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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 30, 2022 6:00am-9:00am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. under pressure — after a chaotic week on the financial markets, the prime minister and chancellor will today meet the head of britain's independent economic forecaster. price cap kicks in. from midnight tonight, the annual bill for a typical household will rise to £2,500 — double what it was last winter. police in liverpool arrest another man on suspicion of the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel. calls for a national rollout of the chickenpox vaccine,
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to protect the most vulnerable children in the uk. 3:00 kick—off times are here to stay for thousands of football fans after efl clubs ruled out a widespread shift to earlier start times to reduce floodlight use as a way of cutting energy bills. it will be a quiet and misty starch to friday in southern and eastern areas but wet and windy already in northern ireland and western scotland. i will heavier forecast on breakfast. —— i will heavier forecast. it's friday the 30th of september. our main story. following days of chaos in the financial markets, the prime minister and the chancellor will meet the head of the uk's independent economic forecaster today. the talks with the office for budget responsibility are being seen as an attempt to build confidence following widespread criticism of last week's mini budget. simonjones reports. seeking to regain the confidence of the markets.
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in an unusual move, both the prime minister and the chancellor will meet the chairman of the office for budget responsibility after a slump in the value of the pound, uncertainty over mortgages, and a week of extreme financial volatility. the watchdog had offered to prepare a draft forecast in time for last friday's mini budget, but that was rejected by the government. forecasts of the uk's economic outlook are usually published to accompany major financial announcements. it's led to accusations ministers were trying to avoid scrutiny, and that that has in part driven the lack of confidence in the markets. now the 0br, its costings methods and forecasts is seen by many as central to the plan to restore stability. but in a series of bbc interviews yesterday, the prime minister seemed keener to talk about cutting taxes and capping energy bills than surging mortgage costs. prime minister, it sounds like you're saying, "crisis? what crisis?" i'm not saying that at all. i think we're in a very serious situation.
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it's a global crisis which has been brought about by the aftermath of covid and putin's war in ukraine. the government says the bank of england independently accepts interest rates. but more than 1,000 mortgage products have been withdrawn due to forecasts of rising interest rates. and listen to the reaction of the question time audience when one woman describes the impact it's having on her. i was actually in the process of getting a mortgage as a young person, and i was told my initial interest rate would be 4.5%. and i was told today that the lender has pulled that offer. and now the best offer that i can get is about 10.5%. gasps. whoa! wow. the chancellor has told conservative mps the government is working at pace to show the markets it has a clear plan. but as they prepare to gather for their conference in birmingham, with labour well ahead in the polls, some tory mps need convincing, too, that the government is on the right path.
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simon jones, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo is at westminster for us now. that is meeting today with the 0br and other precious and liz truss and the new chancellor. tell us more about those. the new chancellor. tell us more about those-— about those. good morning. the meetin: about those. good morning. the meeting between _ about those. good morning. the meeting between the _ about those. good morning. the meeting between the prime - about those. good morning. the - meeting between the prime minister, chancellor and the independent economic forecasters is a bit of an air of being wiser after the event. that is why the government didn't want to call the announcement last friday budget because they would have been required to publish those independent economic forecasts. they want to hold off another couple of months before publishing forecast. plenty of tory mps are saying, look, we need to do that much sooner to lend the plan credibility. there are a lot of nerves, anxiety within the tory party especially since the prime minister and the chancellor yesterday doubled down on their strategy, the chancellor at kwasi kwarteng trying to reach out to tory mps think i understand your concerns but calling on mps in a message
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yesterday to unite behind the plan, saying that labour would be the winners. 0ne saying that labour would be the winners. one thing that will not be reassuring to tory mps is looking at the set of opinion polls published last night. they have now been a number of them, asking questions of people since last friday's mini budget and they all make pretty grim reading. we have to say it is a snapshot, an election is a long way away but one poll published yesterday put labour on 33 point lead, absolute runaway lead for labour. the usual caveats apply that i don't think it is the picture that tory mps, that the government wants to be chewing overjust weeks into a new administration, weeks after a huge new economic strategy was set out, and remember they will be getting together, starting this weekend in birmingham. it is definitely not the backdrop they would have wanted.— definitely not the backdrop they would have wanted. leila, thank you very much- — the new energy price cap comes into effect at midnight — meaning higher bills for millions of people on standard
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and default tariffs. the annual bill for a typical household will rise to £2,500 — double what it was last winter. that figure is a rough guide because the price cap is applied to a unit of gas or electricity — so the more you use, the more you'll pay, as colletta smith explains. as energy prices go up, everyone's talking about how they're trying to keep their bills down. use the dryer quite often, but now i'm tending to leave the washing overnight on the maiden and then finishing off only for ten minutes in the dryer. as i'm on my own, i don't really want to put the central heating on — just put the gas fire on instead. i've got a wood burner so, yeah, i am economising. just became a way of life j of having things running, not turning things off. and i think that's. now had to change. the government has limited tomorrow's energy rise, but a typical bill is still going up
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byjust over £500. this is the weekend that those price rises will start to feel real for millions more households. as the weather gets colder outside and people stick the heating on, it's much tougher decisions that will have to be made — limiting baths, timing showers, avoiding the oven, and putting on a lot more layers inside the house just to make sure that bills don't get out of hand. the new cap is on the price your supplier can charge you per unit of energy. for dual—fuel customers paying by direct debit, it'll be 34p per kilowatt hour for electricity, and for gas it's 10.3p per kilowatt hour. and then daily standing charges are added on top of that. so everyone's bill will look totally different, depending on how much energy they use. if you use more energy, you'll be charged more — there's no maximum price for a bill.
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there is a bit of extra help, with £400 gradually being knocked off your bills for the next six months. there's no need to contact energy suppliers to receive the government support packages, but the advice does remain the same — if people are worried about their energy bills, then their supplier should be their first port of call. but those working with the most vulnerable say for people already in fuel poverty, that isn't enough help. we are seeing, increasingly, individuals going to unregulated lending, such as...typically loan sharks. helen's organisation is trying to get people who are financially, physically or emotionally vulnerable to register with them, so that energy firms can do more to help them. some people don't want to have their circumstances taken into account, but a lot do. and i think the onus is on on large organisations to take that into consideration when it's put in front of them to prevent foreseeable harm and to really give people the support that they need
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if they're asking for it. pre—payment customers can still buy at the cheaper rate if you top up today, and for everyone else without a smart meter or a fixed deal, then it's worth taking a meter reading this weekend to make sure you're billed correctly. and keep on with those little savings. where we fill the kettle, joe tends to fill it up a little bit too much, as if our neighbours are coming in for coffee! laughter. colletta smith, bbc news in manchester. hannah is with us now. today, very much today into tomorrow, is a day when minds will be focused. people talking about what they are planning to do. there is a lot of detail about what is happening in the next 2a hours. we happening in the next 24 hours. we have happening in the next 24 hours. - have been talking about this a lot but we will be dispatched to see this rise in bills start to take effect over the winter. the reality is, despite the government interventions, energy bills are going to be double what they were
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last winter. as well as everything else we have seen going up. when the price cap goes up tomorrow energy suppliers are very likely to start charging more. that is because they can't avoid too. they are already paying more for wholesale gas and electricity that they are buying on international markets. it is true that prices would have gone up even more if the government hadn't taken action. they have really got the two interventions we have been hearing about. the price cap until 2024, which is on the unit rate, costing the government £60 billion just this winter alone, and then the £66 per month we will get our energy bills over the next six months. we cannot stress enough that your electricity bill will be based on your use of the advice is very much to take a metre reading today to stop you being charged that higher rate for any electricity or gas you have already used in the past month or so. it already used in the past month or so. , . already used in the past month or so, , ., , ., already used in the past month or so. _, ., so. it is a point you are reiterating _ so. it is a point you are reiterating many - so. it is a point you are reiterating many times| so. it is a point you are - reiterating many times about the reality of this but it is the case that they are going up some 27%
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tomorrow. normal circumstances, that would be an extraordinary rise, but because it is less than it might otherwise have been, we are sorta able to deal with it a bit better all the practical implications for people at home will be very real. the government certainly hopes the interventions they are making will help people deal with it better but, as you say, we have heard from people who are already struggling, we know some are falling behind on their energy bills. it is a difficult time for many people ahead of. . ~' , ., , difficult time for many people ahead of. . ~ , ., , . a 34—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of olivia pratt—korbel, the nine—year—old girl who was shot dead in her home in liverpool last month. 0ur reporter mairead smythjoins us now from the headquarters of merseyside police. good morning. this is not the first arrest we have seen in relation to this popular no, it's not. ten men have been arrested 50 this popular no, it's not. ten men have been arreste— have been arrested so far in
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connection _ have been arrested so far in connection with _ have been arrested so far in connection with this - have been arrested so far in - connection with this investigation. the investigation that has been going on here in liverpool since the 22nd of august, the night that 0livia pratt—korbel was killed in her home. it happened when her mother had opened the door to two men she didn't know, one of them being chased by a government. we know he was armed with two guns and police are still trying —— up being chased by a gunman. 0livia pratt—korbel�*s mother was injured, the other man was injured and sadly 0livia was killed in the attack. since then, ten arrests and another last night, 34—year—old man from the dovecot area, the area where 0livia lived in liverpool, that money is being questioned by detectives keen to get to the bottom of this investigation and find the person responsible for 0livia's murder. last week the reward offer from crimestoppers was at a record level
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of £200,000. a life changing amount of £200,000. a life changing amount of money. police are so keen to be able to find the person responsible for killing nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel. back to you. for killing nine-year-old olivia pratt-korbel. back to you. indeed. mairead, thank _ pratt-korbel. back to you. indeed. mairead, thank you _ pratt-korbel. back to you. indeed. mairead, thank you very _ pratt-korbel. back to you. indeed. mairead, thank you very much. - parents in england whose children miss school face harsher penalties depending on where they live — that's according to a new bbc investigation. at least £8.6 million worth of fines were handed out last year, but new research shows huge regional variations — as our education editor bra nwen jeffreys reports. smiley, happy people — love to see it. come on in. girls, have you got your planner? not chewing, are we? no. superb. every child checked in every morning. good morning. morning. all right? yeah. yeah? well done. the register shows who hasn't arrived. it's attendance. i'm just letting you know that...not arrived as yet. is he on his way? any child they're worried about, the attendance team put on the list for a visit. ok, so if we just look at the home—visit log,
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so we've got our visits for today. checking on children, offering help. so she should be back in school today. 0n the next visit, mum joanne agreed to talk to me. she told me her daughter's become anxious since the lockdowns. many times when i've been stood at the bus stop with her, i've been saying, "you've got to get on the bus." you know, we'll get in trouble, as well — it's not, you know, it's not you. i mean, it's affecting, obviously, your education, but if we get fined, how would we afford it? or, you know, you don't get the education, you can't get the job you want. joanne's daughter has been in school since the visit. did the house look empty when you went yesterday? some need help, but 50 families had also taken children on holiday at the start of term. post a note — it's a suspected holiday, we'll put a note - through the letterbox. a lot of the times, they don't complete a holiday form. - i think it's almost fear of the fine. l
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quite a lot of our families do have identified needs — coming into the winter, no gas, no electric, no heating. so i think we just never know what we're going to be faced with, day to day. but i think we're quite good at then identifying that support. i spoke to the children's commissioner for bbc panorama. she's worried the pandemic has left some children struggling to attend. i really think the prime minister needs to make this one of her top priorities. the numbers are huge. we absolutely owe it to these children. all the other things in education cannot happen if children aren't in school. our investigation shows the use of fines varies hugely across england. the government wants new national standards for when they're used. why does it matter so much to you as a head teacher that you have the final say over which families end up being fined? yeah. we know our families, and that's important.
