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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 27, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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clout england and wales with more clout and little rain across northern ireland and scotland, a great and murky start here, some splashes of rain, increasingly confined to northern scotland by the afternoon, southern scotland should brighten up. in england and wales, a day at sunny spells and a few isolated showers, top temperatures in the south, 23 or 2a degrees, cooler further north and i7 south, 23 or 2a degrees, cooler further north and 17 for aberdeen. rain could develop in northern ireland in the afternoon and is set to expand into isle of man, south—west scotland and at the same time cloud will topple into north—eastern parts and as the breeze strengthens, temperatures will hold up in double digits for many. monday will be breezy, cool and cloudy on the east coast, further west we will see sunshine and warm.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political commentatorjo phillips, and the political editor of the sunday people and the sunday mirror, nigel nelson. good evening to you both. thank you for being with us. let's have a quick look at some of the papers. the sunday telegraph leads with plans of liz truss — who is said to be thinking about what's decribed as a �*nuclear�* option of a 5% cut in vat. in the express — borisjohnson says a huge package of measures is on the way to protect people from the cost of living crisis. the observer leads on trade union plans to join forces for a wave of strikes in the autumn. the devastating floods in pakistan is on the front of the independent. the mirror leads on allegations of bullying on the x—factor. and finally — the sunday times leads on polling on the nhs — which says the majority now expect delays in treatment. let us begin and jo phillips, let me
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start with you. the sunday telegraph liz truss are mulling the vat cut of 5%. it liz truss are mulling the vat cut of 5%. , h, , liz truss are mulling the vat cut of 5%. , u, , , liz truss are mulling the vat cut of 5%. , ,., , , ., liz truss are mulling the vat cut of 5%. it is said she is having talks with her advisers. _ 5%. it is said she is having talks with her advisers. this - 5%. it is said she is having talks with her advisers. this is - 5%. it is said she is having talks with her advisers. this is what l with her advisers. this is what gordon brown did after the financial crash in 2008, when vat was cut from 20% to 17.5% for a year. the reason they are calling it as a nuclear option is because it would cost the government a fortune. 3.2 billion a month according to the institute for fiscal studies or £38 billion a year. but it would give instant relief, saving the average household over £1000 a year and officially it would have a huge impact on businesses. it is one of the things that apparently liz truss is looking at, of course she is not guaranteed to be a number ten but that is what
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all the indications are. it is certain that she is going to, or whoever gets there, they are going to have to do something to deal with the cost of living but there will be criticism i would imagine that something like this will benefit everybody instead of it being targeted, but the crisis in the cost of living is so enormous that this might be the only option.- of living is so enormous that this might be the only option. nigel, do ou auree might be the only option. nigel, do you agree that _ might be the only option. nigel, do you agree that it — might be the only option. nigel, do you agree that it might _ might be the only option. nigel, do you agree that it might be - might be the only option. nigel, do you agree that it might be the - might be the only option. nigel, do you agree that it might be the only| you agree that it might be the only option? does it leave room for tax cuts? i option? does it leave room for tax cuts? , ., ., . . , cuts? i will be one of the critics that joe was — cuts? i will be one of the critics that joe was talking _ cuts? i will be one of the critics that joe was talking about. - cuts? i will be one of the critics that joe was talking about. i . cuts? i will be one of the critics i that joe was talking about. i think there _ that joe was talking about. i think there is_ that joe was talking about. i think there is a — that joe was talking about. i think there is a real problem with this. liz truse— there is a real problem with this. liz truss seems to be obsessed with the idea _ liz truss seems to be obsessed with the idea of— liz truss seems to be obsessed with the idea of tax cuts were instead she needs — the idea of tax cuts were instead she needs to be targeting help at businesses and individuals. we are talking _ businesses and individuals. we are talking about a mammoth cost for this, _ talking about a mammoth cost for this, £38— talking about a mammoth cost for this, £38 billion which could
