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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 6, 2022 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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out for 31 this is bbc news — i out for 31 �*m chris rogers. this is bbc news — i'm chris rogers. the headlines at seven: the family of 12—year—old archie battersbee confirm he has died after his life support was withdrawn. can ijust say, i am the proudest mum in the world. such a beautiful little boy. and he fought right until the very end. and i'm so proud to be his mum. conservative leadership contenders set out their approaches to dealing with the economic downturn forecast by the bank of england. the palestinian health ministry says 15 palestinians have been killed in the gaza strip — where the israeli military is targeting members of the palestinian group islamichhad. a bus carrying passengers to a roman catholic pilgrimage has crashed in northern croatia — killing 12 polish people
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and injuring more than 30 others. the effects from a cyber attack on the nhs111 system could take until next week to resolve — after phone lines and electronic gp referrals were disrupted. world championjake whiteman has to settle for a bronze medal after coming third in the 1500 metres at the commonwealth games. we'll have all the latest from birmingham in sportsday at 7.30. good afternoon. good evening. the family of archie battersbee, the 12—year—old boy who's been unconcious since april, has announced that he's died. after a legal battle between his parents and doctors, the royal london hospital was given permission to end his treatment today.
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archie's mother, hollie dance, described him as "a beautiful little boy," adding that she was "the proudest mum in the world". here's simonjones. saying their final farewells, these pictures were released by archie's family in the hours before his life support was withdrawn, following a series of legal battles pitting the family against doctors. archie passed at 12:15 today. can ijust say i am the proudest mum in the world. such a beautiful little boy and he fought right until the very end and i'm so proud to be his mum. the 12—year—old was found unconscious at his home in april. he had suffered catastrophic brain injuries. the doctors treating him said there was no hope of a recovery, but his family maintained he needed more time. barts health nhs trust, which runs the royal london hospital, went to court to ask
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for treatment to end. the case was referred to the high court, the court of appeal, the supreme court and the european court of human rights, butjudge afterjudge agreed with doctors. after careful thought we refuse permission to appeal. the family eventually had to accept they had exhausted all legal routes. no family should ever have to go through what we have been through, it's barbaric. tributes to archie left outside the hospital today. his family had wanted him moved to a hospice away from what they saw as the noise and chaos of the hospital. that was refused, the trust arguing that archie was in such an unstable condition it was too great a risk. in a statement, barts health nhs trust said its thoughts and condolences were with archie's family and said that treatment had been withdrawn in line with court rulings about his best interests, and it said staff had shown extraordinary compassion over months caring for archie and in often distressing
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circumstances. archie's family have said they are broken. the end of a life played out in the courts and in the public domain. simon jones, bbc news. joining me now is stephanie nimmo. she's a trustee of paediatric palliative care charity, together for short lives. she also lost her own daughter, daisy, in 2017 when she was 12—year—old. story of archie is hard for any parent to watch but particularly for yourself? it parent to watch but particularly for ourself? , . ., ., yourself? it is and the health of the family. _ yourself? it is and the health of the family, and _ yourself? it is and the health of the family, and together - yourself? it is and the health of the family, and together for . yourself? it is and the health of. the family, and together for short lives, our condolences go to the family today. it has been
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particularly hard as someone who has lived through a very similar situation, my own daughter was 12 and she died in the intensive care unit in great 0rmond street hospital in 2017, when i also had to make the decision to withdraw her life support. she too was too unstable to transfer to a children's hospice. at the end, we gave her a very peaceful death thanks to the wonderful support of the palliative staff that surrounded us. it is support of the palliative staff that surrounded us.— surrounded us. it is interesting because as _ surrounded us. it is interesting because as we _ surrounded us. it is interesting because as we watch _ surrounded us. it is interesting because as we watch this - surrounded us. it is interesting - because as we watch this particular story unfold, it feels very cold, you have a high courtjudge passing on what seems to be a very tough judgment, but is it really like that when it comes to the medics and the staff taking care of your child? my staff taking care of your child? ij�*i personal staff taking care of your child? m: personal experience staff taking care of your child? m; personal experience and the experience and is being involved in the charity, children's palliative
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care hospices services are something most of us in the course of our normal lives won't ever have to engage with but the people involved in caring for children at the very last moments of their lives are wonderful. they are very much trained to support children and theirfamilies and take trained to support children and their families and take on trained to support children and theirfamilies and take on board all theirfamilies and take on board all the families' wishes as far as possible while bearing in mind what is medically right for the child to ensure they are supported to have hopefully a dignified and managed that at the very end. —— managed death. we are all human beings. many of the staff are families themselves and are coming in and supporting the families. it is a very, very hard time. for everyone. absolutely. obviously _ time. for everyone. absolutely. obviously a _ time. for everyone. absolutely. obviously a charity _ time. for everyone. absolutely. obviously a charity like - time. for everyone. absolutely.
