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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 7, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley and these are the latest headlines... air raid sirens sound injerusalem for the first time since the start of last year's full—scale conflict between israel and palestinian militants in the gaza. it's the third day of renewed violence between the two sides. the two conservative party leadership contenders vying the next prime minister outline how they plan to help people cope with the rising cost of living. but former prime minister gordon brown says much more action is needed. i'm quite frankly shocked about the emphasis on tax cuts that will benefit the very richest sections of society. nearly 170,000 tonnes of grain and sunflower oil leaves on a second convoy of ships out of ukaine
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after russia's blockade caused global shortages. the family of archie battersbee, who died yesterday after his life support was withdrawn, has called for an inquiry into the handling of his situation after enduring a lengthy legal battle to try to keep him alive. warnings that millions of children in england could go hungry this summer because councils have reduced or scrapped free school meal vouchers over the holidays. french officials trying to rescue a beluga whale trapped in the river seine come up with a new strategy to free it — find out how they plan to return it back to sea. and 72 artefacts forcibly removed from benin city during a british military incursion in 1897 will be returned to nigeria by a london museum.
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hello if you have just hello if you havejustjoined us. welcome to bbc news. talks are taking place on a possible ceasefire between israel and palestinian militants to end the latest fighting which has killed at least 31 palestinians since friday. egypt is reported to be mediating in the negotiations. palestinian rockets fired from gaza have reached jerusalem for the first time since may last year. the israeli army says it has — in its words — "neutralised" the entire senior leadership of islamichhad with the killing of a second senior member of the group, khaled mansour, in an air strike in gaza. from jerusalem, our middle east correspondent, yolande knell, reports. a huge crater in southern gaza marks a serious blow by israel to islamichhad. its most important commanders the palestinian territory
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was killed here in a strike with seven others. translation: it was horrifying. they targeted the house with rockets. there were bodies on the ground. and today, the violence reached jerusalem, as israeli nationals visited its most disputed holy site for a jewish holiday. israel's air defence system could be seen intercepting at least two palestinian rockets over the city, leaving trails of white smoke. israeli officials say they launched their military operation to prevent attacks by islamichhad on israeli civilians, that they have precise detailed intelligence of its plans. but for now, civilian life is on hold in southern israel, the streets largely empty as air raid sirens leave residents hiding in bomb shelters. 0utside, nobody�*s hurt but some rockets hit. and in gaza, too — we cannot independently verify these pictures, but israel says they
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show a palestinian missile misfiring with deadly consequences. there was no israeli activity in the gaza strip in that area or at that time. islamichhad is killing palestinian children in gaza. one in four rockets fired from gaza towards israel lands inside the gaza strip. as this fighting continues to take a toll, both israel and islamic jihad say publicly that they are ready to continue, but with the humanitarian situation in gaza worsening, pressure is growing for a ceasefire. in the last few moments, there has been developments on the question of a ceasefire. what is the latest you have? ~ , , . , have? well, egypt, which is the usual broker _ have? well, egypt, which is the usual broker here _ have? well, egypt, which is the usual broker here mediating - have? well, egypt, which is the - usual broker here mediating between israel_ usual broker here mediating between israel and _ usual broker here mediating between israel and the militants based in gaza _ israel and the militants based in gaza said — israel and the militants based in gaza said it proposed a ceasefire to start at _ gaza said it proposed a ceasefire to start at ten — gaza said it proposed a ceasefire to start at ten o'clock local time, that— start at ten o'clock local time, that would be eight o'clock uk