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probably be better spent elsewhere. if probably be better spent elsewhere. if you _ probably be better spent elsewhere. if you cut _ probably be better spent elsewhere. if you cut tax, all that happens is that people who have plenty of money 'ust that people who have plenty of money just get _ that people who have plenty of money just get a _ that people who have plenty of money just get a bit more, go out and spend — just get a bit more, go out and spend it — just get a bit more, go out and spend it and therefore this could be inflationary. as the institute for fiscal _ inflationary. as the institute for fiscal studies says, this might reduce — fiscal studies says, this might reduce inflation by 2%, you are still talking about 60% inflation if predictions of 18% next year arise. --16% _ predictions of 18% next year arise. —— 16% inflation. tax cuts that don't — —— 16% inflation. tax cuts that don't help— —— 16% inflation. tax cuts that don't help usually, the national insurance — don't help usually, the national insurance rise scrapping that she plans _ insurance rise scrapping that she plans to — insurance rise scrapping that she plans to do would benefit the lowest 10% by _ plans to do would benefit the lowest 10% by 76p a month, that's all but the richest — 10% by 76p a month, that's all but the richest 10% by £93. jo, 1096 by 76p a month, that's all but the richest 1096 by £93. jo, treasury officials also — the richest 1096 by £93. jo, treasury officials also working _ the richest 1096 by £93. jo, treasury officials also working on _ the richest 1096 by £93. jo, treasury officials also working on parallel- officials also working on parallel plans to introduce covid era relief
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including reduction in vat for hospitality, tourism and agriculture. how much will this be affordable and can it be targeted without massive administrative costs also? ~ , ,., , without massive administrative costs also? ~ , �* without massive administrative costs also? absolutely. and of course, this is rrot _ also? absolutely. and of course, this is not exactly _ also? absolutely. and of course, this is not exactly a _ also? absolutely. and of course, this is not exactly a surprise, - also? absolutely. and of course, | this is not exactly a surprise, this has been coming, maybe not to this level but we have known for months, long before the tory leadership contest which seemed to have started in the bronze age. it is just ridiculous that here we are, nearly into september, people are absolutely desperate, people are absolutely desperate, people are absolutely frightened witless about what will happen as we get into autumn and winter. and the government doesn't seem to have a plan at all and this might be eye—catching but it is not perfect. there is no perfect solution but businesses will be going out of businesses will be going out of
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business pretty soon. they cannot wait for weeks and weeks and weeks and particularly when you look at hospitality, one of the areas you mentioned, the summer holidays are coming to an end, people will be thinking about returning to work looking at the winter, the autumn and thinking about the cost of running those businesses. actually in this article there is a business thatis in this article there is a business that is mentioned here and it is a pub in the wirral and they have received a quote of £61,000 for its annual electricity bill with its unit cost going up from 15p to 97 p. businesses cannot manage. nigel, let me move on to the express. they say boris called on future ahead. are they talking about his future or that of the uk?— they talking about his future or that of the uk? give him his due, boris johnson _ that of the uk? give him his due, boris johnson has _ that of the uk? give him his due, boris johnson has been _ that of the uk? give him his due, boris johnson has been bullish i that of the uk? give him his due, boris johnson has been bullish to | borisjohnson has been bullish to the last — borisjohnson has been bullish to the last. he only has another nine days— the last. he only has another nine days to _ the last. he only has another nine days to go — the last. he only has another nine days to go of his premiership so it is drawing —
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days to go of his premiership so it is drawing to a close. what he is telling _ is drawing to a close. what he is telling the — is drawing to a close. what he is telling the express is there is a huge _ telling the express is there is a huge package of help on its way. if the lil— huge package of help on its way. if the liz truss will go for tax cuts rather _ the liz truss will go for tax cuts rather than _ the liz truss will go for tax cuts rather than a targeted package, it sounds _ rather than a targeted package, it sounds like that our prime minister is already— sounds like that our prime minister is already out of the loop. let sounds like that our prime minister is already out of the loop.— is already out of the loop. let us move on to _ is already out of the loop. let us move on to one _ is already out of the loop. let us move on to one at _ is already out of the loop. let us move on to one at the _ is already out of the loop. let us move on to one at the massive l is already out of the loop. let us - move on to one at the massive impact to all this, unions to join forces for strikes over the cost of living. we have seen the been a problem in scotland and edinburgh but more potentially on the horizon. yes. scotland and edinburgh but more potentially on the horizon. yes, the tuc congress _ potentially on the horizon. yes, the tuc congress takes _ potentially on the horizon. yes, the tuc congress takes place _ potentially on the horizon. yes, the tuc congress takes place next - potentially on the horizon. yes, the i tuc congress takes place next month and this is a series of motions that have been tabled by the country's biggest unions ahead of the congress. this is including unison and unite and as you say, we have already had strike action from the rmt, the railway union,