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obviously a charity like yours i obviously a charity like yours provides that support during and after you have had to let go of your child. what will archie's parents be going through now, what offer of help is there for them? hopefully, there will be _ help is there for them? hopefully, there will be a _ help is there for them? hopefully, there will be a family _ help is there for them? hopefully, there will be a family liaison - there will be a family liaison nurses on the ward, talking to them about next steps. it is just as important to care for the family once the child has passed away. talk about the options. in my own personal case, we were taken to a special room that was on the side of the intensive care unit, completely not medicalised, we were able to sit and process everything that had happened. the family liaison nurse worked with our hospice nurses to arrange for a cold mattress to be brought to our house and i was able to bring daisy home. that was very healing because i was able to
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reclaim her not as a patient but as a little girl. we took her to the hospice and they helped us prepare for what sort of funeral we wanted, what options were available and help to make memories, hand prints, cut to make memories, hand prints, cut to locks of hair, things would never think of normally that the staff gave me options to think of things that have given me so much comfort now that daisy is no longer with me. i have no doubt that is what the staff will be doing now and talking about all the things that are possible and not rushing the family. to many of us that have not gone through what you and other parents have gone through, itjust seems that apparent that you have to fight for what you want for your child. through the courts, through the legal system. through the courts, through the legalsystem. i through the courts, through the legal system. i know it is quite rare, but is there any way you feel that can be avoided? can there be a better system in place that parents have more say or are able to get a
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better understanding of what is always a complex and unique situation? i always a complex and unique situation?— always a complex and unique situation? ~ i, i, , situation? i think fortunately the case is that _ situation? i think fortunately the case is that we _ situation? i think fortunately the case is that we see _ situation? i think fortunately the case is that we see going - situation? i think fortunately the case is that we see going to - situation? i think fortunately the l case is that we see going to court, it is very rare. the majority of cases, conversations happen between clinicians and families and an agreement is reached. i think it is important to bear in mind that in this case, in my own case, you go from one minute living your ordinary life to suddenly being the advocate and the parent of a very sick child. having to navigate a world that is very complex, it felt for me that people were speaking a foreign language. i at least had some time to adjust and understand how the system worked to stop in archie and the case of children where there has been a catastrophic brain injury, this is impossible. things like advocacy a very crucial, sometimes that can be through a chaplaincy service or independent advocacy
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service. i think it is now time to look at how we offer more support through advocacy to help parents navigate. and then where there are disagreements, offering mediation is really vital for getting both parties around the table to discuss and come up with a mediated solution. and then also, most hospitals now have an ethics panel as well which will help advise and guide the clinicians. but there are plenty of ways, and i think it all just comes down to good communication and supporting parents who are emotionally traumatised, trying to do the right thing for their child and trying to navigate what can very much feel like an alien world is when you first enter it. that can sometimes end up in these whole situations where very competitive language is used. if we can try and avoid that and support the parents, i think we will hopefully see a lot less of these high profile, so traumatic for
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everyone involved cases. it high profile, so traumatic for everyone involved cases. it would be aood. everyone involved cases. it would be good- stephanie. — everyone involved cases. it would be good. stephanie, so _ everyone involved cases. it would be good. stephanie, so sorry _ everyone involved cases. it would be good. stephanie, so sorry for- everyone involved cases. it would be good. stephanie, so sorry for your i good. stephanie, so sorry for your loss, all of our thoughts are with archie's family as well this evening. thank you for your time. the two conservative party leadership contenders have set out their approaches to dealing with the economic downturn, forecast by the bank of england. liz truss says she'll help people with the cost—of—living crisis by lowering taxes, not giving "hand—outs." but her rival, rishi sunak, warned that the tories could "kiss goodbye" to winning the next election, unless inflation is quickly brought under control. 0ur political correspondent, damian grammaticas, has more. applause. thank you. liz truss in the sunshine in the west midlands, chasing the votes of tory party members. the looming economic crisis is now weighing on this race. ms truss today said if she was prime minister, she would not be giving more hand—outs to those struggling to pay their bills. she would cut taxes instead.