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summertime. we have had responses, mixed _ summertime. we have had responses, mixed responses, suggestions that israel_ mixed responses, suggestions that israel was — mixed responses, suggestions that israel was ready to agree to that, but at _ israel was ready to agree to that, but at the — israel was ready to agree to that, but at the same time palestinian officials — but at the same time palestinian officials are saying that that would be stuck _ officials are saying that that would be stuck to, others are saying that islamic— be stuck to, others are saying that islamichhad was still demanding islamic jihad was still demanding the islamichhad was still demanding the release by israel of its most senior— the release by israel of its most senior figure from the west bank who was arrested last week. all of those developments coming after thousands turned _ developments coming after thousands turned out _ developments coming after thousands turned out for the funeral of that powerful — turned out for the funeral of that powerful islamichhad commander who powerful islamic jihad commander who was powerful islamichhad commander who was killed _ powerful islamichhad commander who was killed in an israeli air strike overnight _ was killed in an israeli air strike overnight. after night, warning sirens— overnight. after night, warning sirens in— overnight. after night, warning sirens in southern towns and cities but also _ sirens in southern towns and cities but also reaching as far as tel aviv~ — but also reaching as far as tel aviv~ we _ but also reaching as far as tel aviv. we are not getting any reports of people _ aviv. we are not getting any reports of people getting hurt but that was a really _ of people getting hurt but that was a really heavy salvo that then the israeii _ a really heavy salvo that then the israeli military responded to. the securi israeli military responded to. tie: security shield that israeli military responded to. ti9 security shield that protects israel has been very effective in previous
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incidents of this kind, but it leaves the underlying tension is presumably unresolved between the two sides? you can go for ceasefire to ceasefire, then you have another incident and a flare—up. there never feels like there is any progression in this relationship.— in this relationship. yes, it is a deep source — in this relationship. yes, it is a deep source of _ in this relationship. yes, it is a deep source of frustration - in this relationship. yes, it is a deep source of frustration that| in this relationship. yes, it is a - deep source of frustration that the problem _ deep source of frustration that the problem of gaza, the festering problem — problem of gaza, the festering problem is left unresolved. it is often _ problem is left unresolved. it is often dealt with as a humanitarian situation, — often dealt with as a humanitarian situation, and we see that feeding into what— situation, and we see that feeding into what is happening at the moment because _ into what is happening at the moment because there is lots of international pressure and attention on what _ international pressure and attention on what is _ international pressure and attention on what is happening in gaza because the humanitarian situation there is deteriorating so quickly. israel actually— deteriorating so quickly. israel actually close to the crossings into gaza iast _ actually close to the crossings into gaza last week because of threats from _ gaza last week because of threats from islamichhad. that really has led to— from islamichhad. that really has led to ho— from islamichhad. that really has led to no fuel going in, so now the sole power— led to no fuel going in, so now the sole power plant in gaza has had to close _ sole power plant in gaza has had to close down — sole power plant in gaza has had to close down and there are severe power _
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close down and there are severe power shortages. reports that medicai— power shortages. reports that medical resources can only go for another— medical resources can only go for another couple of days. a lot of urgency— another couple of days. a lot of urgency in— another couple of days. a lot of urgency in the background here. the olitics in urgency in the background here. ti9 politics in israel are in transition at the moment. acting prime minister after the coalition collapsed. it is going to be some months before all of this is resolved.— of this is resolved. that's right, and it has _ of this is resolved. that's right, and it has been _ of this is resolved. that's right, and it has been a _ of this is resolved. that's right, and it has been a really - of this is resolved. that's right, and it has been a really big - of this is resolved. that's right, and it has been a really big test for his— and it has been a really big test for his government. the caretaker government that remains in place is one that _ government that remains in place is one that was originally came together in the wake of last may's full flare—up between israel and neck! _ full flare—up between israel and neck! militants. with the promise, i suppose. _ neck! militants. with the promise, i suppose, that they could do better than those that are gone before. he hasn't _ than those that are gone before. he hasn't really had his security credentials tested up until now. it has been — credentials tested up until now. it has been very important for him going _ has been very important for him going through the next couple of days to _ going through the next couple of days to show that he has got what the country is looking for when it comes— the country is looking for when it comes to — the country is looking for when it comes to its leadership. israel is going _ comes to its leadership. israel is going into — comes to its leadership. israel is going into another election in
