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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  August 12, 2022 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. power vacuum: downing street hosts uk energy bosses for talks, but no action is agreed on soaring bills. charities say it can't wait for a new prime minister. up up until justjuly this up untiljustjuly this year, we have given about 120,000 referrals to foodbank and crisis support, but is more than 29 teen and 2020 combined. 7 correct 22019. —— 2019. heading for recession: official figures could show the uk economy went into reverse in the three months tojune. reinstated: samsung heir lee jae—yong gets a presidential pardon
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for his bribery conviction, allowing him to return to running the company. plus, a show of support: mcdonald's says it will reopen in ukraine where it is safe to do so to help restore a small, but important sense of normalcy. we start here in the uk where energy company bosses have been holding talks in downing street with prime minister borisjohnson and chancellor nadhim zahawi as concern grows about soaring bills. the annual energy bill for a typical household is set to top £4,000 a year from january — that's over double what it is now. mrjohnson says the companies have been urged to help, but it's thought no firm decisions will be taken until a new prime minister is in place next month. our business correspondent caroline davies has more.
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ifind it quite i find it quite degrading to live in this situation. there is little left _ live in this situation. there is little left in _ live in this situation. there is little left in dallas's - live in this situation. there is little left in dallas's one| is little left in dallas's one bedroom flat. she says to keep paying the bills and a roof over her head, she sold the rest. 1 over her head, she sold the rest. ., , , , over her head, she sold the rest. . , , , , rest. i flat is empty so i 'ust don't rest. i flat is empty so i 'ust don-t mi rest. i flat is empty so i 'ust don't know how i rest. i flat is empty so i 'ust don't know how i i rest. i flat is empty so i 'ust don't know howl can i rest. i flat is empty so i just i don't know howl can possibly don't know how i can possibly make any more adjustments or changes to try and satisfy this gas bill. in my fridge, just got some bottled water. much she has her— got some bottled water. much she has her gas _ got some bottled water. much she has her gas bill— got some bottled water. much she has her gas bill went - got some bottled water. much she has her gas bill went up . got some bottled water. much she has her gas bill went up a | she has her gas bill went up a few months ago from £30 to £150, and although she is on universal credit and should be eligible for extra government payments to help, is it any help now is too little, too late. it help now is too little, too late. ., ~ , , late. it makes me feel very, very anxious _ late. it makes me feel very, very anxious all _ late. it makes me feel very, very anxious all the - late. it makes me feel very, very anxious all the time, i very anxious all the time, just switching a light on, worrying about where i am going to be in anotherfew months. she about where i am going to be in another few months.— about where i am going to be in another few months. she may be another few months. she may be an extreme _ another few months. she may be an extreme example, _ another few months. she may be an extreme example, but - another few months. she may be an extreme example, but the - an extreme example, but the expected rise in energy bills will affect households around the country. on thursday, 15
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energy companies and organisations met with the prime minister, chancellor and business secretary. but while borisjohnson is this would be difficult. the decisions were made until the new prime minister is in place. that won't be until september five. consumer groups say decisions are needed now. llp consumer groups say decisions are needed now.— are needed now. up until 'ust jul this are needed now. up until 'ust july this year. i are needed now. up until 'ust july this year, we * are needed now. up until 'ust july this year, we have i are needed now. up untiljust july this year, we have given l july this year, we have given out about 150,000 referrals to foodbank and crisis support, thatis foodbank and crisis support, that is more than 2019 and 2020 combined. but for many people, theyjust combined. but for many people, they just can't wait another day. forthe they just can't wait another day. for the government to decide what support is needed in winter. ., ' in winter. there are different ideas about _ in winter. there are different ideas about what _ in winter. there are different ideas about what the - in winter. there are different - ideas about what the government can do to get more support in the next few months. one is to cut vat on energy bills put forward by rishi sunak. it could save a typical household roughly £190. another idea is to temporarily drop green energy level. that is put forward by liz truss and because save an average household around £153. the criticism is that with energy prices going so high, neither of these do enough. at first
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i's hustings in cheltenham, mistrust talked about cutting taxes again but didn't rule out direct support. we taxes again but didn't rule out direct summ— taxes again but didn't rule out direct support. we need to look at exactly _ direct support. we need to look at exactly what _ direct support. we need to look at exactly what the _ direct support. we need to look at exactly what the situation - at exactly what the situation is in september, we need to look at what measures we can take both on taxes and supply and other measures. but what i am not going to do is announce the results of that work now. mr sunekar said the results of that work now. mr sunekarsaid he the results of that work now. mr sunekar said he would provide direct support to vulnerable groups if he won the leadership of there will be many pensioners here in the audience tonight used to receiving a winterfuel audience tonight used to receiving a winter fuel payment in winter, and i say we will provide additional payments alongside that and we will need to provide more than i thought previously because the bills are were so many to do the same for people on low incomes. the clock is ticking, and while government emphasises that billions of pounds of help is already in place, autumn is looming. even some energy leaders away the big decisions are on hold while the panic of are on hold while the panic of a prices is rising.
