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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  August 25, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello and welcome to your thursday one show, live on bbc one and iplayer, with michelle ackerley. and ronan keating. hello, i'm lewis vaughanjones, this is outside source. ukraine's occupied nuclear power plant is temporarily disconnected from the grid. hello, i'm lewis vaughanjones, this is outside source. ukraine's occupied nuclear power plant is temporarily disconnected from the grid. russia and ukraine blame each other for attacks around europe's biggest nuclear facility, stoking fears that an accident is becoming increasingly likely. we'll speak to a nuclear expert about what could happen if the safety systems fail. also on the programme... in myanmar, britain's former
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ambassador is arrested on the same day the uk announces new sanctions against the military regime. more calls for the government to step in as the cap on energy prices is set to triple, compared to a year ago. and we'll hear from a french politican who says britain is threatening france's coastal waters, by dumping raw sewage into the sea. we start in ukraine, where there are growing fears of a nuclear accident at the zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant — which is held by russian forces. in the past few hours the nuclear plant has been temporarily disconnected from ukraine's electricity grid for the first time ever, because of a fire. the zaporizhzhia plant is the biggest in europe. it sits on the south bank of the dnieper river in the country's east, on the front line of the war. russian forces took the site just after the invasion of ukraine began. since then, it's been under moscow's control — but run by a team of ukrainian staff. there are reports up to 9,000 ukrainians workers are still based there.
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both russia and ukraine both claim attacks around the facility are putting safety in danger, with shelling near the site. today the issue reached the white house. we have said russia should agree to demilitarise the zone around the plant, and agree to allow an international atomic energy agency visit as soon as possible to check on the safety and security of the systems. in the past few days the un's nuclear watchdog — the iaea — has expressed its concern about the site staying connected to power for "nuclear safety" reasons. experts worry some of the site's safety mechanisms could fail if the complex loses all power. today fire damaged overhead power lines meaning the remaining two operating reactors shut down. the iaea is demanding safe
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passage to the site. here's the director general, rafael grossi. now there is general recognition that we need to be there, we need to be there soon. kyiv accepts it, moscow accepts it. we need to go. we are going to be there and hopefully very soon. is "very soon" days or weeks? days. there have been multiple warnings that an accident at the plant could be a catastrophe. people of course remember chernobyl, the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster in 1986. at zaporizhzhia there are six nuclear reactors, which experts tell us are quite well protected. only two of them currently provide power to ukraine. the concern, we're told, is nuclear material that's stored on site. if the cooling system is damaged, there is a risk that we see a millstone of some of this material,
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and it is released into the atmosphere. it is unlikely to be a chernobyl style situation, but certainly for the local population and more widely, this is extremely worrying. so just to repeat — not as bad as chernobyl. that sentiment is shared by the european nuclear society. the moderate or low potential for impact on human health would be limited to a radius of approximately 20—30 km. other experts warn the worst case scenario could look something more like the 2011 fukushima disaster. we had a nuclear meltdown, the radioactive fuel there are literally melted down, and got into the soil,
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the water supply, and caused an ecological disaster. so that's the nuclear risk, but there's something else in this equation. ukraine has long claimed that moscow might be trying to connect the zaporizhzhia plant to its own electricity grid. that's not an easy or safe task — here's neil melvin again. redirecting electricity is not necessarily very complicated, but bringing online the large nuclear reactors is a complicated and dangerous operation, particularly when it is in a war zone. these reactors are not designed to operate in the middle of a war. for more on this, let's talk now to seth grae, he's the ceo of fuel technology company lightbridge, and a member of the nuclear security working group. thank you for coming on the programme. in the simplest terms possible, what is your understanding of what has happened at this plant today? of what has happened at this plant toda ? ., , of what has happened at this plant toda ? . , ., w ., , today? there are six large reactors at the site- — today? there are six large reactors at the site. four _ today? there are six large reactors at the site. four have _ today? there are six large reactors at the site. four have been - today? there are six large reactors
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at the site. four have been shut i at the site. four have been shut down for some time, and two of the units, they have been operating at half power. the fire alongside a transmission line today, the ukrainian operators at the plans decided to shut down units five and six, which they did. there have been difficult but successful efforts to aim to repair the fire —— repair the power line, and is the power is plans to bring units five and six up to have power. plans to bring units five and six up to have power-— to have power. what is your assessment _ to have power. what is your assessment of _ to have power. what is your assessment of the - to have power. what is your assessment of the risk - to have power. what is your assessment of the risk of i to have power. what is your| assessment of the risk of an accident from the conflict nearby? i think the risk of an accident that would harm human beings is very low, extremely low. this series of plants
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at the site were built to stand severe outside incidents, potentially including aeroplane clashes, as well as inside incidents in the core of the reactor. the structures are very hard and, as we said, four of the units are already shut down, and the other two are either temporarily shut down or will go back to half hour. —— have power. they will not be surprised like fukushima, they are actively taking precautions to shut down the plant as needed. they also have some of the most modern and robust and redundant safety systems, which have been added to quite extensively since fukushima. diesel generators, back—up diesel generators, batteries
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to back those up, more batteries to back those up, water that can be used to be put back into the core of the reactor, or the fuel pools, and of course very new operating methods and oversights and vigilance airing more on the side of safety. i and oversights and vigilance airing more on the side of safety.- more on the side of safety. i want to turn to — more on the side of safety. i want to turn to this _ more on the side of safety. i want to turn to this other _ more on the side of safety. i want to turn to this other theory - more on the side of safety. i want to turn to this other theory that i to turn to this other theory that the russians controlling it once too, in some way, divert power connected to its own grid. what do you make of that? it is connected to its own grid. what do you make of that?— you make of that? it is a multi-billion _ you make of that? it is a multi-billion dollar - you make of that? it is a. multi-billion dollar asset. you make of that? it is a i multi-billion dollar asset. i you make of that? it is a - multi-billion dollar asset. i can multi—billion dollar asset. i can understand russia wanting the power it produces, that power is very much neededin it produces, that power is very much needed in ukraine. i don't think it is realistic any time in the near term to divert power to russia itself. it would take building new
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transmission lines that do not connect there now, it would take re—synchronising the electricity to match the russian grid. in this type of thing were to happen, i think it is more likely to see power diverted into eastern parts of ukraine that russia has under its control, or that it deems to be separate republics that are not in ukraine, and would try to steal the power for those areas. here in the uk, the new upper limit of what suppliers can charge customers for their energy in england, scotland and wales — called the energy price cap — is announced tomorrow. campaigners say hundreds of thousands of families could find themselves in fuel poverty for the first time this winter because of high bills.