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november where he is going into another election in novemberwhere he is a going into another election in november where he is a leading candidate. he will be trying to stay odd in— candidate. he will be trying to stay odd in that — candidate. he will be trying to stay odd in that prime ministerialjob. all of— odd in that prime ministerialjob. all of that — odd in that prime ministerialjob. all of that sort of feeds into the background of what is going on at the moment. background of what is going on at the moment-— background of what is going on at the moment. :, ~ , :, , : here, gordon brown says borisjohnson and the tory leadership candidates should agree an immediate emergency budget to tackle the rising cost of living. the former labour prime minister says millions of families may be pushed over the edge when energy bills go up in october. he said failing to act now would condemn vulnerable children and pensioners to a winter of "dire poverty". the first responsibility of government is to those people who are the most vulnerable and the people who are blameless in a crisis, and that is families with children, disabled people and elderly people in this country. we know that 80% of each of these groups are going to be in fuel poverty by the end of the year, in other words they are going to have to pay out far more for their fuel bills than they can afford, while at
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the same time having to pay higher prices for theirfood, the same time having to pay higher prices for their food, telecom, council tax at all basic necessities. it is absolutely urgent that you get together in the next few days, if you don't then the benefit changes cannot go through evenif benefit changes cannot go through even if they are agreed in september until perhaps late october or november. it is quite important that we take action now when the emergency exists. i really can't understand why the government is being so slow to respond to the latest very hefty increase in fuel bills, which is pretty an unjustifiable burden on so many people. unjustifiable burden on so many neale, :, unjustifiable burden on so many --eole. :, �* :, allies of the conservative leadership contender, liz truss, have insisted she isn't ruling out future direct help for people struggling to pay energy bills. yesterday, the foreign secretary said she would focus on tax cuts if she becomes prime minister rather than what she called "hand—outs". one of her supporters, the trade minister, penny mordaunt, said ms truss was considering other measures. there will be different things required for different people.
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there's the package of support that has already been put in place. liz is looking at other measures, i spoke to the chancellor yesterday, actually, about this and a raft of other things. he has commissioned some additional work. what we do need to do, though, is provide reassurance to people early and i think the right time to do that is when we have a new prime minister in, but we need to do pretty sharpish. and that's why i think it is right to have an emergency budget, why i am glad liz is committed to that. the former conservative party chair 0liver dowden, said ms truss' proposed tax cuts are "insufficient". we are going to see energy bills going up to almost £a000. if you look at the idea of the tax cuts,
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this idea of averting a national insurance contributions, that is only going to benefit someone working full—time on the national minimum wage by less than £60. contrast that with whoever the prime minister is, they are going to get the benefit of about £1800. this isn't the way to help people through this very difficult period. fiiiuer this very difficult period. oliver dowden, who _ this very difficult period. oliver dowden, who is _ this very difficult period. oliver dowden, who is supporting - this very difficult period. oliver. dowden, who is supporting rishi sunak. four more ships carrying grain and sunflower oil have left ports in ukraine. millions of tonnes of grain have been stuck because of the russian blockades, leading to shortages and higherfood prices in other countries. the ships left 0desa and chornomorsk, and will travel through the safe maritime corridor towards romania. they'll then sail to turkey, where they'll be inspected. two are scheduled to dock there, while the others are headed for italy and china. 0ur correspondent in kyiv james waterhouse has the latest. this is the second convoy to make it