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and we know what that fine could do to a family. and if we are working very closely with them, and then you put in place a fine, that breaks that relationship between home and school, and it's so important that we keep that positive. jack. gracie. jacob. schools in england have been given new guidelines — told by the government to make attendance a top priority. that also means removing the barriers for some children. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. we will be talking more about that story later on in the programme. you can see more of this story on bbc panorama's why kids miss school programme — tonight at 7:30 on bbc one. russia's president, vladimir putin, is expected to hold a ceremony in moscow today to formally annex four parts of ukraine. it comes after a series of self—styled referendums condemned by ukraine and the west as a sham.
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0ur correspondent hugo bachega is live in kyiv for us. there is clearly a very big health warning around the results of these referenda. condemned all around the world. but today vladimir putin will be carrying on regardless. tell us about what will happen. the ukrainians _ about what will happen. the ukrainians i _ about what will happen. the ukrainians i saying about what will happen. tta: ukrainians i saying that about what will happen. tt2 ukrainians i saying that nothing really changes, there is no legal implication as a result of this announcement. there is no legitimacy and that they will continue with the counter offensive to take back territory now under russian occupation. there is a fear this could lead to an escalation in the war. russia says any attack on areas will be seen as an attack on russia itself. there is a fear ukrainian residents may be forced to join the
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russian army and fight against the ukrainian army and we had reports today from the ukrainian military saying that residents in those four regions are being threatened with eviction if they do not accept russian passports. there is an escalation of detention here, countries around the world have said they would not recognise the legitimacy of these decisions by president putin. some strong words yesterday from the un chief saying that any annexation of territory would be a violation of the un charter and also of international law. ., ., ., ., ~ charter and also of international law. hugo, for the moment, thank you very much- _ the first coins featuring king charles iii have been unveiled by the royal mint. a special commemorative £5 coin and a 50 pence will be the first to feature the king's portrait — with some expected to go into circulation within weeks. the coins will also commemorate the life and legacy of her late majesty queen elizabeth ii.
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have we had a £5 coin before? i think there have been. yeah... | have we had a £5 coin before? i l think there have been. yeah... 0. after 23 years on bbc radio 2, presenter steve wright will host his final afternoon show today. he announced back injuly he would be stepping down from his show as part of the station's schedule shake—up — but has assured fans that he's not retiring from broadcasting, but instead taking a break. i think ithinka i think a lot of people will be tuning in today. you need to pay attention to matt, as always. good morning to you. there is almost a contrast of fortunes because even though we have a lot of rain, or some rain, it doesn't negate the problems we have had from the sum at. we definitely need the rain. still part of— we definitely need the rain. still part of the uk in drought. 0ut there this morning it is a pleasant start for southern and eastern areas, fog across _ for southern and eastern areas, fog across parts — for southern and eastern areas, fog across parts of eastern england but they sure _
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across parts of eastern england but they sure you have something waterproof before you head out because — waterproof before you head out because some wet and windy weather to come _ because some wet and windy weather to come for— because some wet and windy weather to come for all. already here in parts _ to come for all. already here in parts of— to come for all. already here in parts of northern ireland, western scotland~ — parts of northern ireland, western scotland. some heavy bursts of rain through _ scotland. some heavy bursts of rain through the — scotland. some heavy bursts of rain through the morning commute in northern— through the morning commute in northern ireland, western scotland. that rain _ northern ireland, western scotland. that rain will push eastwards and southwards through the day, pushing for the _ southwards through the day, pushing for the rest _ southwards through the day, pushing for the rest of scotland this morning, eventually into north—west england. _ morning, eventually into north—west england, north and west wales. reaches— england, north and west wales. reaches the midlands, parts of north—east england for the afternoon, and head towards east anglia _ afternoon, and head towards east anglia and the south—east later in the day~ _ anglia and the south—east later in the day. strong and gusty winds around~ — the day. strong and gusty winds around. switching direction so by the end _ around. switching direction so by the end of— around. switching direction so by the end of the day, quite fresh north— the end of the day, quite fresh north and _ the end of the day, quite fresh north and west, highest temperatures to the _ north and west, highest temperatures to the south and east. the journey home _ to the south and east. the journey home from — to the south and east. the journey home from work will be a bit more pleasant _ home from work will be a bit more pleasant across parts of scotland and northern ireland, sunshine and showers _ and northern ireland, sunshine and showers here. winds the strongest in the early— showers here. winds the strongest in the early day, gusting up to 60 to 70 mph — the early day, gusting up to 60 to 70 mph. the rain band across most parts _ 70 mph. the rain band across most parts of— 70 mph. the rain band across most parts of england and wales. this is where _ parts of england and wales. this is where we _ parts of england and wales. this is where we see the strongest gusts. some _ where we see the strongest gusts. some in_ where we see the strongest gusts. some in east anglia and the
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south—east, don't get that rain untit— south—east, don't get that rain until the — south—east, don't get that rain until the commute home. south—east, don't get that rain untilthe commute home. it south—east, don't get that rain until the commute home. it will ctear— until the commute home. it will clear through the night and clear soetts _ clear through the night and clear spells and a few showers to the north— spells and a few showers to the north and — spells and a few showers to the north and west. staying the wedding season— north and west. staying the wedding season compared with today. frost—free nights and start to saturday _ frost—free nights and start to saturday. saturday, showers across northern— saturday. saturday, showers across northern areas, dry and bright in the south, — northern areas, dry and bright in the south, sunday we flip things around, — the south, sunday we flip things around, could be persistent rain across— around, could be persistent rain across southern england and wales, which _ across southern england and wales, which could affect the london marathon. more details later. thank ou. for most children, chickenpox is a mild illness from which a full recovery is expected. but for some of the most medically vulnerable young people, it can be life—threatening. there are growing calls for the national rollout of a chickenpox vaccine, after a rise in cases of children with hepatitis. john maguire has been speaking to one family who've been affected like any two—and—a—half—year—old, clara is a bundle of activity and energy. a world away from when she first contracted hepatitis from a virus injanuary.
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she'd gone to nursery that day. i was at work and got a call mid—morning from clara's nursery to say they were a bit concerned because they'd seen some yellowing around her groin area when they were changing her nappy. went straight to the gp, who acted, you know, really quickly — thought there was something not quite right there but didn't know what it was. hadn't seen jaundice in a two—year—old before. so we went straight to the emergency department at bristol royal infirmary, where i stayed with her all day, really, while they were doing tests. more and more doctors were coming in, having a look at her, and you think, "this isn't something that's, you know, they're going to give us some antibiotics and go home." i knew pretty much straight away that there was something not quite right. it became clear that clara needed a liver transplant. once a donor was found, the operation took place, but her recovery wasn't straightforward. so there's the realisation that you've got really sick child. and then there's, "is there something we can do about it?" because we knew nothing
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about liver disease, did we? yeah, you are just taking it literally an hour at a time and hoping that, you know... just hoping for stability, really. and there were, you know, bumps in the road, there were a lot of them. there were a few occasions where she went into theatre while we were there and, you know, that seeing her get wheeled away does not get easier whenever it happens — you know, seeing her put to sleep and putting your faith in these doctors when they've got your baby. yeah. tough. it was tough. yeah. she spent three months in the birmingham children's hospital — at one point being treated for a collapsed lung. it's a place she's expected to revisit often, and a place where important steps were taken. watching her learn to walk again was an amazing thing, in that it was progress, wasn't it? yeah, it was, it was. that's our life now — something will happen, we'll have a blood test and something might be off and we'll go back to birmingham. and, you know, we always say to ourselves, it's the safest place
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for her if something isn't quite right. and, actually, iwas quite happy there! and, actually, clara's quite happy there! you know, it's a familiar environment. good girl. daddy. she knows the nurses, she knows the setup, and we just have to make sure she has her trolley! she's happy. she'll take her dollies and she'll push her trolley round the ward. in common with all organ recipients, clara takes drugs to ensure her body doesn't reject her liver. that means her immune system is partly reduced, so she's at increased risk from viruses. she will be like that for the rest of her life, so itjust means that — especially as she's tiny, you know — it's our responsibility today to to make sure that she's protected. it's about slowly introducing her to germs again and, you know, trying to allow her to be a normal two—and—a—half—year—old and, you know, picking up dirt and me not having a complete, you know, panic attack every time she picks up some mud. cup of tea? 0h, i'd love a cup of tea, please. thank you. at around this age, most parents would be more than happy for their children to contract chickenpox. but the virus isn't as innocuous
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as you might think. many countries vaccinate against chickenpox, and some doctors believe we should follow suit. there was the chat that we had before we were discharged, you know, the liver nurses sat down with us and we got reams and reams of information. but that was the... they made it very, very clear that, you know, this is incredibly serious if she gets exposed to chicken pox — you know, they need to know straight away, basically, and then there is a course of action. and also the fact that she's so young. so if you've been exposed to it in your life, you may have antibodies. so if she was a little older, then maybe it wouldn't be as much of an issue. but clearly for those that are very young, chickenpox itself is highly dangerous to her. there's been this increase in cases of child hepatitis, so there are lots of other parents, you know, like us, unfortunately. there are a growing number of us now who have these incredibly
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vulnerable children. ready, ready, ready? clara faces a lifetime of treatment, and always being aware of what could put her at risk. tom, rachael and clara will be joining us later in the programme — along with professor adam finn, who is a paediatrician at bristol royal hospital for children. they will all be with us talking through some of the issues attached to that story and that will be later this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm thomas magill.
