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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 7, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: after the death of archie battersbee calls for changes to try and prevent legal battles over life support ending up in court. the death toll rises in gaza after israeli air strikes. palestinian militants have fired dozens of rockets into israel overnight. liz truss promises to bring in a cut in national insurance within weeks if she wins the conservative leadership race, but rishi sunak says the plan would do little to help most people.
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it wasn't quite as super saturday on the track for the home nations of the track for the home nations of the commonwealth games, but still, keely hodgkinson winning a great meal on night of athletics. temperatures are set to rise. we could see a heatwave once again in parts of england and wales this week. it's sunday 7th august. our main story — 12—year—old archie battersbee has died in hospital after weeks of legal battles over his care. his mother hollie dance said she was the proudest mum in the world. his life—sustaining treatment was withdrawn yesterday. the crossbench peer, lady finlay, who's a professor of palliative care, has called for a different approach to prevent disputes over life—support, ending up in court. helena wilkinson reports.
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these photos were released by the family of archie before his life support was withdrawn. archie passed at 12:15pm today. can i say, i am the proudest moment in the world, such a beautiful little boy. he fought right until the very end. i am so proud to be his mother. he was found unconscious at his home in april. doctors said it was highly likely he was brainstem dead, no hope of recovery, and treatment should be withdrawn. his parents didn't agree, they wanted more time for their son, and so they fought the hospital trust through the courts. the central question judges looked at was what in archie's interest. they all agreed life
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support should be withdrawn. the cases like archie's is extremely rare, and questions are raised about how such disputes could be avoided in the future. one idea would be to have an independent mediator who would speak to both the family and the hospital, in the hope any disagreement could be resolved without getting the courts involved.
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anything we do i think to avoid things escalating would be worth looking it. of course there always will be some cases that do end up in court, but i do think it may be helpful if we can find a way of intervening early. archie's family is now going through what is difficult to imagine. the judge said his parents�* unconditional love and dedication for their son had been a golden thread that runs through this case. helen wilkinson, bbc news. israel says it has neutralised the military leadership of the islamichhad group, during a second day of air—strikes on gaza. israeli officials say in response, the palestinian militant group has fired more than 300 rockets and mortars into the south of the country. at least 30 people are known to have died. our middle east correspondent, yolande knell reports from jerusalem.
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explosion the full force of israel's new literary operation in gaza, this linkagejust minutes literary operation in gaza, this linkage just minutes after a warning strike. palestinians racing away. a year or relative calm now shattered. this is where one of the first israeli airstrikes killed a islamic jihad commander, leaving his neighbour in shock. translation: neighbour in shock. tuna/mom- neighbour in shock. translation: ~ ., translation: we were safe in our home, we translation: we were safe in our home. we were _ translation: we were safe in our home, we were thrown _ translation: we were safe in our home, we were thrown out - translation: we were safe in our home, we were thrown out of - translation: we were safe in our home, we were thrown out of it - translation: we were safe in our home, we were thrown out of it by| home, we were thrown out of it by the bomb. why didn't they warn us? explosion. islamichhad fied heavy barrage as rockets, in revenge, it said, of its leader's death. in response, israeli defences. then, this rocket had an israeli home. the family went to their shelter when the air raid sirens went off, the local official says. this is probably what saved them. no—one was hurt. israeli
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forces are targeting what they say our militant bases in gaza, maintaining they are reacting to a direct threat from iranbacked islamichhad. now, decisions on hamas which governs here. we are hearing about other important developments, at least six people killed including children and a blast in the north of gaza with israel and some palestinians blaming a misfired militant rocket. that could complicate egypt—led efforts to broker a ceasefire. yolande knell, bbc news, jerusalem. liz truss would seek to reverse the rising national contributions if she became a minister. the rise was brought in by her arrival rishi sunak to help business spending on the nhs on a social care, however
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saying that the tax cuts won't help those significantly had by inflation. an 11—year—old girl has died after getting into difficulty at a water park in berkshire. members of the public searched a lake at liquid leisure in datchet yesterday afternoon before she was found by emergency services. thames valley police say they are treating her death as unexplained. there is pressure that ordered from ukraine in coming days. four ships have been given permission to take green and sunflower oil out of two black seaports today. millions of tonnes of grain have been stuck in ukraine since the russian invasion began, causing a global shortage, and that is pushing food prices. french officials desperately trying to rescue a beluga whale trapped in the river seine have come up with a new strategy,
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a vitamin cocktail. after failed attempts to encourage it to swim out, scientists have been worried for its health. rescuers hope the vitamin injection will stimulate its appetite and help it to make the 100—mile return journey out to the english channel, where it can swim back to its arctic habitat. dementia support groups can be a lifeline for those living with alzheimer's and their families. they provide regular social activities aimed at improving the lives of people with the condition. however, funding is due to end injanuary for some services in hull and there's uncertainty about how vulnerable adults in the city will be supported. shirley henry has been speaking to some of the families affected. disco music fun, games and lots of laughter.
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you see your loved one come to life. singing, i love the singing. doing— singing, i love the singing. doing all these little activities does — doing all these little activities does keep— doing all these little activities does keep his _ doing all these little activities does keep his brain— doing all these little activities does keep his brain going. - does keep his brain going. for— does keep his brain going. for many— does keep his brain going. for many people - does keep his brain going. for many people with - does keep his brain going. - for many people with dementia and their carers, this group in hull is a lifeline. # we pass the time away. it is hard, hard looking after someone _ it is hard, hard looking after someone with dementia, and you come here and _ someone with dementia, and you come here and they are all friendly. somebody to talk to in the same situation — somebody to talk to in the same situation who— somebody to talk to in the same situation who understands. - situation who understands. ican— situation who understands. i can see _ situation who understands. i can see you _ situation who understands. i can see you smiling! - situation who understands. i can see you smiling! joanne's mother made _ i can see you smiling! joanne's mother made lots _ i can see you smiling! joanne's mother made lots of _ i can see you smiling! joanne's mother made lots of friends i i can see you smiling! joanne's i mother made lots of friends here. she died two weeks ago. come on, off we go again. we couldn't have done what we have done with her without the support because i have learnt so much, learned how to handle her, how to talk to her. learned how to handle her, how to talk to her-— talk to her. using, mum. the funding _
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talk to her. using, mum. the funding for— talk to her. using, mum. the funding for the - talk to her. using, mum. l the funding for the support talk to her. using, mum. - the funding for the support group run by the alzheimer's society, as well as funding for mind, age uk, and the hospice were due to end on tuesday but last week the council said their contract would be extended untiljanuary. extended until january. we have extended untiljanuary. we have known for a while they were going to end on the ninth of august we put plans in place to cope with that, and within two weeks we then find out they are going to be extended for five months so that is on one hand good news but on the other hand creates still uncertainty in a really bondable client group. there are around 3000 people in hull at the _ there are around 3000 people in hull at the moment with dementia, and numbers— at the moment with dementia, and numbers are rising. people are getting — numbers are rising. people are getting diagnosed every week and looking _ getting diagnosed every week and looking forward, what is going to be there _ looking forward, what is going to be there for— looking forward, what is going to be there for our service. now— there for our service. now a _ there for our service. now a petition has been set up to save the group. everyone is so upset because there isn't anything. they would be back to being sitting at home and being
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isolated. i would be really upset, i would really _ i would be really upset, i would really be — i would be really upset, i would really be upset because i look forward — really be upset because i look forward to coming. the _ forward to coming. the council says it cares about aduu the council says it cares about adult services but it is facing significant challenges. people matter to me as the director of adult social care but people matter to the local authority. there will be some changes we need to make and some things we need to stop doing but it doesn't mean we aren't doing but it doesn't mean we aren't doing nothing. it is about looking at how we can make sure we are making best use of the resources we've got and we are able to provide much care and advice, and support, to people who need it. this is part of me, it's been a huge part of— this is part of me, it's been a huge part of my— this is part of me, it's been a huge part of my mum'sjenny, my dad's jonah, _ part of my mum'sjenny, my dad's jonah, i_ part of my mum'sjenny, my dad's jonah, i don't know what we would have _ jonah, i don't know what we would have done — jonah, i don't know what we would have done without them. # what _ have done without them. # what will be, will be. # que sera,
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sera. the us has accused china provocative and irresponsible action after taiwan said beijing had ordered its forces to rehearse an attack on the island. china has been the past few days conducting military training exercises and the region in response to a controversial visit to taiwan by the senior us politician nancy pelosi. _, , ,., by the senior us politician nancy pelosi. _, , ., , ., pelosi. our correspondent “oins from tai ei and pelosi. our correspondent “oins from taipei and taiwan. h pelosi. our correspondent “oins from taipei and taiwan. what _ pelosi. our correspondent joins from taipei and taiwan. what the - pelosi. our correspondent joins from taipei and taiwan. what the latest? | taipei and taiwan. what the latest? we thought those drills from china would _ we thought those drills from china would and — we thought those drills from china would and about midday at local and tamah— would and about midday at local and taiwan because these exclusion zones that china _ taiwan because these exclusion zones that china imposed on waters around taiwah_ that china imposed on waters around taiwan oh— that china imposed on waters around taiwan on thursday starting at lunchtime were due to be lifted at midday— lunchtime were due to be lifted at midday on — lunchtime were due to be lifted at midday on sunday. we haven't got confirmation yet from china but i can tell— confirmation yet from china but i can tell you according to the defence _ can tell you according to the defence ministry in taipei, activity in the _ defence ministry in taipei, activity in the taiwan strait have continued today~ _ in the taiwan strait have continued
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today. they— in the taiwan strait have continued today. they say that at least ten chinese — today. they say that at least ten chinese ships came up to what is call the _ chinese ships came up to what is call the median line halfway across the taiwan— call the median line halfway across the taiwan strait, and that is usually— the taiwan strait, and that is usually the line that defines — divides— usually the line that defines — divides chinese controlled waters from _ divides chinese controlled waters from normally taiwan controlled waters — from normally taiwan controlled waters. the chinese asides says the li-ht waters. the chinese asides says the light doesn't exist, we will ignore it from _ light doesn't exist, we will ignore it from now on. and as you said in the introduction, we also have had the introduction, we also have had the strong — the introduction, we also have had the strong statement from the white house _ the strong statement from the white house saying, again condemning china's_ house saying, again condemning china's drills but saying that china is attempting to, as the white has put it. _ is attempting to, as the white has put it, change the status quo in the taiwan— put it, change the status quo in the taiwan strait by using these drills, and that— taiwan strait by using these drills, and that is— taiwan strait by using these drills, and that is important language because — and that is important language because the united states policy since _ because the united states policy since 1979 has been to oppose any unilateral— since 1979 has been to oppose any unilateral change in the straight, so they— unilateral change in the straight, so they are saying they are breaking this 40—year old agreement with us, but you _ this 40—year old agreement with us, but you wouldn't do this. thank— but you wouldn't do this. thank you.
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6:40am. let's go through the newspapers. the sunday times reports that rishi sunak has pledged to introduce a multibillion—pound package to help ease the cost of living crisis, saying the country faces a stark choice between "clear—eyed realism "and starry—eyed boosterism". writing in the observer, former prime minister gordon brown has said that borisjohnson and the tory leadership candidates should agree an immediate emergency budget tackling the spiralling cost of living. and the sunday telegraph reports that the environment secretary has urged more water companies to introduce urgent restrictions and that hosepipe must be banned now after a period of dry weather. also featured is a picture of archie battersbee's mum hollie, following the death of the 12—year—old boy. inside the papers, quite a few of them covering the water shortage, some ideas here from courtesy of the mail on sunday, some of the
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left—field ideas, use a container to collect water while you shower then use it to flush the toilet, fancy that? challenge yourself to finish the show in the time it takes to listen to a four—minute track from a playlist on sparta by including lady gaga's rain on me, bruce springsteen's the river and adele's water under the bridge. think about it a lot more because on the side — other side of this, it's not the serengeti, it's a field in cambridge, located there and it does look like it could be wildebeest, hippos and zebras. this is one of europe's most important wetlands but you can see that, just how parched it is. you can see that, 'ust how parched it is. ,,, ., ,, ., , it is. speaking of wildlife, this icture it is. speaking of wildlife, this picture in _ it is. speaking of wildlife, this picture in the _ it is. speaking of wildlife, this picture in the sunday - it is. speaking of wildlife, this picture in the sunday mirror, | it is. speaking of wildlife, this - picture in the sunday mirror, baby zebra and a rhino, making a close bond, daisy the baby rhyno and the little zebra, daisy rescued when she
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was just hours old, the umbilical cord still attached after getting separated from her herd in south africa. six months of intensive care, made an unlikely bond, the two of them, both back to health, in south africa.— south africa. that is seriously cute! isn't _ south africa. that is seriously cute! isn't it? _ south africa. that is seriously cute! isn't it? speaking - south africa. that is seriously cute! isn't it? speaking of- south africa. that is seriously i cute! isn't it? speaking of which, let's check in with matt for a look at this morning's weather. no comparison they are,. no significant rain in the forecast for the next ten days at least, and we have a start like this to begin your sunday across parts of wales, this is the son just peeping up across parts of wales, this is the sonjust peeping up over across parts of wales, this is the son just peeping up over the across parts of wales, this is the sonjust peeping up over the hill there where the sun will be out with blue skies all day long, in fact a much sunny day to come, the exemption northern ireland, scotland, a bit more breeze and a bit more in the way of cloud.
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submarine as well, not as much through recent days but the big picture shows what is happening as well, high—pressure extending from the atlantic, it's going to be with us about the coming week, keeping things dry, some cloud and some outbreaks of rain, not as wet as yesterday but patchy rain across western scotland and north of northern ireland, that will come and go all day long, northern ireland brightening up considerably, some sunshine to the north and east of scotland, isolated showers, some cloud far north of england, but blue skies to take you right to your sunday, strong sunshine overhead and a pretty warm one if not a hot one, temperatures up on yesterday's values, and in the south—westerly when we will see those temperatures rise relative to yesterday. that will pick up over this evening and tonight, further rain at times, pushing into the western isles especially, most places will be dry, cooler conditions across parts of rural wales in the south—west could
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get down into single figures, but on monday, cloud across northern england, especially to the east of the pennines, that will break up, cloudiest of all other highlands where we will see the wet weather, 90, where we will see the wet weather, go, heavy rain, strengthening when, and temperatures will continue to climb. 29, 30 degrees across the south—east of england, low 20s across parts of scotland and northern ireland, and with wins going a bit more south—westerly, temperatures rise further into tuesday, clearing away some of that rain but we could see wins in the top of 45 mph in parts of north—west scotland, a windy day, 2a degrees across some parts of the highlands, 30, 31 towards the south—east of england, and those temperatures will continue to claim a little bit more as we go through this week with a high—pressure system in charge, the ground soil dry underneath, things will warm up, maybe a south—easterly wind picking up the warm from their continent but either way we're looking at heatwave conditions to take us through the middle and second half of the week, especially
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for england and wales, take a look at some of these temperatures, into the 30s quite widely, england in particular but even scotland and northern ireland where you have lots of cloud, outbreaks of rain over recent days, here we will see temperatures into the mid— 20s, a pretty warm if not hot week ahead, back to you both. not much rain at all. , ., ~' back to you both. not much rain at all. , ., 4' , all. may be on next weekend but even then, ve all. may be on next weekend but even then. very much _ all. may be on next weekend but even then. very much a _ all. may be on next weekend but even then, very much a case _ all. may be on next weekend but even then, very much a case of _ all. may be on next weekend but even then, very much a case of wait - all. may be on next weekend but even then, very much a case of wait and i then, very much a case of wait and see. ~ ., ., , ., ~ i. see. we will wait and see, thank you for now, see. we will wait and see, thank you for now. we — see. we will wait and see, thank you for now, we will— see. we will wait and see, thank you for now, we will talk— see. we will wait and see, thank you for now, we will talk to _ see. we will wait and see, thank you for now, we will talk to you - see. we will wait and see, thank you for now, we will talk to you in - see. we will wait and see, thank you for now, we will talk to you in a i for now, we will talk to you in a little bit. it?! for now, we will talk to you in a little bit. " , , , it's a disease that's been around for decades and now researchers in southampton think they've found a new vaccine against whooping cough. the next step is to test whether its effective, but hundreds of volunteers are needed to take part in the trial. alastair fee has been to meet some who've already signed up. in three months time, georgia will be deliberately infected with
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whooping cough. i be deliberately infected with whooping cough.— be deliberately infected with whooping cough. be deliberately infected with whooin: cou:h. ., , whooping cough. i have some friends that have done _ whooping cough. i have some friends that have done clinical— whooping cough. i have some friends that have done clinical trials - whooping cough. i have some friends that have done clinical trials that i that have done clinical trials that said just give it a go, it's a bit of extra cash. is most likely financial, but if this is a way that i can help out in a medical sector, then i'm happy to do that. she graduated _ then i'm happy to do that. she graduated last _ then i'm happy to do that. she graduated last year and the £3700 compensation has attracted her to a potentially life changing study for people all over the world. it’s potentially life changing study for people all over the world. it's not that much — people all over the world. it's not that much work— people all over the world. it's not that much work and _ people all over the world. it's not that much work and is _ people all over the world. it's not that much work and is just - people all over the world. it's not| that much work and isjust coming people all over the world. it's not i that much work and isjust coming in that much work and is just coming in for 4— six months, it's pretty easy. the south hampton testing a new type of vaccine, it is delivered by a nasal spray, the old vaccines were injected. nasal spray, the old vaccines were in'ected. ., ., , ., .. injected. the idea of this vaccine is that it improves _ injected. the idea of this vaccine is that it improves your - injected. the idea of this vaccine is that it improves your immune | is that it improves your immune response in your nose, so the place where we know that whooping cough gets in, and because it improves the immune spot there, it should protect against what we call colonisation, otherwise carrying whooping cough bacteria without having symptoms. tony hibbert suffering from the after—effects of whooping cough and
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he will _ after—effects of whooping cough and he will become the subject of a new experimental shortcut cure.- experimental shortcut cure. before vaccines, whooping _ experimental shortcut cure. before vaccines, whooping cough - experimental shortcut cure. before vaccines, whooping cough board i vaccines, whooping cough board severe death and illness in young children and babies, and it is estimated it still kills 160,000 people worldwide, many of them children. is widely felt that the current vaccine is becoming less effective and can be improved upon. there was a relatively big outbreak of whooping cough in the uk in about 2012 but we have gradually seen an increase in numbers since that time, and we are trying to pre—empt any further increase that we might see, but globally there has been an increase in other parts of the world as well, it does seem to be linked to changes to the vaccine, which is effective for a period of time, but perhaps is wearing off more quickly. all patients first need to be screened to see if they are healthy enough to take part. scott is keen to support new vaccines, but also hopes the compensation will help him get on the property ladder. taste hopes the compensation will help him get on the property ladder.— get on the property ladder. we have been t in: get on the property ladder. we have been trying to _ get on the property ladder. we have been trying to save _
