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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 25, 2022 9:00am-9:30am BST

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this is bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. i'm samantha simmonds and these are the headlines. voting is under way in italy's general election, with opinion polls suggesting victory for the far right which would usher in the country's most right—wing government since world war ii. these are live pictures of rome as people vote in an election triggered by party infighting that brought down prime minister mario draghi's broad national unity government injuly. in the uk, the labour party pledges to boost the economy and create jobs through investment in green energy with plans of making the electricity network carbon—free by 2030. thousands queue at the georgian border to leave russia as president zelensky accuses vladimir putin of sending russian conscripts to their death in ukraine by forcing them to fight in the war.
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a british man freed after being held by russian—backed forces in ukraine describes how he was stabbed by a russian officer and thought he was going to die in captivity. and from a dead rat to an exploding martini glass. the bbc gets rare access into the cia's secret museum where thousands of exhibits and artefacts mark the agency's 75—year history. hello and welcome to bbc news. voting is under way in italy's general election. polling stations opened two hours ago. opinion polls taken during the campain suggest the country will get its first—ever female prime minister, and its first far right leader since mussolini, in giorgia meloni.
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a win for her party would be expected to see the return of silvio berlusconi and matteo salvini to government, two men who've had ties to russia's president putin. our rome correspondent mark lowen reports. there are some things that italians agree on — they've got the best coffee and food — and many they don't. politics is one of them, and it's at the fore today in a crunch election. it was sparked injuly when the prime minister mario draghi lost the support of his coalition partners. so—called super mario had stabilised this politically volatile country amidst the covid pandemic and war in ukraine. giorgia meloni's far—right brothers of italy has led the polls. she wants tax cuts, a naval blockade of libya to stop migrant boats, and is hard—line on lgbt rights. her party has neo—fascist roots but she vehemently rejects the label. she is in coalition with the ultranationalist league of matteo salvini and the ex—prime
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minister silvio berlusconi, known as much for his bunga bunga sex parties as his centre—right politics. fighting them is enrico letta, pro—europe and pro—civil rights, but he failed to form a broad centre—left coalition. he fell out with the once anti—establishment five star movement that came top last time, but has plummeted. it's hoping its social welfare policies will save it now. so, how will the poll affect the war in ukraine? mario draghi has been a big supporter of kyiv and while giorgia meloni backs that, her coalition partners have had close ties with vladimir putin, and salvini has even suggested dropping sanctions on moscow due to the energy crisis. so, this election matters, both here with italy perhaps about to elect its first woman prime minister and first far—right leader since mussolini, and abroad with implications for its relationship with europe. but this country has had
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almost 70 governments since the second world war, so we mightjust be back here again next year. let's cross live to our europe correspondentjessica parker who's in verona in northern italy. what would the possible election of this far right government mean for the people of italy? figs this far right government mean for the people of italy?— the people of italy? as mark was 'ust the people of italy? as mark was just outlining. — the people of italy? as mark was just outlining, this _ the people of italy? as mark was just outlining, this would - the people of italy? as mark was just outlining, this would be - the people of italy? as mark was just outlining, this would be the | just outlining, this would be the first far right government italy has seen since the second world war, so it would spell a political change for italy, but as his report was also reflecting, italian politics can be volatile, and when you talk to people here about polling day, we were speaking to voters yesterday, a lot of people didn't know how they were going to vote today. there is a sense of wariness, another government coming and going in this political system that sees it happen not infrequently. so obviously it depends how the votes shake down, who might become or be appointed as prime minister, and who forms the
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next government. but certainly some of those policies that giorgia meloni from brothers of italy leading those polls that have caused some controversy with policies such as a naval blockade of libya to stop migrants crossing to italy, they seem to be issues that people care about here, but the cost of living crisis as well as something that a lot of people talk about, notjust energy costs but also inflation. a local paper here talking about how the price of bread is even going up, so people we're speaking to really want to see some action in terms of trying to bring down that cost of living. giorgia meloni has talked about tax cuts as part of her right—wing coalition, her right—wing alliance, and of course the management of italy's economy, the management of italy's economy, the management of italy's economy, the management of the debt, will really matter notjust a people here in italy but across the eu as well. this is europe's third largest economy.