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rail passengers are being urged only to travel if necessary into london on saturday because of stike action. members of the rmt, aslef and the tssa unions will stage a co—ordinated walk—out which is expected to cause major disruption. network rail and a number of train operators including southern, southeastern, and thameslink are taking part. a reduced timetable shows just 11% of rail services will operate on saturday. well, the strike could have a knock—on impact for those taking part in sunday's london marathon, as trains will start later than normal. but that won't stop one ukrainian refugee couple from tower hamlets who we've spoken to about why they're taking part in the run. they're raising money for united 24, an initiative by president zelenksy to help their home country. they've been telling why taking part will help those back home. we can ensure all countries that war
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in our country is not stopped. ukrainians are very brave, strong, and we support our country now in london. , ., , , london. this money will help ukrainian _ london. this money will help ukrainian people _ london. this money will help ukrainian people during - london. this money will help ukrainian people during thisl ukrainian people during this difficult _ ukrainian people during this difficult time, during the war. energy prices are set to rise fom tomorrow for many londoners as the price cap increases. it means the average household gas and electricity bill will go up to £2,500. tonight on bbc london, we'll be joined by an energy expert, so if you have a question on bills, readings, or how to save energy, email us at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk. well, let's see how the tube is doing this morning. there's minor delays on the bakerloo line. now the weather with kawser. hello, and a very good morning to you. well, it's a chilly start and a dry
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start for many, but it is all set to change as we look ahead to today, with some wet and windy weather on its way. there will be some morning sunshine for a time, a bit hazy with some patches of mist around, some high cloud. there'll be some sunshine for a time, especially further towards the east. but during the course of the day, we're expecting some clouds, some outbreaks of heavy rain spreading in from the west. and with it, some strong winds gusting potentially up to 30—40mph. so it will be a wet evening commute for many, but that weather system will then clear through, and by the end of the night, it will turn drier. one or two showers, some clear skies, and temperatures holding up at around 10—12 celsius with that milder air. but as we look ahead to the weekend, well, there is some uncertainty regarding this weather front here. it could potentially bring some wet and windy weather for a time that may last until sunday morning, so it could potentially affect the london marathon as well. so there is some uncertainty for the weekend. wet and windy today. there will be some rain overnight
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saturday into sunday, that may last during the morning, affecting the marathon. but after that, it should become drier for monday. and that's your forecast for now. that's it from me. i'll be back in half an hour, but for now it's back to naga and charlie. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on the show this morning — she was the face of wimbledon for 30 years. sue barker will be here on the sofa to discuss her memories of the stars, serves, and showdowns on the world's most famous grass courts. it might be early days on strictly, but the competition's already heating up. among those hoping to lift the glitterball are comedian ellie taylor and her professional partnerjohannes radebe. they'll be with us just after 9.00. and the search for the sports personality unsung hero is under way.
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last year's winner sam barlow will be on the sofa to talk about how you can nominate a local sporting hero. the new energy price cap comes into effect tomorrow in england, scotland and wales. hannah is here to talk us through what it all means. little things, people are going to have to check their meters so they do not get charged too much, it is all kicking in. taste do not get charged too much, it is all kicking in-_ all kicking in. we started comparing our bills in the _ all kicking in. we started comparing our bills in the office, _ all kicking in. we started comparing our bills in the office, and _ all kicking in. we started comparing our bills in the office, and we - all kicking in. we started comparing our bills in the office, and we made | our bills in the office, and we made —— had made us realise how conjugated it is, they are all laid out differently, nobody really realised why they were paying what they were paying. —— how complicated
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it is. one thing we can be pretty sure of is that from tomorrow, unless you're on a fixed tariff, your energy costs will go up, as the price cap rises, so the amount suppliers are allowed to charge per unit increases. they won't go up as much as they could have done, after the government stepped in to freeze energy prices until 2024. but an average household bill is still forecast to go up to £2,500, an increase of 27%. now of course, most of us are not average, and your bill will always be calculated according to the amount of energy you use, not limited to a maximum price. here's a guide on how to interpret your bill, to give you a sense of what to look out for. the first thing to look at is the amount of money you've spent during the period the bill covers. you might see the words "total charges for this period." on this one, that's £100. you're also likely to have an account balance, £300 in our example. it could be in credit or debit, depending whether you've saved up some credit with your energy supplier over the past few months, or you've used more than you've paid for. if you're a direct debit customer,
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there will also be a figure that shows the monthly payment to be taken from your account. here, we're saying that's £400. the next thing to know when you look at your bill is how your energy company has worked it out. do they really know how much you're using? if your bill is estimated, you may need to provide a meter reading. now, when we talk about the price cap, that's a cap on the amount you pay per unit of energy, not a limit on your total bill. so if you use more, your bill will be higher. that's why the unit rate is important. it tells you how much you're paying for each bit of energy you use. on our imaginary bill, we can see the person has been paying a unit rate of 27p per kilowatt hour, and then they're also paying the standing charge here at 40p per day. it's a fee to stay connected to the network. think of it like line rental, but for your energy. from october, the government's
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giving everyone a discount of around £66 a month for six months. you might see that as a reduction on your bill. or some suppliers are choosing to put the money directly into customers' bank accounts instead. and remember, if you do get into difficulty paying, there should be a way of contacting your energy supplier listed on your bill. always try to get in touch with them if you need more help. well, let's dig more into what people should be looking out for in their bills with rosi avis from citizens advice. good morning. we are telling people this morning to take a meter reading. the last time that happened, there were a whole lot of people trying to take a meter reading, submit it, websites crashed, people could not get through. what is your advice around that festival?— that festival? absolutely people should be taking _ that festival? absolutely people should be taking me _ that festival? absolutely people should be taking me readings. that festival? absolutely people i should be taking me readingsjust that festival? absolutely people - should be taking me readingsjust to make _ should be taking me readingsjust to make sure _ should be taking me readingsjust to make sure everything is in line, but people _ make sure everything is in line, but people do— make sure everything is in line, but people do not need to worry, if they cannot— people do not need to worry, if they cannot get— people do not need to worry, if they cannot get it through today or tomorrow, as long as it goes through tomorrow, as long as it goes through to their— tomorrow, as long as it goes through to their energy supplier in the next few days, — to their energy supplier in the next few days, that is fine. take the
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reading — few days, that is fine. take the reading today and as monitors submitted in the next few days, that is great _ submitted in the next few days, that is areat. . , ., , , is great. that will be reassuring for a lot of _ is great. that will be reassuring for a lot of people. _ is great. that will be reassuring for a lot of people. let's - is great. that will be reassuring for a lot of people. let's talk i is great. that will be reassuring for a lot of people. let's talk a l for a lot of people. let's talk a bit about prepayment metres as well, because the unit rate on them is effectively higher for people on prepayment meters. how does the discount work for people who are not on a direct debit? it discount work for people who are not on a direct debit?— on a direct debit? it depends on the -e of on a direct debit? it depends on the type of prepayment _ on a direct debit? it depends on the type of prepayment meter. - on a direct debit? it depends on the type of prepayment meter. if- on a direct debit? it depends on the type of prepayment meter. if you i type of prepayment meter. if you have _ type of prepayment meter. if you have a _ type of prepayment meter. if you have a smart meter, that should be added _ have a smart meter, that should be added as— have a smart meter, that should be added as credit first of all to your meter~ _ added as credit first of all to your meter. however, if you have a non-smart— meter. however, if you have a non—smart prepayment meter, the discount — non—smart prepayment meter, the discount is _ non—smart prepayment meter, the discount is likely to come in the form _ discount is likely to come in the form of— discount is likely to come in the form of vouchers, either through a letter— form of vouchers, either through a letter or— form of vouchers, either through a letter or a — form of vouchers, either through a letter or a text message from your supplier~ _ letter or a text message from your supplier. so it is very important people — supplier. so it is very important people make sure their contact details — people make sure their contact details are up—to—date with their errergy— details are up—to—date with their energy supplier so that they receive those _ energy supplier so that they receive those vouchers.— energy supplier so that they receive those vouchers. there are also some --eole those vouchers. there are also some people across _ those vouchers. there are also some people across the — those vouchers. there are also some people across the country _ those vouchers. there are also some people across the country will - those vouchers. there are also some people across the country will have l people across the country will have oil heating. run us through briefly what the discount like for them. so
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the £400 discount still applies for their electricity. if people are heated — their electricity. if people are heated by oil, then obviously price cap does— heated by oil, then obviously price cap does not apply that, however the government have committed to a £100 payment _ government have committed to a £100 payment for those people who are off the main _ payment for those people who are off the main grid. payment for those people who are off the main grid-— the main grid. what is the scale of the main grid. what is the scale of the problem? _ the main grid. what is the scale of the problem? we _ the main grid. what is the scale of the problem? we are _ the main grid. what is the scale of the problem? we are talking - the main grid. what is the scale of| the problem? we are talking about bills go up. even before they go up, what are you seeing at citizens advice, and what should people do if theyjust advice, and what should people do if they just simply cannot advice, and what should people do if theyjust simply cannot pay? brute theyjust simply cannot pay? we are seeinu a theyjust simply cannot pay? we are seeing a huge _ theyjust simply cannot pay? we are seeing a huge surge _ theyjust simply cannot pay? we are seeing a huge surge in _ theyjust simply cannot pay? we are seeing a huge surge in demand - theyjust simply cannot pay? we are seeing a huge surge in demand for l seeing a huge surge in demand for our support. people very concerned about— our support. people very concerned about how — our support. people very concerned about how they are going to pay their— about how they are going to pay their bills — about how they are going to pay their bills through the winter and people _ their bills through the winter and people who are already concerned about _ people who are already concerned about paying their bills. the important thing to note is that there — important thing to note is that there is— important thing to note is that there is support out there. if people — there is support out there. if people really think they cannot pay, it is important to speak to their energy— it is important to speak to their energy supplier. they do need to help you — energy supplier. they do need to help you find an affordable solution to how _ help you find an affordable solution to how you — help you find an affordable solution to how you are making payments towards — to how you are making payments towards their usage, and if anyone is concerned at all, we would recommend reaching out to us, and our advisors — recommend reaching out to us, and our advisors will try to help people to find _ our advisors will try to help people
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to find a _ our advisors will try to help people to find a solution. and our advisors will try to help people to find a solution.— to find a solution. and some energy su liers to find a solution. and some energy suppliers also _ to find a solution. and some energy suppliers also have _ to find a solution. and some energy suppliers also have funds _ to find a solution. and some energy suppliers also have funds they - suppliers also have funds they can help you with, don't they? absolutely, there are various different _ absolutely, there are various different pots of money out there as grant _ different pots of money out there as grant support. people may be able to apply for— grant support. people may be able to apply for those. it is also worth noting — apply for those. it is also worth noting that there is other support people _ noting that there is other support people might be entitled to, benefits or other forms of grant support— benefits or other forms of grant support that they haven't necessarily explored yet, so again, it is really— necessarily explored yet, so again, it is really worth reaching out to us for— it is really worth reaching out to us for advice and we can help with looking _ us for advice and we can help with looking at— us for advice and we can help with looking at that.— us for advice and we can help with looking at that. thank you very much rosi davis from _ looking at that. thank you very much rosi davis from citizens _ looking at that. thank you very much rosi davis from citizens advice, - rosi davis from citizens advice, hopefully some useful tips there and we will have more throughout this morning. —— rosi avis. we will have more throughout this morning. -- rosi avis.— we will have more throughout this morning. -- rosi avis. hannah, thank ou ve morning. -- rosi avis. hannah, thank you very much- _ time now for the sport news. mike, yesterday you were talking about changing things so that football teams do not have so many games at night time. this has costs
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associated with floodlights, so if they moved to other kick—offs, they would not move the —— they would not have to pay for the floodlights. they had a consultation yesterday with fans, but realised they would lose ticket sales. if you think about carlisle going up to exeter, but it is an afternoon kick—off, possibly a bit early on the saturday, but if it is the night before, hotel bills and things like that come into it. you would be perplexed, naga. yes, football fans are quite willing to travel, aren't they? so two hours, i don't see it being such a huge problem. either way, it is not happening, but it was they thought about it. —— at least they thought about it. —— at least they thought about it. so after their meeting yesterday,
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the football league clubs concluded that they won't save money moving to lunchtime kick—offs because it could mean less ticket sales, and they wouldn't make as much from hospitality. league two side mansfield are giving the idea a go, and have moved their home game against walsall forward to a 1.00 kick—off on the 15th of october to try and keep costs down, and will see what happens, but the clubs have decided against moving the majority of matches. when you actually look at the price of putting on a game, the floodlight situation is not the... it's not one of the big costs of the match. it's quite small in comparison to everything else. so i don't think that we would have really got as much from it as people are suggesting. it's another anxious day for the rugby union club the worcester warriors. it's pay day, and the players union, wants clarity on how the players will get their wages.
