Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 21, 2022 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

8:00 pm
the headlines at 8pm — five britons held captive by pro—russian forces in ukraine have been released. the five include aidan aslin and john harding. meanwhile but a steps up his war in ukraine mobilising up to 30,000 reservists and prompting international condemnation. fix, international condemnation. brutal, needless war, a war chosen by one man to be very frank. here the government _ by one man to be very frank. here the government offers _ by one man to be very frank. here the government offers assistance for those beset by energy bills. we need to do now is — those beset by energy bills. we need to do now is of _ those beset by energy bills. we need to do now is of the _ those beset by energy bills. we need to do now is of the civil— those beset by energy bills. we need to do now is of the civil that - those beset by energy bills. we need to do now is of the civil that would i to do now is of the civil that would -ive to do now is of the civil that would give those — to do now is of the civil that would give those competent to the winter.
8:01 pm
and so _ give those competent to the winter. and so he _ give those competent to the winter. and so he needed to happen because we did _ and so he needed to happen because we did not_ and so he needed to happen because we did not happen— and so he needed to happen because we did not happen businesses - and so he needed to happen because we did not happen businesses wouldi we did not happen businesses would have failed _ we did not happen businesses would have failed and _ we did not happen businesses would have failed and small— we did not happen businesses would have failed and small and _ we did not happen businesses would have failed and small and medium . have failed and small and medium businesses — have failed and small and medium businesses cannot— have failed and small and medium businesses cannot afford - have failed and small and medium businesses cannot afford the - have failed and small and medium businesses cannot afford the scale of increase — businesses cannot afford the scale of increase in _ businesses cannot afford the scale of increase-— of increase. an ongoing crisis in maternity _ of increase. an ongoing crisis in maternity care _ of increase. an ongoing crisis in maternity care with _ of increase. an ongoing crisis in maternity care with new - of increase. an ongoing crisis in. maternity care with new research showing many units in england do not meet safety standards. donald trump and three of his adult children face eight fraud lawsuit after investigation into their family business in new york. and a 20 time grand slam champion roger federer tells bbc he wants to stay involved with tennis after he retires this week. i with tennis after he retires this week. ., ., with tennis after he retires this week. . ., , . , with tennis after he retires this week. ., ., , ., week. i want to stay involved in this game _ week. i want to stay involved in this game in — week. i want to stay involved in this game in some _ week. i want to stay involved in this game in some shape - week. i want to stay involved in this game in some shape or- week. i want to stay involved in | this game in some shape or form week. i want to stay involved in - this game in some shape or form and i will notjust be a ghost or a stranger and not be around any more.
8:02 pm
five british nationals being held by pro—russian forces in eastern ukraine have been released. they had been flown to saudi arabia where these pictures of them arriving havejust where these pictures of them arriving have just been where these pictures of them arriving havejust been released. the prime minister, liz truss, who is at the united nations general assembly in new york, called the news "hugely welcome" and that their safe return was "ending months of uncertainty and suffering for them and theirfamilies". she went on to thank ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky for his efforts to secure their release and for the saudi government's assistance with mediation. the bbc understands that the men being released include aiden aslin from nottinghamshire, who had been helping to defend ukraine as part of the ukrainian armed forces, and john harding, a man in his 50s, originally from sunderland. james langdale is with me and take us through it. out of the blue. pretty much and certainly those in the know heard a few whispers this might be in the offing a few days
8:03 pm
ago, but certainly not expected. these negotiations for the fate of these men has been going on for months now, and there have been no expectations of any single move from the russian side. the question of course is why now. why has this happened today? essentially this is largely the gifts of the kremlin to decide whether or not these men should be released, and so why has a decision being made? why has been made on the same day that president putin makes a statement to the medium in a speech in moscow in which not only announces the partial mobilisation of russian reservists but also rattles a pretty firm nuclear saver. so the question of a mass or asking tonight and they don't know whether they have the answer to this is mr putin on one hand threatening but also making a gesture of goodwill on the other all at the same time? or is that
8:04 pm
overthinking it and people don't know the answer that question. i know the answer that question. i have got nuclear weapons but here are your prisoners back. saudi arabia playing a role in this, take us through that.— arabia playing a role in this, take us throu~h that. . . ., �* ~' ., us through that. again we don't know the details about _ us through that. again we don't know the details about this _ us through that. again we don't know the details about this and _ us through that. again we don't know the details about this and this - the details about this and this was a surprise was that we did not know the audis were involved and they do have good relations with russia and have good relations with russia and have not broken with russia during this conflict. all those oil groups, 0pec plus in things like that which russia plays a role as a major will produce her, they have carried on a continuum so those relationships are there and clearly that is a relationship that has been used by the russians to allow for this mediation to take place. but as we've seen these pictures just now, the sally's have been very much involved in fate notjust for the prime minister here but also the foreign secretary as well. who prime minister here but also the foreign secretary as well. who named the crown prince _ foreign secretary as well. who named the crown prince specifically _ foreign secretary as well. who named the crown prince specifically and - foreign secretary as well. who named the crown prince specifically and he i the crown prince specifically and he had been due to come to london for the future of the late queen but he
8:05 pm
did not and now he is in the headlines for helping the uk. what is his role and relation with the uk then? ., , , , then? the uk has pretty good relations with _ then? the uk has pretty good relations with saudi _ then? the uk has pretty good relations with saudi arabia - then? the uk has pretty good | relations with saudi arabia and certainly better than the us. and to the cost of the british government because they faced a lot of criticism for staying close to the saudis because of the human rights record and the way they are pursuing the war in yemen. but the uk does not have —— it does have reasonable relations and there was the issue with the crown prince, the de facto ruler, he did not end up going to the wedding at the weekend and there was suspicion he might have been in london at the same time and had some engagement but we sadly don't know as that has not been made public. but clearly here, you know, the russians have allowed him to play a role in this. clearly to their mutual benefit. they want to benefit from this. , ., , mutual benefit. they want to benefit from this. , . , ., ~ mutual benefit. they want to benefit from this. , . , ., ,, i. mutual benefit. they want to benefit from this. , ., , . ~' mutual benefit. they want to benefit from this. , ., ~ . russia's president, vladimir putin, has announced
8:06 pm
a "partial mobilisation" of military reservists. up to 300,000 could be called up to fight in ukraine, the first mobilisation of civilians since world war ii. russia has been losing ground in eastern ukraine in recent weeks as ukrainian troops recapture some parts that had been in russian hands for months. in his televised address this morning, president putin accused the west of occupying ukraine and engaging in nuclear blackmail before threatening to use nuclear weapons. 0ur russia editor steve rosenberg reports from moscow. under pressure in ukraine, russia's president has chosen the path that is most familiar to him — escalation. translation: to defend our motherland, its sovereignty l and territorial integrity, for the security of our people, and on the liberated territories, it is necessary to support the proposal of the defence ministry and chief of general staff
8:07 pm
to announce a partial mobilisation of military reservists. seven months after invading ukraine, the kremlin is calling up 300,000 reservists to support what it still calls the "special military operation". and from russia's commander in chief, this threat to the west... translation: our country, too, has i different weapons of destruction. l in some cases, they are more modern than those of nato. if the territorial integrity of our country is threatened, then to defend russia and our people we shall, of course, use all means at our disposal. i am not bluffing. so, why the threat, and why now? well, in a few days' time, the kremlin will try to annex a whole swathe of ukrainian territory.