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well, what i will do from day one is reduce taxes, so reverse the national insurance rise, and also have a temporary moratorium on the green energy levy, so people are spending less of their money on fuel bills. but what i am about as a conservative is people keeping more of their own money, growing the economy, so we avoid a recession. rishi sunak on the south coast said her tax cuts would amount to less than £200 for many average households, and he would look at doing more. we need to get real about this situation. it is simply wrong to rule out further direct support at this time, as liz truss has done, and what is more, her tax proposals are not going to help very significantly people like pensioners or those on low incomes, who are exactly the kind of families who are going to need help. mr sunak�*s message to his party is that inflation is what matters. average annual energy bills could go up another £2000 in the coming months, and it is thought 40% of people are already struggling to pay.
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ms truss says her approach is about optimism, stimulating the economy, and not talking the country into a recession. damian grammaticas, bbc news. six people have been arrested following an altercation at a holiday park in east sussex in which a man died. the incident happened at parkdean resorts in camber sands, just before 11pm on friday. paramedics attended the scene but the man was pronounced dead shortly after midnight. israeli fighterjets have struck palestinian militant targets in gaza for a second day, with residential areas hit. at least 15 palestinians have died, including a five—year—old child and two women. israel says its offensive is targeting the rocket launch sites of the group, islamichhad, which in response has fired more that 200 rockets towards israel. most have been intercepted but air raid sirens have sounded as far away as tel aviv.
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from jerusalem, yolande knell reports. palestinians scatter as an apartment building is hit in gaza, minutes after a warning call. it is only day two of fighting here, and israel's military says its new operation targeting islamichhad militants could last a week. a commander of the group was killed in an early strike. this woman who lived nearby is afraid and angry. translation: we were safe - in our home, we were thrown out of it by the bombing. we were just sitting there. my son is getting married and we were preparing his bride's new clothes. why didn't they warn us that they would bomb? the funeral of the top militant brought huge crowds of mourners onto the streets. islamichhad swore revenge, and afterwards it fired dozens of rockets at israel. many intercepted by its air defence system.