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even though the company that owns the club went into administration on monday, player salaries are paid by a separate business. if players do not receive their september salaries, they have the option of moving elsewhere after completing a two—week notice period. there was a thrilling end to cricket's county championship season — which meant, for a time, a warwickshire player was trending on social media above liz truss. fast bowler liam norwell was the star man who took nine wickets, to demolish hampshire and save warwickshire from relegation. they were last year's champions, and stay in the top division, but their great escape means that yorkshire are relegated, so he's not too popular there! next, to some snooker perfection at the british open. mark selby, known as thejester from leicester was all smiles after he managed a maximum 147 break in the very first frame of his fourth—round match against jack lisowski in milton keynes. 15 reds, 15 blacks and all the colours. it's the fourth one of his career, and he went on to win by four frames to one.
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you know in the cricket the hundred, we have all the music when they get a sex of a four or anything, what happens in the snooker? 147 is a rare feat. , . ., , rare feat. the silence and snooker is a very important _ rare feat. the silence and snooker is a very important part. _ rare feat. the silence and snooker is a very important part. but - rare feat. the silence and snooker is a very important part. but they | is a very important part. but they would have _ is a very important part. but they would have applauded, _ is a very important part. but they would have applauded, a - is a very important part. but they would have applauded, a couple. would have applauded, a couple of tears. i think it would go down well. —— a couple of cheers. i’m tears. i think it would go down well. -- a couple of cheers. i'm all for it. there was racing history at salisbury yesterday, with the first horse to run in the royal colours of king charles iii in action. jockey tom marquand donned the famous purple, gold and red silks. he was on board educator. the late queen's horses have been passed onto king charles, and his first runner managed second. but apparently, the trainer's weight�*s of the horse was a bit distracted, a bit full of himself, was not quite with the programme to
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win the race. you can understand being distracted, being the first royal runner for king charles being distracted, being the first royal runnerfor king charles iii. well, the horse would not know that. i think they are aware of a lot of fuss and excitement. the i think they are aware of a lot of fuss and excitement.— i think they are aware of a lot of fuss and excitement. the horse does not know it — fuss and excitement. the horse does not know it is — fuss and excitement. the horse does not know it is written _ fuss and excitement. the horse does not know it is written for _ fuss and excitement. the horse does not know it is written for a _ fuss and excitement. the horse does not know it is written for a royal. - not know it is written for a royal. i think they have a sense. we were talking yesterday about pets knowing your mood, dogs knowing your mood. it would know it is a sense of occasion, but it wouldn't know it was writing for royalty. fair enough- — was writing for royalty. fair enough- -- _ was writing for royalty. fair enough. -- riding - was writing for royalty. fair enough. -- riding for- was writing for royalty. fair l enough. -- riding for royalty. was writing for royalty. fair . enough. -- riding for royalty. i think you _ enough. -- riding for royalty. i think you should _ enough. -- riding for royalty. i think you should interview - enough. -- riding for royalty. i think you should interview the | think you should interview the horse. t think you should interview the horse. ., ., ., r 4' think you should interview the horse. ., ., ., ~ ,, ., horse. iwould love to. mike, thanks very much- — search and rescue efforts are continuing in the us state of florida after hurricane ian caused widespread destruction. there are fears many lives were lost in the storm, which was one of the most powerful to hit the united states in recent years. 0ur correspondent nada tawfik reports from naples in south west florida. this was fort myers just days ago.
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and this is it after hurricane ian barrelled through. the scale of the devastation has wrought this community, the hardest—hit on florida's west coast, as it deals with what's been described as a 500—year flood event. residents were under mandatory evacuation, but those who chose to stay described how quickly they were overtaken by water, and the fear they felt. we got out the door — swam out the door, because the water was here — and then we got over onto this, and then we walked our way around the whole side of the house from the roof line, and then swam over to that pontoon. so far, there have been 700 rescues across the state. the national guard and the coastguard used boats and, in some places, helicopters to reach those trapped. sanibel island was completely cut off from the mainland after the storm destroyed sections
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of this bridge. president biden has ordered federal aid to help with the recovery, and is sending an emergency administrator to florida today to check in on response efforts. this could be the deadliest hurricane in florida's history. the numbers are still unclear, but we're hearing early reports of what may be substantial loss of life. the priority for emergency response teams is the search—and—rescue effort, the clean—up, and getting basic services back up and running. but looking at the widespread damage, it's clear that a full recovery will take years. ian has regained hurricane strength, and is now moving towards georgia and the carolinas, more low—lying areas vulnerable to flooding. nada tawfik, bbc news, on florida's west coast. here's matt with a look
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at this morning's weather. we often focus just on the wind strength when talking about hurricanes, but it is also be flooding from the storm surge and the rainfall, and we are notjust done with the story yet. this is the satellite imagery from the last few hours across the south—east united states. notice still that distance well, it has come a hurricane again, it has re—strengthened. we have winds of around 100 mph, set to push into south carolina today, again there could be a storm surge, an image of flooding as well. that is not associated with what we have got to do. this area of cloud pushing its way. you will notice, though, to the south and east, clear skies at the south and east, clear skies at the moment, a bright start for some, but that cloud in the west is coming our way to bring some wind and rain today. grab a waterproof if you are
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about to head out the door. already raining quite heavily across parts of northern ireland and western scotland, and the winds is really strengthening. winds of the far west of scotland up to 70 mph. the rain spread across the rest of scotland and northern ireland this morning and northern ireland this morning and into north—west and wales. winds time, through the midlands and the north—east of england, it starts to fringe into east anglia by the end of the afternoon. strongest winds around for that band of rain, coming in batches, some are particularly heavy but a great end for the day towards northern ireland in western scotland. the winds is a little bit, but sunshine and showers here, they fresher feel, temperatures around 12 or 13 celsius. rain this evening for east anglia, that questioning the first part of today, then it is clear spells, showers around mainly in the north and west. temperatures dropping back more than they did last night, eight to 12 celsius. the breeze will still be quite fresh, that. if ross for tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning, a bright start for
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many of you. ciao right from the start of the day, western scotland, northern ireland, north and west wales, north—west england, they will come and go throughout the day, but the further south and east you are, a better chance of staying dry throughout saturday. pleasant enough in the sunshine. easy but less so than today, cloud gambling to the south—west later. a big headache at saturday night into sunday, potential developing area of low pressure here. it moves the rain a bit further north, and of course it is london marathon day, so if you are heading that keep an eye on the forecast. it could change, but potential for it to be quite wet at times and later turning window. sunday plays out this way at the moment, read across many southern counties —— rain across many southern counties and south wales. how that departs is another question murk, but aside from that, a bright day for scotland, northern ireland, northern parts of england, fewer showers around, much more sunshine, and temperatures across the uk
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around 14 to 17 celsius. that is how it is looking. matt, have you ever experienced 190 mph gusts? never come even close, _ experienced 190 mph gusts? never come even close, i _ experienced 190 mph gusts? never come even close, i think _ experienced 190 mph gusts? never come even close, i think probably l come even close, i think probably about 70 mph is the strongest i have ever experienced, hard to imagine. and that feels overwhelming, doesn't it, when you're leaning into the wood? so difficult to imagine. the sound as well _ wood? so difficult to imagine. tt2 sound as well must be just terrifying. sound as well must be 'ust terrifyingi sound as well must be 'ust terri inn. ., . terrifying. matt, thanks so much, we will seak terrifying. matt, thanks so much, we will speak later. _ terrifying. matt, thanks so much, we will speak later. the _ terrifying. matt, thanks so much, we will speak later. the time _ terrifying. matt, thanks so much, we will speak later. the time now - will speak later. the time now is 6.48. we've had an incredible year of sport — from the lionesses' run in the euros, to the many successes of the commonwealth games — so there are plenty of contenders for sports personality of the year. however, the annual awards also recognise the unsung heroes making a difference in their local communities. nominations open today. let's remind ourselves of last year's winner. it gives me great pleasure to announce that the 2021 unsung hero is sam barlow.
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applause. fit mums and friends started in 2009 when i was a lonely mum, and i really wanted some people to run with and be active with. good evening, everybody. thank you so much for being here. fit mums and friends has now grown to 11 clubs across yorkshire. i think the reason it's grown really is because of sam's enthusiasm. we're just going to be punching to the front if anyone's had a bad day today. she'sjust relentlessly. positive and full of life. watch out! sam, it is our great pleasure to present you with your actual sports personality unsung hero award, so well done for everything that you've done. that's actually... you can take that home. now you have to make a speech, sam. oh, my god. no, no, no, no. i've got to take this home on the train. just shove it on your table.
