and urgent questions
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about ambulance delays and there are about ambulance delays and there are a of this and announced that they were there to fix the problem and they are not ready yet. the auxiliary ambulance services, they're not ready yet, not there and there are lots of long term or longer—term solutions and we need urgent action now and people to take the situation very seriously because patients are calling 999 and ambulances it is not available or not responding to people quickly enough. not responding to people quickly enou:h. .. ., not responding to people quickly enou:h. ., ., ., not responding to people quickly enouuh. ., ., . enough. urgent action now have those [on . -term enough. urgent action now have those long-term plans. _ enough. urgent action now have those long-term plans. is — enough. urgent action now have those long-term plans, is there _ enough. urgent action now have those long-term plans, is there anything i long—term plans, is there anything that can be done straightaway to try and fix it? , ., ., _ and fix it? there is no easy fix, with a tray _ and fix it? there is no easy fix, with a tray and _ and fix it? there is no easy fix, with a tray and address - and fix it? there is no easy fix, with a tray and address the i and fix it? there is no easy fix, i with a tray and address the system problems with demand and ambulance services and emergency departments and making sure that the space for patients to go when ambulances arrive at the emergency departments, things like social care and medication patients can be discharged, we do need to concentrate on making sure there's a
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workforce responding to these patients and the moral injury that's being seen because were not getting the people in time, because people are coming to harm before we arrive, thatis are coming to harm before we arrive, that is having a real significant effect on people that are doing these jobs and trying their best to get everybody as quickly as they can. so, there is addressing the workforce shortages and we've definitely got to continue training paramedics, ambulance and staff in this response to the service to make sure they keep court there and see our resources and see they can off—loading it to those patients. thank you very much for coming on explaining it to us. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. hello. the heat hasn't been so intense during today. we've changed our wind direction, it's freshened up. but we do have showers around this evening to fade away, and more rain actually is moving
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in across northern ireland and scotland this evening and overnight. so, holding our temperatures a little higher here — whilst in the south, because we've lost that humidity, again, a much more comfortable night for sleeping. and a fine start to the day, that's a little bit of mist, but plenty of sunshine. our rain does tend to travel east southwards, but petering out as it does so. brighter skies follow on behind. so, just introducing rather more cloud, the breeze from the northwest. but again, it's in the south where we see the highest temperatures. and it's from the south where we'll build the heat as we go through the weekend. those winds changing to the south, pumping that heat right the way across the uk. temperature records could well be broken across all of the home nations, and we could break the temperature record. it is going to be extremely hot — hence the amber warning for extreme heat from the met office. as ever, more online. hello this is bbc news the headlines... attorney general suella
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braverman is out of the race leaving just five candidates left to be the next prime minister. suella braverman says she will now back liz truss. a prime minister has offered his resignation after losing political support but the country wants him to stay. train drivers from eight rail companies will strike on the 30th, three days after a 20 four hour walkabout. the president has resigned. ambulances in england to get average of 51 minutes to respond to an emergency like a heart attack or stroke last month. far longerthan like a heart attack or stroke last month. far longer than 80 minute target. russian missiles struck civilian in central ukraine killing civilians
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including three children and during as many as 50. that is according to ukrainian officials. the attack took place in the city of vinnytsia, far from the front line in the east of the country where there is fighting. i correspond and is there and you made my details distressing. a sunny morning, suddenly turned pitch black. a man filmed this right after the russian missiles hit vinnytsia. it is the very heart of this city. they killed workers, women, children. there was an air raid siren, but this is central ukraine, far from the fighting, so people ignored it. but the blast was huge. a giant department store and an office block were destroyed, but it seems the russians�* target was opposite. this place is called officers house, but it's a concert hall.