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but warning sirens still went off in southern towns, sending israelis running to bomb shelters. israeli forces hit back at what they said were missile launch sites in gaza, releasing these pictures. israel carried out a precise counterterror operation against an immediate threat. 0ur fight is not with the people of gaza — islamichhad is an iranian proxy that wants to destroy the state of israel and kill innocent israelis. the exchange of fire continues, with palestinian rocket trails and smoke from israeli air strikes in the gaza sky. and there have been new palestinian casualties. so far, hamas, the powerful militant group which governs gaza, haven't been drawn into the fighting. much depends on whether it stays that way. yolande knell, bbc news, jerusalem. the headlines on bbc news:
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it's 7.15. the family of 12—year—old archie battersbee confirm he has died after his life support was withdrawn. conservative leadership contenders set out their approaches to dealing with the economic downturn forecast by the bank of england. the palestinian health ministry says 15 palestinians have been killed in the gaza strip — where the israeli military is targeting members of the palestinian group islamichhad. in croatia, at least 12 people have been killed and dozens injured after a polish bus veered off a highway. the bus was heading in the direction of the croatian capital zagreb when it crashed near the city of vazradin. it was on its way to a roman catholic shrine in bosnia—herzegovina. 0ur warsaw correspondent
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adam easton reports. 0ne woman's operation is still ongoing and will take a long time because she has multiple bodily injuries and her life is in danger. we have eight patients in hospital, fourin we have eight patients in hospital, four in intensive care, two of whom are currently in the operating room. the pilgrims were on their way to the small bosnian town... a popular kokomo site ever since local children said they had seen a vision of the virgin mary there in the 1982. many people in poland are deeply attached to their catholic faith and the chance to make the pilgrimage a highlight of their lives. they make the 1500 kilometre
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journey overnight on buses like this one. it is not known why this bus crashed. the tragedy has sparked deep anguish and sorrow here. in churches across polling, players are being set for the victims and their families. adam easton, bbc news, warsaw. the effects from a cyber attack on the uk's nhs111 system could take until next week to resolve. it affected the phone lines and electronic referrals to out—of—hours gps. the service helps people get the right advice and treatment when they need it. nhs england said disruption was minimal. i'm nowjoined by ross brewer, who is a cyber—security expert and commentator, and vice president of attackiq's international operation. are these kind of attacks common? yes, we are seeing an increasing escalation and this could be a
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ransom. it could be unfolding. we have seen a17 billion run somewhere attacks this year, as much as the last five years combined, a massive increase with the geopolitical situation at the moment as well. aha, situation at the moment as well. a modern british army safeguarding us against attacks like this has been mentioned, not traditional ground water. but he is or what is behind attacks like this? is it some person sat in a bedroom somewhere in the world or some kind of more complex operation? it is world or some kind of more complex oeration? , , .,, operation? it is people, individuals, _ operation? it is people, individuals, sitting - operation? it is people, individuals, sitting in i operation? it is people, - individuals, sitting in bedrooms, have a go heroes. but also organised crime, government institutions, government entities get into this as well but typically organised crime because there is money, especially in financial services and health care records such as the nhs, those are highly valuable for the
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information.— are highly valuable for the information. , , ., ., ., information. this is more of a question _ information. this is more of a question for _ information. this is more of a question for the _ information. this is more of a question for the government | information. this is more of a . question for the government and information. this is more of a - question for the government and the nhs, maybe you can enlighten us, how was this able to happen when there is such sensitive information on the 111 line? it is such sensitive information on the 111 line? , ., , , ., 111 line? it is happening too often in critical national _ 111 line? it is happening too often in critical national infrastructure i in critical national infrastructure because organisations are spending too much money putting in defensive capabilities but not validating them, testing them, checking the readiness of the people, processes and technology to make sure they can withstand and repel such an attack. so in your experience, is enough being done then to safeguard our private information, but also the infrastructure of this country? ha. infrastructure of this country? no. what we see _ infrastructure of this country? no. what we see on _ infrastructure of this country? no. what we see on a _ infrastructure of this country? tin what we see on a daily basis is organisations are not able to actually withstand pretty low level hacking attempts and we are seeing a great deal of organisation compromised, they are losing