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sam joins us now. good morning. i love the fact that you do such brilliant stuff and even your most concerned about if you're sitting on the right place. you look fabulous, and even more so with that award. what did it mean to you? it meant everything. and as you can tell from my reaction, i definitely didn't expect it. it was astonishing, really, because as everybody in this suggestion probably said, people like me do not get things like that, that is how it felt. , , ., ., , ., �* felt. they should, though, shouldn't the ? felt. they should, though, shouldn't they? yes. — felt. they should, though, shouldn't they? yes. that _ felt. they should, though, shouldn't they? yes, that is _ felt. they should, though, shouldn't they? yes, that is what _ felt. they should, though, shouldn't they? yes, that is what is _ felt. they should, though, shouldn't they? yes, that is what is so - they? yes, that is what is so brilliant about _ they? yes, that is what is so brilliant about these - they? yes, that is what is so brilliant about these awards. they? yes, that is what is so - brilliant about these awards. that is lovel , brilliant about these awards. that is lovely. your— brilliant about these awards. that is lovely, your reaction there is absolutely fantastic. played out in front of millions.— absolutely fantastic. played out in front of millions. yes, in my home, that was weird. _ front of millions. yes, in my home, that was weird. have _ front of millions. yes, in my home, that was weird. have people - that was weird. have people recognise — that was weird. have people recognise you _ that was weird. have people recognise you sense, - that was weird. have people | recognise you sense, literally that was weird. have people - recognise you sense, literallyjust in passing? recognise you sense, literally 'ust in passing?— recognise you sense, literally 'ust in ”assin? , ., ., , ., in passing? yes. people have to be a oint in passing? yes. people have to be a point where — in passing? yes. people have to be a point where an _ in passing? yes. people have to be a point where an older _ in passing? yes. people have to be a point where an older lady _ in passing? yes. people have to be a point where an older lady in - in passing? yes. people have to be a point where an older lady in hull- point where an older lady in hull was walking across the road with a
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zimmer frame and she turned to me and said, you are that lady off the telly. and i was like, that is so lovely. telly. and i was like, that is so lovel . ., telly. and i was like, that is so lovel. ., , ., , telly. and i was like, that is so lovel. ., , lovely. your story, some people miaht be lovely. your story, some people might be familiar _ lovely. your story, some people might be familiar with, - lovely. your story, some people might be familiar with, you - lovely. your story, some people might be familiar with, you lost| might be familiar with, you lost your husband, as we spoke about a moment ago. that is clearly something that has... i don't know, judging from what you just said to me a moment ago, that has been something of an inspiration for you as well as clearly being a milestone in your life and something you had to dry and cope with, deal with, in your own way. to dry and cope with, deal with, in your own way-— your own way. yes. mike was diagnosed — your own way. yes. mike was diagnosed with _ your own way. yes. mike was diagnosed with a _ your own way. yes. mike was diagnosed with a very - your own way. yes. mike was diagnosed with a very rare i your own way. yes. mike wasl diagnosed with a very rare and incurable tumour before i even set “p incurable tumour before i even set up fit mum's and friends, so we love the life of great uncertainty, and mike's approach to life was, no matter how difficult, we got out there and still did all the volunteering we did. he was a coach, i was a band leader, i was ultimately a coach, and even through the worst of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, he would be out there because it was a way of keeping
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going, and this is my second year of grief. in my last year, it has helped me think about his approach come up tojust helped me think about his approach come up to just get out there and setting up the bereavement walks, the yoga for grief, the children's bereavement project was a way of her helping me cope, really. the bereavement project was a way of her helping me cope, really.— helping me cope, really. the word urief has helping me cope, really. the word grief has so _ helping me cope, really. the word grief has so much _ helping me cope, really. the word grief has so much late _ helping me cope, really. the word grief has so much late to - helping me cope, really. the word grief has so much late to it, - helping me cope, really. the word grief has so much late to it, but i grief has so much late to it, but those projects are not necessarily about sitting around and trying to gather, are they?— about sitting around and trying to gather, are they? exactly. the idea ofthe gather, are they? exactly. the idea of the bereavement _ gather, are they? exactly. the idea of the bereavement walks - gather, are they? exactly. the idea of the bereavement walks is - gather, are they? exactly. the idea of the bereavement walks is that i of the bereavement walks is that bringing people together to be active, there is a double benefit. it has been with people who have experienced a similar circumstance to yourself, but also the activity is so important, because being active creates so much wellness and creates your health and well—being, so that combination was good. t so that combination was good. i suppose also with grief, when you are with people who have experienced something so terrible, knowing that grief comes and goes, and you are in a group where it is comfortable when that wave of grief comes, it is ok, and other people understand how to react as well, because it is such a
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difficult thing to talk to someone if you haven't experienced it. absolutely. and it is having that safe place to be, really safe, and with people who really get it. so grief, as you say, is a roller—coaster, and one which you can be fine, the next week you are not, and you are in a safe place to tell people if you are not so good that week. certainly for the kids, so important to bring children together and let them have a safe space to explore their grief and begin to dry to understand it, which is so difficult.— is so difficult. along the way of caettin is so difficult. along the way of getting this — is so difficult. along the way of getting this award, _ is so difficult. along the way of getting this award, have - is so difficult. along the way of getting this award, have you i is so difficult. along the way of. getting this award, have you met sporting stars? have there been occasions? t sporting stars? have there been occasions?— occasions? i met mike, does he count? 0h. _ occasions? i met mike, does he count? oh, yes. _ occasions? i met mike, does he count? oh, yes. i— occasions? i met mike, does he count? oh, yes. i have - occasions? i met mike, does he count? oh, yes. i have met- occasions? i met mike, does he l count? oh, yes. i have met mike occasions? i met mike, does he - count? oh, yes. i have met mike at the commonwealth _ count? oh, yes. i have met mike at the commonwealth games, - count? oh, yes. i have met mike at the commonwealth games, that i count? oh, yes. i have met mike at| the commonwealth games, that was great. yes, i've met i think everybody in our community is my own hero. my volunteers, the volunteers that are making these groups and clubs and sessions happen across the whole now, spreading out of the
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humber, they are my heroes, because when i won this, i went on a tour and took the trophy round so that every volunteer could get their hands on it, have a photo taken with it, because it is for them as much as it is for me.— as it is for me. some people have been saying _ as it is for me. some people have been saying your _ as it is for me. some people have been saying your spirit _ as it is for me. some people have been saying your spirit shines i been saying your spirit shines through sitting here right now, it really does, there are some people who it is easy to reach, and actually sort of come forward, and there are other people who are really the ones you need to get to need help the most, whether it is luminous or whatever it is, and all of these things are tied together, aren't they? that can be a problem. yes, and i guess that is my passion. people who want to run and are already doing part run, they are easy, aren't they? but as you say, the moment i'm working on a school in hull working with monster have just dropped off their kids and who wants to get a little bit fitter, and they are currently fit. just introducing them to the idea of movement and doing it as part of their day is so important, so good.
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i think you will have a problem in the future, sonnet to flag this up, but you are here on breakfast now, you are presenting the award on breakfast because of the thing was done on soon because of the pandemic. when you're on the and you give speeches, use it is cold the journey of an ordinary mum. i'm sorry, sam, you're not, are you? —— it was done on zoom. sorry, sam, you're not, are you? -- it was done on zoom.— it was done on zoom. well, i think i am, i hope — it was done on zoom. well, i think i am. i hope that— it was done on zoom. well, i think i am, i hope that what _ it was done on zoom. well, i think i am, i hope that what i _ it was done on zoom. well, i think i am, i hope that what i have - it was done on zoom. well, i think i am, i hope that what i have been i am, i hope that what i have been doing has inspired people. there are many ordinary mums and dads out there doing these things. [30 many ordinary mums and dads out there doing these things.- there doing these things. do your children ever _ there doing these things. do your children ever tell— there doing these things. do your children ever tell you _ there doing these things. do your children ever tell you to - there doing these things. do your children ever tell you to slow i there doing these things. do your. children ever tell you to slow down? yes, they do. find children ever tell you to slow down? yes, they do— yes, they do. and they will be watchin: yes, they do. and they will be watching this _ yes, they do. and they will be watching this morning? - yes, they do. and they will be watching this morning? one i yes, they do. and they will be | watching this morning? one of yes, they do. and they will be i watching this morning? one of them is here and watching _ watching this morning? one of them is here and watching outside. - watching this morning? one of them is here and watching outside. how. is here and watching outside. how old are your _ is here and watching outside. how old are your children? 18 - is here and watching outside. how old are your children? 18 and i is here and watching outside. how old are your children? 18 and 16. l old are your children? 18 and 16. are they ever — old are your children? 18 and 16. are they ever embarrassed i old are your children? 18 and 16. are they ever embarrassed by i old are your children? 18 and 16. i are they ever embarrassed by their mother, or is it all about the pride
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white i think there are moments of embarrassed. —— is it all about the pride? t embarrassed. -- is it all about the ride? ~ ., ., , pride? i think there are moments of embarrassment, _ pride? i think there are moments of embarrassment, but _ pride? i think there are moments of embarrassment, but they _ pride? i think there are moments of embarrassment, but they cover i pride? i think there are moments of embarrassment, but they cover it i pride? i think there are moments of. embarrassment, but they cover it up. do you want to hold it for a second? because it's yours. it is actually a really cool award. sometimes you see them and it is not that cool. that one really is. do you get to keep it? ., one really is. do you get to keep it?- fabulous. _ one really is. do you get to keep it?- fabulous.— one really is. do you get to keep it?- fabulous. it? yeah. fabulous. it's stunning, i love it. it? yeah. fabulous. it's stunning, i love it- good _ it? yeah. fabulous. it's stunning, i love it. good luck _ it? yeah. fabulous. it's stunning, i love it. good luck with _ it? yeah. fabulous. it's stunning, i love it. good luck with all- it? yeah. fabulous. it's stunning, i love it. good luck with all of - it? yeah. fabulous. it's stunning, i love it. good luck with all of the i love it. good luck with all of the treat love it. good luck with all of the great work _ love it. good luck with all of the great work that _ love it. good luck with all of the great work that you _ love it. good luck with all of the great work that you do. - love it. good luck with all of the great work that you do. thank l love it. good luck with all of the i great work that you do. thank you. nominations for the bbc sports personality of the year unsung hero award are now open. for more information go to bbc.co.uk/unsunghero — you have until 30 october to enter.
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it has been lovely meeting you. really lovely. t’m it has been lovely meeting you. really lovely-— time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm thomas magill. rail passengers are being urged only to travel into london if necessary on saturday because of stike action. the rmt, aslef and the tssa unions are set to walk out in a long running dispute over pay. it's the first time members have walked out on the same day — so disruption is expected to be worse than on previous strike days. a reduced timetable shows thatjust 11% of rail services will operate on saturday. well, the strike could also affect those taking part in sunday's marathon, as trains will start later than normal. but that won't stop one ukrainian refugee couple from tower hamlets who we've spoken to about why they're taking part in the run. they're raising money
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for united 24 — an initiative by president zelenksy — and say it's their way of supporting those back home. we can show all countries that war in our country is not stopped. we will show that ukrainians are very brave, strong, and we support our country now in london. this money will help ukrainian people during this difficult time, during the war. as many will know, energy prices are set to rise from tomorrow as the price cap increases. it means the average household gas and electricity will go up to £2,500. tonight on bbc london we'll be joined by an energy expert, so if you have a question on bills, readings or how to save energy, email us at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk.
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well, let's see how the tube is doing this morning. now the weather with kawser. hello, and a very good morning to you. well, it's a chilly start and a dry start for many, but it is all set to change as we look ahead to today, with some wet and windy weather on its way. there will be some morning sunshine for a time, a bit hazy with some patches of mist around, some high cloud. there'll be some sunshine for a time, especially further towards the east. but during the course of the day, we're expecting some clouds, some outbreaks of heavy rain spreading in from the west. and with it, some strong winds gusting potentially up to 30—40mph. so it will be a wet evening commute for many, but that weather system will then clear through, and by the end of the night, it will turn drier. one or two showers, some clear skies, and temperatures holding up at around 10—12 celsius with that milder air. but as we look ahead to the weekend, well, there is some uncertainty regarding this weather front here. it could potentially bring some wet and windy weather for a time that may last until sunday morning, so it could potentially affect the london marathon as well.
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so there is some uncertainty for the weekend. wet and windy today. there will be some rain overnight saturday into sunday, that may last during the morning, affecting the marathon. but after that, it should become drier for monday. and that's your forecast for now. that's it from me. i'll be back in half an hour with the latest for london. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today. under pressure — after a chaotic week on the financial markets, the prime minister and chancellor will today meet the head of britain's independent economic forecaster. higher bills for millions of people, as the new energy price cap kicks in. from midnight tonight,
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the annual bill for a typical household will rise to £2,500 — double what it was last winter. police in liverpool arrest another man on suspicion of the murder of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel. record numbers of nurses are quitting the nhs in england — more than 40,000 have left in the last year. a bright but misty start for the south and east but make the most of it because there is wet and windy weather heading across the country. full forecast here on breakfast. it's friday, the 30th of september. following days of chaos in the financial markets, the prime minister and the chancellor will meet the head of the uk's independent economic forecaster today. the talks with the office for budget responsibility are being seen as an attempt to build confidence following widespread criticism of last week's mini budget. simonjones reports.
