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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 19, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm ben brown. the headlines. the mayor of london declares a major incident the surge of fires across the capital because of the current heat wave and record temperatures. it is officially britain's hottest day ever. hottest day ever. according to provisional figures from the met office. the temperature at heathrow reached 40.2 degrees — and within the last hour coningsby in lincolnshire recorded a03. when you come out and you feel this heat, it's like being abroad. there is no way i can work in it properly. it's hot. we'll survive. the government has revealed its pay offer for millions of public sector workers.
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we will be getting reaction the unions. kemi badenoch is eliminated from play election. and then there were three. kemi badenoch is knocked out of the conservative leadership contest — meaning rishi sunak, penny mordaunt and liz truss go through to the next round. and could you soon be allowed to get married in your back garden? a change in the law is set to give couples more say over wedding venues and ceremonies in england and wales. the london fire brigade have declared a "major incident" with a huge surge in fires across the capital amid today's extreme heat, and unprecedented temperatures of around a0 degrees celsius.
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more than 350 firefighters are tackling at least four grass fires — including a blaze that's spread to homes in wennington, in east london. thick black smoke has been billowing in the air — with fields and some buildings on fire. there are also blazes in upminster near the m25, and in south croydon. the mayor of london says firefighters are under immense pressure at the moment — people have been urged not to have barbeques in the current conditions. it comes after the met office announced a new provisional uk temperature record — 40.3 degrees registered at coningsby in lincolnshire. if confirmed, it will mean that today is officially the hottest day in this country since records began. the previous record of 38.7 degrees was set three years ago. the met office had already said that last night was the hottest ever recorded in the uk,
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with night time temperatures staying above 25 degrees in some places. the weather has brought travel disruption, network rail has issued a "do not travel" warning for anyone in the zone covered by the extreme weather warning. the east coast main line out of london's kings cross is closed, and there will be no thameslink or great northern services running north from london all day. services are also currently suspended between euston and milton keynes due to a fire involving overhead cables. many other lines are subject to speed restrictions. the hot weather is also putting added pressure on the nhs emergency services, which are seeing an increase in 999 and 111 calls. the health secretary, steve barclay, said more funding and call handlers had been put in place to cope with increased demand. five people have died while swimming in rivers
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and lakes yesterday — in london, berkshire, salford, northumberland and wiltshire. police and fire services are urging people not to go in rivers, reservoirs, lakes or other open water due to the dangers, including cold water shock. in essex, one person is missing at sea and another five have been rescued after they got into difficulty in waters near clacton pier. daniel sanford is in wellington huge amounts of activity, as we drove out of the city of london or log the eighth 13, at one of the main carriage rays eased out of london, you can see three large fires from the dual carriageway. this one in upstart and dartford. this appears to be perhaps the most serious of fires in london at the moment. it's
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basically grassland between the eighth 13 and the small settlements of wellington has caught fire. this is grassland where horses are grazing nearby. the fire has been blown onto a set of houses. we think about two or three houses have been destroyed, according to residents here. one woman we were talking to here. one woman we were talking to here live right next to them. the fire station, she was very upset at the destruction she has seen today. we've seen fire engine as a fire engine, fire coordination and a stretcher going in. there's large numbers of police officers here, we think the town has been largely evacuated. it looks the moment like there is some potential injuries because of the presence of the ambulance. what we can see at the distance across the fields was the
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fire men's hoses spraying out onto the grassland at the back of the settlement, trying to douse down the flames. it doesn't feel like a panic situation at the moment but it does look as though it's been a very serious grass fire which has unfortunately spilt into the settlement and burned some of the houses. ., .,, houses. daniel sanford with those dramatic pictures _ houses. daniel sanford with those dramatic pictures of _ houses. daniel sanford with those dramatic pictures of those - houses. daniel sanford with those dramatic pictures of those fires. l dramatic pictures of those fires. let's get a picture of what's going on around the country. picture of what's going on around the country. let's speak to our correspondentjo black in newark in nottinghamshire — which could see more records broken. yes, there was a view that the highest temperature would be recorded somewhere in the east of england or maybe around here in the east midlands. we've had that notification about 40.3 it like a chair, be interesting to see if anywhere get any hotter. we're here at luig castle. this is a lovely spot to come was up we've been speaking to people who've been coming out and enjoying the
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sunshine. it's super quiet at the moment as you can see because it has got too hot for a lot of people to come out. it is very uncomfortable standing here talking to you here at the moment. there is a breeze but it feels like standing in front of a hairdryer. we think hits in the high 30s with told us a few hours ago it was 37, it feels much hotter than that now. people have been coming here much earlier today taking advantage of the shade that is provided here by the beautiful trees surrounding here in this lovely landscape. there is a high street just over there and very quiet they are today, hardly any pedestrians or shoppers down there. lots of shops close. i spoke to one cafe owner who said he had to close because it was very quiet and also he was worried about the food and produce the cafe was having to move it around various fridges. i spoke to a lady from nottingham who was a baker she usually gets up at 3am to bake cakes
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and commercial ovens are on for six hours, she said there was absolutely no way she was going to do that today so she decided to close her shop. as we've heard across the day, lots of disruption on the rail, on the roads at some of the airports as well. and some hospitals also talking about not doing operations because it is just too hot to carry out any procedures school closures, schools closing early, sports days being cancelled, things like that, much disruption across the country for that as we say, 40.3 now recorded in lincolnshire, it be interesting to see if that goes any higher. interesting to see if that goes any hi . her. . ~ interesting to see if that goes any hiaher. . ~' ,, , interesting to see if that goes any hiaher. ., ~ , . interesting to see if that goes any hiaher. ., , . g , higher. thank you very much. just want to bring _ higher. thank you very much. just want to bring you _ higher. thank you very much. just want to bring you an _ higher. thank you very much. just want to bring you an update - higher. thank you very much. just want to bring you an update on i higher. thank you very much. just | want to bring you an update on the record—breaking situation. we're narrow hearing that the met office is saying at least 29 of the observation sites across england have provisionally broken that previous record that was set in 2019
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of 38.7 c. that record has been broken at 29 different sites around england from west york shire to sorry, which we reported earlier on. just giving —— sorry. just giving you in extent of the record—breaking which is happening. let's get more on travels disruptions. rails has buckled and services have been cancelled or delayed. for more on the transport disruptions, we can speak to celestina 0lulode at kings cross station. what is happening down the crowd at euston? then it certainly feels a lot cooler here than it did a couple of hours ago. but that doesn't mean that transport is up and running again at this station. there are no trains leaving kings cross here today. that's led to many tourists in