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this is europe's third largest economy-— this is europe's third largest econom . ~ . . ., economy. and what are her main opposition _ economy. and what are her main opposition party. _ economy. and what are her main opposition party, the _ economy. and what are her main opposition party, the centre-left| opposition party, the centre—left democratic party, offering? the? democratic party, offering? they have talked _ democratic party, offering? they have talked about _ democratic party, offering? tie: have talked about trying to democratic party, offering? tie1: have talked about trying to build democratic party, offering? tie1 have talked about trying to build on renewable energy, a minimum wage of 9 euros as well. they have been trying to suggest that it isn't over, that they are fighting for every vote, but of course they have been riven by splits, and something that giorgia meloni seems to have benefited from as the only major party leader who didn't take part in that coalition overseen by mario draghi that collapsed earlier in the summer, but a lot of people are looking at the centre and they really struggled to pull together while georgia maloney of course tied herself to silvio berlusconi, sal vini as well, and that is the other issue that is worth mentioning. you referred to itjust a moment ago and so did mark and his report, comments previously by sal vini, by silvio
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berlusconi, is causing some concerns in eu circles. giorgia meloni has said she is prone supporting ukraine and sanctions in russia, but the eu is already facing quite a lot of pressure from some countries, particularly hungary, in terms of the sanctions, and the pressure it is putting on european families and businesses as well.— businesses as well. jessica park in verona, businesses as well. jessica park in verona. thank _ businesses as well. jessica park in verona, thank you _ businesses as well. jessica park in verona, thank you very _ businesses as well. jessica park in verona, thank you very much. - the british labour party has set out plans to make the uk the first major world economy to generate all of its electricity without using fossil fuels. today is the first full day of the party's conference and leader sir keir starmer will argue that their plan would cut energy bills, help tackle the climate crisis and create hundreds of thousands of jobs. 0ur political correspondent ione wells reports from liverpool. afairer, greenerfuture. that's the message labour want to sell here in liverpool. but what does that look like in practice? the party says if it was in power, it would make the uk's electricity system carbon—free by 2030, five years earlier than what the government has pledged.
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applause. the labour leader will announce they'd achieve this by quadrupling our supply of offshore wind, tripling solar power and doubling onshore wind. and also expanding nuclear, hydrogen and tidal power. the government has also announced its intention to ramp up nuclear and renewable energy, but sources close to the labour leader think they can put clear blue water between them and the tories by putting green energyjobs front and centre of their plans to grow the economy. the conservatives have said they'll do this by cutting taxes, but they'll also ramp up uk oil and gas production by ending the ban on fracking. # my city, my people, my heart! that's the big pitch from the labour leadership, but others here are pushing for other policies too. striking workers here at liverpool docks are among those up and down the country calling for their pay to go up in line with inflation.
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that's not currently labour policy, nor are labour shadow ministers meant to appear on picket lines like this. today, delegates here will vote on whether to put this policy to a vote among members here. it's something the left of the party, like allies of the former leader jeremy corbyn, support. keir starmer! keir starmer, though, will be keen to argue his party is emerging from its own internal divisions, and instead is drawing a clear dividing line between labour and the tories on the economy. ione wells, bbc news, liverpool. 0ur chief political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us from the conference in liverpool. in fact, we will be speaking to him a little bit later. we will get the latest now from kyiv on the situation there. we will be looking at how the russians have reacted to
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the conscription, the fourth conscription of those aged over 35, many fleeing across the border into georgia. 0ur correspondent in kyiv, hugo bachega, has just sent this update. president zelensky last night accused president putin of sending russian conscripts to their deaths here in ukraine after the announcement of the of here in ukraine after the announcement of the a of here in ukraine after the announce oftnt of the azf of? , w here in ukraine after the announce oftnt of ti have azf of? , w here in ukraine after the announce oftnt of ti have been 2 of? , w here in ukraine after the announce oftnt of ti hav seen n 2 of? 2 222 here in ukraine after the announ of )ftnt of ti hav se trying of? 2 222 ii"? ’2 president2"22 222" ' 2 ii"? ’2 pri forces 222" ' 2 ii"? ’2 pri forces 222" 2 2 iii"? t2 pr that as t ' ’ ii"? ’2 pr that as now 22'2 2 2 �*ukraine the four regions of ukraine where carrying the four regions of ukraine where referendums rrying the four regions of ukraine where referendums on ng
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the four regions of ukraine where refere the 11s onjojning ., .., the bus lavrov, said if join receive moscow's they will receive moscow's full protection, doctrine on use of moscow's doctrine on the use of nuclear weapons. there has been a reaction from the ukrainians, the foreign minister here said comments like this are unacceptable. the ukrainian authorities and western countries have dismissed the so—called referendums being held in those occupied regions of ukraine as an illegal process with no legitimacy, and they say this is a propaganda exercise. they say russia has already decided the outcome of those votes, and this is going to be used as an excuse by moscow to annex parts of ukraine. a british man freed this week after being held by russian—backed forces in ukraine has said he was treated worse than a dog and thought he could be killed in captivity.