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ellie price has been to rural south derbyshire to meet a family that's already struggling. rich shaw's heating oil tank ran dry months ago. he can't afford to fill it up. we've got no heating, we've got no hot water, so we've been having to bath the kids in the sink. it's not ideal. luckily, we've had a warm summer, but come the winter, if we can't have central heating, it's just going to get cold. rich is disabled and can't work. the family have received extra financial help from the government towards the cost of living as part of their universal credit but say it's not enough. it's getting gobbled up. we can't save it up and buy a bulk order of kerosene because we're spending more on everything. it makes me feel like i'm failing. i can't explain to the kids why they're cold. i don't want to have to do that. rich is getting help from rural action derbyshire, a charity which bulk—buys heating oil so its clients can get the best possible price. this month, 500 litres
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cost them £450. an average family would use five times that in a year. hopefully we'll be able to get you a delivery of oil in september or october. occasionally, they can fill a tank forfree, and with heating oil prices more than double this time last year, they say more people are in need of their help. there is no regulator, there is no fixed price. it's hard for people to know how much they're going to be paying going forwards, and you don't pay monthly by direct debit — it's 500 litres is the minimum quantity, so you've got to find that money all in one hit. the official definition varies across england and the rest of the uk. broadly speaking, a fuel poor households is one that spends a high proportion of income on fuel, so ignoring other needs.
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the end fuel poverty coalition protect by october this year, almost a third of rural homes will be in fuel poverty. in two years, that is more than doubled. but look how much it would cost to lift a household out of fuel poverty for some latest government figures are for 2020. in urban areas, it was £193. a rural household would need £501 a year extra. but those figures are calculated before this year�* energy price hikes, so the reality is likely to be much higher. not only are they paying more for their energy in the first place because rural households tend to be more expensive to heat, but also the cost of stopping fuel poverty and introducing energy fuel measures like insulation are far greater in rural areas than they are in towns and cities. rich says he will have to rely on hand—outs to keep his family warm to keep his family warm this winter, and tucked away in the countryside, he won't be the only one. ellie price, bbc news.
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let's turn to myanmar, where the former uk ambassador vicky bowman and her husband have been arrested. they're accused of breaking visa rules and face up to five years in jail. ms bowman was the uk's envoy in myanmar for four years from 2002 to 2006. now she's the head of an organisation there that advises businesses on how to operate responsibly in myanmar. her husband is a former burmese political prisoner and now a prominent artist. he's also been detained. rights groups say these are just two of more than 15,000 arrests since myanmar�*s military seized power in a coup last year. and activists says the army has been able to do it without repercussions. the international community did not take much action. it ignored it. the military enjoyed impunity, and that is why today we are facing, the whole country, this crisis. bowman's arrest comes on the same day the uk announced new sanctions targeting myanmar. and on the fifth anniversary of the rohingya crisis. that was when the military began a crackdown in northern rakhine state.
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according to the un it "seems a textbook example of ethnic cleansing" — according to the un's human rights chief. more than 700,000 rohingya fled. most ended up here — the world's largest refugee settlement, in southern bangladesh. these were the scenes today, tens of thousands of people who want conditions to be safe enough to go home. in 2017, myanmar pushed us to bangladesh. it's been five years now and we don't want to stay here. we don't want refugee life. we are ready to go back to our country with a dignified and justified repatriation. one more demand. they must accept us as a rohingya community which they don't recognise. they must declare us as a rohingya community to the whole world before we go back.