8:08 pm
vladimir putin's sabre—rattling sends a message to ukraine and to the west — "don't attack. don't try to take those areas back." as news of mobilisation spread, there were reports that flights out of russia were selling out fast amid concern that men of fighting age would soon not be allowed to leave the country. "i'm worried this is just the start and that there could be full mobilisation", sergei tells me. but margarita says, "if our leaders demand this, we must do our duty. i trust putin 100%." later, the president met his defence minister. they've decided on mobilisation because they're short of troops. so short that in prison camps across russia, this mercenary chief, a close putin ally, has been
8:09 pm
recruiting inmates to fight in ukraine, promising them their freedom if they serve six months with his group, wagner, and survive. when vilena went to visit her husband in prison a few days ago, she was told the husband, a convicted murderer, wasn't there. translation: i said, - "what do you mean not here? he's been here 13 years, and suddenly he's gone?" they told me they had no more information. a few days later, he called me from a ukrainian number. i know for sure that my husband is in ukraine. even if he agreed to go there, he was sent illegally. sending convicts into combat is against the law. now vladimir putin will send reservists to ukraine. this was his invasion. this is his war with the west, and he's determined not to be defeated. steve rosenberg, bbc news.
8:10 pm
let's return to the prisoner release and we will speak to robert generate, aiden aslin's mp. they been able to speak to his family? i have and they are over the moon as you can imagine. that meant sense of relief and they have been through months of torture and strain and stress as a result of this, first his capture and then being put on trial in this kangaroo court and sentenced to death by firing squad. the not knowing, the images of him being beaten and mistreated by the russian authorities. i think is the most wonderful news and they are so happy and relieved and cannot wait to get them back home to the uk. [30 to get them back home to the uk. do you know when that will be? we - you know when that will be? we exected you know when that will be? - expected to come tomorrow, but we don't know precise timing but we do know that he has now landed in
8:11 pm
riyadh in saudi arabia and so he is in a safe third country and is on the way home. he in a safe third country and is on the way home-— in a safe third country and is on the wa home. , ., ,, .,~ ., the way home. he is able to speak to his family? — the way home. he is able to speak to his family? i — the way home. he is able to speak to his family? i expect _ the way home. he is able to speak to his family? i expect he _ the way home. he is able to speak to his family? i expect he will— the way home. he is able to speak to his family? i expect he will be - the way home. he is able to speak to his family? i expect he will be able i his family? i expect he will be able to very soon _ his family? i expect he will be able to very soon but _ his family? i expect he will be able to very soon but i _ his family? i expect he will be able to very soon but i know— his family? i expect he will be able to very soon but i know they - his family? i expect he will be able to very soon but i know they are i to very soon but i know they are going to meet him when he arrives here in the uk and it will be a moment of really unimaginable joy and relief for them to get him back home. do and relief for them to get him back home. , ., home. do tell us about the negotiations _ home. do tell us about the negotiations which - home. do tell us about the negotiations which led i home. do tell us about the negotiations which led up | home. do tell us about the l negotiations which led up to home. do tell us about the i negotiations which led up to his release. i negotiations which led up to his release. ., negotiations which led up to his release. .. ., ., negotiations which led up to his release. ., ., ., release. i cannot divulge all of the detail of those _ release. i cannot divulge all of the detail of those negotiations i release. i cannot divulge all of the detail of those negotiations but i detail of those negotiations but what i can say is that there has been a huge amount of effort put into this from the ukrainian government because it was their primary responsibility for aiden aslin like the other detainees who was serving with the ukrainian armed forces and so it was ukraine posit responsibility to negotiate his ultimate release. president zelensky
8:12 pm
personally supported those efforts and we give him a real debt of gratitude that the prime minister as a foreign secretary and now as prime minister raised the matter repeatedly with president zelensky and other counterparts and was exceptionally helpful. and then most recently the crown prince of saudi arabia has helped to play a part in it as well, so it really has been a huge effort over many months. before an office's detainees team to really put their shoulder to the wheel and help to pull this off as it could easily have gone the other way or it could easily have taken many months or not years to resolve as has been known in some of these cases in the past. but thanks to that huge effort, aiden aslin and the others are now coming home and i am immensely grateful to all involved. and what we make of the involvement of the saudi arabian crown prince, a figure who has been criticised by many rights groups for the human rights record he has presided over
8:13 pm
in saudi arabia? the four secretaries tonight has recognised the role played by him in getting them home. in the role played by him in getting them home-— the role played by him in getting them home. in this instance i can onl sa them home. in this instance i can only say how _ them home. in this instance i can only say how grateful _ them home. in this instance i can only say how grateful i _ them home. in this instance i can only say how grateful i hand i them home. in this instance i can only say how grateful i hand to i them home. in this instance i can | only say how grateful i hand to the role played by saudi arabia. they do have a relationship with russia in part because they are another integral element of 0pec, the oil grouping of nations, and so have regular and deep negotiations and discussions with russia and perhaps as a result of that relationship between the leaders, they been able to play a part in releasing these detainees and for that i am very grateful. but i should stress that it has been absolutely crucial that president zelensky has chosen to prioritise british detainees and of course there are thousands of ukrainian soldiers who are being held by the russians, some in very
8:14 pm
poor conditions. their families in ukraine poor conditions. theirfamilies in ukraine want to get them home as well, so i'm grateful to president zelensky and his fellow ministers in ukraine for choosing as a mark of respect to the relationship with the uk to help these british detainees to get home. uk to help these british detainees to get home-— uk to help these british detainees to net home. ., ,, . ., to get home. thank you so much for “oininu to get home. thank you so much for joining us- — to get home. thank you so much for joining us. thank _ to get home. thank you so much for joining us. thank you. _ to get home. thank you so much for joining us. thank you. let's - to get home. thank you so much for joining us. thank you. let's bring i joining us. thank you. let's bring ou riaht joining us. thank you. let's bring you right no _ joining us. thank you. let's bring you right on to — joining us. thank you. let's bring you right up to date _ joining us. thank you. let's bring you right up to date with - joining us. thank you. let's bring you right up to date with the i joining us. thank you. let's bring i you right up to date with the names of the five men who have been released. you heard him talking about his own constituent there, aiden aslin and with so if you just john harding with one of the five and another of the five is shaun pinner who was detained in the besieged city of shaun pinner in the south of the country and as we get further information on the british captives we will bring those to you. let's return now to the partial
