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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 24, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. eyewitnesses say armed soldiers are going door—to—door in occupied parts of ukraine to collect votes for so—called "referendums" on joining russia. at the united nations general assembly, russia's foreign minister has accused the west of stirring up tensions around the world. translation: the west is introducing diverting lines everywhere along the lines of the confrontation between blocks. you're either with us or against us. there is no third option. in iran, increasingly violent anti—government protests have continued for an eighth day. the uk opposition leader, sir keir starmer, will set out to his party conference the dividing
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lines between labour and the new conservative government. after 12 long years of tory failure, didn't_ after 12 long years of tory failure, didn't they— after 12 long years of tory failure, didn't theyjust show their true colours — didn't theyjust show their true colours yesterday? didn't they just show their true colours yesterday?— didn't they just show their true colours yesterday?- do i didn't theyjust show their true colours yesterday? yeah! do nothing for workinu colours yesterday? yeah! do nothing for working people. _ and how one of the world's most streamed performers, bad bunny, has used his fame to draw attention to the issues facing his native puerto rico. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. reports from ukraine say armed soldiers have been going door to door in occupied parts
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of the country to collect votes for self—styled "referendums" onjoining russia. russian state media says door—to—door voting is necessary for security reasons. these are the four areas where voting is being held. they include occupied parts of luhansk and donetsk in the east, and zaporizhzhia and kherson, in the south — and cover around 15% of ukraine's territory. the so—called referenda have been widely condemned. the us presidentjoe biden described them as a sham and a false pretext to try to illegally annex parts of ukraine. our ukraine correspondentjames waterhouse reports from kyiv. russia's version of their so—called referendums. a free and fair democratic process where ukrainians in kherson decide whether they want to join russia. but, on the same spot today, in the city centre, it's deserted.
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ukrainian officials have posted footage like this. loud knocking apparently ballots being taken door—to—door, with the support of armed men. on this unverified cctv clip, a man is asked what apartment he's from. "i don't live here." "are you sure?" "yes," he says. he carries on down without looking over his shoulder. we've spoken to several people under russian occupation... outgoing dialling tone. hello. hi, bleep. ..including natalia — not her real name. nice to hear you, too. a producer has voiced her words. what are your friends and family thinking about this? do they want to go and vote? translation: all of my friends are against the referendum, - because we are sure
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that the referendum will be rigged. we don't understand why we should answer the question that is written on the ballots. we don't want to be part of russia. driven by losses on the battlefield and growing criticisms back home, the kremlin wants to legitimise its presence in ukraine, while threatening an escalation if ukraine keeps pushing back. this isn't about democracy. it's a move straight out of the russian playbook. the result will be what russia needs it to be. and ukraine is calling on the world to see right through it. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. one kherson resident has been telling the bbc about the situation there. he says it is tense and he's afraid to go outside. i saw so many porters for information on social media that
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russian soldiers are working and knocking on doors —— posts for information. the reports come from the villages as well, and they are varying from village to village. some of them, people refuse to go. they have to leave their homes within 2a hours, otherwise they will face bitter consequences. i will not explain how, but nobody will reach my door. i will continue staying here, but my plans might change at any moment. everything depends on the situation, and everything is changing every day. the president of ukraine, volodymyrzelensky, has accused the russian leader vladimir putin of knowingly �*sending russian citizens to their death'.
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it comes as russia continues to call up reservists to fight in ukraine. human rights groups say more than 700 people have been arrested at anti—war demonstrations across russia since the mobilisation was announced. this video footage has emerged which appears to show a fight in the russian city of omsk between men drafted to the army and local police. the footage appears to show russian police trying to force the men onto buses, according to the reuters news agency journalist who shared the video. this footage has not been verified by the bbc. president putin has announced a call—up of around 300,000 russian who have done compulsory have done compulsory military service. 300,000 russians who have done compulsory military service. i've been speaking to tomila lankina, professor of international relations at london school of economics and political science, about the reaction president putin's move to draft civilians in russia.
