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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 27, 2022 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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, say, say, oh, he this, some people will say, oh, he is boring. — this, some people will say, oh, he is boring. he — this, some people will say, oh, he is boring, he is drab, and then actually— is boring, he is drab, and then actually one of the things i think we will— actually one of the things i think we will hear from keir starmer is the view— we will hear from keir starmer is the view inside labour circles that there _ the view inside labour circles that there has— the view inside labour circles that there has been so much turmoil over there has been so much turmoil over the test— there has been so much turmoil over the test few— there has been so much turmoil over the last few years, actually a lot of calm. — the last few years, actually a lot of calm. or— the last few years, actually a lot of calm, or not having to think about— of calm, or not having to think about all— of calm, or not having to think about all of the changes of government and perhaps having a boring _ government and perhaps having a boring leader, could be what people want _ boring leader, could be what people want but _ boring leader, could be what people want. but then you also speak to shadow— want. but then you also speak to shadow cabinet members and yes, they are very— shadow cabinet members and yes, they are very behind keir starmer, it is hard— are very behind keir starmer, it is hard not _ are very behind keir starmer, it is hard not to— are very behind keir starmer, it is hard not to be when you look at the poll teed. _ hard not to be when you look at the poll lead, but they also say, is he bold enough, should we be capitalising on this and going a bit further, _ capitalising on this and going a bit further, and is he a bit indecisive? and there — further, and is he a bit indecisive? and there for when it comes to the poll teed. — and there for when it comes to the poll lead, you can go to ways, you can carry — poll lead, you can go to ways, you can carry the — poll lead, you can go to ways, you can carry the main vase and try and keep— can carry the main vase and try and keep everything as it is, or you can say this— keep everything as it is, or you can say this is— keep everything as it is, or you can say this is a — keep everything as it is, or you can say this is a reason for us to be bolder— say this is a reason for us to be holder and _ say this is a reason for us to be bolder and have more of a vision, and i_ bolder and have more of a vision, and i think— bolder and have more of a vision, and i think there is a difference of opinion— and i think there is a difference of opinion on— and i think there is a difference of opinion on that. keir starmer some people say we have had enough pizzazz over the last couple of years and huge charisma
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has led us into a chaotic world. someone i was speaking to last night from the shadow cabinet said what is really interesting is through all this turmoil, keir has been quite calm and the fact he has done a lot ofjobs outside politics where he has run big organisations and he is quite a level—headed person when a lot of people in politics are quite hot headed and they look for the drama and they are quite last minute people, they are saying that we are going to be having, there has been a lot of turmoil in british politics and there will be for the foreseeable future, so a sense of calmness and planning, a sense of not being flat bubble and thinking ahead, that is actually maybe something they could sell to the public. something they could sell to the ublic. ~ , , , . public. well, the deputy leader an . ela public. well, the deputy leader angela rayner. _ public. well, the deputy leader angela rayner, i _ public. well, the deputy leader angela rayner, i spoke - public. well, the deputy leader angela rayner, i spoke to - public. well, the deputy leader angela rayner, i spoke to her. public. well, the deputy leader - angela rayner, i spoke to her about a month ago newscast and we were talking about keir starmer�*s delivery and style and she said, when i am with keir and there is not a camera in his face, he is such a
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funny character and a nice guy, if people saw the guy i see every day, they were just absolutely love him as well. but his conditioning when he was a lawyer, sometimes he takes the emotion out of it and i think he could put some more welly in it. do ou could put some more welly in it. do you agree? i think you could definitely argue keir starmer could be more _ definitely argue keir starmer could be more passionate, ithink that definitely argue keir starmer could be more passionate, i think that is a problem. — be more passionate, i think that is a problem, you often hear keir starmer— a problem, you often hear keir starmer talking about his vision, lots starmer talking about his vision, tots of— starmer talking about his vision, tots of the — starmer talking about his vision, lots of the shadow cabinet, i am not sure what— lots of the shadow cabinet, i am not sure what they think —— he thinks on these _ sure what they think —— he thinks on these issues — sure what they think —— he thinks on these issues and some in the shadow cabinet _ these issues and some in the shadow cabinet are _ these issues and some in the shadow cabinet are not sure how political he is _ cabinet are not sure how political he is. ., , cabinet are not sure how political heis. . ,,, . he is. that is because he has had otherjobs _ he is. that is because he has had otherjobs and — he is. that is because he has had otherjobs and so _ he is. that is because he has had otherjobs and so is _ he is. that is because he has had otherjobs and so is not - he is. that is because he has had otherjobs and so is not in - he is. that is because he has had otherjobs and so is not in that i otherjobs and so is not in that sense tribally political in the way others are. i sense tribally political in the way others are-— sense tribally political in the way others are. i think there are pros and cons with _ others are. i think there are pros and cons with that. _ others are. i think there are pros and cons with that. one - others are. i think there are pros and cons with that. one criticismj and cons with that. one criticism is, what is this guy's political mission? on the other hand, he is from a political background, the guy is called keir! he is very radical in his younger life. i think he is may be growing into the freedom of not being part of something where he
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is politically constrained. but what i do think is that i think he probably will show a bit more passion. but what i do think they do need to do is tell the story more because that's quite a lot of policy stop people think there is no policy, that is actually a lot of policy. i think they do need to tell the story more and simple things like slogan, many people have said slogan sounds like e: drew tablet. and perhaps something which is a bit more emotional like a fresh start for britain. —— like a laundry tablet. they could do more around that. having worked for many leaders, when you are a leader, the pressure on you makes you very inhibited. everybody looks at ed miliband and goes, he seems to have this great personality and is really funny. william hague, why could he not have done that? don't forget the pressure and the constraints and scrutiny which makes you self edit in that position, it does make you
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more cautious. so i think that is definitely a work in progress. weill. definitely a work in progress. well, let's no definitely a work in progress. well, let's go back _ definitely a work in progress. well, let's go back into _ definitely a work in progress. well, let's go back into the _ definitely a work in progress. well, let's go back into the hall - definitely a work in progress. well, let's go back into the hall because thatis let's go back into the hall because that is a rousing and passionate introductory speech going on ahead of sir keir starmer taking to the stage. oh, they are on their feet, conference is on their feet clapping away, rehearsing, no doubt, for when the labour leader comes on stage and delivers his speech to conference. there they are. the mood is buoyant, no doubt. they are on to the video, which is about a minute or so long so we are very close, let me just one viewers, to going out of the conference hall here and inside to hear andy burnham deliver that speech. just briefly, on brexit, ayesha, the shadow chancellor rachel reeves spoke about brexit making it work better —— to hear keir starmer deliver that speech. is there any sense of pushing a closer relationship with europe from
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therese coffey and keir starmer? mr; therese coffey and keir starmer? iii sense is therese coffey and keir starmer? m1: sense is they are treading a very careful line keir starmer on brexit, they don't want to reignite and light up the whole row, but that is definitely a feeling if labour did get into power, they would absolutely look to have a better and closer relationship with the eu —— europe from rachel reeves and keir starmer. taste europe from rachel reeves and keir starmer. ~ , , ., . starmer. we 'ust saw the slogan a esha starmer. we 'ust saw the slogan ayesha was — starmer. we just saw the slogan ayesha was talking _ starmer. we just saw the slogan ayesha was talking about. - starmer. we just saw the slogan - ayesha was talking about. everybody is on their feet clapping and keir starmer isjust is on their feet clapping and keir starmer is just appearing on the stage. they are welcoming him for that second in—person speech that he is going to make to the delegates. sir keir starmer. thank you, conference. applause thank you, conference.
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applause thank ou, conference. . ,, ., thank you, conference. thank you for eve hinu thank you, conference. thank you for everything you _ thank you, conference. thank you for everything you are — thank you, conference. thank you for everything you are doing _ thank you, conference. thank you for everything you are doing for- thank you, conference. thank you for everything you are doing for our- everything you are doing for our party. and thank you, conference. it is great to be here in liverpool. after all the changes we have made, all the hard work that we put in, finally we are seeing the results. yes, conference, we can say it at last. arsenal are top of the league. but before i begin, i want to address something important. this is ourfirst address something important. this is our first conference address something important. this is ourfirst conference in address something important. this is our first conference in liverpool since 2018. that means it is our first conference since this city's call for justice first conference since this city's call forjustice for first conference since this city's call for justice for the 96 first conference since this city's call forjustice for the 96 became justice for the 97. for too long,
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for too long, this city has been let down. so when labour wins the next election, one of my first acts as prime minister will be to put the hillsborough law on the statute book. applause i know how much this matters. i spent a lifetime helping those who have been failed by the system. i worked with stephen lawrence's family to get them justice. i promise you, we will get this city the justice it deserves. applause
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conference, we have seen two sided britain in the last few weeks. on one side, a nation united a profound purpose, to pay its respects to a remarkable sovereign. and that q, remarkable sovereign. and that 0, five miles at its peak, even in death, our queen found a new unique way to capture the british spirit —— that's queue. conference, the other side of britain never went away. a britain all at sea, where a cloud of anxiety hangs over working people. at moments of uncertainty like this we must provide clear leadership. we must stand with working people, meet their ambitions for real change, walk towards a better future and build a new britain together. a
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britain that is fairer, greener, more dynamic and that is not afraid to use the power of government to help working people succeed. because we can't go on like this. what we have seen in the past few days has no precedent. the government has lost control of the british economy. and for what? they have crushed the pound. and for what? higher interest rates, higher inflation, higher borrowing. and for what? not for you. not forworking borrowing. and for what? not for you. not for working people. borrowing. and for what? not for you. not forworking people. for borrowing. and for what? not for you. not for working people. for tax cuts for the richest 1% in our society. don't forget, don't forgive. the only way to stop this is with a labour government. applause
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and our problems don't end there. more sewage in our rivers and seas, backlogs everywhere. at our borders, in our courts, in our hospitals. crimes like burglary totally unpunished. people told to drive themselves to hospital after a heart attack. and millions of families, pensioners, the poorest in our society still facing the coldest winter of their lives. i said on sunday that a fitting tribute to the late queen would be to turn our colour up and face the storm. and we will. because britain never won its battles with wishful thinking. our successful —— our success comes firstly from the hard work and the graft and the common—sense of
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british people. our common sense that teachers up and down the country drumming to their pupils. failed to prepare and you prepare to fail. conference, that is how the tories have gone on to our country for 12 long years. —— government. that is why our economy has been more brutal than others in the face of crisis. they used to lecture others about fixing the roof when the sun was shining. but take a look around britain. they haven'tjust failed to fix the roof. they have ripped out the foundations, smashed through the windows and now they have blown the doors off for good measure. applause conference, my government will be different. we will run towards the challenges of tomorrow. we will get
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us out of this endless cycle of crisis. and we will do it with a fresh start, a new set of priorities and a new way of governing. but it won't be easy. and the first step must be to tackle the cost—of—living crisis. now, the prime minister has finally accepted there is no alternative to labour's plan to freeze energy prices. when she was arguing against hand—outs, labour provided the clarity our nation needed. we said, this winter, not a penny more on anyone's bills. but politics is about choices. and the choice, the political choice is who pays? working people or the oil and gas companies, making huge profits from higher prices? the head of bp has said that this crisis is a —— machine for his company. but that is a __ machine for his company. but that is a —— machine fed by working people.
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so our choice, the only choice, the labour choice, is to put those profits to work. this party is always on the side of working people in times of crisis. and, conference, i know this will shock you, but the tories are not on the side of the nhs either. my mum worked in the nhs. my sister worked in the nhs. my wife still works in the nhs. the nhs runs to ourfamily like a stick of rock. but i tell you what, i am like a stick of rock. but i tell you what, lam really like a stick of rock. but i tell you what, i am really worried about how many lives are at risk this winter. talking to doctors in my local hospital, i said, talking to doctors in my local hospital, isaid, the talking to doctors in my local hospital, i said, the nhs is on its knees, isn't it? and they said, no, keir, it is facedown on the floor.
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and the pathetic response of the government last week left it there. the way to get it back to its feet as with a stronger nhs workforce, thatis as with a stronger nhs workforce, that is the main barrier to capacity right now. staff are. so is rachel announced yesterday, we will take on announced yesterday, we will take on an extra 7,500 medical students every year, we will double the number of district nurses. 5,000 new health visitors. 10,000 extra nursing placements. thank you. thank you. and,
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conference. i tell you this. if it is a choice between a tax cut for those earning hundreds of thousands of pounds or supporting our nhs, thatis of pounds or supporting our nhs, that is not a hard choice for us. labour will always deliver for our nhs. but these are just the first steps on a much biggerjourney. the next labour government must restore oursense next labour government must restore our sense of collective hope. we should never be left cowering in a brace position. it is time for britain to stand tall again. to believe in ourselves again. to chart a new course and to get our future back. now, some of you have heard this before. i grew up in a pebble
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—— semi. my dad was a toolmaker. my mum was a nurse. ourfirst car was —— semi. my dad was a toolmaker. my mum was a nurse. our first car was a ford cortina, it was the 1970s. so i remember what rising prices feel like. i rememberwhen our remember what rising prices feel like. i remember when our phone was cut off because we couldn't pay the bill. how hard it was to make ends meet. it wasn't easy. but there is something else i remember about being working class in the 1970s. hope. not a grandiose utopian dream kind of hope. a hope that was ordinary, basic, taken for granted. because like all families, although we had our ups and downs, my parents never doubted for one second that things will get better. and you know what? they were right. they worked their socks off and gave me the gift of opportunity, and that gift drives
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me to make sure no—one anywhere in this country is held back their circumstances. applause. and that is notjust words, it's the story of my life. and i don't think these values are special, the opportunity to get on is what everyone wants for their family. it's more than a british value, it's what we tell our children, work hard, and you can achieve anything. work hard and you will get a fair chance in britain. my parents didn't just believe this, it comforted them. but is it still true? i don't think so. after 12 long years, our spirit is ground down. when i talk to working people now, they tell me they work harder and harderjust to
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stand still, that their graft can't provide their family with a sense of security, that they're worried that kids won't have a better life than them. conference, what does it say about britain when families worry like this about their children's future? it says an unwritten contract is broken. a contract where in return for hard work, you get on, where your contribution is always respected, and which reaches through the generations to say, britain will always be better for your children. that's the deep cost of tory failure. they keep talking about aspiration, but they don't understand how they've choked it off for working people. and it gets worse. because the other thing people say is, politics can't do anything about it. they don't think real change is possible anymore. and
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who can blame them? just look at what they've been through. they were told, we're all in this together. yet they paid for the mess made by bankers. they cried out for economic change in a referendum. but their calls went unanswered. they united to defeat a virus, only to see the government to break all the rules that they respected. and now... applause. and now this, the biggest hit to their living standards in a century. and it turns out there is money for the top 1%. now, i am and it turns out there is money for the top 1%. now, lam not and it turns out there is money for the top 1%. now, i am not going to stand here and pretend the awful conflict in ukraine is not the immediate spark of the cost of living crisis. we will never allow putting's threats and imperialism to
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succeed, we will stand alongside the ukrainian people, fighting alongside of them. applause. so, let this entire confidence say it together slava ukraini! applause and cheering. but conference, i will never accept that the war is an excuse for how unprepared britain was to tackle the fallout. the war didn't ban offshore wind, the war didn't scrap home insulation, the war didn't stall nuclear energy, the tories did that.
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applause. and in their budget last week, they sent out a new message, a message that echoes around the kitchens and workplaces of families right across the country. and says, your struggles, your hopes, your ambitions, don't matter to us. we are not here for you. you are not our people. we are here for those at the top, and the rest of you can shove off. applause. and conference, make no mistake about it. in one bold move on friday, the tory party gave up on any claim it may have had to be a party of aspiration. applause.
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so, we need to get moving, that's the other thing my background gives me, inpatients. if you're born without privilege, you don't have time for messing around, you don't walk around problems without fixing them, and you don't surrender to the instincts of organisations that won't face up to change. as a human rights lawyer, i took on governments who wanted to keep the barbaric practice of death by hanging. in northern ireland, i worked alongside others to make sure the police service worked for all communities. as director of public prosecutions, i overhauled the handling of sexual violence cases to make them work better for victims. violence cases to make them work betterfor victims. and violence cases to make them work better for victims. and this working class impatience is what drives me in this job, class impatience is what drives me in thisjob, too. applause. conference, i knew in april 2020 when i became leader of this party, we had a big task before us. we had
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to change our party and prepare for power, all in one go. not change for change's sake, change with a purpose, to make our party fit to serve our country. that's why we had to rip out anti—semitism by its roots. applause. that's why we had to show our support for nato is non—negotiable, show we want business to prosper,
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shed unwelcome... country first, party second. applause and cheering. and i didn't do this alone, conference, we did it together. and it shows. we've taken councils in scotland, in wales, in every part of england, from southampton to stevenage, wrexham to wolverhampton, we've shown labour can win again anywhere. we won in wakefield with simon, ourfirst by—election gain for a decade. simon! applause and cheering. but people need more. they're crying out for change, looking for decisive leadership. they need to know we can be a reforming government with clear answers to the big challenges they
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face. that we can grow the economy and raise living standards for everyone, notjust the privileged few. tackle climate change by creating newjobs, new industries, new opportunities, redesign our public services to unleash opportunity and provide security, restore faith in politics as a force for good, get britain's hope, its confidence and it's future back. applause. so, conference, imagining that we're looking back at the first term of the next labour government, how is britain different? i will tell you. we've defeated the cost of living crisis, and the clouds of anxiety have lifted. services are there when you need them, our economy is stable again, business has the certainty to invest, the nhs is back in good
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health. and people are starting to raise their sights, believe in britain again. tiger is fairer, people feel they can get on. there is more opportunity, more affordable housing, fairer taxes, higher wages, jobs more secure. families can aspire again, look forward with hope again. and britain is greener a few to leading the world on climate change, people look at us and follow our example. newjobs, industries, technologies, benefit all parts of the country. we are proving net zero can be achieved and the most precious gift to the next generation is within our grasp, a safer, more prosperous world to live in. applause. and because we're fairer, because we
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are greener, we are also more dynamic, our entrepreneurial spirit is unleashed, new technology improving public services, cutting—edge science and world—class services driving economic growth, and working people are respected as the people who create the wealth that drives britain forward. and there's one more thing, something important. people have started to notice it's possible to govern with integrity. applause. to unite rather than divide, to respect other points of view, to see that long—term plans from short—term fixes. that decline is not
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inevitable. yes, some people will say politicians are all the same, but not as many. in grimsby a few months ago, i was really struck by a woman i met, she said something which was really simple... i don't just want to survive, i want to live. as i got back on the train, that phrase went round and round in my head. i don'tjust want to survive, i want to live. conference, i want to look her in the eyes after five years of a labour government, and i want to know that she and millions of people like her are not just surviving, they're thriving, that's the difference a labour government will make. that's the britain we're fighting for. applause.
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conference, let's be honest, missions don't achieve themselves. you need focus, determination and the courage to make very difficult choices. particularly when managing the country's finances. rachel reeves and i have set out a framework for sound money. we're determined to reduce debt as a share of our economy, every policy we announce will be fully costed, and we will set up an office for value for money to make sure public spending targets the national interest. and we should be clear about what that means. it means not being able to do things, good labour things, as quickly as we might like. that's what responsible government looks like. because if you lose control of the economy, if you act
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irresponsibly, as the tories have donein irresponsibly, as the tories have done in spectacular fashion, irresponsibly, as the tories have done in spectacularfashion, then you lose the ability to do anything, and working people pay the price. we will not let that happen. applause. we will only borrow to invest when it is in the long—term national interest, when the cost of not investing makes it much more expensive for the next generation. conference, the labour party is at its best when we glimpsed the future and lead our country towards it. in 1945, out of the rubble of the second world war, we built a land fit for heroes. in 1964, we
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harnessed technology to pay our way in a modern economy. and in 1997, we modernise the country held back by crumbling public services and outdated institutions. —— we modernised. it is time. it is time to write a new chapter of labour party history about how we built a fairer, greener, more dynamic britain by tackling the climate emergency head—on and used it to create thejobs, the industries emergency head—on and used it to create the jobs, the industries and the opportunities of the future. i come at this notjust as leader of the labour party. but also come as a father, i am spurred on by the voices of our children, the cry of indignation, demanding our generation act before it is too
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late. as labour leader, i see it as a matter ofjustice and opportunity about the fairness and better society that i came into politics to create. the biggest opportunity we have had in decades to make this country work for working people. across the world, countries are already gearing up to meet this challenge. we cannot afford to miss out. because some nation is going to lead the world in offshore wind. why not this one? some nation will win the race for electric vehicles. why not us? some nation will be the first to harness new hydrogen power. why not britain? applause
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conference. that is why today, i am so proud to launch our green prosperity plan. a plan that will turn the uk into a green growth superpower. and driving the plan forward is a goal that will put us ahead of any major economy in the world. 100% clean power by 2030. a huge national record. a huge national record. an effort that will double britain's onshore wind capacity, trouble solar power, quadruple offshore wind, invest in tidal, hydrogen, nuclear, black carbon culture,, to green steel culture, new giga factories and insulate 19 million homes.
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and working with ed miliband and his team we will make sure this energy revolution powers up all parts of the country. let's get clean hydrogen energy into south yorkshire come into the east of england, across the river in the wirral. offshore wind in scotland, teesside, east and north yorkshire. solar power in rural communities, in the south east of the south west and the midlands. this will require a different way of working, the biggest partnership between government, business and communities this country has ever seen. it will mean newjobs, more than a million newjobs. training for plumbers, electricians, engineers, software designers, technicians and builders. it will all start within the first 100 days of a new labour government.