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through this corridor, through the dangerous black sea where there is the russian navy and thousands of mines thought to be positioned. we are a week into this landmark grain deal, the only diplomatic breakthrough in this war. around a quarter of eight million tonnes has made its way out of ukraine's ports for the first time. eight vessels have made it out. there has been one empty ship arriving the other way. ukraine's ambition is for three million tonnes to be shifted every month and for 100 ships to pass through in the same time period. we are still in the early days, in a testing phase, but the deal is holding. and as far as kyiv is concerned, this is about building confidence. it's about saying to insurance companies, "look, this is an acceptable level of risk." it's about saying to shipping companies, "come to our docks, there is plenty of business here." and whether kyiv likes it or not,
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it's about establishing some kind of trust with russia as it continues to fight for its very survival. here, the family of archie battersbee have called for an investigation and inquiry into what happened to their son. the 12—year—old died yesterday in hospital after his life support was withdrawn. he had been in a coma since he was found unconscious at home in april. his parents fought a long legal battle to maintain his treatment, and then to have him transferred to a hospice. 0ur correspondent simon jones has been following the story and joins me now. we talked extensively about this yesterday after the news came through of archie's death. what are the family say?— the family say? yesterday, we saw the family say? yesterday, we saw the sad sight _ the family say? yesterday, we saw the sad sight of _ the family say? yesterday, we saw the sad sight of marty's _ the family say? yesterday, we saw the sad sight of marty's mother- the sad sight of marty's mother emerged from the hospital where he was being treated to announce that his life support had been turned off and he had died yesterday lunchtime. then, his mother said he was a wonderful little boy and she said he had fought to the end and she was extremely proud of him. 2a hours on, we have had a more considered statement from the family, where you get a sense of the anger that they are still feeling. i'm just going to
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read through some of what they say. the statement says, "no parent or family must go through this again. we have been forced to fight a relentless legal battle by the hospital live micro—trust but faced with an unimaginable tragedy. we were backed into a corner by the system, stripped of all our rights and vowed to fight for arty�*s real best interest and right to live with everything stacked against us." they want a public inquiry looking into his care, looking into how the hospital handle this, the nhs and also the family courts. we did approach the hospital that treated him, barts health nhs trust, i don't think they want get involved with a back and forth with the family, but they referred us to the statement they referred us to the statement theyissued they referred us to the statement they issued yesterday, saying arty�*s treatment was withdrawn followed by rulings from the courts. they also said that he had been provided with excellent care and it was difficult for the staff who were looking after him as well. in terms of the inquiry, we approach the department
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of health for a comment and they have yet to come back to us. court after court and judge afterjudge after court and judge after judge did after court and judge afterjudge did come down on the side of the doctors, it is worth pointing out, he said simply it was not worth continuing the treatment because there was no chance of him recovering, despite the wishes of the family who were praying for a miracle. detectives investigating the disappearance of a student nurse from grays in essex have arrested a fifth man in connection with her disappearance. 0wami davies was last seen a month ago in west croydon, after leaving her family home in essex three days earlier. the man is being questioned on suspicion of kidnap. four others have been bailed. let's move on to school meals. a leading charity is warning that millions of children in england could go hungry this summer because councils have over the holidays. the children's society says the rising cost of living,
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and changes to how the scheme is funded, has created a postcode lottery for families that are struggling. 0ur education correspondent, elaine dunkley, reports. zed watches every penny. today, she's shopping at a community food pantry to pick up discounted essentials for the children. last summer, zed got a free school meal voucher in the holidays worth £15 a week. but here in birmingham, that's been scrapped. £15 might not sound like a lot of money. actually, in the grand scheme of it, it is. when you've got two children to be paying for, like, it is a big loss. the vouchers have been replaced with free holiday clubs that provide food and activities. i love to get my children out in all activities, but with having a young child and a child with additional needs, it can be extremely difficult for many reasons. three, two, one, go! the council has organised events like this. in birmingham, nearly 70,000 children are eligible for free school meals.