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get on the property ladder. we have been trying to save for _ get on the property ladder. we have been trying to save for a _ get on the property ladder. we have been trying to save for a few- get on the property ladder. we have been trying to save for a few years l been trying to save for a few years and we had to save more because of the health crisis and we are at an ok point but this is a nice sort of chunk of change to have on top of the deposit money.— chunk of change to have on top of the deposit money. around 60 people will take part. — the deposit money. around 60 people will take part, several— the deposit money. around 60 people will take part, several hundred - the deposit money. around 60 people will take part, several hundred are i will take part, several hundred are needed to see if they are eligible. many more people are being urged to come forward. all participants will have to attend several appointments and also stay in a hotel for 16 days where they will be carefully monitored. the trial will run until next april, it is hoped the results will make a big difference to the number of people who suffer worldwide. let's hope it rolls out successfully.- let's hope it rolls out successfully. let's hope it rolls out successfull. :: , ., ., let's hope it rolls out successfull. :: , ., , ., ., ., , ., successfully. 70 years ago a small but perfectly _ successfully. 70 years ago a small but perfectly formed _ successfully. 70 years ago a small but perfectly formed visitor i but perfectly formed visitor attraction was created in dorset. wimborne's model town captures the look and feel of the 19505, but all the buildings are the size of dolls houses.sean killick went along to see how they're marking this special anniversary. they should have sent me for this,
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just make it even smaller! it's a small place celebrating a big day. it's a small place celebrating a big da . ., , ,, it's a small place celebrating a big da . ., , _ , it's a small place celebrating a big day. happy birthday wimborne model town, and day. happy birthday wimborne model town. and god _ day. happy birthday wimborne model town, and god save _ day. happy birthday wimborne model town, and god save her _ day. happy birthday wimborne model town, and god save her majesty i day. happy birthday wimborne model town, and god save her majesty thel town, and god save her majesty the queen! it town, and god save her ma'esty the queen! , ., ., , ., town, and god save her ma'esty the queen! , ., ., . ., queen! it started as a commercial venture and _ queen! it started as a commercial venture and is _ queen! it started as a commercial venture and is now _ queen! it started as a commercial venture and is now is _ queen! it started as a commercial venture and is now is run - queen! it started as a commercial venture and is now is run as i queen! it started as a commercial venture and is now is run as an i venture and is now is run as an educational charity preserving nineteen fifties wimborne in one tenth scale, including more than 100 shopfronts, many nowjust memories. we are celebrating our 70th birthday, the model town survivors are commercial attraction of over 30 years, but it nosedived, it had to close in 1983 on the site was sold to housing, however, lack i like a phoenix, it has risen again thanks to some very determined volunteers who campaigned to have it moved and rebuilt on what was a field, and here we are all those years later celebrating 70 years. this here we are all those years later celebrating 70 years.— here we are all those years later celebrating 70 years. this is how wimborne _
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celebrating 70 years. this is how wimborne model _ celebrating 70 years. this is how wimborne model town _ celebrating 70 years. this is how wimborne model town looked i celebrating 70 years. this is how. wimborne model town looked when celebrating 70 years. this is how- wimborne model town looked when we visited in 197a. the wimborne model town looked when we visited in 1974-— visited in 1974. the model town of wimborne. _ visited in 1974. the model town of wimborne. a _ visited in 1974. the model town of wimborne, a place _ visited in 1974. the model town of wimborne, a place where - visited in1974. the model town of wimborne, a place where all- visited in 1974. the model town of wimborne, a place where all of i visited in 1974. the model town of wimborne, a place where all of us become _ wimborne, a place where all of us become gulliver 's.— become gulliver 's. when it was moved to _ become gulliver 's. when it was moved to the — become gulliver 's. when it was moved to the new _ become gulliver 's. when it was moved to the new site - become gulliver 's. when it was moved to the new site in - become gulliver 's. when it was moved to the new site in the i become gulliver 's. when it was i moved to the new site in the 1980s moved to the new site in the 19805 it was a major reconstruction job as mike hopkin5 remembers. the mike hopkins remembers. the counsellor. — mike hopkins remembers. the counsellor, she _ mike hopkins remembers. tie counsellor, she was mike hopkins remembers. tte counsellor, she was mainly responsible for the site being restored, and she stopped me in the street and said good, you can mix up some concrete for me, so for the next three years i spent mixing up concrete on the side and it was like a giantjigsaw puzzle in those days, each piece weighs a couple of times, so quite a physical exercise.- so quite a physical exercise. among the visitors — so quite a physical exercise. among the visitors were _ so quite a physical exercise. among the visitors were decades _ so quite a physical exercise. among the visitors were decades was i the visitors were decades was cameron rabbits, here on the ride, visiting with her sister. cc says today brings back happy childhood memories but she loves it even more now. ., ., ,, . ., ., now. you never appreciated it as a child, it now. you never appreciated it as a child. it was _ now. you never appreciated it as a child, it was just _ now. you never appreciated it as a child, it wasjust a _ now. you never appreciated it as a child, it wasjust a fun _ now. you never appreciated it as a child, it wasjust a fun place i now. you never appreciated it as a child, it wasjust a fun place to i child, it was just a fun place to be, but now i understand the hard work and the passion and dedication that gone into it, and the garden, and so much more, you could spend a
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whole day here and just don't want to get out of it, you are in a little wonderland.— to get out of it, you are in a little wonderland. today they get 27,000 visitors _ little wonderland. today they get 27,000 visitors a _ little wonderland. today they get 27,000 visitors a year. _ little wonderland. today they get 27,000 visitors a year. i - little wonderland. today they get 27,000 visitors a year. i really i 27,000 visitors a year. i really like all the _ 27,000 visitors a year. i really like all the little _ 27,000 visitors a year. i really like all the little objects i 27,000 visitors a year. i really like all the little objects in i 27,000 visitors a year. i really like all the little objects in the| like all the little objects in the shops and how they are very detailed. . shops and how they are very detailed-— shops and how they are very detailed. . ., , ., detailed. the children really love it. we detailed. the children really love it- we come _ detailed. the children really love it. we come and _ detailed. the children really love it. we come and have _ detailed. the children really love it. we come and have a - detailed. the children really love it. we come and have a look- detailed. the children really love it. we come and have a look in i detailed. the children really love | it. we come and have a look in all the windows— it. we come and have a look in all the windows and we are playing all the windows and we are playing all the games, so yeah, brilliant. amazingly, to celebrate the special anniversary, they have 3d printed 110 scale model of a 110 scale model, and they have really gone to town. t model, and they have really gone to town. ., ., . a ., town. i will have to check it out next time _ town. i will have to check it out next time i _ town. i will have to check it out next time i end _ town. i will have to check it out next time i end dorset - i i town. i will have to check it out next time i end dorset - i am l town. i will have to check it out| next time i end dorset - i am in next time i end dorset — i am in dorset. next time i end dorset - i am in dorset. ., , ., nexttimelend dorset-lam in dorset. ., , ., ., , dorset. from little things to really bi thins, dorset. from little things to really big things. we're _ dorset. from little things to really big things, we're talking _ dorset. from little things to really big things, we're talking about i big things, we're talking about volcanoes later in the programme, one has erupted, close to iceland's capital reykjavik, these are life pictures, take a look at that! it’s pictures, take a look at that! it's amazini! pictures, take a look at that! it�*s amazing! and started his motor last
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wednesday, local authorities have warned people from the local area to stay away, which is pretty good advice on the look of the pictures. the local volcano is known as...? it is close by to one in a similar area that lasted about six months and this one has been acquired for 6000 years. this one has been acquired for 6000 ears. ., ~' ., this one has been acquired for 6000 ears. ., ~ ., ., ., ., years. you know what that name means? l'm _ years. you know what that name means? i'm going _ years. you know what that name means? i'm going just _ years. you know what that name means? i'm going just keep i years. you know what that name i means? i'm going just keep seeing it until i can get it. beautiful valley mountain. ., ., ., ., , mountain. not at the moment! lamy. showin: mountain. not at the moment! lamy. showing off — mountain. not at the moment! lamy. showing off for _ mountain. not at the moment! lamy. showing off for the _ mountain. not at the moment! lamy. showing off for the cameras. - showing off for the cameras. obviously incredibly dangerous at the moment, and toxic gas is being released, although as things stand it is safe. brute released, although as things stand it is safe. ~ . ~ released, although as things stand it is safe. ~ ., ,, i. . ,, it is safe. we will take you back there a little _ it is safe. we will take you back there a little later _ it is safe. we will take you back there a little later so _ it is safe. we will take you back there a little later so i - it is safe. we will take you back there a little later so i can i it is safe. we will take you back there a little later so i can see l there a little later so i can see there a little later so i can see the name again. it's 626, that's not bad. . ., ' the name again. it's 626, that's not bad. . ., , , the name again. it's 626, that's not bad. , ~'
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the name again. it's 626, that's not bad. , �*, bad. the coffee is kicking in! let's turn to sport- _ chetan is in birmingham on the penultimate, and busiest, day of the commonwealth games. good morning! morning, no volcanoes in birmingham — good morning! morning, no volcanoes in birmingham but _ good morning! morning, no volcanoes in birmingham but the _ good morning! morning, no volcanoes in birmingham but the sun _ good morning! morning, no volcanoes in birmingham but the sun is - good morning! morning, no volcanoes in birmingham but the sun is rising i in birmingham but the sun is rising behind us on the penultimate day of the commonwealth games, it has gone so quickly, and i was hoping we would be talking about a super sunday after the lionesses last sunday after the lionesses last sunday winning the women's heroes, we could have had england's women in the final of the t20 cricket of the hockey and netball, one of the things will be happening, more to come on that in a moment, before we look ahead to what will be an epic day of metals but as for saturday, we were building it as a super saturday, it did not quite happen. nick miller did win gold for england in the hammer, but other hopefuls were pushed down the medals. here's our sports correspondent natalie pirks. every sinew strained, every effort made, but gold remains elusive.
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keeley hodgkinson won silver at the world champions and hopes were high and 800 metres, but went tenure's mary moore returned the burners on, there was no. her. mari; mary moore returned the burners on, there was no. her.— there was no. her. mary with an incredible _ there was no. her. mary with an incredible performance! - there was no. her. mary with an incredible performance! bronze| there was no. her. mary with an i incredible performance! bronze for scotland's laura _ incredible performance! bronze for scotland's laura muir. _ incredible performance! bronze for scotland's laura muir. ten - incredible performance! bronze for scotland's laura muir. ten years i incredible performance! bronze for i scotland's laura muir. ten years ago keeley hodgkinson watched a super saturday in —— saturday and decided to focus on running. to now has world silver, olympic silver, and commonwealth silver. it world silver, olympic silver, and commonwealth silver. it happened so auick! i commonwealth silver. it happened so quick! i gave — commonwealth silver. it happened so quick! i gave it _ commonwealth silver. it happened so quick! i gave it all, _ commonwealth silver. it happened so quick! i gave it all, and _ quick! i gave it all, and unfortunately came home with silver again. unfortunately came home with silver aaain. ., ., . ., , ., but again. now, the world champion. but world championship _ again. now, the world champion. but world championship wednesday i again. now, the world champion. but world championship wednesday and | world championship wednesday and ultimately guarantee commonwealth winds as jake whiteman found out. with all the eyes of the world champion, the scott found himself fading in a rapid 1500 metre final and having to settle for bronze. it's going to be australia for gold!
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for england's nick miller it was hammer time, for england's nick miller it was hammertime, giving for england's nick miller it was hammer time, giving everyone an early scan with two no throws but made up for it to successfully his commonwealth title. four years ago england john el hughes wanted 200 metres only to be disqualified during his victory lap, this time, he was denied again by trinidad & tobago. smiles though for this silver lining. and this is what is all about, alistair charmers with an unexpected 400 metres hurdles bronze, guernsey 's unexpected 400 metres hurdles bronze, guernsey '5 first ever athletics commonwealth metal, hugs all around, athletics commonwealth metal, hugs allaround, it's athletics commonwealth metal, hugs all around, its called the friendly games after all. following the death of the 12—year—old boy. away from the track, plenty of success for the home nations, and including a rather emotionally goal forjack hunter
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33 goals won on day nine, number more than this. after opening up about his struggles with and health struggles, jack hunter spivey has added another god. i'm just a regular working scouse lad, and i have got this. this is my mum! an english one, two, three in the springboard, with daniel goodfellow taking the win. four years ago he pardoned tom daley for the synchro title, but this was the dive that helped them a claim individual glory. england's hope of a second commonwealth goal in a row in the netball didn't quite go to plan. australia won the semi—final 60-51. plan. australia won the semi—final 60—51. england will now play new zealand for the bronze. it was australia versus england in the
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men's hockey semi—final as well, with england again losing outcome at this time throwing away a two—goal lead. elsewhere, wells got there first rhythmic gymnastic gold, gemma frizelle with this first place in the hoop event. and in boxing, while it was a night of semifinals across the weight classes that could be quite a party planned in belfast. aidan will go for gold today in the light middleweight final while sister michaela will battle for the featherweight crown. northern ireland are having the most successful games ever, and while they wait on the boxing, the bowls was in the bag. martin mccue, northern ireland's joint flag bearer with a winning bowl and the men's pause. you won't even born when they were winning and the commonwealth games in kuala lumpur! i'm not sure appreciate that on tv,
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but it— i'm not sure appreciate that on tv, but it is— i'm not sure appreciate that on tv, but it is unbelievable. especially with these bad, they are legends. it is a pleasure to be a part of this. two _ is a pleasure to be a part of this. two legends. in is a pleasure to be a part of this. two legends-— two legends. in the long ball siniles it two legends. in the long ball singles it was _ two legends. in the long ball singles it was bronze - two legends. in the long ball singles it was bronze for i two legends. in the long ball- singles it was bronze for scotland's in maclean and silver for northern ireland's gary kelly, but it was australia's aaron wilson who won the event, and with it came a celebration of the games. brilliant stuff there. so, how does all that leave the medals table? australia have pulled away from england again at the top. england with 50 golds now, scotland have eight, wales five and northern ireland are on two, but that's bound to go up later, with a host of boxers through to gold medal bouts. that should be far more fruitful for
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northern ireland. away from birmingham, from birmingham, we've had the first saturday of the premier league season, and it wasn't short on drama, with newly promoted fulham giving liverpool a tough test. dan ogunshakin rounds up the best of the action. excitement in the air for full and's returned to the big and unfinished business to resolve. liverpool have designs on the premier league title but for much of the game the hose look more like the top—flight side. commentator: it is in! alexander—arnold beaten at the back state by alexander middle ridge! jurgen klopp hoping to see the side of the season. but thanks to a new signings of newness, the signs are promising. having fought hard to level, they trip themselves. the serve at the double left the reds staring at an opening—day defeat.
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however, as long as there is mo salah, there is hope, and this meant it was two rather than three points dropped. really bad game, really bad. and for others, we got a plan for it, so thatis others, we got a plan for it, so that is the only positive thing. a miserable day on merseyside as everton also paid the penalty to chelsea. georginio wijnaldum estate for the spot to give thomas the winning start. nottingham forest spent 22 years dreaming of a return to the top—flight, but it might yet prove a nightmare. second throughout, they resisted them until they no longer could. he has smashed it in. 1-0 he has smashed it in. 1—0 down and a change of plan was required, get callum wilson was writing the script and this deft finish to make it 2—0, leaving steve cooper with plenty to ponder. time to recover, they are ok in terms of the possession they had, the territory, but
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terms of the possession they had, the territory, but didn't terms of the possession they had, the territory, but didn't play terms of the possession they had, the territory, but didn't play well at ball. prows's is excellent opening goal could divide. and then they would level before a rare eric dier strike from the front. most allah's and own goal, giving spasm breathing room before dayjohn struck to send the coach into raptures and up to the top of the premier league. wins for celtic and rangers in the scottish premiership. celtic were made to work for their win at ross county, it looked like the game was heading for a draw for a draw before a debut goal from moritzjenz won it for celtic it was a little more comfortable for rangers, they were 2—0 winners at home to kilmarnock — alfredo morelos with their second goal. south africa's ashleigh buhai leads the women's british open at muirfield. she had a storming third round,
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hitting eight birdies, to move to 14 under par. that's five shots clear of the field. joe root helped trent rockets to a six—wicket win over birmingham phoenix in the hundred. he scored 34 off 26 balls including this six off the bowling of moeen ali. alex hales contributed 58 towards their victory target of 147, which they reached with three balls to spare. johann zarco will start this afternoon's british motogp from pole. the french rider set a new track record in qualifying at silverstone as he claimed the top pot on the grid by a tenth of a second. remarkably spain's espargaro recovered from this crash in final practice to take part in qualifying and will start from sixth.
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tha nkfully thankfully he is ok. a40 five—gold medals offered on the penultimate day of for games. and the hockey, motor, more on that coming up. we will be back with you. busy day. after covid closed theatres and silence live music events, the entertainment industry is albeit slowly getting back on its feet. but how can it protect its future the opera world is finding a way. i've been an opera fan for decades and i want to share my passion with you, so i'm on a mission to find out how opera is making itself fit for the future. i've come to munich to meet one of my all—time opera heroes, the german tenorjonas kaufmann, who's widely viewed as the world's leading opera singer.
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he's a charismatic person, performer. his way of communicating, his intelligence that one hears whenever he is singing, isjust unique. and that makes him really very special. but the pressures of staying at the top are immense. the highs and lows of life as an operatic celebrity from one of the people who knows him best. to get to the top is not so difficult, but to stay there, this is really a hard one. are the sacrifices worth it? the moment it all falls into place and you are at a position that you've hardly ever dreamt of is so much of a payback that everything, all the work that you've done before, seems to be minimal. jonas kaufmann unveiled.
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let me take you to the opera. singing jonas kaufmann is an opera legend. he's already assured of his place in history as one of the greatest ever tenors. applause like millions of others, i'm a huge fan ofjonas kaufmann and i try to see him
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perform whenever i can. i am in awe of his almost supernatural talent, but now i can go one step further. i've come to the opera house in his hometown, munich, to find out more about his meteoric rise to globalfame. the bavarian state opera house is wherejonas began his career. and tickets are always snapped up for his performances. he sings during intervals, the foyer shop does a brisk trade. which single artist do you sell the most dvds, cd5 of?
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the most and the best singer, it'sjonas kaufmann here in munich. and i think also in general, the visitors of this opera house fall in love also to this born in munich singer, jonas kaufmann. serge dorny, general manager of the bavarian state opera, explains kaufmann's appeal. well, the house, whenever he comes, is packed. i mean, these are... this is one of the first performances to be sold out, up to the point that even the orchestra pit... when he does a recital, we have to lift the orchestra pit and put seats. i mean, recently, in a recital, he had to sing five encores and they wouldn't stop. kaufmann's international career really took off in 2006, when he performed alongside soprano angela gheorghiu at the metropolitan opera in new york. after that, he was
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flooded with offers. i became what people call a star with these performances alongside angela gheorghiu at the met. but that was obviously a key moment where the international market, if you would call it, noticed that there's this guy... laughs: ..that they just can't avoid any more for the future. but how did he start out? well, jonas kaufmann was born in 1969, when germany was divided. his parents fled east germany in the 19505. his father was an insurance broker, his mother a teacher, and he grew up with his older sister. we meet at the bavarian state opera house, where he first performed in his early career, and he tells me how his passion for music was formed. well, i grew up in a family that was fortunately extremely passionate with classical music and opera. they were all amateurs, obviously, but everyone was playing an instrument, and they all had
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subscriptions to various concert series and opera performances and theatre and everything. so, i luckily was in a good position to actually see all the great artists that passed through munich and the various houses here. and, of course, that does something with you. and classical music was on either radio or from tape or lps all day long, so i really sucked it up like a sponge. so, classical music was your normal, but when did you fall in love with opera? well, i was there for the very first time — actually, in this house down there — for a performance of madame butterfly by puccini. and it was kind of awakening for me. i couldn't believe what i saw, what i heard. yeah, i was right there in the middle, that centre behind the conductor, when i saw this very first performance. and it was something so thrilling that i came home and said, "this is what i want to do."