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applause and what will it mean for working people? cheaper bills and higher living standards. take home insulation. i saw this for myself on abbey road. not that one! this one is on a council estate in kirklees, where the labour council had the good yorkshire foresight to do a realjob on insulation. i went in january, it was freezing cold. i was invited income of the house was warm, the energy bills next to nothing and the tenants were grinning from ear to ear and why not? overa grinning from ear to ear and why not? over a grand off your winter fuel bill, what is not to like? clean energy is already cheaper than fossil fuels, clean energy is already cheaper than fossilfuels, nine times clean energy is already cheaper than fossil fuels, nine times cheaper. clean energy is already cheaper than fossilfuels, nine times cheaper. we just need more of it. this is about fair growth, powered by clean
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british energy. everywhere in the country. that is what levelling up really looks like, practical labour solution, not empty tory slogans. and, conference, as rachel announced yesterday, a new british sovereign wealth fund will drive us forward on this mission. we will make sure that the public money was spent building up the public money was spent building up british industry spurs on private investment, stimulates growth in construction, life sciences, finance and insurance, and the british people enjoy the returns. we won't make the mistake the tories made with north sea oil and gas back in the 1980s, when they frittered away the 1980s, when they frittered away the wealth from our national resources. just look at what is happening at the moment. the largest onshore wind farm in wales, who owns it? sweden. energy bills in swansea
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are paying for schools and hospitals in stockholm, the chinese communist party has a stake in our nuclear industry. and 5 million people in britain pay their bills to an energy company owned by france. so we will set up great british energy, within the first year of a labour government. a new company. a new company. applause thank you, conference. conference, a new company that takes advantage of the opportunities in clean british power. and because it is right for jobs. because it is right for growth. because it is right for
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energy independence from tyrants like putin, then yes, conference, great british energy will be publicly owned. cheering conference, none of this will be easy, it is not like flicking a switch. it will mean tough battles on issues like planning and regulation. but when the tories may say, rememberthis, the regulation. but when the tories may say, remember this, the road to net zero is no longer one of stem self—denial, it is at the heart of modern 21st century aspiration. technology has turned everything on
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its head. green and growth, they just go together. they are inseparable. the future wealth of this country is in our air, in our seas, in ourskies, britain this country is in our air, in our seas, in our skies, britain should harness that wealth and share it with all. british power to the british people. applause that is why i have always said we will fight the tories on economic growth. their record is appalling. the worst decade of growth in two centuries. oras the worst decade of growth in two centuries. or as the chancellor puts it, a vicious cycle of stagnation. now, i have to say, is a former prosecutor, it always warms my heart when somebody caught bang to rights pleads guilty at the first
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opportunity! and after 12 years, what is their big idea? unlimited bonuses for bankers. back the billionaires, go easy on the oil and gas companies. it is a nonsense. everyone earning less than £155,000 a year loses out with their plan. and they say they don't believe in redistribution, but they do. from the port of the rich! —— from the port to the rich. and they are loading up the company —— they are loading up the company —— the country were debt to pay for it. and what about those in the middle? they are losing £780. and, conference, i am sure you have all heard the tape where liz truss says, britain's working people like skill
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and application, that the problem with our economy is they don't graft hard enough. working people don't graft hard enough. no, we are not going to take this. this is the fight. if they want to fight is on redistribution, if they want to fight us on workers' rights, if they want to tell us working people don't come first, we will take them on and we will win! applause and we will win notjust because we have fairness on our side. because we have economic reason on our side,
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too. trickle—down economics doesn't work. britain won't be better off just because we make the rich richer. the real problem is we create too manyjobs that are low—paid and insecure. we lock too many communities out of the wealth we create. and public services are not strong enough to help working succeed. that is why we struggle to grow. our economic foundations are weak. and the tory argument is, that's fine. if the city of london races ahead and the rest of the country stagnates, they think that is ok. conference, they are the ones not prepared to graft. they are the ones not prepared to do the hard yards on growth. applause but we will. we will end the plight of low pay and insecure work with our new deal for working people. we
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will transform the state so the decisions which drive growth in communities are made by local people with skin in the game. the people of liverpool, they know what is best for liverpool. and the same is true in burnley, sunderland, peterborough. if we want fair growth everywhere, communities need a stake. and they need good, affordable housing for working people as well. i have seen homeownership raise almost my entire life. it is the bedrock of security and aspiration. that pebble—dashed semi meant everything to my family. but now, under the tories, the dream of owning your own home is slipping away for too many. and that is a political choice. because if you keep inflating demand without increasing supply, house prices will only rise and homes become less affordable for working people. so we
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will set a new target, 70% homeownership, and we will meet it with a new set of political choices. a labour set of political choices. no more buy to let landlords or second home owners getting in first. we will back working people's aspirations. help first—time buyers onto the ladder with a new mortgage guarantee scheme. reform planning so speculators can't stop communities getting shovels in the ground. my message is this, if you are grafting every hour to buy your own home, labour is on your side. labour is the party of home ownership in britain today. applause and let me say something about business, too. don't be fooled into thinking that they buy into the tory
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trickle—down fantasy. business leaders are not knocking on my door saying they want to rip up employee rights. they don't tell me that the problems they face will be solved by corporation tax cuts. they want fair taxes, high skills and the long—term confidence to invest. i want to be crystal clear about this. i am not just pro—business, i want to partner with business. so we will scrap business rates level the playing field for start—ups in the high street, give employers new flexibility to invest in world—class training they need. and asjohnny reynolds said, invite them to drive forward our modern industrial strategy. a true partnership between governments, businesses and trade unions. this isn't about the size of government, it's about what government, it's about what government can do. government can support businesses to innovate and
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grow, can bring in the creative genius of our scientists and universities, can unite us to tackle the country's challenges on behalf of working people. tory ideology is a barrier to growth. and i will tell you another one. the mess they've made of our public services. strong public services are the foundation of a successful economy, always. deal with nhs waiting lists and growth improves. invest in childcare so parents can go back to work, and growth improves. more mental health support, world—class schooling, skills training when you need it, and growth improves. but we have to be honest, i would love to stand here and say labour will fix everything. but the damage they've done to our finances and our public services means that this time, the rescue will be harder than ever. it
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will take investment, of course it will. but it will also take reform. one, we need to recruit, train and motivate the very best doctors, nurses, teachers, police officers. two, we need to get the best innovation in their hands, make technology work for us. three, we need to make sure services are built around people's lives, empower them to meet the challenges of the future. and four, and above all, we must shift towards a prevention first policy. applause. now, i've seen this for myself, early intervention saves lives and saves money. every time i read a serious case review as director of public prosecutions, the story was the same, just a change of name. another life that could have gone in
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a different direction if someone had stepped in earlier. it's that kind of injustice that must drive us to think differently about our public services. in health, it's about moving treatment towards communities, exploring how technology can free up nhs workers to focus on care. in education, it means notjust imparting knowledge, but developing the creativity, the resilience, the curiosity young people need in a modern world. in crime, it means a model of policing that can focus on prevention and give victims faith in a system that will not let violence go unpunished. and conference, the state of our public services show you exactly who the tories are. shows you they fundamentally don't believe government can help working people succeed. every time they choose a new prime minister, and there have been plenty of them, you get a hymn
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of lip service to its power, usually from the steps of downing street itself. but as soon as the black door swings shut behind them, they retreat to their comfort zone. that's why they don't plan for the future, they don't believe it's theirjob. and so, we lurch from crisis to crisis, always reacting, always behind the curve, a sticking plaster, nevera always behind the curve, a sticking plaster, never a cure. and if you want the totemic symbol of it, the single biggest failure to grasp the nettle, then look no further than brexit. conference, the policy of my labour government will always be to make brexit work. it's no secret i voted remain, as the prime minister did... laughter. but what i heard around the country was people who thought we got our priorities wrong, who wanted democratic—controlled over their lives, but who also wanted opportunities for the next
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generation, communities they felt proud of, public services they could rely on. i didn't hear that brexit was about slashing workers' rights, i didn't hear people wanting to lower standards on food, animal welfare and the environment. i didn't hear them wanting to end redistribution. so, iwant didn't hear them wanting to end redistribution. so, i want to speak directly to the people who left labour on this issue. whether you voted leave or remain, you've been let down. and with liz truss, the tories are changing the meaning of brexit before your eyes. if you voted for a government to step in on your side, for better work, higher wages, more opportunities in your community, for an nhs that is modern and reliable, if you voted to take control of your life, and for the next generation to have control of theirs, then i say to you, that is what i will deliver. i will make
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work pay for people who created this country's wealth. i will make sure we buy, make and sell more in britain. i will revitalise public services and control immigration using a point —based system. i will spread power and opportunity to all our communities and i will never be shy to use the power of government to help working people succeed. labour will make brexit work, labour will deliver change, and you will never get that from the tories. applause. and conference, you won't get it from the snp, either. applause and cheering. conference... the challenges we face, the cost of living crisis, climate change, standing up to
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putin, are common across our four nations. we saw off the threat of fascism and deadly disease together. we built the nhs and the welfare state together. but i don't believe in our union just because of our history, i believe in it because of our future. history, i believe in it because of ourfuture. i know we history, i believe in it because of our future. i know we can history, i believe in it because of ourfuture. i know we can meet history, i believe in it because of our future. i know we can meet the great challenges to come, build new beacons of fairness that light up the islands we share. scotland needs a liver government that can deliver change. applause. —— a labour government. conference... but it also needs the power and resources to shape its own future, whoever is in power in
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westminster. and the snp are not interested in this. for them, scotland's success in the uk is met with gritted teeth, seen as a roadblock to independence, and so they stand in the way. we can't work with them, we won't work with them, no deal under any circumstances. applause and cheering. a fairer, greener, afairer, greener, more a fairer, greener, more dynamic scotland, in a fairer, greener, more dynamic labour britain. applause. conference, on climate change, growth, aspiration, levelling up, brexit economic responsibility, we
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are the party of the centre ground, once again the political wing of the british people. applause. and we can achieve great things. yesterday, we even managed to get a liverpool crowd cheering gary neville! applause. but let's not kid ourselves, the next two years will be tough, the tories want a fifth term, and they will stop at nothing to achieve it. and because of their record, because of the state of britain, they're getting desperate, with so little thatis getting desperate, with so little that is good to defend, they will lash out. we need to be prepared,, focused, spend every day working to win the trust of the british people,
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make their attacks with hope, provide the leadership this country so desperately needs, because as in 1945, 1964, 1997, this is a labour moment. so... applause. conference... say it loud and believe it, britain will deal with the cost of living crisis. britain will get its future back. a country where aspiration is rewarded, where working people succeed, a force for goodin working people succeed, a force for good in the world, a clean energy superpower, a fairer, greener, more dynamic nation. this is my commitment to you, the national mission of the next labour government, and together with the british people, we will do it! thank you, conference! applause and cheering. standing ovation there for sir keir starmer, he spoke forjust under an
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hour, ending his speech by saying, as in 1945, 1964 and 1997, this is a labour moment. he spoke with a sense of self—belief, it was a confident, self—assured speech, there he is hugging his wife victoria at the end of that speech. it was a confident performance by him, the second in—person speech that he has given to conference, and he spoke about aspiration. he said he didn'tjust want british people to survive, he wanted them to thrive under a future labour government. he was very clear about restating how far he says the labour party has moved, and that its current position is marked a sea change from what was before. he said, we have to make our labour party fit to serve our country, that's why we had to rip out anti—semitism by its roots. that got
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anti—semitism by its roots. that got a huge and sustained standing ovation, and there were a number of standing ovations, why we had to show, he said, oursupport standing ovations, why we had to show, he said, our support for nato, that it show, he said, our support for nato, thatitis show, he said, our support for nato, that it is non—negotiable, show we want business to prosper, country first, party second. he spoke about britain leading the way, why shouldn't it be britain that leads the way, as he posed the question, when it came to clean power? a pledge that we have already heard this week, to be 100% clean power by 2030. he said it was a national effort and he didn't see why it shouldn't be the uk that led from the front. he spoke about economic confidence, he said that this was a moment when labour could prove they could be trusted with the economy. that, in the light of friday's of statement by the chancellor kwasi kwarteng. but there was a moment of candour when he said, we may not be able to do all the things, all the
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good labour things, as quickly as we might want to. he is now making his way out of the conference hall, no doubt people will be on their feet for several moments, one of the other standing ovations was when he talked about the nhs, his commitment to the nhs, a cornerstone for successive labour governments, and parties in opposition, they have already committed the party to spending the money raised if a labour government were to come to power, reinstating that 45p top rate of tax, to be spent on thousands more nurses. i have ayesha hazarika here with me, and katy balls, from the spectator. ayesha hazarika, from times radio, what did you make of it? i times radio, what did you make of it? , , , ., , it? i feel he will be very pleased with that speech, _ it? i feel he will be very pleased with that speech, his _ it? i feel he will be very pleased with that speech, his team - it? i feel he will be very pleased with that speech, his team will. it? i feel he will be very pleased i with that speech, his team will be as well, i actually thought it was a better speech than last year. i personally felt that he looked a very different type of performer from last year, and a very different type of politician, he looked much
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more confident, he looked much more comfortable in his own skin. my understanding from his team is that he has worked with a very small number of people, he has actually written a lot of this himself, he's been thinking about this in speech and writing it himself for a while now, and i think that really showed, i think his voice and some of his political thinking showed through. a couple of lines that really stood out to me, this thing about, fail to prepare and prepare to fail, i think that's very much how he is going to try and brand himself. he is not the sa crisis leader, he talked about this endless cycle of crises that we have had over the last couple of years, he is basically pitching himself i think more as a sort of clement attlee than a tony blair. someone who is calm, sober, coming in at a very, very difficult time, not sunny uplands, a very difficult time, calm, sober, so i think, i felt that was very much of the mood
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of it. ~ . felt that was very much of the mood of it. . ., ., felt that was very much of the mood ofit.~ . . ._ felt that was very much of the mood ofit. . . of it. what about you, katy, what did ou of it. what about you, katy, what did you think. _ of it. what about you, katy, what did you think, government - of it. what about you, katy, what did you think, government in - did you think, government in waiting, prime minister in waiting, thatis waiting, prime minister in waiting, that is what he has got to show people here and beyond the whole, out to the country? find people here and beyond the whole, out to the country?— out to the country? and i think that moment when _ out to the country? and i think that moment when he _ out to the country? and i think that moment when he said, _ out to the country? and i think that moment when he said, this - out to the country? and i think that moment when he said, this is - out to the country? and i think that moment when he said, this is a - moment when he said, this is a labour— moment when he said, this is a labour moment, referring to the other— labour moment, referring to the other times when labour have been in powei’. _ other times when labour have been in power. you _ other times when labour have been in power, you could see him really tapping — power, you could see him really tapping into that, and we have all been _ tapping into that, and we have all been saying this confidence has been a lot been saying this confidence has been a tot more _ been saying this confidence has been a lot more confident, i think keir starmer— a lot more confident, i think keir starmer is — a lot more confident, i think keir starmer is a _ a lot more confident, i think keir starmer is a lot more confident, i think— starmer is a lot more confident, i think he _ starmer is a lot more confident, i think he sounds like he actually does _ think he sounds like he actually does believe he could be the next by nrinister. _ does believe he could be the next by minister, and i think that has been missing _ minister, and i think that has been missing a — minister, and i think that has been missing a bit in the past. i think that also, — missing a bit in the past. i think that also, that clear blue water, that also, that clear blue water, that ideological clear blue water between the tories, now liz truss is prime _ between the tories, now liz truss is prime minister, is something that is working _ prime minister, is something that is working for— prime minister, is something that is working for keir starmer, because some _ working for keir starmer, because some of— working for keir starmer, because some of the things he is saying, one thing _ some of the things he is saying, one thing boris _ some of the things he is saying, one thing borisjohnson some of the things he is saying, one thing boris johnson would some of the things he is saying, one thing borisjohnson would do is that he would _ thing borisjohnson would do is that he would occupy that centre ground, beobte _ he would occupy that centre ground, people would depict borisjohnson as someone _ people would depict borisjohnson as someone who was, very right wing and someone who was, very right wing and so forth, _ someone who was, very right wing and so forth, but— someone who was, very right wing and so forth, but on things such as energy— so forth, but on things such as energy supply, big state, exactly, and much — energy supply, big state, exactly, and much more in terms of spending. it and much more in terms of spending. it was _ and much more in terms of spending. it was really _
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and much more in terms of spending. it was really tricky for labour to attack — it was really tricky for labour to attack. and i think part of the confidence of keir starmer is because _ confidence of keir starmer is because liz truss has been so clear, because _ because liz truss has been so clear, because she — because liz truss has been so clear, because she seems much more small state, _ because she seems much more small state, doesn't want a windfall tax and so _ state, doesn't want a windfall tax and so forth, it means that he can 'ust and so forth, it means that he can just point— and so forth, it means that he can just point out these policy differences and there for he is able to make _ differences and there for he is able to make a — differences and there for he is able to make a more convincing case for labour _ borisjohnson against keir starmer, he was a more serious and sober personality, that wasn't difficult against the former prime minister. he made a littlejibe, perhaps the british people have realised you can actually govern with integrity, and i presume that is what he's talking about. ideal logically, there is now about. ideal logically, there is now a much bigger gap, it is not about the personality of the person who is prime minister, liz truss, it is the ideology. prime minister, liz truss, it is the ideolo: . . , prime minister, liz truss, it is the ideolo . . , . , , ideology. that is absolutely right and we saw _ ideology. that is absolutely right and we saw that _ ideology. that is absolutely right and we saw that very _ ideology. that is absolutely right and we saw that very clearly - ideology. that is absolutely right| and we saw that very clearly from his first encounter with truss at prime list of�*s questions, there was a clear ideological difference
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between them and now this fiscal event, it has done two things —— at pmqs. there are clear dividing lines in british politics. but it has also shifted, when i was advising ed miliband, rememberany talk shifted, when i was advising ed miliband, remember any talk of borrowing was seen as really, really bad and taxing. now the question is, what to do with that borrowing, how do you spend that borrowing? one of the other things which was interesting about what he was saying, agree he has the space to be a bit more radical, we had this great british energy company, british power for british great british energy company, british powerfor british people. but he also sent a very strong messages to middle britain as well. he said, i want to do homeownership, i am happy for people to create wealth, control immigration with a points—based system, vitalise public services. big cheers for supporting nato, ukraine. slaying some of those dragons from the era ofjeremy corbyn. so he has got this interesting position where he is
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being radical on some things like rail going back into national ownership. but he is still, the word aspiration came up a number of times. {iii aspiration came up a number of times. u, , aspiration came up a number of times. _, , , ., times. of course, it is not the same as the ten — times. of course, it is not the same as the ten policy — times. of course, it is not the same as the ten policy pledges _ times. of course, it is not the same as the ten policy pledges he - times. of course, it is not the same as the ten policy pledges he made l times. of course, it is not the same| as the ten policy pledges he made at the time of his leadership which was going to throw everything into public ownership, but there is a movement slightly back towards that with, as you say, this new publicly owned energy company. on the aspiration point, he obviously feels that he has to occupy whatever you want to define as the centre ground to have an electoral chance because of the drubbing at the 2019 election and all those seats labour lost. yes, exactly, there was some housekeeping, talking about the royat— housekeeping, talking about the royal family. housekeeping, talking about the royal family-— housekeeping, talking about the royal family. which they started with god save _ royal family. which they started with god save the _ royal family. which they started with god save the king. - royal family. which they started with god save the king. exactly i royal family. which they started - with god save the king. exactly come and auoin with god save the king. exactly come and going back _ with god save the king. exactly come and going back to _ with god save the king. exactly come and going back to that. _ with god save the king. exactly come and going back to that. some - with god save the king. exactly come and going back to that. some on - with god save the king. exactly come and going back to that. some on the | and going back to that. some on the labour— and going back to that. some on the labour left _ and going back to that. some on the labour left didn't like the idea of
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it went _ labour left didn't like the idea of it went off— labour left didn't like the idea of it went off without a hitch and he went _ it went off without a hitch and he went back — it went off without a hitch and he went back to that. and the support for ukraine — went back to that. and the support for ukraine feeds into one of labour's _ for ukraine feeds into one of labour's weaknesses on foreign policy— labour's weaknesses on foreign policy during the jeremy corbyn period — policy during the jeremy corbyn period. trying to win back parts of the red _ period. trying to win back parts of the red wall which has always been key, trying to show that support. patriotism — key, trying to show that support. patriotism. exactly. and then i think— patriotism. exactly. and then i think also— patriotism. exactly. and then i think also when you go through the list of— think also when you go through the list of those things, it was just a general— list of those things, it was just a general sense of trying to say, we are the _ general sense of trying to say, we are the sensible option on the economy— are the sensible option on the economy and also on those values and aspiration _ economy and also on those values and aspiration and trying to win the centre — aspiration and trying to win the centre ground, almost saying the labour _ centre ground, almost saying the labour party a few years ago, we are not that _ labour party a few years ago, we are not that. anti—semitism again, bringing — not that. anti—semitism again, bringing up the fact he has tackled that, _ bringing up the fact he has tackled that, cheers in the hall showed how the party— that, cheers in the hall showed how the party is — that, cheers in the hall showed how the party is changing again. the values thing _ the party is changing again. the values thing is _ the party is changing again. ire: values thing is really interesting because another line i thought was interesting, he talked about his parents lived in a time where if you worked hard, you could get on. that is very evocative of this idea of a promise to britain or the american dream where if you work hard, you
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can get on and the next generation should do better than the last. that is much more of an emotional argument he's bringing in as well. again, to appeal notjust to middle britain, but tapping into that frustration a lot of people have right now. 1ng frustration a lot of people have right now— frustration a lot of people have riaht now. a i. . right now. as you are saying, the electoral space _ right now. as you are saying, the electoral space that _ right now. as you are saying, the electoral space that might - right now. as you are saying, the electoral space that might open i right now. as you are saying, the i electoral space that might open up, it is becoming clearer, except for theissue it is becoming clearer, except for the issue of scotland. the snp's dominance there. he made a very clear commitment towards the end of his speech, there will be no deal with the snp because it was that that dogged ed miliband, yourformer bossin that dogged ed miliband, yourformer boss in 2015, because there were those posters as people will remember of ed miliband being in the pocket of alex salmond._ pocket of alex salmond. absolutely, and i remember _ pocket of alex salmond. absolutely, and i remember in _ pocket of alex salmond. absolutely, and i remember in that _ pocket of alex salmond. absolutely, and i remember in that short - and i remember in that short campaign, we saw a shift in the five week and four week period, at the beginning of the campaign, we were knocking on doors in target seats, conservatives hoping to move to
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labour, those posters hit the billboards and we went back to those places and they were like, we are a bit nervous now. so labour is going to be very nervous about that, that is why we are seeing in clear signals being sent out. but if labour is going to win more seats in scotland, they are going to have to persuade soft independent voters, soft snp voters to move over to labour. so they are sending a very strong message to voters in england that they would do no deal with the snp and the snp are terrible, but that message might not go so well with some of the voters they need to bring over in scotland. yes. with some of the voters they need to bring over in scotland.— bring over in scotland. yes, i think the coalition _ bring over in scotland. yes, i think the coalition of— bring over in scotland. yes, i think the coalition of chaos, _ bring over in scotland. yes, i think the coalition of chaos, i _ bring over in scotland. yes, i think the coalition of chaos, i mean, - bring over in scotland. yes, i think the coalition of chaos, i mean, in l bring over in scotland. yes, i think| the coalition of chaos, i mean, in a way, _ the coalition of chaos, i mean, in a way, i— the coalition of chaos, i mean, in a way, ithink— the coalition of chaos, i mean, in a way, i think it — the coalition of chaos, i mean, in a way, i think it would be quite hard for the _ way, i think it would be quite hard for the tories to go in a coalition of chaos— for the tories to go in a coalition of chaos at— for the tories to go in a coalition of chaos at the next election, given it has— of chaos at the next election, given it has not— of chaos at the next election, given it has not exactly been a calm and smooth _ it has not exactly been a calm and smooth period of government. so in a way, there _ smooth period of government. so in a way, there is— smooth period of government. so in a way, there is clearly a vulnerability there and we are seeing — vulnerability there and we are seeing keir starmer saying, no.
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vulnerability there and we are seeing keirstarmersaying, no. i think— seeing keirstarmersaying, no. i thinkthe— seeing keirstarmersaying, no. i think the problem is that you can say absolutely no deal whatsoever, but we _ say absolutely no deal whatsoever, but we will still say what happens if labour — but we will still say what happens if labour would win a big majority now as _ if labour would win a big majority now as polls suggest, but what if they are — now as polls suggest, but what if they are just the largest party and have to _ they are just the largest party and have to work with another angie rule out the _ have to work with another angie rule out the snp, is that a minority government? there are still questions about this, i think. —— angie _ questions about this, i think. —— angie rule — questions about this, i think. —— angie rule out. how does that work in practice? — angie rule out. how does that work in practice? we angie rule out. how does that work in practice?— in practice? we don't have to talk about that _ in practice? we don't have to talk about that at _ in practice? we don't have to talk about that at the _ in practice? we don't have to talk about that at the moment. - in practice? we don't have to talk about that at the moment. but i in practice? we don't have to talk. about that at the moment. but the polls suggest that is more likely. labour strategists tell me even if they are in a minority government, they are in a minority government, they will not do deals with the snp and they don't think they need to. but another argument is important to take into account and that is what anas sarwar makes, the leader of the snp in scotland. if it looks like keir starmer is a serious contender for downing street, that might persuade some more soft snp voters to go, my desire to kick out the tories is stronger than the
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constitutional question, particularly if they are worried about their mortgages and the economy tanking. that is a big if, but that is an argument. i economy tanking. that is a big if, but that is an argument. i suppose there is a truth _ but that is an argument. i suppose there is a truth in _ but that is an argument. i suppose there is a truth in that, _ but that is an argument. i suppose there is a truth in that, they - but that is an argument. i suppose there is a truth in that, they are i there is a truth in that, they are not going to vote against in that sense some of the key policies, labour will be able to rely in that instance of being the largest party, but a minority government. band i but a minority government. and i think if you _ but a minority government. and i think if you can _ but a minority government. and i think if you can look _ but a minority government. and i think if you can look as _ but a minority government. and i think if you can look as though i but a minority government. and i think if you can look as though you are on— think if you can look as though you are on the — think if you can look as though you are on the cusp of a minority, ultimately, something that has helped — ultimately, something that has helped the snp with its support for independence is some of those who don't _ independence is some of those who don't want — independence is some of those who don't want the tories in power and think— don't want the tories in power and think that — don't want the tories in power and think that is — don't want the tories in power and think that is indefinite tory rule and that— think that is indefinite tory rule and that pushes on the vote, but if it looks _ and that pushes on the vote, but if it looks as— and that pushes on the vote, but if it looks as though that period is coming — it looks as though that period is coming to— it looks as though that period is coming to an end, some of the soft independent voters might get behind labour— independent voters might get behind labour so _ independent voters might get behind labour so it can work that way as well _ labour so it can work that way as well it— labour so it can work that way as well it is— labour so it can work that way as well. it is tricky when, who is pulling — well. it is tricky when, who is pulling his _ well. it is tricky when, who is pulling his strings when you don't -et pulling his strings when you don't get the _ pulling his strings when you don't get the numbers? if keir starmer can keepthe— get the numbers? if keir starmer can keep the current leads we are seeing over liz— keep the current leads we are seeing over liz truss, he doesn't have to -et over liz truss, he doesn't have to get too _ over liz truss, he doesn't have to get too much into these conversations.— get too much into these conversations. . , . , ., conversations. that is a big f and we're still — conversations. that is a big f and we're still talking _ conversations. that is a big f and we're still talking about - conversations. that is a big f and we're still talking about two - conversations. that is a big f and | we're still talking about two years away and an awful lot can happen.
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one of the things you mentioned while the speech was going on about a clear thought, one clear thought, narrative, slogan, not the one they are using for the conference itself. did it emerge? ifelt are using for the conference itself. did it emerge? i felt there was sort of green shoots of this. i think what we saw was a lot of very good, strong themes. some interesting policy ideas. ifeel like many strong themes. some interesting policy ideas. i feel like many of your viewers will probably think, if your viewers will probably think, if you were to say to people, what was the one big takeaway message other than that we are very much preparing for government? i still think work needs to be done to distill policies and those thoughts and themes down to a bit of, i know people hate slogans, but in politics, slogans are important because they tell a story about the big messages and policy. a couple of lines stood out, building a new britain together. a fresh start for britain. we heard a few lines like that. i suspect we will probably see more of that.