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we had sandwiches, yoghurt, and a bit of fruit. yeah, it's a healthy lunch. i've enjoyed it a lot because i was able to go out. like, usually i wouldn't go to the park. usually i'd just be at home on my phone. the holiday activities and food programme is also meant to help families on low incomes who don't qualify for free school meals but are also struggling. the government says the household support fund has allocated up to £281 million to councils to spend on families with children. some local authorities have told us it has led to a reduction in the value of the vouchers they're able to offer. he wants chicken. birmingham city council says it's not offering vouchers this summer, but will spend £4 million on grants for households with children on free school meals. hi, andy, how's it going? at this community hub, they're helping struggling families applying for a grant. currently on the desk, more than 400 applications. a similar number of people, but more
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families with young children. if you're a working family on a low income, or in the gig economy or you work part time, then your choices are really limited. we're a lifeline. without us, they would, you know, really struggle. for many families, tough times have got tougher, with no breakfrom the rising costs over the summer holidays. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in birmingham. and andy, who was in that report, is with me now. good afternoon. thank you for speaking to us today. it sort of feels like we have gone from a situation where last summer there was something for everybody to be situation this summer where there is nothing for anybody, certainly in the case of local authorities, including birmingham where you are have stopped providing the vouchers. do you understand what has happened? bring them city council have taken the decision —— birmingham city
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council taken the decision to put their money into playschemes because evidence shows that children need more than just food during the summer holidays, so we offer games, we take them away from screens, we give them activities and we give them physical exercise. that they wouldn't normally get. i think choices for parents are really difficult over the summer because if you are a working family, and many of ourfamilies that you are a working family, and many of our families that struggle are working all day, you can either leave your children at home and go out to work and take the risk with that or you can give them to a family member to look after, often an older member of the family who finds it difficult. and they end up playing on their phone all day. or
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you take holiday and you lose shifts. and then that escalates into even more debt and even more struggles in being able to buy food. you make the point of the dilemma very clearly. i suppose my question was more that birmingham is one of the councils that has made this decision, but it's right to say, isn't it, that last summer the government was funding a lot of dispatcher support? presumably your charity also has a pantry so you help with meals, with food for some of the youngsters. but presumably and lots of parts of the country that option isn't available either, but it must be worrying to think there are other cities and towns where perhaps there isn't the kind of support that you and your colleagues are able to provide in conjunction with the council? yeah, that's right- — conjunction with the council? yeah, that's right. we _ conjunction with the council? yeah, that's right. we are _ conjunction with the council? yeah, that's right. we are really - conjunction with the council? yeah, that's right. we are really worried l that's right. we are really worried notjust that's right. we are really worried not just about free school meal
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children, actually, but the threshold is really quite low. for lots of our non—free school meal children, with parents that are going to work, then they struggle just as much. and so what we are trying to do is to provide a long—term solution, notjust over the summer, over the year when we can support young people throughout the year. we can support people on with food. because they need it. and demand is all through the year. we do see a little bit of an increase during the summer but actually, all through the year we gain 56,000 tonnes of food last year to families that are in need. a, tonnes of food last year to families that are in need.—