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particular having to change their plans and many other passersby hereto. here is what some people told me earlier today. we hereto. here is what some people told me earlier today.— told me earlier today. we were su osed told me earlier today. we were summed to — told me earlier today. we were supposed to take _ told me earlier today. we were supposed to take the _ told me earlier today. we were supposed to take the train - told me earlier today. we were| supposed to take the train from this station _ supposed to take the train from this station to— supposed to take the train from this station to cambridge but no trains running _ station to cambridge but no trains running. it's all booked in cambridge so we have to find a way to cambridge. gr cambridge so we have to find a way to cambridge-— cambridge so we have to find a way to cambridge. or to find a new hotel in london. to cambridge. or to find a new hotel in london- we _ to cambridge. or to find a new hotel in london. we will— to cambridge. or to find a new hotel in london. we will have _ to cambridge. or to find a new hotel in london. we will have to _ to cambridge. or to find a new hotel in london. we will have to make - to cambridge. or to find a new hotel in london. we will have to make a i in london. we will have to make a decision — in london. we will have to make a decision i— in london. we will have to make a decision. .. ., , �* in london. we will have to make a decision. .. . , �* , . decision. i actually didn't expect that london _ decision. i actually didn't expect that london would _ decision. i actually didn't expect that london would be _ decision. i actually didn't expect that london would be this - decision. i actually didn't expect that london would be this hot. | decision. i actually didn't expect that london would be this hot. i | that london would be this hot. i actually— that london would be this hot. i actually came out and abandoned the chance _ actually came out and abandoned the chance to _ actually came out and abandoned the chance to travel around london. i'm trying _ chance to travel around london. i'm trying to— chance to travel around london. i'm trying to stay— chance to travel around london. i'm trying to stay in someplace cool like british museum. it�*s trying to stay in someplace cool like british museum.— like british museum. it's a big matter of— like british museum. it's a big matter of concern _ like british museum. it's a big matter of concern for - like british museum. it's a big matter of concern for all - like british museum. it's a big matter of concern for all of. like british museum. it's a big matter of concern for all of us| like british museum. it's a big i matter of concern for all of us to see where — matter of concern for all of us to see where going _ matter of concern for all of us to see where going wrong - matter of concern for all of us to i see where going wrong right now. especially— see where going wrong right now. especially in — see where going wrong right now. especially in terms _ see where going wrong right now. especially in terms of _ see where going wrong right now. especially in terms of global- especially in terms of global warming _ especially in terms of global warming demand _ especially in terms of global warming demand warming l especially in terms of global. warming demand warming and especially in terms of global- warming demand warming and global change _ warming demand warming and global change for— warming demand warming and global change for that — warming demand warming and global change for that you _ warming demand warming and global change for that you think— warming demand warming and global change for that you think about - warming demand warming and global change for that you think about this l change for that you think about this happening — change for that you think about this happening every— change for that you think about this happening every day~ _ change for that you think about this happening every day. that - change for that you think about this happening every day-— happening every day. that some of the --eole happening every day. that some of the peeple you _ happening every day. that some of the people you were _ happening every day. that some of the people you were talking - happening every day. that some of the people you were talking to - happening every day. that some of the people you were talking to but| the people you were talking to but what about the situation with euston station in london? issues tonight.
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euston isjust station in london? issues tonight. euston is just five or ten minutes walk down in that direction. today it now and the last couple of minutes network rail has apologised saying that do to overhead electric cables overheating they've had to stop all trades coming in and out of that station. another major transport hub for the uk. this is all leading them to questions about whether transport operators need to look at whether services need to change in times like this when there is exceptionally high heat that is forecasted. but in response to that, network rail says that it is too early to take a decision at this stage. at the same time, we're advised to keep an eye out for updates from network rail and other service providers because there could be an impact tomorrow. and
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network rail says in the meantime, if you're trains have been impacted you are do to get a refund.- you are do to get a refund. thank ou ve you are do to get a refund. thank you very much — you are do to get a refund. thank you very much for _ you are do to get a refund. thank you very much for that _ you are do to get a refund. thank you very much for that update - you very much for that update from kings cross. let's speak to our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, who's at coldingham sands on the coast of the scottish borders. what is the picture there? very comfortable — what is the picture there? very comfortable warm _ what is the picture there? - comfortable warm weather by the coast here in the border. you just have to go a few hundred metres in length for the heat to become oppressive. the unofficial reports are suggesting that the record—breaking temperature for scotland has been reached in the borders today of 35 to 36 celsius without that's near kelso which is in scottish borders. it'sjust without that's near kelso which is in scottish borders. it's just a miles away from where the previous record was set back in 2003, the previous record was 32.9 c. that's a significantjump of a couple of degrees. still to be verified by the
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met office. that is unofficial, suggesting that records have been broken here in scotland as well there is disruption to trains, severe disruption on the main east coast line as well for some of the advice from scottish government was to take care, especially if you are out the middle in of the day and to keep an eye out for the most vulnerable amongst us, the very elderly and of course the young. a big risk here and elsewhere, multiple agencies warning is to take care around the water. the lifeguards here looking for people getting caught in rip tides perhaps getting caught in rip tides perhaps getting blown out to sea. but in land and parts of the coast but in land and parts of the coast but in land and parts of the coast but in land and particular in the locks, the water can be particularly cold and when contrasted with the hot air temperatures one of the big risks is cold water shock. people are being advised to take particular care if they are in the water today as well.
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0k, they are in the water today as well. ok, thank you very much indeed. as well as here in the uk, belgium, the netherlands and germany are also seeing temperatures soar. the heatwave has made its way north from southern europe. after days of record heat, temperatures have dipped in some parts but wildfires are threatenening parts of southwest france and spain. from madrid, guy hedgecoe reports. this summer is turning out to be a nightmare for many in spain. around 30 wildfires are burning, many of them out of control. the north—western region of galicia has been among the worst hit areas, having seen temperatures reach the low 40s celsius in recent days. in many areas, roads have been cut off. a blaze in zamora in central spain has already burned tens of thousands of hectares and killed two people, one a local farmer, the other a firefighter. this man only narrowly escaped the flames.
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the fire services are at full stretch. translation: we are scared. if the wind changes this way it burns down my parents�* house. if it changes that way it burns down my wife's work. that's what we have to live with. other countries in europe are seeing similar scenes, with portugal and greece also battling a barrage of wildfires. in zamora, local people who were evacuated are being housed in public buildings. as the heat has moved north from spain, france has seen temperatures rocket. this has fuelled huge wildfires in the south—western gironde region, which is popular with foreigners, forcing thousands of residents to be evacuated. translation: you get. nervous because you think about your grandparents house, they have lived there for such a long time, the whole village might burn. you get nervous. some people might die there.