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translation: it's been five years since we came to bangladesh. - we don't want to stay in the camps as refugees. we want to go back to myanmar. but if we go, we want security and a livelihood there. we must get that guarantee. thousands of rohingya also fled to india, here's our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan. five years on, and many have made the journey here. five years on, and many have made thejourney here. many five years on, and many have made the journey here. many say they do not feel welcome here, either. india's government describes rohingya as illegal foreigners. india's government describes rohingya as illegalforeigners. for many years they have led a basic existence in rural india. the hindu nationalist bjp government has denied any offer to move them, which
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has let families like this one feeling helpless. for his four—year—old daughter, there is unending uncertainty. this man wishes he could give her a better life. translation: ., translation: the indian government does not want — translation: the indian government does not want us. _ translation: the indian government does not want us. i _ translation: the indian government does not want us. i would _ translation: the indian government does not want us. i would rather- does not want us. i would rather they kill us than send us back. it feels like no one cares about rohingya these days. we are like old furniture and a house, kept in a corner and forgotten. for furniture and a house, kept in a corner and forgotten.— corner and forgotten. for these refugees. _ corner and forgotten. for these refugees. the _ corner and forgotten. for these refugees, the hopes _ corner and forgotten. for these refugees, the hopes of - corner and forgotten. for these l refugees, the hopes of returning corner and forgotten. for these - refugees, the hopes of returning to me and mark never fades. refugees, the hopes of returning to me and mark neverfades. but refugees, the hopes of returning to me and mark never fades. but with the military who attacked their families now in charge of the country, it is still not safe. nobody can tell these rohingya children when they are able to go home. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, delhi. as for the international response — sanctions on the military have tightened.
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to dave the uk government announced fresh actions today the uk announced "fresh action against the myanmar armed forces on 5th anniversary of the military�*s campaign of ethnic cleansing against the rohingya" and "new sanctions against military—linked companies to target the military�*s access to arms and revenue". antonia mulvey is the founder of law — legal action worldwide. she has been representing the rohingya since 2018 and has interviewed hundreds of rohingya when she was a un investigator. i would like to start with the events today, what do you make of the arrests?— events today, what do you make of the arrests? unfortunately what we are seeinu the arrests? unfortunately what we are seeing is _ the arrests? unfortunately what we are seeing is illustrative _ are seeing is illustrative of a pattern of the military. not only has the trumped up charges against the former ambassador, we have also seen with angus and sue chi, and her former advisor, these trumped up
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charges, and we have had breaches of the immigration act, which has been drafted so that foreigners can be easily detained. what happens is a closed hearing, followed by a prison sentence. this is in a broader landscape, 15,000 people have been arrested since the coup last year, and more have been detained. as you pointed out, in the broader framework, there are the most serious allegations of brutal sexual violence, destruction of property, and approximately dharmic thousands of rohingya killed. [30 and approximately dharmic thousands of rohingya killed.— of rohingya killed. do you draw an hinu of rohingya killed. do you draw anything from _ of rohingya killed. do you draw anything from the _ of rohingya killed. do you draw anything from the timing - of rohingya killed. do you draw anything from the timing of - of rohingya killed. do you drawj anything from the timing of this arrest today?—
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anything from the timing of this arrest today? there been a lot of speculation. _ arrest today? there been a lot of speculation, why _ arrest today? there been a lot of speculation, why now? _ arrest today? there been a lot of speculation, why now? as - arrest today? there been a lot of speculation, why now? as you i arrest today? there been a lot of. speculation, why now? as you say, the uk announced sanctions against military linked companies, and they announced their plans to intervene in the international court of justice case. it is worth remembering that the uk has been announcing and issuing sanctions against the myanmar military since 2017. of course, vicky bowman's husband is a known leader, and she has been heading up an organisation that has focused on business and human rights. i’m that has focused on business and human righte— human rights. i'm afraid we are runnina human rights. i'm afraid we are running out _ human rights. i'm afraid we are running out of _ human rights. i'm afraid we are running out of time _ human rights. i'm afraid we are running out of time already, . human rights. i'm afraid we are i running out of time already, there are so many issues here already, but ijust are so many issues here already, but i just want to get a sense, five years on, where are we in terms of justice for about rohingya? taste
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years on, where are we in terms of justice for about rohingya?- years on, where are we in terms of justice for about rohingya? we are a lot further than _ justice for about rohingya? we are a lot further than we _ justice for about rohingya? we are a lot further than we thought - justice for about rohingya? we are a lot further than we thought we - justice for about rohingya? we are a | lot further than we thought we would be into theirs when i was a un investigator sitting there in the camps, thinking they will never be anyjustice, right now we have a positive decision in the international court ofjustice, saying the case will proceed to the merits, we have a full investigation by the international criminal court, and we have a case that is also ongoing in argentina. so, ithink there are multiple justice proceedings for the rohingya right now and the desperate situation in bangladesh. that now and the desperate situation in itangiadesh-_ bangladesh. that was really comprehensive _ bangladesh. that was really comprehensive in _ bangladesh. that was really comprehensive in a - bangladesh. that was really comprehensive in a very - bangladesh. that was really l comprehensive in a very short bangladesh. that was really - comprehensive in a very short amount of time, we really appreciate that, thank you. in response to vicky bowman's arrest the uk's foreign office told us "we are supporting a british woman in myanmar and are in contact with the local authorities." we'll keep you updated as the story develops. next we're going to look at a claim that the uk is threatening france's coastal waters by allowing raw sewage to be dumped into the sea. three french meps —
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members of the european parliament say that's what's happening. this is what they're talking about. sewage overflow being diverted to the coast around england. in most of the uk, waste water from toilets is carried to treatment centres through the same pipes as rainwater. during heavy rain the system is designed to overflow to prevent flooding. dry ground from recent hot weather means the flood risk is currently high as it can't absorb water. and that's led to more overflow and dumping of raw sewage. this is a map of beaches in the south of england where pollution risk warnings are now in place, marked with red crosses. the french coastline is 32 kilometres away at its closest point across the english channel. in a letter to the eu's environment commissioner, the three french meps wrote:
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iuk i uk government spokesperson said this is simply not true. i'm joined by pierre karleskind, one of the 3 french meps who wrote that letter. he represents the brittany region of france and is also chair of the eu committee on fisheries. thank you very much for coming on the programme. this issue is clearly one which has been covered in the uk media. we have witnessed this raw sewage being dumped into the sea. it is an issue that is affecting beaches around the uk. why does france and the eu care? this beaches around the uk. why does france and the eu care?— france and the eu care? as you mentioned. _ france and the eu care? as you mentioned, really _ france and the eu care? as you mentioned, really precisely, . france and the eu care? as you| mentioned, really precisely, the channel is just between england and the european union. what i'm concerned about is that this is lowering the quality of the waters of the channel. it is notjust stay
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along the english coast, it spreads all over the channel. in the long term, or maybe not in the long term, it might be the short term, this will affect the quality of the water, and so there is the possibility for fishermen to do their activity, for shellfish farmers to be able to have quality products, this is for the entire environment of the channel being threatened, which is not acceptable. some say the vast majority of the water being pumped out is just rain water, so we are talking about relatively small amounts in a relatively small amounts in a relatively big channel water. are you seriously thinking that there will be serious damage done? i am really seriously _ will be serious damage done? i —n really seriously thinking that we
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have to improve the water quality, we all know that. this is really not something new. we know that 80% of the pollution indices come from the land. there is nothing magic in this, this comes from rivers, this comes from overflow of untreated sewage. just imagine if you are in a building and every morning you found garbage dropped by your neighbours, you will ask them to stop that. if the answer is, and this is the answer of the british government, we are aiming to progressively reduce the impact of this untreated sewage, you would say this is not acceptable. we have to act now to stop this. ijust want to give you the uk government's response to this. water minister steve double said: "our world—leading environment act has made our laws on water quality even stronger
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than when we were in the eu." precisely because of the decision of mrjohnson, boris's government, there is really something special, which i havejust explained there is really something special, which i have just explained with the nature of the innovator and the garbage, there's an element of the duke of wellington proposing to forbid to prohibit the release of untreated sewage, and theyjust refuse to vote this, and they allowed this requirement. this is reflected of the commitments of the united kingdom during brexit. i’m united kingdom during brexit. i'm afraid we have to leave it there, thank you so much for coming on top of us. —— are you so much for coming
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on to talk with us. hello there. the torrential downpours and thunderstorms that drenched some parts of southern and eastern england have been clearing away — the back edge of that turbulent weather there from a weather watcher in essex. this is how the rain developed and swept its way northwards. around 5000 lightning strikes moved through during the first part of the day. plenty more rain behind that as well, only slowly clearing away eastwards, and in some places — let's take bury st edmunds as an example — we've had more than a month's worth of rain, 73 millimetres up to 3:00 this afternoon. that's more than bury st edmunds would normally see in the whole of the month of august. but what that wet weather has done is it's swept away the humidity. so, tonight will be much cooler, much fresher. one or two fog patches developing
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through parts of the midlands, east anglia, the southeast. some clear spells, a cool, fresh night, but cloud bringing some showers for northern ireland and parts of southwest scotland, northwest england, wales and the southwest. and this zone of cloudy and showery weather will slowly move a little further eastwards as we go through the day tomorrow. some sunshine down to the southeast, but generally more in the way of cloud by the afternoon, northern scotland likely to stay quite sunny. top temperatures between 17—24 degrees with a much cooler, fresher feel than we've been used to of late. and then, as we head into the weekend — it's a bank holiday for most of us, of course — and the weather is looking predominantly dry with sunny spells. there willjust be one or two showers. so, this is saturday's weather outlook with largely dry conditions, just one or two showers there in a few places on the map, this area of cloudy and wet weather getting perilously close to northern ireland and western scotland, but probably not making much of an impact. now, as we move out of saturday into sunday, we'll have
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high pressure to the north of the uk, and this weather setup will start to bring us a fairly keen northeasterly breeze blowing onto some of these north sea coasts. that could well generate one or two showers. it'll bring more cloud and it will also bring a decidedly cool feel to the weather. so, temperatures from aberdeen to newcastle and hull stuck in the teens. further west, that's where we'll have some warmth — 2a the high in cardiff. looking ahead to monday, mainly dry, some spells of sunshine, temperatures in the high teens or low 20 celsius.
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hello, i'm lewis vaughanjones. this is outside source. ukraine's occupied nuclear power plant is temporarily disconnected from the grid. russia and ukraine blame each other for attacks around europe's biggest nuclear facility, stoking fears that an accident is becoming increasingly likely. the french president is in algeria to try and reset their strained relationship, which links back to france's 132 years of colonial rule. imran khan appears in court on terrorism charges. the former pakistani prime minister could be banned from politics and face years in jail. and in south—west china,
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a heatwave is forcing people underground to escape temperatures above a0 degrees celsius. let's turn to algeria. the french president is there on a three—day visit, hoping to reset the strained relationship between the two countries. this is the moment mr macron arrived, along with a large delegation. there's plenty on the agenda, including energy and security links, as well as france facing its colonial past. this is the french president speaking a short time ago. let's get a flavour of how some algerians are feeling about his visit. translation: concerning - the relationship between france and algeria, i think there'll be progress in the next few years, but the course will be slow. i think we have to start by solving the key issue between both states for real progress towards economic, cultural and linguistic change. these two countries are very similar in many aspects. we have many things in common. translation: the important thing l to remember is that this is about | france's personal interests.