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he sings kaufmann trained as an opera singer at the academy of music, in munich. over the years, i learned how to sing, but i learned it in a way that the voice was...not harmed, maybe, but stressed so much that it was not a reliable instrument. and this is one of the absolute fundamental basics, if you want to have a long and successful career, that this instrument is reliable. and fortunately, i found another teacher who turned the whole process upside down. how difficult was it to get to where you are, to train your voice to be as versatile and incredible as it is? i mean, of course, it was a lot of training. it was a lot of waiting and hoping and suffering, maybe, too. but the moment it all falls into place and you are at a position that you've hardly ever dreamt of is so much of a payback that
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everything, all the work that you've done before, seems to be minimal. it's a beautiful opera house, jonas. what does it mean to you performing here as a local boy? well, it's fantastic, obviously. i mean, i grew up in this city and, of course, it was always a super—glamorous moment and event to be here. such a look... i look at this and it's amazing. and to then be able to not only walk through here and afford a ticket, but to be the one that people are queuing for, it's unbelievable. he sings kaufmann has to look after his voice and tries to stay healthy. well, i don't have a general recipe. i mean, i do some warm—up exercises, some yoga that i do every day.
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and i do it also right before the performance, because i believe very much into the fact that only a body that is fit and awake can hold a healthy voice. if you only concentrate on these tiny little vocal cords and all your effort goes through there, i think you're going to destroy the instrument and have no result whatsoever. if you run dry, it's a matter of seconds and your voice is gone. some people chew chewing gums, or i have these little gummy bears that i put somewhere in my cheek. but something like that. while you're singing, you'll put a gummy bear...? yeah, yeah, a little something. yeah, but... really? can you sing with it? the small ones, not these big ones. the babies! that's one of the secrets of your success? they laugh but not beer, not beer, for which the germans are renowned...? oh, absolutely. beer's very, very important because, after a performance, you're extremely dehydrated and then
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there's nothing better than a beer... that's an excuse, jonas kaufmann! they laugh he sings whatever role he's in, jonas kaufmann dazzles. he's renowned for a vast range of performances in tosca, la traviata, otello and fidelio, amongst many others. what is the secret of his success? that's what the next generation of opera stars want to know. coming up, meet the young singers who want to learn from kaufmann i've come to castiglione della pescaia, on the tuscan coast in italy, to find out how a new generation of opera singers draw inspiration from the stellar career of the world's top tenor, jonas kaufmann.
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they sing here, every year, a dozen lucky singers are selected from hundreds of applicants to attend masterclasses with big names from the world of opera at a summer school run by the georg solti academy. applause the academy was set up in 2004 by the family of the late hungarian conductor georg solti. during a long and distinguished career, he was music director of several opera houses, including the bavarian state opera in munich, germany, where, decades later, the young kaufmann would get his performing break. solti had believed passionately in encouraging and mentoring exceptional young opera singers from all over the world. he sings
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that's beautiful, dear. one more time. and be even longer on heaven. the beginning... jonathan papp is co—founder and artistic director of the georg solti academy and is one of the world's leading vocal coaches. we've had some really wonderful singers that we've nurtured through here, and they've gone on to sing at all the great houses. angel vargas is a tenor from puerto rico and studied music in the united states. i first sanonas kaufmann in a video in 2011 of the royal opera house production of tosca. and i had no idea what he was singing, but he made me feel so many emotions. the music and his voice just took me to a place that i wanted to feel again. so, that's why i study opera, because of the passion and the emotion i felt in his voice. what i admire the most aboutjonas kaufmann is his voice, his passion, his artistry.
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everything he brings, whenever he's on stage, isjust so pure. how would you describe jonas kaufmann's voice in the pantheon of tenors? it's extremely rare to find a voice likejonas kaufmann. and it's finding a voice where the person's put in that kind of work to give them the longevity, but also to give them this expressive quality in whatever they choose to sing, the dramatic quality, which is compelling when you're in your audience. he sings armenian tenor tigran melkonyan is also a great admirer of kaufmann. if i meetjonas kaufmann, i i will ask how to be like him, because, actually, you can say- "jonas kaufmann" and everyone around you will understand that - you are speaking about taste, about extraordinary voice, about talent, about, - of course, attractiveness.
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he sings what advice would you give to young tenors or young opera singers who are embarking on a great career? it's always difficult to give general advices. of course, the first advice maybe is listen to yourself, because you need to be satisfied with what you're doing, but you need to be very critical to yourself because no—one at the beginning will believe you, probably, or believe in you as much as you do. and later on, no—one will tell you... laughs: ..if you're i doing something wrong! and the second is you have to burn for it. and if you burn for such thing, if you have this passion, you have to do it. and it's a tough world. and i'm sure there are a lot of great, great talents out there. but unfortunately, many of these talents never make it because they get the wrong advice, or they are not discovered
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by the right person to be guided in the right way, and their talent is burned within a couple of years. what would you say is the secret of your phenomenal success, jonas? well, the easy answer to the question, what the secret of my success is, there are not that many! i would love to have more competition, and especially the number of tenors is going down. but, i mean, stability is maybe one of the reasons. i keep that quality. and i kept it now for quite a while, for at least, let's say, 15 years. and there's a certain guarantee, when there is a performance with kaufmann, that there is a certain quality to expect. but, i mean, what about the sacrifices you've had to make along the way to get to the top of an opera career such as yours? there are a lot of things that you have to give up. i don't want to say you don't see your children grow up, but there are these moments
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where you really, really, really want to be there, whether it's... ..a play that they're playing or a first day at a new school and you want to be there when they come home and talk about it, because, of course, you hearfrom it second—hand, or maybe with a video or something, but it's not the same. it's not the same also for them. i'm sure there are people who want to swap with me, and so i shouldn't complain too much. thomas voigt is kauffman's official biographer and is also his media manager and close friend. even in the same production, he will never give the same performance twice because it's all different. i mean, of course, he always looks for some days to refill the batteries, but sometimes i wish he would stop for more than two weeks, let's say a month, without doing anything to be ready for the next season. sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. so, depends on the planning.
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how does he deal with having to cancel performances when people have bought tickets and they want to see him? oh, yes, this is really a hard thing if he has to cancel because of illness. and on the social media, there are many, many voices of people, very disappointed. every cancellation is always a problem, and it's something that you don't want to do easily. i totally understand the frustration. what i don't understand is, if i buy a ticket for bayern munchen or chelsea and my favourite player is not playing because he's injured, everyone feels sorry for this person, but no—one asks to take its money back. they all see the same game, only that it maybe turns out with a different result because the best player was not on the field.
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but in opera, it is... it seems to be a very different story and people don't believe that opera singers can be sick and have problems of health, and therefore not able to sing, which on the other hand maybe shows me that it seems to be something extraterrestrial, something not human, what we are doing. that's why people don't believe that we are human beings and that this gift that we are having can be easily destroyed. he sings
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so, regular audiences may at times be disappointed when their favourite singers cancel, but how does one attract such passion for opera amongst younger people? i know that young people love modern things, but they would never go to the opera to find modernity. they would go to the opera to find fantasy, to find the past, to dream away from a difficult life that they are in. so, keep the opera traditional... keep it... ..don't try to reinvent it in a modern way, and you feel that that will maintain and spread its appeal? absolutely. tell the story that people are entertained and are drawn into this...into this
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wonderful, magicalworld. are you worried about the future of opera? i am worried, because i... of course, everyone wants to do something new. music means it is something that not only entertains us, but itjust resonates somewhere within us. and it can only resonate if it has a certain beauty. and the more you go away from these rules and recipes that for several centuries did work well, the more complicated this music becomes. he sings jonas kaufmann is extremely important, actually, for opera today and opera tomorrow. somehow, he makes it relevant. he gives it a kind of actuality, his personality, the way he is approaching it.
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so, he makes it that opera is not something about the past. there is no nostalgia of the past. i mean, somehow, he communicates nostalgia of the future. so, jonas, what are your plans for the future? or have you done everything you want to do? well, pretty much, yes. the list is getting shorter and shorter. it's more of the same, but more of the same is actually already quite a variety because, i mean, fortunately, the repertoire has been growing so big that whatever i take on, even if i've done it already several times, but it's certainly ages ago, and that makes this whole thing very exciting and interesting and keeps me attracted to it. it's been a joy to spend time withjonas in munich. i even managed to share the stage with him. this is a stage with which you're very familiar, jonas. it is true, absolutely, yes. and what's it like performing here in your hometown? it's fantastic.
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imean, it's... it's an absolute dream come true. i mean, imagine you stand here and there's a crowd... ..that cheers and is asking for more. i don't have words to describe the feeling that you are the one chosen to stand there. it's amazing. he sings oh, yeah, been a while! he laughs being serenaded byjonas kaufmann, i have to say... ijust introduced her as my fiancee! oh, even better! they laugh jonas kaufmann's standing as one of the greatest opera singers in history is secure. here in his hometown of munich, audiences at the bavarian state opera house see him as the local boy turned opera legend. and he inspires a new generation
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of singers, as well as his countless fans — including me — who will want to see him perform for many years to come. applause in the next episode, the young venezuelan conductor gustavo dudamel, and why he's shaking up the world of opera and music. seems to be minimal. good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: after the death of archie
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battersbee, calls for more to be done to prevent legal battles over life support ending up in court. the death toll rises in gaza after israeli air strikes. palestinian militants have fired dozens of rockets into israel overnight. liz truss promises a cut in national insurance within weeks if she wins the conservative leadership race, but rishi sunak says the plan would do little to help most people. good morning from victoria square in birmingham. it wasn't quite a super saturday on the track for the home nations at the commonwealth games, with keeley hodgkinson among those missing out on gold, but still winning a medal on an eventful night of athletics. cloudy, breezy and wet at times for scotland _ cloudy, breezy and wet at times for scotland over— cloudy, breezy and wet at times for scotland over the _ cloudy, breezy and wet at times for scotland over the next— cloudy, breezy and wet at times for scotland over the next few - cloudy, breezy and wet at times for scotland over the next few days. i scotland over the next few days. elsewhere. — scotland over the next few days. elsewhere, temperatures- scotland over the next few days. elsewhere, temperatures set i scotland over the next few days. elsewhere, temperatures set toi scotland over the next few days. i elsewhere, temperatures set to rise. we could _ elsewhere, temperatures set to rise. we could see — elsewhere, temperatures set to rise. we could see a — elsewhere, temperatures set to rise. we could see a heatwave _ elsewhere, temperatures set to rise. we could see a heatwave again -
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elsewhere, temperatures set to rise. we could see a heatwave again in i elsewhere, temperatures set to rise. | we could see a heatwave again in the parts of _ we could see a heatwave again in the parts of england _ we could see a heatwave again in the parts of england and _ we could see a heatwave again in the parts of england and wales _ we could see a heatwave again in the parts of england and wales this - parts of england and wales this week — it's sunday 7th of august. our main story — 12—year—old archie battersbee has died in hospital after weeks of legal battles over his care. his mother hollie dance said she was the proudest mum in the world. his life—sustaining treatment was withdrawn yesterday. the crossbench peer, lady finlay, who's a professor of palliative care, has called for a different approach to prevent disputes over life support, ending up in court. helena wilkinson reports. these photographs were released by archie's family in the hours before his life support was withdrawn. he died yesterday in hospital. archie passed at 12:15pm today. can ijust say, i am the proudest mum in the world, such a beautiful little boy. and he fought right until the very end, and i am so proud to be his mum.
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archie was found unconscious at his home in april. doctors said it was highly likely that he was brain stem dead, no hope of recovery, and treatment, they said, should be withdrawn. archie's parents didn't agree, they wanted more time for their son, and so they fought the hospital trust through the courts. the central question judges looked at was what was in archie's best interest. they all agreed — life support should be withdrawn. barts health nhs trust said its heartfelt condolences remained with archie's family, adding:
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cases like archie's are extremely rare. it's questions are raised about how such disputes can be avoided in the future. one idea would be to have an independent mediator who would speak to both the family and the hospital, in the hope any disagreement could be resolved without getting the courts involved. anything that we can do i think to try to avoid things escalating would be worth looking at. of course there always will be some cases that do end up in court, but i do think it may be helpful if we can find a way of intervening early. archie's family are now going through what is difficult to imagine. the judge said archie's parents' unconditional love and dedication for their son had been a golden thread that ran through this case.
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helen wilkinson, bbc news. conservative leadership frontrunner liz truss will reverse the planned increase in national insurance contributions within weeks of becoming prime minister, according to her campaign team. arguments between ms truss and former chancellor rishi sunak over how to handle the economy and the cost of living crisis have been central to the campaign. we're joined now by our political correspondentjonathan blake. how realistic is this? is how realistic is this? is the _ how realistic is this? is the rise of national insurance payments, that is what most was paid for each _ payments, that is what most was paid for each employer as well, but she has now— for each employer as well, but she has now said that she will do it sooner— has now said that she will do it sooner than planned, within weeks of taking _ sooner than planned, within weeks of taking office as part of an emergency budget. this illustrates
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the key— emergency budget. this illustrates the key dividing line between rishi sunak— the key dividing line between rishi sunak and liz truss, which has been the economy— sunak and liz truss, which has been the economy throughout this contest here, _ the economy throughout this contest here, of— the economy throughout this contest here, of course saying it is not the right _ here, of course saying it is not the right time — here, of course saying it is not the right time to — here, of course saying it is not the right time to be cutting taxes on the scale — right time to be cutting taxes on the scale that liz truss wants to do. the scale that liz truss wants to do he — the scale that liz truss wants to do. he wants it will be inflationary. she argues it is what is needed — inflationary. she argues it is what is needed to go the economy. rishi sunaks— is needed to go the economy. rishi sunak's team also pointing out it would _ sunak's team also pointing out it would actually save somebody on typical— would actually save somebody on typical earnings a couple of hundred pounds _ typical earnings a couple of hundred pounds per— typical earnings a couple of hundred pounds per year, so not a huge amount, — pounds per year, so not a huge amount, they argue, and also won't necessarily— amount, they argue, and also won't necessarily do anything to benefit pensioners or the lowest paid. in terms _ pensioners or the lowest paid. in terms of— pensioners or the lowest paid. in terms of an— pensioners or the lowest paid. in terms of an emergency budget, that is e>
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more than 30 people are known to have died. our middle east correspondent yolande knell has the latest from jerusalem. explosion the full force of israel's new military operation in gaza. this building hitjust minutes after a warning strike. palestinians racing away. a year of relative calm now shattered. this is where one of the first israeli airstrikes killed a islamichhad commander, leaving his neighbour in shock. "we were safe in our home, we were thrown out of it "by the bomb," says mariam, "why didn't they warn us?" islamichhad fied heavy barrages of rockets, in revenge, it said, for its leader's death. most were intercepted by israeli defences. but earlier, a missle hit this israeli home. "the family went to their shelter when the air raid sirens went off," local official yaron says.
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"this is probably what saved them. "no—one was hurt." israeli forces are targeting what they say are militant bases in gaza. they maintain they are reacting to a direct threat from iran—backed islamichhad. with further deaths in gaza, much now depends on the decisions of the powerful militant group on hamas which governs here. we're hearing about other important developments, at least six people killed, including children, in a blast in the north of gaza, with israel and some palestinians blaming a misfired militant rocket. that could complicate egypt—led efforts to broker a ceasefire. yolande knell, bbc news, jerusalem. an 11—year—old girl has died after getting into difficulty at a waterpark in berkshire. members of the public searched a lake at liquid leisure in datchet yesterday afternoon before she was found by emergency services. thames valley police say
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they are treating her death as unexplained. there is fresh hope that tens of thousands of tons of essential food will begin being exported from ukraine in the coming days. four ships have been given permission to take grain and sunflower oil out of two of the country's black sea ports today. millions of tons of grain have been stuck in ukraine since the russian invasion began, causing a global shortage, which is pushing up food prices. the united states has accused beijing of provocative and irresponsible actions after taiwan said china rehearsed an attack on the island. china has been holding its biggest—ever show of military force around self—ruled taiwan, including the firing of ballistic missiles. it follows a trip to taiwan by senior us democrat nany pelosi on wednesday. our china correspondent stephen mcdonnelljoins us live from beijing.
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how does this play out from here? what happens mark the hard line on the communist party would be feeling pretty good about how this has panned out. after all, eventually they want to do retake taiwan by force. now, as a result of this visit by nancy pelosi a whole new level of militaristic response has been normalised, if i could put it that way. firing missiles over taiwan's territory, having a dress rehearsal for missiles over taiwan's territory, having a dress rehearsalfor a blockade of taiwan. are we going to see that every year from now on? for example. more broadly, there are problems in that there has been significant damage to commercial shipping, it is a very busy area for commercial shipping, shipping, it is a very busy area for commercialshipping, commercial commercial shipping, commercial flights, taiwan's commercialshipping, commercial flights, taiwan's economy has been hurt, and we have all these areas of cooperation between china and the us
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which have now stopped, for example maritime safety. no more cooperation on that front. cross—border crime prevention and significantly, climate change. they have dropped all talks on those fronts. so a lot of tensions between the world's superpowers. thank you for the update. some hoping for warmer weather this week, some hoping for rain. we have the letters. i have one but not the other. if you are after rain, not much coming past england and wales. another sunny start, more to come. more cloud further north, this is the view it cumbria. still some breaks by the cloud is the car across the north of northern ireland in western scotland. some rain and drizzle so far this morning. these areas continue to see damp weather at times. the east of scotland is drier and brighter. clyde will increase. northern ireland will brightens guys, more sunshine in the afternoon. still cloud across
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cumbria and northern ireland. in the south, blue skies dominate. another warm if not hot one. temperatures higher, 25—28. hotter in scotland and northern ireland compared to yesterday. developing southwest wind which will pick up through the evening and overnight across the far north—west of scotland, bringing into the western isles, may be part of the highlands later. elsewhere, dryander, clearskies of the highlands later. elsewhere, dryander, clear skies towards the south and west. temperatures in parts of wales, south—west england and rural areas could get down to six degrees. mostly, double figures. monday, dry and bright for the vast majority. cloud across yorkshire, lincolnshire, it will break up. cloudiest as the north—west of scotland. shetland orkney, outbreaks of rain some richly heavy, strengthening wind. six e—18, so they still continue to rise, rising up they still continue to rise, rising up to 29, 30 in the south—east corner. and indeed through this figurehead as well we will see
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temperatures rise even further into the mid 305 by the middle of the week and on. more details later. just over two weeks ago, on britain's hottest day, unprecedented grassfires in and around london destroyed the homes and possessions of dozens of families. the scorched remains of houses still bear witness to what happened in wennington in east london, including that of alfie stock, who showed our reporter guy lynn what remains of his family home of 50 years. these are the moments filmed from a mobile phone. houses in wennington going up in flames. alfie tries to use a garden hose as his family home of 50 years is destroyed in minutes. two weeks on from that fateful tuesday, alfie wants to showers the
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damage. this is the front door. this was mum and dads bedroom. that is their bed sitting there. alfie lives in a small community of around 20 homes in wennington. three other families — around 20 homes in wennington. three other families like _ around 20 homes in wennington. three other families like yours _ around 20 homes in wennington. three other families like yours are still trying to make sense of the last fortnight. my fortnight. my place was hanging off the wall there, that was always my bedroom from when i was about five, you know. so i think seeing that made me more emotional than anything else. it is hard to remember what it look like, actually, to be fair. this led here was of a box of medals that my dad had. we couldn't find it in the house for the last couple of years. we were worried it may have been stolen or misplaced. lucky enough, it fell out of the window, so it went too bad, so i got to get back my great grandad's or middle flat. this is the base of the whole family, you know, friends and stuff. everybody showed a lot of memories here. it isjust everybody showed a lot of memories here. it is just sad to see it like
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this. after scrambling through, trying to get what few possessions you can out, i think i feel detachment now, you know, this ain't the house that i grew up in. as and they house that my parents love. i look to the future now. it they house that my parents love. i look to the future now.— look to the future now. it will take a lona look to the future now. it will take a long time _ look to the future now. it will take a long time to _ look to the future now. it will take a long time to rebuild _ look to the future now. it will take a long time to rebuild these i look to the future now. it will take i a long time to rebuild these homes. at the local church where the grounds were also damaged by fire, locals have been coming for support and quiet reflection. and also to leave presence for those who have lost their homes. i think there has been a whole range of reactions over the last two weeks. there has been shot, there has been grief, anger, even moments of laughter and joy in the mist of it all is well. and then the broader community has been a immensely generous, the outpouring of donations has been overwhelming. around 20 families are still can't return to their homes. alfie has been staying at this hotel. today he was continuing to search for a place to rent for at least the next year.