8:15 pm
mobilisation of hundreds of thousands of russian reservists. at the un today, presidentjoe biden asked the world to come together in solidarity. this afternoon, president biden has called the conflict in ukraine a brutal, needless war and said it was "chosen by one man". he says it goes against the main principles of the united nations. the kremlin in organising a sham referendum to try to annex parts of ukraine, an extremity significant violation of the un charter. this war is about extinguishing ukraine's right to exist as a state plain and simple. presidentjoe biden at the un and i enjoy now by elizabeth sheckleford at the chicago council of global affairs and a former american diplomat. thank you forjoining us. looking at this mobilisation and putting another 300,000 reservists putting another 300 , 000 reservists potentially putting another 300,000 reservists potentially towards her on the front line, how might that change the course of the conflict. i line, how might that change the course of the conflict.— line, how might that change the course of the conflict. i don't see this changing _ course of the conflict. i don't see this changing the _ course of the conflict. i don't see this changing the course - course of the conflict. i don't see this changing the course of- course of the conflict. i don't see this changing the course of the l this changing the course of the conflict but this is a signal that he has been doing something he has
8:16 pm
been determined not to do. he was determined to keep this as low—profile in the russian public as he could and it's a clear sign that he could and it's a clear sign that he is feeling his back is up against the wall and he does not have much choice. i imagine it reflects how well the numbers are a people they have on hand to fight this war and it is his intention to not lose it but i don't think it is going to change the course of the war for him. i change the course of the war for him. ., , change the course of the war for him. . , . ~' change the course of the war for him. ., ., ,, ., change the course of the war for him. ., ., ~ ., ., change the course of the war for him. i was talking to a cook about the release _ him. i was talking to a cook about the release of _ him. i was talking to a cook about the release of five _ him. i was talking to a cook about the release of five british - the release of five british nationals who have been held by pro—russian proxy forces in the east and my colic was almost scratching his head to work at the strategy on the russians, on the one hand mobilising and threatening the use of nuclear weapons and on the other hand quietly releasing very important captives and prisoners of war and can you help us understand the russian strategy in the last 2a hours? i the russian strategy in the last 24 hours? ., the russian strategy in the last 24 hours? . ., , , ., , hours? i am not sure there is a very clear russian strategy _ hours? i am not sure there is a very clear russian strategy going - hours? i am not sure there is a very clear russian strategy going on i clear russian strategy going on but there are a lot of desperate moves and i was able to the things to note with the release of those captives and it is always great news when you have nothing like that the report is
8:17 pm
either he is trying... first of all we don't know what he got in return so there could have been something in exchange, whether prisoners or something else works of the concession that is important and they can help him perhaps to mobilise some of the military that might be upset with the path things are going but the one thing i noticed was the role saudi arabia played in this, particularly the crown prince. because right now vladimir putin is really running at a friends and just last week, the president xi and the indian prime minister both basically dressed down putin as part of conversations around the shanghai summit last week and these are two allies he is relied on for support. and it looks to me lately is looking elsewhere for france because they have told him you need to get the war wrapped up him you need to get the war wrapped up and have signalled that less support is coming from that site that i think he was hoping for. ianthem
8:18 pm
that i think he was hoping for. when he is in trouble _ that i think he was hoping for. when he is in trouble and _ that i think he was hoping for. when he is in trouble and he _ that i think he was hoping for. when he is in trouble and he has - that i think he was hoping for. when he is in trouble and he has one phone call, who does he make it to? right now it looks like saudi arabia because in the news last week, putin and the sallies were conniving to try to keep a wheel on the market lower to try to keep those prices up and this is again putin trying to maintain desperately some sense of economy coming yes he can continue to fund this war but the last couple of calls and saudi arabia. i think before last week it would have been china. ., , , , before last week it would have been china. . , , , ., china. that shift is interesting and we willt china. that shift is interesting and we will try to _ china. that shift is interesting and we will try to keep _ china. that shift is interesting and we will try to keep people - we will try to keep people up—to—date with what we have learned about what the russians got in exchange as a definition of a negotiation is people do get things one way or another. looking at the mobilisation and i spend a sunday speaking people in russia who were worried about being called up and members of families called up and we have seen demonstrations and one organisation says several hundred have been arrested so how significant my opposition to that mobilisation be? are we overrating it? , ., , , , ,.,
8:19 pm
mobilisation be? are we overrating it? , ., ., it? the problem is it is so hard for us to have — it? the problem is it is so hard for us to have a _ it? the problem is it is so hard for us to have a real— us to have a real clear understanding of what the public perceptions are in russia and a big part of that is because there is so much disinformation in russia and coming out of russia so it is really unclear but the other issue is how much does public opinion really matter? at this stage you don't really have kids in the streets of moscow who are being called up so until such time as elites are being called in that will be a challenge and i think one of the issues that shaun pinner is struggling with right now is given the military on board. after the routeing by the ukrainian military in their counteroffensive, there are certainly rumblings in the military of people who were upset with the path and every time somebody proposes some pushback on putin, they get so out of a window so it is really hard to imagine that much pushbackis really hard to imagine that much pushback is going to have a real impact on him now and you will certainly be arresting people but putin seems duggan at this stage. i imagine it would take a long time that level of public pushback to really have an impact on his