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seeking to regain the confidence of the markets. in an unusual move, both the prime minister and the chancellor will meet the chairman of the office for budget responsibility after a slump in the value of the pound, uncertainty over mortgages, and a week of extreme financial volatility. the watchdog had offered to prepare a draft forecast in time for last friday's mini budget, but that was rejected by the government. forecasts of the uk's economic outlook are usually published to accompany major financial announcements. it's led to accusations ministers were trying to avoid scrutiny, and that that has in part driven the lack of confidence in the markets. now the 0br, its costings methods and forecasts is seen by many as central to the plan to restore stability. but in a series of bbc interviews yesterday, the prime minister seemed keener to talk about cutting taxes and capping energy bills than surging mortgage costs. prime minister, it sounds like you're saying, "crisis? what crisis?"
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i'm not saying that at all. i think we're in a very serious situation. it's a global crisis which has been brought about by the aftermath of covid and putin's war in ukraine. the government says the bank of england independently sets interest rates. but more than 1,000 mortgage products have been to forecasts of big rises. and listen to the reaction of the question time audience when one woman describes the impact it's having on her. i was actually in the process of getting a mortgage as a young person, and i was told my initial interest rate would be 4.5%. and i was told today that the lender has pulled that offer. and now the best offer that i can get is about 10.5%. gasps. whoa! wow. the chancellor has told conservative mps the government is working at pace to show the markets it has a clear plan. but as they prepare to gather for their conference in birmingham,
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with labour well ahead in the polls, some tory mps need convincing, too, that the government is on the right path. simon jones, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo is at westminster for us now. good morning. we heard from liz truss after few a days, we haven't yet heard from kwasi kwarteng, but the government is under pressure to react to what has happened over the last few days, since the mini budget. last few days, since the mini buduet. . ~ , budget. yeah, i think there will be a lot of people _ budget. yeah, i think there will be a lot of people resisting _ budget. yeah, i think there will be a lot of people resisting talking i a lot of people resisting talking about horses and stable doors at that meeting between the prime minister, chancellor and independent economic forecaster. many tory mps think that should have accompanied the measures announced last friday, the measures announced last friday, the forecast. that is one of the reasons we are not calling it a budget because in that case they would have had to provide that forecast. now they have to work with the 0br but they will publish an independent forecast in a couple of months when we were here or from the
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government about the medium—term economic plans. tory mps are very anxious still, despite what they heard from the prime minister and the chancellor yesterday about the plans. there are a lot of nerves within the tory party about those plans, not helped of course by those three opinion polls that were published last night. another set of opinion polls showing a very sharp turn towards labour. we should say they are only a snapshot, an election is still very far away at this point, but one poll by yougov showed labour with 33 percent lead, not what the tory party would have been expecting just weeks into choosing a new leader and certainly not what they want to be digesting ahead of their conference, beginning on sunday in birmingham. a very difficult week coming up by the conservative party, and certainly not the unified party that wants to be going into conference and supporting its new leader. leila,
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for the moment, _ supporting its new leader. leila, for the moment, thanks - supporting its new leader. leila, for the moment, thanks very i supporting its new leader. leila, i for the moment, thanks very much. the new energy price cap comes into effect at midnight — meaning higher bills for millions of people on standard and default tariffs. the annual bill for a typical household will rise to £2,500 — double what it was last winter. that figure is a rough guide because the price cap is applied to a unit of gas or electircity — so the more you use, the more you'll pay, as coletta smith explains. as energy prices go up, everyone's talking about how they're trying to keep their bills down. use the dryer quite often, but now i'm tending to leave the washing overnight on the maiden and then finishing off only for ten minutes in the dryer. as i'm on my own, i don't really want to put the central heating on — just put the gas fire on instead. i've got a wood burner so, yeah, i am economising. just became a way of life j of having things running,
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not turning things off. and i think that's. now had to change. the government has limited tomorrow's energy rise, but a typical bill is still going up byjust over £500. this is the weekend that those price rises will start to feel real for millions more households. as the weather gets colder outside and people stick the heating on, it's much tougher decisions that will have to be made — limiting baths, timing showers, avoiding the oven, and putting on a lot more layers inside the house just to make sure that bills don't get out of hand. the new cap is on the price your supplier can charge you per unit of energy. for dual—fuel customers paying by direct debit, it'll be 34p per kilowatt hour for electricity, and for gas it's 10.3p per kilowatt hour. and then daily standing charges are added on top of that. so everyone's bill will look totally different, depending on how
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much energy they use. if you use more energy, you'll be charged more — there's no maximum price for a bill. there is a bit of extra help, with £400 gradually being knocked off your bills for the next six months. there's no need to contact energy suppliers to receive the government support packages, but the advice does remain the same — that if people are worried about their energy bills, then their supplier should be their first port of call. but those working with the most vulnerable say for people already in fuel poverty, that isn't enough help. we are seeing, increasingly, individuals going to unregulated lending, such as...typically loan sharks. helen's organisation is trying to get people who are financially, physically or emotionally vulnerable to register with them, so that energy firms can do more to help them. some people don't want to have their circumstances taken into account, but a lot do. and i think the onus is on large organisations to take that into consideration when it's put
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in front of them to prevent foreseeable harm, to really give people the support that they need if they're asking for it. pre—payment customers can still buy at the cheaper rate if you top up today, and for everyone else without a smart meter or a fixed deal, then it's worth taking a meter reading this weekend to make sure you're billed correctly. and keep on with those little savings. where we fill the kettle, joe tends to fill it up a little bit too much, as if our neighbours are coming in for coffee! laughter. hannah is with us now. it is that day. the next 24 hours everyone is focusing minds, talking about what energy they will use. t about what energy they will use. i think a lot of people have been thinking the price is capped and it means it will all be fine but as we have been hearing it is going up from tomorrow. the average energy bill will be double what it was last
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winter and permit everything else thatis winter and permit everything else that is going up it really is a huge rise and an impact that a lot of people will feel in their pockets as they start to use more energy this winter. it is worth saying that the energy suppliers are not making a huge amount of profit out of this. they are charging more for energy tomorrow, from tomorrow, because they are paying more for it on the wholesale market. they cannot afford not to put these unit rates up for people. they would have gone up more the government hadn't taken action with the two pieces of action the government has taken. the price cap until 2024, that is costing £60 billion, the government estimates, just this winter alone, and then £66 per month we will all be getting off on our energy bills on the next —— over the next signal. the advice people have been hearing all morning is to take the metre reading today if he can. it doesn't matter if you can't necessarily submit it today, can't necessarily submit it today, can't get through to your energy
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supplier, but make sure you are not being charged a higher rate for energy you have already used. later on ou energy you have already used. later on you are — energy you have already used. later on you are doing _ energy you have already used. later on you are doing a _ energy you have already used. later on you are doing a breakdown of what it looks like on your bill because we are not necessarily used to looking at the detail. we might look at the number but maybe not that the unit price issue. taste at the number but maybe not that the unit price issue.— unit price issue. we were talking in the office and _ unit price issue. we were talking in the office and realising _ unit price issue. we were talking in the office and realising how - the office and realising how different bills are between people and a lot of people didn't realise exactly why they were paying what they were paying. it is either the headline figure that you owe, and you don't necessarily realise what you don't necessarily realise what you are paying per kilowatt hour and what is the standing charge that we will run through that later. t got what is the standing charge that we will run through that later.- will run through that later. i got a text at the _ will run through that later. i got a text at the other _ will run through that later. i got a text at the other day _ will run through that later. i got a text at the other day and - will run through that later. i got a text at the other day and i - will run through that later. i got a text at the other day and i know l text at the other day and i know lots of people are getting them about, oh, just reply to get your £400, £66 per month. this is a scam. you had a scam and there are warnings to make sure you are alert to any scams that don't come directly from your energy supplier but it is worth saying a lot of energy suppliers have been getting in touch with people about this rise
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in touch with people about this rise in bills. most people will probably have heard something that is legitimate but definitely look out for scams. . ~ legitimate but definitely look out for scams. ., ,, , ., a 34—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of olivia pratt—korbel, the nine—year—old girl who was shot dead in her home in liverpool last month. 0ur reporter mairead smythjoins us now from the headquarters of merseyside police. very good morning to you. what more can you tell us about the latest events? ~ ~' ., can you tell us about the latest events? ~ ,, ., ., , events? we know that this 34-year-old _ events? we know that this 34-year-old man - events? we know that this 34-year-old man was i events? we know that this i 34-year-old man was arrested in events? we know that this _ 34-year-old man was arrested in the 34—year—old man was arrested in the dovecot area of liverpool, the area of the city where 0livia pratt—korbel was killed on the 22nd of august. two men had burst into her home, unknown to the family, one being chased by a gunman, who fired, injuring 0livia's mother cheryl and killing the nine—year—old girl. since then police have been trying to not only find the men responsible for that killing but also the guns used in that attack. she was laid to
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rest two weeks ago in a church close to where she had gone to school, saint margaret mary's, and earlier that week police were trying to find the guns at a golf club close to the shooting. the guns have not been found and more importantly the men responsible for the murder have not been found, this latest arrest is among ten men arrested. nobody charged as yet with the murder or assisting the offender. we know that this man, the 34—year—old arrested last night, is being held on suspicion of the nine—year—old's murder was not the most important thing as well to say is that the police are still keen to hear from anyone who can help with this investigation. last week a reward from crimestoppers, a record—breaking £200,000, was record—breaking £200 , 000, was offered record—breaking £200,000, was offered to the person who can help find the man responsible for 0livia pratt—korbel as michael nader. mairead, thank you very much. ——
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responsible for 0livia's murder. the number of nurses leaving the profession in england has hit a record high according to new analysis by the nuffield trust for the bbc. in the year tojune, more than 40,000 qualified nurses left nhs employment — that's11.5% of the total workforce. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. ijust had to just leave this poor mum who's just left her brand—new—diagnosed child with cancer and just say, "i'm really sorry, there's nobody to look after you." and thatjust felt like i'd failed that mum so much. from front—line care to running a coffee shop. amanda, after 20 years as a paediatric nurse in west yorkshire, decided the stress and strain of nhs work was too much, and it was time for a new career. for me, i wanted to leave because i was burnt out. i was completely burnt out. i didn't feel that i was meeting the mark any more. i felt like i was letting families down, i was letting parents down. the profession has changed immeasurably over probably the last ten years. nobody could say they're
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truly happy in the nhs. amanda isn't alone in quitting the nursing profession. over the last year, more than 40,000 nurses in england left nhs employment. according to the nuffield trust think tank, the number of nursesjoining — shown here by the blue line — is rising, but the total leaving — including for maternity leave, the red line — is going up fast. this latest research comes at a time when nhs providers, representing trusts in england, has voiced concern about the impact of the rising cost of living on staff. employers are finding it's difficult sometimes to hang on to skilled healthcare workers who want to leave to take less—stressful and better—paid jobs. we've heard some heart—rending stories around a nurse having to skip meals to fund school uniforms, for example, and about people being worried about covering the cost of getting into work. all of that is having a chilling effect on recruitment and retention in the nhs at almost the worst possible moment, when we've already got over 130,000 vacancies and we are trying to gear up for quite a challenging
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winter ahead. the nuffield trust said the proportion of nurses quitting in scotland was almost the same as in england. similar data is not available for wales and northern ireland. the department of health said nurse numbers had increased in england since 2019, and there would be a long—term workforce plan to help recruit and retain more staff. hugh pym, bbc news. police in the afghan capital of kabul say that at least 19 people have been killed following an explosion at an education centre. 27 other people are believed to be injured. local officials say the blast happened as students were sitting a practice university exam. this information has just this information hasjust come in over the last half an hour or so. those details in the last few minutes but we will keep you up—to—date with any developments.