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look, we are two years out from a general election.— general election. there is time to finesse it in _ general election. there is time to finesse it in that _ general election. there is time to finesse it in that sense. _ general election. there is time to finesse it in that sense. for - general election. there is time to finesse it in that sense. for you? | general election. there is time to | finesse it in that sense. for you? i stru: ale finesse it in that sense. for you? i struggle to — finesse it in that sense. for you? i struggle to think— finesse it in that sense. for you? i struggle to think of _ finesse it in that sense. for you? i struggle to think of a _ finesse it in that sense. for you? i struggle to think of a single - finesse it in that sense. for you? i struggle to think of a single line. i struggle to think of a single line. ithink— struggle to think of a single line. i think a — struggle to think of a single line. i think a labour moment captures the sense _ i think a labour moment captures the sense. perhaps what the tories are putting _ sense. perhaps what the tories are putting forward is going out of sense. perhaps what the tories are putting and ard is going out of trying to that _ that vision which is point didn't it bit represented or they found it a bit gr” -. idea 1,52: "fl w represented or they found it a bit gr” -. idea e a represented or they found it a bit g some i e a represented or they found it a bit g s( ofei= a represented or they found it a bit a": s( ofei compelling ' "' " ' represented or they found it a bit $7 5�* mean; arid 1.95!!qu ? represented or they found it a bit g 5�* mean; thinkrelljmg ? represented or they found it a bi- g 5�* mean; think-ellirig 5 don't ? labour's, clear know exactly labour's, the clear of know exactly labour's, the clear - to i of— know exactlyilabour's, the clear
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- as § of you know exactly labour's, the clear as 7... of you . ~ something can take chance he has succeeded in getting rid of leader �*the but leader �* the but le the �* the the frontbench, across the frontbench, the shadow cabinet. ed is terms pooling in terms of pooling of talent? undoubtedly. i that things keir starmer did which as he did shake up the shadow cabinet, he did shake up the shadow cabinet, he did bring in huge talent —— transformer terry things. particularly bringing rachel as shadow chancellor and people like yvette cooper. picking up on people not being frightened of the labour party, it is partly because of the shadow cabinet as well. take business, yesterday, there was a business, yesterday, there was a business forum at the labour party. it was sold out, they told me they could have sold it out five times
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over. a lot of business leaders, and from the financial services sector as well. they really respect rachel reeves. you get a feeling the suits are back at the labour party, people don't feel frightened of a labour government. don't feel frightened of a labour government-— don't feel frightened of a labour covernment. . , , . government. have you seems that in terms of the — government. have you seems that in terms of the suits? _ government. have you seems that in terms of the suits? i _ government. have you seems that in terms of the suits? i think— terms of the suits? i think completely _ terms of the suits? i think completely and _ terms of the suits? i think completely and you - terms of the suits? i think completely and you walk. terms of the suits? i think- completely and you walk around the exhibition _ completely and you walk around the exhibition hall and it is full, it has more _ exhibition hall and it is full, it has more stores and businesses here. i has more stores and businesses here. i was _ has more stores and businesses here. i was speaking to some people and saying. _ i was speaking to some people and saying, actually, we are sending 'ust saying, actually, we are sending just as _ saying, actually, we are sending just as many people to labour as tory _ just as many people to labour as tory and — just as many people to labour as tory and i— just as many people to labour as tory. and i think that does suggest people _ tory. and i think that does suggest people are — tory. and i think that does suggest people are taking it seriously and actually _ people are taking it seriously and actually thinking, this might happen, _ actually thinking, this might happen, and also, they think there is something they can liaise on and potentially — is something they can liaise on and potentially work with. let�*s potentially work with. let's introduce _ potentially work with. let's introduce the _ potentially work with. let's introduce the deputy - potentially work with. let's | introduce the deputy leader potentially work with. let's - introduce the deputy leader of potentially work with. let�*s introduce the deputy leader of the labour party, angela rayner. we haven't spoken for a couple of months, but i remember we did sit at the last labour conference together, well done for battling your way out of the conference hall. what well done for battling your way out of the conference hall.— well done for battling your way out of the conference hall. what did you think? i of the conference hall. what did you think? | thought — of the conference hall. what did you think? | thought it _ of the conference hall. what did you think? i thought it was _ of the conference hall. what did you think? i thought it was great. -
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of the conference hall. what did you think? i thought it was great. i - of the conference hall. what did you think? i thought it was great. i was | think? i thought it was great. i was really. _ think? i thought it was great. i was really. keir— think? i thought it was great. i was really. keir gave _ think? i thought it was great. i was really, keir gave parts— think? i thought it was great. i was really, keir gave parts of— think? i thought it was great. i was really, keir gave parts of keir- think? i thought it was great. i wasj really, keir gave parts of keir many people _ really, keir gave parts of keir many people say, — really, keir gave parts of keir many people say. what _ really, keir gave parts of keir many people say. what is— really, keir gave parts of keir many people say, what is keir— really, keir gave parts of keir many people say, what is keir like? - really, keir gave parts of keir many people say, what is keir like? i- people say, what is keir like? i always— people say, what is keir like? i always say, _ people say, what is keir like? i always say. if— people say, what is keir like? i always say, if you _ people say, what is keir like? i always say, if you only- people say, what is keir like? i always say, if you only see - people say, what is keir like? i always say, if you only see the | people say, what is keir like? i- always say, if you only see the keir i see, _ always say, if you only see the keir i see, that — always say, if you only see the keir isee. that is — always say, if you only see the keir isee. that is a _ always say, if you only see the keir ! see, that is a keir— always say, if you only see the keir i see, that is a keir ac. _ always say, if you only see the keir ! see, that is a keirac. he- always say, if you only see the keir i see, that is a keir ac. he talked l i see, that is a keir ac. he talked about— i see, that is a keir ac. he talked about his — i see, that is a keir ac. he talked about his motivation _ i see, that is a keir ac. he talked about his motivation to _ i see, that is a keir ac. he talked about his motivation to politics, i about his motivation to politics, making — about his motivation to politics, making sure _ about his motivation to politics, making sure there _ about his motivation to politics, making sure there is— about his motivation to politics, making sure there is standards, people — making sure there is standards, people have _ making sure there is standards, people have respect _ making sure there is standards, people have respect —— - making sure there is standards, people have respect —— that- making sure there is standards, people have respect —— that is. making sure there is standards, i people have respect —— that is the keir i _ people have respect —— that is the keir i see — people have respect —— that is the keir i see and _ people have respect —— that is the keir i see. and that _ people have respect —— that is the keir i see. and that we _ people have respect —— that is the keir i see. and that we have - people have respect —— that is the i keir i see. and that we have respect for the _ keir i see. and that we have respect for the british— keir i see. and that we have respect for the british industry— keir i see. and that we have respect for the british industry and - keir i see. and that we have respect for the british industry and have - for the british industry and have the tools— for the british industry and have the tools and _ for the british industry and have the tools and be _ for the british industry and have the tools and be proud - for the british industry and have the tools and be proud of- for the british industry and have - the tools and be proud of ourselves, it was— the tools and be proud of ourselves, it was incredibly _ the tools and be proud of ourselves, it was incredibly inspirational. - the tools and be proud of ourselves, it was incredibly inspirational. you i it was incredibly inspirational. you said to us news _ it was incredibly inspirational. said to us news because, if only people did see the keir starmer that i see. you love him as much as i do. did he give it a welly and the passion? did he give it a welly and the assion? , , . . , passion? oh, yes, i felt that was the keir that _ passion? oh, yes, i felt that was the keirthat | _ passion? oh, yes, i felt that was the keir that i see _ passion? oh, yes, i felt that was the keir that i see day _ passion? oh, yes, i felt that was the keir that i see day in - passion? oh, yes, i felt that was the keir that i see day in and - passion? oh, yes, i felt that was the keir that i see day in and day out, _ the keir that i see day in and day out, he _ the keir that i see day in and day out, he was _ the keir that i see day in and day out, he was talking _ the keir that i see day in and day out, he was talking about - the keir that i see day in and day out, he was talking about he - the keir that i see day in and dayj out, he was talking about he was the keir that i see day in and day. out, he was talking about he was a working-class _ out, he was talking about he was a working—class kid, _ out, he was talking about he was a working—class kid, he _ out, he was talking about he was a working—class kid, he talked - out, he was talking about he was a working—class kid, he talked aboutj working—class kid, he talked about how proud — working—class kid, he talked about how proud his _ working—class kid, he talked about how proud his parents _ working—class kid, he talked about how proud his parents were - working—class kid, he talked about how proud his parents were of- working—class kid, he talked about. how proud his parents were of owning their pebble—dash _ how proud his parents were of owning their pebble—dash semi— how proud his parents were of owning their pebble—dash semi terraced - their pebble—dash semi terraced house. _ their pebble—dash semi terraced house. i— their pebble—dash semi terraced house, i thought _ their pebble—dash semi terraced house, i thought it— their pebble—dash semi terraced house, i thought it was - their pebble—dash semi terraced house, i thought it was an - house, i thought it was an incredibly— house, i thought it was an incredibly inspiring - house, i thought it was anl incredibly inspiring speech. house, i thought it was an - incredibly inspiring speech. and let's get— incredibly inspiring speech. and let's get off _ incredibly inspiring speech. and let's get off our _ incredibly inspiring speech. and let's get off our knees, - incredibly inspiring speech. and let's get off our knees, we - incredibly inspiring speech. andj let's get off our knees, we want incredibly inspiring speech. and i let's get off our knees, we want to be positive — let's get off our knees, we want to be positive it _ let's get off our knees, we want to be positive. it is _ let's get off our knees, we want to be positive. it is not _ let's get off our knees, we want to be positive. it is notjust— let's get off our knees, we want to be positive. it is notjust about - be positive. it is notjust about words — be positive. it is notjust about words and _ be positive. it is notjust about words and slogans, _ be positive. it is notjust about words and slogans, how - be positive. it is notjust about words and slogans, how do - be positive. it is notjust about words and slogans, how do we j be positive. it is notjust about i
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words and slogans, how do we do be positive. it is notjust about - words and slogans, how do we do the hard now— words and slogans, how do we do the hard now and — words and slogans, how do we do the hard now and reap _ words and slogans, how do we do the hard now and reap the _ words and slogans, how do we do the hard now and reap the rewards - words and slogans, how do we do the hard now and reap the rewards of- hard now and reap the rewards of that together, _ hard now and reap the rewards of that together, inclusively, - hard now and reap the rewards of that together, inclusively, and ii that together, inclusively, and i thought— that together, inclusively, and i thought it — that together, inclusively, and i thought it was _ that together, inclusively, and i thought it was an _ that together, inclusively, and i thought it was an incredibly - thought it was an incredibly powerful— thought it was an incredibly powerful speech— thought it was an incredibly powerful speech that - thought it was an incredibly powerful speech that will i thought it was an incredibly i powerful speech that will give thought it was an incredibly - powerful speech that will give every part of _ powerful speech that will give every part of the — powerful speech that will give every part ofthe uk— powerful speech that will give every part of the uk some _ powerful speech that will give every part of the uk some hope _ powerful speech that will give every part of the uk some hope that- powerful speech that will give every part of the uk some hope that we i powerful speech that will give every i part of the uk some hope that we can work together — part of the uk some hope that we can work together to _ part of the uk some hope that we can work together to make _ part of the uk some hope that we can work together to make this _ part of the uk some hope that we can work together to make this happen. i work together to make this happen. one of— work together to make this happen. one of the _ work together to make this happen. one of the big — work together to make this happen. one of the big announcements, - work together to make this happen. one of the big announcements, andj one of the big announcements, and certainly a theme this week, is the green commitment. by the labour party. and he said very passionately that britain should be leading the way when it comes to a greener future. he talked about this great british energy company, a new publicly owned company. how would it work in terms of actually delivering those cheaper bills that people want? ~ ~' ., those cheaper bills that people want? ~ ,, ., . ., ., want? well, we know we have got to net to want? well, we know we have got to get to renewables, _ want? well, we know we have got to get to renewables, we _ want? well, we know we have got to get to renewables, we know- want? well, we know we have got to get to renewables, we know we - want? well, we know we have got toj get to renewables, we know we have -ot get to renewables, we know we have got to— get to renewables, we know we have got to be _ get to renewables, we know we have got to be self— get to renewables, we know we have got to be self reliant _ get to renewables, we know we have got to be self reliant on _ get to renewables, we know we have got to be self reliant on our- get to renewables, we know we have got to be self reliant on our energy i got to be self reliant on our energy needs— got to be self reliant on our energy needs and — got to be self reliant on our energy needs and it — got to be self reliant on our energy needs and it is _ got to be self reliant on our energy needs and it is about _ got to be self reliant on our energy. needs and it is about turbo—charging that and _ needs and it is about turbo—charging that and it _ needs and it is about turbo—charging that and it is — needs and it is about turbo—charging that and it is about _ needs and it is about turbo—charging that and it is about the _ needs and it is about turbo—charging that and it is about the public- that and it is about the public having — that and it is about the public having the _ that and it is about the public having the investment - that and it is about the public having the investment in - that and it is about the public having the investment in it. that and it is about the public. having the investment in it and that and it is about the public- having the investment in it and the stake _ having the investment in it and the stake in _ having the investment in it and the stake in it— having the investment in it and the stake in it so— having the investment in it and the stake in it so it _ having the investment in it and the stake in it so it brings— having the investment in it and the stake in it so it brings down- having the investment in it and thej stake in it so it brings down energy prices _ stake in it so it brings down energy prices but— stake in it so it brings down energy rices. �* ., ., . ., prices. but how will it do that? how will ou prices. but how will it do that? how will you say — prices. but how will it do that? how will you say to _ prices. but how will it do that? how will you say to people _ prices. but how will it do that? how will you say to people who - prices. but how will it do that? how will you say to people who are - will you say to people who are facing, we have had the cap that the average household bill will be about £2500, can you, that this new
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company that sounds good, that it will actually work? it company that sounds good, that it will actually work?— will actually work? it will it is renewables, _ will actually work? it will it is renewables, it _ will actually work? it will it is renewables, it is _ will actually work? it will it is renewables, it is water, - will actually work? it will it is - renewables, it is water, hydrogen, onshore _ renewables, it is water, hydrogen, onshore wind~ _ renewables, it is water, hydrogen, onshore wind. it _ renewables, it is water, hydrogen, onshore wind. it is— renewables, it is water, hydrogen, onshore wind. it is bringing - renewables, it is water, hydrogen, onshore wind. it is bringing all- renewables, it is water, hydrogen, onshore wind. it is bringing all of. onshore wind. it is bringing all of that together _ onshore wind. it is bringing all of that together and _ onshore wind. it is bringing all of that together and harnessing - onshore wind. it is bringing all of| that together and harnessing that technology— that together and harnessing that technology and _ that together and harnessing that technology and that _ that together and harnessing that technology and that power, - that together and harnessing that i technology and that power, investing in it so _ technology and that power, investing in it so we _ technology and that power, investing in it so we have — technology and that power, investing in it so we have new— technology and that power, investing in it so we have newjobs, _ technology and that power, investing in it so we have newjobs, a - technology and that power, investing in it so we have newjobs, a million. in it so we have newjobs, a million new in it so we have newjobs, a million newjobs_ in it so we have newjobs, a million newjobs as — in it so we have newjobs, a million newjobs as part— in it so we have newjobs, a million newjobs as part of— in it so we have newjobs, a million newjobs as part of that _ in it so we have newjobs, a million newjobs as part of that deal, - in it so we have newjobs, a million newjobs as part of that deal, and i newjobs as part of that deal, and also that— newjobs as part of that deal, and also that we — newjobs as part of that deal, and also that we are _ newjobs as part of that deal, and also that we are self—reliant - newjobs as part of that deal, and also that we are self—reliant and i newjobs as part of that deal, and i also that we are self—reliant and we are not— also that we are self—reliant and we are not in— also that we are self—reliant and we are not in the— also that we are self—reliant and we are not in the global— also that we are self—reliant and we are not in the global market- also that we are self—reliant and we are not in the global market on- also that we are self—reliant and we are not in the global market on gas| are not in the global market on gas and oil— are not in the global market on gas and oil prices, _ are not in the global market on gas and oil prices, and _ are not in the global market on gas and oil prices, and that— are not in the global market on gas and oil prices, and that will- are not in the global market on gas and oil prices, and that will be - and oil prices, and that will be incredibly— and oil prices, and that will be incredibly well— and oil prices, and that will be incredibly well received - and oil prices, and that will be incredibly well received by- incredibly well received by business. _ incredibly well received by business, i— incredibly well received by business, i think, - incredibly well received by business, i think, who i incredibly well received by business, i think, who arej business, i think, who are struggling, _ business, i think, who are struggling, and _ business, i think, who are struggling, and also - business, i think, who are struggling, and also by. business, i think, who are - struggling, and also by households that really— struggling, and also by households that really need _ struggling, and also by households that really need that _ struggling, and also by households that really need that desperate i that really need that desperate short-term _ that really need that desperate short—term help _ that really need that desperate short—term help and _ that really need that desperate short—term help and also - that really need that desperate short—term help and also that. short—term help and also that long-term _ short—term help and also that long-term plan— short—term help and also that long—term plan of— short—term help and also that long—term plan of how - short—term help and also that long—term plan of how we i short—term help and also thatj long—term plan of how we get short—term help and also that i long—term plan of how we get to short—term help and also that - long—term plan of how we get to a better— long—term plan of how we get to a better place — long—term plan of how we get to a better place than _ long—term plan of how we get to a better place than where _ long—term plan of how we get to a better place than where we - long—term plan of how we get to a better place than where we are i long—term plan of how we get to a i better place than where we are now. so this— better place than where we are now. so this company— better place than where we are now. so this company is _ better place than where we are now. so this company is going _ better place than where we are now. so this company is going to - better place than where we are now. so this company is going to be - better place than where we are now. so this company is going to be taken out of the global energy market in terms of prices, it will be separate to that? irate terms of prices, it will be separate to that? ~ . ., ., . , , to that? we are going to ramp up, it will be our company _ to that? we are going to ramp up, it will be our company that _ to that? we are going to ramp up, it will be our company that builds - to that? we are going to ramp up, it will be our company that builds up . will be our company that builds up that technology _ will be our company that builds up that technology that _ will be our company that builds up that technology that is _ will be our company that builds up that technology that is able - will be our company that builds up that technology that is able to - that technology that is able to import — that technology that is able to import to _ that technology that is able to import to all— that technology that is able to import to all of _ that technology that is able to import to all of our _ that technology that is able to i import to all of our households that technology that is able to - import to all of our households and businesses — import to all of our households and businesses renewable _ import to all of our households and businesses renewable energy, - import to all of our households and businesses renewable energy, so. import to all of our households andj businesses renewable energy, so it will be _ businesses renewable energy, so it will be taking — businesses renewable energy, so it will be taking the _ businesses renewable energy, so it will be taking the wind, _ businesses renewable energy, so it will be taking the wind, the - businesses renewable energy, so it| will be taking the wind, the energy, the sea, _ will be taking the wind, the energy, the sea, we — will be taking the wind, the energy, the sea, we will—
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will be taking the wind, the energy, the sea, we will be _ will be taking the wind, the energy, the sea, we will be making - will be taking the wind, the energy, the sea, we will be making sure i will be taking the wind, the energy, the sea, we will be making sure all| the sea, we will be making sure all of those _ the sea, we will be making sure all of those natural _ the sea, we will be making sure all of those natural ways _ the sea, we will be making sure all of those natural ways of _ the sea, we will be making sure all of those natural ways of creating i of those natural ways of creating energy— of those natural ways of creating energy is — of those natural ways of creating energy is pumped _ of those natural ways of creating energy is pumped right- of those natural ways of creating energy is pumped right back- of those natural ways of creatingj energy is pumped right back into households— energy is pumped right back into households and _ energy is pumped right back into households and into _ energy is pumped right back into households and into our - energy is pumped right back into| households and into our business energy is pumped right back into. households and into our business is here _ households and into our business is here and _ households and into our business is here and the — households and into our business is here. and the technology _ households and into our business is here. and the technology that - households and into our business is here. and the technology that we i here. and the technology that we develop _ here. and the technology that we develop will — here. and the technology that we develop will also _ here. and the technology that we develop will also mean _ here. and the technology that we develop will also mean that - here. and the technology that we develop will also mean that we i here. and the technology that we i develop will also mean that we will be internationally— develop will also mean that we will be internationally able _ develop will also mean that we will be internationally able to _ develop will also mean that we will be internationally able to make i develop will also mean that we willi be internationally able to make sure we are _ be internationally able to make sure we are world — be internationally able to make sure we are world leaders _ be internationally able to make sure we are world leaders on _ be internationally able to make sure we are world leaders on this. - you know that when keir starmer stood for the leadership, he had his ten commitments, which included putting utilities, all of them into public ownership, he has rowed back from that. i public ownership, he has rowed back from that. ., ., , from that. i would not say it is rowin: from that. i would not say it is rowing back. _ from that. i would not say it is rowing back, we _ from that. i would not say it is rowing back, we are _ from that. i would not say it is rowing back, we are going i from that. i would not say it is - rowing back, we are going forward, this is— rowing back, we are going forward, this is the _ rowing back, we are going forward, this is the future _ rowing back, we are going forward, this is the future force _ rowing back, we are going forward, this is the future force only- rowing back, we are going forward, this is the future force only on - this is the future force only on some — this is the future force only on some of— this is the future force only on some of it. _ this is the future force only on some of it, there _ this is the future force only on some of it, there has- this is the future force only on some of it, there has been- this is the future force only onl some of it, there has been this commitment _ some of it, there has been this commitment to— some of it, there has been this commitment to nationalising i some of it, there has been this i commitment to nationalising rail, some of it, there has been this - commitment to nationalising rail, we have got— commitment to nationalising rail, we have got this — commitment to nationalising rail, we have got this publicly— commitment to nationalising rail, we have got this publicly owned - have got this publicly owned company, _ have got this publicly owned company, not— have got this publicly owned company, not nationalisingi have got this publicly owned - company, not nationalising energy i’ili'it company, not nationalising energy right across — company, not nationalising energy right across the _ company, not nationalising energy right across the board, _ company, not nationalising energy right across the board, obviously, i right across the board, obviously, what _ right across the board, obviously, what about — right across the board, obviously, what about the _ right across the board, obviously, what about the people _ right across the board, obviously, what about the people here - right across the board, obviously, what about the people here who i right across the board, obviously, - what about the people here who would have liked _ what about the people here who would have liked to _ what about the people here who would have liked to have _ what about the people here who would have liked to have seen _ what about the people here who would have liked to have seen that, - what about the people here who would have liked to have seen that, you - have liked to have seen that, you will be _ have liked to have seen that, you will be disappointing _ have liked to have seen that, you will be disappointing those - have liked to have seen that, you will be disappointing those who i will be disappointing those who believed — will be disappointing those who believed keir— will be disappointing those who believed keir starmer- will be disappointing those who believed keir starmer when i will be disappointing those who believed keir starmer when hei will be disappointing those who i believed keir starmer when he said in that— believed keir starmer when he said in that 2017— believed keir starmer when he said in that 2017 manifesto, _ believed keir starmer when he said in that 2017 manifesto, that i believed keir starmer when he said in that 2017 manifesto, that that i in that 2017 manifesto, that that manifesto — in that 2017 manifesto, that that manifesto of _ in that 2017 manifesto, that that manifesto ofjeremy— in that 2017 manifesto, that that manifesto ofjeremy corbyn i in that 2017 manifesto, that that manifesto ofjeremy corbyn was| in that 2017 manifesto, that that| manifesto ofjeremy corbyn was a foundational— manifesto ofjeremy corbyn was a foundational document? - manifesto ofjeremy corbyn was a foundational document? what i manifesto ofjeremy corbyn was a foundational document? what we j manifesto ofjeremy corbyn was a i foundational document? what we are doin-
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foundational document? what we are doing with _ foundational document? what we are doing with keir— foundational document? what we are doing with keir is _ foundational document? what we are doing with keir is we _ foundational document? what we are doing with keir is we are _ foundational document? what we are doing with keir is we are not- doing with keir is we are not looking _ doing with keir is we are not looking at— doing with keir is we are not looking at the _ doing with keir is we are not looking at the past, - doing with keir is we are not looking at the past, we i doing with keir is we are not looking at the past, we are i doing with keir is we are not- looking at the past, we are looking at the _ looking at the past, we are looking at the future — looking at the past, we are looking at the future and _ looking at the past, we are looking at the future and what _ looking at the past, we are looking at the future and what our - at the future and what our needs are _ at the future and what our needs are we — at the future and what our needs are we know— at the future and what our needs are. we know no— at the future and what our needs are. we know no need _ at the future and what our needs are. we know no need to i at the future and what our needs are. we know no need to look. at the future and what our needs are. we know no need to look atj are. we know no need to look at renewables. _ are. we know no need to look at renewables. we _ are. we know no need to look at renewables, we know— are. we know no need to look at renewables, we know we i are. we know no need to look at renewables, we know we need i are. we know no need to look at i renewables, we know we need good public— renewables, we know we need good public services, _ renewables, we know we need good public services, and _ renewables, we know we need good public services, and the _ renewables, we know we need good public services, and the public i renewables, we know we need good public services, and the public if i public services, and the public if they— public services, and the public if they put— public services, and the public if they put money— public services, and the public if they put money into _ public services, and the public if| they put money into investment, public services, and the public if i they put money into investment, they should _ they put money into investment, they should reap— they put money into investment, they should reap the — they put money into investment, they should reap the rewards _ they put money into investment, they should reap the rewards of— they put money into investment, they should reap the rewards of that i they put money into investment, they should reap the rewards of that as i should reap the rewards of that as well, _ should reap the rewards of that as well, and — should reap the rewards of that as well, and that— should reap the rewards of that as well, and that was _ should reap the rewards of that as well, and that was the _ should reap the rewards of that as well, and that was the journey- should reap the rewards of that asi well, and that was the journey that rachel— well, and that was the journey that rachel reeves _ well, and that was the journey that rachel reeves sent _ well, and that was the journey that rachel reeves sent us _ well, and that was the journey that rachel reeves sent us on - well, and that was the journey that i rachel reeves sent us on yesterday, and it— rachel reeves sent us on yesterday, and it is— rachel reeves sent us on yesterday, and it is also— rachel reeves sent us on yesterday, and it is also the _ rachel reeves sent us on yesterday, and it is also the journey— rachel reeves sent us on yesterday, and it is also the journey that i rachel reeves sent us on yesterday, and it is also the journey that keir i and it is also the journey that keir is setting — and it is also the journey that keir is setting out _ and it is also the journey that keir is setting out today, _ and it is also the journey that keir is setting out today, with - and it is also the journey that keir is setting out today, with the i and it is also the journey that keir is setting out today, with the gb i is setting out today, with the gb energy. — is setting out today, with the gb energy. he — is setting out today, with the gb energy. he said _ is setting out today, with the gb energy, he said actually- is setting out today, with the gb energy, he said actually it i is setting out today, with the gb energy, he said actually it will. energy, he said actually it will help— energy, he said actually it will help power— energy, he said actually it will help power the _ energy, he said actually it will help power the next— energy, he said actually it will. help power the next generation energy, he said actually it will- help power the next generation into the green _ help power the next generation into the green energy— help power the next generation into the green energy that _ help power the next generation into the green energy that we _ help power the next generation into the green energy that we need i help power the next generation into the green energy that we need to i help power the next generation into. the green energy that we need to see into the _ the green energy that we need to see into the future — the green energy that we need to see into the future.— the green energy that we need to see into the future. economic competence is what keir starmer _ into the future. economic competence is what keir starmer and _ into the future. economic competence is what keir starmer and rachel i is what keir starmer and rachel reeves have talked about. you have already committed to £28 billion a year to tackle climate change and for green policies, i spoke to your colleague little earlier today, jonathan reynolds, who said that everything will be under review, and i wondered if that is a sense of not being able to commit going forward to that £28 billion a year on green... to that £28 billion a year on green- - -_ to that £28 billion a year on ureen... ., ,. , to that £28 billion a year on ureen... . , . , ., green... that is an investment, and here is the — green... that is an investment, and here is the difference, _ green... that is an investment, and here is the difference, what i green... that is an investment, and here is the difference, what the i here is the difference, what the conservatives _
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here is the difference, what the conservatives are _ here is the difference, what the conservatives are doing i here is the difference, what the conservatives are doing is i conservatives are doing is increasing _ conservatives are doing is increasing borrowing, i conservatives are doing is increasing borrowing, and conservatives are doing is _ increasing borrowing, and increasing debt~ _ increasing borrowing, and increasing debt. ., ., . ., . debt. you would have to increase borrowin: debt. you would have to increase borrowing as _ debt. you would have to increase borrowing as well. _ debt. you would have to increase borrowing as well. but i debt. you would have to increase borrowing as well. but they i debt. you would have to increase borrowing as well. but they are . borrowing as well. but they are doinu in borrowing as well. but they are doing in order _ borrowing as well. but they are doing in order to _ borrowing as well. but they are doing in order to give i borrowing as well. but they are doing in order to give 1% - borrowing as well. but they are doing in order to give 1% of- borrowing as well. but they are doing in order to give 1% of the | doing in order to give 1% of the country— doing in order to give 1% of the country a — doing in order to give 1% of the country a tax _ doing in order to give 1% of the country a tax cut, _ doing in order to give 1% of the country a tax cut, we _ doing in order to give 1% of the country a tax cut, we are - doing in order to give 1% of the. country a tax cut, we are talking about _ country a tax cut, we are talking about giving _ country a tax cut, we are talking about giving the _ country a tax cut, we are talking about giving the public- country a tax cut, we are talking about giving the public a - country a tax cut, we are talking about giving the public a stake l country a tax cut, we are talkingl about giving the public a stake in the future — about giving the public a stake in the future of— about giving the public a stake in the future of business _ about giving the public a stake in the future of business and/or- the future of business and/or technology— the future of business and/or technology so _ the future of business and/or technology so that _ the future of business and/or technology so that we - the future of business and/or technology so that we can i the future of business and/or. technology so that we can grow the future of business and/or- technology so that we can grow our economy _ technology so that we can grow our economy in— technology so that we can grow our economy in the _ technology so that we can grow our economy in the long _ technology so that we can grow our economy in the long term - technology so that we can grow our economy in the long term so - technology so that we can grow our economy in the long term so that l economy in the long term so that everyone — economy in the long term so that everyone is— economy in the long term so that everyone is able _ economy in the long term so that everyone is able to _ economy in the long term so that everyone is able to do _ economy in the long term so that everyone is able to do well - economy in the long term so that everyone is able to do well out i economy in the long term so that everyone is able to do well out of that and — everyone is able to do well out of that and also _ everyone is able to do well out of that and also making _ everyone is able to do well out of that and also making sure - everyone is able to do well out of that and also making sure that i that and also making sure that workers — that and also making sure that workers are _ that and also making sure that workers are not _ that and also making sure that workers are not undercut, - that and also making sure that workers are not undercut, or. that and also making sure that i workers are not undercut, or that they— workers are not undercut, or that they have — workers are not undercut, or that they have precarious, _ workers are not undercut, or that they have precarious, insecure i workers are not undercut, or that - they have precarious, insecure work, so it's— they have precarious, insecure work, so it's a _ they have precarious, insecure work, so it's a partnership. _ they have precarious, insecure work, so it's a partnership, it's— they have precarious, insecure work, so it's a partnership, it's good - they have precarious, insecure work, so it's a partnership, it's good for- so it's a partnership, it's good for workers _ so it's a partnership, it's good for workers and _ so it's a partnership, it's good for workers and it's _ so it's a partnership, it's good for workers and it's good _ so it's a partnership, it's good for workers and it's good for... - so it's a partnership, it's good for workers and it's good for... since ou brina workers and it's good for... since you bring up _ workers and it's good for... since you bring up workers _ workers and it's good for... since you bring up workers and - workers and it's good for... you bring up workers and being workers and it's good for...“ you bring up workers and being on the side of workers, you will know that conference has passed a motion here to say that people like you, members of the shadow cabinet, should bejoining workers on members of the shadow cabinet, should be joining workers on the picket line. that is something they would like to see, and you're not going to do it, are you? irate would like to see, and you're not going to do it, are you?- going to do it, are you? we are auoin to going to do it, are you? we are going to get — going to do it, are you? we are going to get into _ going to do it, are you? we are going to get into government i going to do it, are you? we are l going to get into government and abolish— going to get into government and abolish the — going to get into government and abolish the picket _ going to get into government and abolish the picket line _ going to get into government and abolish the picket line because i abolish the picket line because there _ abolish the picket line because there won't— abolish the picket line because there won't be _ abolish the picket line because there won't be any— abolish the picket line because there won't be any need - abolish the picket line because there won't be any need for. abolish the picket line because there won't be any need for it, j there won't be any need for it, that's— there won't be any need for it, that's the _ there won't be any need for it, that's the point _ there won't be any need for it, that's the point we _ there won't be any need for it, that's the point we were - there won't be any need for it, . that's the point we were making. good _ that's the point we were making. good answer. _ that's the point we were making. good answer, but _ that's the point we were making. good answer, but until— that's the point we were making. good answer, but until that - that's the point we were making. i good answer, but until that point, it is ruled out you are on the side of workers but not so much that you want to stand with them on the picket line on strikes for fair pay?