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that are in need. a last thought, and d. that are in need. a last thought, and d- how _ that are in need. a last thought, and d. how concerned _ that are in need. a last thought, and d. how concerned are - that are in need. a last thought, and d. how concerned are you . that are in need. a last thought, i and d. how concerned are you that perhaps some of the organisations and individuals who help support your work will for their own financial reasons perhaps not be able to give so much as they have donein able to give so much as they have done in the past? i able to give so much as they have done in the past?— able to give so much as they have done in the past? i think people are stru: aalin done in the past? i think people are struggling themselves. _ done in the past? i think people are struggling themselves. so - done in the past? i think people are struggling themselves. so it - done in the past? i think people are struggling themselves. so it is - struggling themselves. so it is tough for them. so we do rely on our very generous funders from people like western power who have given us money this year to help non—free school meal children as well. so we are very dependent on funding and the way in which councils choose to spend their money. find the way in which councils choose to spend their money.— the way in which councils choose to spend their money. and he would from the oasis community _ spend their money. and he would from the oasis community hub, _ spend their money. and he would from the oasis community hub, andy - spend their money. and he would from the oasis community hub, andy brown | the oasis community hub, andy brown forgive me. also from your local pantry scheme as well. thank you very much. a london museum says it will return
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ownership of artefacts that were looted in the nineteenth century to nigeria. the horniman museum said 72 objects which were forcibly removed from the kingdom of benin, during a british military incursion in 1897, would be handed over to the nigerian government. 0ur correspondent, sanchia berg, joins me now. in one case it is literally the keys to the kingdom we are talking about here? the to the kingdom we are talking about here? ~ , to the kingdom we are talking about here? ~' , :, .,. to the kingdom we are talking about here? ~' , :, ., ' here? the key to the palace, also 12 bronze plaques _ here? the key to the palace, also 12 bronze plaques. another _ here? the key to the palace, also 12 bronze plaques. another of - here? the key to the palace, also 12 bronze plaques. another of other i bronze plaques. another of other artefacts — bronze plaques. another of other artefacts. a very significant collection that was actually begun by a tea _ collection that was actually begun by a tea trader in 1897, just a few months _ by a tea trader in 1897, just a few months after benin itself was sacked — months after benin itself was sacked. he was one of the first to start— sacked. he was one of the first to start collecting these artefacts. and it _ start collecting these artefacts. and it is — start collecting these artefacts. and it is now at the horniman museum. _ and it is now at the horniman museum, and afteran and it is now at the horniman museum, and after an independent inquiry— museum, and after an independent inquiryand— museum, and after an independent inquiry and a local consultation they— inquiry and a local consultation they have _ inquiry and a local consultation they have decided to respond positively to the request from the nigerian —
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positively to the request from the nigerian side to restore ownership of this— nigerian side to restore ownership of this collection to nigeria. does that mean that _ of this collection to nigeria. does that mean that the _ of this collection to nigeria. tiff that mean that the artefacts will definitely go back, or is it a question then of saying to nigeria will your loan as these? how is it likely to work? i will your loan as these? how is it likely to work?— will your loan as these? how is it likely to work? i understand that as a lot of museums _ likely to work? i understand that as a lot of museums are _ likely to work? i understand that as a lot of museums are now - likely to work? i understand that as a lot of museums are now offering l likely to work? i understand that as i a lot of museums are now offering to return— a lot of museums are now offering to return these — a lot of museums are now offering to return these artefacts, it may be some _ return these artefacts, it may be some time — return these artefacts, it may be some time before everything is restored — some time before everything is restored to nigeria. but the nigerians are building a special centre — nigerians are building a special centre for them so the plan is, i'm sure: _ centre for them so the plan is, i'm sure. for— centre for them so the plan is, i'm sure, for them to go back ultimately. but of course, what happens — ultimately. but of course, what happens to them, where we go, who -ets happens to them, where we go, who gets to _ happens to them, where we go, who gets to see _ happens to them, where we go, who gets to see them will now be up to nigeria _ gets to see them will now be up to nigeria rather than to the museum in london _ nigeria rather than to the museum in london and — nigeria rather than to the museum in london. and oxford and cambridge universities have also taken a similar— universities have also taken a similar step, and so they are going to restore — similar step, and so they are going to restore their pretty substantial collections of similar artefacts. so that means that the biggest collection in the world, over 900 of these _ collection in the world, over 900 of these in _ collection in the world, over 900 of these in the — collection in the world, over 900 of these in the british museum, is the one that _ these in the british museum, is the one that is — these in the british museum, is the one that is rather isolated in all