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caroline davies, bbc news. russ mould is investment director at aj bell. good to see you as always. what would you like to see on this front to help alleviate the huge economic cost that we're all to bear?— all to bear? there are two perspectives- _ all to bear? there are two perspectives. investment| perspectives. investment perspectives. investment perspective is a less important one and the social perspective it is how we all get through this. from the investment perspective, yes, the theory is that companies are there to create shareholder value. that is why shareholders and investors will be pleased to see the company is handing out dividends and doing share backs and reserve cash to shareholders, but equally, that is no good if the result of thatis is no good if the result of that is companies bringing the public and the wrath of the regulator of the government upon themselves and then attracting more regulation, more taxes in the short—term game, long—term pain. there needs to be a balance there. from a social perspective, we
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have two challenges. how do we get through the winter, how we help the most vulnerable, many more people in society in terms of meeting the immediate bill, and the longer—term question of energy security and where does the energy come from? what energy security and where does the energy come from?- the energy come from? what is our the energy come from? what is your view _ the energy come from? what is your view for— the energy come from? what is your view for example - the energy come from? what is your view for example on - the energy come from? what is your view for example on the i your view for example on the road france has taken, nationalising temporarily and addressing huge subsidies for the french people? that addressing huge subsidies for the french people?— the french people? that is a model. the french people? that is a model- we _ the french people? that is a model. we have _ the french people? that is a model. we have in - the french people? that is a model. we have in america | the french people? that is a l model. we have in america go down a different path which is the inflation reduction at which the long—term solution to promote investment in green energy, so you have a short—term approach from the french and a longer—term approach from the americans. in france it was easier, they were a big stakeholder anyway and you can argue there is an option to do that here in the uk but i think it would be legally and financially potentially extremely difficult, and i think one thing we need to see whether you are a company, consumer or investor, is a long—term plan
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for long—term energy production from sustainable sources and perhaps funding encouragement for that to be achieved, and thatis for that to be achieved, and that is a long—term solution, we have a much more pressing short—term problem which will require financial help. haifa require financial help. how damaging _ require financial help. how damaging it _ require financial help. how damaging it is _ require financial help. how damaging it is increase - require financial help. how damaging it is increase in i damaging it is increase in energy bills is going to be for the uk economy as a whole? we can see it _ the uk economy as a whole? we can see it in _ the uk economy as a whole? - can see it in the consumer confidence numbers, the number is struggling at a record low for that index which has been running since them in the mid—19 70s. myalup you can see their squeeze across a wide range of demographic. if you look at oil price spikes in the 19705, look at oil price spikes in the 1970s, there are six occasions we have seen the oil price more than double year on year, and pretty much every occasion has led to a recession, the company
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profits, they have oil based products and costs.- profits, they have oil based products and costs. let's stay in the uk, because official gdp figures out in the next few hours could suggest the country is already heading towards recession. they are expected to show the economy shrank in the three months tojune. two quarters in a row of negative growth is the usual definition of a recession. the bank of england has warned uk growth will go into reverse later this year, and continue to contract all of next year and into 202a. yael selfin is chief economist at kpmg here in london. welcome. what are you expecting of the figures? lode welcome. what are you expecting of the figures?— of the figures? we are expecting _ of the figures? we are expecting a _ of the figures? we are| expecting a contraction of the figures? we are - expecting a contraction as well, although we need to bear in mind that that contraction is probably down to more technicalfactors. we had an extra bank holiday injune and we have also seen the phasing out of test and trace, which is
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a big problem that had a big impact on gdp. the underlying growth might be a little bit stronger than what we will see in the overall numbers. find in the overall numbers. and what about _ in the overall numbers. and what about things _ in the overall numbers. and what about things like - in the overall numbers. and what about things like the platinum jubilee weekend and the other areas like construction, travel and manufacturing which did see some growth. manufacturing which did see some growth-— manufacturing which did see some growth. yes, as i said, the additional _ some growth. yes, as i said, the additional bank - some growth. yes, as i said, the additional bank holiday i some growth. yes, as i said, | the additional bank holiday in june is likely to cause part of that weakness, and when it comes to the underlying growth, we are probably likely to see growth that is a little bit stronger, but we are seeing signs of weakening in the economy, some surveys, you have already heard some of that on the programme, and we are expecting growth to moderate. we are also expecting recession potentially not as long as the bank of england, predicting a