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i have met with the general secretaries _ i have met with the general secretaries and _ i have met with the general secretaries and have - i have met with the general secretaries and have been i i have met with the general- secretaries and have been working with them — secretaries and have been working with them to — secretaries and have been working with them to push _ secretaries and have been working with them to push the _ secretaries and have been working with them to push the governance| secretaries and have been working - with them to push the governance and employers _ with them to push the governance and employers to — with them to push the governance and employers to find _ with them to push the governance and employers to find a _ with them to push the governance and employers to find a solution, - with them to push the governance and employers to find a solution, in - employers to find a solution, in wales, — employers to find a solution, in wales, we _ employers to find a solution, in wales, we don't— employers to find a solution, in wales, we don't have _ employers to find a solution, in wales, we don't have industrial action, — wales, we don't have industrial action, we _ wales, we don't have industrial action, we have _ wales, we don't have industrial action, we have a _ wales, we don't have industrial action, we have a welsh - wales, we don't have industrialj action, we have a welsh labour government _ action, we have a welsh labour government-— government. and k4, the first minister. _ government. and k4, the first minister, has _ government. and k4, the first minister, has been _ government. and k4, the first minister, has been very, - government. and k4, the first minister, has been very, very| government. and k4, the first- minister, has been very, very clear, he wants to see inflation or above inflation pay rises for those workers that are going on strike, but i haven't heard that from keir starmer. ~ but i haven't heard that from keir starmer. ,, , .,~ ., but i haven't heard that from keir starmer. ,, ., , starmer. mark drakeford is the leader in wales _ starmer. mark drakeford is the leader in wales and _ starmer. mark drakeford is the leader in wales and there - starmer. mark drakeford is the leader in wales and there is . starmer. mark drakeford is the leader in wales and there is no j leader in wales and there is no industrial— leader in wales and there is no industrial action— leader in wales and there is no industrial action in— leader in wales and there is no industrial action in wales, - leader in wales and there is no- industrial action in wales, because they have — industrial action in wales, because they have got _ industrial action in wales, because they have got the _ industrial action in wales, because they have got the bodies... - industrial action in wales, because they have got the bodies... what. industrial action in wales, because i they have got the bodies... what we have set _ they have got the bodies... what we have set out — they have got the bodies... what we have set out in— they have got the bodies... what we have set out in the _ they have got the bodies... what we have set out in the future _ they have got the bodies... what we have set out in the future of- they have got the bodies... what we have set out in the future of work, . have set out in the future of work, where _ have set out in the future of work, where the — have set out in the future of work, where the employers _ have set out in the future of work, where the employers work - have set out in the future of work, where the employers work with i have set out in the future of work, i where the employers work with trade unions _ where the employers work with trade unions to— where the employers work with trade unions to avoid — where the employers work with trade unions to avoid industrial— where the employers work with trade unions to avoid industrial action, - unions to avoid industrial action, that is— unions to avoid industrial action, that is what— unions to avoid industrial action, that is what we _ unions to avoid industrial action, that is what we want _ unions to avoid industrial action, that is what we want to - unions to avoid industrial action, that is what we want to see. - unions to avoid industrial action, that is what we want to see. we | that is what we want to see. we don't _ that is what we want to see. we don't want — that is what we want to see. we don't want to _ that is what we want to see. we don't want to see _ that is what we want to see. we don't want to see picket - that is what we want to see. we don't want to see picket lines, l that is what we want to see. we don't want to see picket lines, i| don't want to see picket lines, i don't _ don't want to see picket lines, i don't want _ don't want to see picket lines, i don't want a _ don't want to see picket lines, i don't want a picture _ don't want to see picket lines, i don't want a picture on - don't want to see picket lines, i don't want a picture on a - don't want to see picket lines, i don't want a picture on a picket| don't want a picture on a picket line, _ don't want a picture on a picket line. i— don't want a picture on a picket tine. iwant— don't want a picture on a picket line, i want to _ don't want a picture on a picket line, i want to see _ don't want a picture on a picket line, i want to see workers - don't want a picture on a picket line, i want to see workers at l don't want a picture on a picket. line, i want to see workers at work feeting _ line, i want to see workers at work feeling respected _ line, i want to see workers at work feeling respected and _ line, i want to see workers at work feeling respected and given- line, i want to see workers at work feeling respected and given a - line, i want to see workers at work. feeling respected and given a decent pay feeling respected and given a decent bay for— feeling respected and given a decent pay for a _ feeling respected and given a decent pay for a decent _ feeling respected and given a decent pay for a decent days _ feeling respected and given a decent pay for a decent days work. - feeling respected and given a decent pay for a decent days work. find - feeling respected and given a decent pay for a decent days work.- pay for a decent days work. and so can ou pay for a decent days work. and so can you truly _ pay for a decent days work. and so can you truly say — pay for a decent days work. and so can you truly say you _ pay for a decent days work. and so can you truly say you are _ pay for a decent days work. and so can you truly say you are on - pay for a decent days work. and so can you truly say you are on the i can you truly say you are on the side of working people, working people who are struggling, who have been forced out on strike, as they see it, and who look to the labour party, and they are not physically
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there with them but? timer;r party, and they are not physically there with them but?— party, and they are not physically there with them but? they know we are with them. _ there with them but? they know we are with them, they _ there with them but? they know we are with them, they saw— there with them but? they know we are with them, they saw it - there with them but? they know we are with them, they saw it through l are with them, they saw it through the green — are with them, they saw it through the green paper— are with them, they saw it through the green paperfor_ are with them, they saw it through the green paper for the _ are with them, they saw it through the green paper for the future - are with them, they saw it through the green paper for the future of. the green paper for the future of work. _ the green paper for the future of work. they— the green paper for the future of work, they have _ the green paper for the future of work, they have seen _ the green paper for the future of work, they have seen it- the green paper for the future of work, they have seen it with - work, they have seen it with procurement, _ work, they have seen it with procurement, making - work, they have seen it with procurement, making sure i work, they have seen it with i procurement, making sure that work, they have seen it with - procurement, making sure that in sourcing, — procurement, making sure that in sourcing, making _ procurement, making sure that in sourcing, making sure _ procurement, making sure that in sourcing, making sure every- procurement, making sure that in. sourcing, making sure every pound that is _ sourcing, making sure every pound that is spent— sourcing, making sure every pound that is spent we _ sourcing, making sure every pound that is spent we invest _ sourcing, making sure every pound that is spent we invest in _ sourcing, making sure every pound that is spent we invest in our- that is spent we invest in our public— that is spent we invest in our public services, _ that is spent we invest in our public services, they- that is spent we invest in our public services, they say- that is spent we invest in ourj public services, they say that that is spent we invest in our. public services, they say that in keir's _ public services, they say that in keir's commitment _ public services, they say that in keir's commitment today- public services, they say that in l keir's commitment today around setting _ keir's commitment today around setting up— keir's commitment today around setting up the _ keir's commitment today around setting up the gb— keir's commitment today around setting up the gb energy, - keir's commitment today around | setting up the gb energy, talking about— setting up the gb energy, talking about a _ setting up the gb energy, talking about a million _ setting up the gb energy, talking about a million new _ setting up the gb energy, talking about a million newjobs - setting up the gb energy, talking about a million newjobs come i setting up the gb energy, talking i about a million newjobs come addesi that we _ about a million newjobs come addesi that we are _ about a million newjobs come addesi that we are on — about a million newjobs come addesi that we are on their— about a million newjobs come addesi that we are on their side, _ about a million newjobs come addesi that we are on their side, the - about a million newjobs come addesi that we are on their side, the side i that we are on their side, the side of the _ that we are on their side, the side of the working _ that we are on their side, the side of the working people _ that we are on their side, the side of the working people of - that we are on their side, the side of the working people of this i of the working people of this country. _ of the working people of this country. that— of the working people of this country, that is— of the working people of this country, that is how- of the working people of this country, that is how we i of the working people of this i country, that is how we change of the working people of this - country, that is how we change their lives, _ country, that is how we change their lives, not _ country, that is how we change their lives, not stood _ country, that is how we change their lives, not stood on _ country, that is how we change their lives, not stood on the _ country, that is how we change their lives, not stood on the picket - country, that is how we change their lives, not stood on the picket line, i lives, not stood on the picket line, that is— lives, not stood on the picket line, that is how— lives, not stood on the picket line, that is how we _ lives, not stood on the picket line, that is how we will— lives, not stood on the picket line, that is how we will change - lives, not stood on the picket line, i that is how we will change people's lives for— that is how we will change people's lives for the — that is how we will change people's lives for the better— that is how we will change people's lives for the better pop _ that is how we will change people's lives for the better pop oscar i that is how we will change people's lives for the better pop oscar what| lives for the better pop oscar what would _ lives for the better pop oscar what would be _ lives for the better pop oscar what would be the — lives for the better pop oscar what would be the one _ lives for the better pop oscar what would be the one big _ lives for the better pop oscar what would be the one big idea - lives for the better pop oscar what would be the one big idea from i lives for the better pop oscar what would be the one big idea from a l would be the one big idea from a future _ would be the one big idea from a future labour— would be the one big idea from a future labour government - would be the one big idea from a future labour government that l would be the one big idea from a i future labour government that would transform _ future labour government that would transform people's _ future labour government that would transform people's lives _ future labour government that would transform people's lives at _ future labour government that would transform people's lives at this - transform people's lives at this conference? _ transform people's lives at this conference? growing _ transform people's lives at this conference? growing our- transform people's lives at this i conference? growing our economy transform people's lives at this - conference? growing our economy in a sustainable _ conference? growing our economy in a sustainable way, — conference? growing our economy in a sustainable way, so— conference? growing our economy in a sustainable way, so that _ conference? growing our economy in a sustainable way, so that there - conference? growing our economy in a sustainable way, so that there is - sustainable way, so that there is more _ sustainable way, so that there is more of— sustainable way, so that there is more of a — sustainable way, so that there is more of a drive _ sustainable way, so that there is more of a drive to— sustainable way, so that there is more of a drive to invest - sustainable way, so that there is more of a drive to invest in i sustainable way, so that there isl more of a drive to invest in public services _ more of a drive to invest in public services but — more of a drive to invest in public services but that _ more of a drive to invest in public services but that is _ more of a drive to invest in public services but that is what - more of a drive to invest in public services but that is what we i more of a drive to invest in public services but that is what we are l services but that is what we are hearing — services but that is what we are hearing from _ services but that is what we are hearing from liz— services but that is what we are hearing from liz truss - services but that is what we are hearing from liz truss and - services but that is what we are l hearing from liz truss and kwasi kwartenq — hearing from liz truss and kwasi kwartenq but_ hearing from liz truss and kwasi kwarteng. but they _ hearing from liz truss and kwasi kwarteng. but they have - hearing from liz truss and kwasii kwarteng. but they have trashed hearing from liz truss and kwasi - kwarteng. but they have trashed the economy— kwarteng. but they have trashed the economy over — kwarteng. but they have trashed the economy over the _ kwarteng. but they have trashed the economy over the last _ kwarteng. but they have trashed the economy over the last few _ kwarteng. but they have trashed the economy over the last few years. - economy over the last few years. because — economy over the last few years. because we — economy over the last few years. because we are _ economy over the last few years. because we are not _ economy over the last few years. because we are not proposing. because we are not proposing that, we are _ because we are not proposing that, we are pr0posing _ because we are not proposing that, we are proposing real—
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because we are not proposing that, we are proposing real investment. we are proposing real investment that is— we are proposing real investment that is going _ we are proposing real investment that is going to— we are proposing real investment that is going to grow— we are proposing real investment that is going to grow the - we are proposing real investment| that is going to grow the economy we are proposing real investment. that is going to grow the economy in a sustainable — that is going to grow the economy in a sustainable way— that is going to grow the economy in a sustainable way and _ that is going to grow the economy in a sustainable way and a _ that is going to grow the economy in a sustainable way and a plan- that is going to grow the economy in a sustainable way and a plan to - that is going to grow the economy in a sustainable way and a plan to do . a sustainable way and a plan to do it that _ a sustainable way and a plan to do it that witt— a sustainable way and a plan to do it that will give _ a sustainable way and a plan to do it that will give confidence - a sustainable way and a plan to do it that will give confidence to - it that will give confidence to business _ it that will give confidence to business and _ it that will give confidence to business and confidence - it that will give confidence to business and confidence to l business and confidence to the markets — business and confidence to the markets and _ business and confidence to the markets and also _ business and confidence to the markets and also give - business and confidence to the markets and also give us - business and confidence to the markets and also give us our l business and confidence to the - markets and also give us our world leading _ markets and also give us our world leading part — markets and also give us our world leading part internationally, - markets and also give us our world leading part internationally, soapy| leading part internationally, soapy people _ leading part internationally, soapy pe0pte see — leading part internationally, soapy pe0pte see us _ leading part internationally, soapy pe0pte see us as— leading part internationally, soapy people see us as competitors - people see us as competitors globally— people see us as competitors globally instead _ people see us as competitors globally instead of— people see us as competitors globally instead of the - people see us as competitorsi globally instead of the pariahs globally — globally instead of the pariahs globally that _ globally instead of the pariahs globally that we _ globally instead of the pariahs globally that we have - globally instead of the pariahs globally that we have been . globally instead of the pariahs . globally that we have been seen globally instead of the pariahs - globally that we have been seen as. so, globally that we have been seen as. so. you _ globally that we have been seen as. so. you are — globally that we have been seen as. so, you are agreeing _ globally that we have been seen as. so, you are agreeing to— globally that we have been seen as. so, you are agreeing to take - so, you are agreeing to take national insurance contributions, you agree that the government on that, you are going to reverse that. you agree with cutting... the government— you agree with cutting... the government wanted - you agree with cutting... the government wanted to - you agree with cutting... the . government wanted to increase you agree with cutting... the - government wanted to increase the tax and _ government wanted to increase the tax and we — government wanted to increase the tax and we opposed _ government wanted to increase the tax and we opposed it _ government wanted to increase the tax and we opposed it at _ government wanted to increase the tax and we opposed it at the - government wanted to increase the tax and we opposed it at the time. i tax and we opposed it at the time. and tax and we opposed it at the time. ami so— tax and we opposed it at the time. ami so you — tax and we opposed it at the time. ami so you are _ tax and we opposed it at the time. and so you are in— tax and we opposed it at the time. and so you are in agreement - tax and we opposed it at the time. and so you are in agreement withi tax and we opposed it at the time. i and so you are in agreement with the government? hie. and so you are in agreement with the government?— and so you are in agreement with the covernment? ., , . government? no, we said the 45p rate should not have _ government? no, we said the 45p rate should not have happened, _ government? no, we said the 45p rate should not have happened, we - government? no, we said the 45p rate should not have happened, we would l should not have happened, we would put that— should not have happened, we would put that back — should not have happened, we would put that back up. _ should not have happened, we would put that back up, we _ should not have happened, we would put that back up, we said _ should not have happened, we would put that back up, we said we - should not have happened, we would put that back up, we said we would l put that back up, we said we would tackte _ put that back up, we said we would tackle non—dom _ put that back up, we said we would tackle non—dom status, _ put that back up, we said we would tackle non—dom status, we - put that back up, we said we would tackle non—dom status, we said - put that back up, we said we would| tackle non—dom status, we said the oil and _ tackle non—dom status, we said the oil and gas — tackle non—dom status, we said the oil and gas companies _ tackle non—dom status, we said the oil and gas companies who - tackle non—dom status, we said the oil and gas companies who have - tackle non—dom status, we said the . oil and gas companies who have made hu-e oil and gas companies who have made huge profits— oil and gas companies who have made huge profits should _ oil and gas companies who have made huge profits should pay _ oil and gas companies who have made huge profits should pay their- oil and gas companies who have made huge profits should pay their share, i huge profits should pay their share, rather— huge profits should pay their share, rather than — huge profits should pay their share, rather than saddling _ huge profits should pay their share, rather than saddling the _ huge profits should pay their share, rather than saddling the next - rather than saddling the next generation— rather than saddling the next generation with _ rather than saddling the next generation with debt. - rather than saddling the next generation with debt. therei rather than saddling the next. generation with debt. there are rather than saddling the next - generation with debt. there are lots of different — generation with debt. there are lots of different changes _ generation with debt. there are lots of different changes that _ generation with debt. there are lots of different changes that we - generation with debt. there are lots of different changes that we have i of different changes that we have said are _ of different changes that we have said are our— of different changes that we have said are our priorities— of different changes that we have said are our priorities about - of different changes that we have said are our priorities about howl of different changes that we have . said are our priorities about how we grow— said are our priorities about how we grow the _ said are our priorities about how we grow the economy— said are our priorities about how we grow the economy and _ said are our priorities about how we grow the economy and pay - said are our priorities about how we grow the economy and pay for - said are our priorities about how we . grow the economy and pay for things, and rachet— grow the economy and pay for things, and rachel reeves _ grow the economy and pay for things, and rachel reeves was _ grow the economy and pay for things, and rachel reeves was very - grow the economy and pay for things, and rachel reeves was very clear- grow the economy and pay for things, and rachel reeves was very clear in l and rachel reeves was very clear in her statement — and rachel reeves was very clear in her statement yesterday _ and rachel reeves was very clear in her statement yesterday that - and rachel reeves was very clear in her statement yesterday that we . and rachel reeves was very clear ini her statement yesterday that we will make sure _ her statement yesterday that we will make sure that— her statement yesterday that we will make sure that every— her statement yesterday that we will make sure that every single - her statement yesterday that we will make sure that every single one - her statement yesterday that we will make sure that every single one of. make sure that every single one of our plans—
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make sure that every single one of our plans is— make sure that every single one of our plans is costed. _ make sure that every single one of our plans is costed. you _ make sure that every single one of our plans is costed._ our plans is costed. you will go into the next _ our plans is costed. you will go into the next election - our plans is costed. you will go into the next election saying i our plans is costed. you will go l into the next election saying you are going to put up taxes, you are going to put that 45p rate of tax, reinstall it? for going to put that 45p rate of tax, reinstall it?— reinstall it? for the 196! we think there was with _ reinstall it? for the 196! we think there was with the _ reinstall it? for the 196! we think there was with the broadest - there was with the broadest shoulders— there was with the broadest shoulders should _ there was with the broadest shoulders should pay - there was with the broadest shoulders should pay a - there was with the broadest shoulders should pay a bit i there was with the broadest - shoulders should pay a bit more. the 1% shoulders should pay a bit more. the i% that— shoulders should pay a bit more. the i% that i_ shoulders should pay a bit more. the i% that i have — shoulders should pay a bit more. the 1% that i have been _ shoulders should pay a bit more. the 1% that i have been speaking - shoulders should pay a bit more. the 1% that i have been speaking to, - 1% that i have been speaking to, they were — 1% that i have been speaking to, they were squirming _ 1% that i have been speaking to, they were squirming in - 1% that i have been speaking to, they were squirming in their- 1% that i have been speaking to, i they were squirming in their seats because _ they were squirming in their seats because they _ they were squirming in their seats because they know— they were squirming in their seats because they know this _ they were squirming in their seats because they know this isn't - they were squirming in their seats because they know this isn't the l because they know this isn't the right— because they know this isn't the right move _ because they know this isn't the right move at _ because they know this isn't the right move at this _ because they know this isn't the right move at this time, - because they know this isn't the right move at this time, when . because they know this isn't the - right move at this time, when people can't afford _ right move at this time, when people can't afford to — right move at this time, when people can't afford to pay— right move at this time, when people can't afford to pay their _ right move at this time, when people can't afford to pay their bills, - can't afford to pay their bills, wheh — can't afford to pay their bills, when ordinary— can't afford to pay their bills, when ordinary workers - can't afford to pay their bills, when ordinary workers of- can't afford to pay their bills, | when ordinary workers of this country— when ordinary workers of this country are _ when ordinary workers of this country are told _ when ordinary workers of this country are told they - when ordinary workers of this country are told they have - when ordinary workers of this | country are told they have got when ordinary workers of this i country are told they have got to show _ country are told they have got to show wage — country are told they have got to show wage restraint, _ country are told they have got to show wage restraint, we - country are told they have got to show wage restraint, we let - country are told they have got to - show wage restraint, we let bankers lift the _ show wage restraint, we let bankers lift the cab— show wage restraint, we let bankers lift the cap on— show wage restraint, we let bankers lift the cap on bankers' _ show wage restraint, we let bankers lift the cap on bankers' bonuses- show wage restraint, we let bankers lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and| lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and -ive lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and give the _ lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and give the i% — lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and give the i% a — lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and give the 1% a massive _ lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and give the 1% a massive bigger- lift the cap on bankers' bonuses and give the 1% a massive bigger tax - give the 1% a massive bigger tax cut, that — give the 1% a massive bigger tax cut, that is — give the 1% a massive bigger tax cut, that is not _ give the 1% a massive bigger tax cut, that is not a _ give the 1% a massive bigger tax cut, that is not a priority- give the 1% a massive bigger tax cut, that is not a priority at- give the 1% a massive bigger tax cut, that is not a priority at the i cut, that is not a priority at the moment, — cut, that is not a priority at the moment, the _ cut, that is not a priority at the moment, the priority- cut, that is not a priority at the moment, the priority is - cut, that is not a priority at the . moment, the priority is investing cut, that is not a priority at the - moment, the priority is investing in the public— moment, the priority is investing in the public services, _ moment, the priority is investing in the public services, growing - moment, the priority is investing in the public services, growing our- the public services, growing our economy— the public services, growing our economy and _ the public services, growing our economy and investing - the public services, growing our economy and investing in - the public services, growing our economy and investing in our. economy and investing in our business _ economy and investing in our business bio— economy and investing in our business— business. no cuts in public services. _ business. no cuts in public services, then. _ business. no cuts in public services, then. we - business. no cuts in public services, then. we want i business. no cuts in publici services, then. we want to business. no cuts in public- services, then. we want to invest in -ublic services, then. we want to invest in public services. _ services, then. we want to invest in public services, and _ services, then. we want to invest in public services, and if _ services, then. we want to invest in public services, and if you _ services, then. we want to invest in public services, and if you heard - public services, and if you heard what _ public services, and if you heard what keir— public services, and if you heard what keir said... _ public services, and if you heard what keir said... but— public services, and if you heard what keir said. . ._ public services, and if you heard what keir said... but how would you -a for it, what keir said. .. but how would you pay for it. if— what keir said... but how would you pay for it. if you've _ what keir said... but how would you pay for it, if you've agreed - what keir said... but how would you pay for it, if you've agreed to - pay for it, if you've agreed to reverse that 1.25 percentage rise in national insurance that was going to go to the national health service, and the health and social care levy,
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where will you find the money? you saw in my speech around key and, billions _ saw in my speech around key and, billions of— saw in my speech around key and, billions of pounds _ saw in my speech around key and, billions of pounds wasted, - saw in my speech around key and, billions of pounds wasted, it's - billions of pounds wasted, it's about— billions of pounds wasted, it's about making _ billions of pounds wasted, it's about making sure _ billions of pounds wasted, it's about making sure the - billions of pounds wasted, it's about making sure the moneyi billions of pounds wasted, it's - about making sure the money that .oes about making sure the money that goes in. _ about making sure the money that goes in. goes _ about making sure the money that goes in. goes in _ about making sure the money that goes in, goes in the _ about making sure the money that goes in, goes in the right- about making sure the money that goes in, goes in the right places, i goes in, goes in the right places, whether— goes in, goes in the right places, whether it's — goes in, goes in the right places, whether it's social— goes in, goes in the right places, whether it's social care, - goes in, goes in the right places, whether it's social care, where i goes in, goes in the right places, i whether it's social care, where we have _ whether it's social care, where we have got _ whether it's social care, where we have got the — whether it's social care, where we have got the acute _ whether it's social care, where we have got the acute crisis - whether it's social care, where we have got the acute crisis in- whether it's social care, where we have got the acute crisis in the - whether it's social care, where we i have got the acute crisis in the nhs because _ have got the acute crisis in the nhs because we — have got the acute crisis in the nhs because we have _ have got the acute crisis in the nhs because we have the _ have got the acute crisis in the nhs because we have the vacancies - have got the acute crisis in the nhs because we have the vacancies and| have got the acute crisis in the nhs. because we have the vacancies and we don't have _ because we have the vacancies and we don't have the — because we have the vacancies and we don't have the skills _ because we have the vacancies and we don't have the skills that _ because we have the vacancies and we don't have the skills that we _ because we have the vacancies and we don't have the skills that we need - don't have the skills that we need at the _ don't have the skills that we need at the place — don't have the skills that we need at the place where _ don't have the skills that we need at the place where we _ don't have the skills that we need at the place where we need - don't have the skills that we need at the place where we need it. . don't have the skills that we need i at the place where we need it. that costs— at the place where we need it. that costs money, — at the place where we need it. that costs money, not _ at the place where we need it. that costs money, not only _ at the place where we need it. that costs money, not only is _ at the place where we need it. that costs money, not only is it- at the place where we need it. that costs money, not only is it bad - at the place where we need it. that costs money, not only is it bad fori costs money, not only is it bad for people _ costs money, not only is it bad for people who — costs money, not only is it bad for people who are _ costs money, not only is it bad for people who are not _ costs money, not only is it bad for people who are not getting - costs money, not only is it bad for people who are not getting the . people who are not getting the support— people who are not getting the support they _ people who are not getting the support they need _ people who are not getting the support they need it, - people who are not getting the support they need it, when - people who are not getting the i support they need it, when they people who are not getting the - support they need it, when they need it, support they need it, when they need it. but— support they need it, when they need it. but it _ support they need it, when they need it. but it costs— support they need it, when they need it, but it costs us _ support they need it, when they need it, but it costs us more _ support they need it, when they need it, but it costs us more money- support they need it, when they need it, but it costs us more money to - support they need it, when they need it, but it costs us more money to do i it, but it costs us more money to do it, but it costs us more money to do it that _ it, but it costs us more money to do it that way, — it, but it costs us more money to do it that way, so — it, but it costs us more money to do it that way, so we _ it, but it costs us more money to do it that way, so we can _ it, but it costs us more money to do it that way, so we can find _ it, but it costs us more money to do it that way, so we can find savings l it that way, so we can find savings by doing _ it that way, so we can find savings by doing things _ it that way, so we can find savings by doing things effectively - it that way, so we can find savings by doing things effectively and - by doing things effectively and property _ by doing things effectively and property. bil— by doing things effectively and ro erl . �* ., , by doing things effectively and --roerl. �* ., , ., properly. all future governments to sa those properly. all future governments to say those things, _ properly. all future governments to say those things, but _ properly. all future governments to say those things, but i _ properly. all future governments to say those things, but i will- properly. all future governments to say those things, but i will take - say those things, but i will take you at your word. can i point you to a different story, we were talking about it before keir starmer�*s speech, let's remind everybody of this tweet from jack berry, chairman of the conservative party, calling on keir starmer to act over what he called disgusting comments made about the chancellor by rupa huq.