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basically just trying to find a place to live until the house is rebuild. obviously there was a lot of those in the house only to find a place that has got enough bedrooms, and we need to look for something for my family around here, don't really expect it here. hasn't really sunkin really expect it here. hasn't really sunk in yet, i don't think. you can't imagine not what alfie's family but others are going through. how easily that can happen, and then you feel so defenceless. te: how easily that can happen, and then you feel so defenceless.— you feel so defenceless. 16 minutes ast you feel so defenceless. 16 minutes past seven- — you feel so defenceless. 16 minutes past seven- the _ you feel so defenceless. 16 minutes past seven. the father _ you feel so defenceless. 16 minutes past seven. the father of _ you feel so defenceless. 16 minutes past seven. the father of a - you feel so defenceless. 16 minutes past seven. the father of a soldier i past seven. the father of a soldier from lincoln who took his own life after serving in afghanistan is determined to have his son honoured on the memorial.— determined to have his son honoured on the memorial. nathan hunt server more than 20 — on the memorial. nathan hunt server more than 20 years _ on the memorial. nathan hunt server more than 20 years and _ on the memorial. nathan hunt server more than 20 years and was - on the memorial. nathan hunt server more than 20 years and was being i more than 20 years and was being treated for ptsd when he died three years ago. the defence minister has now agreed to meet his father.
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nathan hunt served in many conflicts in recent memory, including alongside prince harry in afghanistan. nathan's dad and grandad were in the military and he joined up at16, grandad were in the military and he joined up at 16, serving for 23 years before taking his own life. this is all the medals that he earned a his tours, and above, we have the montage of him and his pal, very sad. his have the montage of him and his pal, ve sad. , . , , ., ., very sad. his dad believes nathan was suffering _ very sad. his dad believes nathan was suffering from _ very sad. his dad believes nathan | was suffering from post-traumatic was suffering from post—traumatic stress disorder, or combat stress, as a result of what he saw in was owned. ., ., ., , owned. one of the traumas he exnerienced — owned. one of the traumas he experienced in _ owned. one of the traumas he experienced in afghan - owned. one of the traumas he experienced in afghan he - owned. one of the traumas he - experienced in afghan he survived 107 in a compound. unfortunately for the afghan national army, that was in the compound of the time, they took the brunt of the injuries, nathan and his mate had to go back and try and treat the dying because
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they took the full force of the rocket attack, so the injuries were quite horrific. for rocket attack, so the in'uries were quite horrificfi rocket attack, so the in'uries were quite unmet quite horrific. for two years derek has fou t ht quite horrific. for two years derek has fought to _ quite horrific. for two years derek has fought to have _ quite horrific. for two years derek has fought to have nathan's - quite horrific. for two years derekj has fought to have nathan's name engraved on the armed forces memorial wall for other soldiers who have been included died by suicide, but the ministry of defence as nathan's death was not directly linked to his sermon so they won't put his name down. every year, people gather at cenotaph like this one to remember those who have given their lives for their country. derek says that's what he wants for nathan, a permanent mark of respect. in a statement the ministry of defence said... .— in a statement the ministry of defence said... . soldiers do die in battle, defence said... . soldiers do die in battle. and — defence said... . soldiers do die in
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battle, and for _ defence said... . soldiers do die in battle, and for those. .. _ defence said... . soldiers do die in battle, and for those. .. i _ battle, and for those... i understand, but there are those that died because of battle, and people have to remember that not all wounds are visible. , ,, , ., ., are visible. derek is travelling to london next _ are visible. derek is travelling to london next month _ are visible. derek is travelling to london next month to _ are visible. derek is travelling to london next month to meet - are visible. derek is travelling to london next month to meet the | london next month to meet the ministerfor london next month to meet the minister for veterans affairsjonny minister for veterans affairs jonny maddison us. minister for veterans affairsjonny maddison us. he says nathan would want him to keep fighting this, not only for them, but for other families as well. it only for them, but for other families as well.— families as well. it will be somewhere _ families as well. it will be somewhere where - families as well. it will be somewhere where his - families as well. it will be - somewhere where his daughter and families as well. it will be _ somewhere where his daughter and we have long gone, for a place of reflection to... you know... it's notjust reflection to... you know... it's not just for reflection to... you know... it's notjust for me, it's for all the others, the victims of war, and they are victims of war. coming up to 20 past seven, and as you have been hearing this morning 12—year—old archie battersbee has died after doctors were given permission to withdraw his life—support. the twelve—year—old had been
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at the centre of a legal battle about his care. he was found unconscious by his mother hollie dance in april and had since been on life support. we'rejoined now by doctorjosh parker who specialises in medical ethics and also by baroness finlay, a professor of palliative medicine at cardiff university. a good morning to you, thank you for being here. such a tragic outcome in this case. talk us through a little bit first of all about the decisions in the process that will have been gone through to get us to where we are today. gone through to get us to where we are toda . , , ., ,, ., are today. this is not the kind of decision that _ are today. this is not the kind of decision that one _ are today. this is not the kind of decision that one doctor - are today. this is not the kind of decision that one doctor would l are today. this is not the kind of- decision that one doctor would make on their own, so usually, therefore, point where the team are starting to think that the prognosis is looking very poor, that they will not be an outcome that is considered to be good, and so then a process of trying to make sure that we are certain about that, we are convinced that that really is the truth of the
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facts, and then there is a conversation amongst the team to see what the rest of the team think, because in paediatric intensive care, you have a huge amount of people on a team, a huge number of specialists and you wanted to bring them together to make the best decision, and in the process of having a dialogue with the family opens up, and that takes time, you have to lay a foundation, to build upon, it's a highly, stressful difficult situation, you can'tjust appear and start with these really difficult decisions, you have to build up to it, so this dialogue happens and things progressed from there but ultimately what you are looking for is consensus, agreements amongst the family and the team that continuing treatment is not in the individual�*s best interests. find continuing treatment is not in the individual's best interests. and the ho -e i individual's best interests. and the hone i sunpose _ individual's best interests. and the hone i sunpose is— individual's best interests. and the hope i suppose is that _ individual's best interests. and the hope i suppose is that consensus l individual's best interests. and the| hope i suppose is that consensus is reached and it does not have to be escalated. when it does a winner becomes a legal procedure, and that's really difficult for the judiciary, isn't it? it
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that's really difficult for the judiciary, isn't it?— judiciary, isn't it? it is, it raises difficult _ judiciary, isn't it? it is, it raises difficult questions | judiciary, isn't it? it is, it. raises difficult questions for everyone, i think one of the difficulties with the legal system is it gives the perception of quite a competitive environment, and when you have a critically unwell child's, that may be you have a critically unwell child's, that may he isn't the best kind of environment or the environment you are looking for. the reality is everybody in the room is working together to answer one question, what is in the best interests of the child, and they may disagree fundamentally on the answer to that, the reality is they should all be working towards the same goal. all be working towards the same toal. ., all be working towards the same , oal, ., ., all be working towards the same qoal ., ., , ., all be working towards the same toal. ., ., ., , all be working towards the same toal. ., . , , ., goal. how do you answer the question when it is somebody _ goal. how do you answer the question when it is somebody who _ goal. how do you answer the question when it is somebody who is _ goal. how do you answer the question when it is somebody who is not - when it is somebody who is not unconscious and people do have to make decisions on their behalf? it's the essence of what it means to be human or alive?— human or alive? absolutely yes, it these fundamental _ human or alive? absolutely yes, it these fundamental questions, - human or alive? absolutely yes, it these fundamental questions, but | human or alive? absolutely yes, it. these fundamental questions, but the law has got a series of cases from the past that it can rely upon to
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help answer these questions about what is in somebody�*s best interests, as well as the expertise of specialists around the country who can go through the medical facts of the case and explain what the prognosis is, is this person brainstem dead, however we come to the conclusion, and to take things from there. the conclusion, and to take things from there-— from there. and the dilemma of course in all _ from there. and the dilemma of course in all of _ from there. and the dilemma of course in all of this _ from there. and the dilemma of course in all of this is _ from there. and the dilemma of course in all of this is while - from there. and the dilemma ofj course in all of this is while they may be scientific or medical evidence and there is a debate about what is best for the patient based on out, in all of these cases of course, there is a huge amount of emotion, and that sort of clouds the judgements on what, even though it is a fundamental part of those decisions. is a fundamental part of those decisions-_ is a fundamental part of those decisions. i , ,., , , decisions. absolutely. so, in terms ofthe decisions. absolutely. so, in terms of the facts. _ decisions. absolutely. so, in terms of the facts, the _ decisions. absolutely. so, in terms of the facts, the science _ decisions. absolutely. so, in terms of the facts, the science of- decisions. absolutely. so, in terms of the facts, the science of it, - of the facts, the science of it, that can't some —— that can't answer the question for you, only values and ethics, what we believe is right and ethics, what we believe is right and wrong, the science can't tell us what is good all right, and the
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whole project of ethics is fundamentally human, and will raise difficult emotions, and part of the skill for the medical team is moderating those emotions and using them to help make a good decision, is not letting them cloud but you can't entirely remove emotion from a situation where you have a 12—year—old who is really really sick. 12-year-old who is really really sick. ., ., 12-year-old who is really really sick. ., . , , , 12-year-old who is really really sick. ., ., , , ,. , sick. you are studying this closely. how often do _ sick. you are studying this closely. how often do you _ sick. you are studying this closely. how often do you think _ sick. you are studying this closely. how often do you think clinical- how often do you think clinical communication goes wrong, and plays a part in outcomes becoming a lot more complicated and convoluted than they necessarily need to be? communication is absolutely key in these kinds of situations, especially because it comes down to disagreement and the only way really to resolve this is the conversation, so communication has to a car stop at the difficulty with communication is trying to explain typical medical concepts to help people who are in a really difficult situation, and also
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what you are trying to navigate is this quite tricky balance between sort of saying we want you to be involved and want to know what you think, this decision matters to you, so we want to reach consensus, but ultimately if you don't agree with us, it's not entirely your decision, there is another process to go along and navigating the outline is really hard, saying it is and isn't your decision at the same time. find hard, saying it is and isn't your decision at the same time. and it's very difficult _ decision at the same time. and it's very difficult when _ decision at the same time. and it's very difficult when you _ decision at the same time. and it's very difficult when you are - very difficult when you are suffering grief and trauma and it is your child at the end of the day. good morning to you, we have been going to the complexities of cases like this, what do you think should happen so that when we do have tragic cases in this form the complications don't arise when it comes to a legal battle like this? i think first of all, i have been calling — think first of all, i have been calling for a review, and i do think that we _ calling for a review, and i do think that we need to do that, to look and
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hear from _ that we need to do that, to look and hear from parents and staff and understand the point at which the communication, which hasjust been spoken— communication, which hasjust been spoken about, seems to be completely out of— spoken about, seems to be completely out of sten _ spoken about, seems to be completely out of step. but i also think we do need _ out of step. but i also think we do need to— out of step. but i also think we do need to look at ways in which the family— need to look at ways in which the family can — need to look at ways in which the family can be adequately supported, and not _ family can be adequately supported, and not suddenly feel that they are bounced _ and not suddenly feel that they are bounced into court, to make sure that they — bounced into court, to make sure that they can get legal aid, that they know they can have legal representation, and to have that conversation early. i think also, sadly. _ conversation early. i think also, sadly. we — conversation early. i think also, sadly, we need to have a better understanding about what medicine can and _ understanding about what medicine can and cannot do. there is sometimes a view that somehow medicine — sometimes a view that somehow medicine can wave a magic wand in a way. _ medicine can wave a magic wand in a way, which _ medicine can wave a magic wand in a way, which it— medicine can wave a magic wand in a way, which it can't do, and so we need _ way, which it can't do, and so we need to— way, which it can't do, and so we need to take _ way, which it can't do, and so we need to take a family through very very gentle steps right from the
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beginning, as to what the expectations might be, but also what they might not be, and help them understand what is happening. and so much of the debate _ understand what is happening. and so much of the debate here _ understand what is happening. and so much of the debate here and - understand what is happening. and so much of the debate here and what - understand what is happening. and so much of the debate here and what we| much of the debate here and what we have been discussing this morning is communication, it's about talking with families and as you say, educating on what are the possible scenarios. isuppose educating on what are the possible scenarios. i suppose some of the problem is that people will always pin their hopes on the one example where somebody has made it through after being in a vegetative state for so long, and that is one of the difficulties here, no—one wants to give up hope in a case like this. {131 give up hope in a case like this. of course no—one wants to give up hope, of course _ course no—one wants to give up hope, of course every loving parent wants to fight _ of course every loving parent wants to fight and fight and fight for their— to fight and fight and fight for their child, and of course they do, but i _ their child, and of course they do, but i also — their child, and of course they do, but i also think we need to be in a way niuch — but i also think we need to be in a way much more in medicine itself, and examine ourselves, what our
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processes — and examine ourselves, what our processes are like, and ask whether sometimes — processes are like, and ask whether sometimes it can feel like undue haste. _ sometimes it can feel like undue haste. and — sometimes it can feel like undue haste, and is that the right thing to do? _ haste, and is that the right thing to do? because i think that makes it worse. _ to do? because i think that makes it worse. it— to do? because i think that makes it worse, if people feel like they are under— worse, if people feel like they are under pressure, particularly to go because _ under pressure, particularly to go because things look as if they are going _ because things look as if they are going down the route that they don't want to— going down the route that they don't want to go— going down the route that they don't want to go down, and they are dreading — want to go down, and they are dreading them i go down, so timing, that becomes important, and i worry actually— that becomes important, and i worry actually that in this country, we have _ actually that in this country, we have such — actually that in this country, we have such pressure on clinical staff and such _ have such pressure on clinical staff and such pressure on beds and we try to put— and such pressure on beds and we try to put everything into almost an order— to put everything into almost an order and — to put everything into almost an order and almost a protocol, or guidance, — order and almost a protocol, or guidance, that we find it difficult to stand — guidance, that we find it difficult to stand back and say yes, but in
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this particular case perhaps we should — this particular case perhaps we should wait a bit longer, try something different, give flexibility in our approach, and be prepared — flexibility in our approach, and be prepared to take some risks actually, _ prepared to take some risks actually, such as transferring children— actually, such as transferring children and even allowing the child to he _ children and even allowing the child to be taken abroad, if that's what the family— to be taken abroad, if that's what the family have set up and if it is properly— the family have set up and if it is properly set up, and accept the risk involved _ properly set up, and accept the risk involved in— properly set up, and accept the risk involved in such trouble. many thanks, involved in such trouble. many thanks. do _ involved in such trouble. many thanks. do you _ involved in such trouble. many thanks, do you both _ involved in such trouble. many thanks, do you both for- involved in such trouble. many thanks, do you both for your i involved in such trouble. many - thanks, do you both for your time, that was a really difficult conversation but really interesting ideas that. just approaching 730, overin ideas that. just approaching 730, over in birmingham, with the penultimate and busiest day of the commonwealth games. good morning, run us through what we should expect today.