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people attempting to leave russia are people who can afford to do so, and if_ are people who can afford to do so, and if the _ are people who can afford to do so, and if the a — are people who can afford to do so, and if the a formed segment of russian — and if the a formed segment of russian population, because there is still a _ russian population, because there is still a large _ russian population, because there is still a large chunk of russian society— still a large chunk of russian society that is in denial, and what we are _ society that is in denial, and what we are witnessing now is actually a shift in _ we are witnessing now is actually a shift in the — we are witnessing now is actually a shift in the awareness of the other percentage of the population that have had — percentage of the population that have had wool over their eyes but are how _ have had wool over their eyes but are now realising war has come to russia _ are now realising war has come to russia but — are now realising war has come to russia. but the people who are fleeing — russia. but the people who are fleeing are the ones who can afford to do— fleeing are the ones who can afford to do so, _ fleeing are the ones who can afford to do so, who have the resources are more _ to do so, who have the resources are more informed and have been aware perhaps— more informed and have been aware perhaps for— more informed and have been aware perhaps for a longer time or recently— perhaps for a longer time or recently become aware of the reality of the _ recently become aware of the reality of the aggression that russia's pursuing — of the aggression that russia's pursuing in ukraine. but also, this is how— pursuing in ukraine. but also, this is now personally affecting many more _
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is now personally affecting many more people that has been the case before, _ more people that has been the case before, but— more people that has been the case before, but the interesting thing to observe _ before, but the interesting thing to observe is — before, but the interesting thing to observe is that the people who have been perhaps watching russian propaganda are not as informed as the liberal— propaganda are not as informed as the liberal based middle—class groups — the liberal based middle—class groups. they are also realising that the war— groups. they are also realising that the war is— groups. they are also realising that the war is affecting them personally, there's an interesting shift to— personally, there's an interesting shift to observe as well. people in villages— shift to observe as well. people in villages and rural areas are not necessarily willing responding to this call— necessarily willing responding to this call to come to the constriction centres and be taking away— constriction centres and be taking away and — constriction centres and be taking away and are actually thinking about plan away and are actually thinking about pleh a, _ away and are actually thinking about plan a, plan b, what should they do? their— plan a, plan b, what should they do? their opihioh — plan a, plan b, what should they do? their opinion now is shifting and it i their opinion now is shifting and it i have _ their opinion now is shifting and it i have friends and family in russia, eveh _ i have friends and family in russia, even people who have been very, very supportive _ even people who have been very, very supportive of the regime, some of them _ supportive of the regime, some of them live — supportive of the regime, some of them live in rural areas, don't have marry sources — them live in rural areas, don't have many sources of information. they
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watched _ many sources of information. they watched a — many sources of information. they watched a propaganda news. all of a sudden, _ watched a propaganda news. all of a sudden, they're realising their hephews— sudden, they're realising their nephews are being taken away, their son is— nephews are being taken away, their son is being — nephews are being taken away, their son is being taken away and possibly taken _ son is being taken away and possibly taken very— son is being taken away and possibly taken very quickly to face certain death _ taken very quickly to face certain death. they're becoming critical in the dash— death. they're becoming critical in the dash of— death. they're becoming critical in the dash of the regime. that is something in interesting to observe, we are _ something in interesting to observe, we are observing a shift in public opinion— we are observing a shift in public opihioh of— we are observing a shift in public opinion of this layer of the population that have not been very informed _ population that have not been very informed orjust simply thought that the war— informed orjust simply thought that the war is— informed orjust simply thought that the war is not something that affects — the war is not something that affects them.— the war is not something that affects them. , ' affects them. very different when it's impacting _ affects them. very different when it's impacting on _ affects them. very different when it's impacting on you _ affects them. very different when it's impacting on you personally. l it's impacting on you personally. for those who are leaving, those images at the border, for example, the border between georgia and russia — those are not the best optics for president putin. are they being allowed to leave safely? at being allowed to leave safely? at the moment, the reality of russia is
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that it _ the moment, the reality of russia is that it is _ the moment, the reality of russia is that it is a _ the moment, the reality of russia is that it is a country that is, we think of— that it is a country that is, we think of it _ that it is a country that is, we think of it as a totalising state, much _ think of it as a totalising state, much like _ think of it as a totalising state, much like the starlet system was. much— much like the starlet system was. much like — much like the starlet system was. much like the soviet system, even under— much like the soviet system, even under stalin, even under the darkest is decades, _ under stalin, even under the darkest is decades, it was still a not very well—managed country. the sense that you can _ well—managed country. the sense that you can have _ well—managed country. the sense that you can have people escaping for this _ you can have people escaping for this the — you can have people escaping for this. the record—keeping is so poor and so _ this. the record—keeping is so poor and so primitive, in many cases, it's on— and so primitive, in many cases, it's on paper _ and so primitive, in many cases, it's on paper. there have also been our sins _ it's on paper. there have also been our sins which have intensifies, so our sins which have intensifies, so our people — our sins which have intensifies, so our people trying to set them on fire or— our people trying to set them on fire or throw molotov cocktails at