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we will not gain anything, and i really hope that when they welcome him, they will not embarrass us with slogans about illegal immigration to europe, as has already been done in previous years. coming to visit algeria, that's fine, but don't praise him for it. algeria is a former french colony. it was occupied for over 130 years — that was until a war in 195a. it lasted seven years and led to algeria's independence. last year, president macron came under fire when he accused the "politico—military system" in power in algiers of "cashing in on memories" of the war to justify its existence. algeria then accused france of committing genocide during the war, and then it recalled its ambassador from paris. so, with more on how likely it is that relations will improve, here's one academic from algiers university.
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he is coming to apologise for his mishaps— he is coming to apologise for his mishaps and _ he is coming to apologise for his mishaps and erroneous - he is coming to apologise for hisl mishaps and erroneous mistakes. he is coming to apologise for his - mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, _ mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, if— mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, if he — mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, if he came _ mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, if he came to _ mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, if he came to catch - mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, if he came to catch up - mishaps and erroneous mistakes. of course, if he came to catch up with i course, if he came to catch up with what he _ course, if he came to catch up with what he lost — course, if he came to catch up with what he lost because _ course, if he came to catch up with what he lost because now, - course, if he came to catch up with what he lost because now, algerial what he lost because now, algeria has a _ what he lost because now, algeria has a very— what he lost because now, algeria has a very speedy— what he lost because now, algeria has a very speedy relation - what he lost because now, algeria has a very speedy relation with - has a very speedy relation with itaiy~ _ has a very speedy relation with itaiy~ i— has a very speedy relation with italy. ithink— has a very speedy relation with italy. i think he _ has a very speedy relation with italy. i think he realised - has a very speedy relation with italy. i think he realised that. has a very speedy relation with| italy. i think he realised that he he will— italy. i think he realised that he he will do — italy. i think he realised that he he will do everything _ italy. i think he realised that he he will do everything his... - italy. i think he realised that he he will do everything his... i. italy. i think he realised that he i he will do everything his... i don't think_ he will do everything his... i don't think he _ he will do everything his... idon't think he will— he will do everything his... i don't think he will -- — he will do everything his... i don't think he will -- it _ he will do everything his... idon't think he will —— it will— he will do everything his... i don't think he will —— it will be - he will do everything his... i don't think he will —— it will be easy. - this isn't the french president's first visit to algeria. here he is in 2017 — this was shortly after he came to power. he's ruled out issuing an apology for colonialism, which is a highly sensitive issue in france, but potentially important to many in algeria. it's been called off and seduction.
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—— operation seduction. i grew up in the south of france, where there is a very large algeria diaspora, and many of them still hold a grudge against the old coloniser. a manual macron has his work cut out. these young generations have not lived through the war and they are slowly turning away from france. so, france really has to work very quickly here. there's another element to this, too. as europe grapples with the shortage of energy caused by the war in ukraine, there's been renewed interest in algeria's oil and gas reserves. at the moment, algeria is the eu's third—largest gas supplier. to put it another way, it represents 8.2% of the eu's gas imports in 2021. and here's our correspondent in paris, hugh schofield, with more on what's at stake for president macron.
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the vast stocks of oil and gas could well play a vital role in helping europe through energy shortages caused by the break with russia. he also knows any new security policy following france's humiliating decision to withdraw its forces, fighting g hottie forces in mali, will have to be coordinated with algerians —— jihadi. let's speak to algiers—based journalist yasmine marouf—araibi. what do you make of this visit? well, macron entered today, and he was welcomed by his algerian counterparts. he came with a delegation of over 90 people and went to the memorial, where he laid
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down flowers and stood there in honour of the... is having a private... honour of the. .. is having a private- - -— honour of the. .. is having a rivate... i. ~ , private... do you think this will be enou:h to private... do you think this will be enough to improve _ private... do you think this will be enough to improve relations? - private... do you think this will be enough to improve relations? if i private... do you think this will be l enough to improve relations? if the coal of enough to improve relations? if the goal of this — enough to improve relations? if the goal of this visit. _ let's remind do that in last october, he questioned the existence of an algerian nation, and he also accused the algerian systems of hatred.
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do you think an apology for france's past the behaviour is important whether happens not?- past the behaviour is important whether happens not? they're very im ortant whether happens not? they're very important because _ whether happens not? they're very important because a _ whether happens not? they're very important because a lot _ whether happens not? they're very important because a lot of - whether happens not? they're veryl important because a lot of algerians are expecting an apology from macron, but the fact that he already overruled an apology for what france has done for over a century, gives us a hint that you will not be apologising for what he said. his words have not been denied by him or his staff and no apology has been made since. his staff and no apology has been made since-— made since. let's move to this issue of energy- — made since. let's move to this issue of energy- there _ made since. let's move to this issue of energy. there doesn't _ made since. let's move to this issue of energy. there doesn't seem - made since. let's move to this issue of energy. there doesn't seem to i made since. let's move to this issue of energy. there doesn't seem to be a great deal of hope, ambition, that the french will get a great deal out of this when it comes to energy. $5
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of this when it comes to energy. as i of this when it comes to energy. is i said, he of this when it comes to energy. sis i said, he will be having at least two private meetings, so there could be a lot of subject they will be talking about. it's not the main goal of this visit. yes, maybe france will ask algeria to increase its production, its gas production, since it won't be the first european country to turn since the beginning of the war between russia and ukraine. but for now, they are saying no contract will be signed, but it's not the main goal of the visit. ., ., s but it's not the main goal of the visit. . ., ~ , ., , but it's not the main goal of the visit. ., ., s , ., , . ., visit. yaz thank you very much for talkin: to there are warnings europe could be facing five to ten difficult winters, with soaring energy costs and harsh economic conditions. governments on the continent are under pressure to support people with billions being spent to help the most vulnerable.