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that is what she said in a fringe here at the labour party conference, that when he is on the today programme, kwasi kwarteng, she said he doesn't even sound like a black man. do you condone those comments? yeah, she should apologise for those comments, i haven't seen it, for me, those comments are completely unacceptable.— those comments are completely unacceptable. those comments are completely unaccetable. . . ., unacceptable. what about losing the whi - , that unacceptable. what about losing the whip. that is — unacceptable. what about losing the whip, that is what _ unacceptable. what about losing the whip, that is what jake _ unacceptable. what about losing the whip, that is what jake berry - unacceptable. what about losing the whip, that is what jake berry wants l whip, that is what jake berry wants to see? he would like keir starmer to see? he would like keir starmer to take firm action against what he thinks are vile comments. i to take firm action against what he thinks are vile comments.- thinks are vile comments. i think ru -a thinks are vile comments. i think rua hu: thinks are vile comments. i think ropa huq needs _ thinks are vile comments. i think rupa huq needs to _ thinks are vile comments. i think rupa huq needs to reflect - thinks are vile comments. i think rupa huq needs to reflect on - thinks are vile comments. i think. rupa huq needs to reflect on what she has said and she needs to take immediate action. band she has said and she needs to take immediate action.— immediate action. and if she doesn't? _ immediate action. and if she doesn't? when _ immediate action. and if she doesn't? when people - immediate action. and if she doesn't? when people have| immediate action. and if she - doesn't? when people have made mistakes and _ doesn't? when people have made mistakes and said _ doesn't? when people have made mistakes and said something - mistakes and said something completely inappropriate, recognise it and publicly acknowledge it and apologised, it is not the right thing to say. apologised, it is not the right thing to say-— apologised, it is not the right thing to say. and if she doesn't a ”oloise thing to say. and if she doesn't apologise herself, _ thing to say. and if she doesn't apologise herself, then - thing to say. and if she doesn't apologise herself, then what? l thing to say. and if she doesn't - apologise herself, then what? then that is a whipping — apologise herself, then what? then that is a whipping matter, but i apologise herself, then what? trim that is a whipping matter, but i am pretty certain that the whip will see that and will say that that is not acceptable. i am sure that rupa will recognise that that is not acceptable, i have no rupa a very
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long time and i don't think those comments are appropriate. angela ra ner, comments are appropriate. angela rayner. deputy _ comments are appropriate. angela rayner, deputy leader _ comments are appropriate. angela rayner, deputy leader of _ comments are appropriate. angela rayner, deputy leader of the - comments are appropriate. angela l rayner, deputy leader of the labour party, thank you very much for joining us here outside the conference hall, where keir starmer has given his speech to delegates. we have got quite a few of them i am pleased to say around here listening to the interview with angela rayner. but let's find out a bit more about what people thought about keir starmer�*s speech with lone wells, our political correspondent. well, the mood outside the conference hall here is pretty buoyant. i am joined by a couple of delegates who were watching that speech, what did you make of it? ~ ,,., , watching that speech, what did you make of it?— watching that speech, what did you makeofit? ,~ . make of it? absolutely fantastic. he brou:ht make of it? absolutely fantastic. he brou . ht the make of it? absolutely fantastic. he brought the a _ make of it? absolutely fantastic. he brought the a game _ make of it? absolutely fantastic. he brought the a game today, - make of it? absolutely fantastic. he brought the a game today, starting | brought the a game today, starting off on the nhs, true labour values, nationalising the energy, utility companies, and helping working class families, brilliant, first—class, can't for the general election. band can't for the general election. and ou are can't for the general election. and you are delegates from deeside, there is a wafer thin labour majority, nearly lost to the conservatives last election, does keir starmer have what it takes to go thing to win back support from people who flipped to the tories? i people who flipped to the tories? i think so, definitely, there was a
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very— think so, definitely, there was a very clear— think so, definitely, there was a very clear message today, we know what we _ very clear message today, we know what we are — very clear message today, we know what we are going out with on the doorstep, — what we are going out with on the doorstep, and we can assure people that we _ doorstep, and we can assure people that we are — doorstep, and we can assure people that we are a government in waiting, and keir— that we are a government in waiting, and keir is— that we are a government in waiting, and keir is going to be our next prime _ and keir is going to be our next prime minister.— and keir is going to be our next prime minister. how confident are ou that prime minister. how confident are you that some _ prime minister. how confident are you that some of— prime minister. how confident are you that some of the _ prime minister. how confident are you that some of the policies - prime minister. how confident are you that some of the policies he i you that some of the policies he talked about are going to cut through with the public outside of just conference and the members here? i just conference and the members here? ~' , ., , ., , here? i think with young people especially. _ here? i think with young people especially. my _ here? i think with young people especially, my age, _ here? i think with young people especially, my age, it's - here? i think with young people especially, my age, it's very - especially, my age, it's very promising _ especially, my age, it's very promising to _ especially, my age, it's very promising to hear— especially, my age, it's very promising to hear about- especially, my age, it's very promising to hear about the| especially, my age, it's very- promising to hear about the housing deals— promising to hear about the housing deals that _ promising to hear about the housing deals that they— promising to hear about the housing deals that they have _ promising to hear about the housing deals that they have got _ promising to hear about the housing deals that they have got going - promising to hear about the housing deals that they have got going on, l deals that they have got going on, and being — deals that they have got going on, and being able— deals that they have got going on, and being able to _ deals that they have got going on, and being able to think— deals that they have got going on, and being able to think that - deals that they have got going on, and being able to think that we . deals that they have got going on, | and being able to think that we can -et and being able to think that we can get our— and being able to think that we can get our own— and being able to think that we can get our own house, _ and being able to think that we can get our own house, and _ and being able to think that we can get our own house, and it- and being able to think that we can get our own house, and it is- and being able to think that we can get our own house, and it is not. get our own house, and it is not an aspiration — get our own house, and it is not an aspiration anymore, _ get our own house, and it is not an aspiration anymore, it _ get our own house, and it is not an aspiration anymore, it could - get our own house, and it is not an aspiration anymore, it could be - aspiration anymore, it could be real. _ aspiration anymore, it could be real. which— aspiration anymore, it could be real. which is— aspiration anymore, it could be real, which is amazing. - aspiration anymore, it could be real, which is amazing.- aspiration anymore, it could be real, which is amazing. what about ou, the real, which is amazing. what about you, the standout _ real, which is amazing. what about you, the standout for _ real, which is amazing. what about you, the standout for all _ real, which is amazing. what about you, the standout for all of - real, which is amazing. what about you, the standout for all of you? i l you, the standout for all of you? i think nationalising great british energy. — think nationalising great british energy, thatjust blew us think nationalising great british energy, that just blew us all away, it's fantastic, absolutely brilliant. like my daughter said, she had — brilliant. like my daughter said, she had no— brilliant. like my daughter said, she had no hope of getting on the housing _ she had no hope of getting on the housing ladder a couple of years ago. _ housing ladder a couple of years ago. but — housing ladder a couple of years ago, but now there is a real chance for her— ago, but now there is a real chance for her and — ago, but now there is a real chance for herand her ago, but now there is a real chance for her and her partner, that they might— for her and her partner, that they might actually be able to afford their— might actually be able to afford their own home. find might actually be able to afford their own home.— might actually be able to afford their own home. and in a couple of words, their own home. and in a couple of
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words. very — their own home. and in a couple of words, very briefly, _ their own home. and in a couple of words, very briefly, what _ their own home. and in a couple of words, very briefly, what was - their own home. and in a couple of words, very briefly, what was your| words, very briefly, what was your feel of the mood compared to last year? feel of the mood compared to last ear? , , . . ., year? optimistic, we are full of confidence _ year? optimistic, we are full of confidence going _ year? optimistic, we are full of confidence going into _ year? optimistic, we are full of confidence going into the - year? optimistic, we are full of confidence going into the next| confidence going into the next general— confidence going into the next general election, _ confidence going into the next general election, and - confidence going into the next general election, and keir- confidence going into the next general election, and keir will| confidence going into the next i general election, and keir will be the next — general election, and keir will be the next prime _ general election, and keir will be the next prime minister. - general election, and keir will be the next prime minister.- general election, and keir will be the next prime minister. there is definitely a _ the next prime minister. there is definitely a buzz _ the next prime minister. there is definitely a buzz in _ the next prime minister. there is definitely a buzz in that _ the next prime minister. there is definitely a buzz in that room - definitely a buzz in that room today. definitely a buzz in that room toda . , , definitely a buzz in that room today-_ pretty - definitely a buzz in that room . today._ pretty positive today. definitely. pretty positive mood there _ today. definitely. pretty positive mood there from _ today. definitely. pretty positive mood there from some - today. definitely. pretty positive mood there from some of- today. definitely. pretty positive mood there from some of the i mood there from some of the delegates here. and i think that has been reflected by a lot of the people we have been speaking to outside of the conference here, and no doubt some of the ones back with you, jo. thank you very much, lone wells there, mingling with delegates. they are pleased, i suppose that is not really a surprise, after the days we have had here, and that conference speech. your thoughts? i here, and that conference speech. your thoughts?— your thoughts? i feel like since keir starmer _ your thoughts? i feel like since keir starmer became _ your thoughts? i feel like since keir starmer became leader, . your thoughts? i feel like since - keir starmer became leader, there has been a lot of doom and gloom, he didn't even get to make a speech for a very long time, to me this almost feels like his honeyman conference, like the first time he has really had the chance to enjoy conference, not have lots of internal division, i feel like this is the first time he has been able to pivot out to the public and not talk about internal
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party matters. and as your box pops just said there is something in the air there is just said there is something in the airthere is an just said there is something in the air there is an optimism which has not been felt since about 2006, 2007, it feels like the possibility is there that labour might win. because there is no room for complacency, but this is a big feeling, this is a feeling the labour party has not had for a very long time. i labour party has not had for a very lona time. ., , . long time. i agree, there is that level of optimism, _ long time. i agree, there is that level of optimism, you - long time. i agree, there is that level of optimism, you are - long time. i agree, there is that i level of optimism, you are hearing it from _ level of optimism, you are hearing it from the — level of optimism, you are hearing it from the delegates. 0bviously level of optimism, you are hearing it from the delegates. obviously you would _ it from the delegates. obviously you would expect them to be receptive, of course _ would expect them to be receptive, of course. but there is two sides to this. _ of course. but there is two sides to this. in— of course. but there is two sides to this. in the — of course. but there is two sides to this, in the sense, what is happening with the tory party and the economy right now helps keir starmer— the economy right now helps keir starmer to a degree, but we also heard _ starmer to a degree, but we also heard in— starmer to a degree, but we also heard in that speech, he had to acknowledge that a labour government, if we do get one, will not be _ government, if we do get one, will not be able — government, if we do get one, will not be able to do all of the things they want— not be able to do all of the things they want to do, they will be inheriting a very difficult situation, and listening to angela rayner— situation, and listening to angela rayner speak to you, some tricky guestions — rayner speak to you, some tricky questions on actually how they would have market confidence, they are planning — have market confidence, they are planning to cut some taxes, no matter— planning to cut some taxes, no matter what they say, and therefore
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a tricky _ matter what they say, and therefore a tricky inheritance, if they do get there _ a tricky inheritance, if they do get there. i , i, , a tricky inheritance, if they do get there. , i, , i, �*, i, there. tricky questions, that's what we like on this _ there. tricky questions, that's what we like on this programme. - there. tricky questions, that's what we like on this programme. from i there. tricky questions, that's what| we like on this programme. from all of us here, bye—bye, i will be back tomorrow. the still plenty of showers and a blustery wind. feeling quite autumnal. the weather not changing in a hurry. this north—westerly breeze bringing showers. heaviest in eastern england. the showers will ease tonight. still some rain in the far south—west of england. temperatures down to about three to eight degrees. mostly frost—free. maybe some frost in rural areas of scotland. some showers pushing into eastern scotland and north—east england. away from that drier and brighter and less windily. it will
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feel warm we are temperatures 12 to 16 degrees. the next few days quieter on thursday, but heavy rain and brisk winds for a time on friday. hello and welcome, and we have had a lot of questions today. some mortgage deals have been withdrawn by banks and building societies after a fall in the pound fuelled forecasts of a sharp rise in interest rates. virgin money and skipton building society halted mortgage offers for new customers while bank of ireland said it had withdrawn all mortgages. halifax said it would stop mortgages with product fees. the bank of england said on monday it would "not hesitate" to hike interest rates after the pound hit record lows.