8:20 pm
decision to maintain the war but we are seeing anecdotal evidence the russians do not want to go fight this. ., ~ russians do not want to go fight this. . ,, , ., russians do not want to go fight this. . ,, i. . ., russians do not want to go fight this. . ,, . ., ., ,, this. thank you so much for talking to us today- _ this. thank you so much for talking to us today. thank _ this. thank you so much for talking to us today. thank you. _ sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's marc. we will start with a rugby and wasps have noticed that they won't go into administration. this comes after an unpaid tax bill with the business is not in administration but says the move provides a crucial period of grace to continue negotiations with a number of interested parties to secure the long—term future of the group. cash—strapped worcester warriors have been told to meet two deadlines by the rugby football union or risk being suspended from all competitions. the premiership club have debts totalling £25 million. the rfu says they must show by midday tomorrow that this
8:21 pm
weekend's match with newcastle can go ahead. they must also give certain financial guarantees by 5pm on monday. meanwhile, two former players will come out of retirement tonight to help the side fulfil their premiership cup match against gloucester at kingsholm. number eight siwan lillicrap has been named wales captain for the rugby world cup in new zealand. lillicrap will lead the 32—strong squad with centre hannahjones named as vice captain. wales open their pool a campaign against scotland on sunday the 9th of october before facing hosts new zealand the following week and then australia six days later. in the last few moments the england's women have lost to india at canterbury. the second highest total in 0die as for the hosts. it started so well for england,
8:22 pm
kate cross taking the early wicket of shefali verma as they reduced the tourists to 99—3. but then a captain's innings from harmanpreet kaur. she blasted a stunning unbeaten knock of 143 as india piled on the runs. they eventually posted 333 from their 50 overs. england slipped to 12—2 and 47 hi three and the seeing off end and 82—5 lose nd 82—5 lose the 82—5 are going to happen zero down in and are going to happen zero down in the three match contest. tonight, scotland take on ukraine in the nations league just three months after the ukrainians knocked them out of the world cup play—offs. ukraine i3—i ukraine 13—1 at the beginning of june to end their hopes of the world cup. a victory though for scotland will lift them up above ukraine at the top of their nations lead group and with 33 minutes on the clock, it is a very interesting goal is stronger than the two sides. all the
8:23 pm
support for now and back to you, james. you put it up and told us it was 0—0. the government has announced a multi—billion pound support package for businesses this winter which will almost halve the amount they would have paid for their energy bills. gas and electricity prices for companies will be capped for six months in an attempt to stop them from going bust. hospitals, schools and places like community halls and churches will also receive the support. the plans are on top of the £150 billion already announced to help households with their bills for two years. industry groups have welcomed today's package, though warned that further help may be needed after the winter. our business editor simonjack has more. red hot energy prices have threatened to have a chilling effect on the uk economy. today, businesses and other nondomestic users got details of a six—month cut in wholesale energy costs this winter. annette dolan says she welcomes a cut to the wholesale part
8:24 pm
of her bill, but wants more clarity on other uncapped charges. there's some welcome bits, but there's a lot really unclear. until i get my final bill and my final quote, and i know what it's going to be, i can't relax. it's really worrying. so, how's this going to work? well, the government will cap the wholesale price of gas and electricity from october the 1st to march the 31st next year. for example, prices for electricity are expected to be around £600 per unit this winter. a cap of £211 will be applied. the government will fund the difference with a similar discount for gas. other costs like standing charges aren't capped, but the government hopes it could mean final bills are roughly half what they would've been this winter. the programme will be reviewed in january to assess which sectors need extended support beyond april. we've got 5000 staff... the prime minister has already hinted that hospitality may qualify for that, which would be welcomed by pub
8:25 pm
owners like fuller's. i think this was looking very bad for the hospitality sector overall. and i've already seen pubs and restaurants start to close midweek and close down permanently. i think this will be a lifeline for so many businesses to enable them to battle through the autumn and the winter period. now, what we need to make sure is that the consumer still comes out. the government's plan to revert a nasty recession had two parts. the first, two weeks ago, hold down household bills so people's disposable income isn't totally wiped out. and part two today, make sure businesses don't have to close down and lay off staff from their own crippling energy bills. but there's no such thing as a free lunch. the combination of those two packages could present future taxpayers with a bill easily in excess of £100 billion. the government insists this is a simple, speedy and significant response that can be altered as required. what we needed now, immediately, quickly, was something simple that| would give people confidence through the winter. -
8:26 pm
what we will have is a review in three months' time - which will allow us to see | that we are giving support in the right places and that we can |ensure continued support if that's| necessary, is directed i at where it needs to go. the labour party said that businesses still didn't have enough clarity to plan for the future. if you're a business and you need to be able to plan on any kind of reasonable time frame, you're not getting any of the certainty that you should get from an announcement of this significance. so, i'm a bit worried about people still not knowing what the future will hold for them. this is intervention on the scale of the covid furlough scheme, and it's not guaranteed to prevent recession, but, like then, the alternative may have been a severe economic slump. simon jack, bbc news. the government expects the scheme for businesses to cost tens of billions of pounds, although the exact figure is not yet known. that's on top of the £150 billion plan to help households with their bills for two years.
8:27 pm
so, how is it all going to be paid for? 0ur economics editor faisal islam has been looking at the numbers. the cost of today's energy plan for businesses is, says the government, in the tens of billions of pounds. 25 billion says one top energy analyst. a bit more, £40 billion, according to the independent institute for fiscal studies. it's actually quite difficult to work out as it depends on gas prices and the structure of people's bills, but that gives a sense of scale. it's almost half the pandemic furlough scheme. let's add on some of the other announcements we've had. £60 billion for the support to households for a year. and if as expected there are a series tax cuts liz truss has promised, could leave a hole of about £35 billion. the costs will be borrowed, are not paid for upfront.