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our europe correspondent, jessica parker, reports from belgium. veronique often wears a smile, though her money, she says, doesn't go far. she gets a discount on energy bills through a social tariff, along with a million belgian households. but still, she's taking fewer showers and won't heat her flat above 16 degrees this winter. higher energy costs will have consequences. translation: if they're increasing, l then i'll have even less to live on. | i don't know what i'll do then. eventually i'll have to go for food parcels to help me eat. and that's happening to more and more people i know. europe is awash with warnings about hard times ahead, and information campaigns on how to cut energy use. it's hitting the news
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as governments use tax breaks, price caps and lump sum payments to help people with rising prices. how long can this go on for in terms of providing this level of government support? this cannot go on forever. so that means that we have to look for structural measures. we need a price cap at european level. because renewable energy is the most affordable form of energy and will bring energy bills down. but moving to a green economy is a long haul. i'm on the north coast of belgium. to the west is france, across the water is the uk. and while countries are taking national measures, this squeeze on supply that's pushing up energy prices is spilling across borders. and governments looking at ways to help face the same question everywhere. will it be enough? i've been working on energy poverty now for the last ten years, and it's never been this bad.
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it's not only people in poverty that are worrying. it's a big middle class of people who are also worrying about their energy bill. the war in ukraine feels far away from here as families enjoy the last days of summer. but supply cuts from russia are feeding a crisis that could seriously test political and public resolve. jessica parker, bbc news, belgium. pakistan's former prime minister, imran khan, has appeared in court on terrorism charges that could threaten his future political career. here he is arriving at the hearing in the capital, islamabad, surrounded by security guards, as well as large crowds of supporters. a short time later, he was granted interim bail. our pakistan correspondent, pumza finhlani, sent this update from outside the court. mr imran khan may not be a stranger to controversy, but these current charges are the most serious yet.
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he's facing terrorism charges, and if they stand and he is found guilty, they pose a serious threat to his political career. when he arrived in court today, he arrived in an armoured car under heavy security. a few hundred metres from the courthouse, hundreds of supporters had been standing in the rain, chanting, "imran khan is our man," chanting, "long live imran khan." very clear evidence that this man still enjoys the support of the public. and there's reason for that. when he addresses people here in pakistan, he says that all the charges around him, all the controversy around him is rooted in a political conspiracy. he has repeatedly said that the government are behind it and they are trying to hamper his chances of coming back into politics. he has been using the months since being removed as prime minister as a political tool on the campaign trail to try and garner support. the next move now is this needs to be resolved by the courts. the terrorism charges are not
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again for the public. they will need to be resolved by the court. and on the 1st of september is the next move where he will once again be expected to present himself for the terrorism case. to the us now, and the fallout from the school shooting in uvalde thejudge approved the judge approved the search warrant is still determining whether to make the document public. he said on monday he believed it should not remain completely sealed, given public interest. anthony's gave the latest. it public interest. anthony's gave the latest. ., s public interest. anthony's gave the latest. ., ~ ,., ., latest. it will take some time for the 'ud . e latest. it will take some time for the judge to _ latest. it will take some time for the judge to review— latest. it will take some time for the judge to review the - latest. it will take some time for the judge to review the request | latest. it will take some time for. the judge to review the request for read actions, but there's a considerable interest because it can
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shed light on the reason for the raid. the redactions could be because they relied perhaps on insider information from someone close to trump or other means of gathering information that they use to find out they were more classified documents in mar—a—lago. this could be a big development. we could learn a lot from this affidavit, or there could be pretty thorough redactions that don't shed too much new light. i think we're looking for the reasoning behind this search. this is unprecedented. a former president has never had government agents come into his home and search through documents that former president had. we are looking into why thejustin hospital into why the justin hospital apartment looked into this. we've heard reports and leaks talking
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about top—secret information. there was a new york times report that said some of it was about the french president, some of it was about nuclear secrets, so this may not all come out, but at leastjournalist may be one in the right direction about what was behind the justice department's reasoning.- about what was behind the justice department's reasoning. thanks to anthony for — department's reasoning. thanks to anthony for that. _ department's reasoning. thanks to anthony for that. stay _ department's reasoning. thanks to anthony for that. stay with - department's reasoning. thanks to anthony for that. stay with us. - the blue butterfly has its best summer in britain for 150 years. it's been an anxious day for hundreds of thousands of teenagers across the uk, with gcse results for the first exams sat in person since the pandemic. education editor branwenjeffreys reports. i'm more excited than i am nervous. like, the pressure still hasn't hit me yet. i couldn't sleep at all. it was a nightmare. oh, no, yeah, i was really nervous. so, friends came together to get their results. i passed!