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three quarters recession starting from the fourth quarter of this year with output contracting by 1.8% in total. 0ver that period. output contracting by 1.8% in total. 0verthat period. so output contracting by 1.8% in total. 0ver that period. so we are heading towards a much weaker. in terms of the economic, uk economy. good to net economic, uk economy. good to let our economic, uk economy. good to get your thoughts. _ economic, uk economy. good to get your thoughts. thank - economic, uk economy. good to get your thoughts. thank you - get your thoughts. thank you very much for being with us. it's notjust here in the uk that fears are growing of an economic downturn. the head of america's conference board, which represents 1,000 us companies and carries out regular confidence surveys, has told the bbc the us could be in recession by the end of the year. he says soaring fuel and food prices are stopping consumers from spending and bosses from investing. people are ratcheting back all their plans related to big purchases, automobiles, appliances, capital goods, but it is also rippling back then
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through businesses, and so our latest confidence index has predicted a recession, and when the us gets worried about recession, they start ratcheting back capital investment, hiring plans and everything else so this becomes a concern because it can actually create a recession by ratcheting back to the spending. the all of this is coming through in sort of a circularfashion here to coming through in sort of a circular fashion here to our projection that there will be a recession in the us by the end of 2022 and carried over into 2023. and you can see more of that interview on talking business with aaron heslehurst this weekend. you can catch that on the bbc news channel at 1530 on saturday here in the uk, and in the rest of the world on bbc world news. to asia now, and the heir to south korean tech giant samsung, jy lee, has received a presidential pardon for his bribery and embezzlement conviction. it will allow him to return to running the company.
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the country's justice minister says he will be "reinstated" to give him a chance to "contribute to overcoming the economic crisis." jean mackenzie is our correspondent in seoul. jean, give us the background to this. so, jy lee was convicted on a bribery case that was related to the former resident here, it was a corruption scandal that brought her down, and he was imprisoned. but he was actually released last august, so he has been out of prison for a while, and his official sentence ended last month. in some ways, is pardoning today is slightly symbolic because he was already out of prison and his centres have been completed and he was actually already back working. the issue with the conviction is still limited the work that he could do with a company, so the pardoning today will allow him to assume more responsibility at the company and take on operational duties, and take on operational duties, and it is widely accepted that he will move up the company and
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may one day take over that role of chairman.— of chairman. 0k, folau, thank ou of chairman. 0k, folau, thank you much— of chairman. 0k, folau, thank you much for— of chairman. 0k, folau, thank you much for the _ of chairman. 0k, folau, thank you much for the update. -- l of chairman. 0k, folau, thank. you much for the update. -- 0k, you much for the update. —— ok, for now, thank you very much for now, thank you very much for the update. mcdonald's has announced plans to reopen outlets in ukraine after it closed its restaurants across the country following russia's invasion in march. the fast—food chain says it hopes the move will help restore a small, but important sense of normalcy. michelle fleury reports. mcdonald's shut its restaurant in after russian invasion stop it has continued to pay the wages of more than 10,000 employees. now, the berghan giant says they will be a phase reopening over the next several months at it is deemed safe. company said it is working with suppliers and contractors to ensure the restaurants are ready. the fast food chain isn't the only company its support for ukraine in this way. kfc, mikey and zara are among other western brands who stores are reported to be opening in the country. the ukrainian economy has been
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severely damaged by the war, exports disrupted, key infrastructure destroyed and businesses forced to close. so restarting businesses even in a limited capacity would be extremely helpful. international monetary fund excess ukraine positive economy to shrink 35% this year. but while donald is returning to work in ukraine, it has sold most of its restaurant in russia to a local franchise owner. roughly three decades after the golden arches first opened its doors in moscow in what was a powerful symbol of opposed cold war era. stay with us on bbc news. still to come, highly charged action: formula e runs its 100th race this weekend. but can electric motorsport push petrol power off the grid? the big crowds became bigger as the time of the funeral approached.