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the centres. so the reality of organising this is also something that is— organising this is also something that is a — organising this is also something that is a mirror into russian bureaucracy and russian mismanagement, really. reports suggest that authorities have regained control of large parts of a town in western iran from anti—government demonstrators. the protesters had briefly seized large parts of the city of oshnevyeh, which lies close to the border with iraq. footage appeared to show protesters in control of the town. police say about 740 people have been arrested nationwide, including 60 women, after protests were sparked by the death in custody of a woman who'd allegedly broken dress rules. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent, jiyar gol. the city of oshnavieh is a small kurdish town, but that was the city in the first day of the protests,
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three young people died there — i could hear them, actually. they were shouting "freedom, we will take revenge for those martyrs, and you have nowhere to go." and last night, actually, we managed to get in touch with some people because close to the iraqi border, sometimes the signalfrom iraqi kurdistan, they can pick it up, so we talked to some people and they were telling us many of the officials left the city, or they took their families out of the city. they went to the place where there was a military or a revolutionary guard barracks. but at this point in time, we know in the morning the protesters somehow went back, they came out at night, so they have been going house by house. they have arrested so many people. but it's notjust in the city. in other cities, and in tehran, and i'm talking to you at night, three and a half hours ahead, we are hearing in some neighbourhoods, in some cities, the police cannot go because they're using molotov cocktails and attacking them with stones. so the protesters are
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continuing in so many different places as we talk. how do these protests compared to those back in 2009 when we look at the crackdown from the government? i think first of all, there is a saying in there is a saying in the middle east — if women leave, men don't retreat. when you see so many women going out there and standing up to revolutionary generals, removing their headscarves, something that's punishable, and we see so many people... but byjudging from past experience, the fear so many people have, the government might deal with these protests heavy heavy—handedly and might use force, which we have seen in the footage, they are using live ammunition and directly aiming at protesters with weapons. i'm just thinking of the context and the background to what we're seeing on the streets in iran now. generally, what is the state of the economy in the country? is there a much deeper malaise that is going on?
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i think for so many years, women, they are imposing this strict islamic rule on women, controlling them, and many women, well—educated, they see it as a humiliation command well—educated, they see it as a humiliation. on top of it, corruption, economic situation in iran, sanctions, inflation, unemployment — there is so many elements hand—in—hand and people believe the government day after day is lying to them and they don't care about their future, their current situation of the economy, of the economy. that's why so many young people who have been educated in this who have been educated in this system have nothing to lose and they are out there in the street. here in the uk, the leader of the opposition labour party, sir keir starmer, has arrived in liverpool ahead of the start of the party's annual conference. he's condemned the package of tax cuts unveiled by the chancellor on friday — calling them �*tory casino economics�*, which, he says, are gambling with the finances of every family in the country.
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the government insists its package of measures, including scrapping the top rate of income tax, will help kick—start economic growth. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. labour's been out of power for more than a decade, but they now believe their political fortunes could be turning around. just as their party conference gets under way, liz truss has made just as her party conference gets under way, liz truss has made the political dividing lines with the opposition far more stark. applause arriving in liverpool, the labour leader believes this will work to his advantage. after 12 long years of tory failure, didn't they just show their true colours yesterday? crowd: yes! and earlier, the party's deputy leader argued that yesterday's tax—cutting, not—so—mini budget, had now given labour an opportunity to set out a distinct vision on the economy. the conservatives have failed to grow our economy over 12 years and now we're seeing
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that there is a last—ditch attempt at going for the risky strategy byjust helping those at the top. i don't believe that'll give us the growth and investment we need for the future or will help those that are working hard today. over loudspeaker: my city, my people, my heart. - my city, my people, my heart. but not everything in the wider labour movement is harmonious. keir starmer has told his senior mps to stay away from picket lines, but not far from his conference, a strike has flared up at liverpool docks. the people on the picket line here are members of unite, the union that gives more money to the labour party than any other. that union's leader met keir starmer in recent days and what she wants to see is a more ambitious economic policy from him and perhaps, unsurprisingly, far more support for striking workers. i think he wants to make it very clear that he's supporting workers and the reality is actions will speak louder than words. for me, jam tomorrow does not pay the bills as far as workers are concerned. and therefore, today is the time they are struggling, today