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yeah! overall, there are fewer passes because of the return of exams, so across england, more will resit english or maths at college. the fact that i've come out with a three is really good to me, because i know that if i do resit, then i can try again harder and i can get that pass. grace didn't know she'd get the grades she wanted. all that's stacked against you, you've worked. i'm so proud of you. it's been an emotional day for teachers, too. they've kept this year group going through covid. results were as they expected, but today has been a reminder of a north—south divide in top grades. a lot of our children are very disadvantaged and have been disadvantaged throughout their entire school career. and when you look at that and you add to that the fact we've had a pandemic, there is a lot of work that is needed to support those young people. and, you know, that's absolutely right that we do that, but it's very easy and it's very
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convenient sometimes just to look at those headline figures. the pandemic has led to more disruption, more lost learning in the north, on top of a gap that already existed. to understand the difference in results, you've really i did not expect to get what i did get, considering the year we've all had. ..or in wales, most 16—year—olds were firmly focused on their next steps. what we've got to do is, fill out the application form, just answer a few really easy questions... at newcastle college, grace was using her gcses to sign up for a btec, with others getting advice on their options. it's such a big step into theirfuture, with hopes they can leave the shadow of covid behind. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story: warnings over the potential for a nuclear accident as ukraine's occupied power plant is temporarily disconnected from the grid.
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in china, a heatwave is still hitting the south—west. people are heading underground to escape the heat. temperatures are consistently above a0 degrees celsius. it's leading to china's worst drought on record. water levels are so low that cities which rely on hydro—power are cutting electricity. this is in chongqing in china's south—west. you can see the riverbed. there are ongoing power cuts. subway train carriages are turning down the lights. people are heading to restaurants in old bomb shelters because they're cooler. this one is 16 degrees, whereas its 43 degrees above ground. in sichuan, there are air conditioning restrictions so offices are using huge ice—blocks to cool down. this picture has been widely shared on chinese social media app weibo. it's a before and after picture of the yangtze river. you can see how much water levels have dropped.
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kerry allen is the bbc�*s china media analyst and used to live in chongqing, where some of those pictures were taken. lots of people showing up online, showing up how their trying to stay cool showing up how their trying to stay cool. ., , ., ., ., cool. people do that thing of when it's really hot _ cool. people do that thing of when it's really hot or _ cool. people do that thing of when it's really hot or really _ cool. people do that thing of when it's really hot or really cold, - cool. people do that thing of when it's really hot or really cold, you i it's really hot or really cold, you take a picture of the temperature on your phone, and people have been showing in chongqing in the daytime, it can be 45 celsius, and at night, in the mid 30s. 32 degrees as you're trying to sleep. it is really uncomfortable.— trying to sleep. it is really uncomfortable. ., , ., ., , uncomfortable. people are literally headina uncomfortable. people are literally heading underground _ uncomfortable. people are literally heading underground to _ uncomfortable. people are literally heading underground to try - uncomfortable. people are literally heading underground to try and - uncomfortable. people are literally| heading underground to try and get as far away from the sun as possible. as far away from the sun as possible-— as far away from the sun as ossible. , . �* , , ., ., possible. yes, that's quite standard in china. when _ possible. yes, that's quite standard in china. when it _ possible. yes, that's quite standard in china. when it gets _ possible. yes, that's quite standard in china. when it gets particularly l in china. when it gets particularly hot, air raid shelters are open and people are able to go underground. we've also seen a lot of people
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heading to malls. there's been footage that's gone viral of elderly people taking chairs, chess sets, tables, setting up inside a mall to stay cool. also in sichuan province, known for spicy food and pandas, people have been taken to caves. hagar people have been taken to caves. how the new is this — people have been taken to caves. how the new is this and how use to our people this —— how use to our people to this? i people this -- how use to our people to this? ., to this? i lived in chongqing ten ears auo to this? i lived in chongqing ten years ago and — to this? i lived in chongqing ten years ago and l— to this? i lived in chongqing ten years ago and i remember- to this? i lived in chongqing ten years ago and i remember the l years ago and i remember the temperatures. but at the same time, this has been a very unusual year. there have been records set all over the country for high temperatures, and this might actually be the coolest year in the decades to come. people are getting quite scared. this year in particular in
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chongqing, there has been a level one warning for heatstroke, being more ever that these are really dangerous temperatures that could affect your help. dangerous temperatures that could affect your help-— affect your help. that's really worrying- _ affect your help. that's really worrying. what _ affect your help. that's really worrying. what people - affect your help. that's really worrying. what people will i affect your help. that's really| worrying. what people will be affect your help. that's really - worrying. what people will be hoping for is a bit of rain and cooler temperatures.— for is a bit of rain and cooler temperatures. for is a bit of rain and cooler temeratures. , . , , ., temperatures. yes, and they should be cominu temperatures. yes, and they should be coming on _ temperatures. yes, and they should be coming on monday, _ temperatures. yes, and they should be coming on monday, that's - temperatures. yes, and they should be coming on monday, that's the i be coming on monday, that's the latest prediction. people are thinking that's when it's going to get cool. thinking that's when it's going to net cool. , . ., get cool. fingers crossed, thanks very much- _ it became extinct in britain more than 40 years ago — but thanks to conservation work, the �*large blue' butterfly has now had a bumper summer. thousands have been recorded this year with the restoration of wild meadows, and southwest england now has the world's greatest concentration. helen briggs has the story. the vibrant flash of the large blue butterfly, declared extinct in the uk 1979, it had to be rescued by bringing caterpillars in from sweden. and now decades of conservation
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work's paying off, with more large blue recorded this summer than at any time in 150 years. for one scientist, it's a dream come true. it's been a great thrill to see the butterfly back in such large numbers again. i, alas, was present when the large blue went extinct in this country many years ago and, at the time, i never thought i'd see it back. but now, to look at it and watch perhaps some four, five, six or more all on one patch of flowers is just terrific. the butterfly�*s tricky to protect because it is fussy about where because it's fussy about where it lives and depends on ants. the young caterpillars trick the ants into taking them into their nests to spend the winter underground. restoring the flower—rich meadows that the butterfly likes to lay its eggs has been key to turning its fortunes around. i'm just trying to get the large
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blue back on these sites. we're actually recreating a missing type of habitat that for various reasons of land use change had more or less disappeared from at least the northern half of europe. you can now see the large blue across much of southern england, alongside other rare insects. the butterfly remains endangered, with climate change and extreme weather the greatest challenges ahead. but the resurgence is, for today at least, providing a bright spot for conservationists. helen briggs, bbc news. one more update to bring you — novak djokovic says he won't play in the us open because he hasn't had a vaccine. that means he would be refused entry to the country. he has won 21 grand slam tournaments, including three us opens. he made the announcement on twitter and said good luck to my fellow players.