8:28 pm
government says that tax costs will help to lower these numbers total. we have had no numbers and forecasts which is how we normally work this out. this is where borrowing was thought to be going at the last official forecast in march. now take a look at the latest reduction from the iss. borrowing is higher in every single year. and in every single year. by incredible amounts. this yt it and by incredible amounts. this year it was due to the incredible emergency but over the next five years it stays high. this was the amount thought to be going at the last official forecast in march. and this adds to government debt, which the government pledged to reduce earlier this year. all this borrowing is costing more as interest rates rise. you can see this energy package but also down to the ongoing tax cuts and a slower economy. but this is
8:29 pm
when the interest rates on government borrowing has travelled. all this comes at a time when the interest rate on government borrowing has trebled. so the hope is in the next year this will help businesses and households to avoid a major recession and beyond that the government thinks it can grow the economy much faster. either way, it's forecast to borrow hundreds of billions of pounds more in the coming years as a result. let's speak to natalie he runs a dental cosmetics company. tell us how your company has been dealing with a rising energy prices over recent months.— with a rising energy prices over recent months. ,, ,., . , recent months. sure, so we currently have a warehouse _ recent months. sure, so we currently have a warehouse that _ recent months. sure, so we currently have a warehouse that is _ recent months. sure, so we currently have a warehouse that is based i recent months. sure, so we currently have a warehouse that is based in i have a warehouse that is based in wembley and we send out around 3000 or 4000 holy euros per month and what we've seen recently is an increase from our landlord passing on a utility rate increases as well as a rental increases onto our business. so that is the impact that we are feeling in the uk but like many businesses, we do have an
8:30 pm
international supply chain. we manufacture some of our products in the uk but we are also importing from the us and from asia and shipping to the uk. so the energy costs we are seeing from our supply chain when shipping to the uk has been an increase to our manufacturing costs and increase to our shipping costs when using dhl, fedex, ups and those of costs that really businesses like mine are experiencing and there is not yet any guidance on how this package is going to help that significant supply chain caustic we are experiencing as a result of those damaging increases. find experiencing as a result of those damaging increases.— experiencing as a result of those damaging increases. and of course this package _ damaging increases. and of course this package is _ damaging increases. and of course this package is focused _ damaging increases. and of course this package is focused on - damaging increases. and of course this package is focused on fixing i this package is focused on fixing wholesale gas and electricity prices and firms light years for six months and firms light years for six months and will that make a real impact on your financial planning? and will that make a real impact on yourfinancial planning? it and will that make a real impact on your financial planning?— your financial planning? it will definitely help. _ your financial planning? it will definitely help. it's _ your financial planning? it will definitely help. it's a - your financial planning? it will definitely help. it's a step i your financial planning? it will definitely help. it's a step in l your financial planning? it will l definitely help. it's a step in the right direction, but i think as we heard earlier, there is still a lack
8:31 pm
of clarity and i do think that more needs to be done when contemplating how businesses like mine are operating and if you do have international supply chain and the energy impact we are experiencing is not purelyjust energy impact we are experiencing is not purely just at the warehouse level in terms of the facilities that we are operating from, there are also several other impacts that we are experiencing from those household utilities and i think in terms of the energy bills, the impact of the energy crisis globally is notjust being fell within the warehouse but a wider problem. share warehouse but a wider problem. are ou able warehouse but a wider problem. are you able to keep all of your staff? that is something that we are definitely looking at. we have core staff and they are definitely we have done a review and recently only reduced staff where we thought they are not needed for the core business, but we have now already made some changes to streamline the business and our product range to
8:32 pm
make sure that we are trying to keep the business as stable as possible for this foreseeable uncivil patch that we are seeing and terms what we expect for the next six or 12 months. expect for the next six or 12 months-— expect for the next six or 12 months. . . ., ,, , ., . months. natalie, thank you so much forjoining us- _ months. natalie, thank you so much forjoining us. no _ months. natalie, thank you so much forjoining us. no problem. - now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. most of us have had a dry day today with a little sunshine coming through the clouds. however, we do have rain on the way. and overnight, this weatherfront is going to be bringing a zone of fairly heavy rain to scotland and northern ireland, eventually reaching cumbria towards the end of the night. allowing temperatures in the countryside to dip down into single figures. milder for scotland and northern ireland with the cloud, 14 or 15 celsius pretty widely. tomorrow, this weather front will continue to push its way eastwards, taking the rain from scotland and northern ireland and pushing it in across northern england, wales and eventually southwest england.
8:33 pm
ahead, some bright or sunny weather across east anglia, southeast england, the midlands and central southern england, where it's going to feel quite warm with temperatures up to 20 celsius. a fresher feel to the weather for scotland and northern ireland, as the sunshine comes out in the afternoon, temperatures will drop down about 15—16 celsius. now, for thursday night, we will see this band of rain continuing itsjourney, eventually reaching eastern england later in the night. this is bbc news. five britons held captive by pro—russian forces in ukraine have been released. the five include, aiden aslin. meanwhile putin has stepped up his effort provoking strong international combination. announcing support the businesses with electricity bills.
8:34 pm
new research shows that many units do not meet safety standards. donald trump and three have his children face a $250 million fraud suit after an investigation in which there family business. the us central bank has pushed interest rates to its highest level in almost 15 years. the bank seeks to rein in soaring prices in the worlds largest economy. the fed has announced it was announcing its key rate by another 0.7 0.75 percentage rates. let's get more on this now from the from the wall streetjournal. managing corporate finance coverage. what do you make the move? it was managing corporate finance coverage. what do you make the move? it was to some degree — what do you make the move? it was to some degree expected. _ what do you make the move? it was to some degree expected. we _ what do you make the move? it was to some degree expected. we did - what do you make the move? it was to some degree expected. we did expect| some degree expected. we did expect at least 75 points. some were even expecting 100. this is the third in
8:35 pm