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russia's president, vladimir putin, is expected to hold a ceremony in moscow today to formally annex four parts of ukraine. it comes after a series of self—styled referendums condemned by ukraine and the west as a sham. 0ur ukraine correspondent james waterhouse is in zaporizhzhia for us. good morning. it has happened, it has been decreed. whether or not it is a sham, it has happened. what does it mean for those living in those regions? tt does it mean for those living in those regions?— does it mean for those living in those reuions? , , ., those regions? it depends on where ou are. those regions? it depends on where you are- in — those regions? it depends on where you are. in zaporizhzhia _ those regions? it depends on where you are. in zaporizhzhia itself, i those regions? it depends on where you are. in zaporizhzhia itself, the l you are. in zaporizhzhia itself, the regional capital, very little. the missile strikes overnight, the latest victims, we were told, a convoy trying to make its way into russian territory to pick up relatives. and then you move closer to the front line, an area that
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russia is now trying to portray as a border. these are people who have lived under almost daily shelling. these are places that have seen an exodus, frankly, where men and children have long gone and you are left with communities made up of almost completely women. they don't know what will come next. in moscow there will be a lot of pomp and ceremony, where vladimir putin will announce four more regions being annexed, joining russia come in their eyes. it is a very chilling prospect to people here and that is the very point, it is to create this uncertainty and what russia is trying to do is spell. ukraine from launching counter offensive, which hit her said it will not do, to try to put western allies from supplying weapons, which until now has proved an effective. but the aim of moscow still remains unclear. it was once to topple ukraine's leadership. last
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week they said we will liberate the east. now it seems they are looking to create a new body. it remains unclear because their backs are against the wall of late —— to create a new border. against the wall of late -- to create a new border.- against the wall of late -- to create a new border. thank you, that is james in — create a new border. thank you, that is james in zaporizhzhia. _ create a new border. thank you, that is james in zaporizhzhia. that - create a new border. thank you, that is james in zaporizhzhia. that is i create a new border. thank you, that is james in zaporizhzhia. that is an i is james in zaporizhzhia. that is an extraordinary picture if you are in carnoustie. extraordinary picture if you are in carnoustie— carnoustie. you want to get your uirlfriend carnoustie. you want to get your girlfriend and _ carnoustie. you want to get your girlfriend and quickly. _ carnoustie. you want to get your girlfriend and quickly. red i carnoustie. you want to get your girlfriend and quickly. red sky i carnoustie. you want to get your girlfriend and quickly. red sky inj girlfriend and quickly. red sky in the morning, shepard's warning. some of you start dry and bright, but mist and fog patches that will quickly create this way. wet and windy weather on the way before the day is out. the rain already across parts of northern ireland and western scotland. very heavy at times throughout the morning commute. away from that, most places are dry but the rain is shifting
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through. the rest of scotland through. the rest of scotland through this morning, always heaviest in the west, clearing from northern ireland as we head towards the end of lunchtime and sitting in across parts of north—west in the natwest, eventually reaching east anglia late in the day. temperatures at the highest as the breeze picks up at the highest as the breeze picks up around 17 degrees, fresher to the north and west, winds gusting around 70 mph for a time this morning in the western isles. easing through the western isles. easing through the day and there will be a brighter and better into the day compared to the morning across scotland and northern ireland. brightening across cumbria, lancashire, but rain across much of england, bands of heavy rain which will come and go, strong and gusty winds. east anglia and south—west, not until the evening rush hour when you see the rain eventually arrive. wet here and the rain the first part of the night. clear skies, a few showers for the rest of the night, still breezy but frost—free thanks to that strength of wind. into the weekend, today looks dry and bright for many in the
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south and east, a few showers in the north and west but by sunday what is best for the drier weather, the further south, the chance of heavy rain which could affect the london marathon. more on that later. thank you, we will see you later on. there's a warning this morning that parents whose children miss school face a postcode lottery when it comes to attendance fines. a new bbc investigation has found that some local authorities handed out thousands of such penalties — while in other areas there were none. 0ur education editor branwenjeffreys has been speaking to young people about some of the reasons why pupils are missing school. he raps: thought about my life, got my mind, you know - i want my fix and so... it's in music bradley really expresses himself. he raps: it's been too long. i don't know how we even got like this. at first i was a happy kipper. now my life is... the grief and loss since his dad died suddenly last year. he raps: i've been in my zone just thinking. -
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mum wishing that she gets old. but i ain't got no—one to keep me straight and i lost the man that did that. a heavy blow on top of the impact of covid. last year was — it was a horrible year. for me, anyway — i don't know about anyone else, but for me it was. were you questioning whether it was worth going to school? yeah. like, i wasjust finding different ways to obviously cope with my grief over my dad. when you think back to before covid, what was school like for you, and how did you feel about going every day? there was times before covid where i actually loved school. like, i'd actually be excited in the morning to go to school, but, like, after covid, it kind ofjust put me off — like, lockdown has just put me off. it's all left bradley struggling to engage sometimes. he's had a lot of support and mentoring, until he was attending almost every day last year. his head of year is hoping bradley can move past his struggles with school. bradley's not a rare example,
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especially post—covid. you come back and students were either down on themselves, like, switched off — you can tell they're disengaged — either they were shut down or they were introverted about processing the emotional experiences they had had — covid, and with bradley with the bereavement also. er...he was a different young man. bradley has also been mentored, a charity that uses football to connect. the government is looking at how mentoring can help attendance, but it might not work for everyone. 13—year—old abby is autistic. she also has adhd. she's more sensitive to crowds, noise, and touch. when covid restrictions eased in her secondary school, it became too much. it gradually started getting harder and harder for me to go into school. i started to find it really challenging because it was all of these different sensory things. there were people bumping into me, there were all these people talking,
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it was really noisy, there were all these different smells because of perfumes and stuff. and so it was kind of... it wasjust... there was a lot of sensory things that went on. she spent months recovering with her family. after being diagnosed with autistic burn—out, abbie missed more than 100 days at school last year. i've said all the way through this that i want to learn in school because i find it easier to learn in a school environment. i want to learn, but i also want to have fun. i want to enjoy being at school. abbie's parents have found her a new small private school. both teachers, they hope it will help. the council will pay, as abbie has an education health care plan. a teenager still grieving, another struggling with additional needs. there are so many different reasons why kids miss school. that report was brought to you by our education
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editor bra nwen jeffreys. we're joined now by headteacher, claire huddart and children's commissioner for england, dame rachel de souza. good morning. ialways good morning. i always think i should sit up straighter in the presence of a head teacher. when it comes to your school, there are two types of fines. there are ones if parents take their children out for holidays during term time and once for absence. holidays during term time and once for absence-— holidays during term time and once for absence.- give - holidays during term time and once for absence.- give me i holidays during term time and once for absence.- give me an i for absence. correct. give me an idea at the _ for absence. correct. give me an idea at the college _ for absence. correct. give me an idea at the college how - for absence. correct. give me an idea at the college how many - for absence. correct. give me an i idea at the college how many have been issued in the past year. the hohda been issued in the past year. the holiday once. _ been issued in the past year. ire: holiday once, quite a been issued in the past year. ire holiday once, quite a few because parents are taking children out of holidays. dozens. and still even now, returning in september, the first week back we had over a0 families, a0 children out of holidays and that is on the first week of the return. so holidays is a
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huge issue for schools. the week of the return. so holidays is a huge issue for schools.— week of the return. so holidays is a huge issue for schools. the fine is? £60. and huge issue for schools. the fine is? £60- and what _ huge issue for schools. the fine is? £60. and what about _ huge issue for schools. the fine is? £60. and what about absence - huge issue for schools. the fine is? | £60. and what about absence during term time? the _ £60. and what about absence during term time? the fixed _ £60. and what about absence during term time? the fixed penalty - £60. and what about absence during term time? the fixed penalty notice| term time? the fixed penalty notice ones art rare. _ term time? the fixed penalty notice ones art rare, single _ term time? the fixed penalty notice ones art rare, single figures - term time? the fixed penalty notice ones art rare, single figures for - ones art rare, single figures for those. ~ , :, , , , those. 0k. when you issue this fine, how easily does _ those. 0k. when you issue this fine, how easily does that _ those. 0k. when you issue this fine, how easily does that come _ those. 0k. when you issue this fine, how easily does that come to - those. 0k. when you issue this fine, how easily does that come to you, i how easily does that come to you, how easily does that come to you, how easy is the decision to make? the holiday one, probably quite easy. we have some families doing two or three holidays but the other one, to fine parents, we have to go through a multitude of layers to get to that fine. a child misses a day, my staff will call straightaway and it is the form tutor who is there first port of call so it is very personalised to that child, very welcoming, why are they off, can they return, either any barriers? if we reach three days there will be a home visit. my staff will be out, knocking on doors, what can we do to
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get that child back into school. when we try, the next layer will be lectures, supportive letters and then we move, lots of different layers. we moved to children and because the voice of the child is important enough, as well. why are you off? we look at everything to see where we can get. beyond that it goes to education welfare service and even then there are still letters that get sent, warning letters, it is way down the line that fine will be issued. flan letters, it is way down the line that fine will be issued.- letters, it is way down the line that fine will be issued. can i ask ou a that fine will be issued. can i ask you a practical— that fine will be issued. can i ask you a practical question - that fine will be issued. can i ask you a practical question is - that fine will be issued. can i ask you a practical question is why i that fine will be issued. can i ask| you a practical question is why all the stuff you have outlined their which people recognise and think, this sounds like a good policy, it was quite expensive. it this sounds like a good policy, it was quite expensive.— this sounds like a good policy, it was quite expensive. it is. you have was quite expensive. it is. you have to have staff — was quite expensive. it 3 you have to have staff allocated to do this, spending time out in the street, knocking on doors. do you have the budget to do that? how it work? it depends where you put your budget to, and children are imported. i am lucky i am a large school so i have the economy of scale to spend.