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on monday, a new fire broke out further north in brittany. as efforts are made to put out the blazes, the question constantly being asked right now is, "where will the next one be?" guy hedgecoe, bbc news, madrid. let's turn our attention to the other big story of the day which is pay awards for public sectors workers. more than1 million nhs staff will be given a pay rise of at least £1,400 after the government accepted the recommendations of an independent review. the lowest—paid of those will see their salaries rise by up to 9.3%. dentists and doctors who are eligible will receive 4.5%, and police officers and teachers 5%. let's get more from our health editor hugh pym, who's with me, as well as our business
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correspondent carrie davies. just bring us up—to—date on some of the figures and what this means broadly in terms of public sector workers. ~ �* , ., workers. we're getting this in at the same time. _ workers. we're getting this in at the same time. we've _ workers. we're getting this in at the same time. we've had - workers. we're getting this in atj the same time. we've had press releases from the department for education about teachers but also from the department of health and social care for doctors, the nhs workers and we're also hearing from the home office and that is about police pay. in terms of what we've heard about teachers, we've heard that they will get between a 5% and 8.9% from september, that's when they're coming in. pay for experienced teachers who'd been in the profession for more than five years will rise by 5% and the academic year, which is an increase on the governments initial proposal of 3%. in terms of the pay for police, that will be overall a 5% pay award that will then depend upon where someone already sits within the pay grades. 8.8% they are saying for some of the lowest paid points and between not .6 and 1.8 on the
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highest pay for you can talk about the health care system. hugh pam, what is happening _ the health care system. hugh pam, what is happening in _ the health care system. hugh pam, what is happening in the _ the health care system. hugh pam, what is happening in the nhs? - the health care system. hugh pam, what is happening in the nhs? is i what is happening in the nhs? is complicated but senior doctors, consultants will get around about or a half— consultants will get around about or a half percent. junior doctors, those — a half percent. junior doctors, those who— a half percent. junior doctors, those who actually called trainees but those who actually called trainees hut may— those who actually called trainees but may have been practising for ten years— but may have been practising for ten years or— but may have been practising for ten years or so _ but may have been practising for ten years or so are on a pre—existing deat— years or so are on a pre—existing deal which — years or so are on a pre—existing deal which is _ years or so are on a pre—existing deal which is not changed by today. that actually will cause quite a lot of anger— that actually will cause quite a lot of anger because it average to present— of anger because it average to present a _ of anger because it average to present a year over four years. nurses. — present a year over four years. nurses, the lower paid will be getting — nurses, the lower paid will be getting more, maybe 9%. but on average — getting more, maybe 9%. but on average nurses will get about for ~5%~ _ average nurses will get about for ~5%~ those — average nurses will get about for .5%. those mainstream settlement awards— .5%. those mainstream settlement awards witt— .5%. those mainstream settlement awards will be about half the rate of inflation and already health unions — of inflation and already health unions have said that this is not nearly— unions have said that this is not nearly enough —— 4.5%. given the last coupte — nearly enough —— 4.5%. given the last couple years it is certainly not appropriate, it's insulting and i not appropriate, it's insulting and i know— not appropriate, it's insulting and i know the — not appropriate, it's insulting and i know the royal college of nursing as one _ i know the royal college of nursing as one health union will be consulting members on whether
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further— consulting members on whether further action in some form needs to be taken _ further action in some form needs to be taken. ~ �* , ., ., be taken. we've 'ust had some of these be taken. we've just had some of these figures and _ be taken. we've just had some of these figures and in _ be taken. we've just had some of these figures and in the - be taken. we've just had some of these figures and in the last - be taken. we've just had some of these figures and in the last few. these figures and in the last few minutes but in the run—up to these announcements, the unions have been saying that something like 5% is not enough because inflation is running at around double that.— at around double that. inflation is currently 9.196, _ at around double that. inflation is currently 9.196, that's _ at around double that. inflation is currently 9.196, that's expected i at around double that. inflation isj currently 9.196, that's expected to currently 9.1%, that's expected to continue to go out. the expectation and protection from the bank of england could exceed 11% put up with that in mind a lot of the unions were already making this case that pay rises needed to be more in step with inflation, particularly there's been a real concern that the public sector workers were the ones who kept most of the country going during the course of the pandemic. that's been the argument that the unions have made that it's important to show that appreciation and give people pay rises. from the governments part of view, what they said in some of these statements, they've talked about concerns about making sure the taxpayer has value for money as well. there's also a concern they could add to
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inflationary pressures by continuing to give higher and pay increases. that's interesting in line of what we're today we've heard labour figures about the state of labour in the economy at the moment, it showed that even though in general there was a decrease in real wages, the highest receipt for 20 years, actually public sector workers were on about five times less likely to have an increase in pay or pay them sector workers who were getting 7% increase on their pay. i think some people and unions will say well, private sector is going up, that's going to attract people who are in the public sector and public sector workers are given more wages you might see people being lost from the system. might see people being lost from the s stem. ., ~ might see people being lost from the s stem. ., ,, i. might see people being lost from the s stem. ., ~' ,, , . system. thank you very much indeed. we're going — system. thank you very much indeed. we're going to — system. thank you very much indeed. we're going to discuss _ system. thank you very much indeed. we're going to discuss which - we're going to discuss which happening with health workers in a bit more detail now.