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of this — one that is rather isolated in all of this. because as i say, museums elsewhere — of this. because as i say, museums elsewhere in— of this. because as i say, museums elsewhere in the world are now offering — elsewhere in the world are now offering to return ownership. the british offering to return ownership. ti9 british museum says the reason it can't act is because it legally can't act is because it legally can't act, is that right? it is can't act, is that right? it is constrained _ can't act, is that right? it is constrained by _ can't act, is that right? it is constrained by the - can't act, is that right? it is constrained by the 1963 - can't act, is that right? it is constrained by the 1963 british museum act. there is an argument that says _ museum act. there is an argument that says that needs to be changed, and only— that says that needs to be changed, and only parliament can change it in order— and only parliament can change it in order for— and only parliament can change it in order for them to hand over these artefacts — order for them to hand over these artefacts. there is some argument in the arts— artefacts. there is some argument in the arts world over whether there is a little _ the arts world over whether there is a little bit _ the arts world over whether there is a little bit of leeway in the act, but certainly they are in a particularly difficult and rather unique — particularly difficult and rather unique position. an particularly difficult and rather unique position.— unique position. an unusual question. — unique position. an unusual question, one _ unique position. an unusual question, one of _ unique position. an unusual question, one of the - unique position. an unusual- question, one of the conservative party campaign events, to pose to liz truss and rishi sunak. whether they will amend the british museum act. french officials trying to rescue a beluga whale trapped in the river seine have tested a new strategy — a vitamin cocktail. the visibly malnourished beluga was first spotted on tuesday and has swum upriver to within 70
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kilometres of paris. rescuers say it has so far refused their offerings of fish, either because it lacks energy or is sick. they hope that the vitamin injection will stimulate its appetite and help it to make the 160km journey to the english channel, where it can swim back to its arctic habitat. let's go live to eure, the location of the beluga in northern france, to speak to lamya essemlali, president of sea shepherd france. i'm s o rry , i'm s o rry , i'm sorry, ifind mispronounced your surname? no, it was perfect. one is the latest situation with the well? we have been watching it 20 47 since it got _ we have been watching it 20 47 since it got in— we have been watching it 20 47 since it got in since yesterday. it got injections _ it got in since yesterday. it got injections yesterday of antibiotics and to— injections yesterday of antibiotics and to stimulate its appetite. we are feeding him squid and fish, so far there — are feeding him squid and fish, so far there is — are feeding him squid and fish, so far there is no change in his
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interest— far there is no change in his interest in— far there is no change in his interest in food. we showed experts interest in food. we showed experts in quebec— interest in food. we showed experts in quebec all of the photos we have and it's— in quebec all of the photos we have and it's good description of the behaviour— and it's good description of the behaviour of the beluga whale, and they believe that it has a thickness that is— they believe that it has a thickness that is prior to his entrance into the river— that is prior to his entrance into the river seine. he is extremely skinny— the river seine. he is extremely skinny and — the river seine. he is extremely skinny and the loss of appetite is not the _ skinny and the loss of appetite is not the original issue. it is most likely— not the original issue. it is most likely a — not the original issue. it is most likely a symptom. so right now we have _ likely a symptom. so right now we have very — likely a symptom. so right now we have very few options for him. we believe _ have very few options for him. we believe that if we open the lock and let him _ believe that if we open the lock and let him go— believe that if we open the lock and let him go and pray for him to get back to _ let him go and pray for him to get back to see, there is little chance of him _ back to see, there is little chance of him getting back to the ocean. so i’ilht of him getting back to the ocean. so right now— of him getting back to the ocean. so right now the privileged option is to give _ right now the privileged option is to give him vitamins, food, to...