a row they indicated there would be more increases to come as inflation remains relatively high, even though it hasn't risen further over the summer. so to sum readers it was expected move, markets did anticipate it by selling off quite significantly in recent days and also in the past week. so, this is something that people have been planning for and will probably continue for a lot longer. thea;r planning for and will probably continue for a lot longer. they have been planning _ continue for a lot longer. they have been planning for _ continue for a lot longer. they have been planning for it, _ continue for a lot longer. they have been planning for it, well— been planning for it, well it worked? . ., been planning for it, well it worked?— been planning for it, well it worked? ., , ., ~ worked? another question. some think it will and the — worked? another question. some think it will and the chances _ worked? another question. some think it will and the chances are _ worked? another question. some think it will and the chances are that - worked? another question. some think it will and the chances are that it i it will and the chances are that it will. the question is not so much, will. the question is not so much, will it work but when will it work? because we have seen the fed when it ended this year, we were zero in terms of interest rates or near zero here in the us. fast forward a few meetings from the fed and we are at higher rates that we have been in the 15 years, as you said. so, the
8:36 pm
pace of which the fed has been responding has been fast but also the paste with which inflation has increased as significant and so the question is also how will the labour market respond? in one of the labour market respond? in one of the labour market at some point slow down significantly, and will we see higher unemployment rates as we are seeing now, because so far the unemployment is still at a reasonable level, it's not at levels yet where you would expect the economy to automatically go into recession. even though we have also seen two quarters of contracting growth here in the us, there is this feeling of there being a slowdown. we are seeing companies making selective short cuts, we are seeing companies refinancing a higher rate, therefore seeing higher financing costs. so, the picture is certainly one of the corporate slowdown in growth, but inflation so far hasn't really slowed market leave in the
8:37 pm
past month we saw at 8.3 down from 8.5 in the summer. which is to some degree a decline, but over here it is still very elevated. what i hear from companies and cfos is very much that people expect high inflation to be a feature at least for the next year if not longer. we be a feature at least for the next year if not longer.— be a feature at least for the next year if not longer. we saw president biden the other _ year if not longer. we saw president biden the other day _ year if not longer. we saw president biden the other day trying _ year if not longer. we saw president biden the other day trying to - year if not longer. we saw president biden the other day trying to defend j biden the other day trying to defend that high inflation rate suggesting that high inflation rate suggesting that it was some sort of an achievement the fact that it was static. when we look at these rate rises, what kind of international fat might this provoke, given the fact that so many other countries or looking to see what the united states does? we looking to see what the united states does?— looking to see what the united states does? ~ . , ., states does? we have seen other countries around _ states does? we have seen other countries around the _ states does? we have seen other countries around the world i states does? we have seen other countries around the world followj countries around the world follow suit, we have seen the bank of england do this, increase rates, we have seen the european central bank do this. we have also seen other countries around the world sort of maintaining lower rates. but of course, the big thing that this causes is further increases in the us dollar. which is something that
8:38 pm
influences economies all around the world in very many different ways, given that it still has a very important impact on the global economy. so that is something that we have seen in the past year, a significant increase in the us dollar compared to other international currencies. as the fed has tightened its monetary policy, so that is something that we are expecting to continue for a while longer. expecting to continue for a while loner. ., ~' ,, expecting to continue for a while loner. . ,, i. ., expecting to continue for a while lower, ., ~' y., ., ., expecting to continue for a while loner. ., ~ ,, ., ., , longer. thank you for “oining us. here, crimestoppers i longer. thank you forjoining us. here, crimestoppers is - longer. thank you forjoining us. here, crimestoppers is offering l longer. thank you forjoining us. | here, crimestoppers is offering a record... crimestoppers is offering a record £200,000 reward for information that leads to the conviction of those responsible for the killing of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel in liverpool. a £100,000 sum was offered by a private donor, and the charity's founder lord ashcroft is matching it. nine people have so far been arrested in connection with her murder, but no charges have been brought. a serving metropolitan police officer and a former constable have been found guilty of sending grossly offensive misogynistic and racist messages in a whatsapp group with sarah everard's killer.
8:39 pm
serving metropolitan police officer jonathon cobban and former pcjoel borders sent the messages in a whatsapp group with wayne couzens two years before he raped and killed sarah everard. more than half of england's maternity units failed to meet standards. in a review from the care quality commission, the bbc�*s research found that 7% posed a high risk of avoidable harm. the nhs will set aside £8 million compensation after mothers and babies were harmed or died during childbirth. the royal couege or died during childbirth. the royal college of midwives say that the findings reflect an ongoing crisis in maternity care following a series of safety standard. 0ur health correspondence has this report. a warning though you may find this
8:40 pm
distressing. she was my best friend, lucy. i lost that. everything changed when lucy was 22. we used to have fun, we had banter. she always looked out for me. now, all her family wants is to have a proper conversation with her. lucy, i've got your feed. going to put yourfeed on. this is life for lucy now. she can't talk or walk. she needs 24—hour support. her sister zoe leads her team of carers. she also helps bring up lucy's daughter millie who is eight now. the problem started just after lucy gave birth to her. she had millie and put her onto her chest and within a few seconds lucy said to me, "just take her, take her, mum," and i could see her going. that was the last thing lucy said before she lost a huge amount of blood.
8:41 pm
shall we sing a song? # lucy, lucy, lucy... in surgery she was wrongly given an epidural, meaning she was awake. her body couldn't cope with this and the bleeding. her heart stopped, her brain is starved of oxygen, and she has been left with severe brain damage. your life has been totally transformed by this. you were just 19 when this happened? yes, a bit ofa kid. i had to grow up because i had to bring millie up. lucy's story shows the human cost of when a birth goes wrong but there is a financial one, as well. the family receives payments from the nhs for lucy's care. compensation is nothing to me. i would have still liked lucy normal and carry on with life as it was, have a happy life. 0ne baby is born every 54 seconds in england and the vast majority do arrive safely. i'm happy because i've got my little boy in my arms, that's the most important thing. there were almost 600,000 births
8:42 pm
in england last year. a small number, just over 1200, ended in compensation claims. that is 12% of all cases made against the nhs in england. but maternity mistakes are expensive, so the nhs expects this area to account for 60% of the money it will end up paying out the problems that happened last year. which means those claims will over time come to almost £8 billion. to give you an idea of what that £8 billion could be worth, it is about four times the annual salary of all maternity doctors, nurses and midwives in england. if we invest in maternity services now, the compensation costs will go down, but actually the most important thing is that women and families won't have the poor care and outcomes, the devastating outcomes that we all know about. the government says it wants the nhs to be the best place in the world