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we saw no sign of any military here. translation: it was scary. people came running this way covered in shrapnel injuries, so i ran in the other direction because it was frightening. this is right in the heart of vinnytsia and now this whole square is a disaster scene. there are dozens of rescuers here working through the day bray, the wreckage this missile strike. this was a building of offices, there were shops and they are all completely destroyed. as a social club just next door, a concert venue. again, a civilian building and it is also gutted. there is a huge hole blasted through the building. there have been a firework are dousing the flames even hours after the strike. russia of course always says it
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fires precision missiles at military targets. but this was shops, these as people, civilians out walking in the park and a square here. it's another reminder that this war is costing lives every single day, civilians are being killed a long way from any front lines. sarah rainsford with the latest there in vinnytsia in ukraine. thousands of civilians have been killed, and millions of ukrainians have fled their homes since russia invaded ukraine. but the devastating consequences of the war have extended to russian families too. the bbc�*s russia editor steve rosenberg has spoken to the mother of one russian soldier who went missing in ukraine. russia's invasion has brought untold pain to ukraine. but if you travel across russia, you'll discover that here, too, there are families that are suffering the consequences. this mother has asked us
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to hide her identity. valya — not her real name — fears she may get into trouble for speaking out. but she wants to tell us about her son, a russian soldier who was fighting in ukraine. valya last heard from him more than four—and—a—half months ago. translation: i don't believe the government any more. i i wrote to his unit, i wrote to the military district office, i wrote to the defence ministry, and then i wrote to them all again. no one has given me the basic information — where, when and how my son disappeared. in official letters, valya was told that her son had been taking part in a special military operation and that he's missing. translation: on tv, they say that l everything's fine, we're winning. l but our lads are being killed. if our country had been attacked like this, we would also be defending ourselves, like they are.
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we'd defend ourselves and we'd be angry, too. i realise now that ukrainian mothers are the same as us. their sons are being killed. they're searching for their children. i don't know what this was all for. you'd have to ask the government. ask president putin and he'll tell you he ordered troops into ukraine to defend the motherland. he wants russians to rally around the flag. but valya is in touch with soldiers' mothers across russia and she says that many of the mothers blame the kremlin for what is happening. translation: they hate - the government, they hate putin. they all want this war to end. if the mothers of all the soldiers who are fighting there and the ones who've lost sons, if they all rose up, can you imagine how big that army would be?
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and they will. their nerves will snap. stop. stop all this. stop it and protect our children. since she spoke to us, valya has received confirmation that her son is dead. one more russian soldier who won't be coming home. steve rosenberg, bbc news, russia. management have announced how they intend to merge. earlier the cultural editor gave more details to my colleague. this channel, the bbc news channel will merge with bbc world news to create a global channel, which is advert free in the uk. we learn a bit more detail about what that will involve, they are talking about some programmes based
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around high—profile presenters. radio programmes visualised on television. the channel will be presented from the uk in uk daytime hours that will then move to washington and singapore to be presented then. there will be alive and breaking news team offering global coverage of breaking news stories. clearly, everyone listening to that, if you managed to turn all understand thatjobs will be lost. clearly it's very unsettling for people who work on the channel because my understanding is that 70 jobs will be lost although they say 20 jobs will be created in washington. and that people have to reapply for new roles. why is the bbc doing this? well, to main reasons. we are in tough economic times. it was announced recently a freeze to the licence fee which means that conceiving her to continue to be made. they have announced they are going to start putting cbbc and cb of c4 on
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traditional broadcast channels. this falls into that there is a wider suggestion in question the assignments as tv audiences are dwindling, they need to move the offer of tv, the author the bbc makes to those places that the audiences are. they have looked, there is a buzz phrase, i'm sure you've heard it at the bbc and wider about being digital first. you've heard it at the bbc and wider about being digitalfirst. clearly the audience are being driven to the bbc website. tens of millions of people have gone on to stories when unfolding stories happen, for example borisjohnson resigning. or indeed glastonbury. the live pages at the bbc offer have had tens of millions of people going on to them. they have been suggesting that the bbc is the best place to create, as the head of digital has said, the best live and digital news service on our web pages, our apps are iplayer. what are the next step so