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as it employers you are going to have to cough up a lot more money to pay for these awards, can you afford? this pay for these awards, can you afford? �* , , ., pay for these awards, can you afford? a , ., pay for these awards, can you afford? , afford? as you said it is a complex icture. afford? as you said it is a complex picture. government _ afford? as you said it is a complex picture. government is _ afford? as you said it is a complex picture. government is offering . afford? as you said it is a complex| picture. government is offering the largest increases in pay for the lowest paid workers. porters, cleaners, people critical to the nhs family, we understand the rationale for that approach. as you started your package, for the vast majority of nhs staff this will all considerably below the rates of inflation that we're seeing and will fail to acknowledge the cost of living crisis that they are grappling with. i've never heard so many stories from trusts or nurses accessing food bags provided by the hospital after their shift. or of community health care workers in tears because they can't afford the fuel cost to get out there and see their patients. leaders as
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employers, they will be disappointed, that not all of their staff and being recognised as they would want. they will certainly have concerns that these pay deals might not be enough in the context of work fault shortages and against the backdrop of operational pressures that we continue to say, he weighed this week, the pandemic, the spike in covert infections, dealing with care backlogs as a result of the pandemic. pay is a key ingredient in helping us with recruitment and retention in the nhs to offer valued doctors, nurses, health care workers a good career, good work life balance and a decent pay packet at the end of the month. certainly employers will be concerned this may not be enough. that employers will be concerned this may not be enough-— not be enough. that is a key point. the nhs is — not be enough. that is a key point. the nhs is so _ not be enough. that is a key point. the nhs is so short _ not be enough. that is a key point. the nhs is so short of— not be enough. that is a key point. the nhs is so short of nursing - not be enough. that is a key point. | the nhs is so short of nursing staff that the pay is a crucial way of trying to get more people in. certainly the health unions are not going to be happy with this pay award because they say it's running
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well below inflation and therefore it actually amounts a real term pay cut. ., , it actually amounts a real term pay cut. . , ~ it actually amounts a real term pay cut. . , cut. that is right. most staff at the nhs it _ cut. that is right. most staff at the nhs it is — cut. that is right. most staff at the nhs it is quite _ cut. that is right. most staff at the nhs it is quite a _ cut. that is right. most staff at the nhs it is quite a complex l cut. that is right. most staff at l the nhs it is quite a complex set cut. that is right. most staff at - the nhs it is quite a complex set of deals to go through. on the face of it, for most of it is looking like it, for most of it is looking like it will fall considerably short of the cost of living. that can have a very direct impact on recruitment and retention in the service. we already have about a vacancies across the nhs, we saw a real pinch points in particular specialties, learning disabilities, mental health for example. the other factor which you mention is that at the moment the nhs nationally is only funded for a pay uplift of an average of 3% across—the—board. of course we have to unpack all of the governments figures which are out today but we think that could an unplanned hole in the nhs budget of up to £8 billion. the nhs will have to find from somewhere and is to front light
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service delivery in some way for the potentially our ability to invest in diagnostics in the future, cancer care in the future, that hole in the money is also very significant and will have a direct impact on patient care. ., ~' will have a direct impact on patient care. . ~ , ., will have a direct impact on patient care. ., ~ , ., y will have a direct impact on patient care. . ~ i. , . care. thank you very much. interim deu care. thank you very much. interim deputy chief— care. thank you very much. interim deputy chief executive _ care. thank you very much. interim deputy chief executive of _ care. thank you very much. interim deputy chief executive of nhs - deputy chief executive of nhs providers. more than 150,000 royal may workers have agreed to go on strike. members of the communication workshop voted overwhelmingly in favour of walk—outs in protest at of 2% walk out. royal mail has previously said there were no grounds for industrial action. to the conservative party leadership raise. those still in the rays are rishi sunak at 118 votes, liz truss and got 86, penny mordaunt —— penny
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mordaunt who got 92. the big question now is who will those 59 and bizou back kemi badenoch now transfer their votes to? the man with all the answers is with me now. a wry smile from him. he's got no idea at all. where does this leave the rates, do you think? if idea at all. where does this leave the rates, do you think?- idea at all. where does this leave the rates, do you think? if you look at the piacings _ the rates, do you think? if you look at the placings as _ the rates, do you think? if you look at the placings as they _ the rates, do you think? if you look at the placings as they were in - the rates, do you think? if you look at the placings as they were in the l at the placings as they were in the last round of vote rishi sunak former chairs vote rishi sunakformer chairs out in front followed by the trade minister, far by the foreign secretary liz truss. what's important is it to see who's moving up important is it to see who's moving up and who's moving down or who's staying still in terms of the tally of their vote momentum at the moment is with liz truss. she has been jostling with penny mordaunt to join rishi sunak at the final two, the expectation is barring any last—minute unforeseen upsets that he is pretty much certain to get through. will it be penny mordaunt or will be liz truss that he goes up
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against in that final run of? looking at the numbers which you just ran through for us in this latest round of those who may truss picked up 15 on her totalfrom the last round. most of those we can assume, although this is a secret ballot so we will never really know have come from tom to get heart supporters who was eliminated in the previous round of voting. —— tugendhat. she is more likely to pick up votes from kemi badenoch who is left the race because she appealed to many on the right of the party as does liz truss. so how many of those 59 votes from kemi badenoch supporters will go to liz truss, how many will go to penny mordaunt, how many will go to penny mordaunt, how many will go to penny mordaunt, how many will go to rishi sunak was like that's what we're watching for now in the final round of voting. but momentum really is everything in this contest without penny mordaunt installed a bit, she did add votes on the last time at the last round but not as many as liz truss and perhaps liz truss is now poised to
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overtake her into second place. it is too close to call so we have to wait until the next round of voting. if macro one comes out and back to one of the candidates publicly, that will be a big clue to who will finish second behind rishi sunak in the next round this afternoon. it the next round this afternoon. it all goes to the wider conservative party membership, 175,000 or so. i saw a today which suggested to whoever is up against rishi sunak more or less, he is going to lose that. �* , , ., ., that. there's been a lot of commentary _ that. there's been a lot of commentary that - that. there's been a lot of commentary that rishi - that. there's been a lot of i commentary that rishi sunak that. there's been a lot of - commentary that rishi sunak is far more popular among conservative mps that he is necessarily more widely among the conservative party membership. that's one reason why this really is a contest of two halves. it will be very interesting to see how he goes down with conservative party grassroots members across the country who may be have different priorities and different ideas about what they want from a leader. is it somebody who is
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so closely associated with boris johnson's government, somebody who makes a big plate for holding their nerve in terms of economic policy and not cutting taxes due soon? in contrast to say liz truss who is gone much further and said she would reduce taxes in attempts to get economic growth going. depending on who you talk to you, it depends on whether liz truss or penny mordaunt is an easier or more difficult opponent for rishi sunak to face in the final two. the debate was the other night the more feisty contest and perhaps the ones where more sparks will fly is between liz truss and rishi sunak who are more directly opposed in terms of the policy. directly opposed in terms of the oli . ., ~ directly opposed in terms of the oli . . ~' ,, directly opposed in terms of the oli . . ~' , directly opposed in terms of the oli . ., ~' , ., , . policy. thank you very much indeed. i will be policy. thank you very much indeed. i will be down _ policy. thank you very much indeed. i will be down with _ policy. thank you very much indeed. i will be down with you _ policy. thank you very much indeed. i will be down with you at _ policy. thank you very much indeed. i will be down with you at west - i will be down with you at west minister tomorrow afternoon for the latest round. let's go back to the latest round. let's go back to the dramatic heat wave that we're seeing. were seeing live pictures
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from east london where there have been hundreds of firefighters tackling a blaze which is all part of this extraordinary heatwave we're seeing today with temperatures of 40 degrees plus in quite a few areas and certainly records tumbling all over the place. the london fire brigade have declared a major incident because of what they call a huge surge in blazes among blended amid 40 celsius heat. firefighters tackling that blaze in wellington but also other blazes around the capital as well. the mayor of london talking about a fire brigade being under immense pressure at the moment. quite dramatic scenes we're seeing. also in scotland, they have now experienced their hottest day on record in scotland. temperatures reached 30 for .8 celsius, that is a charter hall in the scottish
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borders. those provisional met office figures —— 34.8. let's get more on the latest forecast and when it all might cool down. certainly the records and the temperatures have been extraordinary today. ben, what is happening? it's been an extraordinary day. i don't think any of us wanted to see these records broken to be honest for that we've seen so many records falling across the uk for that we've seen so many records falling across the uk. not only by a little bit, we'd expect has to produce so far 40 mac .3 celsius that's more than a degree higher than the previous record. the changes started out west, thunderstorms have been pushing in, could also see some thunderstorms through the first part of the evening across parts of southeast scotland and northeast england. these storms as they move eastwards will be quite well scatter, not everyone is going to get rain and we really could do with it with all the
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fires are burning. what we should start to see at least from the west overnight is something fresh or arriving, still 20 degrees or higher across some parts of eastern england. tomorrow a lot of dry weather round of the spells of sunshine, bit of rain early on in eastern scotland, shower eat rain for wells in the southwest of the afternoon potentially big thunderstorms for the midlands, east anglia on the southeast. still very warm and eastern england but feeling cooler and fresher elsewhere, we stick with the cooler theme for the rest of the week.