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is the time they are on the picket lines, today is the time that they want labour to put their arm around them. this is a crucial conference for us on the left... and left—wing delegates are pushing for a motion to be debated that would support mps joining picket lines and which would call for pay rises to be at or above inflation. but keir starmer will be keen to show that his party has emerged from the political storms of thejeremy corbyn era, and that the clear blue water in british politics is now between government and opposition. iain watson, bbc news, liverpool. russia's foreign minister, sergey lavrov, sat with press after addressing the united nations general assembly. he blamed the start of the war on the ukrainian government, which he says created a situation in eastern ukraine that was "intolerable" for ethnic russians living there. translation: | would like just - to comment on some of the statements thatjust today have been heard from washington, london,
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brussels and other western capitals with respect to the referenda which in these days are to be carried out in donetsk people's republic, the luhansk people's republic and the liberated territories of kherson and zaporizhzhia oblast in ukraine. the hysteria with which we have seen is very telling. the direct expression of the popular will of citizens has long ceased to be a form of establishment of control over a territory which the west has embraced and supported. however, once again i do wish to draw attention to something i have said already when, in august of 2021, mr zelensky, in one of the interviews, vociferously
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proclaimed that in the east of ukraine, there are not even people. for the sake of the future of their children, he would recommend that those people leave, go to russia. so, if... will he launch the process... mr lavrov was highly critical of washington and what he described as �*russophobia' in the west. nada tawfik gave us her reaction to his address. he was really trying to turn the west's— he was really trying to turn the west's argument around. we know western— west's argument around. we know western nations have said that the war in— western nations have said that the war in ukraine really undermines the current— war in ukraine really undermines the current world order creative after world _ current world order creative after world war — current world order creative after world war ii, the very principles that you — world war ii, the very principles that you can't invade your neighbour and take _
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that you can't invade your neighbour and take land by force. what we heard _ and take land by force. what we heard here from the foreign minister of russia _ heard here from the foreign minister of russia was that he accused the west— of russia was that he accused the west of— of russia was that he accused the west of trying to destroy his country— west of trying to destroy his country and fracture it. in his narrative _ country and fracture it. in his narrative was that nato had been encroaching on russia's borders, that they— encroaching on russia's borders, that they had tried to negotiate for years— that they had tried to negotiate for years over— that they had tried to negotiate for years over eastern ukraine through the minsk— years over eastern ukraine through the minsk agreements, but he accused ukraine _ the minsk agreements, but he accused ukraine and _ the minsk agreements, but he accused ukraine and the west of not being open _ ukraine and the west of not being open to— ukraine and the west of not being open to negotiations and said that the west— open to negotiations and said that the west was acting as a self—proclaimed masters of the world who are _ self—proclaimed masters of the world who are acting unilaterally through sanctions. — who are acting unilaterally through sanctions, using them as blackmail and trying — sanctions, using them as blackmail and trying to create the entire world — and trying to create the entire world as — and trying to create the entire world as its own back yard. so, this was a _ world as its own back yard. so, this was a very— world as its own back yard. so, this was a very extreme attack on the west— was a very extreme attack on the west here — was a very extreme attack on the west here by the russian foreign minister. — west here by the russian foreign minister, but repeating the lines we have heard — minister, but repeating the lines we have heard in the past, justify what they deem — have heard in the past, justify what they deem their special measures
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yearly— they deem their special measures yearly operations some point. serie a lavrov— yearly operations some point. serie a lavrov did — yearly operations some point. serie a lavrov did make a comment on those referendums, _ a lavrov did make a comment on those referendums, accusing the west of hysteria _ referendums, accusing the west of hysteria -- — referendums, accusing the west of hysteria. —— sergey lavrov. comparing _ hysteria. —— sergey lavrov. comparing this to crimea. saying that these — comparing this to crimea. saying that these referendums are ethnic russians— that these referendums are ethnic russians who want to be part of russia, — russians who want to be part of russia, but certainly, what we heard from the _ russia, but certainly, what we heard from the rest of the international community is expressing extreme concern _ community is expressing extreme concern about these referendums and the un _ concern about these referendums and the un secretary—general himself and his comments to the un security council. — his comments to the un security council, talking about how this would — council, talking about how this would he — council, talking about how this would be a violation of international law. more than 500,000 people in eastern canada are without power as the region continues to be battered by a huge storm.