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earlier this year, he was deported from australia after his visa was cancelled on health and good order grounds. more now from tennis journalist george bell shah. it’s journalist george bell shah. it's not a great _ journalist george bell shah. it�*s not a great surprise. he's been desperately hoping there would be a change in the covid regulations. that's not happened yet. it may well happen later. but, look, as was the case in australia, this is a problem of his own making. he's chosen not to have the vaccine. it seems quite ludicrous to ask from the outside, inking this guy is one of the greatest ever out leaks, he has a chance to end his career —— athletes. he's choosing not to play
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because of the vaccine, so it's a crazy time we live in and another astonishing moment in ten minutes for novak djokovic �*s. == astonishing moment in ten minutes for novak djokovic 's._ for novak d'okovic 's. -- in tennis. our to for novak djokovic 's. -- in tennis. our top story _ for novak djokovic 's. -- in tennis. our top story - _ for novak djokovic 's. -- in tennis. our top story - there _ for novak djokovic 's. -- in tennis. our top story - there are _ for novak djokovic 's. -- in tennis. our top story - there are growing i our top story — there are growing fears and ukraine of an accident at the zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, which is held by russian forces. in the past two hours, the plant has been temporarily disconnected from ukraine's electricity grid for the first time ever because of a fire. the fire damaged overhead power lines, meaning the remaining two operating reactors shut down. of course, in the past few days, the un's nuclear watchdog, the iaea, expressed his concern about the site, saying they are staying connected to power for nuclear safety reasons. experts worry some of the site's mechanisms could fail if it loses all power.
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that's it from me. get me online at l vonjones. i'm lewis vaughanjones with bbc news. hello there. the torrential downpours and thunderstorms that drenched some parts of southern and eastern england have been clearing away — the back edge of that turbulent weather there from a weather watcher in essex. this is how the rain developed and swept its way northwards. around 5000 lightning strikes moved through during the first part of the day. plenty more rain behind that as well, only slowly clearing away eastwards, and in some places — let's take bury st edmunds as an example — we've had more than a month's worth of rain, 73 millimetres up to 3:00 this afternoon. that's more than bury st edmunds would normally see in the whole of the month of august. but what that wet weather has done is it's swept away the humidity. so, tonight will be much cooler, much fresher.
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one or two fog patches developing through parts of the midlands, east anglia, the southeast. some clear spells, a cool, fresh night, but cloud bringing some showers for northern ireland and parts of southwest scotland, northwest england, wales and the southwest. and this zone of cloudy and showery weather will slowly move a little further eastwards as we go through the day tomorrow. some sunshine down to the southeast, but generally more in the way of cloud by the afternoon, northern scotland likely to stay quite sunny. top temperatures between 17—24 degrees with a much cooler, fresher feel than we've been used to of late. and then, as we head into the weekend — it's a bank holiday for most of us, of course — and the weather is looking predominantly dry with sunny spells. there willjust be one or two showers. so, this is saturday's weather outlook with largely dry conditions, just one or two showers there in a few places on the map, this area of cloudy and wet weather getting perilously close to northern ireland and western scotland, but probably not making much of an impact. now, as we move out of saturday
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into sunday, we'll have high pressure to the north of the uk, and this weather setup will start to bring us a fairly keen northeasterly breeze blowing onto some of these north sea coasts. that could well generate one or two showers. it'll bring more cloud and it will also bring a decidedly cool feel to the weather. so, temperatures from aberdeen to newcastle and hull stuck in the teens. further west, that's where we'll have some warmth — 24 the high in cardiff. looking ahead to monday, mainly dry, some spells of sunshine, temperatures in the high teens or low 20 celsius.
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this is bbc news — i'm frankie mccamley. the headines at 8pm... a think—thank campaigning on behalf of low and middle income families warns "a catastrophe' is coming this winter" — unless the government steps in to help with energy costs. i don't know what we're going to do. i'm just hoping that maybe somebody will offer us a lifeline, maybe the government will help, who knows? the shooting of 9—year—old olivia pratt—korbel — merseyside police say the suspected gunman is still on the run despite appeals to hand himself in. we will not rest until we find you. and we will find you. conservative leadership candidate rishi sunak says the government gave too much power to scientists during covid lockdowns.
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but experts who advised downing street say ministers

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