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good morning. just keeping an eye on the big screen behind us. you will see this place on a sunday morning, hundreds of thousands of people will be here later and those without tickets can watch the action on that big screen. i was hoping to tell you about an epic super sunday today with the women's team, who we thought may be in the t20 cricket final and the netball final and the hockey final. one of those things will still be happening, because england will play australia later in the gold medal match in the hockey, and i am really pleased to say this morning kate richardson—walshjoins us bright and early this sunday. how are you feeling about england's chances tonight? i are you feeling about england's chances tonight?— chances tonight? i am really confident — chances tonight? i am really confident about _ chances tonight? i am really confident about england's i chances tonight? i am really - confident about england's chances tonight _ confident about england's chances tonight. it is their third in the world, — tonight. it is their third in the world, australia, against the fifth in the _ world, australia, against the fifth in the world, the top two seeded teams _ in the world, the top two seeded teams going head—to—head, and when you get— teams going head—to—head, and when you get to _ teams going head—to—head, and when you get to the final it really can be anybody's. there is nothing that england _ be anybody's. there is nothing that england should be afraid of, they
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should _ england should be afraid of, they should go— england should be afraid of, they should go out there and exert their game _ should go out there and exert their game on _ should go out there and exert their game on the australians, a bit like amended _ game on the australians, a bit like amended last night so bravely and courageously. theyjust couldn't courageously. they just couldn't come _ courageously. theyjust couldn't come out — courageously. theyjust couldn't come out with that result. you have tla ed a come out with that result. you have played a home _ come out with that result. you have played a home commonwealth - come out with that result. you have i played a home commonwealth games come out with that result. you have - played a home commonwealth games and in london 2012, where you won bronze. how much of a difference does it make at our home games with that support?— that support? massive. i have been callint it a that support? massive. i have been calling it a wall— that support? massive. i have been calling it a wall of— that support? massive. i have been calling it a wall of sound, _ that support? massive. i have been calling it a wall of sound, that - calling it a wall of sound, that grandstand behind you, but also the support— grandstand behind you, but also the support of— grandstand behind you, but also the support of friends and family who can't _ support of friends and family who can't be _ support of friends and family who can't be there but our messaging you and you _ can't be there but our messaging you and you know they will be able to switch _ and you know they will be able to switch on — and you know they will be able to switch on the tv and be able to watch _ switch on the tv and be able to watch you _ switch on the tv and be able to watch you. it really is the 12th women, — watch you. it really is the 12th women, and we need to be here for them, _ women, and we need to be here for them, and — women, and we need to be here for them, and left them for the very first time — them, and left them for the very first time onto that podium. seeing entland first time onto that podium. seeing england women _ first time onto that podium. seeing england women six _ first time onto that podium. seeing england women six medals - first time onto that podium. seeing england women six medals at - england women six medals at commonwealth games, but that gold has thus far been elusive. why do you think that is, and why could it be different this afternoon? it always is the finest of margins. in 2002 _ always is the finest of margins. in 2002 we — always is the finest of margins. in 2002 we lost on the buzzer against
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india. _ 2002 we lost on the buzzer against india. in— 2002 we lost on the buzzer against india, in 2014 we had 11 seconds to id india, in 2014 we had 11 seconds to go and _ india, in 2014 we had 11 seconds to go and we — india, in 2014 we had 11 seconds to go and we ended up drawing that game and losing _ go and we ended up drawing that game and losing on penalties. it will be the fine _ and losing on penalties. it will be the fine details tonight. when you are playing the top teams in the world _ are playing the top teams in the world it — are playing the top teams in the world it is — are playing the top teams in the world it is the smallest of margins. if we _ world it is the smallest of margins. if we are _ world it is the smallest of margins. if we are really disciplined, we stick— if we are really disciplined, we stick to— if we are really disciplined, we stick to our game plan and we are aggressive, — stick to our game plan and we are aggressive, we can get the result in the end _ aggressive, we can get the result in the end. �* , ., ., ., aggressive, we can get the result in the end. . , ., ., ., , the end. australia have the history and the pedigree, _ the end. australia have the history and the pedigree, they _ the end. australia have the history and the pedigree, they are - the end. australia have the history and the pedigree, they are a - and the pedigree, they are a teambuilding inexperience, a young teambuilding inexperience, a young team as well. how do you rate them at the moment, where they are in their development?— their development? yes, the hockeyroos _ their development? yes, the hockeyroos have _ their development? yes, the hockeyroos have a _ their development? yes, the hockeyroos have a long - their development? yes, the l hockeyroos have a long history their development? yes, the - hockeyroos have a long history of success _ hockeyroos have a long history of success that they are building on, and i_ success that they are building on, and i do _ success that they are building on, and i do think they have some really .ood and i do think they have some really good experience at the core of the team, _ good experience at the core of the team, some youngsters who are bringing _ team, some youngsters who are bringing something different to the game. _ bringing something different to the game, and they have the fearlessness of youth, _ game, and they have the fearlessness of youth, which is so lovely to see. i think— of youth, which is so lovely to see. i think it _ of youth, which is so lovely to see. i think it will — of youth, which is so lovely to see. i think it will be really interesting matchup. last week --eole interesting matchup. last week people celebrating _ interesting matchup. last week people celebrating the - interesting matchup. last week people celebrating the lioness| interesting matchup. last week. people celebrating the lioness is and what did for english women's football. we're not going to pretend the hockey is quite where football is at the moment but how important is at the moment but how important is it in terms of the platform,
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growing the sport england to potentially win a gold medal here in hockey and inspire a new generation? yes, i think the netball, the yes, ithink the netball, the hockey. _ yes, ithink the netball, the hockey, the cricket, the rugby— we loved _ hockey, the cricket, the rugby— we loved him — hockey, the cricket, the rugby— we loved him sport in this country and i think— loved him sport in this country and i think women athletes in those sports — i think women athletes in those sports have been doing an incredible 'ob sports have been doing an incredible job at— sports have been doing an incredible job at being role models to the next generation, two young boys and two girls. _ generation, two young boys and two girls. to _ generation, two young boys and two girls, to young people generally, to say that— girls, to young people generally, to say that this sport is for you. come and watch — say that this sport is for you. come and watch us, come and join us, come and watch us, come and join us, come and he _ and watch us, come and join us, come and he us~ _ and watch us, come and join us, come and he us the — and watch us, come and join us, come and be us. the hockey players will do that— and be us. the hockey players will do that again today, and we talked about— do that again today, and we talked about super sunday. england might not he _ about super sunday. england might not he in _ about super sunday. england might not be in all the finals but they are in— not be in all the finals but they are in metal matches, so let's get behind _ are in metal matches, so let's get behind them and support them and really— behind them and support them and really grow women's support in this country— really grow women's support in this country -- — really grow women's support in this country —— medal matches. xliter? really grow women's support in this country -- medal matches. very much medal matches _ country -- medal matches. very much medal matches against _ country -- medal matches. very much medal matches against the _ country -- medal matches. very much medal matches against the aussies. . medal matches against the aussies. that is at 3pm this afternoon you will be able to watch that on iplayer. will be able to watch that on ipla er. ., .. will be able to watch that on ipla er. ., ,, i. will be able to watch that on ipla er. ., ~' ,, ,, will be able to watch that on ipla er. ., ,, , ., ,, ., iplayer. thank you. quite an excitint iplayer. thank you. quite an exciting day- _ iplayer. thank you. quite an exciting day. and _ iplayer. thank you. quite an exciting day. and the - iplayer. thank you. quite an l exciting day. and the premier iplayer. thank you. quite an - exciting day. and the premier league back as well. find
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exciting day. and the premier league back as well-— back as well. and the but ultimate da , the back as well. and the but ultimate day. the this _ back as well. and the but ultimate day. the this -- — back as well. and the but ultimate day, the this -- penultimate - back as well. and the but ultimate day, the this -- penultimate day l back as well. and the but ultimate l day, the this -- penultimate day the day, the this —— penultimate day the busiest day. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9:00am this morning, but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. welcome it isa it's a disease that's been around for decades and now researchers in southampton think they've found a new vaccine against whooping cough. the next step is to test whether it's effective — but hundreds of volunteers are needed to take part in the trial. alastair fee has been to meet some who've already signed up. in three months time, georgia will be deliberately infected with whooping cough. i have some friends that have done clinical trials that said just give it a go, it's a bit of extra cash. it's mostly financial, but like if this is a way that i can help out in the medical sector, then i'm happy to just do that. she graduated last year, and the £3700 compensation has
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attracted her to a potentially life changing study for people all over the world. it's not that much work, and it's just coming in for 4— six months. it's pretty easy. this south hampton testing a new type of vaccine. it's delivered by a nasal spray — the old vaccines were injected. the idea of this vaccine is that it improves your immune response in your nose, so the place where we know that whooping cough gets in, and because it improves the immune response there, it should protect against what we call colonisation, otherwise carrying whooping cough bacteria without having symptoms. tony here is suffering from the after—effects of whooping cough, and he is about to become the subject of a new experimental shortcut cure. before vaccines, whooping cough brought severe illness and death in young children and babies. it's estimated that it still kills 160,000 people worldwide, many of them children. it's widely felt that the current vaccine is becoming less effective and can be improved upon. we know there was a relatively big
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outbreak of whooping cough in the uk in about 2012, but we have gradually seen an increase in numbers since that time, and we are trying to pre—empt any further increase that we might see. we know that globally there has been an increase in other parts of the world as well, and it does seem to be linked to changes to the vaccine, which is effective for a period of time, but perhaps is wearing off more quickly. all patients first need to be screened to see if they are healthy enough to take part. scott is keen to support new vaccines, but also hopes the compensation will help him get on the property ladder. we have been trying to save for a few years. with housing prices climbing then of course we have to save more, so while we are at an ok point, this is a nice sort of chunk of change to have on top of that deposit money. while around 60 people will take part, several hundred are needed to see if they are eligible. many more people are being urged to come forward. all participants will have to attend several appointments and also stay in a hotel for 16 days where
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they will be carefully monitored. the trial will run until next april. it's hoped the results will make a big difference to the number of people who suffer worldwide. alastair fee, bbc news. coming up to 20 to eight. the conditions on mont blanc are so dangerous that climbers are being asked to pay a deposit of 15,000 euros to cover the cost of their potential rescue. a lack of winter snow and this summer's extraordinary heat have destabilised rocks and made crossings more difficult. let's now speak to british mountaineer kenton cool. good morning, thanks for being with us. 15,000 euros, an insurance policy that if you do nude rescue in whatever circumstances, you are covered. is that a reasonable charge? covered. is that a reasonable charte? ,, ., covered. is that a reasonable (hare? ., ., ., j covered. is that a reasonable charte? ,, ., ., �* ,, charge? quite frankly, i don't think it's reasonable, _ charge? quite frankly, i don't think
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it's reasonable, and _ charge? quite frankly, i don't think it's reasonable, and that's - charge? quite frankly, i don't think it's reasonable, and that's for - charge? quite frankly, i don't think it's reasonable, and that's for a - it's reasonable, and that's for a number of reasons. it's been put in place by the manner of the local principality —— mayor. and the key thing is, nobody owes mont blanc —— owns. i totally sympathise with what the mayor's offices trying to do, they are trying to pull out a reasonable warning that is unsafe to climb. the line that you have to cross is very very dangerous this year and the mayor's office has given a number of warnings that climbers should not approach the mountain, yet that has been ignored, so this is a bit of a shock tactic, i believe, by the mayor, to try to dissuade people to do that, and i totally sympathise with that, however, i think the way it has been done is unlawful and not really in the ethos of mountaineering. but as
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ou said, the ethos of mountaineering. but as you said. this _ the ethos of mountaineering. but as you said. this is— the ethos of mountaineering. but as you said, this is the _ the ethos of mountaineering. but as you said, this is the mayor- the ethos of mountaineering. but as you said, this is the mayor saying i you said, this is the mayor saying if you do need help, someone has to pay, it's dangerous, please don't go but if you insist on going we need to cover our costs.— but if you insist on going we need to cover our costs. exactly what he is doint , to cover our costs. exactly what he is doing. but— to cover our costs. exactly what he is doing. but i _ to cover our costs. exactly what he is doing, but i do _ to cover our costs. exactly what he is doing, but i do what _ to cover our costs. exactly what he is doing, but i do what sort - to cover our costs. exactly what he is doing, but i do what sort of- is doing, but i do what sort of french jurisdiction is doing, but i do what sort of frenchjurisdiction of is doing, but i do what sort of french jurisdiction of french law he can do that, i'm not 100% sure. are used to live in the area, is to climb mont blanc in main capacity as a mountain guide pretty much weekly throughout the summer season, and i know how dangerous it can be, and i know how dangerous it can be, and i know that the local rescue servers do an amazing job at vast expense, and most climbers who have been there will have some sort of insurance anyway, most british climbers would sign up to an insurance policy like british mountaineering council or something akin to that. most climbers already have that in place. exactly how the authorities intend to enforce this
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15,000 euros deposit i'm not entirely sure. how they are going to keep people off the mountain again, i don't understand. the underlining thing here is the mayor is trying to keep people safe. he said you should not go, yet only last week five romanians who were essentially in tennis shoes were attempting to climb the mountain and had to be turned back by the local police are. people are not listening to the authorities who have a much better level of expertise and knowledge. i keep reiterating this point, i believe this is a shock tactic to try to dissuade people from going, but mountaineering is one of these amazing sports and a rare sport these days where you don't need to be a member of a club, or society, you don't necessarily need to be in the right clothing, it is open to everybody, anybody can go into the mountains, pretty much anywhere in the world and pit themselves against what the mountain has to offer, and that should i believe, in the
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current society that we live in, be encouraged. this is doing quite the opposite, this is generating some form of almost financial elitism, to say you can only claim if you have the financial wherewithal of putting down that particular deposit. i’m down that particular deposit. i'm sure ou down that particular deposit. i'm sure you do _ down that particular deposit. i'm sure you do agree only to climb where it is safe. just explain the combination of factors at the moment, the hot weather, the lack of snow, that means geologically, it's particularly dangerous at the moment on the mountain. that particularly dangerous at the moment on the mountain.— on the mountain. that particular area of mont _ on the mountain. that particular area of mont blanc _ on the mountain. that particular area of mont blanc has - on the mountain. that particular area of mont blanc has always . on the mountain. that particular i area of mont blanc has always been notorious but what we have seen recently in recent years really, just recently is the permafrost, the colder temperatures that keeps the mountain together is, that sticks it with snow and ice, what we have found over the last few years, rising temperatures means that the permafrost is gradually getting higher and higher,
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permafrost is gradually getting higherand higher, normally permafrost is gradually getting higher and higher, normally during the summer overnight, things would freeze back in place, and now is not happening. only last week in switzerland, the zero ice level, where things that january —— generally freeze, was at 5200 metres, that the highest ever recorded number overnight, so these rocks are not being stuck into place in the mountain quite literally is falling to pieces, and every now and then a rock will tumble down and set off a chain reaction. you can go onto twitter or youtube and cds videos, it is quite literally russian roulette, it is incredibly dangerous. most guides like myself decided to or three weeks ago that it was too dangerous to climb, but the mayor took the option not to pull out, he was highly advised, and this week the two mountain hearts that most people would stay in were
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officially shuts to try and dissuade people and finally this shock tactic of the deposit for the rescue, and right now they are quite literally falling to pieces, rocks raining down everywhere and it's very sad state of affairs, which i believe pretty much directly linked to climate change and global warning. we have been looking at some of those pictures while you have been talking, we getting to the stage where some of these mountains will be un— climbable, particularly during summer, and maybe in winter when there is more ice, it will be safer, and i use the word safer and not safe, to climb?— safer, and i use the word safer and not safe, to climb? 100%. over the last decade — not safe, to climb? 100%. over the last decade or _ not safe, to climb? 100%. over the last decade or two _ not safe, to climb? 100%. over the last decade or two decades, - not safe, to climb? 100%. over the last decade or two decades, we - not safe, to climb? 100%. over the | last decade or two decades, we have seen some roots, not necessarily all routes, but we have seen some roots that become much more frequented and perhaps a spring or autumn time when the temperatures are lower, when we do continue in the manner where we have seen in terms of warming in the
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alps, the lack of snowfall in the winter, this winterjust gone as one of the lower snowfalls the alps has ever seen, of the lower snowfalls the alps has everseen, if of the lower snowfalls the alps has ever seen, if we continue to see this, the standard route on mont blanc, then the mountain guides not going to going to want to do this as their bread and butter worker so we will see a shift to perhaps more rocky roots which are arguably safer, or easier roots over a bit more mellow terrain which doesn't have this potential chokepoint. it's a very worrying trend that mountain guides have been watching for the last 5—10 years. lets guides have been watching for the last 5-10 years— last 5-10 years. lets people start to heed those — last 5-10 years. lets people start to heed those warnings _ last 5-10 years. lets people start to heed those warnings then. - last 5-10 years. lets people start - to heed those warnings then. kenton cool to heed those warnings then. kenton cool, telling us about the dangers around mont blanc at the moment but also that balance between making sure people still enjoy it is a really important message, it isn't
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it? get out — get out there and walk, wherever you live. who would have thought that mountains can start collapsing as well. speaking of mountains, we're also about volcanoes later in the programme. heat at the other end of the scale. there is a little bit of rain near to the icelandic capital. it started to the icelandic capital. it started to smoke last wednesday, local authorities nearby have warned people to stay away from the area as you would expect. we have helpfully put the name of the volcano on top of the screen. well done. half—an—hour from of the screen. well done. half—an—hourfrom reykjavik, it half—an—hour from reykjavik, it began half—an—hourfrom reykjavik, it began erupting on the third of august and it is still going. i don't think that level of drizzle will put out a volcano. it’s don't think that level of drizzle will put out a volcano. it's going to create a _
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will put out a volcano. it's going to create a lot _ will put out a volcano. it's going to create a lot of _ will put out a volcano. it's going to create a lot of steam... - will put out a volcano. it's going to create a lot of steam... is - will put out a volcano. it's going i to create a lot of steam... is going to create a lot of steam... is going to be quite steamy up there. some toxic fumes in the area as you might imagine. toxic fumes in the area as you might imatine. ,, ._ toxic fumes in the area as you might imatine. . ._ ., ., toxic fumes in the area as you might imatine. . ., ., ., ., imagine. staying with a lot of heat and hot air- _ imagine. staying with a lot of heat and hot air. toxic _ imagine. staying with a lot of heat and hot air. toxic fumes. - imagine. staying with a lot of heat and hot air. toxic fumes. good - and hot air. toxic fumes. good mornint and hot air. toxic fumes. good morning to _ and hot air. toxic fumes. good morning to you _ and hot air. toxic fumes. good morning to you both! - and hot air. toxic fumes. good morning to you both! i - and hot air. toxic fumes. good morning to you both! i don't i and hot air. toxic fumes. good i morning to you both! i don't think that drizzle will be welcome, very good morning to you anyway, but we have just been chatting about the impact of the high temperatures across france and mont blanc, the heatwave continuing in france, could see temperatures at the top of 40 degrees again, the country is facing one of the most severe droughts in its history, but talking about the heatwave in france, it could be a heatwave in france, it could be a heatwave here, not to the extent we saw the other week but temperatures are building through this weekend through the mid week onwards we could see temperatures top 13 to 34 degrees, temperatures also rising in parts of scotland and northern ireland as well, so another spell of hot and sunny weather on the way and
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indeed this morning plenty of sunshine to greet your sunday across much of england and wales, this is the view on the east coast of essex, not the same everywhere, more cloud to the north and west of scotland at the moment, producing some rain and drizzle around and will that it will always be a bit cloudy other further north you go. we have high pressure building on but underneath that we will see temperatures left day by day because the ground is so dry, but on the northern edge we have some weather fronts pushing through, and the rain drizzle coming and going across the northern east of northern ireland, fringing into northern ireland, fringing into north cumbria and northumberland but largely dry here, the rain and drizzle will be there all day long because parts of western scotland but northern eastern scotland, other than the odd isolated shower, northern ireland seeing more sunshine developing into the afternoon, some cloud on the far north of england, and these temperatures are up on yesterday, further south are starting to turn hot, 25- 28
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further south are starting to turn hot, 25— 28 degrees in strong sunshine overhead. the rain drizzle easing for a time in scotland but wetter weather pushing towards the western isles, with a stiffening breeze and temperatures denied a bit higher than last night, most places in double figures but they will be some rural areas, particularly across the western southwest. for monday, rain at times, for the highlands, islands, orkney and shetland, and away from that southern scotland much more sunshine, sunshine a bit hazy, blue skies and much of england and wales, early cloud in lincoln and yorkshire, and the temperatures continuing to rise, already approaching 30 degrees towards the central london area, rising further into tuesday and wins will be stronger, gale force winds possible but plenty of sunshine elsewhere, temperatures up to around 30 or 31 in the south—east, to around the mid 20s in eastern scotland and northern ireland and high pressure still with us as we go through the rest of this
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week, maybe tapping into a bit of a south—easterly wind, heatwave conditions likely in england and wales, and temperatures well for the second half of the week of staying in the 30s and claiming further in scotland and northern ireland. hot temperatures, no hot air. and no rain either- — now it's time for the film review, with anna smith and jane hill. hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. and taking us through this week's cinema releases, anna smith is back with us. good to see you for the summer, anna, and what have you been watching? first off, we're getting on board bullet train. this is brad pitt's new starring role in an action thriller based on a japanese novel. then we've got fadia's tree, which is a documentary
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about a palestinian refugee, by the artist sarah beddington. and then, we've got maisie, which is a documentary about britain's oldest performing drag queen. it's a fantastic mixture — let's start with brad pitt, though. we've got to start with brad pitt. i'm a big fan, i think he's terrific in almost everything i've seen him in, to be honest. he's great in bullet train — as i said, it's based on a novel, ajapanese novel, and it's directed by david leitch, who actually used to be brad pitt's stunt double. which is quite an interesting turnaround. oh, interesting! and since then, he's directed atomic blonde, deadpool 2. i think fans of the tones of those kind of films might want to check this film out. it's set in tokyo on a bullet train with an international cast. brad pitt plays ladybug, who is a hit man who's hired to do what's meant to be a simplejob — go onto the train, get a briefcase, come off the train, deliver it to the right people. simple, i'm sure. not that simple, this being an action thriller. and it turns out there
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are a lot of other hit men on the train — coincidence or not, two of them are supposedly british hit men. and we'll see from the clip that they're having a little conversation about their names. one is called lemon, and one is called tangerine. let's have a look. lemon. tangerine. you're bleeding, mate. that's not mine, mate. it's not yours? 0h, in that case, just leave yourjacket open and let people have a good old look. yeah, i want everyone to see my tie. - pull your coat together so no—one else notices, lemon. i think they'll notice - the childish codenames first, but if we're sticking with fruit, why not| apple or orange? so what's in this case? on phone: are we doing this? you know what's in the case. money, it's always money. tangerine's a sophisticated fruit. 0h, now a fruit's sophisticated? i yeah, it's cross—hybridised with other fruit. they're adaptable — like me. then why am i lemon? because you're sour — no—one likes lemon. lemonade, lemon drops... you got a sore throat? lemon meringue pie. when was the last time you ate a lemon meringue pie? lemon drizzle cake. i'm sorry, are you talking about lemons? i quite like lemons — i ijust hate code names.