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lots to talk about around mortgages and the housing market and what on earth is going to happen next. with me to answer your questions is the deputy editor of which? money, sam richardson, and i'm also joined by sarah pennells, who is a consumer finance specialist at royal london. thanks forjoining us. after everything we have been talking about, it is striking the number of questions we have had. we want a couple of things explained first of all. variable—rate mortgage vs fixed—rate mortgage. what's the difference and how is one affected compared to the other? in simple terms a fixed—rate mortgage means the interest rate you pay is fixed until the end of the term, and in the uk we tend to go for a two year orfive term, and in the uk we tend to go for a two year or five year fix. with a variable rate it is more complex, in that they are different types of variable rate, so the standard one is the rate you go onto
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once you reach the end of the deal, generally not the most competitive, by some way, and the other versions of a variable rate our tracker and that does what it says on the tin, it tracks the bank of england base rate, so if the interest rates go up, your tracker rate mortgage will go up, your tracker rate mortgage will 9° up up, your tracker rate mortgage will go up pretty much straightaway and by the same amount. the other kind of variable rate mortgage is a discounted rate and that means you pay a bit less than the standard variable rate and it tends to go up and down with the variable rate. it won't necessarily track the bank of england base rate quite as closely and quite as quickly as a tracker rate mortgage. fixed rate stays as it is, variable rate can go up and down but by how much and when depends on the kind of product you have. 50 depends on the kind of product you have. i depends on the kind of product you have, . ., , depends on the kind of product you have. i i, , i, , have. so much anxiety for people around interest _ have. so much anxiety for people around interest rates _ have. so much anxiety for people around interest rates and - have. so much anxiety for people around interest rates and where i have. so much anxiety for people - around interest rates and where they are going to go. if you are on a fixed rate for the duration of that, you don't have quite the anxiety
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because your product does what it says on the tin but is the question is will show, people who are not on fixed rates and who have them coming to an end, that is where the nervousness comes in for the rates were reaching rock bottom two years ago, when those rates return to the standard variable rate theyr ago, when those rates return to the standard variable rat- standard variable rate they will see a real rise in _ standard variable rate they will see a real rise in their— standard variable rate they will see a real rise in their payments - standard variable rate they will see a real rise in their payments each | a real rise in their payments each month _ a real rise in their payments each month but — a real rise in their payments each month. but for those who are fixed for five _ month. but for those who are fixed for five years from now, they have a white _ for five years from now, they have a white to _ for five years from now, they have a white to sit — for five years from now, they have a while to sit and plan ahead and they don't _ while to sit and plan ahead and they don't need — while to sit and plan ahead and they don't need to make any rash moves. we have _ don't need to make any rash moves. we have a _ don't need to make any rash moves. we have a good number of specific questions from viewers but also some specifics so we thought we would before we get into those, we have been looking at basically what people are looking for online and a lot of searches around at some key themes. how much will my mortgage go up, is the housing market going to crash, are house prices going to go down? crystal ball time, to both of
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you, but broad thoughts about some of the anxieties you can see are coming through from these search terms? there is a lot that is really worrying people. the terms? there is a lot that is really worrying people-— worrying people. the first thing i would say. _ worrying people. the first thing i would say. you _ worrying people. the first thing i would say, you don't _ worrying people. the first thing i would say, you don't need - worrying people. the first thing i would say, you don't need to - worrying people. the first thing i i would say, you don't need to make these _ would say, you don't need to make these decisions. alone, that is. talk— these decisions. alone, that is. talk to— these decisions. alone, that is. tatk to your— these decisions. alone, that is. talk to your lender and ideally an independent mortgage broker because they are _ independent mortgage broker because they are the experts and they can at your individual financial situation. it is difficult to forecast ahead to try and _ it is difficult to forecast ahead to try and time the markets yourself, and a _ try and time the markets yourself, and a broker can really help with that _ and a broker can really help with that i_ and a broker can really help with that. i, i i, i, , that. i would echo that. it is important. _ that. i would echo that. it is important, even _ that. i would echo that. it is important, even those - that. i would echo that. it is important, even those for i that. i would echo that. it is - important, even those for whom this is an unnerving time, especially with all the other costs going up at the same time, but i would also say, don't make a decision in a hurry and don't make a decision in a hurry and don't make a kneejerk response because you could do something that ties you in for several years and although what is happening to the currency markets and interest rates, we have seen a lot of volatility, but we don't actually know how it
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will settle down and the second thing to echo about talking to a broker, it is hard to compare the best deal at the best of times, because it is notjust about the headline rate but about the costs, and the charges you may have to pay. if you want to get out of the deal early. also at the moment, when mortgage lenders are pulling deals, a good broker should have the inside track on how long a mortgage application will take to process, and some of these lenders will have and some of these lenders will have a lot of admin on their hands and they will be very popular if they have a competitive deal. there are many ways a mortgage broker can help you and it is a good idea to get their expert advice and insight into what is best for your situation and what is best for your situation and what is best for your situation and what is best for somebody else, your friend, that may not be good for you. friend, that may not be good for ou. , i i, , , ' i, you. every case is different. one of the search — you. every case is different. one of the search terms _ you. every case is different. one of the search terms is, _ you. every case is different. one of the search terms is, should - you. every case is different. one of the search terms is, should i - the search terms is, should i overpay my mortgage? i guess that is people thinking, if they are going to go up and up, do i want to pay
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off if! to go up and up, do i want to pay off if i can, even a little bit extra right now. every case is different but what are your thoughts? a lot of people are searching for that. it thoughts? a lot of people are searching for that.— thoughts? a lot of people are searching for that. it will not be an 0 tion searching for that. it will not be an option for — searching for that. it will not be an option for everyone - searching for that. it will not be | an option for everyone especially with the — an option for everyone especially with the cost of living crisis and there _ with the cost of living crisis and there are — with the cost of living crisis and there are a _ with the cost of living crisis and there are a couple of steps to go through— there are a couple of steps to go through before you overpay a mortgage and the first is to pay off more _ mortgage and the first is to pay off more expensive debts you have, so credit _ more expensive debts you have, so credit card. — more expensive debts you have, so credit card, personal loan, that is tikety— credit card, personal loan, that is tikety to _ credit card, personal loan, that is tikety to be — credit card, personal loan, that is likely to be far more expensive than a mortgage, even when rates go up, it is best — a mortgage, even when rates go up, it is best to— a mortgage, even when rates go up, it is best to clear though is if you can _ it is best to clear though is if you can make — it is best to clear though is if you can. make sure you have rainy day savings. _ can. make sure you have rainy day savings, generally seen as three months — savings, generally seen as three months worth of expenses, get these in place _ months worth of expenses, get these in place and _ months worth of expenses, get these in place and then talk to your lender— in place and then talk to your lender about how much can i overpay without _ lender about how much can i overpay without incurring penalty fees. usuatty— without incurring penalty fees. usually that is around 10% per year, either— usually that is around 10% per year, either a _ usually that is around 10% per year, either a lump usually that is around 10% per year, eithera lump sum usually that is around 10% per year, either a lump sum or instalments, but some — either a lump sum or instalments, but some will charge so it is best to check — but some will charge so it is best to check. i i, , i, but some will charge so it is best to check. i i, i, i, to check. what sam said about having rain da to check. what sam said about having rainy day savings _ to check. what sam said about having rainy day savings is _ to check. what sam said about having rainy day savings is important, - to check. what sam said about having rainy day savings is important, and i rainy day savings is important, and we have just done some research into the cost of living and we found a third of people said they could not afford an unexpected bill of more
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than £500 and we know some people are really up against it but don't tie up your money effectively in your mortgage by overpaying because we have seen in the last couple of years, covid showed it clearly, how circumstances can change almost overnight. secondly, in terms of savings, there is often a trade—off between getting a better rate on your savings than on your mortgage, but even though the interest rate on savings has been creeping up, because inflation is so much higher, your savings are still losing value in terms of the cost of living. so that part of the maths is simple because for most people they are going to be paying more on their mortgage than on their savings and if they have savings, although they are important for an emergency, they will lose value over the longer term while inflation remain so high. irate while inflation remain so high. we ave while inflation remain so high. we gave the list at the beginning of some of the building societies don't
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have the drawn products and change them, whatever, but when you read more about what they are doing, they say, we do think other products will be coming forwards and may not even in the distant future. they are acknowledging that things are changing all the time. lenders will aet some changing all the time. lenders will get some certainty _ changing all the time. lenders will get some certainty when _ changing all the time. lenders will get some certainty when the - changing all the time. lenders will get some certainty when the bank| changing all the time. lenders will. get some certainty when the bank of england _ get some certainty when the bank of england looks at the base rate again. — england looks at the base rate again. if— england looks at the base rate again, if not sooner, but it is possible _ again, if not sooner, but it is possible some will go back to the market— possible some will go back to the market before then, but what they are trying — market before then, but what they are trying to deal with is uncertainty, and the next few days are especially uncertain, but it is in their— are especially uncertain, but it is in their interest to have products out there — in their interest to have products out there for people to buy and they don't _ out there for people to buy and they don't want _ out there for people to buy and they don't want to be off the market. it is not _ don't want to be off the market. it is not a _ don't want to be off the market. it is not a credit crunch situation, certainty — is not a credit crunch situation, certainl . �* , is not a credit crunch situation, certainl . �*, i i, i ~ is not a credit crunch situation, certainl . �*, i i, is not a credit crunch situation, certainly-— certainly. let's crack on with individual — certainly. let's crack on with individual questions. - certainly. let's crack on with individual questions. julie i certainly. let's crack on with individual questions. julie is | individual questions. julie is talking about uncertainty and she says she is coming to the end of her fixed rate mortgage and she then just has nine months left until her mortgage is completely paid off, but
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she says she's becoming increasingly anxious about those final nine months, what can she do? ihline anxious about those final nine months, what can she do? nine months is a tricky one — months, what can she do? nine months is a tricky one because _ months, what can she do? nine months is a tricky one because you _ months, what can she do? nine months is a tricky one because you would - is a tricky one because you would not really — is a tricky one because you would not really get a fixed deal for that amount— not really get a fixed deal for that amount of— not really get a fixed deal for that amount of time but i would say to talk to— amount of time but i would say to talk to your— amount of time but i would say to talk to your lender. you are so close _ talk to your lender. you are so close to — talk to your lender. you are so close to the end point of paying off your mortgage, it is in their interests _ your mortgage, it is in their interests to get it paid off and they— interests to get it paid off and they don't want anything to go wrong. — they don't want anything to go wrong. so _ they don't want anything to go wrong, so they have got various options — wrong, so they have got various options for— wrong, so they have got various options for you. they could give you a temporary— options for you. they could give you a temporary payment holiday or extend — a temporary payment holiday or extend the term of the mortgage so your monthly repayments goes down, but you _ your monthly repayments goes down, but you won't get if you don't ask though— but you won't get if you don't ask though i— but you won't get if you don't ask though i would deftly approach them. —— definitely. the though i would deftly approach them. -- definitely-— -- definitely. the financial conduct authority reached _ -- definitely. the financial conduct authority reached an _ -- definitely. the financial conduct authority reached an agreement. -- definitely. the financial conduct. authority reached an agreement with all kinds of lenders including mortgage lenders that they would help their customers who were in payment difficulties and julie is not in a payment difficulty but it means they will offer things like the payment holiday, extending the
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mortgage term, so they are set up to do those things after covid and they have been hovering those 2000s of customers in the last couple years, so it is always worth approaching the lender —— they have been offering. she could also may be overpay while she's in the fixed pay deal. generally with a fixed—rate deal. generally with a fixed—rate deal you can normally overpay about 10% per year without a penalty, but some lenders are more generous so it is worth checking the small print and asking the lender and seeing how much she can overpay and again have a conversation. there might be more vexed ability than she realises, if she has the means to make overpayments now —— there might be more flexibility. the overpayments now -- there might be more flexibility.— more flexibility. the general theme seems to be _ more flexibility. the general theme seems to be pick— more flexibility. the general theme seems to be pick up _ more flexibility. the general theme seems to be pick up the _ more flexibility. the general theme seems to be pick up the phone - more flexibility. the general theme seems to be pick up the phone and | seems to be pick up the phone and ask them if you don't ask, you don't get. lucy says what will the government do to protect homeowners who are about to finish their fixed—rate period, to protect them from losing their home because of the rise in interest rates or
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estimate she can't sleep over this, she says. —— the rise in interest rates? it is difficult to read that from someone who is worried so much about it. has there been any suggestion from the government that they would do anything? flat suggestion from the government that they would do anything?— they would do anything? not that i'm aware of, they would do anything? not that i'm aware of. but — they would do anything? not that i'm aware of, but there _ they would do anything? not that i'm aware of, but there are _ they would do anything? not that i'm aware of, but there are existing - aware of, but there are existing schemes— aware of, but there are existing schemes like the support for mortgage schemes but that is mainly meant _ mortgage schemes but that is mainly meant for— mortgage schemes but that is mainly meant for people receiving certain types _ meant for people receiving certain types of— meant for people receiving certain types of benefits. it comes as atone. — types of benefits. it comes as alone, there is an equivalent in scotland — alone, there is an equivalent in scotland and wales, as well —— as a loan _ scotland and wales, as well —— as a loan i_ scotland and wales, as well —— as a loan i would — scotland and wales, as well —— as a loan. i would say do not let it get to that _ loan. i would say do not let it get to that point for top your lender should — to that point for top your lender should be — to that point for top your lender should be the first point of call. that _ should be the first point of call. that should be the first point of contact — that should be the first point of contact. �* i, i, i, ~' that should be the first point of contact. �* i, i, i, ,, i ,, that should be the first point of contact. �* i, i ,, i, contact. again, if we look back to what happened — contact. again, if we look back to what happened with _ contact. again, if we look back to what happened with the - contact. again, if we look back to | what happened with the pandemic there were huge concerns that people who had lost theirjobs overnight would lose their homes, but the government did not step in and offer skin, and the financial conduct
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authority —— offer a scheme, and the financial conduct authority basically reached a deal with lenders to offer more help. we don't know how things are going to develop but i'm not sure that the government would be considering this kind of scheme because there is this support for mortgage interest scheme but thatis for mortgage interest scheme but that is a loan and it is for people, it doesn't begin until the first nine months, so if you are on something like universal credit, because you have lost yourjob, you have to find your mortgage for nine months before you are even eligible for this help. it doesn't pay the full interest rate and it won't pay for the full amount of your loan unless you have a small mortgage and it used to be essentially a benefit but now it is a loan so you have to pay it back once your circumstances improve or you sell your property. i improve or you sell your property. i hope that helps, lucy. it is difficult to read messages from
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people who are so worried but i think the fact we have had so many comments about this speaks to a lot of this. a question here from dinesh who makes reference to what happens in the us, he says why can't we have mortgage deal similar to the us where people can opt for a 25 year fixed mortgage and then they are still allowed to swap to cheaper deals if they become available? my knowledge of the us market is not great. any observations that you have about that? the great. any observations that you have about that?— great. any observations that you have about that? i, i, i, ,, have about that? the mortgage market in the states has _ have about that? the mortgage market in the states has operated _ have about that? the mortgage market in the states has operated quite - in the states has operated quite differently to our mortgage market for years and people have often taken very long fixed—rate deals but they haven't been tied in. but although in the uk we tend to prefer either two—year or five fixed—rate deals, we have had a number of lenders offering longer term deals, so i can remember many years ago a lender was offering a ten year deal and that seemed revolutionary at the time. i did a quick check a couple
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of years ago and the longest fixed i could find was a 15 year mortgage, and mortgage is definitely for eight, nine, ten years, and one lender offered a 40 year fixed rate mortgage but that was for a very specific property. with the longer term fixes, though, unlike in the states, you tend to get higher charges, if you want to get out of those deals early. although you get the certainty, if your circumstances change, that could just deciding to move house, those kind of things, you have to make sure you can take that mortgage. and make sure you are basically buying a property of a similar value so you don't have to end up paying down chunks of the mortgage and then you will be affected by the early repayment charge. you can fix your mortgage for longer. whether these deals will be available in the coming days because of all the turbulence, i don't know, but you have to look
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carefully at the early repayment charges and again to echo what sam said, it is a good one to talk to your mortgage broker about rather than making that kind of long—term decision on your own. just than making that kind of long-term decision on your own.— than making that kind of long-term decision on your own. just to add to what sarah — decision on your own. just to add to what sarah said, _ decision on your own. just to add to what sarah said, you _ decision on your own. just to add to what sarah said, you do _ decision on your own. just to add to what sarah said, you do pay - decision on your own. just to add to what sarah said, you do pay for - decision on your own. just to add to j what sarah said, you do pay for that certainty. _ what sarah said, you do pay for that certainty. so — what sarah said, you do pay for that certainty, so you will pay higher rates _ certainty, so you will pay higher rates on — certainty, so you will pay higher rates on those fixed term mortgages, especially— rates on those fixed term mortgages, especially where we are getting up to around — especially where we are getting up to around 40 years or even ten years and above — to around 40 years or even ten years and above because they are so rare. not so _ and above because they are so rare. not so much — and above because they are so rare. not so much competition for those very long _ not so much competition for those very long term mortgages, so keep that in— very long term mortgages, so keep that in mind. a broker can give you advice _ that in mind. a broker can give you advice on _ that in mind. a broker can give you advice on that.— advice on that. let's move to a cuestion advice on that. let's move to a question from _ advice on that. let's move to a question from gertrude, - advice on that. let's move to a question from gertrude, i - advice on that. let's move to a question from gertrude, i have advice on that. let's move to a i question from gertrude, i have a mortgage on a variable rate and i have been over my mortgage, by double, in fact, have been over my mortgage, by double, infact, and have been over my mortgage, by double, in fact, and the payments are done on a weekly basis, is this helpful? if so, in which way? so overpaying on a variable rate. has helpful? if so, in which way? so overpaying on a variable rate. as we discussed before, _ overpaying on a variable rate. as we discussed before, it _ overpaying on a variable rate. as we discussed before, it is _ overpaying on a variable rate. as we discussed before, it is good - overpaying on a variable rate. as we discussed before, it is good to - discussed before, it is good to overpay— discussed before, it is good to overpay to reduce the amount you
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overall— overpay to reduce the amount you overall are — overpay to reduce the amount you overall are in overpay to reduce the amount you overallare in debt, but i overpay to reduce the amount you overall are in debt, but i would like to— overall are in debt, but i would like to know whether gertrude has taken _ like to know whether gertrude has taken no _ like to know whether gertrude has taken no steps we discussed, does she have _ taken no steps we discussed, does she have rainy day savings in place, has she _ she have rainy day savings in place, has she paid — she have rainy day savings in place, has she paid off other debts she has? _ has she paid off other debts she has? and — has she paid off other debts she has? and also, has she considered going _ has? and also, has she considered going on— has? and also, has she considered going on to — has? and also, has she considered going on to a fixed—rate mortgage, has she _ going on to a fixed—rate mortgage, has she discussed this with her tender— has she discussed this with her tender or— has she discussed this with her tender or a _ has she discussed this with her lender or a broker? the variable rate is— lender or a broker? the variable rate is not— lender or a broker? the variable rate is not necessarily the best deal— rate is not necessarily the best deal and — rate is not necessarily the best deal and it can be quite expensive if it is— deal and it can be quite expensive if it is the — deal and it can be quite expensive if it is the default option. i deal and it can be quite expensive if it is the default option.- if it is the default option. i would atree if it is the default option. i would agree with _ if it is the default option. i would agree with that. _ if it is the default option. i would agree with that. i _ if it is the default option. i would agree with that. i would - if it is the default option. i would agree with that. i would say - if it is the default option. i would agree with that. i would say one | agree with that. i would say one thing, for people thinking about whether to overpay, having worked out whether they have other debts, sometimes it is tempting to think you need to overpay by a lock to make a difference to your mortgage term but you don't necessarily, so if you do have a bit of money you can genuinely spare, you have some savings, it may be worth at least considering or talking through with a broker or your lender and working out how much difference it would
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make. there are calculators that are free to use online on mortgage brokers websites that will tell you how much interest you would save and how much interest you would save and how much interest you would save and how much you would take off your term by overpaying. but as sam said, being on a variable rate, it can be right for some people but you will get the certainty if you're on fixed—rate deal, although we do know fixed—rate deal, although we do know fixed—rate deals are becoming more expensive and have been ready since interest rates started rising at the beginning of this year. to interest rates started rising at the beginning of this year.— beginning of this year. to that oint, beginning of this year. to that point, everyone _ beginning of this year. to that point, everyone watching, - beginning of this year. to that i point, everyone watching, trying beginning of this year. to that - point, everyone watching, trying to guess what is coming next, joanne says, my fixed—rate is coming up in july. says, my fixed—rate is coming up in july, should i contact the bank now and try to renegotiate or should i wait? that is planning had because of her mortgage is not running out untiljuly. would a bank even start talking about it ten months in advance what it is worth asking and talking to a broker as well, and
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usuall it talking to a broker as well, and usually it is _ talking to a broker as well, and usually it is about _ talking to a broker as well, and usually it is about three months before — usually it is about three months before you can lock into a new deal but some _ before you can lock into a new deal but some lenders will allow you to -et but some lenders will allow you to get ready— but some lenders will allow you to get ready the new rate and fix it. as far— get ready the new rate and fix it. as far as — get ready the new rate and fix it. as far as nine months before, i have heard. _ as far as nine months before, i have heard. so— as far as nine months before, i have heard. so in— as far as nine months before, i have heard, so in that case it is worth joanne _ heard, so in that case it is worth joanne having a think about it now. i joanne having a think about it now. i would _ joanne having a think about it now. i would be — joanne having a think about it now. i would be conscious about early repayment charges, if you want to move _ repayment charges, if you want to move any— repayment charges, if you want to move any earlier than that, and also consider— move any earlier than that, and also consider the — move any earlier than that, and also consider the rate she's on at the moment— consider the rate she's on at the moment is— consider the rate she's on at the moment is may be a lot better than is going _ moment is may be a lot better than is going to — moment is may be a lot better than is going to be, even if it is quite competitive. i would caution against moving _ competitive. i would caution against moving too— competitive. i would caution against moving too quickly. i competitive. i would caution against moving too quickly.— moving too quickly. i would agree with that. the — moving too quickly. i would agree with that. the people _ moving too quickly. i would agree with that. the people who - moving too quickly. i would agree with that. the people who are - moving too quickly. i would agree with that. the people who are at| moving too quickly. i would agree i with that. the people who are at the end of their deals and towards the end of their deals and towards the end of their deals, the early repayment charge in the last year often falls away, so depending on the deal that you are on, you may find the early repayment charge is very low, and in terms of getting out of what seems like a competitive deal to one which is more expensive, that might seem counterintuitive but
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you can see some people are worried, the next deal, not so much the remaining time on this one, and there are calculators online where you can work out how much your deal would need to be in orderfor you to upset the early repayment charge. talk to a broker. i would not make a kneejerk decision because you are worried about the fact that fixed rates are moving up because it could end up being not the best decision for you in the longer term. the answer may be more subtle as in, just because there is an early repayment charge does not necessarily mean it is off the cards in terms of getting another deal but it is about how much your budget can take and how much you like certainty and how much are you going to worry about the fact that there is going to be, we are in for a bumpy ride, in the short term, if not for longer, and those are the things which it is a good idea to get an expert insight from a broker and they can help you understand the pros and the cons of trying to jump
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out of a deal earlier. it pros and the cons of trying to 'ump out of a deal earlier.i out of a deal earlier. it speaks to the uncertainty _ out of a deal earlier. it speaks to the uncertainty that _ out of a deal earlier. it speaks to the uncertainty that we - out of a deal earlier. it speaks to the uncertainty that we are i out of a deal earlier. it speaks to the uncertainty that we are all i the uncertainty that we are all experiencing, whatever stage we are at, because the fact that people are thinking, i have got to sort this out in my mind now, i want to know what is best, but they still have ten months before they need to do anything. that tells a story. completely understandably, about where we are at and the anxiety that people are feeling.— people are feeling. there is one thin that people are feeling. there is one thing that people _ people are feeling. there is one thing that people can _ people are feeling. there is one thing that people can start i people are feeling. there is one| thing that people can start doing before thinking about their mortgage deal which is putting themselves in the best position to get a good mortgage deal, whatever that looks like, so things like getting a copy of your credit report, something you have the legal right to do and you can do this free of charge, there are three main credit rating agencies and if there is anything on there you are not expecting and maybe you missed a payment, or there is a mistake, you have got time to put it right. i would also suggest having a conversation with a broker,
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without sounding like a broken record, have that conversation early, they may not tell you what kind of deal you are going to get a few months down the line, but they may be able to give you some advice on how to put yourself in that best position for when the deal comes along. position for when the deal comes alont. �* , , i, position for when the deal comes alont. �* ,i, , along. build up your savings, especially — along. build up your savings, especially if _ along. build up your savings, especially if you _ along. build up your savings, especially if you have - along. build up your savings, especially if you have quite i along. build up your savings, especially if you have quite a | along. build up your savings, i especially if you have quite a low fix at _ especially if you have quite a low fix at the — especially if you have quite a low fix at the moment, look at your outgoings — fix at the moment, look at your outgoings each month and what money you could _ outgoings each month and what money you could put away for a rainy day or to _ you could put away for a rainy day or to help — you could put away for a rainy day or to help me if the repayments of the mortgage go up by so much that i'm the mortgage go up by so much that i'm going _ the mortgage go up by so much that i'm going to struggle, whether it is for a bit _ i'm going to struggle, whether it is fora bit. use i'm going to struggle, whether it is for a bit. use those good times to -et for a bit. use those good times to get ready— for a bit. use those good times to get ready for more difficult times ahead _ get ready for more difficult times ahead. we get ready for more difficult times ahead. i i, i, i, i, ahead. we have one more final thou:ht ahead. we have one more final thought here — ahead. we have one more final thought here from _ ahead. we have one more final thought here from brian, i ahead. we have one more final thought here from brian, he i ahead. we have one more final thought here from brian, he is| thought here from brian, he is asking, tour the government provide support for mortgages in the weight they have for energy? —— will the government provide support for mortgages in the way they have
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energy? people are concerned enough that they are thinking the government might need to do something. but, sarah, no suggestion that we are at that point? it is that we are at that point? it is hard to know. _ that we are at that point? it is hard to know. as _ that we are at that point? it is hard to know. as it _ that we are at that point? it 2 hard to know. as it stands at the moment i do not see any sign of it, and it may be something the government is considering, but i would reflect back on how things were during covid which was a bigger shock than where we are at the moment in terms of potentially what it could mean the job losses and it is people losing theirjobs, that is the big concern, repossessions. i don't at the moment see any sign thatis don't at the moment see any sign that is something the government is thinking about and that doesn't mean it isn't on their minds. but we do note that the lenders were offering people more flexibility as a result of covid and that is something the regulator was very keen to see. so talk to your lender. a lot of people for understandable reasons want to sort this out on their own and they
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want to feel they can cope on their own and i really understand that but actually it may be better to approach your lender. final thought, sam. approach your lender. final thought, sam- mortgage _ approach your lender. final thought, sam- mortgage is— approach your lender. final thought, sam. mortgage is not _ approach your lender. final thought, sam. mortgage is not a _ approach your lender. final thought, sam. mortgage is not a one - approach your lender. final thought, sam. mortgage is not a one size i approach your lender. final thought, sam. mortgage is not a one size fits| sam. mortgage is not a one size fits all roduct sam. mortgage is not a one size fits all product and _ sam. mortgage is not a one size fits all product and it _ sam. mortgage is not a one size fits all product and it is _ sam. mortgage is not a one size fits all product and it is very _ sam. mortgage is not a one size fits all product and it is very much i all product and it is very much about— all product and it is very much about your— all product and it is very much about your individual financial circumstances so that is why you need _ circumstances so that is why you need to— circumstances so that is why you need to phone up your lender, not something — need to phone up your lender, not something we can give you a blanket answer— something we can give you a blanket answer for. — something we can give you a blanket answer for, and if you call them up, they are _ answer for, and if you call them up, they are not — answer for, and if you call them up, they are not out to get you, they want _ they are not out to get you, they want to — they are not out to get you, they want to support you and they don't want _ want to support you and they don't want to— want to support you and they don't want to lose you as a customer, still less— want to lose you as a customer, still less repossess your home, so pick up _ still less repossess your home, so pick up the — still less repossess your home, so pick up the phone. it is a really good _ pick up the phone. it is a really good starting point.— pick up the phone. it is a really good starting point. very good point on which to end, _ good starting point. very good point on which to end, that _ good starting point. very good point on which to end, that is _ good starting point. very good point on which to end, that is clearly i good starting point. very good point on which to end, that is clearly the l on which to end, that is clearly the theme of the day. to both of you, thanks forjoining us. you are watching bbc news. we have
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some news coming through from our political correspondent. we hear that the labour mp rupa huq has had the labour whip suspended. this is following comments she made during the labour conference which is taking place in liverpool right now, of course, comments she made about the chancellor. rupa huq has had the labour whip suspended pending an investigation, that is what we are hearing. that has just come through from our political correspondent. we will have more from the labour conference at the top of the hour. sir keir starmer made his speech to conference in the last hour and we will be talking more about that. that is all coming up at the top of the hour. we have a few minutes to smile because now we can talk about eurovision. the contest to host eurovision
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2023 has been whittled down to the final two, either liverpool or glasgow will host the song contest next year. seven cities had been in contention, but newcastle, leeds, manchester, birmingham and sheffield are now out of the running. the bbc has said the final decision will be made within weeks. let's speak to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson, whojoins us from one of the hopeful cities, glasgow. glasgow has made it to the last two. who would have thought it? eurovision and having a long and drawn—out voting process? we have gone from seven cities down to two and it is glasgow versus liverpool, the venue behind me, the hydro in glasgow is where it could be held in may next year. glasgow will be hosting it on behalf of ukraine and that venue has already hosted
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eurovision. it was only a will ferrell eurovision netflix movie but thatis ferrell eurovision netflix movie but that is the building that doubled as the venue nevertheless. the eurovision delegation will be back here on friday to have another look at glasgow because they are going to have further conversations with both cities about the technicalities, the huge press areas, the fan zones that have to be arranged, and these cities were said to be head and shoulders above the others. according to the people making the decision. a couple of strange coincidences, scotland could get into not one but two euro play—offs, it made it into the eurovision play—off and if the men's football team gets a point against ukraine but they are in the play—offs for the euros 2024. another strange coincidence, in 1988, a glaswegian called scott fitzgerald entered eurovision and he came second. he
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was beaten by one point by celine dion. if you host eurovision here, the singers will have to be kicked out and guess who is supposed to be playing afterwards? celine dion. scotland could get its eurovision revenge after 25 years. that scotland could get its eurovision revenge after 25 years.— revenge after 25 years. that is fantastic- _ revenge after 25 years. that is fantastic. a _ revenge after 25 years. that is fantastic. a couple _ revenge after 25 years. that is fantastic. a couple of - revenge after 25 years. that is l fantastic. a couple of thoughts, when do we know, do we know the exact date? there are a lot of things they have got to talk through? the big stuff like access to airports and international travel, the venue is? and also broadcast considerations? a number of things have got to be checked off? when do we find out? yes. it will be next _
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off? when do we find out? yes. it will be next month, _ off? when do we find out? yes. it will be next month, and _ off? when do we find out? yes. it will be next month, and today i off? when do we find out? yes. it| will be next month, and today was off? when do we find out? yes. it i will be next month, and today was a surprise for everybody because people have been running around getting reactions and what you are saying is the truth, the delegation will be going to both liverpool and glasgow and looking at those things. the amount of hotel rooms and where the fan zones would be and there is so much for people to decide. it is a huge logistical event. six weeks, it takes over the city, that it is in, and what glasgow and liverpool have going for it is a venue next to a lot of space, in glasgow we have the sse next door and a lot of the buildings that were used in the commonwealth games in 2014, and liverpool, they have the huge area down by the docks which is why these two have made it into the final two. 0nly two have made it into the final two. only one is going to get to win and host the event next may on behalf of ukraine! i’m host the event next may on behalf of ukraine! �* i. i. , i i ukraine! i'm already excited. we will have more _ ukraine! i'm already excited. we will have more to _ ukraine! i'm already excited. we will have more to come - ukraine! i'm already excited. we will have more to come from i ukraine! i'm already excited. we. will have more to come from colin patterson in glasgow. liverpool is
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the other city on the list. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. more sunshine out there today compared to yesterday but still plenty of showers and quite a blustery wind so feeling quite autumnal out there at the moment, the weather not changing in a hurry, we still have a north—westerly breeze, bringing a scattering of showers which will last into the evening hours, heaviest on the east coast of england. we still have a bit of rain to come across the far south—west of england and thatjust clearing away as we head towards dawn. temperatures down to around 3-8 dawn. temperatures down to around 3—8 for most, mostly frost free but maybe a bit of frost in a few rural areas, and during wednesday we have more cloud and a few showers pushing into parts of eastern scotland and north—east england, but away from that we have drier and brighter and less windy than recent days. it will feel a bit warmer with temperatures about 12—16. the next few days, quieter weather on thursday but we are going to see heavy rain and
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brisk winds for a time on friday. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines: keir starmer sets out his plan for a labour government — pledging to create a publicly—owned energy company within a year if his party wins at the next election. because it is right for growth, because it is right for energy independence from tyrants like putin, then, yes, conference, great british energy will be publicly—owned. the labour leader said the party can win anywhere again promising a fresh start for the uk. we'll be analysising his speech to supporters at the labour conference. also this hour: a labourmp has a labour mp has been suspended from
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the parliamenty party after describing the chancellor kwasi kwarteng as superficially black. dozens of banks and building societies have stopped mortgage offers — after a fall in the pound stoked forecasts of a steep rise in interest rates. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng has told leading figures from the financial sector he's confident in his plan for growth. 0h, oh, wow! visual confirmation... nasa successfully crashes a probe into an asteroid to test whether space rocks that might threaten earth, could be deflected out of the way. as far as we can tell or first planetary defence test was a success and i think we can clap to that everyone. right so, yeah, well, yeah, i think everybody should be better. and it's liverpool—v—glasgow in the battle to find out which city
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will host eurovision. good afternoon. sir keir starmer has delivered his keynote speech to the labour party conference in liverpool, promising a fresh start for the country. the labour leader promised to set up a publicly—owned green company within a year if elected — with 100% clean power. he also promised to a brighter economic future under a labour government. sir keir said that the conservatives had lost control of the uk economy and told delegates they should "not forgive or forget" that. he promised that a labour government would take action on the cost
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of living crisis and invest in the nhs, bringing in extra medical staff. and he pledged that he would make brexit work. in a moment, we'll cross to liverpool to speak to our political correspondent for some analysis of that speech, but the centrepiece was a pledge to turn the uk into a "clean energy superpower" by 2030. let's hear some of what sir keir had to say on that. we won't make the mistake the tories made with north sea oil and gas in the 80s when they frittered away the wealth from our national resources. just look at what's happening at the moment. the largest onshore wind farm in wales. who owns it? sweden. energy bills in swansea are paying for schools and hospitals in stockholm. the chinese communist party has a stake in our nuclear industry and five million people pay
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their bills to an energy company owned by france. so we will set up great british energy within the first year of a labour government. a new company... first year of a labour government. a new company- - -_ conference, a new company that takes advantage of the opportunities in clean british power and because it is right forjobs, because it is right for growth, because it is right for growth, because it is right for growth, because it is right for energy independence from tyrants like putin, then yes, conference, great british energy will be publicly—owned.