8:43 pm
to give birth and has invested more than £200 million in maternity care. we want to make sure that babies and mums are cared for safely, and if we get it right first time those claims will reduce. meanwhile, lucy's family are left rebuilding their lives. i will probably get married one day but kids... the thought goes through your mind, like, will it happen to you? danger is my fear now because i'm always thinking, well, if i injure myself, that's another one down. catherine burns, bbc news. let's get more on this now with a as the —— by a solicitor who specialises in this. what are you finding about the standard of maternal care?—
8:44 pm
finding about the standard of maternal care? ., , ., ., , maternal care? really over the last 20 ears, maternal care? really over the last 20 years. which _ maternal care? really over the last 20 years, which is _ maternal care? really over the last 20 years, which is how _ maternal care? really over the last 20 years, which is how long - maternal care? really over the last 20 years, which is how long i i maternal care? really over the last 20 years, which is how long i have | 20 years, which is how long i have been acting for, really, we are seeing the same problems time and time again. which obviously is really worrying. and the progress is very slow. and i think that is what the report is really finding. things need to be done in order to address, notjust the training and the quality of care in the trust around the uk, but also fundamentally to understand why these things are happening in the first place. and thatis happening in the first place. and that is really where we are failing at the moment. loath? that is really where we are failing at the moment.— that is really where we are failing at the moment. why are they things happening? — at the moment. why are they things happening? it _ at the moment. why are they things happening? it is _ at the moment. why are they things happening? it is a — at the moment. why are they things happening? it is a combination i at the moment. why are they things happening? it is a combination of. happening? it is a combination of thins, it happening? it is a combination of things. it is _ happening? it is a combination of things. it is a _ happening? it is a combination of things, it is a really _ happening? it is a combination of things, it is a really difficult i things, it is a really difficult time within the nhs. notjust staffing pressures but also in terms of cultural array, we have got some real problems as evidenced by the fact that we have got several inquiries are ongoing, earlier this year we had reports that demonstrated that there are problems widespread, or have been widespread
8:45 pm
problems. we are awaiting the publication of the report ease can we have got the review into what is going on in nottingham. it leaves us with an alarming picture that these problems are going under the radar for too long. i have got some hope that the families are now being listened to, but really family shouldn't be campaigning for the their voice to be heard. bare shouldn't be campaigning for the their voice to be heard. are there s stems their voice to be heard. are there systems in _ their voice to be heard. are there systems in place _ their voice to be heard. are there systems in place of— their voice to be heard. are there systems in place of people i their voice to be heard. are there systems in place of people to i their voice to be heard. are there systems in place of people to go| their voice to be heard. are there i systems in place of people to go to speak to you?— speak to you? when things like this ha en a speak to you? when things like this happen a trust _ speak to you? when things like this happen a trust will— speak to you? when things like this happen a trust will carry _ speak to you? when things like this happen a trust will carry out - speak to you? when things like this happen a trust will carry out an i happen a trust will carry out an internal investigation. the problem with those as they can be quite flawed because naturally it is difficult for an organisation to appraise itself. and to point criticism at colleagues. so, i very much favour the approach of independent investigation by external bodies. we have got a step
8:46 pm
in the right direction with the body who have been undertaking investigations for a portion of these types of cases. but the arena isn't broad enough and really we need to see independence in these investigations. because frankly if you can't pinpoint the failures and how is anybody going to learn the lessons? that is all we need to do, we need to come together as health professionals, legal profession and patient safety is paramount and really that is the only way it can be achieved.— really that is the only way it can be achieved. ., . , ., ,, be achieved. you have been working in this field for— be achieved. you have been working in this field for some _ be achieved. you have been working in this field for some time, - be achieved. you have been working in this field for some time, when i in this field for some time, when family first approaches you is something that you would tell them first of all about the process they're to undertake? ihlo first of all about the process they're to undertake? no one goes under that process _ they're to undertake? no one goes under that process lightly, - they're to undertake? no one goes under that process lightly, when i under that process lightly, when families come to us theyjust want to know what happened. they want to know why i happen. and if things could have been done differently they want to understand that. if failures took place and they want an apology. ultimately, often quite far
8:47 pm
down the line there is no question of compensation or address, but it becomes very important because as we saw in the case of. so the figures that we here quoted are frankly because somebody now needs 20 47 care. they might need adapted accommodation, specialist therapies for the rest of their life. and busy that comes at a cost. but the real way to eliminate that cost is to learn the lessons at the outset, to look further down at the root causes of these problems. that is the way that we eliminate the cost in all of this. ., ~ that we eliminate the cost in all of this. . ,, , ., that we eliminate the cost in all of this. . ,, i. ., ., , this. thank you for “oining us. in other news. h this. thank you for “oining us. in other news, a i this. thank you for “oining us. in other news, a 15 i this. thank you forjoining us. in other news, a 15 old _ this. thank you forjoining us. in other news, a 15 old boy - this. thank you forjoining us. in other news, a 15 old boy is i this. thank you forjoining us. in other news, a 15 old boy is in i other news, a 15 old boy is in critical condition in hospital after an incident near a school in huddersfield. emergency services were called this afternoon after reports that a teenager had been
8:48 pm
seriously injured in an assault. west yorkshire police said the inquiry is under way to establish the circumstances. 0ur reporter has beenin the circumstances. 0ur reporter has been in huddersfield for us. the incident been in huddersfield for us. tie: incident happened here been in huddersfield for us. ti9: incident happened here this afternoon. emergency service got a call at 2:45pm to reports that a boy, a 15—year—old had been seriously injured in an attack. that 15—year—old boy is now in a critical condition in hospital and west yorkshire police have released a statement saying that inquiries are under way to the circumstances. there is a chord in hair that is going to remain in place while those investigations are carried out. this is a place where 900 children go to school. don't forget it has just been a summer holiday, they have just come back and some of them have just come back and some of them have just started her. so this is a community left shaken by the events of this afternoon and a community that a are desperate for answers.