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hello again. this is bbc news with me, ben brown. our latest headlines: the mayor of london declares a major incident, with a surge in fires across the capital because of the current heatwave and record temperatures. it is officially britain's hottest day ever, according to provisional figures from the met office. at least 29 places in the uk — including heathrow airport — have broken the previous record. the government has revealed its pay offer for millions of public sector workers. we'll get reaction from the unions. and in the tory leadership contest, then there were three.
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kemi badenoch is knocked out, meaning rishi sunak, penny mordaunt and liz truss go through to the next round. and could you soon be allowed to get married in your back garden? a change in the law is set to give couples more say over wedding venues and ceremonies in england and wales. sport — and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. hello, holly. hi there. first to durham. england are facing south africa. the tourists won the toss. he was finally pulled by liam livingstone. south africa ending on
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333-5. 333—5. glenn had just begun, currently three without loss. —— england havejust begun. this is ben stokes's last odi before retirement. he said this would be a warning to cricket chiefs over increasingly packed schedule. i feel like this is too much cricket rammed into play all three formats. it is a lot harder than what i think it used to be. when i was doing all three, it did not feel like it was this jam—packed and everything like that, so you obviously want to play as much cricket as you possibly can, but when it is making you feel tired and sore and you've got to look towards, i don't know, five, six months down the road, what you're doing in the here and now, it is probably not the best thing.
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england's women are consuming their preparations on the south coast in the heat, playing spain tomorrow in brighton. the players were playing in the morning to avoid those temperatures and using ice jackets. meanwhile, goalkeeper hannah hampton has tested positive for covid while manager serena wiegman says she "still has to wait" to see if she'll be ready in time for the match. captain lee williamson has said they have just had to work around it. —— leah. she has stayed really well connected with us and her nominal influence is there, obviously. you lose a little bit when you are not eating that face—to—face contact and the time at the game, obviously, without a manager there is slightly different, but she is ever present and, yeah, her influence on the game has been as usual as possible. manchester united captain harry maguire was booed by some fans before their preseason match with crystal palace earlier. maguire has
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been confirmed as captain the season despite criticism. the match was played at the melbourne cricket ground. manchester united one — one. —— won 3-1. anthony martial gave them the lead before goals from marcus rashford and jadon sancho wrapped things up. youngster will fish was shown a red card late on, but that victory makes it three wins from three pre season friendlies so far. tottenham have signed middlesbrough defender djed spence in a deal worth up to £20 million over five years. the england under—21 right—back spent last season on loan with nottingham forest, helping them secure promotion to the premier league. and the tour de france has reached the pyrenees. the danish writer... the canadian writer broke away at the last 20 miles to win stage 16.
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—— canadian rider. the... britain's a kearon thomas stayed in touch. he is another 19 seconds back into place overall and there are still five stages to go. —— geraint thomas. that is all the sport for now. stay tuned with you at 6:30pm on sportsday for more sports news. thank you. let's get more on the new temperature record set for the uk, its hottest temperature on record, with 40.3 celsius recorded in leicestershire. let's speak now to tadj oreszczyn, a professor of energy and environment at the university college london energy institute. thank you very much indeed for being with us. people are probably starting to think they are going to have to get used to these much hotter summers. what can they do, do you think, to alleviate these extreme heat that they are feeling
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in their homes as they go about their daily lives? what is your advice? it their daily lives? what is your advice? ., , their daily lives? what is your advice? . , , ., advice? it will really depend on the -e of advice? it will really depend on the type of house _ advice? it will really depend on the type of house they _ advice? it will really depend on the type of house they live _ advice? it will really depend on the type of house they live in _ advice? it will really depend on the type of house they live in and - advice? it will really depend on the type of house they live in and the l type of house they live in and the actual occupants of the house, and there is a big variation of people and buildings that we have in the uk. so, for some, for these extreme events and particular for vulnerable people, air conditioning will unfortunately be the solution, but many homes can be adapted to cope with high temperatures. it isjust that we are not used to doing that. we have developed a way of behaving mostly around providing heating in our homes rather than cooling, because these are reasonably strange events for us, and so we have not adapted the strategies that you find very often in the mediterranean, where people will close down the
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building as soon as the temperature outside gets warmer than inside, they will shield the building from they will shield the building from the sun, and they will... and then use fans to help the evaporation occurs. 50 use fans to help the evaporation occurs. , use fans to help the evaporation occurs, , , ., use fans to help the evaporation occurs. , ., . ., use fans to help the evaporation occurs. . . ., , occurs. so is your advice to people now to start _ occurs. so is your advice to people now to start looking _ occurs. so is your advice to people now to start looking at _ occurs. so is your advice to people now to start looking at the - occurs. so is your advice to people | now to start looking at the homes, to start thinking of ways for which they can adapt? and what should they do? �* , ,., , they can adapt? and what should they do? �* , , , ., they can adapt? and what should they do? absolutely, yeah. we have to think about _ do? absolutely, yeah. we have to think about that, _ do? absolutely, yeah. we have to think about that, and _ do? absolutely, yeah. we have to think about that, and it _ do? absolutely, yeah. we have to think about that, and it is - do? absolutely, yeah. we have to| think about that, and it is adapting physical homes, but it is also adapting the behaviours we have in our homes. we have historically thrown open the windows when we have had a little bit of heat, and that provides air movement and cools you down, but if it gets really hot outside, and actually you have to shut the house down and you have to get the air movement from fans, but these strategies will not work for
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everybody and they will not work if you in a house that has been poorly designed, particularlya you in a house that has been poorly designed, particularly a flat or something which has a lot of solar heat gains. then it becomes very, very tricky to try and control the heat, but again, it would be possible to retrofit some of these buildings, and some of the buildings would be more extensive than others to do some of these remedial actions to. �* ,., to do some of these remedial actions to. �* , ., , , to. and some people might be, if the can to. and some people might be, if they can afford — to. and some people might be, if they can afford it, _ to. and some people might be, if they can afford it, tended - to. and some people might be, if they can afford it, tended to - to. and some people might be, if they can afford it, tended to put i to. and some people might be, if| they can afford it, tended to put in air conditioning, but that is bad for the environment, that is bad for the environment, and probably only going to make global warming worse in the end of. going to make global warming worse in the end of-— in the end of. yes, certainly at the case. in the end of. yes, certainly at the case- that — in the end of. yes, certainly at the case. that will _ in the end of. yes, certainly at the case. that will not _ in the end of. yes, certainly at the case. that will not be _ in the end of. yes, certainly at the case. that will not be if _ in the end of. yes, certainly at the case. that will not be if we - in the end of. yes, certainly at the case. that will not be if we get - case. that will not be if we get a fully electrified air conditioning system... right now, if you use air conditioning, able use energy.