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as the lines of fans became longer, the police prepared for a hugejob of crowd control. idi amin, uganda's brutal former dictator, has died at the age of 80. he's been buried in saudi arabia where he lived in exile since being overthrown in 1979. 2 billion people around - the world have seen the last total eclipse of the sun to - take place in this millennium. it began itsjourney- off the coast of canada, ending three hours later, when the sun set - over the bay of bengal.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines: wildfires, record temperatures and drought: europe's stifling summer heatwave continues with no sign of stopping. donald trump says he won't stand in the way of the release of any documents seized in the fbi search of his home. this week, digital currency exchange coinbase revealed the extent of the damage to investor confidence done by the huge sell—off in cryptocurrencies from their peak, last year. it said crypto trading by institutions was down by almost half in the three months tojune, and trading by retail investors slumped even more, down more than two—thirds or 68% in the same period. but there's no question digital currencies will be part of our economic future. central banks are looking seriously at issuing their own digital money — the frontrunner, china, is already testing a "digital yuan" in major cities. katharine wooller is uk managing director of the crypto wealth management
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platform, dacxi. thank platform, dacxi. you for being with us. tell thank you for being with us. tell us a bit more about cbbc and how it is from crypto currencies. —— from cdbc. crypto currencies are typically decentralised, so central bank digital currencies are a bit of a mouthful, way central bank looks to create a token to represent their currency, to rather than having coins or notes or alongside traditional fiat currency, there is a crypto version, which is really exciting. it is a very new technology. exciting. it is a very new technology-— exciting. it is a very new technology. exciting. it is a very new technolo .':: , ., technology. 105 countries are considering — technology. 105 countries are considering these _ technology. 105 countries are considering these with - technology. 105 countries are considering these with 50 - considering these with 50 already in development. why, what is so appealing about them? , ., , , them? yes. yeah, sure, so they are quicker. _ them? yes. yeah, sure, so they are quicker, faster, _ them? yes. yeah, sure, so they are quicker, faster, more - are quicker, faster, more efficient, betterfor efficient, better for payment... transferring efficient, betterfor payment... transferring from one currency to another. actually there are a number of
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currencies which central banks who are light with projects, so nigeria, jamaica, the eastern caribbean bank. so really popular —— who are live. where they are looking to control inflation, and looking to have better tabs on their currencies, for example avoiding tax evasion and controlling illicit activity, obvious things being money—laundering, people trafficking, things like that. so lots of reasons why governments are interested in the technology, even though a good number are perhaps a little bit cautious. anyone who has been involved in government digital transformation project will say that sometimes governments can be a little bit slow on adopting those new technologies.— slow on adopting those new technologies. yes, those are some of the _ technologies. yes, those are some of the pros, _ technologies. yes, those are some of the pros, what - technologies. yes, those are| some of the pros, what about the cons7 some of the pros, what about the cons?— the cons? yeah, sure, so i think it _ the cons? yeah, sure, so i think it is _ the cons? yeah, sure, so i think it is very _ the cons? yeah, sure, so i think it is very interesting. j think it is very interesting. lots of people are quite passionate about their currency. the uk, we move away from perhaps paper notes to the more plastic ones, or when certain kinds are phased out
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people can be a little bit emotional, you build a bit of a relationship to the past really. some people are quite nostalgic and proud about their currency, also from a crypto perspective there are a few people in crypto industries who feel it is a little bit against the initial vibe of chris —— of crypto. people felt it was decentralised. to see it used for centralised finance is probably a bit of a deviation from what crypto was originally created for.— created for. really interesting. - created for. really interesting. thank| created for. really - interesting. thank you for created for. really _ interesting. thank you for your thoughts. this weekend sees the final race of the formula e season in the south korean capital seoul. it's a milestone for the electric car racing series — the seoul event is the 100th race since formula e was launched, around a decade ago. it attracted a record 316 million viewers last season. but, despite that, some big names in the car industry have failed to stick with it. audi and bmw pulled out last year, and now reigning champion mercedes says it won't continue after the current season, preferring to focus on formula 1.