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because this is a proposal? it is a ro osal. because this is a proposal? it is a proposal- so _ because this is a proposal? it is a proposal- so of — because this is a proposal? it is a proposal. so of course _ because this is a proposal? it is a proposal. so of course is going i because this is a proposal? it is aj proposal. so of course is going to be a negotiation with the unions. i think the bbc have already said they hope to do most of this, if not all of this through voluntary redundancies. clearly there is also a recruitment plate rack process that needs to go on in washington because there is a big team being created there. on the creative side for people who are watching and wondering what this will look like. they are going to develop a detailed schedule over the next few months and they'll be piloting this from the autumn with a view to launch the channel in april 2023.— channel in april2023. next, do us and israel have _ channel in april2023. next, do us and israel have signed _ channel in april2023. next, do us and israel have signed a _ channel in april2023. next, do us and israel have signed a joint i and israel have signed a joint declaration saying that they will not allow iran to develop a nuclear bomb. joe biden has been meeting the israeli prime minister on his first middle eastern trip since becoming president. iran insists its nuclear programme is peaceful. here is what
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some of president biden had to say. today, you and i also discuss the commitment to ensuring iran never obtains a nuclear weapon. it is a vital security that involves israel and the united states and i would add for the rest of the world as well. i continue to believe that diplomacy is the best way to achieve this outcome and we will continue to work with israel to counter other threats from iran throughout the region, including support for terrorism and ballistic missile programme continues and the proliferation of weapons to terrorists. we will also continue working on the abraham court which i strongly support because they deepen israel's integration. establish lasting ties for business, cooperation and tourism. ice lasting ties for business, cooperation and tourism. joe biden will also visit _ cooperation and tourism. joe biden will also visit the _ cooperation and tourism. joe biden will also visit the occupied - cooperation and tourism. joe biden will also visit the occupied west i will also visit the occupied west bank before travelling to saudi arabia. our correspondence gave this
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assessment of how president biden's visit has gone so far. this has been a day when the israelis and americans have really been lavishing each other with the words friendship and alliance. but they still differ on the key strategic issue for the region is over iran. and so i think what we have been left with is the restating of already known positions throughout this trip by mr biden. he wants to revive the nuclear deal with the iranians, the israelis are vehemently oppose that. mr biden knows that deal installed and i think what we have seen during this is that the israeli prime minister trying to oppress similar to a different position. he says that democratic countries should underpin the diplomacy with the threat of force if iran tried to develop a nuclear bomb. he said that they should know they have to pay the price. i think the other thing that
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is notable through mr biden's trip is notable through mr biden's trip is the complete lack of police diplomacy, for example, america's commitment to a two state solution to israelis and palestinians. that was in a shared and joint declaration between the israelis and the americans. but it was only mr biden appeared to be signing up to that particular part of it and the commitment was way down the document itself, nearto commitment was way down the document itself, near to the bottom. had even fewer words in a section about science and food security. i spoke to one palestinian official i asked if there was anything that he welcomed in a document? he simply said no. on friday mr biden will head to eastjerusalem to the occupied red boot west bank to meet the palestinian prime minister i think there will be a challenging game for a few ways. not least of which is that the relations between the israeli and and the palestinians fell apart under president trump and
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it is taking mr biden a long time to try and rebuild them. you're watching bbc news headlines... attorney general suella braverman is out of the race for the leadership. leaving just five candidates left to be the next by minister. suella braverman says she will now back liz truss. train drivers from eight rail companies will strike on the 30th, three days after another 24 hour walk—out from the rmt union. italian prime minister mario draghi has offered his resignation after losing political support but the country's president said he should stay on. a disabled woman is facing fines for parking in a disabled car parking space cerys gemma says the parking space allocated to her flat,
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space allocated to her flat, in a gated development in cardiff bay, is too small for her to use with her wheelchair so she's been using a space for disabled visitors instead. but the company responsible for parking says that's against the rules and the now fines are building up. as colette hume reports. gemma leaving for work. she's a development manager for a local charity and she parks her car in this wheelchair accessible space near her flat in cardiff bay. but every time she does, she risks another ticket. that is because the spaces for disabled visitors, not disabled residents. so far, she owes more than £1000. it has plagued me for two years and ijust, ijust, i can't go on any more. like, i'm at breaking point and i have had conversations with people and said, this is the end. i can't do this any more. something has to change and i'm not willing to be pushed out of my home
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because i'm in a wheelchair. it's hard enough anyway and i try to be as graceful and as patient with people that don't have accessible buildings. i understand that it is hard but i'm not being pushed out of my home just because of a parking space when they've got eight accessible bays that are for visitors that are empty most of the time that they can just let me park in. this is her official parking space. she can drive into it, but it's about all she can do. as you can see, it is absolutely impossible for me to park here. this is as far as i can open my door, i think an able bodied person would struggle with that and someone who needs to get a wheelchair out. the tickets are being issued by the london firm, new generation parking management. they say she cannot have her own space because it would be, in their words, impossible to give special consideration to one disabled user without also giving the same consideration to all other disabled users. i spoke to chris frey, he is a lawyer and an expert on disability legislation.