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speaking to the sun on sunday, aiden aslin, who's now back in the uk, described how he was stabbed by a russian officer. he was one of five britons freed as part of a prisoner exchange between russia and ukraine. simon jones has more. we are now out of the danger zone... the fight that took aiden aslin to his freedom after months in captivity, where he said he was treated worse than a dog. in my cell, it was a two—man cell, but there it was for four people, because we had to sleep on the same bed, on a mat that was infested with lice. we had to sing the russian national anthem every morning, and if you didn't sing it, you'd get punished, you'd be beaten or they would punish you some way or another. aiden aslin moved to ukraine four years ago and had joined the ukrainian armed forces. if you're watching this it means we have surrendered. but his unit was forced to surrender in april. he was held with other prisoners by russian—backed separatists. in donetsk, he said an interrogation by a russian officer almost cost him his life. he got down on his knees,
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he was smoking a cigarette, and he was like, "do you know who i am?" i was like, "no." he said, "i'm your death," basically, in russian. i saw myself, i'd been stabbed, so i knew there was a very high possibility i was about to be killed. now freed in a deal brokered by saudi arabia between russia and ukraine, aiden aslin says he's amazed to be back home and among people who don't want to hurt him. simon jones, bbc news. there are reports from several cities in iran of more clashes between anti—government protestors and the police, including in the capital, tehran. police say they've arrested more than 700 protesters at anti—government demonstrations and officials say 35 people have been killed. claudia redmond has this report.
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cheering and applause. protesters push back and overwhelm a fire engine that was being used to disperse demonstrations in this town north of tehran. siren wails. it's one of many protests that have ignited in dozens of cities across iran following the death of a young woman in police custody. in another town, protesters are defacing the image of the supreme leader ali khamenei from the walls of the university. yelling. in the capital, demonstrators lit fires, reportedly to act as a barrier against the security forces and to alleviate the effects of tear gas. dozens of protesters have been killed, and this woman told us what happened to her husband at one demonstration. translation: we went out to protest for our rights and this is what they did to my husband. what you see on my husband's body are bruises from baton strikes and kicks from the members of the security forces. afterwards, we went to all the pharmacies, but they refused to help us. even the doctors in hospitals didn't dare help us. but a doctor secretly visited my husband at home.
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i hope we win. i hope iran becomes free. the protests were triggered by the death in custody of a young iranian kurdish woman, mahsa amini, who'd been detained for not wearing the hijab properly. the police say she suffered from sudden heart failure, but they had reportedly beaten her. herfather says she had no prior health problems. earlier, it was reported that areas of the majority kurdish city 0shnavieh, near the border with iraq, had been taken over by demonstrators. authorities say they have regained control of the town. they accuse kurdish separatists of stirring up unrest in iran and say they have launched a cross—border artillery attack on militant bases in the kurdish region of northern iraq. iran has rarely seen widespread
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protest like this over a civil rights issue, but what started as a movement against mandatory hijabs and for equality between the sexes has escalated to calls for regime change, and women are leading the way. leana hosea, bbc news. claudia redmond, bbc news. the headlines here on bbc news. voting is under way in italy's general election with opinion polls suggesting victory for the far right which would usher in the country's most right—wing government since world war ii. in the uk, the labour party pledges to boost the economy and create jobs through investment in green energy with plans of making the electricity network carbon—free by 2030. thousands queue at the georgian border to leave russia as president zelensky accuses vladimir putin of sending russian conscripts to their death in ukraine by forcing them to fight in the war. the military is being deployed to canada's nova scotia province after tropical storm fiona battered the coastline. hundreds of thousands of people across five provinces have been left without power and officials have warned of severe damage to critical infrastructure.
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leana hosea has this report. tropical storm fiona has battered eastern canada, leaving devastation in its wake. houses were washed into the sea, and hundreds of thousands of people are left without power as winds up to 100 mph bring down power lines. emergency teams are already working to clear the roads of the huge amount of debris and fallen trees left in its wake. two women were reportedly swept into the ocean in newfoundland. the south—west tip of newfoundland bore the brunt of the storm. the mayor declared a state of emergency and evacuated parts of the town that were flooded.