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not without humour. well, it is certainly attempts at comedy. i'm glad to see you laughing, maybe i'm a little bit harder to please. i was not finding that that funny. i like both actors, brian tyree henry and aaron taylor—johnson — one american and one british, by the way. but to me this was a bit of an attempt at the tarantino—style, you know, the criminals having the little conversations. there's a running joke about thomas the tank engine — one of them's obsessed with thomas the tank engine. it doesn't quite [and for me. in the screening i went to, some people were laughing, some people were stony—faced. but the emphasis of this is very much on the action, because of the genre we're in here. and the action is well delivered, it's very, very slick. what i felt was, is that a lot of the dialogue and the characters definitely came second to that. so, if you want to sit back and enjoy a thriller on a train with pretty top—end violence for cert 15, i'd say, then go ahead. but if you want a film where you actually believe the characters and you actually believe what they're saying, because i felt like there was quite a lot of stuff that should've worked on the page — they didn't do a second or third orfourth take when it actually came
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to the shooting of it. so i've got a bit of a mixed response to this one. it's not up there with deadpool 2, if you're a fan of the genre. i'm loving the look, you see, because i love all the bright primary colours. i mean, that's great. but it's interesting that you mentioned atomic blonde, because my other half loved it, and that sort of thing is just, again, a bit too violent for me. so it's — take your pick. if you like that sort of film, maybe you'll enjoy it. maybe you will — it's not the top of the genre, but it had its pleasures. all right, and, yeah, we like brad pitt. so something very, very different with fadia's tree. so fadia's tree is a documentary about a palestinian refugee who's living in a camp in lebanon, she's called fadia. and i love the story of how she met the film—maker, sarah beddington, the artist — they were in a cafe in beirut 15 years before this film was made, and a woman leant over to sarah and said, "are you happy?" such an interesting intro. and the two struck up a conversation, they struck up a great friendship. sarah ended up going to the camp, finding out more about this very strong personality, fadia, who makes a very interesting subject, i think.
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and fadia actually asked her to go to her homeland — the homeland she can't visit — in order to find this tree, which is a mulberry tree that's kind of legendary in the family, and it's very much part of her ancestral identity. i think it's a quietly powerful piece of work. for me, it's not up there with other personal female—led documentaries we've had recently like i am belmaya, or the wonderful for sama. but i do think that it raises some issues that are interesting, and it's certainly quite moving and a little bit heartbreaking in places. yes, i think everyone should watch it, in the sense ofjust reminding ourselves how refugees live. this is someone who can almost see the border of the country she should be living in, but is living her whole life with herfamily in a refugee camp in lebanon — and yet so close to her homeland, which she clearly, of course, as you would, really pines for. and that comes through across the whole film, doesn't it? and that's very powerful and very moving, i think. it's very much about a sense of home, and also, it's interesting, it's contrasted with lots of details about bird migration in the area.
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so i think perhaps slightly laboured, but interesting symbolism there obviously about the freedom of the birds and the freedom that she doesn't have. yes, and how certain birds will land on one side of the palestine border, as that as they refer to their homeland, and some land in lebanon. and the ornithologist makes the point that some birds know where they belong, and they will always find their way home. i know what you mean — possibly slightly laboured, but also very beautiful, and some very beautiful filming of the birds, as well. it's gorgeous, i like the pace of this, i think it's one of those films that you just submit to. and if you commit to it and you just buy into it, then it is a rather lovely film. yeah, and you certainly learn a lot, and heartbreaking. a different — very different style and subject matter for the finalfilm. yeah, another documentary — this is about britain's oldest performing drag artist, maisie trollette, otherwise known as david raven. and this is a brighton—set documentary, chiefly. and you see david in the run—up to his 85th birthday when his friends have a bit of a surprise for him.
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let's have a look at a clip. i love that!
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they keep coming back to that point, don't they, during the documentary? yeah, he insists he is a "drag artiste", and quite rightly so. and i love this idea of this american coming over and this culture clash. again, it's obviously very set up, but the fact they're both slightly unimpressed and slightly wary of each other and this rather awkward afternoon tea — you've got this boozy brit, and then this very abstemious, very showy american. and it's kind of fascinating, but it also touches on what it was like to be a young gay man when he was young. and i think that that's really interesting, there's lots of memories in his friends. and also, there's a real sense of community that you get from this film, as well, the fact that he has no living relatives and his friends are helping him out, looking after him. and, you know, it's a low—budget documentary, for sure, but i think if this kind of subject matter interests to you, then it's a bit of a charmer. yes, i think you've hit the nail on the head in the sense of you do have to have some interest in the subject matter. i think it is quite niche — and i've nothing against that at all, you know, i'm really interested, and i think some
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elements of this are very affectionate. but it's funny that we're looking at the clip of the american chap, because actually, for me, that's the bit that worked the least. the bits that are great, as you say, are all about community, the brighton community, and these two people who'd never met before — maybe if they'd got on famously, it would have been quite sweet, but actually, i don't think they really did! and you could find that a bit funny, but i actually found that a little bit painful. i know what you mean, it's almost like two films in one — i would have happily watched just his daily life in brighton and, you know, him and his garden, just saying, "who'd know that in this garden shed, "i have all these sparkly ball gowns, and they help keep "the birds away"? all those lovely details. yeah, they were the more touching and more telling details, weren't they? definitely. i could've lived without the man from america, i'm afraid, but there you are. that will only make sense to you if you see the film. but it's an interesting, affectionate portrait — but, yes, made on more of a budget than fadia's tree. definitely, but i enjoyed it. yeah. and so, your best out for this week? she will — this is charlotte colbert's drama—horror—thriller, call it what you will,
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set in the scottish highlands, where alice krieger plays a former hollywood star who's recovering in a retreat with her nurse. and things take a very interesting turn — it touches on witchcraft, it touches on the metoo movement, there's folk horror elements, there's a bit of dark comedy there — rupert everett is rather amusing as this sort of flamboyant man running the retreat. there's a lot going on. i really liked it, i think it's a really interesting film, visually stunning. it stayed with me, for sure — i watched it first at the london film festival, and it really stuck with me. i think the atmosphere is incredible, and the whole storyline — the idea that that the women of the past are inspiring and empowering the women of the present through the earth — i thought that was rather powerful. i loved the filming of it and the look of it. it is well documented — it's a little bit too creepy for my taste, but i know that's testament to how well it's made that i found it very creepy, i think, because that is the point. but it is really well—made. and is it a debut feature?
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i thought that's impressive for a debut feature. i thought that was really fantastic. and for people who would like to stay in or stream or get a dvd, what else do we have this week? 50, new to streaming is good luck to you, leo grande, the emma thompson—starrer. so a lot of people will have seen this in cinemas, but if you haven't, i think it's really well worth seeing it on the small screen at home. maybe you'd rather watch this film on your home. emma thompson hires a young sex worker, played by daryl mccormack, because she's never been satisfied in her life and she wants to have a good time, and she wants to branch out, really, and explore. and it's very much a two—hander between them, talking in the room and exploring each other — and exploring each other�*s psychology more than anything, it's not desperately racy, but it's more about empowerment. i don't think it's racy at all. i think it is absolutely about the psychology. and, in fact, by chance, the screening i went to — it was all women in the audience, and there are some laughs in it, as well. it's written by katy brand, and there are some funny moments and all the women laughed,
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and it's a real talking point. i think everyone should see it, actually, as a debate aboutjust older people and sexuality — she's not even that old, for goodness' sake, but it counts as older people when it comes to the big screen, doesn't it? yeah, exactly, you know, it's a very accessible film. it's a fairly light—hearted film, but it does actually have the power to change things on the level you say, i think — it's important. it's a good watch. thank you very much, anna. we'll see you next week. good morning welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: after the death of archie battersbee, calls for more to be done to prevent legal battles over life support ending up in court. death toll rises in gaza after israeli air strikes — palestinian militants have fired dozens of rockets
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into israel overnight. liz truss promises a cut in national insurance within weeks if she wins the conservative leadership race — but rishi sunak says the plan would do little to help most people. good morning from victoria square in birmingham. it wasn't quite a super saturday on the track for the home nations at the commonwealth games, with keeley hodgkinson among those missing out on gold. but still winning a medal on an eventful night of athletics whilst it may be cloudy and breezy at wet at times for parts of scotland over the next few days, elsewhere temperatures are set to rise and we could see a heat wave again in parts of england and wales this week. it's sunday 7th august.
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our main story. 12—year—old archie battersbee has died in hospital after weeks of legal battles over his care. his mother hollie dance said she was "the proudest mum in the world". his life sustaining treatment was withdrawn yesterday. the crossbench peer, lady finlay, who's a professor of palliative care, has called for a different approach to prevent disputes over life—support, ending up in court. helena wilkinson reports. these photographs were released by archie's family in the hours before his life support was withdrawn. he died yesterday in hospital. archie passed at 12:15pm today. can ijust say, i am the proudest mum in the world, such a beautiful little boy. and he fought right until the very end, and i am so proud to be his mum. archie was found unconscious at his home in april. doctors said it was highly likely that he was brain stem dead,
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no hope of recovery, and treatment, they said, should be withdrawn. archie's parents didn't agree, they wanted more time for their son, and so they fought the hospital trust through the courts. the central question judges looked at was what was in archie's best interest. they all agreed — life support should be withdrawn. barts health nhs trust said its heartfelt condolences remained with archie's family, adding... cases like archie's are extremely rare.
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it's questions are raised about how such disputes can be avoided in the future. one idea would be to have an independent mediator who would speak to both the family and the hospital, in the hope any disagreement could be resolved without getting the courts involved. anything that we can do i think to try to avoid things escalating would be worth looking at. of course there always will be some cases that do end up in court, but i do think it may be helpful if we can find a way of intervening early. archie's family are now going through what is difficult to imagine. the judge said archie's parents' unconditional love and dedication for their son had been a golden thread that ran through this case. helen wilkinson, bbc news. conservative leadership frontrunner liz truss will reverse the planned increase in national insurance contributions within weeks
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of becoming prime minister, according to her campaign team. arguments between ms truss and former chancellor rishi sunak over how to handle the economy and the cost of living crisis have been central to the campaign. we're joined now by our political correspondentjonathan blake. jonathan, how quickly could this be implemented? a promise is one thing, implementation is another. liz truss's campion clearly believe they can _ liz truss's campion clearly believe they can go — liz truss's campion clearly believe they can go further and faster than plant _ they can go further and faster than plant with— they can go further and faster than plant with the national insurance rise reversal. claiming it is possible _ rise reversal. claiming it is possible within weeks of her taking office _ possible within weeks of her taking office if— possible within weeks of her taking office if she wins the leadership contest — office if she wins the leadership contest. and this has been a key promise — contest. and this has been a key promise of— contest. and this has been a key promise of her campaign, fitting in with the _ promise of her campaign, fitting in with the narrative of cutting taxes to stimulate growth, and take the uk out of— to stimulate growth, and take the uk out of what _ to stimulate growth, and take the uk out of what may well be a decision by the _ out of what may well be a decision by the end — out of what may well be a decision by the end of this year. rishi sunak's— by the end of this year. rishi sunak's campion counter that by seeing _ sunak's campion counter that by seeing cutting taxes too quickly
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will be — seeing cutting taxes too quickly will be inflationary and make the situation — will be inflationary and make the situation worse and on this national insurance _ situation worse and on this national insurance rise, which rishi sunak brought— insurance rise, which rishi sunak brought in— insurance rise, which rishi sunak brought in as chancellor, they argue it will— brought in as chancellor, they argue it will not— brought in as chancellor, they argue it will not make too much of a difference _ it will not make too much of a difference to many households, something in the region of a couple of hundred — something in the region of a couple of hundred pounds a year, that's because — of hundred pounds a year, that's because he — of hundred pounds a year, that's because he also in line with bring in the _ because he also in line with bring in the national insurance rise change — in the national insurance rise change the threshold at which people start paying it meaning fewer people. — start paying it meaning fewer people, or more people have to earn more _ people, or more people have to earn more money— people, or more people have to earn more money before they contribute in that way _ more money before they contribute in that way. walked type of tax cuts, when _ that way. walked type of tax cuts, when and — that way. walked type of tax cuts, when and whether to do them and dominating the conservative leadership contest but increasingly there _ leadership contest but increasingly there is— leadership contest but increasingly there is a — leadership contest but increasingly there is a sense both candidates need _ there is a sense both candidates need to— there is a sense both candidates need to say more about what they immediately to help people with rising _ immediately to help people with rising energy costs and help people pay bills _ rising energy costs and help people pay hills which are forecast to rise ever higher. liz truss yesterday appearing — ever higher. liz truss yesterday appearing to rule out direct financial— appearing to rule out direct financial support payments for people — financial support payments for people saying she was not interested in giving _ people saying she was not interested in giving hand—outs, rishi sunak saying _ in giving hand—outs, rishi sunak saying that it is unwise and he
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would — saying that it is unwise and he would look to do more. that saying that it is unwise and he would look to do more. that is the tuestion would look to do more. that is the question that _ would look to do more. that is the question that everybody _ would look to do more. that is the question that everybody is - question that everybody is wondering. jonathan, in london, thank you. israel says it has killed leading members of the military leadership of the islamichhad group, during a second day of air—strikes on gaza. israeli officials say in response, the palestinian militant group has fired more than 300 rockets and mortars into the south of the country. at least 24 people are known to have died. our middle east correspondent yolande knell has the latest from jerusalem. good morning. bring us up on what is happening right now. thei;t good morning. bring us up on what is happening right now.— happening right now. they have put lots of dramatic _ happening right now. they have put lots of dramatic developments - happening right now. they have put lots of dramatic developments this | lots of dramatic developments this morning. we heard a couple of hours ago distant blast after rockets were fired from the gaza strip towards jerusalem just as it is really nationalists were visiting the most disputed holy site, always a flashpoint for violence. this is the first time since the start of last year at�*s full—scale conflict in
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gaza palestinian militants have reached the outskirts ofjerusalem, they were intercepted by israel's missile defence system. intense fighting has continued in gaza as well. they are islamichhad militants confront the death of a second senior commander in an israeli air strike. israel says this new military operation launched on friday codenamed breaking dawn is to counter a direct threat it says is coming from islamichhad militants. all these developments are very worrying for israelis and palestinians but at the death toll in gaza is rising, we heard what israel says it is a misfired militant rocket killed several people in a house, and the sole power plant has been closed down, so humanitarian situation is worsening. an 11—year—old girl has died
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after getting into difficulty at a water park in berkshire. members of the public searched a lake at liquid leisure in datchet yesterday afternoon before she was found by emergency services. thames valley police say they are treating her death as unexplained. there is fresh hope that tens of thousands of tonnes of essential food will begin being exported from ukraine in the coming days. four ships have been given permission to take grain and sunflower oil out of two of the country's black sea ports today. millions of tonnes of grain have been stuck in ukraine since the russian invasion — causing a global shortage, which is pushing up food prices. our correspondent in kyiv, hugo bachega joins us now. these grains shipments are not only vitalfor the ukrainian economy but also the rest of the world aren't they, hugo? absolutely. we just had absolutely. wejust had confirmation at the four ships have left the ports in the south of ukraine and
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going through the safe maritime corridor has been created because the black sea is infested with minds. they are expected to reach turkey where they will be inspected by a team of russian, ukrainian officials and also officials from turkey and the united nations, which broke at this deal. and a fifth vessel has been given authorisation to come to ukraine to be loaded with grain. the expectation is these exports will help ease a global food crisis and the authorities in ukraine say these are positive developments and they say this shows the deal is working and that it is safe for companies to operate in this country's ports. so they are seeing those developments today as a sign that this is still very complicated deal but it is it shows the complexities of the resumption
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of the exports. the complexities of the resumption of the “ports-— the united states has accused beijing of "provocative" and "irresponsible" actions after taiwan said china rehearsed an attack on the island. china has been holding its biggest—ever show of military force around self—ruled taiwan, including the firing of ballistic missiles. it follows a trip to taiwan by senior us democrat nancy pelosi on wednesday. our china correspondent stephen mcdonelljoins us live from beijing. good morning. what happens next, how does this play out? i think the hardliners in the upper echelons of the chinese communist party in beijing would be quite happy with where nancy pelosi's visit have blessed them. these more extreme military —— have left them. these more extreme military measures have entered the realms of the acceptable and them preparing for what they see as an inevitable attack on taiwan and some point in
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the future. well we see this every year now, having a sort of test run for the blockade of taiwan? this week has real damage commercial shipping in that busy area for shipping in that busy area for shipping and also commercial flights, it has hurt the taiwanese economy and also has left all these areas of cooperation between washington and beijing now put on hold. no cooperation on cross—border crime including involving narcotics. and, crucially, no cooperation on climate change leaving the world's two biggest emitters of carbon not talking to one another, quite a blow for the rest of the world, i would have thought. for the rest of the world, i would have thought-— for the rest of the world, i would have thought. stephen, for now, thank ou have thought. stephen, for now, thank you very — have thought. stephen, for now, thank you very much. _ here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. morning crop both. my garden is looking reminiscent of the cricket
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pitch in basingstoke, it is dry and with no rain in the forecast and blue skies overhead. this is the view in cumbria a short while ago but there are outbreaks in this cloud, put up to these weather fronts are at the top end of this high pressure which dominate this week and keeping things dry and lifting temperatures further. that weather front bringing rain and drizzle the parts of western scotland on the coast of northern ireland and the odd spot into the isle of man but by and large dry. more cloud at times in the far north of england but blue skies foremost. becoming cloudy in scotland later on in northern ireland sees more sense then developed into the afternoon. temperatures up on yesterday but turning hotter across central southern england and wales. peaking at 25-28. this southern england and wales. peaking at 25—28. this evening and overnight, we continue seeing the
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rain and drizzle for the west of scotland, feeding and more rain for the western isles or the strengthening winds into the morning. dry it with clear skies partially for the rest of the country and ruud gullit parts with a slightly chilly start tomorrow. more cloud toward morning for north—east england, yorkshire and lincolnshire, that breaks up, cloudier st temperature is 15—18 c and most places seek temperatures rising the byte day, widely into the 20s in scotland and northern ireland and 30s in southern england. tuesday, rain for orkney and shetland but drier compared to monde it but windier as well. there will climb
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further, high pressure in charge this week with the ground dry, we all seek temperatures climbing a bit more as we go through this week and through the week we will see heatwave conditions development across england and wales. three or more days above a certain temperature threshold and temperatures above 30 celsius in london and abergavenny and a hot by night as well. in scotland and northern ireland, the week will be much drier and even here turning to significantly warmer as well. back to you. dementia support groups can be a lifeline for those living with alzheimer's and their families. they provide regular social activities aimed at improving the lives of people with the condition. however, funding is due to end injanuary for some services in hull and there's uncertainty about how vulnerable adults in the city will be supported. shirley henry has been speaking
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to some of the families affected. disco music. fun, games and lots of laughter. you see your loved one come to life. singing, loved the singing. doing all these little activities, it keep his brain going. - # one, two, three, shake your body now. for many people with dementia and their carers, this group in hull is a lifeline. # we pass the time away. it's hard, it's hard work looking after someone with dementia, and you come here and they're all friendly. somebody to talk to that's in - the same situation and understands. i can see you smiling! joanne's mum doreen made lots of friends here. she died two weeks ago. come on then, off we go again.