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i wanted to ask him what he made of the situation. if the space that she's been allocated is inaccessible due to her disability, then they under an obligation to make a reasonable adjustments maybe to change at space to a close respond towards the front door. and, really, if they don't, that's a breach of the equality act. earlier this afternoon, we heard from a building management company, the ringley group. they suggested that she could try to swap her allocated parking space with another resident for something more suitable. they see a shortage of visitors spaces means they cannot provide her with a permanent disabled parking space. she says she simply wants to go to work each day without the fear of more fines. 38.7 degrees celsius — that's the hottest temperature ever recorded in the uk —
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that was in cambridge in 2019. but that record could be broken next week amid warnings of extreme temperatures particularly across southern, eastern and central england. and not surprisingly given this heatwave and lack of rainfall in recent months — there are now warnings that water levels in some reservoirs are at their lowest levels for decades as danny savage reports from yorkshire. water companies are starting to worry. across a large part of the uk, it's been dry for months and reservoir levels are falling. this is one of several reservoirs which supplies drinking water to leeds. yorkshire water say back in march, they were nearly full. you can see the line on the wall up there as to where the water got to. it's now right down here. they are now asking customers to use water more wisely. in other words, use less or face mandatory restrictions. restrictions is one of the tools we have with our drought management plan as we head
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into very high temperatures. we'll be doing very targeted communications, they adapt their behaviour and that makes a difference. but of course, we can't rule out restrictions later in the year. yorkshire water isn't alone. customers in other regions are also being asked to take shorter showers and let the lawn turn brown. with potentially record temperatures forecast for next week and no recent rain, an increase in wildfires is expected. this is the salisbury plain area today. how bad is it this year? it's really bad. we've had significant periods of dry weather. conditions are some of the worst this fire officer has seen. we're seeing record numbers of fires in the uplands and our rural landscapes. we've already surpassed our national totals and we're onlyjust hitting our summer months now. so it's a really concerning time for us as a fire service. the dry conditions could soon lead to hosepipe bans and other restrictions. more fires are expected. next week's high temperatures won't help.