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however, if you are on the air conditioning your house for a couple of days a year and it is only one room, the impact won't be that great, but it will cost you to buy the air conditioning, it will cost you to run it and, as you say, if you to run it and, as you say, if you run it a lot, it will have quite significant global warming impacts. tadj oreszczyn, thank you very much indeed. very interesting to get your insight. let's get more on the extreme heat from our weather presenter ben rich, who's with me now. i don't suppose you've seen a day like it, have you? i i don't suppose you've seen a day like it, have you?— i don't suppose you've seen a day like it, have you? i have never seen a da like like it, have you? i have never seen a day like it — like it, have you? i have never seen a day like it and, _ like it, have you? i have never seen a day like it and, to _ like it, have you? i have never seen a day like it and, to be _ like it, have you? i have never seen a day like it and, to be honest, - a day like it and, to be honest, ben, i was never expecting to. when i trained as a meteorologist, and i've spoken to colleagues that have said the same, the assumption was in the uk, we could not get to 40 degrees. there would be things to stop it. we are surrounded by ocean. our weather patterns would not allow us to get us this hot, and yet here we are, a new record of 40.3 celsius
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— that is a provisional record, and some of the records are coming in. it breaks the record by more than 1.5 degrees. normally when we break records, we expected by a fraction of a degree this record has been less well behind us. we have heard about a new record for scotland, close to 2 degrees above scotland's previous record. in the number of different places that have seen degrees above 40 is astonishing. find degrees above 40 is astonishing. and we are seeing the terrifying implications of this heat wave. fires in the east of london, but the fire brigade have said this is a major incident, so this is what we are dealing with and maybe what we have to get use to in our summers. what has really struck me about todayis what has really struck me about today is how suddenly the impact donna have sorta begun to be felt —— how
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the impacts have sort of been felt across sectors. huge problems on the railways, problems at the airport yesterday, and now all of these fires, because this heat has been coupled with very, very dry weather, particularly in the southeast of england, extraordinarily dry so far this month in the southeast of england, so, yeah, huge impacts that we are clearly going to have to think about in the future, because it feels as if there has been some sort of fun and mental shift in the uk's climatology —— fundamental shift. should not get to 40 degrees. if it has happened once, we should plan for what happens if we get these kind of temperatures again. it these kind of temperatures again. it has come from southern europe, and we have seen the invocations thereof of wild temperatures, with wildfires, thousands of people fleeing their homes.— wildfires, thousands of people fleeing their homes. yeah. we have had records — fleeing their homes. yeah. we have had records broken _ fleeing their homes. yeah. we have had records broken in _ fleeing their homes. yeah. we have had records broken in portugal, - had records broken in portugal, extraordinarily high—temperature in
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spain and france, and we have seen wildfires there. people talked about the heatwave in 1976, they compare with the situation. that went on for a very long time, but if you look at the global heat maps, that was a uk and europe focused event. the difference this time is it gets in with a pattern across the road system high temperatures in china, the —— across the world, high temperatures in china, the us as well. it seems to be affecting the entire world.— well. it seems to be affecting the entire world. frightening pattern. what are the _ entire world. frightening pattern. what are the prospects _ entire world. frightening pattern. what are the prospects for - entire world. frightening pattern. what are the prospects for the . what are the prospects for the temperatures cooling down later in the week? , , ., the week? this is where i get to announce _ the week? this is where i get to announce some _ the week? this is where i get to announce some good _ the week? this is where i get to announce some good news. - the week? this is where i get to announce some good news. we | the week? this is where i get to - announce some good news. we have seen some storms in the west. they will break out quite sporadically in the uk. that means not everybody will get rain, and everybody could do but some, but there will be some
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pressure air. another hot night to come in eastern parts, pressure up towards the west, and tomorrow, it is going to turn cooler for all of us —— pressure up towards the west. in normal circumstances, we would call it hot, but compared to today, it will feel very different.— thank you for your assessment —— ben rich, think if your assessment. —— thank you for your assessment. let's get more on those fires in winning ten... zoe conway is there. ~ ., , fires in winning ten... zoe conway is there. ~ . , ., is there. what they are telling me is there. what they are telling me is there. what they are telling me is they fear _ is there. what they are telling me is they fear that _ is there. what they are telling me is they fear that as _ is there. what they are telling me is they fear that as many - is there. what they are telling me is they fear that as many as eight | is they fear that as many as eight homes have been destroyed, and they are very worried about the church ——
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wennington. very dramatic footage of buildings engulfed in these flames, and as far as we know, there is not anyone trapped in there. there was one woman i was speaking to at the puppu set her uncle had been trapped for a while. he has been building trenches to keep the flames away from his house, but she said that the police have gone into get him —— i spoke to one woman who said. close to where i am are a couple of farms and there has been a lot of concern, the police told me, about the livestock year. a huge amount of activity here. what is pretty extraordinary, speaking to villagers here, isjust how extraordinary, speaking to villagers here, is just how calm they are. you're expecting people to be currently upset, but there is sort of incredible here and people saying, what will be will be, and it