8:49 pm
the new york attorney general has announced that she is suing former president, donald trump, three of his adult children and his real estate the trump organisation fraud. she said that his organisation had repeatedly used false statements to get banks to lend him money under favourable terms. this follows a three—year investigation. he has branded the suit politically motivated. the attorney general announced the suit at a press conference. following a comprehensive three year investigation by my office, including witnesses, interviews with more than 65 witnesses, and review of millions of documents that were submitted by mr.trump and others. i am announcing that today, we are filing a lawsuit against donald trump. for violating the law as part of his efforts to generate profits for himself, his family
8:50 pm
and his company. the complaint demonstrates that donald trump falsely inflated his net worth by billions of dollars to unjustly enrich himself and to cheat the system, thereby cheating all of us. he did this with the help of the other defendants, his children. donald trumer, ivanka trump and eric trump. and former trump 0rganization cfo allen weisselberg and trump 0rganization controllerjeffrey mcconney. mr.trump and the trump 0rganization repeatedly and persistently manipulated the value of assets to induce banks to lend money to the trump organization a more favorable terms than would otherwise have been
8:51 pm
available to the company. to pay lower taxes, to satisfy continuing loan agreements and to induce insurance companies to provide insurance coverage for higher limits and at lower premiums. his conduct was all in violation of executive law, section 6312, which gives the attorney general broad and special powers to go after persistent and repeated fraud and illegality. as part of demonstrating illegality under that section of law, 6312 we show that they violated several state criminal laws. including, falsifying business records, issuing false financial statements. insurance fraud. and engaging in a conspiracy to commit each of these state law violations. the new york stated attorney general
8:52 pm
there. for more on the story. the new york attorney general is accusing donald trump along with donald junor, ivanka and eric champ of falsely exaggerating how much he was worth by billions of dollars in order to convince banks to lend money at preferential rates. claiming you have money that you do not have is not the art of the deal she said, it is the art of this deal. for instance, donald trump is accused of claiming that his manhattan apartment was worth way more than actually was by billions of dollars, by claiming it was three times the size it really is. donald trump has responded already on social media accusing the new york attorney general of a racist witchhunt saying that she has got her own political agenda. he was interviewed by investigators in this case a few weeks ago and he refused to answer questions invoking his right to answer more than 400 times. this case is a civil suit meaning
8:53 pm
there can't be anyjail sentences as a result. but the attorney general says that she believes that she has evidence that state and federal laws have also been violated. let's return out of the news that five british nationals who've been held by pro—russian forces in eastern ukraine have been released. these are the latest pictures of the release captives are riding in saudi arabia. saudi arabia mediated the release, aiden aslin from nottinghamshire they were... john harding and sean pinner. the father of the 15—year—old who took her own life after being exposed to harmful content online has told an inquest into her death that he was shocked when he discovered what she had been looking at online. he said it was only after her death that she had been accessing large numbers of
8:54 pm
disturbing close about anxiety, self—harm and even suicide. we have this report. they were words molly's family were never meant to see. some of them are so painful to read. we just wish we'd been able to help her. june 2017, six months before she died, and she wrote, "it sucks when you want to cry but you just sit there, doing nothing." she also wrote, "how can you tell the people you love that you want to die?" at times, her mood did lift. she followed celebrities like ariana grande and she loved harry potter. but then her worries and insecurities would seem to overwhelm her. "my mind has been full of suicidal thoughts for a while, but reading harry potter and the world you created is my escape," and she @—ed jk rowling.
8:55 pm
in a way, molly does seem to have been asking for help, but ian says she was just shouting into the ether. none of the celebrities she tweeted messaged her back. of course they didn't. how could they have noticed her amongst their millions of followers? celebrities, like an american influencer called salice rose. molly idolised her and messaged repeatedly. "i don't want to be in this world any more," molly wrote. "i kind of want to die." louisa runs children's mental health charity beyond. it's a clear call for help. it's a clear call for support. she's saying that she needs help. but she's saying it into this kind of vacuous void. but the reality is that social media can't respond. it's not equipped. it's really sad. salice rose didn't want to be interviewed, but she did send
8:56 pm
us this video message. i'm sad that i didn't know her- before she even did what she did. i wish i knew her so i could have called her and been like, "hey, i you know, don't do this. like, things get better." it's november 2017 and molly writes her final message. molly tweeted to salice rose, "happy birthday, have an amazing day." that evening, i really don't know that she was thinking that she wouldn't be there the next morning. all i would say is, if you're in a place, a horrible, low place where you actually want to end your life, please reach out to those people that you love, cos they would so much rather you did. angus crawford, bbc news. if you have been affected by any of
8:57 pm
theissues if you have been affected by any of the issues raised by the story, you can find help and support from organisations listed. a spectacular view of the planet neptune has been captured by nasa's james webb telescope. it is the clearest image that has been taken for 30 years. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. for many of you, it's been a dry day today with some decent spells of sunshine breaking through the clouds. some of the sunniest weather has been across southwest england, where here in dorset, we had barely a cloud in the sky. however, it's not been like that for western scotland, where, through the afternoon, the clouds really have been gathering and thickening. this cloud here is this cloud here on the satellite picture, it's a weather front that's on the way. a weather front that's going to be particularly slow moving, indeed, it's going to take the next two days
8:58 pm
to cross the uk, eventually spreading the rain in to east anglia and southeast england, but a slow process for sure. 0vernight tonight, the weather front will continue to shuffle its way in, bringing outbreaks of rain into northwestern areas. so, if it's not already raining where you are, for scotland and northern ireland, it will be through the night, and the rain's going to be quite heavy at times too. eventually the rain spreads across dumfries and galloway and starts to bring some wet weather into cumbria. but that's right towards the end of the night. now, with clear spells across parts of england and wales, we could see temperatures in the countryside dip down into single figures, but it's mild for scotland and northern ireland, 14 or 15 celsius. but it's a wet start to the day here. now through thursday, the weather front does move away. so we'll see some sunshine following to the northwest with just a few isolated afternoon showers, an improving weather picture. whereas for northern england, wales and south west england, outbreaks of rain will be moving in during thursday, and, again, there could be a few heavier bursts mixed in. to the east of the front, it is still quite warm with some sunny spells across the midlands, east anglia and southeast england.
8:59 pm
behind the front temperatures drop a bit, and it will certainly feel a fair bit fresher. now thursday night, the weather front loses some of its strength, so the rain becomes a bit lighter and patchier as it moves across the midlands and central southern england. by the time it reaches east anglia in the southeast on friday, initially quite weak, it looks like the weather front is actually going to get a bit stronger, so the rain turns heavier for a time across east anglia and southeast england. away from that, though, a decent day, sunny spells and, again, just a few showers into the north west. now we're taking a look at the weather charts into the weekend and beyond, another weather front dives its way southwards, and behind that, we get cooler and fresher air. so some fairly brisk winds around next week and certainly plenty of showers, too. but that said, the weekend not looking too bad, although there'll be some showers, it's still on the mild side. it's monday onwards that we see those strengthening winds and quite a big drop in temperatures. goodbye.
9:00 pm
hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. the war will go on — vladimir putin has called up the reservists and warns that russia will defend the territory it has taken from ukraine with nuclear weapons if necessary. since the draught was announced, over 1000 anti—war protesters have been arrrested in russia. not so much "the art of the deal as the art of the steal", says new york's attorney general. she is suing donald trump and his children for $250 million over alleged fraud that netted the trump 0rganization millions in profit. and the furious protests in iran following the death in police custody of a woman arrested for not wearing the hijab appropriately.
9:01 pm
tonight with the context, from rome, former foreign policy adviser to the eu nathalie tocci, and from chevy chase,

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on