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these pictures show the town of channel—port aux basques. storm fiona brought winds of nearly 150 kilometres per hour, tearing down power lines and trees. authorities have issued severe weather warnings and prime ministerjustin trudeau has promised to send help to the affected regions. we have approved nova scotia'si request for federal assistance and will deploy the canadian armed forces to assist in assessmentl and clean—up, and stand ready to do more. - we are seeing reports of significant damage in the region and recoveryl is going to be a big effort. we will be there to support every step of the way. - the international recording artist bad bunny has released a new music video from his latest album. the clip isn'tjust a video to accompany his hit �*reggae—ton' track. it's also a viral documentary about the issues facing the artist's native puerto rico. released just hours before hurricane fiona struck, it's already racked up millions of views.
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ben derico has the story. # puerto rico, esta bien, cabron...# this is bad bunny, one of the world's most popular musicians. on spotify alone, he has over 44 billion streams. he's just released his latest music video for his song el apagon, but it's not your usual video clip. kacho lopez is the video's director. it was an idea, it was a bad bunny idea. they called and said, "how do we turn a music into a documentary?" not your usual ask, but he and his team found a way. after three minutes of music, the video transitions into a 20—minute report about some of the island's most pressing issues, like blackouts, corruption and american influence. you know, it's kind of like a trojan horse in that it uses bad bunny's popularity and his platform to get people that were not looking for a documentary about these issues and having them just come to have
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fun, come to get entertained by the music, and, all of a sudden, wait, what is he talking about? the documentary is fronted by bianca graulau, a journalist in puerto rico who has gained followers on platforms like tiktok and instagram for her investigative reporting. as the documentary says, - "aqui vive gente", people live here. this is notjust your playground, this is notjust a tourism - destination, there are people who have been living - here for generations and they're i struggling to have a good life. i it's been five years since hurricane maria decimated infrastructure across puerto rico. since then, blackouts have become common and, to make things worse, since hurricane fiona passed through, thousands are still without power. so, i think it's that balance that shows the real puerto rico — a place that's beautiful, a place that's rich and amazing,
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but also a place that has problems. the video has over 6 million views and it's given an amazing platform to a documentary that wouldn't usually get anywhere near as many. but will viewers keep watching when bad bunny isn't asking them to? puerto rico and the world will have wait to find out. ben derico, bbc news, san francisco. nasa has called off another scheduled launch of its historic un—crewed mission to the moon — which was due to take place on tuesday. that's because of tropical storm ian, which could become a hurricane as it approaches florida. it's the third delay in a month for the test flight, which has suffered a fuel leak and other technical glitches at the end of august. nasa had previously said that a further delay would force them the first picture of the new ledger stone marking queen elizabeth's final resting place in windsor has been released by buckingham palace. it's engraved in memory of the queen, her parents and her late husband,
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the duke of edinburgh. it sits in the floor of the george vi memorial chapel, where she was buried on monday. you're watching bbc news. in a few minutes, we'll take a look at tomorrow's front pages in the papers — our guests joining me tonight are the journalist and author shyama perera and katy balls, deputy political editor of the spectator. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. it's set to get colder for all of us over the next few days. although that said, lowers temperatures likely to be sunday morning. for most, a chilly start to sunday, but a lovely sunny one. assure you showers will crop up and
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most will be dry. a band of heavy rain corp. sweeping across these areas. temperatures for all down. those wins will go northwesterly as we go into sunday evening. that band of rain, pushing through quite quickly than clear skies and showers. in that rain spread southwards across much of england and wales. it probably won't feel as chillyjust because of the strength of the wind. that wind will be a key feature because, as we go into monday, it's coming down from the north and northwest, feeding it with a arctic air. it probably won't feel too bad out there, but in the showers on monday, it will feel distantly chilly. those showers spread across the country quite
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rapidly, so really rain to allow a sunnier day. —— early rain. dusting 40 sunnier day. —— early rain. dusting a0 may be 50 mph. just notice only 9 degrees in aberdeen. a chilly day on tuesday, a slight shift means eastern areas will have a much brighter day. showers in the north and west, maybe some longer spells or rain. temperatures may be up to around 15—16 , but only 10—1a degrees for many on tuesday. winds will fall later for wednesday and thursday as low pressure gradually pulls away. but it's still going to be chilly, temperatures only in the teens and there will be some for the rain at times.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the journalist and author shyama perera and also katy balls — deputy political editor of the spectator. hello again to you both. a quick look through the front pages for our viewers. the observer leads with keir starmer�*s green growth plan, which he says will "boostjobs
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and slash emissions". "you ain't seen nothing yet," reads the front

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