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seems that the village really helps each other. i spoke to one man called john bishop who has lived in the village for ten years, and he said that he and his relatives went from house to house to check that everybody was ok and helped to get people out. he has got a theory, not something the police or fire people out. he has got a theory, not something the police orfire brigade are saying, that he and other residents saw the fire out of their window working from home, and he said he thinks it may have started from a compost keep fire, because thatis from a compost keep fire, because that is what he was looking at that was ablaze, and he could not believe how quickly it spread, and then his family sprung into action and helped people... bud family sprung into action and helped --eole. .. �* ., family sprung into action and helped --eole... �* ., , people... and for the people there, ou sa people... and for the people there, you say they _ people... and for the people there, you say they are — people... and for the people there, you say they are calm, _ people... and for the people there, you say they are calm, and - people... and for the people there, you say they are calm, and that - people... and for the people there, you say they are calm, and that is l you say they are calm, and that is to be commended, but they must be in some shock. here we are reporting record temperatures, but then suddenly here in wennington, it has
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translated into the stoeva sitting fire which, as you say, seems to have consumed a number of homes —— translated into a shocking fire. what is shocking this hominy fires there are not far from here. what is shocking this hominy fires there are not farfrom here. we what is shocking this hominy fires there are not far from here. we are talking about at least a couple of fires down in dartmouth —— how many fires. two or three fires there, and also this village, it is surrounded by field, but is that sense of the village being encircled by flames and losing in, and it really is boiling hot, tinder dry, and you are right, there is shock here, but remarkably very good spirit in the people i've been speaking to here, and perhaps it is because the sense we are getting is they really did help each other when it came to it and there is a strong sense that the people in the village were looking out for each other support and a
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large number of —— and a large number of firefighters there. -- and a large number of firefighters there.- -- and a large number of firefighters there. -- and a large number of firefiahters there. , ., firefighters there. the fire brigade across the capitol _ firefighters there. the fire brigade across the capitol have _ firefighters there. the fire brigade across the capitol have declared i firefighters there. the fire brigade across the capitol have declared a| across the capitol have declared a major incident, the surge of fires like that one that we have seen in london because of the extreme temperatures is popular exactly, and they're having to pull in resources from across they're having to pull in resources from acros— i think we have lostjelly conway, but there is the i think we have lost “elly conway, but there is the_ but there is the dramatic footage -- zoe conway. zoe was _ but there is the dramatic footage -- zoe conway. zoe was telling us, in l zoe conway. zoe was telling us, in number of homes engulfed in the fire, maybe eight homes in all, firefighters there trying to deal with the situation. the temperatures topping 40 celsius for the first
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time in the uk, and these are some of the effects that we are seeing on the ground. you can see the flames there, perhaps starting with some sort of compost, some peat fire, zoe was telling us. we will not know for a while. we have got an eyewitness we can speak to now. timothy, thank you forjoining us. what can you tell us about what you have seen today? it tell us about what you have seen toda ? ., , , tell us about what you have seen toda ? . , , ., today? it has been quite a frightening. _ today? it has been quite a frightening, frightening i today? it has been quite a l frightening, frightening day. today? it has been quite a - frightening, frightening day. this morning, only one of the houses had cotton light. i believe it started in one of the back gardens —— caught a light. literally within no time at all, itjust got horrendous. i believe it is now about seven houses that have gone up. all the residents are out. the fire brigade, they were
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brilliant. there is only one fire station, one fire engine to begin with, because there were other fires, but the fire brigade had really stretched today, especially in essex, but it is just a scene of total devastation. i feel so sorry for the homeowners who have lost their houses. bud for the homeowners who have lost their houses-— their houses. and we have been havin: their houses. and we have been having these — their houses. and we have been having these very _ their houses. and we have been having these very high - their houses. and we have been - having these very high temperatures for a few days now, and today was the peak, really, of the heatwave. you cannot have been expecting anything like this, though. yes, the temperatures work 40 plus in parts of the country, but this is just devastating, isn't it? it of the country, but this is 'ust devastating, isn't it?�* of the country, but this is 'ust devastating, isn't it? it is. the . round devastating, isn't it? it is. the ground is _ devastating, isn't it? it is. the ground is very. _ devastating, isn't it? it is. the ground is very, very _ devastating, isn't it? it is. the ground is very, very dry - devastating, isn't it? it is. the l ground is very, very dry because devastating, isn't it? it is. the - ground is very, very dry because of the weather at the moment, and that is not helping anything, but the winds picked up with the flames. as i say, the flames were behind house at one point and then it literally jumped over the house and got in the front garden. the fire brigade were
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doing a marvellousjob, as best they could with the resources they had, butjust could with the resources they had, but just took off so quickly. could with the resources they had, butjust took off so quickly. we all had to move away because of the smoke, it was hard to breathe. within literally ten minutes, you cannot see any of the houses it's all because of the smoke. it because of the smoke. it is terrifying- _ because of the smoke. it is terrifying. very _ because of the smoke. it is terrifying. very briefly, - because of the smoke. it is terrifying. very briefly, any idea how it started? a, terrifying. very briefly, any idea how it started?— how it started? a local resident said the fire _ how it started? a local resident said the fire started _ how it started? a local resident said the fire started in - how it started? a local resident said the fire started in one - how it started? a local resident said the fire started in one of i how it started? a local resident i said the fire started in one of the back gardens, because of the heat coming down, setting fire to the grass, and it literally took hold straightaway, because the ground so dry, hejust straight straightaway, because the ground so dry, he just straight through it. timothy, thank you very much indeed. that is what i witnessed what happened there in wennington, timothy bassett. thank you so much for calling in. now, we are going to get more on the conservative party leadership race.