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prime minister trudeau has pledged federal help to affected communities. as we see the images of houses falling into the sea, the waves destroying property and buildings, ourfirst thought needs to be for people, to make sure that people are staying safe. buildings and even communities can be rebuilt, but we have to make sure that we are keeping everyone safe. storm fiona has already swept through parts of the caribbean, knocking out power across virtually all of puerto rico, but this storm surge was not expected in canada. according to the conversations that we had in folks around the industry for a long time, all of their lives, between 70 and 80 years, a lot of them, they have never seen anything like this before. wind is not a big issue here, it is always during the winter particularly we have 80—140 mph winds, but we don't have storm surges. storm fiona is now losing steam, and has been downgraded
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to a post—tropical cyclone, but as prime ministerjustin trudeau admits, infrastructure will need to be rebuilt to withstand ever more frequent extreme weather as we see these maybe once—in—a—century storms start to hit every few years. leana hosea, bbc news. america's spy agency, the cia, has many secrets to keep, but to mark its 75th anniversary it has unusually opened up a little about its past, inviting a select few to visit its normally undercover museum. 0ur security correspondent gordon corera was the only international broadcaster to be let in. here's what he saw. one of the most secret organisations in the world offers a rare glimpse inside its operations. to mark its 75th anniversary, the cia opened the doors to its in—house museum. closed to the public, we were among a select few given access. inside this most unusual of museums are exhibits and artifacts marking
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the cia's history and its operations right from its foundation soon after world war ii through the cold war and right up to the present day. among the 600 artefacts on display are a dead rat in which messages were hidden, a pigeon with a spy camera attached, and even an exploding martini glass. welcome to the cia... but as the museum's director showed me on a tour, there are also details of more high—profile operations. and how was this model then used by the agency? this model is used to. brief top policymakers, including the president. on display is a scale model of the compound where it was suspected al qaeda leader 0sama bin laden was hiding in 2011. the level of detail gave president 0bama the confidence to approve the mission to go after bin laden, who was killed in the raid. so over here we have our newest artefact in the collection. -
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the most recent exhibit is another model, this time of the compound in kabul, afghanistan, where bin laden's successor, ayman al—zawahiri, was killed thisjuly. some failures, like plots in cuba and iraq's missing weapons of mass destruction do get a mention, although other controversies like over torture are downplayed or absent. the intended audience are primarily cia staff. this museum is notjust - a museum for history's sake. this is an operational museum. we are taking cia officers exploring our history, both good and bad. - we make sure that our officers understand their history- so that they can do a betterjob in the future. _ the story begins... amongst the more bizarre stories are how the cia worked with an eccentric billionaire to come up with a cover story so that a ship could secretly try and recover a wrecked
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soviet submarine. and injuly of 1974, i the gigantic claw goes to the bottom of the ocean, - scoops up that submarine and starts bringing it to the surface. that story may now be public, but there are others, officials say, still too classified even for this secret museum. gordon corera, bbc news, cia headquarters. he doesn't get to say that very often! fascinating. if anyone deserves a lie—in this weekend, it's the men and women of the british armed forces who took part in the queen's funeral procession. that flawless display followed ten days of intensive training, from the moment her majesty's death was announced. sarah smith has been talking to some of the troops who were involved. a procession a mile long. the british military and all its finery. but for the individual men and women here, the pressure was on to do their best for their regiment, their country, and, of course, their queen. among them, the engineers, more used to the practical tasks of keeping the army going — suddenly given ten days
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to get ready for this. the news came in on the thursday. we were on parade at 8am on the friday morning, sorted into our marching contingents and sorted into the contingents for windsor and london. straight into practice. in the parade in the morning, they asked who wanted to be part of the parade, and my hand shot up. we were non—stop practising. it's hard because on the day you want to focus on being in the right step, and moving together — that you look as one. it was hard work, but worth it in the end. 0n the day, some marched, some lined the route, but all felt the weight of the occasion. throughout the march - was really, really humbling, as well as emotional, - as well, because the queen, the late her majesty the queen, she was our colonel—in—chief. i this is a sterling moment,
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i believe, and also an opportunity to do our last duty for her majesty, and give her a good farewell and think of what she has done for us. my eyes were full of tears. i was trying to look in the sky and trying to remember her. it was really the proudest moment of my life. they will always remain the queen's gurkha engineers, but the regiment will need a new colonel—in—chief. this was about getting it right for the one they have lost. must to salute the queen, it is
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un—describable the feeling in words when that happens. sarah smith with that report there. and the first picture of the new burial stone marking the queen's final resting place has been released by buckingham palace. the ledger stone has been set into the floor of the george vi memorial chapel at windsor castle, where she was buried alongside her late husband prince philip on monday. members of the public will be able to visit the chapel in person from thursday. nasa has called off another scheduled launch of its historic uncrewed mission to the moon — which was due to take place on tuesday. that's because of tropical storm ian, which could become a hurricane as it approaches florida. it's the third delay in a month for the test flight, which suffered a fuel leak and other technical glitches at the end of august. nasa had previously said that a further delay would force them to roll the spacecraft back from the launchpad. i'm going to be back very shortly