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i'm to give him vitamins, food, to... im sorry— to give him vitamins, food, to... im sorry to— to give him vitamins, food, to... i'm sorry to interrupt you, we are having some problems hearing you because of the wind noise where you are. just one of these things. can i just clarify, there is a possibility that if you can get the antibiotics into him you might then be able to move him, yes? in order then to be able to release him at a later stage. even if you can get the antibiotics into him, even if he can start eating, it will be a little time before he was at the strength to be able to take what would be a mammoth swim to get back to the english channel?— mammoth swim to get back to the english channel? yes, we believe he is too weak — english channel? yes, we believe he is too weak to _ english channel? yes, we believe he is too weak to make _ english channel? yes, we believe he is too weak to make it _ english channel? yes, we believe he is too weak to make it back - english channel? yes, we believe he is too weak to make it back on - english channel? yes, we believe he is too weak to make it back on his i is too weak to make it back on his own to _ is too weak to make it back on his own to the — is too weak to make it back on his own to the sea. so right now we all think— own to the sea. so right now we all think that _ own to the sea. so right now we all think that the best chance that he has is _ think that the best chance that he has is that— think that the best chance that he has is that we help him. so either putting _ has is that we help him. so either putting him — has is that we help him. so either putting him on a boat or by the
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road _ putting him on a boat or by the road. definitely give him vitamins, food, _ road. definitely give him vitamins, food, antibiotics and give him the best chance possible. and then we will let _ best chance possible. and then we will let nature take its course and hope _ will let nature take its course and hope he — will let nature take its course and hope he can make it. but it is out of our— hope he can make it. but it is out of our hands _ hope he can make it. but it is out of our hands what happens after that _ of our hands what happens after that if— of our hands what happens after that. , :, , �* :, ~' of our hands what happens after that. , :, , �* :, ,, that. if this doesn't work, you obviously _ that. if this doesn't work, you obviously wouldn't _ that. if this doesn't work, you obviously wouldn't just - that. if this doesn't work, you obviously wouldn't just leave | that. if this doesn't work, you . obviously wouldn'tjust leave him obviously wouldn't just leave him there obviously wouldn'tjust leave him there to die. would you consider euthanising him? giving him an injection to let him die more peacefully?— injection to let him die more eacefull ? ~ :, peacefully? well, we did mention that option- _ peacefully? well, we did mention that option. the _ peacefully? well, we did mention that option. the easiest - peacefully? well, we did mention that option. the easiest way - peacefully? well, we did mention that option. the easiest way to i peacefully? well, we did mention| that option. the easiest way to do it would _ that option. the easiest way to do it would be — that option. the easiest way to do it would be to do it while he is in the lock. — it would be to do it while he is in the lock, because he is at reach. we put that— the lock, because he is at reach. we put that aside because he is actually— put that aside because he is actually a lot, he is curious, he reacts — actually a lot, he is curious, he reacts to— actually a lot, he is curious, he reacts to his _ actually a lot, he is curious, he reacts to his environment and he is not like _ reacts to his environment and he is not like a _ reacts to his environment and he is not like a dying whale. it would be a premature decision to decide to euthanise — a premature decision to decide to euthanise him at this stage. so that is why— euthanise him at this stage. so that is why we _ euthanise him at this stage. so that is why we refuse to do that at the moment — is why we refuse to do that at the moment. and once he is back at sea,
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well, _ moment. and once he is back at sea, well, obviously, there isn't much we can do _ well, obviously, there isn't much we can do. :, ~ well, obviously, there isn't much we can do. :, ,, ,:, well, obviously, there isn't much we can do. :, ,, well, obviously, there isn't much we cando. :, ,, . well, obviously, there isn't much we cando. :, . can do. thank you so much. good luck with the project- _ can do. thank you so much. good luck with the project. i _ can do. thank you so much. good luck with the project. i know— can do. thank you so much. good luck with the project. i know your - with the project. i know your volunteers are with him all the time every day, and we will hope for good news on that well. thank you. time now for a look at the weather. we have the sunshine out again and temperatures will climb, still some cloud in western scotland producing one or two spots of rain but otherwise dry, more sunshine in eastern scotland, more sunshine coming through over the next few hours in northern ireland, lifting temperatures to 20 degrees. high temperatures to 20 degrees. high temperatures across england and wales, possibly reaching 28, so hot today than yesterday. overnight, we keep clearer skies for many parts of the country, more rain arriving in the country, more rain arriving in the far north—west of scotland but otherwise temperatures ahead of that down to 11 or 12 degrees. moving
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into monday, and there is

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