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we couldn't have done what we have done with mum without the support because i have learnt so much, so much, learned how to handle her, how to talk to her. you sing, mum, you sing. the council's grant funding for the dementia support group, which is run by the alzheimer's society, as well funds for mind, ageuk, dovehouse hospice, and bodmin road church were due to end next tuesday, but last week the council said their contract would be extended tilljanuary. we have known for a while they were going to end on the 9th of august, so we put plans in place to cope with that and then within two weeks we then find out they're going to be extended for five months. so that is on one hand good news but on the other hand creates still uncertainty in a really vulnerable client group. there are around 3000 people in hull at the moment with dementia, and those numbers are rising, people are getting diagnosed every week.
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and looking forward, what is going to be there for our service users? now a petition has been set up to save the group. everybody is so upset because there isn't anything. they would be back to being sitting at home and being isolated. 0h, i'd be really upset, i would really be upset because i look forward to coming. the council says it cares about adult services but it's facing significant challenges. people matter to me as the director of adult social care but people matter to the local authority. there will be some changes we need to make and some things we need to stop doing, but that does not mean we're not doing nothing. it is about looking at how we can make sure we are making best use of the resources we've got and we are able to provide much care and advice, and support, to people who need it. this is part of me, it's been a huge part of my mum'sjourney, myjourney, my dad'sjourney. we don't don't know what we'd've done without them, i really don't.
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# what will be, will be. # que sera, sera #. this reminds me of my mum. it's just under a month until we find out the results of the conservative leadership election — with candidates liz truss and rishi sunak divided on how they'll tackle the economy and the cost of living crisis. to discuss the latest from the campaign, we'rejoined from north london by new stateman columnist martha gill and the financial times' whitehall editor seb payne, who's in devon. can you talk to us through it whether you think economics remains at the centre of this debate? very much it does and i think it'll be at the centre of that debate for the next month until we get the next
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prime minister and we've seen some interventions today that liz truss has announced national insurance cut, but has been a big part of her campaign, or come within weeks and not the next financial year in april which normally when you would make changes, it takes quite some time to work through the system but the papers today saying she found a way of doing it straightaway. find papers today saying she found a way of doing it straightaway.— of doing it straightaway. and that rishi sunak _ of doing it straightaway. and that rishi sunak has _ of doing it straightaway. and that rishi sunak has done _ of doing it straightaway. and that rishi sunak has done an - of doing it straightaway. and that| rishi sunak has done an interview any sunday times where he talks about the fact they would be willing to give out hand—outs to help with energy bills this winter because we know the price cap is going to kick in in october and bills are going to increase by a massive amount i we interviewed liz truss for the financial times on saturday and she said she would not give more hand—outs and would look towards more tax cuts to help with the energy crisis so you can see the very clear dividing line. the issue for rishi sunak is one of liz truss gets in front of the conservative party members and talked about tax
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cuts they love it and that is what they're voting for in this contest, what is making them feel nice and not necessarily what is going to win the next election or help the country through difficult months ahead. .,, , , ., ahead. those members might love it but the cost — ahead. those members might love it but the cost of _ ahead. those members might love it but the cost of living _ ahead. those members might love it but the cost of living crisis _ ahead. those members might love it but the cost of living crisis facing - but the cost of living crisis facing everyone, it seems just tweaking a bit of national insurance might save a couple of hundred quid on an average salary over one year but what is needed is an emergency budget and a fundamental reset of how the government would deal with a cost of living crisis?— cost of living crisis? that's exactly what _ cost of living crisis? that's exactly what gordon - cost of living crisis? that's. exactly what gordon brown, cost of living crisis? that's - exactly what gordon brown, former liberal prime minister, has called for in observer today and says whoever comes in will need to do this and liz truss has in fact talk about that, holding an emergency budget in september at the 21st to bring in tax cuts and also set out what kind of support you'll put forward for the energy crisis. the key moment will be in october when ofgem will announce where the price
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cap is going and we expect it to go away through the roof and at the moment £67 a week of support from the government, if the price cap goes what we think it will that will need to beat, bills will hit £500, thatis need to beat, bills will hit £500, that is a huge increase and liz truss might say she's not going to give hand—outs and try to keep things as much as they are and offer more tax cuts, i would bet you are an awful lot of money that does not happen because the very difficult choice in experiments that will face is do you want to stick to conservative ideology on tax cuts and see lots of people starve and not heat their homes, or do you do what is necessary? i think, the actual crunch she would end up doing what is necessaryjust as rishi sunak did before and just as rishi sunak did before and just as rishi sunak did before and just as rishi sunak did during the pandemic. in some ways, to u—turn on a promise like that matters less once you've won the race. there are other elements at play, liz truss's u—turn
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and rishi sunak's comments. have the even touched people —— the people who are voting? earlier this week i checked on the hustings and at 1000 tory party members were there and before the hustings even began the biggest round of applause was for an opening video that showed borisjohnson on the night of the tooth is in the 19 election, the applause went way above the other candidates —— night of the 2019 election. within that room there was a vocal group who were saying they are ready for rishi sunak holding placards and cheating truss —— quantity of that trust supporters were much greater. we've seen one
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paul with liz truss 36 points ahead and another showing her 32 points ahead. she also has been the bookmaker�*s favourite. all that data would have to be badly wrong, the worst polling ever in modern history for her not to win. rishi sunak's team are very enthusiastic and say the mood on the ground is different to the polling but look at the data and what i've seen from the hustings, it looks as if liz truss is on the path to downing street and all what is going on now is not making that much difference at all. is there a danger all of this is about the westminster bubble, lots of navel—gazing going on an internal division and the rest of the country is saying, hang on, there are some really big issues to be dealing with and nothing is getting done right now. it’s and nothing is getting done right now. �* , ., , _ and nothing is getting done right now. �*, ., , _ now. it's not helped by the fact the prime minister _ now. it's not helped by the fact the prime minister and _ now. it's not helped by the fact the prime minister and the _ now. it's not helped by the fact the prime minister and the chancellor. prime minister and the chancellor seems to be on holiday at the moment
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and this always happens in westminster, people go off to sun themselves just as things get very chaotic. last summer we had the withdrawal of british troops from afghanistan and dominic raab was on the beach while trying to oversee the beach while trying to oversee the withdrawal of troops from kabul. always a perilous time for politicians to go away because it gives the sense there is no hand on the tiller. with the contest that is at some of navel—gazing and focusing on the predilections of conservative members and voters but this is fundamentally about economics and the cost of living crisis and i think for the average person looking at what is going on in the country thatis at what is going on in the country that is what the race has focused on so in that sense it's a good thing, what i don't think is present is the sense of the scale of how bad the problem is going to be, the first 100 days of the next prime minister will be the most challenging since the second world war because not
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only have we got the cost of the crisis, rising inflation, ongoing strikes, the energy issue, we've still got the war in ukraine, people are very divided within the conservative party. put that together and it is not an enviable task so perhaps you can forgive them slightly for not facing up to reality. those issues are going nowhere. thank you for your time. and what a great cookbook collection! now for some lovely news — a pair of osprey chicks have been born in north yorkshire for the first time in 100 yea rs. it's the result of a successful reintroduction programme at the bolton castle estate, near leyburn, where they made purpose built platforms in a bid to encourage the birds to nest. sacha dench, is founder of conservation without borders and ambassador for the un's convention on migratory species and joins us now. good morning to you. it looks glorious where you are. talk to me
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about how significant this is. ospreys have been born elsewhere in the country but this is the first time in north yorkshire?- time in north yorkshire? it is, first time _ time in north yorkshire? it is, first time since _ time in north yorkshire? it is, first time since records - time in north yorkshire? it is, first time since records began| time in north yorkshire? it is, l first time since records began in the early 1800s so put it significant. whilst the land owners put up a platform for them there was not an active reintroduction in noticed birds potentially were looking for somewhere and had the forethought to put up some platforms and miraculously the birds have taken to its and the first breathing in that amount of time is really significant. in that amount of time is really significant-— in that amount of time is really sitnificant. ,, , ., , , significant. quite unusual because the tend significant. quite unusual because they tend to _ significant. quite unusual because they tend to return _ significant. quite unusual because they tend to return to _ significant. quite unusual because they tend to return to where - significant. quite unusual because they tend to return to where they | they tend to return to where they are from, don't they? thei;t they tend to return to where they are from, don't they?— they tend to return to where they are from, don't they? they do but one of the — are from, don't they? they do but one of the parent _ are from, don't they? they do but one of the parent usually - are from, don't they? they do butj one of the parent usually prospect around in different places and so on the nest in particular the female has come from where i am at the moment in wales. she peered up
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another male and eight found the nest. males tend to try prospect for a nest site near where they were born and on the migration from africa they keep an eye out for places. africa they keep an eye out for laces. ., ., , , ._ ., places. how long will they stay and where to the _ places. how long will they stay and where to the head _ places. how long will they stay and where to the head off— places. how long will they stay and where to the head off to _ places. how long will they stay and where to the head off to because i | where to the head off to because i think they are ringed so you can track them. think they are ringed so you can track them-— think they are ringed so you can track them. , ., , ., ., track them. yes, the two young and the female — track them. yes, the two young and the female are _ track them. yes, the two young and the female are ring, _ track them. yes, the two young and the female are ring, the _ track them. yes, the two young and the female are ring, the two - track them. yes, the two young and the female are ring, the two young, they were born sometime around the 13th ofjune and they will head off in about four weeks, potentially, as soon as they feel big and strong enough and they will migrate on their own. we have an idea of where their own. we have an idea of where the ospreys are going from the uk because various birds have been tagged over time. with these birds we don't know exactly, they will probably go to sub—saharan africa. there will be anywhere between senegal, gambia and even further
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because they've got rings on them this year we can follow the migration as much as possible and ideally find exactly where they are wintering. how incredible. who comes up with the names? they are not the most imaginative cut mum is called k s one, some of the other parents, cj seven, where are the names from? the names are seven, where are the names from? tue: names are purely denoted by seven, where are the names from? tue names are purely denoted by the ring distributed to whoever was doing it, they are not particular creative! some have got names, we follow the satellites of birds one is called tweed coat for example so some places named them and others don't like to. this year we'll follow them on migration. it's easier to follow a bird called tweed but anyone looking out for birds will be comfortable with those kind of numbers. you've been called the human s1 you've been called the human s! because of your paragliding, following geese. —— human s1. will
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you have the fear of missing out if you have the fear of missing out if you are not following them? we will be following — you are not following them? we will be following the _ you are not following them? we will be following the migration - you are not following them? we will be following the migration this - be following the migration this year, nine of us in total, researchers and people with cameras and we will follow all the way and trying to visit people and look at the key stopover it states the use on their way and trying to look at what the to the ospreys because these juveniles that we will look out for have a pretty low survival rate, between 60% and 70% never return to breed so we will visit all the places they tend to use and follow some satellite tracks as well and see what we can do to look at the threats on the way and speak to different people and a rally lots of people to support the osprey comeback in the future and hopefully will have many more return in future. ~ will have many more return in future. . :, :, ,, :, future. we often talk about the im act of future. we often talk about the impact of things _ future. we often talk about the impact of things like _ future. we often talk about the impact of things like climate i future. we often talk about the i impact of things like climate change and the destruction of the habitat,
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how significant is its and how rewarding is it that you are able to do stuff like this and we can see a positive impact with albeit some human intervention but its a really significant moment in trying to reverse some of the damage. tt is. reverse some of the damage. it is. the fact they _ reverse some of the damage. it is. the fact they are _ reverse some of the damage. it is. the fact they are happy _ reverse some of the damage. it is. the fact they are happy to - the fact they are happy to re—inhabit the place, like balls and council estate, means there are decent quality waters and fish around for them so that a key indicator and a sign of what we can do if people collaborate and work together and that is what we're trying to further with the flight of the ospreys. big and complex issues such as climate change and biodiversity but what you have to do is figure out how to adapt to it and look at this key problem is and what we can do which is what we will try to do on this migration, looking at not only there might be problems
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with climate change but how can we help adapt and i think we will find people all the way from here to ghana will be interested in helping. what a brilliant way to do it. i didn't think you are taking part in the flight because of injury but good to hear that you will be. thank you. look at that view. that is the most glorious views, so calming and peaceful and serene. i'm so jealous. what more do you need? enjoy it. stay with us, plenty more still to come on breakfast.
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hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and nina warhurst. chetan is in birmingham, on the penultimate, and busiest, day of the commonwealth games. good morning morning, guys super busy today- — good morning morning, guys super busy today- 45 _ good morning morning, guys super busy today. 45 medals _ good morning morning, guys super busy today. 45 medals to _ good morning morning, guys super busy today. 45 medals to be i good morning morning, guys super busy today. 45 medals to be one, | good morning morning, guys superi busy today. 45 medals to be one, and thatis busy today. 45 medals to be one, and that is the busiest day of the commonwealth games, the atmosphere was electric at the alexander stadium, whether it was for their hockey, netball, the beach volleyball, the crowds have been here in huge numbers, and we are expecting hundreds later to be watching their action on the big screen. some athletes are wondering whether birmingham stands a chance of putting a bit in for the olympics
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in 2036 or 2040, that is the ambition that has been felt after these commonwealth games, which is gone so successfully. we have an epic day ahead of us. looking back at last night, though... well, we were hoping for a super saturday in the athletics stadium but it failed to materialise. nick miller did win gold for england in the hammer, but other hopefuls were pushed down the medals. here's our sports correspondent natalie pirks. every sinew strained, every effort made, but gold remains elusive. keely hodgkinson won silver at the world championships and hopes were high in the 800 metres, but when kenya's mary moraa turned the burners on, there was no stopping her. bronze for scotland's laura muir and boogie wonderland for niakhate. keely hodgkinson watched super saturday at london 2012 and decided to focus on running.
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she now has world silver, olympic silver and commonwealth silver. i'm not quite sure. i could do anything. it went so quick. silver again. world championship wins don't automatically guarantee commonwealth ones, as jake wightman found out. with our eyes on the world champion, the scot found himself fading in a rapid 1500 metre final and having to settle for bronze. it's going to be i australia, the gold! but for england's nick miller it was hammer time. he gave everyone an early scare with two no throws, but he made up for it to successfully defend his commonwealth title. four years ago england's zharnel hughes won the 200 metres only to be disqualified during his victory lap. this time he was denied again by trinidad and tobago'sjereem richards. smiles, though, for this silver lining. and this is what it is all about.