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communication workers union, the postal workers union and this is a call which is not for a general strike but it is for coordinated action and emotion comes from unison, the country's biggest union. it is demanding the tuc coordinate union action, so this is not unlawful secondary action, as everybody knows, the rules on strike action and any industrial action are incredibly strict these days. so you can't have one union that is not in dispute supporting another one which is but if you are to have a series of coordinated periods of industrial action or strikes, between unions, then you would in effect have a much greater impact. they are arguing quite rightly in my view that there is a huge problem, a cost of living crisis that we have just been talking about, the tuc is calling for £15 an hour for talking about, the tuc is calling for £15 an hourfor a minimum wage
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and many people, whether they are on the railways, postal workers, nurses, secondary support staff in schools, teachers, all unions and civil servants as well are all looking at industrial action. that is another thing that will be in the in tray of the incoming prime minister. ., ~ in tray of the incoming prime minister. ., ,, , ., ., ., in tray of the incoming prime minister. ., ., ., , , minister. thank you for that because those stories. _ minister. thank you for that because those stories. another _ minister. thank you for that because those stories. another story - minister. thank you for that because those stories. another story in - minister. thank you for that because those stories. another story in the l those stories. another story in the observer. nigel, they have a story 0bserver. nigel, they have a story on the bbc and the labour party saying to strengthen the bbc�*s political independence and retain it as a publicly owned public service broadcaster while the tory government would wage war against the corporation. thea;r government would wage war against the corporation.— the corporation. they welcome it is to, sa in: the corporation. they welcome it is to. saying that _ the corporation. they welcome it is to, saying that labour— the corporation. they welcome it is to, saying that labour would - the corporation. they welcome it is| to, saying that labour would protect
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the bbc's _ to, saying that labour would protect the bbc's independence. this comes on the _ the bbc's independence. this comes on the hack— the bbc's independence. this comes on the back of emily maitlis's rather— on the back of emily maitlis's rather controversial speech earlier on this— rather controversial speech earlier on this week when she was having a io on this week when she was having a go at _ on this week when she was having a go at the _ on this week when she was having a go at the bbc, particularly about people _ go at the bbc, particularly about people who come from the political field ending up on the bbc board. i don't _ field ending up on the bbc board. i don't agree with her on that, she was talking — don't agree with her on that, she was talking about robbie give and i don't _ was talking about robbie give and i don't think— was talking about robbie give and i don't think she was right. where i don't think she was right. where i do think— don't think she was right. where i do think she had a point is how the bbc wori
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ending the revolving doors of people in politics in top spots in the corporation. there has been a lot of change, funding cuts here in the bbc and this is about reporting in a democratic society and a public institution. i know we might be guilty of wallowing, talking about ourselves but it is important for the future of the uk. it is the future of the uk. it is incredibly _ the future of the uk. it is incredibly important - the future of the uk. it is incredibly important and | the future of the uk. it 3 incredibly important and never ever more so and i think if you look at what the bbc managed to do during covid, it felt like within seconds they had got schools programmes, they had got schools programmes, they had got schools programmes, they had education programmes. the bbc is a fantastic resource, it is the envy of the world and it is ill informed and short—sighted of any government, whatever their political colours come to regard it as a political football to be kicked around if they feel they are not