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jamie reigle is the chief executive officer of formula e — he's in the south korean capital seoul. jamie, welcome to you. tell us a bit more about the pulling out of mercedes, and how concerned are you by it? first of all, thanks _ concerned are you by it? first of all, thanks very _ concerned are you by it? first of all, thanks very much - concerned are you by it? first of all, thanks very much for l of all, thanks very much for having me. it is great to be here and yes, we have been developing an electric car racing series for nearly a decade as you point out, and manufacturers come into formula e for a couple of reasons, to develop the technology and to promote their brands, and it is fair to say over the last couple of years with covid, we have faced some significant challenge that led to some departures. 0n the other hand, we have great momentum going today. we will be finishing our year here in seoul, and mercedes are top of the table, so i wonder if that might change how they are looking at it. next year, mercedes have
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acquired the team. you described _ acquired the team. you described the _ acquired the team. you described the loss - acquired the team. you described the loss of i acquired the team. you described the loss of mercedes is a very significant blow. there are others who have pulled out as well. how damaging is it to what you are doing? damaging is it to what you are doinu ? ., , ., , damaging is it to what you are doinu? ., , ., , .,, doing? our ambition is to build a... and doing? our ambition is to build a- -- and it _ doing? our ambition is to build a... and it means _ doing? our ambition is to build a... and it means we _ doing? our ambition is to build a... and it means we have - doing? our ambition is to build l a... and it means we have great team protagonists, racing around the world and we are present on the big media channels and people talking about it, and i think that is happening. 0bviously manufacturers are important to that. still have in the series jaguar, porsche, nissan, and we will have mclaren and maserati joining, we have mahendra from india, neo the number one manufacturer in china, so there is no doubt there is an impact of losing a couple of german manufacturers, but the world is going electric, we have six
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more manufacturers coming into a championship. so we're pretty confident we are going in the right direction.— right direction. you are growing _ right direction. you are growing in _ right direction. you are growing in numbers, i right direction. you are l growing in numbers, 360 right direction. you are - growing in numbers, 360 million viewers watched last season. what is the appeal, do you think, how are you managing to pull in those numbers? we taruet a pull in those numbers? we target a very _ pull in those numbers? - target a very different audience than typical motorsport. the common motorsport. the common motorsport fan, the petrol heads, they have a lot of reference to traditional car racing. what we do is we take our racing series, go right into the heart of the cities. we can do that because the cars are quiet, specifically the points of differentiation over electric it is what allows us to put on a different kind of car race. that is appealing to a different kind of demographic, a younger one, last week, two weeks ago we based in london, the excel centre, we had indoors and outdoors with a light show and a music and right before the race. it isjust a music and right before the race. it is just a a music and right before the race. it isjust a different blend of sport entertainment. here in seoul we will be racing in the 88 in a limping stadium
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indoor. —— 0lympic in the 88 in a limping stadium indoor. —— olympic stadium, indoor. —— olympic stadium, indoor and outdoor through the stadium so that really attracts a different audience. tell stadium so that really attracts a different audience.— a different audience. tell us a bit more about _ a different audience. tell us a bit more about how _ a different audience. tell us a bit more about how useful- bit more about how useful formula e is, in terms of testing and promoting ev technology7 testing and promoting ev technology? we testing and promoting ev technology?— testing and promoting ev technolo: ? ~ ., , . ., technology? we are very much an r&d lab technology? we are very much an md lab for _ technology? we are very much an r&d lab for the _ technology? we are very much an r&d lab for the future _ technology? we are very much an r&d lab for the future of - r&d lab for the future of electric. clearly there are big government mandates that are driving the shift to electric but as important as the consumer demand. 0nce but as important as the consumer demand. once people try electric cars, people realise they are very fun to drive, high—performance and exhilarating. the manufacturers all the teams come in because they want to test their know—how in software, in battery technology, inverters, or the control software that manages the energy, and the use that in very high performance racing environments, so they are testing themselves against their peers, and that translates into the car industry. jaguar with their i-pace to industry. jaguar with their i—pace to what they learned in