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personnel information, financial information, taken out of business information, taken out of business in terms of infrastructure is being brought down. the actors doing this, the techniques they use, there is not enough being invested in validating that these organisations, the information technologies they have invested in and security technologies are actually correctly configured, prepared in such a way that people can monitor and repel these attacks.— these attacks. rogue countries, countries that _ these attacks. rogue countries, countries that we _ these attacks. rogue countries, countries that we are _ these attacks. rogue countries, countries that we are in - these attacks. rogue countries, countries that we are in dispute | countries that we are in dispute with, i do not need to name them, it would be in their interest to disrupt british society and how it operates and can continue, but also as you mentioned earlier, they get information, particularly from databases, medical phone lines like this one. what is that information actually then used for? lots of people will be worried this evening, we have been assured not to, but
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people will be worried about who has the personal private medical details, address, phone numberand who knows what else. details, address, phone number and who knows what else.— who knows what else. typically we want to think _ who knows what else. typically we want to think about _ who knows what else. typically we want to think about this _ who knows what else. typically we want to think about this as - who knows what else. typically we want to think about this as a - who knows what else. typically we | want to think about this as a nation state attack. more often than not, it is organised criminals. what they do with that information, you can sell personal information, home addresses, nhs numbers and things like that. , ., _, like that. leeds for cold calling and selling _ like that. leeds for cold calling and selling people _ like that. leeds for cold calling and selling people things? - like that. leeds for cold calling l and selling people things? social engineering. _ and selling people things? social engineering, call— and selling people things? social engineering, call someone, - and selling people things? social engineering, call someone, you. and selling people things? 5m —.i engineering, call someone, you have the information, you went to the doctor on this date. just give us your password for your e—mail so we can fix something for you. people think it is legitimate and it leads to a greater problem.— to a greater problem. ross, fascinating _ to a greater problem. ross, fascinating and _ to a greater problem. ross, fascinating and frightening, | to a greater problem. ross, - fascinating and frightening, thank you forjoining us. now these are not words to you expect to find in the same
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sentence: flash flooding in california's death valley has left hundreds of people stranded and forced the temporary closure of the national park. the flooding was triggered by a torrential shower on friday, which dumped a near record 3.7 centimetres of rain at furnace creek. around 60 cars belonging to visitors and staff were buried in debris near the park headquarters. death valley is usually one of the hottest, driest spots on earth the transport secretary grant shapps has vowed for the transport bill, due to come into to parliament in the autumn, should include a new offence which would be the cycling equivalent to causing death by dangerous driving. whilst many are in favour of tightening laws around reckless cycling, some campaigners argue deaths caused by cyclists are a fraction of those caused by motorists. i'm nowjoined by professor chris 0liver, who is a retired surgeon and cycle campaigner for the spokes lothian cycle campaign based in scotland
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which aims to promote better condiitons for cyclists. what is your reaction to the plans for an offence of death by danger cycling? i for an offence of death by danger clina ? ~ , ., for an offence of death by danger clina ? ~' , ., , cycling? i think there needs to be some proportionate _ cycling? i think there needs to be some proportionate tightening i cycling? i think there needs to be some proportionate tightening of| cycling? i think there needs to be . some proportionate tightening of the law, largely historical galore and thatis law, largely historical galore and that is not an unreasonable thing. the vast majority of pedestrians who are killed or injured in collisions, they hit by a motor vehicle in any location. i will give you some figures from cycling uk. they said cycles were involved in about three pedestrians fidelity is per year, 82 serious injuries. this represents 0.6% of pedestrian without the several, 1.5% of serious injuries. but cars were involved on average about 317 fatalities per year and