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with a look at the day's papers if you are watching here in the uk, as sir keir starmer has been making his judgments about what he will do on tax. stay with us. hello there. it was a beautiful start for early risers out there today, but it was on the chilly side, temperatures quite widely across the country dipping down to low single figures. it was glorious, a lot of sunshine, but quickly we had a veil of high cloud. this weather watcher picture from oxford to illustrate the point quite beautifully. as we go through today, england and wales will continue to see some cloud, but sunny spells in quite a quiet story, a few scattered showers across northern ireland, western scotland and then a weather front gradually arriving to the north—west of the great glen, with the winds are strengthening to gale force. here a little cooler, 13 or 14 force. here a little cooler, 13 or 111 degrees, but with the sunshine we should see temperatures widely
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between 16 and 18 celsius. the wind will be quite a feature over the next few days, westerly at the moment, but as the weather front continues to descend southwards, they are going to change to more northerly, and that will derive in plenty of showers across scotland and northern ireland overnight. 0ur weather front takes welcome rain south, with the cloud and rain around, and the winds, temperatures holding up into double figures quite widely. early morning rain easing away, but it is going to be a windier and colder story as we move into monday. that northerly flow driving that cool air further south across the country. so certainly on monday some early rain easing away from the south coast, and then sunny spells and scattered showers, but a blustery wind will drive those showers through at quite a pace, but it is going to make it feel really on the cool side. gusts of wind in excess of 110 or 50 mph on west facing coast, so that will have an
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impact. the temperatures on the thermometer, 8—10 if we are lucky in scotland, may be as high as 16 somewhere in the south—east. as we move out of monday into tuesday, the wind will fall a little later, still coming from the north and still driving in showers, some of these could be heavy with the odd rumble of thunder potentially is well on tuesday, so again temperatures struggling, around 10—14 may be in the south—west we will see highs of 16 celsius. it stays cooler with further showers to come as we go through the remainder of the week. take care. andy burnham this morning has said all of the tax cut should be reversed, keir starmer did not quite go there? i reversed, keir starmer did not quite to there? ., ., , reversed, keir starmer did not quite 10 there? ., ., , ., go there? i thought to be heard clearly from _ go there? i thought to be heard clearly from keir _ go there? i thought to be heard clearly from keir starmer - go there? i thought to be heard clearly from keir starmer that l go there? i thought to be heard l clearly from keir starmer that he go there? i thought to be heard . clearly from keir starmer that he is determined to have a progressive tax system, everybody should pay their fair share, system, everybody should pay their fairshare, including system, everybody should pay their fair share, including corporations like amazon and wealthy individuals. what i thought was interesting was a
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very confident outlining of what a labour government would do for working people, a real living wages instead of the minimum wage, he would ban zero—hours and fire and rehire, some of those awful p&0 style employment practices we have seenin style employment practices we have seen in ourjobs market. people know that amplify the message i conference that the biggest act of solidarity with working people would be to get a labour government in power. we be to get a labour government in ower. ~ ., ., be to get a labour government in ower. . ., ., , ~' power. we heard from the striking workers who _ power. we heard from the striking workers who wanted _ power. we heard from the striking workers who wanted to _ power. we heard from the striking workers who wanted to see - power. we heard from the striking workers who wanted to see keir. workers who wanted to see keir starmer on the picket line, as a union leader, does it matter to you that he does not think he and his team should be doing that? what team should be doing that? what matters to me — team should be doing that? what matters to me as _ team should be doing that? what matters to me as we _ team should be doing that? what matters to me as we have - team should be doing that? wisgt matters to me as we have workers team should be doing that? 21st matters to me as we have workers on strike in the jocks who work for a parent company that has got £30 billion of profit this year —— on strike in the docks. they are saying they can't afford to give workers an
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inflation proof pay rise, we think thatis inflation proof pay rise, we think that is disgusting. we want passion and pointing out that that is plain wrong, working people deserve a file share of the cake and some dignity at work. —— deserve a fair share. pride in working people. to decency and pride in unions for this is bbc news. i'm samantha simmonds and these are the headlines... this is bbc news. i'm samantha simmonds and these are the headlines... voting is under way in italy's general election with opinion polls suggesting victory for the far right which would usher in the country's most right—wing government since world war ii. in the uk, the labour party pledges to boost the economy and createjobs through investment in green energy with plans of making the electricity network carbon—free by 2030. now time to cross to sarah with the
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sport _ now time to cross toj sarah with the sport.

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