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cheering and applause that was part of speech. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is in liverpool. you can tell us a sense of how it's been going down? it you can tell us a sense of how it's been going down?— you can tell us a sense of how it's been going down? it went down very well in the hall, _ been going down? it went down very well in the hall, as _ been going down? it went down very well in the hall, as you _ been going down? it went down very well in the hall, as you might - well in the hall, as you might expect, keir starmer talking to the party faithful in liverpool. if you think back to last year's labour conference, although there was a significant amount of support, it was marred by heckling and interruption and other dissent in the hall and the conference itself didn't run as smoothly as thing seem to have done for labour in liverpool. keir starmer said in his speech, taking credit for changes he has put in place and to give voters the impression he is closing the door on thejeremy corbyn era and positioning labour in the centre ground. we can talk more about what
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keir starmer said with a labour mp and national campaign coordinators. do you think he convinced people that labour are ready to win the next election.— that labour are ready to win the next election. yes the speech was full of energy _ next election. yes the speech was full of energy and _ next election. yes the speech was full of energy and energy - next election. yes the speech was full of energy and energy policy i full of energy and energy policy featured — full of energy and energy policy featured a huge amount as well. he was setting out a clear plan, not 'ust was setting out a clear plan, not just for— was setting out a clear plan, not just for dealing with the current crisis. _ just for dealing with the current crisis. the — just for dealing with the current crisis, the cost—of—living crisis that— crisis, the cost—of—living crisis that is— crisis, the cost—of—living crisis that is affecting everyone, but a plan for— that is affecting everyone, but a plan for the future and an exciting plan for the future and an exciting plan where — plan for the future and an exciting plan where britain can win the global— plan where britain can win the global race on new clean energy, making _ global race on new clean energy, making sure not only are we sustainable, but we are a clean energy— sustainable, but we are a clean energy superpower, showing how we can take _ energy superpower, showing how we can take the opportunities and make sure they— can take the opportunities and make sure they result in good, strong, well paid — sure they result in good, strong, well paid jobs, a clear plan with a clear— well paid jobs, a clear plan with a clear mission and keir is the man to deliver— clear mission and keir is the man to deliver it _ clear mission and keir is the man to deliver it he— clear mission and keir is the man to deliver in i, i, clear mission and keir is the man to deliveri i, i, , deliver it he said labour would be the -a deliver it he said labour would be the party of _ deliver it he said labour would be the party of home _ deliver it he said labour would be the party of home ownership i deliver it he said labour would be the party of home ownership and| deliver it he said labour would be l the party of home ownership and be
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probusiness. they sound like things the conservatives have claimed to be. the conservatives have claimed to he. are you trying to mimic what they have done? lilo; be. are you trying to mimic what they have done?— be. are you trying to mimic what they have done? no, keir set out the labour party — they have done? no, keir set out the labour party is _ they have done? no, keir set out the labour party is the _ they have done? no, keir set out the labour party is the political— they have done? no, keir set out the labour party is the political wing - labour party is the political wing of the _ labour party is the political wing of the british people, we are focus oped _ of the british people, we are focus oped the _ of the british people, we are focus oped the concerns of work people all over our— oped the concerns of work people all over our country and they are around the cost—of—living and energy bills. the tories — the cost—of—living and energy bills. the tories can say what they like, we know — the tories can say what they like, we know there is a huge difference between _ we know there is a huge difference between their rhetoric and reality, look what — between their rhetoric and reality, look what has been happening after the so—called minibudget. they have shown— the so—called minibudget. they have shown their— the so—called minibudget. they have shown their true priorities. we have seen _ shown their true priorities. we have seen the _ shown their true priorities. we have seen the failure of 12 years of tory government and people are struging with gtihg _ government and people are struging with gling with the cost of live and a good _ with gling with the cost of live and a good job— with gling with the cost of live and a good job doesn't mean you are keep a good job doesn't mean you are keep a roof_ a good job doesn't mean you are keep a roof overture head. people are worried — a roof overture head. people are worried about their bill ands s and we have _ worried about their bill ands s and we have the answers to get the economy— we have the answers to get the economy back on its face. you
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mentioned _ economy back on its face. you mentioned the _ economy back on its face. you mentioned the labour- economy back on its face. mt. mentioned the labour party being the political wing of british people, thatis political wing of british people, that is from tory, do you think it makes you look like have nothing to new to say. makes you look like have nothing to new to sa . ., makes you look like have nothing to new to say-— new to say. that team won three aeneral new to say. that team won three general elections _ new to say. that team won three general elections and _ new to say. that team won three general elections and we - new to say. that team won three general elections and we want i new to say. that team won three general elections and we want to new to say. that team won three - general elections and we want to win a general— general elections and we want to win a general election. the changes keir have been— a general election. the changes keir have been making have been about changing _ have been making have been about changing the labour, instead of fighting — changing the labour, instead of fighting for control of labour party. — fighting for control of labour party, we are facing the voters and the public. — party, we are facing the voters and the public, speaking to them, listening _ the public, speaking to them, listening to them, talk about their concerns — listening to them, talk about their concerns i— listening to them, talk about their concerns. i want to take the election— concerns. i want to take the election record of 97. there is no point _ election record of 97. there is no point in _ election record of 97. there is no point in being in politics to sit in opposition _ point in being in politics to sit in opposition. that goes against everything keir starmer stands for. what _ everything keir starmer stands for. what is _ everything keir starmer stands for. what is your biggest challenge do you think between now and the
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election? we you think between now and the election? ~ ., ., ., ., ., election? we went down to one of our worst ever defeats _ election? we went down to one of our worst ever defeats in _ election? we went down to one of our worst ever defeats in 2019 _ election? we went down to one of our worst ever defeats in 2019 and - election? we went down to one of our worst ever defeats in 2019 and we - worst ever defeats in 2019 and we have had — worst ever defeats in 2019 and we have had a — worst ever defeats in 2019 and we have had a huge mountain to climb, we lost _ have had a huge mountain to climb, we lost the — have had a huge mountain to climb, we lost the trust of voters who had never _ we lost the trust of voters who had never voted for another party until 2019 and _ never voted for another party until 2019 and they turned from us, that breach— 2019 and they turned from us, that breach of— 2019 and they turned from us, that breach of trust between the labour party— breach of trust between the labour party and _ breach of trust between the labour party and people that had normally voted _ party and people that had normally voted labour, as well as the rest of the country. — voted labour, as well as the rest of the country, was severe. coming back from that— the country, was severe. coming back from that is_ the country, was severe. coming back from that is a — the country, was severe. coming back from that is a huge challenge. we have _ from that is a huge challenge. we have to _ from that is a huge challenge. we have to achieve a swing that not only tony — have to achieve a swing that not only tony blair managed, but i think keir starmer is the man to do it and he set— keir starmer is the man to do it and he set out _ keir starmer is the man to do it and he set outa— keir starmer is the man to do it and he set out a clear plan to earn the trust _ he set out a clear plan to earn the trust of _ he set out a clear plan to earn the trust of the — he set out a clear plan to earn the trust of the british people.- trust of the british people. thank ou. as trust of the british people. thank you- as you _ trust of the british people. thank you. as you heard _ trust of the british people. thank you. as you heard there, - trust of the british people. thank you. as you heard there, there . trust of the british people. thank you. as you heard there, there is confidence, but i think a sense that labour doesn't want to come across complacent. because the party has a huge mountain to climb when you think back to 2019 and that disastrous election result, it is worth bearing that in mind when we
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listen to keir starmer today. but some policy and the big announcement about a state—owned energy company, about a state—owned energy company, a green energy production company was the main policy announcement. perhaps the positioning was more of what he wanted to achieve in his speech, trying to put labour back in the centre ground.— the centre ground. thank you. developments _ the centre ground. thank you. developments in _ the centre ground. thank you. developments in the - the centre ground. thank you. developments in the last - the centre ground. thank you. developments in the last few| developments in the last few minutes, the news a labour mp, has been suspended pending an investigation. what are you hearing? this is in relation to comments rupa huq, describing the chancellor as being superficially black. we have heard from the labour spokesperson confirming that she has had the whip suspended pending an investigation
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into comments made at labour conference. 50 she won't be technically speaking a labour mp while an investigation starts. some of her colleagues said they were inappropriate comments to make. thank you. a small number of lenders have withdrawn new deals entirely, while others including the scottish building society are understood to have withdrawn offers at fixed rates. yorkshire building society joined virgin money and skipton building society in halting mortgage offers for new customers. halifax said it would stop mortgages with product fees. the bank of england said on monday it would "not hesitate" to hike interest rates after the pound hit record lows. our economics correspondent andy verity has been explaining what the falling pound means for mortgages.
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we tend to focus on the bank of england rate, the mortgage rate it announces, but fewer than two million households have variable rate mortgages, it is difficult for some of them, but most mortgage holders, about six million are on fixed rate deals and almost all lenders are pulling the deals they had on offer last week. here is a list of them. the cost depends not on what the rate is now but what traders think will happen to rates in the next few years. that has changed since friday and the rate is 2.25%. by december traders think that will be 4.5% and byjune 5.75%. lenders say households will have to pay more. the lenders say households will have to -a more. ., , ., lenders say households will have to -a more. . , ., . pay more. the rates have increased and they're — pay more. the rates have increased and they're now _ pay more. the rates have increased and they're now looking _ pay more. the rates have increased and they're now looking at -
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pay more. the rates have increased and they're now looking at 5.75% i pay more. the rates have increased l and they're now looking at 5.7596 and and they're now looking at 5.75% and that is _ and they're now looking at 5.75% and that is a _ and they're now looking at 5.75% and that is a massive change to what customers— that is a massive change to what customers can expect to pay on their monthly— customers can expect to pay on their monthly outgoings. that is based on the facts _ monthly outgoings. that is based on the facts the traders think the rate will be _ the facts the traders think the rate will be 6%— the facts the traders think the rate will be 6% next year and that will increase — will be 6% next year and that will increase monthly payments by up to £6,000 _ increase monthly payments by up to £6,000 for the average mortgage hotden _ £6,000 for the average mortgage holder. ., , ., , , £6,000 for the average mortgage holder. . , . , , , , holder. that is happening, because kwasi kwarteng _ holder. that is happening, because kwasi kwarteng is _ holder. that is happening, because kwasi kwarteng is planning - holder. that is happening, because kwasi kwarteng is planning to - holder. that is happening, because l kwasi kwarteng is planning to borrow so much, investors think it is more risky to lend money to the government and demanding higher interest rates. this what hayes what has happened to the rate the government pays, you can see that sharpjump after government pays, you can see that sharp jump after the announcement on friday. because the government is the least risky borrower to lend to, the least risky borrower to lend to, the other costs are shooting up and cheap fixed rate deals are
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disappearing. if cheap fixed rate deals are disappearing.— cheap fixed rate deals are disappearing. cheap fixed rate deals are disa -~earin. ., cheap fixed rate deals are disauearinu. ., , ., disappearing. if we look back a year and all-time — disappearing. if we look back a year and all-time lows _ disappearing. if we look back a year and all-time lows and _ disappearing. if we look back a year and all-time lows and fixed - disappearing. if we look back a year and all-time lows and fixed rates i and all—time lows and fixed rates going back to october were available at around 1%. now you're going to be lucky to get something around li% or just a touch below currently. but the pressure is very clearly upwards. the pressure is very clearly upwards— the pressure is very clearly uwards. ., , ,, , ~' , the pressure is very clearly uwards. . , ,, , ~ , ., upwards. that pressure is likely to hit borrows _ upwards. that pressure is likely to hit borrows like _ upwards. that pressure is likely to hit borrows like aaron, _ upwards. that pressure is likely to hit borrows like aaron, whose - upwards. that pressure is likely toj hit borrows like aaron, whose wife is on maternally leave and he is the only one paying the fixed rate deal and it is ending. igut’ith only one paying the fixed rate deal and it is ending.— and it is ending. with other bills it will ut and it is ending. with other bills it will put us _ and it is ending. with other bills it will put us at _ and it is ending. with other bills it will put us at quite _ and it is ending. with other bills it will put us at quite a - and it is ending. with other bills it will put us at quite a lot - and it is ending. with other bills it will put us at quite a lot more | it will put us at quite a lot more of a deficit _ it will put us at quite a lot more of a deficit. i'm picking up the entirety— of a deficit. i'm picking up the entirety of the mortgage cost and quite _ entirety of the mortgage cost and quite a _ entirety of the mortgage cost and quite a lot of pressure and a big hit. , ., ., ., , , ., hit. here is what would happen to our hit. here is what would happen to your mortgage — hit. here is what would happen to your mortgage in _ hit. here is what would happen to your mortgage in the _ hit. here is what would happen to your mortgage in the worst - hit. here is what would happen to your mortgage in the worst case i your mortgage in the worst case scenario in if two year deals rate to 6%. your rate would double. you
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don't have to worry about thatjump now. but if your fixed rate expires in the current year, the cheap rates available now are not likely to stay as cheap for long. we can speak with malcolm davidson, managing director at uk money man. hello. have you, has your phone been ringing off the hook since this concern has blown up?- ringing off the hook since this concern has blown up? yes, i have barely got — concern has blown up? yes, i have barely got time — concern has blown up? yes, i have barely got time to _ concern has blown up? yes, i have barely got time to talk _ concern has blown up? yes, i have barely got time to talk to - concern has blown up? yes, i have barely got time to talk to the - concern has blown up? yes, i have barely got time to talk to the bbc. j barely got time to talk to the bbc. it has been an extraordinary 2a hours. i have been doing this 25 years and i can't remember a time like this. it is almost 30 years to the day since black wednesday, but everyone wants to have a chat and see what they can do about their mortgage payments. what
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see what they can do about their mortgage payments.— see what they can do about their mortgage payments. see what they can do about their mortuaae -a ments. ~ ., . . mortgage payments. what are the main anxieties, mortgage payments. what are the main anxieties. what — mortgage payments. what are the main anxieties, what are _ mortgage payments. what are the main anxieties, what are the _ mortgage payments. what are the main anxieties, what are the key _ mortgage payments. what are the main anxieties, what are the key themes - anxieties, what are the key themes for you? anxieties, what are the key themes for ou? ~ , ., ., anxieties, what are the key themes for ou? ~ i. ., ., anxieties, what are the key themes for ou? ~ ., ., ., ., for you? well, if you had a mortgage a coule for you? well, if you had a mortgage a couple of — for you? well, if you had a mortgage a couple of years _ for you? well, if you had a mortgage a couple of years ago _ for you? well, if you had a mortgage a couple of years ago and _ for you? well, if you had a mortgage a couple of years ago and you - for you? well, if you had a mortgage a couple of years ago and you had i a couple of years ago and you had rock bottom rate and in the past decade, interest hasn't gone up. so thatis decade, interest hasn't gone up. so that is the first thing, it is people are not used to mortgage rates going up and then the media coverage is bringing this home, but actually there are things that can be done, such as when your deal ends, your current lender will offer you a new deal to stay with them, it is vital that everyone doesn'tjust hook into that deal and they compare what the deal is their lender is offering against everything else on the market. , . , offering against everything else on the market-— offering against everything else on the market. , . , , ., . the market. deal ends, your current lender will offer _ the market. deal ends, your current lender will offer you _ the market. deal ends, your current lender will offer you a _ the market. deal ends, your current lender will offer you a new - the market. deal ends, your current lender will offer you a new deal - the market. deal ends, your current lender will offer you a new deal to i lender will offer you a new deal to stay with them, it is vital that
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everyone doesn'tjust hook into that deal and they compare what the deal is their lender is offering against everything else on the market. i'm assuming people are phoning you really worried, thinking, even if i can get another fixed deal, they're so scared about what the figures will look like?— so scared about what the figures will look like? yes, we have seen that and people _ will look like? yes, we have seen that and people are _ will look like? yes, we have seen that and people are panicking, i will look like? yes, we have seen| that and people are panicking, we mad a customer yesterday that —— had a customer that made a terrible decision by hooking in too early. but remember the affordability checks that were brought in 2015 had this calculated, the stress test that were built in place on the back of the credit crunch, so people will be able to afford it, but of course when something happens for the first time in someone's life, it is a concern, on top of everything else going up as it has been. yes. concern, on top of everything else going up as it has been.— going up as it has been. yes, that is the thing. _ going up as it has been. yes, that is the thing, the _ going up as it has been. yes, that is the thing, the stress _ going up as it has been. yes, that is the thing, the stress test - going up as it has been. yes, that is the thing, the stress test was l is the thing, the stress test was done before we knew what, that energy bills would be what they are. there is still problems for people there. what is your, for anyone who everything else going up as it has
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been. yes, that is the thing, the stress test was done before we knew what, that energy bills would be what, that energy bills would be what they are. there is still problems for people there. what is your, for anyone who is anxious and phoning you up and worried, what are the, what is your key message to them? you like?— them? you like? people that are alread in them? you like? people that are already in the — them? you like? people that are already in the home _ them? you like? people that are already in the home buying - them? you like? people that are i already in the home buying process and their deals are locked n a mortgage offer will last for six months, so there is no need the panic in pulling out of a house purchase. if you're on a fixed rate you're unaffected. but it may be different in the plan to reduce inflation by the energy cap comes off. it is the people whose fixed rates are ending, they need to take action and make sure you don't leave it to the last minute, have a look six months out and see what your bank is offering you and the cheapest deal on that given day. we have been reading out the list of banks withdrawing products, you said yourself, you have been in the
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business a long time, do you have confidence that ultimately things will settle down, that other products will come back on the market, do you see this as a short blip or what is your reading of it as someone who has worked in this area for several decades. to as someone who has worked in this area for several decades.— area for several decades. to an extent all _ area for several decades. to an extent all the _ area for several decades. to an extent all the bets _ area for several decades. to an extent all the bets are - area for several decades. to an extent all the bets are off, - area for several decades. to an - extent all the bets are off, because we are living unprecedented times. lenders have been struggling to keep pace with the unprecedented demand for mortgages in the past few months, they're struggling to get their call centres staffed up after covid. at the moment where we are now, lenders are trying to find out where they are so they can come back to the market and price their products accordingly. banks are well funded and they have got the money to lend, unlike in 2008.— to lend, unlike in 2008. thank you for sparing — to lend, unlike in 2008. thank you for sparing a _
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to lend, unlike in 2008. thank you for sparing a few _ to lend, unlike in 2008. thank you for sparing a few minutes - to lend, unlike in 2008. thank you for sparing a few minutes to - to lend, unlike in 2008. thank you for sparing a few minutes to talk i to lend, unlike in 2008. thank you | for sparing a few minutes to talk to us. it follows from announcement, the changes the chancellor kwasi kwarteng made in the last few days. how much has changed? the chancellor kwasi kwarteng has told leading figures from the financial sector he's confident in his plan for growth.