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danny savage, bbc news, west yorkshire. hundreds of british dentists are having to treat patients with serious complications after they had cut—price crowns put in abroad, according to the british dental association. the research done for a bbc documentary has discovered that the latest look, seen on love island and on social media, has given some people their dream smile but left others asking the nhs to pick up the pieces. divya talwar reports. this is one of the latest beauty trends that's taken off on social media. it's all about getting the perfect smile by filing down most of your natural teeth and gluing a cap or crown on top. it's been dubbed turkey teeth because it's one of the most popular destinations people are travelling to for this look. tilly is 22 and says she hated her old teeth. ever since a young age, i was bullied for my teeth,
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so i grew a complex against them, i didn't like them. it was called things like bugs bunny. so earlier this year, tilly travelled to turkey for 16 new crowns. i'm smiling a lot more and laughing. i'm not hiding my mouth, which i did constantly. our investigation has found that this risky and invasive treatment is often planned entirely over social media, and many dentists in the uk won't touch turkey teeth. if we have a patient who is not our patient say they've had work done in turkey, it is much easier for us to simply not take that patient. if i did 20 crowns on a 21—year—old for the purposes of improving the colour, i would have my licence revoked. getting this look can come with major risks, like painful infections and tooth extractions. turkey teeth don't last forever. lisa says she had no idea they'd need replacing when she had her teeth done over
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a decade ago. she had to go back last year to have 26 new crowns. i thought once they put the teeth into your mouth, that was it. they never said, you know, that your teeth can die, that you can get... they never said anything. lisa's had major complications, including infections and chronic pain. i've just been crying. if she'd known about these risks, she never would have got the treatment done. while many people will continue travelling abroad for that instagram—worthy smile, the advice is to do your research — because once you've got these teeth, there's no going back. divya talwar, bbc news. and you can see more on that story here on the bbc news channel this saturday at 5:30pm in "�*turkey teeth — bargain smiles or big mistake' and it's also available on iplayer.
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some news coming in saying that donald trump's first wife, yvonne a champ he was 73 has died. that is according to the former us president on thursday. quote saying i am very sad to informed of those that loved her, of which there are many that ivana trump has passed away at her home in new york city. that was the former president's post. the couple divorced in 1992, they had three children together. that news is coming through now. that she has died at the age of 73. next, it's been hidden for a 137 years , now a secret self portrait by one of the most famous artists in the world — vincent van gogh —
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has been revealed by a gallery in edinburgh. experts say the incredible find was discovered on the back of another painting, "head of a peasant woman", when it went through an x—ray. joanne macaulay has the story. for more than 100 years, this picture has been holding a secret. on the back of van gogh's head of a peasant woman is a previously unseen work by the artist. the ghostly image was revealed as experts carried out an x—ray on the painting. oh, it was a complete shock and, i have to say, pretty much instant recognition. we thought, my goodness, there he is. we have his hat and his beard, signature neckerchief around his neck, and itjust struck us immediately that it was a self—portrait. as a poor artist, van gogh used both sides of the canvas to save money. but the self—portrait side is covered in cardboard and glue. experts hope they can safely remove the material from this valuable piece. this is really a major and very exciting find for the national galleries of scotland.
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it's so unusual to find a new painting on the back of a canvas like this. and, also, it is a good example of a period when van gogh was developing his mature, very radical style. the style we associate with him. it's likely to be some time before all the cardboard and glue on the back of the painting is removed and the self—portrait is fully revealed. but, in the meantime, members of the public can see the x—ray of it here in edinburgh when it goes on display at the end of the month. 110w now it's time for the weather. good evening. the heat hasn't been so intense today. we do have some showers around this evening. rain moving in across northern ireland and scotland this evening and overnight. holding our temperatures a little higher here, was in the south because we
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have lost that humidity again and much more comfortable night for sleeping. a fine start to the day, plenty of sunshine. our ranges travel eastwards and southwards but petering out as it does to. just introducing more cloud, a breach of the north—west. but again it is in the north—west. but again it is in the south where we see the higher temperatures. it is from the south that we are going to build the heat as we go through the weekend. when is changing to the south, pumping that heat right the way across the uk. temperature records could be broken across all of the home nations. we could break the temperature record it is going to be extremely hot, hence the amber warning for extreme heat from the met office, more online. thank you very much for coming on explaining it to us. thank you.
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hello, i'm maryam moshiri. you're watching the context on bbc news. another one bites the dust in the conservative leadership race — suella braverman is knocked out — with rishi sunak coming out on top again. penny mordaunt remains the favourite among the party membership — but today comes under fire from allies of liz truss. more than 22 civilians are killed in central ukraine as a cruise missile hits a residential area — injuring many more. wildfires in france, spain, portugal and croatia — as the uk braces for record temperatures. tonight with the context, lord peter ricketts — former uk national security advisor and the republican strategist rina shah.

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