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a500 serious injuries. that represents about 67.5% of pedestrians authorities and over four fifths of pedestrian serious injuries. you can see that motor vehicles were involved in 99.a% of collisions in which a pedestrian died. the numbers of cyclists actually killed, the numbers of pedestrians killed by cyclists is actually very small.— pedestrians killed by cyclists is actually very small. where grant sha -s is actually very small. where grant shapps is coming _ actually very small. where grant shapps is coming from, - actually very small. where grant shapps is coming from, he - actually very small. where grant i shapps is coming from, he actually said this in his statement, is that any death on the road caused by danger cycling is a death too many. i think the point he is trying to make is that there are a lot of people injured by psychosis well, maybe not the same numbers of motorists, and you are trying to make cyclists thinking about whether they go through the red light, curb
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round a corner, is a good thing. the law does round a corner, is a good thing. iie: law does need round a corner, is a good thing. tie: law does need to round a corner, is a good thing. ti2 law does need to be tightened up. everybody should be responsible within the law and the highway code. i think that is absolutely right. but i think the messages, and gran shapps may have not got this completely right, cyclists do very little help banish might harm to other road users including pedestrians. figs other road users including pedestrians.— other road users including edestrians. a ~ ., ., , ., pedestrians. as we know, lots of concern for _ pedestrians. as we know, lots of concern for the _ pedestrians. as we know, lots of concern for the safety _ pedestrians. as we know, lots of concern for the safety of - pedestrians. as we know, lots of concern for the safety of cyclists | concern for the safety of cyclists on our roads. she think things are getting better particularly in our cities? lots of people want to use our roads for very different forms of transport, only increasing. cycling increased a lot during the pandemic. and the numbers of fatalities increased as well. just before the pandemic, we had about 100 cycling deaths per year. from all causes, throughout the uk. during the pandemic that rose by
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almost 50%. in 20—21, 1a1 people died from cycling —related accidents on our roads and pathways. 0ther on our roads and pathways. other users of newer kinds of vehicles on the road, eg scooters, not regulated. people do try to regulate them, but there is too much e—scooting, i do not think that is safe or lawful. e-scooting, i do not think that is safe or lawful.— safe or lawful. professor, thank ou. brighton pride has been back on the streets, after being cancelled for the past two years due to covid—19. the singer, christina aguilera, is headlining a concert this evening. paloma faith is the headline act tomorrow. sam harrison reports.
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brighton pride has been back on the streets, after being cancelled for the past two years due to covid—19. a celebration finally back to its brilliant best, but this time it simply meant more. this morning, thousands gathered on hove lawns to send off the long—awaited pride parade. i felt a bit emotional when i first got here because we've had such a long time away from each other. so it felt extra special. this is the first year that it's been back on since covid. it's our first time having family and dogs here, so it's quite an exciting pride for all of us. it's really kind of like my first proper pride in general, and honestly it's kind of amazing already. with the parade in full swing, you can feel the excitement here and you can see just what it means to people to be back celebrating this world—famous event. back in 2019, these smiling faces weren't to know what was round the corner, and for those running events today, it's a reminder that this celebration can never be taken for granted.
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this is still a protest. us being here is a protest. you know, today the cameras will pan round and see people of all ages, colours, sexualities, genders, and that is a protest. and there will be somebody who is not here and look at that and go, but i want to be part of that because that's me. those are my people. after a packed day of parades and parties, attention this evening turns to the concert at preston park, and with headline performer christina aguilera in town, it's set to be a night to remember. it's going to be electric! we've been waiting for this for three years, for it to come back, for pride to come back, so we are so excited. we can't wait. really looking forward to christina aguilera, aren't we? and then coming tomorrow as well, so looking forward to paloma. brilliant. _ absolutely brilliant. a big night ahead, then, after a day ofjoy and celebration. pride 2022 is already proving to be a pride to remember. sam harrison, bbc south east today, brighton. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett.
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you are on holiday in the england and wales will probably be loving the weather. more clout in scotland and northern ireland, rain to come tonight, patches on the western side of the country, otherwise dry and largely clear, temperatures dipping to eight or nine in rural areas. a breeze still blowing, milder in scotland, continues to blow into western parts of the country on sunday. drier, brighterand warmer for eastern areas. cloud for the far north of england, northern ireland, rest of england and wales bathed in sunshine, sea breezes development, in one temperatures rising to 28 in the south east perhaps. it touch warmer than today in scotland and northern ireland. england and wales, heat building, heatwave conditions into next week, temperatures possibly to the 30s.

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