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earlier this afternoon, the former equalities minister kemi badenoch was been knocked out of the race. in the latest round of voting among conservative mps, the foreign secretary liz truss gained most new supporters but came third behind penny mordaunt, who was in second, but the frontrunner remains rishi sunak. those are the three at the moment. with me are the conservative commentator alex deane, who worked for david cameron when he was prime minister, and ed dorrell, who's the director of public first, which is a policy, research, opinion and strategy consultancy. his research this week found penny morduant to be polling ahead of her rivals. alex, first of all to you, we have got three now, it is going to be whittled down to two. what is your latest prognosis? where are we going to end up, do you think? i latest prognosis? where are we going to end up, do you think?— to end up, do you think? i think it is very likely _ to end up, do you think? i think it is very likely to — to end up, do you think? i think it is very likely to be _ to end up, do you think? i think it is very likely to be liz _ to end up, do you think? i think it is very likely to be liz truss. - is very likely to be liz truss. absolutely it's ordinary circumstances. you would think the majority of kemi badenoch's supporters would go to liz truss. she would trump penny morton on the
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last two, and i think liz truss beats rishi sunak into membership. —— penny mordaunt. people hoping for a bigger surge for mordaunt because tom tugendhat dropped out would be disappointed, bigjumper tom tugendhat dropped out would be disappointed, big jumper liz truss, and her background would support liz truss. ., ., , ., , , truss. how do you see it, is it liz truss. how do you see it, is it liz truss against _ truss. how do you see it, is it liz truss against sunak _ truss. how do you see it, is it liz truss against sunak in _ truss. how do you see it, is it liz truss against sunak in the - truss. how do you see it, is it liz truss against sunak in the final. truss against sunak in the final contest? , ~ �* , truss against sunak in the final contest? , ~ ., ., , contest? yes, alex's announces very accurate. there _ contest? yes, alex's announces very accurate. there is _ contest? yes, alex's announces very accurate. there is very _ contest? yes, alex's announces very accurate. there is very little - contest? yes, alex's announces very accurate. there is very little room i accurate. there is very little room to manoeuvre for penny morton stash make _ to manoeuvre for penny morton stash make alex's_ to manoeuvre for penny morton stash make alex's analysis. she to manoeuvre for penny morton stash make alex's analysis.— make alex's analysis. she will not be delighted _ make alex's analysis. she will not be delighted to _ make alex's analysis. she will not be delighted to hear _ make alex's analysis. she will not be delighted to hear that! - make alex's analysis. she will not be delighted to hear that! when i make alex's analysis. she will not be delighted to hear that! when it comes to the membership, has sunak got a chance? many say his performance in the tv debates have been better than other candidates, but according to the pulling i have
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seen, the members, he loses to almost everybody he is up against. of course he has got a chance. in any binary contest, as brexit taught us, you should consider any options, and i think things can develop in the course of the campaign. bear in mind, they're going to go around the country, campaigning for more support for members than they currently have, but i would say this. rishi sunak has been very unlucky. on times timing is everything in politics. if this contest had been a year ago before the green card issue came out, he would've won it. if it had been a year from would've won it. if it had been a yearfrom now, when people had an opportunity to get past that and he had a chance to rebuild his brown, he would have done better, but hard luck for him. it is very slight —— slap bang this time. notwithstanding his performance among the party, he will not succeed in membership at large. it is
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in membership at large. it is interesting. _ in membership at large. it is interesting, because - in membership at large. it is interesting, because he is seen as the more left wing of the candidates, whether it is sin against liz truss or him against mordaunt. i against liz truss or him against mordaunt-— against liz truss or him against mordaunt. ., ., ~ ., , mordaunt. i do not know if rishi sunak is left-wing _ mordaunt. i do not know if rishi sunak is left-wing in _ mordaunt. i do not know if rishi sunak is left-wing in any - mordaunt. i do not know if rishi sunak is left-wing in any way, i mordaunt. i do not know if rishi - sunak is left-wing in any way, shape sunak is left—wing in any way, shape or form. _ sunak is left—wing in any way, shape or form. that — sunak is left—wing in any way, shape or form, that is for the but among the conservative party, i am not sure _ -- i think —— i think that is accurate. within this field, — —— i think that is accurate. within this field, he_ —— i think that is accurate. within this field, he has been seen as the moderniser, i suppose — been seen as the moderniser, i suppose. the problem rishi sunak has with the _ suppose. the problem rishi sunak has with the members but i also thing with the _ with the members but i also thing with the general public is that he is seen _ with the general public is that he is seen as— with the general public is that he is seen as slick which, in the current— is seen as slick which, in the current political culture, where authenticity is valued very highly, is not _ authenticity is valued very highly, is not in _ authenticity is valued very highly, is not in his— authenticity is valued very highly, is not in his early good thing. he is not in his early good thing. he is also _ is not in his early good thing. he is also seen _ is not in his early good thing. he is also seen as weirdly a remainder, which is odd, given he voted _ remainder, which is odd, given he voted for— remainder, which is odd, given he voted for leeds, and finally, in the
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current— voted for leeds, and finally, in the current climate, because a living crisis. _ current climate, because a living crisis, where the cost of living crisis — crisis, where the cost of living crisis is — crisis, where the cost of living crisis is the _ crisis, where the cost of living crisis is the biggest story by a mile — crisis is the biggest story by a mile in — crisis is the biggest story by a mile in public opinion, being him to be very. _ mile in public opinion, being him to be very. very— mile in public opinion, being him to be very, very rich is very, very challenging _ be very, very rich is very, very challenging —— voted leave. be very, very rich is very, very challenging -- voted leave. alex, do ou think challenging -- voted leave. alex, do you think the — challenging -- voted leave. alex, do you think the members _ challenging -- voted leave. alex, do you think the members think- challenging -- voted leave. alex, do you think the members think of - challenging -- voted leave. alex, do you think the members think of the l you think the members think of the party as they see them or how they would perform in a general election — in other words, against keir starmer and labour party? tara;r - in other words, against keir starmer and labour party? tory party members are — starmer and labour party? tory party members are desperate _ starmer and labour party? tory party members are desperate to _ starmer and labour party? tory party members are desperate to always - starmer and labour party? tory party members are desperate to always be| members are desperate to always be the labour party. that is police number one in the membership, and if you were to canvass them about their priorities, they would place a very high. but there are other things at play. ideology is one full are they going to cut taxes? liz truss has done well about pivoting on this kind of things and a demonstration she cares about his priorities. on
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the one hand, the tory party is lucky to have so many runners and riders. if we are honest, on the other hand, none of them are complete articles as of yet. great to net complete articles as of yet. great to get your _ complete articles as of yet. great to get your analysis, _ complete articles as of yet. great to get your analysis, alex - complete articles as of yet. great to get your analysis, alex deane | complete articles as of yet. great to get your analysis, alex deane and ed dorrell. thank you very much indeed. we will see what happens. somebody who is a complete and finished article as a weather resent her is ben rich! as we were saying earlier on, an if ordinary and —— an extraordinary and scary day. and -- an extraordinary and scary da . �* , , ~ and -- an extraordinary and scary da . �* , , . ., day. absolutely right. we have broken records _ day. absolutely right. we have broken records without - day. absolutely right. we have broken records without we - day. absolutely right. we have i broken records without we never really wanted to post up a reminder of that provisional old record —— we never really wanted to, a reminder of the. things are changing. from the west, you can see thunderstorms pushing in. the odd shower in northeast scotland. could be the odd
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thunderstorm across scotland and north england. i know we need rain, i do not think that many of us are going to see it overnight. not a huge amount anyway, but what the showers and storms will do as they push eastwards is introduced cooler, fresher air. cool start in eastern areas. there are going to be some spells of sunshine around in the middle of the day. as we go through the afternoon, some pretty heavy downpour speaking out across parts of the midlands and into the eastern side of england. scattered under storms, again not delivering rain for everyone, but where you could get a shower could give you a lot of rain, some quite intense downpours. temperatures north to south ranging from... still quite warm across eastern parts, but as we head across the rest of the week, this exceptional heatwave is not going to
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return. temperatures will be significantly lower than they have been. there will be some rain at times, probably not the widespread rain we could do with, some spells of sunshine as well, but at least it is going to feel a bit cooler. heatwave linked fires break out across the capital. a number of the calls that we've been dealing with today have been wildfires or grass fires in particular, where the ground has been tinderbox dry as a result of the weather that we've experienced. scotland sees a new temperature record — 34.8 degrees — and in all 29 places across england have broken the previous uk record. with soaring temperatures comes travel disruption, major stations have been shut down and several lines suspended. we'll be finding out how people have been coping. also on the programme:

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