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formula e, didn't over the soft where update that included —— increase the range by 20 kilometres. cars are supercomputers and what we're seeing the learning on track translate directly into the road car programmes of the most progressive manufacturers forced to progressive manufacturers forced tr . progressive manufacturers forcedt. ., . .,., , forced to what new technologies due think we'll _ forced to what new technologies due think we'll see _ forced to what new technologies due think we'll see next - due think we'll see next season?— due think we'll see next season? ~ ., ., season? we have a new car cominu season? we have a new car coming next _ season? we have a new car coming next year. - season? we have a new car coming next year. in - coming next year. in horsepower, nearly 150 horsepower, nearly 150 horsepower, it will be about £100 lighter because the battery is getting smaller and denser. it means and summer terms the car will go a lot quicker, the top speed will be over 200 cape —— 200 miles an hour, so you are closing the gap to where the top f1 car is. really progressive developments, and as we said before with maserati and mclaren joining, before with maserati and mclarenjoining, it gets before with maserati and mclaren joining, it gets even more entertaining.— mclaren joining, it gets even more entertaining. thank you very much — more entertaining. thank you very much for— more entertaining. thank you very much forjoining - more entertaining. thank you very much forjoining us - more entertaining. thank you very much forjoining us from | very much forjoining us from the soul. apologies for the slight dropout in sound. let's see how the asian markets are faring today... mostly fell friday, winding back some of the previous day's
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rally, as traders come to terms with the likelihood that central banks will continue to raise interest rates to battle runaway inflation. i will be back shortly. thanks for watching. hello. we've seen the heat intensify day by day so far this week, and for many of you, the heat is set to peak, either through friday or indeed saturday. most places on both days sitting under sunny skies yet again. the main risk areas, of course, of the highest of the temperatures, the greatest impacts for health and transport, covered by the met office amber extreme heat warning, still in place, all the way through to sunday across a good part of england and east wales, where we start with the highest temperatures on friday morning. a little bit fresher through the countryside, particularly northern england, scotland and northern ireland. and, here, a very pleasant start, a few mist and fog patches dotted around. for most of you, they will clear, and for the vast majority, again, it's going to be another day of blue skies from dawn till dusk. a few exceptions, though. eastern coasts of england, from lincolnshire northwards,
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we could see some mist and sea fog patches just drift ashore — not many of them. certainly more for eastern coasts of scotland, and in the far north of scotland, our weather front�*s still there. not producing as much rain or drizzle, and the better chance of some brightness, so maybe a little bit warmer, compared with thursday. but elsewhere, away from these eastern coasts, where the mist and fog rolls its way in every now and again, it's going to be an even warmer day — temperatures 36 celsius, potentially, through parts of the midlands. and then into the evening, a warm evening in store. most will be under clear skies again, but mist and low cloud becomes more of an issue, eastern scotland and through the central belt, towards the glasgow area. it means temperatures won't drop as much here, compared with what we see into friday morning. and a warm night elsewhere, particularly so, west wales and parts of west cumbria, to the west of high ground. we'll see really temperatures hold up. could see temperatures above 20 degrees for some. and that sets us off to a very warm start to saturday, lots of sunshine again, but again, there's that risk of some mist and low cloud close to eastern coasts. bit more sunshine developing across the north of scotland. temperatures across england and wales peaking at around 35—37 degrees.
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probably the highest temperature in and around the london area by this stage. but there are signs of a change. through into sunday, an area of low pressure pushes out of france, which will then sit in place for the start of next week. splodges of blue, yes, they are indeed, the chance of rain, potentially some quite nasty thunderstorms as well. and with the ground dry, that could lead to some flooding in one or two spots. but, being thunderstorms, they're going to be very much scattered around, hit—and—miss. most places still dry and sunny until late in the day, still pretty hot. temperatures drop as we go into next week, only slowly. the nights stay warm, but there is that potential here and there of some missing out of some storms.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today. a drought is expected to be declared in many parts of england, meaning stricter controls over the use of water. yorkshire water is the latest firm to announce its introducing a hosepipe ban, while restrictions come into effect today across kent and sussex. good morning. iam in west good morning. i am in west sussex this morning, one of those areas waking up to the hosepipe ban. it is looking as dry and barren here is across the country, and with more hot and dry weather in the forecast,
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i will bring you all the weather

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