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let's talk to our business correspondent. a couple of things in that that i don't get. big bang 2.0? that a couple of things in that that i don't get. big bang 2.0? that is a deregulation _ don't get. big bang 2.0? that is a deregulation drive, _ don't get. big bang 2.0? that is a deregulation drive, to _ don't get. big bang 2.0? that is al deregulation drive, to re-establish deregulation drive, to re—establish london as a financial centre and he believes reducing regulation is the way to do it. what is interesting is the talk of close co—operation with the talk of close co—operation with the bank of england. what many critics say that the bank of england and the government are approaching the economy in two different ways. the bank of england is looking at increasing interest rates to take money out of the system to reduce inflation and the government is trying to put money back into people's pockets by cutting taxes. so they're being accused of working at odds with each other and the impression with investors is that more co—ordination is needed and
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what is the reason for the lack of confidence, the fall in the pound, is because the bank and the government don't seem to be heading in the same direction. the government don't seem to be heading in the same direction.— in the same direction. the fact that kwasi kwarteng _ in the same direction. the fact that kwasi kwarteng is _ in the same direction. the fact that kwasi kwarteng is even _ in the same direction. the fact that kwasi kwarteng is even saying - in the same direction. the fact that| kwasi kwarteng is even saying this, is that because, has he been pushed into making the comments? because there is so much anxiety. we have been talking about the worries about mortgages. what is behind the statement?— mortgages. what is behind the statement? . , ., statement? that is a good question, i think the government _ statement? that is a good question, i think the government maybe - statement? that is a good question, i think the government maybe was l i think the government maybe was caught by surprise by how strong the reaction to the minibudget was. the government has been saying, liz truss has been saying since before she came into office that she wanted to cut taxes. she wanted to boost growth. when kwasi kwarteng came out and said this on friday, the reaction was strong in part because of the amount of borrowing the government set out it would do. £70
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billion worth of extra borrowing. but not going into the nitty—gritty and how it would work. that seems to have undermined confidence in the government's economic strategy. so now kwasi kwarteng knows that the markets will be listening to every word he says and putting out reassuring statements about more information on 23rd november about what the government intends to do. that is designed to be reassuring. yesterday we had statements that came from the treasury and the bank of england, at roughly the same time, both seemed to be aimed at calming the markets and bring stability to sterling which seems to happened so far. stability to sterling which seems to happened so far-— stability to sterling which seems to happened so far. interesting times, thank ou. happened so far. interesting times, thank you. let's _ happened so far. interesting times, thank you. let's does _ happened so far. interesting times, thank you. let's does that - happened so far. interesting times, thank you. let's does that and - happened so far. interesting times, thank you. let's does that and that | thank you. let's does that and that statement from the chancellor. henry hill is the deputy editor of the political blog, conservative home. ed
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is that your take on the comments from the chancellor, that he feels he has to say something to offer some reassurance?— he has to say something to offer some reassurance? yes, absolutely, he should be — some reassurance? yes, absolutely, he should be offering _ some reassurance? yes, absolutely, he should be offering bucket - some reassurance? yes, absolutely, he should be offering bucket loads i he should be offering bucket loads of reassurance, when a you're trying to affect a bold of reassurance, when a you're trying to affect a hold 90 degree change of economic direction in the middle of a parliament and you don't have a mandate from the electorate, you should be offering as much reassurance as possible. instead there are elements of the government seem to have indulged in a tough message. but it has not offered a message. but it has not offered a message. the more radical you are the more you need to dress it up in reassuring language. lloathed the more you need to dress it up in reassuring language.— reassuring language. what is your 'ud . ment reassuring language. what is your judgment about — reassuring language. what is your judgment about the _
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reassuring language. what is your judgment about the number- reassuring language. what is your judgment about the number of. judgment about the number of backbench conservatives, or the number of conservative mps and members of the party who are concerned about the way it was laid out without any back up from the office of budget responsibility and that sort of thing?— that sort of thing? there are several mps _ that sort of thing? there are several mps who _ that sort of thing? there are several mps who have - that sort of thing? there are i several mps who have different concerns. some tory mps think it is a big departure from how the conservatives have approached economic matters for the past ten years. the tories were all about fiscal responsibility and they had these groups backing them up. now they have gone in a different direction and conservative mps are nervous about that. others are worried about the fact that boris johnson won on a programme or a promise to change the conservative party, millions of voters in the red wall who backed the tories for the first time thought they were voting for something different and the question mark these mps have is is
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this programme going to deliver for my constituents who voted tory for the first time, or will they feel they have been conned into voting for thatch terrorism? for thatcherism? kwasi kwarteng said it is a lona for thatcherism? kwasi kwarteng said it is a longtime _ for thatcherism? kwasi kwarteng said it is a long time plan _ for thatcherism? kwasi kwarteng said it is a long time plan for _ for thatcherism? kwasi kwarteng said it is a long time plan for growth. - it is a long time plan for growth. is there an argument to say, well, fiscal changes take a while to bed in and you take time too see results of everything he outlined and the conservatives who have anxieties, kwasi kwarteng would say you need to give it time? he kwasi kwarteng would say you need to rive it time? give it time? he might, their counter argument _ give it time? he might, their counter argument would - give it time? he might, their counter argument would be i give it time? he might, their i counter argument would be that give it time? he might, their - counter argument would be that is an argument you make at the start of a five—year parliament when you have a mandate from the voters for the programmes and when every tory mp has stood on a manifesto that contains these reforms. i think the big question, it is a political question, whether you agree with the
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economics, i'm notan question, whether you agree with the economics, i'm not an economist and lots of tory mps are not, politically, whether it is a long—term plan, there are two years until the next general election and the tories have lost time, because of covid and the pandemic consumed the agenda. they have two years at most to deliver on the promises they made to the voters in 2019. they need to focus they will argue on doing that. not on pivoting with two years to go to another long—term strategy that they may take five or more years when the government will go to the polls in two. if this long—term plan can't win the tories the election, it doesn't matter, because labour will change course any way. what liz truss needs to prove to tory mps, maybe it is a long—term plan, but it needs to get them over the line in 2024 and a lot of mps are asking how it can possibly do that.— of mps are asking how it can possibly do that. they chose liz truss and _
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possibly do that. they chose liz truss and knew _ possibly do that. they chose liz truss and knew she _ possibly do that. they chose liz truss and knew she was - possibly do that. they chose liz truss and knew she was about i possibly do that. they chose liz - truss and knew she was about lower taxes, deregulation.— taxes, deregulation. conservative members chose _ taxes, deregulation. conservative members chose liz _ taxes, deregulation. conservative members chose liz truss. - taxes, deregulation. conservative members chose liz truss. she i taxes, deregulation. conservative| members chose liz truss. she did taxes, deregulation. conservative - members chose liz truss. she did not win among conservative mps in the first round. the leadership structure is what it is, they make the decision to outsource the decision to party members and it is their decision to make sure the two candidates they send to the members they support. i agree, liz truss is a known quantity in political term. some might be surprised at how bold she is. there play have been an expectation that she would have waited for an opportunity to call an election and then gone for liz truss economics when she had her own man
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tait. —— mandate. some are surprised that she has had such a change of course in the circumstances. thank ou, course in the circumstances. thank you. henry — course in the circumstances. thank you. henry hill- — course in the circumstances. thank you, henry hill. more _ course in the circumstances. thank you, henry hill. more to _ course in the circumstances. thank you, henry hill. more to come. - course in the circumstances. thank. you, henry hill. more to come. now time for the weather. we have had some autumnal showers and it has been blustery today. as we head through the next 24 hours the blustery winds will be easing and most of the showers should be fading away as well. an improvement in the weather for the next 24 hours. still this front bringing rain to devon and cornwall and showers in northern scotland and the east coast of england and some of the irish sea coasts. with the clearer skies, a cold night, temperatures down to three to eight degrees. low enough perhaps for a
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touch of frost in rural spots. tomorrow some areas will see showers in eastern scotland and north—east england. a few further west. temperatures the 12 to 16. similar to today, but feeling warmer with more sunshine. a quiet day on thursday. but things turning wet and windy by friday. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: sir keir starmer sets out his plan for a labour government — pledging to create a publicly owned energy company within a year if his party wins at the next election. because it is right for growth, because it is right for energy
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independence from tyrants like putin, then, yes, conference, great british energy will be publicly—owned. the labour mp, rupa huq, has been suspended from the parliamentary party after she described the chancellor, kwasi kwarteng, as "superficially black". she was recorded making the comments at a meeting on the sidelines of the labour conference. dozens of banks and building societies have stopped mortgage offers — after a fall in the pound stoked forecasts of a steep rise in interest rates. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng has told leading figures from the financial sector he's confident in his plan for growth oh, wow! we're getting visual confirmation... cheering. nasa successfully crashes a probe into an asteroid — to test whether space rocks that might threaten earth, could be deflected out of the way. and it's liverpool vs glasgow in the battle to find out which city
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will host eurovision. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. scotla nd scotland could be promoted in the nation sleep tonight if they avoid defeat against ukraine in poland. —— the nation's league. that would assure them of a play—off spot for euro 2024. they have beaten ukraine and the republic of ireland in the last couple of weeks with lyndon bikes one of their top performers but he is one of a number of players who have been suffering the effects of a virus —— lyndon bikes. chez adams is another. steve clarke, the manager, has seen his squad depleted with injury and suspensions but still feels momentum is with them. we spoke about the summer and how we
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felt, but we have kick—started again and we feel we have done that with those performances, but we have not done anything yet. we want to finish top of the group and we have got to go to ukraine and play as well as we can and get the result required. the northern ireland manager ian baraclough has called on his players to take care of business against greece and not let the threat of relegation from the nations league affect them. they beat kosovo on saturday. the leicester city defenderjonny evans will captain the side in his 100th international appearance. he will become only the reach a century following the to reach a century following the likes of patjennings. it is to reach a century following the likes of pat jennings.— to reach a century following the likes of pat jennings. it is a great milestone- _ likes of pat jennings. it is a great milestone. it _ likes of pat jennings. it is a great milestone. it doesn't _ likes of pat jennings. it is a great milestone. it doesn't compare i likes of pat jennings. it is a great milestone. it doesn't compare to | milestone. it doesn't compare to
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playing big games and winning big games but it is a milestone. it is something i have had my eye on for a number of years and i'm glad i have finally done it for the england manager gareth southgate says the door remains open for players not involved in the recent tome on matches and insists he has not made any final decisions about his squad for the world cup in qatar —— in the recent tome on matches. for the world cup in qatar -- in the recent tome on matches.— for the world cup in qatar -- in the recent tome on matches. glready been relegated from the too the nations and they tier of the nations league and they are now without a victory in six 7 7 harry . 7 7 harry maguire . in 7 7 harry maguire . �*arnold'r’ criticism and trent alexanderameld not in criticism and trent atexenderarnetd not in squad yesterday. was not in the squad yesterday. southgate says people should take from eric dier�*s return to the heart from eric dier�*s return to the england squad. taste heart from eric dier's return to the england squad-— heart from eric dier's return to the england squad. we would be foolish not to keep an _ england squad. we would be foolish not to keep an open _ england squad. we would be foolish not to keep an open mind _ england squad. we would be foolish not to keep an open mind especially to players we have worked with
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before who we know and who know us and can slot in canterbury. the way eric dier has played across the two games is a good example —— slot in comfortably. he did not need a big adaptation and he fits in with the group immediately and so those guys in particular, we are monitoring closely, but also we have got to keep an open mind on others. the worcester warriors captain has called for greater scrutiny on club owners in rugby union. he has been speaking after the club were put into administration yesterday and they now face the threat of relegation from the premiership. the financially troubled side failed to provide proof of a credible plan for their future by five o'clock yesterday. the r have now banned the men's team from the premiership and also the women's team from the premier 15 stash the rfu have now banned. hannah russell has announced her retirement from swimming. she
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won silver and bronze at london 2012 at the age of 16. world and european titles, world records and other titles, world records and other titles followed at rio four years later and then she took a period of time away from the water in 2019 to focus on her well—being and returned and won another paralympic gold in tokyo and then her most recent international success came with the silver medal at the commonwealth games in birmingham in the summer. that is all the spot for now. studio: thanks forjoining us. nasa scientists have carried out a startling test of a new technique to protect the earth from potentially dangerous asteroids. they deliberately crashed a spacecraft into a 500ft—wide space rock to push it off—course — at a speed of around 14,000 miles an hour. the collision took place almost seven million miles from earth. our science editor,
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rebecca morelle, was watching. closing in on the target. images beamed back from seven million miles away as a nasa spacecraft approaches an asteroid. the details of the rocky world are revealed, but this probe isn't here to study it. its job is to knock the space rock off course by smashing into it. ..two...one! oh, wow. and this was the reaction from mission control. cheering fantastic! oh, fantastic! this space rock poses no threat. this is a test to see how we could deal with one on a collision course with the earth. i definitely think that, as far as we can tell, our first planetary defence test was a success, and i think we can clap to that, everyone. cheering. so... right? so, yeah, well, i... yeah, i think that earthlings should sleep better — definitely i will! the people working here, we're
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definitely going to sleep better. and lift—off of the falcon 9... the mission, called dart, began last year, with the spacecraft starting its epicjourney to its destination. the target, a twin asteroid system. a larger space rock called didymos is orbited by a smaller space rock called dimorphos, that's about 150 metres — that's about 500 feet — across. the spacecraft, travelling at 14,000 miles an hour, crashes into dimorphos, giving the asteroid a kick. this changes its speed byjust a fraction — about a millimetre per second — but this is enough to alter its orbit, and scientists can monitor this from earth to see if it's worked. this telescope did just that and tracked the moving asteroid, capturing the moment of impact... ..revealing the rocky debris being hurled into space.
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dart really is just the start. it's just the first planetary defence test mission. it was spectacular and it's accomplished and we'll figure out how effective it was — that's really what we're going to learn in the next weeks to come. all right, we hit this asteroid — now, how effective was that at deflecting it and what would that mean for using it? the damage asteroids can do is well known — the biggest ones could cause global devastation, like the space rock that wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. the challenge is to find them early enough, so a mission to divert could be carried out well in advance. the dart mission is the first step in finding a solution, and in the coming days and weeks, scientists will be assessing whether their test has been successful. it's a demonstration of a technology that could one day save our planet. rebecca morelle, bbc news.
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colin snodgrass is professor of planetary astronomy at the university of edinburgh — and member of the dart mission team. you were part of the team at that crucial moment? last night i was watching the feed crucial moment? last night i was watching the fee— crucial moment? last night i was watching the feed from home like eve bod watching the feed from home like everybody else — watching the feed from home like everybody else but _ watching the feed from home like everybody else but also _ watching the feed from home like everybody else but also in - everybody else but also in communication with the teams at observatories around the world, because now that the mission has done its thing and crashed into the asteroid, we rely on telescopes around the world to follow up on that and to cover what has happened. we don't find out absolutely for sure for a couple of weeks but how confident are you that this has achieved everything you were trying to achieve? the achieved everything you were trying to achieve? p, , achieved everything you were trying to achieve? . , ., , ., to achieve? the early images we have been getting — to achieve? the early images we have been getting back _ to achieve? the early images we have been getting back have _ to achieve? the early images we have been getting back have been - been getting back have been spectacular and i don't think anyone expected we would see this plume of
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debris quite as early as we did. there has definitely been some big effect on the asteroid and we look forward to finding out exactly how much it has changed its orbit over the coming weeks. the much it has changed its orbit over the coming weeks.— the coming weeks. the people watchin: the coming weeks. the people watching this _ the coming weeks. the people watching this thinking, - the coming weeks. the people watching this thinking, well, i the coming weeks. the people watching this thinking, well, itj the coming weeks. the people i watching this thinking, well, it is fascinating, remarkable, what can be achieved, but really is it necessary, by which i mean, to what extent are there lots of rocks floating out there which are a danger to earth in that specific example? is this really vital work in a practical sense? we example? is this really vital work in a practical sense?— in a practical sense? we know an asteroid impact, _ in a practical sense? we know an asteroid impact, it _ in a practical sense? we know an asteroid impact, it will _ in a practical sense? we know an| asteroid impact, it will eventually happen, it is a matter of when, not if, and we don't expect it to be any time soon but it is a good idea to have tested the technology for something like this before you need to use it. 50
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something like this before you need to use it. ., , ., ., to use it. so what is out there that ou know to use it. so what is out there that you know of? _ to use it. so what is out there that you know of? what _ to use it. so what is out there that you know of? what kind _ to use it. so what is out there that you know of? what kind of- to use it. so what is out there that you know of? what kind of size i you know of? what kind of size objects i'll we talking about? —— are. objects i'll we talking about? -- are. ~ ~ ., , objects i'll we talking about? -- are. ~ ~ ., ., , ., , objects i'll we talking about? -- are. ~ ~ ., , ., , ., are. we know about the big ones that come close to — are. we know about the big ones that come close to us, _ are. we know about the big ones that come close to us, only _ are. we know about the big ones that come close to us, only a _ are. we know about the big ones that come close to us, only a handful- come close to us, only a handful that are of the sort of size that wiped out the dinosaurs and we know where they are and they are not a threat. but the size of the asteroid we deflected with dart, hunted metre types go, this is the size that could cause devastation locally on a city or regional scale, these are the things we are still discovering all the time. these are the ones that may at some point, not anytime soon, but at some point in hundreds of thousands of years, it could become a threat so it is a good idea to have technology ready. interesting. i'm assuming this is an example of international cooperation? it
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example of international cooperation?— example of international cooperation? example of international cooeration? . , , cooperation? it really is. the nasa mission has _ cooperation? it really is. the nasa mission has done _ cooperation? it really is. the nasa mission has done the _ cooperation? it really is. the nasa mission has done the deflecting i cooperation? it really is. the nasa i mission has done the deflecting and thatis mission has done the deflecting and that is part of it but there will be a european space agency follow—up to look at this in detail and in the meantime there are observers at telescopes on every continent following this and following the evolution of it.— following this and following the evolution of it. really interesting. sor we evolution of it. really interesting. sorry we can't _ evolution of it. really interesting. sorry we can't talk _ evolution of it. really interesting. sorry we can't talk longer - evolution of it. really interesting. sorry we can't talk longer but - evolution of it. really interesting. | sorry we can't talk longer but very good to have you with us. thanks for joining us. professor colin snodgrass there from the university of edinburgh. the state funeral of the japanese leader shinzo abe has been taking place, but some people injapan are
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worried about the costs and other factors. we now have this report. many world leaders are attending, including the us vice president, kamala harris. akie abe, the widow ofjapan's longest serving prime minister, carries his ashes to his state funeral. 4,500 people attended to pay respect to shinzo abe, who was shot dead injuly in a rare case of violent crime in the country. among those attending today were the us vice president kamala harris, india's prime minister narendra modi and the uk's former prime minister theresa may. outside, a long queue of people also waited for hours to express their condolences, butjust as when he was prime minister, mr abe's state funeral has divided opinion. translation: i'm about to pay for a tribute to mr abe - because of his contribution
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to the country, but also to the way he was killed. translation: i have nothing against spending that much i money for the country, but the money can be spent on other things, like people who are suffering in shizuoka, where a typhoon hit. many protests took place throughout the day questioning the legitimacy of a state funeral, which is usually only reserved for imperial family members. others are unhappy about the £10 million price tag. quite a change from an outpouring of grief and sadness shortly after his assassination. the state funeral is now over but what's been dubbed as funeral diplomacy continues for the current prime minister fumio kishida, who is taking the opportunity to hold dozens of meetings with the state leaders who have attended. pushing ahead with the event has affected his popularity. whether it was worth the cost and the surrounding mariko oi, bbc news, in tokyo. the headlines on bbc news:
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keir starmer sets out his plan for a labour government — pledging to create a publicly owned energy company — within a year if his party wins at the next election. the labour mp, rupa huq, has been suspended from the parliamentary party after she described the chancellor, kwasi kwarteng, as "superficially black". she was recorded making the comments at a meeting on the sidelines of the labour conference. and it's liverpool vs glasgow in the battle to find out which city will host eurovision. the cypher of king charles ii! has been revealed, the contest to host eurovision 2023 has been whittled down to the final two, either liverpool or glasgow will host the song contest next year.
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it is the uk hosting eurovision, of course, in place of ukraine. seven cities had been in contention, but newcastle, leeds, manchester, birmingham and sheffield are now out of the running. the bbc has said the final decision will be made within weeks. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has the latest. eurovision having a long and drawn—out voting process! we have gone from seven cities down to two and it is glasgow versus liverpool, the venue behind me, the hydro in glasgow is where it could be held in may next year. glasgow will be hosting it on behalf of ukraine and that venue has already hosted eurovision. ok, it was only a will ferrell eurovision netflix movie but that is the building that doubled as the venue nevertheless. the eurovision delegation will be back here on friday to have
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another look at glasgow because they are going to have further conversations with both cities about the technicalities needed. the huge press areas, the fan zones that have to be arranged, and these cities were said to be head and shoulders above the other bids. according to the people making the decision. a couple of strange coincidences, scotland could get into not one but two euro play—offs. it's made it into the eurovision play—off and if the men's football team gets a point against ukraine they are in the play—offs for the euros 2024. another strange coincidence — in 1988, a glaswegian called scott fitzgerald entered eurovision and he came second. he was beaten by one point by celine dion. if you host eurovision here,
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the acts in the hydro six weeks before have to be kicked out and guess who is supposed to be playing? celine dion. scotland could get its eurovision revenge after all these years! that is fantastic. you are on my pub quiz team because there is so much that could come in handy there! a couple of thoughts, when do we know, do we know the exact date? there are a lot of things they have got to talk through, like the big stuff like access to airports and international travel, the venues. and also broadcast considerations? a number of things have got to be checked off. so when do we find out? yes. it will be next month. today was a surprise for everybody because people have been running around getting reactions and what you are saying is the truth, the delegation will be going to both liverpool and glasgow and looking at all those things.
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the amount of hotel rooms, where the fan zones would be, and there is so much for people to decide. it's a huge logistical event. six weeks, it takes over the city that it is in, and what glasgow and liverpool have going for it is a venue next to a lot of space. in glasgow we have the ssec next door and a lot of the buildings that were used in the commonwealth games in 2014, and in liverpool, they have the huge area down by the docks which is why these two have made it into the final two. only one is going to get to win and host the event next may on behalf of ukraine! the one and only colin patterson in glasgow. we are going to talk to people from liverpool, later on, by the way, i don't want to be a bias in this very important competition. we are staying with glasgow because we are going to talk to scott reid, a eurovision superfan. how
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we are going to talk to scott reid, a eurovision super fan. how excited are you? a eurovision super fan. how excited are ou? , p a eurovision super fan. how excited are ou? , . ., a eurovision super fan. how excited are ou? , . are you? very exciting. glasgow has been amongst _ are you? very exciting. glasgow has been amongst the _ are you? very exciting. glasgow has been amongst the favourites - are you? very exciting. glasgow has been amongst the favourites now i are you? very exciting. glasgow has| been amongst the favourites now for some time but you just do not know until you see the shortlist. and then the even shorter shortlist. hagar then the even shorter shortlist. how would ou then the even shorter shortlist. how would you sell— then the even shorter shortlist. how would you sell glasgow? how would you sell it to people who are going to be flying in from all over the world for eurovision next may? you have an amazing _ world for eurovision next may? gm. have an amazing emotional case but also it is a great place to host it and as colin said, you have the hydro which is the venue from the eurovision movie right behind the exhibition centre, right beside another building, an extra bbc scotland which would be very practical for the organisers, scotland which would be very practicalfor the organisers, and in terms of coming to glasgow, it is a beautiful city with a lot of green space and knowing very well as a music city. and just a wonderful place to be. music city. and 'ust a wonderful place to be.— music city. and 'ust a wonderful place to be. very good of you to consider the _ place to be. very good of you to consider the practical _ place to be. very good of you to i consider the practical implications for the broadcasters! that doesn't
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happen very often, that is very nice of you. what would it mean... if it is in glasgow in your home next may, my goodness, what does a eurovision super fan my goodness, what does a eurovision superfan do my goodness, what does a eurovision super fan do with that? how many weeks have you got to take off work? that is a good point. just to recover, possibly. it is a fascinating thing and it would be essentially ten minutes down the road from my house. there would be parties and glasgow would make everyone incredibly welcome. it would be ridiculously exciting. haste would be ridiculously exciting. have ou aot would be ridiculously exciting. have ou not a would be ridiculously exciting. have you got a sofa _ would be ridiculously exciting. have you got a sofa bed? _ would be ridiculously exciting. have you got a sofa bed? i _ would be ridiculously exciting. have you got a sofa bed? i will be looking for somewhere to stay. you are welcome _ looking for somewhere to stay. you are welcome to _ looking for somewhere to stay. gm. are welcome to stay in the attic! looking for somewhere to stay. you | are welcome to stay in the attic! we do know that one of the considerations, the venue, extraordinarily, i'm sure you know this, it has got to be, anyone who
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is booked in, they have got to be thrown out, because there's so much preparation and rehearsal, and that is a bit mean for the people who are already booked in and the people who have paid for tickets already, do you think that is just a price that has got to be paid for this country to have this great honour? yes. has got to be paid for this country to have this great honour?- to have this great honour? yes. i feel for the _ to have this great honour? yes. i feel for the people _ to have this great honour? yes. i feel for the people who - to have this great honour? yes. i feel for the people who have - to have this great honour? yes. i i feel for the people who have tickets for those events and the artists, obviously. it is such a huge thing to put together, and an incredibly short space of time, so i can completely understand and also you would want to secure the area and get everything set up. you are putting together something which, with most events, like a wild come, you would have plenty of time to organise and prepare, but with eurovision, it comes around and not too many months —— like a world cup. i understand why they have got to get it organised quickly. you i understand why they have got to get it organised quickly.— get it organised quickly. you are robabl get it organised quickly. you are probably not _ get it organised quickly. you are probably not old _ get it organised quickly. you are probably not old enough - get it organised quickly. you are probably not old enough to - get it organised quickly. you are probably not old enough to havej get it organised quickly. you are - probably not old enough to have gone to a eurovision in this country before? i am old enough, you see.
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birmingham was about 300 years ago. i would have been in my teens, so i would take that as a compliment. but i was not there last time, but this time around, i would be desperate to get there. i'm sure a lot of people would want to be there, there are rehearsals and semifinals and so forth, so great to be part of it, to be part of any of it. fine forth, so great to be part of it, to be part of any of it.— be part of any of it. one final thought. _ be part of any of it. one final thought. do _ be part of any of it. one final thought, do you _ be part of any of it. one final thought, do you note - be part of any of it. one final thought, do you note the - be part of any of it. one final| thought, do you note the date be part of any of it. one final- thought, do you note the date of the contest? this is something that is not being talked about. it is in may but do you know any more? we don't know the date. _ but do you know any more? we don't know the date, but _ but do you know any more? we don't know the date, but i _ but do you know any more? we don't know the date, but i would _ know the date, but i would speculate, and this would be speculation, it might be late may because the bbc has got to turn this around very quickly. it is already quite late in the process in terms of trying to get things organised but that is complete speculation. it is always in the month of may, that
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is always in the month of may, that is the best i can do, i'm afraid. scott, we will find out in a couple of weeks whether it is indeed glasgow, and maybe we will talk again. thanks forjoining us. scott reid, eurovision superfan, there. we will find out in a couple of weeks whether it is glasgow or liverpool. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. typically autumnal few days, we have had a bit of sunshine out there but also plenty of heavy showers around and blustery winds coming in from the north—westerly direction, winning a fairly cool field to the weather, lots of rainbows around —— bringing a fairly cool. through the course of tonight, showers easing away becoming a bit dry with clear spells developing and the brisk winds are going to be easing as well. it is not dry everywhere and well. it is not dry everywhere and we still have a low pressure sitting out in the north sea and we have a weather front lingering in the far
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south—west so over the next few hours we are going to have more wet weather in parts of cornwall, devon, the channel islands, but elsewhere, showers fading away, and a few continuing around the coast, anywhere exposed to the northerly breeze, but with clear spells developing, it is set to sea temperatures down to about 3—8 for most so maybe a bit cold in more rural areas and maybe a touch of frost in the north especially, posting on wednesday, but after that, the fresh start, it is looking like a better day in terms of dry weather on the cards. still if few showers around wales and south—west england and maybe more persistent rain for scotland. 12 degrees with the breeze and the showers but for most it is 14—16, feeling a bit warm up most it is 14—16, feeling a bit warm up with a lighter wind and more sunshine. overnight into thursday, showers continuing their progress further south over england and wales in particular, so notjust cold ——
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so not as cold, but overnight into thursday, as the low pressure starts to clear away and fizzle out, we see a ridge of high pressure trying to tumble in from the atlantic and squeeze away most of the showers. not a completely dry day on thursday, we have a few spackle say, some showers pushing south across england and wales, looks like scotland and northern ireland will be predominately dry and a few degrees warmer with a change of wind direction. 14—18 on thursday, back to where it should be for this time of year. we have this sloping west to east across the whole of the uk and that will linger into the weekend so we are expecting a spell of blustery and wet weather on friday. northern areas clearing up on saturday and for most of us it looks like sunday will be the best day of the weekend.
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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines: keir starmer sets out his plan for a labour government — pledging to create a publicly owned energy company within a year if his party wins at the next election. because it is right for growth, because it is right for energy independence from tyrants like putin. then, yes, conference, great british energy will be publicly—owned. the labour mp rupa huq has been suspended from the parliamentary party after she described the chancellor, kwasi kwarteng, as "superficially black". she was recorded making the comments at a meeting on the sidelines of the labour conference. dozens of banks and building societies have stopped mortgage offers after the fall in the pound prompted fears of a sharp
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rise in interest rates.

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