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getting a fair deal. [30 around if they feel they are not getting a fair deal.— around if they feel they are not getting a fair deal. do you think that is happening? _ getting a fair deal. do you think that is happening? yes, - getting a fair deal. do you think that is happening? yes, i- getting a fair deal. do you think that is happening? yes, i do. i getting a fair deal. do you think. that is happening? yes, i do. we have had nonsense _ that is happening? yes, i do. we have had nonsense coming - that is happening? yes, i do. we have had nonsense coming out . that is happening? yes, i do. we| have had nonsense coming out of that is happening? yes, i do. we - have had nonsense coming out of the culture secretary nadine dorries's mouth and it is always this threat to the bbc, threat to funding. without recognising that it is a huge asset and when you think about programmes like david attenborough, which are sold around the world commercially, and you think about that in terms of soft diplomacy and the impact that a programme like that was on the arguments and the conversations about climate change, you cannot get that unless you have got an organisation like the bbc and when you see what is happening in america and you see the amount of fake news and the difficulties people find in navigating their way through opinion and rants and everything else to try and find the truth. it is never been more important, if we want to understand what is going on in ukraine,
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understand the risk from china, want to understand what is happening with the climate and want to understand and hold our own government to account, then we do need the bbc and i think this is very good news that lucy powell is saying this. also, giving it a longer term for license renewal instead of ten years which is a very short time in terms of planning for a vast organisation. might be a number of changes before all of that. depends when an election is and the outcome of that and who wins the conservative party leadership. let us move on to our final story for this hour. emma raducanu saying, i miss my old life but i will keep this one. yes. raducanu saying, i miss my old life but i will keep this one.— but i will keep this one. yes, she is about to _ but i will keep this one. yes, she is about to defend _ but i will keep this one. yes, she is about to defend her _ but i will keep this one. yes, she is about to defend her title - but i will keep this one. yes, she is about to defend her title at. but i will keep this one. yes, she | is about to defend her title at the us open— is about to defend her title at the us open which of course is where she shot to _ us open which of course is where she shot to instant fame and she is very young _ shot to instant fame and she is very young it's —
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shot to instant fame and she is very young. it's obviously not been easy for her_ young. it's obviously not been easy for her and — young. it's obviously not been easy for her and what she says has made her on _ for her and what she says has made her on her_ for her and what she says has made her on her guard, which one can understand _ her on her guard, which one can understand. it must be difficult coping — understand. it must be difficult coping with such a lot of them so quickly — coping with such a lot of them so quickly. but the one great thing about— quickly. but the one great thing about this, she does say she wouldn't _ about this, she does say she wouldn't trade any of it in for a moment — wouldn't trade any of it in for a moment. , ., wouldn't trade any of it in for a moment-— wouldn't trade any of it in for a moment._ she - wouldn't trade any of it in for a moment._ she is i wouldn't trade any of it in for a moment._ she is 19 j wouldn't trade any of it in for a i moment._ she is 19 for moment. jo, quickly. she is 19 for goodness" — moment. jo, quickly. she is 19 for goodness' sake, _ moment. jo, quickly. she is 19 for goodness' sake, she _ moment. jo, quickly. she is 19 for goodness' sake, she has - moment. jo, quickly. she is 19 for goodness' sake, she has done - moment. jo, quickly. she is 19 for goodness' sake, she has done her moment. jo, quickly. she is 19 for i goodness' sake, she has done her a levels as well and we all absolutely fell in love with her last year. she's had a few injuries but she beat serena williams for goodness' sake. the pressure is on her are great but she is always gracious and we still think she is great even if she had not been so spectacular last year. she had not been so spectacular last ear. ~ , ,., y she had not been so spectacular last year. absolutely. i always love her res - onses year. absolutely. i always love her responses even _ year. absolutely. i always love her responses even when _ year. absolutely. i always love her responses even when she - year. absolutely. i always love her responses even when she has - year. absolutely. i always love her| responses even when she has lost. she is so unbelievably upbeat and positive. amazing. thank you so much. jo phillips and nigel nelson. great to see you. we will talk to you again very soon. that is it for
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this hour. we are back at half past 11 for another look at the headlines. dojoin us. it is time for click now. on your marks... get set... go! can you believe that it's exactly ten years since this site was just getting ready to host the 2012 olympic games? it feels like it was yesterday
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that this olympic stadium was alive with the roars of the crowds, cheering on the athletes.

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