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alastair chalmers with an unexpected 400 metres bronze, guernsey's first ever athletics commonwealth medal. hugs all round. it's called the friendly games, after all! natalie pirks, bbc news, birmingham. away from the athletics, veteran northern ireland bowlers martin mchugh and ian mcclure rolled back the years, winning gold in the men's fours — 24 years after they first took the title. this time sam barkley and adam mckeown made up the foursome. and gemma frizelle made history for wales, winning their first ever gold medal in rhythmic gymnastics, with a sensational hoop routine. so, how does all that leave the medals table? australia have pulled away
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from england again at the top — england with 50 golds now. scotland have 8, wales 5. and northern ireland are on 2, but that's bound to go up later, with a host of boxers through to gold medal bouts. we have 17 home nations boxers who will battle for medals across the day. joining me now is jack laugher, winner of two gold medals and a bronze in the diving at these games. thank at these games. you for taking the time to join thank you for taking the time to join us. this has been extraordinary, just having to double check, you have seven gold medals across the commonwealth games, you defended your title in their one metre springboard, you defended your three metres synchro title, it sounds incredible, looking at those numbers, how would you sum up your
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games? numbers, how would you sum up your tames? :, :, :, :, games? having nine commonwealth medals, games? having nine commonwealth medals. seven _ games? having nine commonwealth medals, seven gold _ games? having nine commonwealth medals, seven gold won _ games? having nine commonwealth medals, seven gold won bronze i games? having nine commonwealth medals, seven gold won bronze and | medals, seven gold won bronze and one silver, it's a huge achievement for me. it's been a really interesting games, and it has been a route really amazing to have such a massive home crowd as well, it is really help the athletes, and last night was just extraordinary. we had three englishmen on the podium, i was so lucky to be one of them, diving is amazing, it was a great competition, and team gb, team england, team scotland, team wales, to northern ireland, all of us are doing extraordinary things in the diving. hate doing extraordinary things in the divint. ~ :, , doing extraordinary things in the divint. . :, , doing extraordinary things in the divin. _ : ., , ,., :, doing extraordinary things in the divin. _ : ., , :, y:, diving. we are seeing some of you in action at the — diving. we are seeing some of you in action at the moment, _ diving. we are seeing some of you in action at the moment, i _ diving. we are seeing some of you in action at the moment, i know- diving. we are seeing some of you in action at the moment, i know that i action at the moment, i know that you talked previously about your gran, who lived not far from the aquatics centre. you said you wanted to win gold for her, how big an influence was key in your life? having somebody who is so close to the west midlands, my mum was raised
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here, my gran and grandad lived here, my gran and grandad lived here, and it is a really special place in my heart to do that for her especially with how much support she gave me in my life, she was always such a massive inspiration in my life in such a wonderful woman. it is such a massive shame that she couldn't be here to see that, but i'm really proud of what i have done, and i know that she will be extremely proud of everything that i have achieved as well. t am extremely proud of everything that i have achieved as well.— extremely proud of everything that i have achieved as well. i am sure she would be. have achieved as well. i am sure she would be- i— have achieved as well. i am sure she would be. iwas— have achieved as well. i am sure she would be. i was to _ have achieved as well. i am sure she would be. i was to tear— have achieved as well. i am sure she would be. i was to tear yesterday i would be. i was to tear yesterday watching the three metre prelims, you spoke afterwards very honestly, saying nurse took over, you perform the wrong dive. what was that moment like for you, and how did you overcome it come back in the evening and one bronze? tt overcome it come back in the evening and one bronze?— and one bronze? it was a very interesting — and one bronze? it was a very interesting moment _ and one bronze? it was a very interesting moment for i and one bronze? it was a very interesting moment for me, l and one bronze? it was a very - interesting moment for me, something that i had not experienced before. i think the pressure of wanting to get that third gold medal, back in the gold coast i got three out of three,
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and i think ijust put too much pressure on myself. in diving it is overin pressure on myself. in diving it is over in such a short time, and if you make a tiny mistake then it's all over. the crowd thought i had done a really good dive, that they didn't realise i'd done the wrong one. but a sport, sometimes go slightly wrong, i'm still learning, even though i've had all these achievements in the past, i'm really proud of how i managed to turn it around. :, : :, , : , around. that crowd is incredible. i'm sure around. that crowd is incredible. i'm sure you _ around. that crowd is incredible. i'm sure you could _ around. that crowd is incredible. i'm sure you could do _ around. that crowd is incredible. i'm sure you could do anything, l around. that crowd is incredible. i i'm sure you could do anything, and they would be cheering you on. your girlfriend is of course diving for england to winning a silver medal, how handy is it to having a partner who completely understands your life and the pressures on your shoulders, and the pressures on your shoulders, and what it takes to be an elite athlete? tt and what it takes to be an elite athlete? , q q and what it takes to be an elite athlete? , :, :, ., athlete? it is amazing having somebody — athlete? it is amazing having somebody that _ athlete? it is amazing having somebody that close - athlete? it is amazing having somebody that close in i athlete? it is amazing having somebody that close in my i athlete? it is amazing having i somebody that close in my life, sharing experiences with me, we get
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to travel the world together, and what is great about it is that she understands the pressures that come with diving, it is very daunting sport, and a lot of the time you are by yourself, especially her, she is “p by yourself, especially her, she is up on ten metres, and all the things that i struggle with she has had in the past, and all the things she struggles with i have had in the past, so we can always be very transparent with each other. it's very nice having someone that close to me who can help guide me through the struggles of being an elite sportsman. hate the struggles of being an elite sportsman-— the struggles of being an elite sportsman. the struggles of being an elite s-ortsman. . :, :, , , sportsman. we have about ten seconds left, i sportsman. we have about ten seconds left. i won't _ sportsman. we have about ten seconds left. i won't ask— sportsman. we have about ten seconds left, i won't ask you _ sportsman. we have about ten seconds left, i won't ask you about _ sportsman. we have about ten seconds left, i won't ask you about paris - left, i won't ask you about paris 2024, you will be 29 then, is that on the radar, will be going? t 2024, you will be 29 then, is that on the radar, will be going? i hope so. i 'ust on the radar, will be going? i hope so- iiust want _ on the radar, will be going? i hope so. i just want to _ on the radar, will be going? i hope so. i just want to say _ on the radar, will be going? i hope so. i just want to say thank - on the radar, will be going? i hope so. i just want to say thank you i on the radar, will be going? i hope so. i just want to say thank you to | so. i just want to say thank you to everybody who has helped me get to where i am now and is going to help me in the future, so thank you to my coaches, friends, family, the national lottery, thank you everybody for getting me there and hopefully on to paris 20 to 84 as
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well. :. .. hopefully on to paris 20 to 84 as well. :, «i , :, hopefully on to paris 20 to 84 as well. :, «i y:, ,:, hopefully on to paris 20 to 84 as well. :, «i y:, : :, well. thank you so much for giving the best moments _ well. thank you so much for giving the best moments of— well. thank you so much for giving the best moments of these - the best moments of these commonwealth games so far. incredible stuff, that is brilliant. let's take a quick look at some of the action on the first saturday of the new premier league season. and liverpool had to come from behind twice to earn a point at newly—promoted fulham, aleksandar mitrovic with both the home side's goals. darwin nunez came off the bench to score liverpool's first and set up mo salah for their second. they never felt the game properly. maybe directly after they equalised, looked like we found a little bit where we want to go. yeah, so, really bad game. really bad game for my side and from us.
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you know, we got a point for it, so that's the only positive thing. tottenham are the early league leaders, thanks to a 4—1 win over southampton, eric dier was among the scorers, his first goal in three years. there were wins for celtic and rangers in the scottish premiership — rangers beat kilmarnock 2—0. but celtic were made to work for their victory at ross county, it was heading for a draw when a debut goal from moritzjenz put them ahead 6 minutes from time, and they went on to win 3—1. i nearly said goals there, i've got gold medals in my mind, so much going on. road races, the cycling, boxing as well, and we spoke about
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this earlier, england's women go in the hockey final against australia. there truly is so much happening, tupac finals in the morning and evening sessions of the athletics as well. here, there will be hundreds of people behind me packing in to enjoy all the action on the big screen. studio: it's looking beautiful behind you. studio: it's looking beautiful behind you-— studio: it's looking beautiful behind ou. :, :, behind you. looking rather golden in the sunshine- _ can you believe it, we are going to be talking heatwave again, not to the exceptional heaps that we saw last time, that we will see temperatures build over the next few days, and by the time we get to mid week and beyond, we could be talking about temperatures widely in the low to mid 30s stop compared to the cooler conditions of the last few
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daysin cooler conditions of the last few days in scotland and northern ireland, significantly warmer here as well. of course, with that heat comes the sunshine, with the sunshine it means no rain, and many areas desperately need it. this is a reservoir near barnsley this morning, it's looking a little bit low it has to be said. there is a bit of cloud overhead compared to what we have got further south, and further north there is a lot more cloud in particular. it is here where we have patchy rain across parts of scotland and the north of northern ireland at present. it is all due to these well in france, which are running around this area of high pressure. this also what is going to rule the roost, it will move its way eastwards as we go through this week. at the moment it is helping that westerly wind across the west of scotland, some outbreaks of rain, there will be a few spots throughout the day, that there will be dry weather too. dry to the east of scotland, and a good deal brighter with some sunshine, but cloud amounts will increase, and then diminish a bit across parts of
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northern ireland. silva declined in the far of england but all of these places seeing temperature is higher than they were yesterday, getting hot to parts of central and southern england. this evening and overnight, after a warm evening it will turn quite cool after the sun has set, we could see temperatures down in rural parts to six or 7 degrees. most of you see temperatures in double figures to start your monday morning, starting dry, a bit more close to the midlands, yorkshire and lincolnshire will thin and break, cloudier st of all in the far north of scotland, rain which will become heavier time, strengthening wind, but for the vast majority a dry day a sunny day and an increasingly warm one. by this stage we are getting close to 30 celsius across the south—east corner. even though we have lost some of the rain across northern scotland comparing monday and tuesday, it could be very windy
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comic approaching dealforce and tuesday, it could be very windy comic approaching deal force at times. elsewhere, lots of sunshine, temperatures continue to creep up, 30 or 31 celsius in london by the stage. that heat transferring a bit further westwards as we go through the week, as i said the high pressure is nudging its way east, may be tapping into a bit of warmth from france, but that's because the brand is so —— the ground is so dry, so heating up. widely seen temperatures in the high 20s in england and wales, namely in the low to mid 30s, that showing up and our forecast chart, wears further north it will be temperatures in the mid 20s. katia and maurice krafft loved two things — each other and volcanoes. for two decades, these french volcanologists roamed the planet, chasing eruptions and documenting
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their discoveries on film and in photographs. they lost their lives whenjapan's mount unzen erupted in 1991. now, a new national geographic film, 'fire of love', opens the krafft�*s spectacular archive, allowing us to follow their adventures. let's take a look. alone they could only dream of volcanoes, together they can reach them. they met on a blind date in a cafe, from here on out, life will only be volcanoes, volcanoes, volcanoes. for katia and maurice, the unknown is not something to be feared, it is something to go towards.
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in this world lived a fire. in this fire, two lovers find a home. that is a hobby, it made me nervousjust watching that. but how romantic about them doing it together. now, someone who met the kraffts is clive oppenheimer, a fellow volcanologist and film—maker. hejoins us now from cambridge. just for my clip, what a mesmerising couple? just for my clip, what a mesmerising cou-le? . , couple? absolutely. i met them when i was a couple? absolutely. i met them when i was a phd — couple? absolutely. i met them when i was a phd student _
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couple? absolutely. i met them when i was a phd student and _ couple? absolutely. i met them when i was a phd student and my _ couple? absolutely. i met them when i was a phd student and my first i i was a phd student and my first conference, and i remember maurice saying to me, 95% of french men die in their beds, i would rather die in a volcano. they showed their latest film, and it was mesmerising then, that was fantastic to see their archive resurrected, 20, 30 years later. it's extraordinary.— later. it's extraordinary. even thouth later. it's extraordinary. even though it— later. it's extraordinary. even though it is— later. it's extraordinary. even though it is 20 _ later. it's extraordinary. even though it is 20 or _ later. it's extraordinary. even though it is 20 or 30 - later. it's extraordinary. even though it is 20 or 30 years i later. it's extraordinary. even i though it is 20 or 30 years later, the power of those images is incredible. now, we have drones, we have weather cardinals, we have live footage volcanoes, but this footage just feels very different, doesn't it? its, just feels very different, doesn't it? �* : :, :, :, , :, just feels very different, doesn't it? �* : :, :, :, :, ,, it? a cinematographer that i worked with sa s it? a cinematographer that i worked with says that _ it? a cinematographer that i worked with says that celluloid _ it? a cinematographer that i worked with says that celluloid massages i with says that celluloid massages the retina, and i think you can see that here. they dedicated their lives to this, they got some extraordinary film, that there is
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just a quality to that celluloid film that i think is unmatched even with all the eight k we have today. it is really reminiscent of the 19705 it is really reminiscent of the 1970s space films when they imagined what outer—space might look like. that is right, i think also, their heritage, there was another volcanologist in the 1960s who was to volcanoes what jacques cousteau was to the oceans. this prime landscapes and volcanic eruptions that we don't routinely get see... they said they were absently fascinated by capturing these images, getting closer and closer, but ultimately that did cost them their lives, didn't it? tt but ultimately that did cost them their lives, didn't it?— their lives, didn't it? it did.
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where they _ their lives, didn't it? it did. where they were _ their lives, didn't it? it did. where they were when i their lives, didn't it? it did. | where they were when they their lives, didn't it? it did. i where they were when they were killed was just insanely close to this unstable, viscous, crumbling love. they were trying to get closer and closer to film what happens when domes like that disintegrate, and they generate these hurricanes of ash and dust and rock at very high temperatures, which may very very fast. they were so close, and unfortunately, there are 40 other people with them who all lost their lives. they were moths to the flame to get the best footage, stuff that had never been seen before up close. you can imagine an obsession like that that you can never quite satisfy, wanting to get closer, wanting to get hotter, where does it end? , :, :, :, :, end? they were waiting to hear about the latest eruptions _ end? they were waiting to hear about the latest eruptions in _ end? they were waiting to hear about the latest eruptions in indonesia i end? they were waiting to hear about the latest eruptions in indonesia or. the latest eruptions in indonesia or latin america and they would get out
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there. they also figured out that a good way to film volcanoes was from the air, so they weren't always trying to get on the ground, and they took some wonderful aerial footage as well. they were very obsessive, even when they weren't on volcanoes, maurice collected anything to do with volcanoes, movie posters, prints, artwork. t5 a anything to do with volcanoes, movie posters, prints, artwork.— posters, prints, artwork. is a good thint the posters, prints, artwork. is a good thing they were — posters, prints, artwork. is a good thing they were both _ posters, prints, artwork. is a good thing they were both into - posters, prints, artwork. is a good thing they were both into it, i thing they were both into it, because if one of them was, that is our marriage ender, isn't it? thei;t our marriage ender, isn't it? they decided that _ our marriage ender, isn't it? they decided that they _ our marriage ender, isn't it? tue decided that they weren't going our marriage ender, isn't it? tue:g decided that they weren't going to have children, because they knew the risks, going out there and being faced with lava bombs, that the other thing they did, as they have this legacy with the footage that will inspire future volcanologist, and their film will inspire future volcanologist, and theirfilm is will inspire future volcanologist, and their film is also used in short films which were shown to
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communities at risk from volcanic eruptions, which made it easierfor authorities to evacuate people from harm's way. authorities to evacuate people from harm's way-— harm's way. you must have loved ttoin harm's way. you must have loved going through _ harm's way. you must have loved going through that _ harm's way. you must have loved going through that archive, i harm's way. you must have loved going through that archive, thankj going through that archive, thank you so much for your time and your insight into an absolutely fascinating couple. mi; insight into an absolutely fascinatintcou-le. g , fascinating couple. my pleasure. fan that fascinating couple. my pleasure. fancy that with _ fascinating couple. my pleasure. fancy that with your _ fascinating couple. my pleasure. fancy that with your other i fascinating couple. my pleasure. fancy that with your other half i fascinating couple. my pleasure. i fancy that with your other half this weekend? i'lljust fancy that with your other half this weekend? i'll just watch the film, thanks. 'fire of love' is out now in selected cinemas. we're going to continue talking about volcanos this morning, as one has erupted close to iceland's capital of reykjavik. it started to smoke last wednesday and tourists have been trying to catch a glimpse of the red hot lava. icelandic authorities though have warned people to stay away from the area. dr kristinjonsdottir is
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a seismologist and joins us now. hello to you, good morning. we saw pictures of it bubbling away a little earlier, what is the danger level? tt little earlier, what is the danger level? . :. little earlier, what is the danger level? , :, , level? it is quite a different scenario. — level? it is quite a different scenario, as _ level? it is quite a different scenario, as you _ level? it is quite a different scenario, as you were i level? it is quite a different i scenario, as you were describing before — scenario, as you were describing before. here we are looking at a fisher— before. here we are looking at a fisher which has opened inside the valley _ fisher which has opened inside the valley the — fisher which has opened inside the valley. the [over is flowing slowly away _ valley. the [over is flowing slowly away from — valley. the [over is flowing slowly away from the fissure, so people can stay at higher— fissure, so people can stay at higher grounds and avoid the lava. of glowing and dangerous, but we have organic gases which we are monitoring closely, which can be deadly— monitoring closely, which can be deadly if— monitoring closely, which can be deadly if you go very close to the eruption — deadly if you go very close to the eruption site, and if you stay at lower—
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eruption site, and if you stay at lower ground where volcanic gases can concentrate. the area is generally— can concentrate. the area is generally open, not today because the weather is terrible, but generally the area has been open, and the _ generally the area has been open, and the response units have been making _ and the response units have been making sure that people can access the area _ making sure that people can access the area. . making sure that people can access the area. , :, ::, :, :,, , the area. this volcano last erupted in march last _ the area. this volcano last erupted in march last year, _ the area. this volcano last erupted in march last year, what _ the area. this volcano last erupted in march last year, what props i the area. this volcano last erupted i in march last year, what props these flare—ups like this? this in march last year, what props these flare-ups like this?— flare-ups like this? this was not something _ flare-ups like this? this was not something that _ flare-ups like this? this was not something that we _ flare-ups like this? this was not something that we expected i flare-ups like this? this was not something that we expected to l something that we expected to happen. — something that we expected to happen, but it was quite interesting, but it was something that i— interesting, but it was something that i did — interesting, but it was something that i did not expect to see in my lifetime. — that i did not expect to see in my lifetime, because we have eruptive periods _ lifetime, because we have eruptive periods so — lifetime, because we have eruptive periods so close to the capital, maybe — periods so close to the capital, maybe every 800 or 1000 years. we understood _ maybe every 800 or 1000 years. we understood that we were coming closer— understood that we were coming closer to — understood that we were coming closer to this period, that it could 'ust closer to this period, that it could just as _ closer to this period, that it could just as well— closer to this period, that it could just as well have started in 200 years — just as well have started in 200 years. another interesting thing is that this _
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years. another interesting thing is that this volcano has not erupted before _ that this volcano has not erupted before the 2021 eruption for over 6000 _ before the 2021 eruption for over 6000 years so it was not a volcano that we _ 6000 years so it was not a volcano that we were pinpointing for an eruption — that we were pinpointing for an eruption. it was a bit unexpected, but prior— eruption. it was a bit unexpected, but prior to — eruption. it was a bit unexpected, but prior to the eruption itself, we were _ but prior to the eruption itself, we were experiencing quite a lot of earthquake activity. we knew that one was _ earthquake activity. we knew that one was on — earthquake activity. we knew that one was on the way. we earthquake activity. we knew that one was on the way.— earthquake activity. we knew that one was on the way. we heard there when we are — one was on the way. we heard there when we are talking _ one was on the way. we heard there when we are talking about _ one was on the way. we heard there when we are talking about the i one was on the way. we heard there when we are talking about the kraftt couple, who lost their life chasing volcano, they hold a huge appeal to tourists? , :, :, , tourists? they do, and it is understandable, _ tourists? they do, and it is understandable, it - tourists? they do, and it is understandable, it is i tourists? they do, and it is understandable, it is one l tourists? they do, and it is - understandable, it is one thing to look at _ understandable, it is one thing to look at things through your screen, but it_ look at things through your screen, but it is_ look at things through your screen, but it is totally different
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experience to observe volcanoes and an erupting _ experience to observe volcanoes and an erupting volcano in real life. you _ an erupting volcano in real life. you not — an erupting volcano in real life. you not only experiencing it visually, _ you not only experiencing it visually, also hear the crackling and the — visually, also hear the crackling and the sound of the volcano, and you smell— and the sound of the volcano, and you smell the volcano, and it is mesmerising.— mesmerising. you are clearly passionate — mesmerising. you are clearly passionate about _ mesmerising. you are clearly passionate about your - mesmerising. you are clearly passionate about your work, | mesmerising. you are clearly - passionate about your work, thank you so much forjoining us from set three this morning. i was going to ask if you are pronouncing the volcano properly. undoubtedly we weren't. that's all from breakfast for today. we'll be back tomorrow from 6am. untilthen, enjoy the rest of your day. goodbye.
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this is bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. i'm lewis vaughanjones, and these are the latest headlines. air raid sirens sound injerusalem for the first time since the start of last year's full—scale conflict between israel and palestinian militants in the gaza strip. it's the third day of violence between the two sides. this is the scene live in gaza. we'll have all the latest developments from our middle east correspondent. nearly 170,000 tonnes of grain and sunflower oil leaves on a second convoy of ships out of ukaine after russia's blockade caused global shortages. in the uk, liz truss promises a cut in national insurance within weeks if she wins the conservative party leadership race. her rival rishi sunak disagrees and says he wants to give more
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direct help to those hardest hit by inflation.

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