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attendance absolutely matters and we need those children in, so you have to place that money where it is needed. i have five staff solely working on attendance, was a huge well—being team that's adroit in that, as well. well-being team that's adroit in that, as well.— well-being team that's adroit in that, as well. ., , a that, as well. rachel de souza, pick u . that, as well. rachel de souza, pick u- on that, as well. rachel de souza, pick up on some — that, as well. rachel de souza, pick up on some of _ that, as well. rachel de souza, pick up on some of the _ that, as well. rachel de souza, pick up on some of the wider— that, as well. rachel de souza, pick up on some of the wider issues. - that, as well. rachel de souza, pick| up on some of the wider issues. you were saying how few fines you have given out. 179,157 issued in 2021 to 2022. that is quite a lot. it is given out. 179,157 issued in 2021 to 2022. that is quite a lot.— 2022. that is quite a lot. it is and all schools _ 2022. that is quite a lot. it is and all schools have _ 2022. that is quite a lot. it is and all schools have guidance - 2022. that is quite a lot. it is and all schools have guidance and - all schools have guidance and systems and i think claire has outlined them well, it is a long process. getting great attendance, which is really important, children need to be in school to learn and be safe, getting good attendance means we need to really understand what is happening with children and why children are not attending, and one of the things i did last year was go out and find the children who were
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not attending, we spoke to hundreds and the stories we hear today are very common. it is often mental health, anxiety, special needs were sometimes children who have just gone off with covid and never come back. the trick is to get that dialogue going, really understand what's going on so we can get those children into school. carrot, as well. if you ask children why they like skill, what is good about it, it is often as simple as a great teacher or school dinners so we need to do whatever we can to get children back in. they need to be into lent but also to be safe and to be with their peers. it really is, i absolutely agree that attendance is critically important to. we absolutely agree that attendance is critically important to.— critically important to. we cannot i . nore critically important to. we cannot ignore politics — critically important to. we cannot ignore politics in _ critically important to. we cannot ignore politics in this _ critically important to. we cannot ignore politics in this because - critically important to. we cannot ignore politics in this because we | ignore politics in this because we have had a lot of education secretaries in recent years. a big churn. do you think enough attention is given to this issue by governments?- is given to this issue by governments? is given to this issue by covernments? ., governments? so, i have campaigned all of last year — governments? so, i have campaigned
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all of last year because _ governments? so, i have campaigned all of last year because i _ governments? so, i have campaigned all of last year because i was - governments? so, i have campaigned all of last year because i was so - all of last year because i was so worried about children missing school, notjust me, many others, as well. the secretary of state did convene, we have convened, and i really want this prime minister who has promised to be the promise of education to attendance a front consent. if she just looked at the attendance data every week if you call for it, that could make a big difference. attendance is the bed of everything. if children are not in they cannot learn and we cannot keep them safe so i think it should be a top priority for all of us, it should be everybody�*s business. claire, reading in politics and talking about the cost of living, what happens if you know parents cannot afford the fine but is not sending a child into school? we would not _ sending a child into school? , would not break that relationship. that is what is important, keeping that absolutely positive. putting a child that cannot come to school because the parents cannot afford a fine is wrong. we would not do that.
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equally, fines for some is a deterrent, it gets the child back into school. the cost—of—living crisis at the moment, that's really is starting, we are feeling the bite, even things like the bus fare children affording the 80p to come into school, £8 per week, that is starting to bite and education should be free for all, even that cost of the bus fare is starting to affect some families. aha, cost of the bus fare is starting to affect some families.— cost of the bus fare is starting to affect some families. a very good oint, affect some families. a very good point. one. _ affect some families. a very good point, one, head _ affect some families. a very good point, one, head teacher- affect some families. a very good point, one, head teacher at - affect some families. a very good l point, one, head teacher at horizon community college, you will be at school on time. i community college, you will be at school on time.— community college, you will be at| school on time._ 7:30am school on time. i hope so! 7:30am now. school on time. i hope so! 7:30am now- 8:30am. _ school on time. i hope so! 7:30am now. 8:30am, so _ school on time. i hope so! 7:30am now. 8:30am, so hopefully - school on time. i hope so! 7:30am now. 8:30am, so hopefully my- now. 8:30am, so hopefully my children are _ now. 8:30am, so hopefully my children are up, _ now. 8:30am, so hopefully my children are up, as— now. 8:30am, so hopefully my children are up, as well- now. 8:30am, so hopefully my children are up, as well for- children are up, as well for starting school.— children are up, as well for startin: school. :, starting school. rachel de souza, children's commissioner, - starting school. rachel de souza, children's commissioner, thankl starting school. rachel de souza, i children's commissioner, thank you. you can see more of this story on bbc panorama's why kids miss school programme — tonight at 7.30pm on bbc one.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm thomas magill. rail passengers are being urged only to travel if necessary into london on saturday because of stike action. members of the rmt, aslef and the tssa unions will stage a co—ordinated walk—out which is expected to cause major disruption. network rail and a number of train operators including southern, southeastern, and thameslink are taking part. a reduced timetable shows just 11% of rail services will operate on saturday. it is the first time members of the three unions have walked out at the same time, so disruption is expected to be work than on previous days. well, the strike could have a knock—on impact for those taking part in sunday's london marathon, as trains will start later than normal. but that won't stop one ukrainian refugee couple from tower hamlets
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who we've spoken to about why they're taking part in the run. they're raising money for united 2a, an initiative by president zelenksy to help their home country. they've been telling why taking part will help those back home. we can show all countries that war in our country is not stopped. we will show that ukrainians are very brave, strong, and we support our country now in london. this money will help ukrainian people during this difficult time, during the war. energy prices are set to rise fom tomorrow for many londoners as the price cap increases. it means the average household gas and electricity bill will go up to £2,500. tonight on bbc london, we'll be joined by an energy expert, so if you have a question on bills, readings, or how to save energy, email us at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk. well, let's see how the tube is doing this morning. there's a good service on all lines
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so far this morning. now the weather with kawser. hello, and a very good morning to you. well, it's a chilly start and a dry start for many, but it is all set to change as we look ahead to today, with some wet and windy weather on its way. there will be some morning sunshine for a time, a bit hazy with some patches of mist around, some high cloud. there'll be some sunshine for a time, especially further towards the east. but during the course of the day, we're expecting some clouds, some outbreaks of heavy rain spreading in from the west. and with it, some strong winds gusting potentially up to 30—a0mph. so it will be a wet evening commute for many, but that weather system will then clear through, and by the end of the night, it will turn drier. one or two showers, some clear skies, and temperatures holding up at around 10—12 celsius with that milder air. but as we look ahead to the weekend, well, there is some uncertainty regarding this weather front here. it could potentially bring some wet and windy weather for a time that may last until sunday morning, so it could potentially affect the london marathon as well. so there is some uncertainty
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for the weekend. wet and windy today. there will be some rain overnight saturday into sunday, that may last during the morning, affecting the marathon. but after that, it should become drier for monday. and that's your forecast for now. that's it from me. i'll be back in an hour, but for now it's back to naga and charlie. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. today marks a week since chancellor kwasi kwarteng unveiled a budget described as "mini," but which in reality was anything but. in the days since, the uk has seen a collapse in the value of the pound, chaos in the financial markets, and an intervention from the bank of england. later today, the primer stand the chancellor will meet the head of the uk's independent economic
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forecaster. it is seen as an effort to build confidence in the markets. we can speak now to the financial secretary to the treasury, andrew griffith. thank you very much for your time with us here on bbc breakfast. what is the point in the meeting today between the prime minister, the chancellor, and the 0br? i between the prime minister, the chancellor, and the obr? i think it is a very welcome _ chancellor, and the obr? i think it is a very welcome meeting, - chancellor, and the obr? i think it is a very welcome meeting, it - chancellor, and the obr? i think it is a very welcome meeting, it is i is a very welcome meeting, it is important that we go forward on the basis of forecast. there was a huge amount, notjust the energy package thatis amount, notjust the energy package that is going to cap and give confidence for households across the country, starting tomorrow when otherwise bills would have been increasing by a much larger extent, but also the growth plan had a0 pages of detail in there about the supply side measures we were going to take to really get our economy going again, deal with some of the challenges that have held growth back, things like the strikes we just had about, they are going to just had about, they are going to just grind this country to a halt tomorrow, people will not get their posts delivered, the trains won't be
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running. i think a meeting posts delivered, the trains won't be running. ithink a meeting between the prime minister, the chancellor, and the 0br shows the importance of getting that forecast right, and it is a very welcome thing to see. of course of the 0br itself is independent, they must do that on their own time, but i think the chancellor has asked them to report back by the 23rd of november. mira; back by the 23rd of november. why didn't the chancellor wanted a port elliot from the 0br? because the 0br said it was ready, willing and able to deliver one. —— why didn't you chancellor want a report earlier? there's a huge amount of funds that the 0br would have needed to take into account... the obr would have needed to take into account. . ._ into account... sorry to interrupt, but it did say _ into account... sorry to interrupt, but it did say it _ into account... sorry to interrupt, but it did say it was _ into account... sorry to interrupt, but it did say it was able - into account... sorry to interrupt, but it did say it was able to - into account... sorry to interrupt, but it did say it was able to do - but it did say it was able to do that. the 0br said in a letter to the chancellor that it was able to do that within a certain time, and it was declined. i do that within a certain time, and it was declined.— do that within a certain time, and it was declined. i think that would have been a _ it was declined. i think that would have been a static— it was declined. i think that would have been a static report - it was declined. i think that would have been a static report during i have been a static report during prior to the growth plan. it was really important, we have made a massive intervention to support households and businesses on energy,
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it will cost £60 billion or thereabouts for this winter alone, so important we within that is understanding how we are going to grow the economy to pay for that. this was a mini budget, it was a fiscal event, wasn't it? we have been guided to not even call it a mini budget. the 0br has given forecasts for a full—blown budget. why would this have been so difficult? �* , ., , ., why would this have been so difficult? , ., ., difficult? because that is a great deal of detail... _ difficult? because that is a great deal of detail... is _ difficult? because that is a great deal of detail... is this _ difficult? because that is a great deal of detail... is this bigger i deal of detail... is this bigger than a normal _ deal of detail... is this bigger than a normal budget, - deal of detail... is this bigger than a normal budget, then? | deal of detail... is this bigger - than a normal budget, then? this fiscal event is bigger and full of more detail than a normal budget? this growth plan is full of detail about how this government is going to grow the economy. a0 pages, details of infrastructure plans that have been long held up, that we are going to crack through, detail about how we are going to bring forward the new clean energy revolution. it is fully 0br to ultimately decide how they reflect that in that their policies... how they reflect that in that their olicies. .. :, �* ., :, policies... indeed. i don't want to be petty--- _
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policies... indeed. i don't want to be petty--- what _ policies... indeed. i don't want to be petty... what we _ policies... indeed. i don't want to be petty... what we all _ policies... indeed. i don't want to be petty... what we all want - policies... indeed. i don't want to be petty... what we all want now| policies... indeed. i don't want to i be petty... what we all want now is to net be petty... what we all want now is to get those — be petty... what we all want now is to get those plans _ be petty... what we all want now is to get those plans in _ be petty... what we all want now is to get those plans in place, - be petty... what we all want now is to get those plans in place, such i to get those plans in place, such as a good thing that the prime minister and chancellor are sitting down with independent 0br this morning, just as we have been working through... i as we have been working through... i don't want to be petty here, but how many pages are in a normal full—blown annual budget? i’m many pages are in a normal full-blown annual budget? i'm not one to answer _ full-blown annual budget? i'm not one to answer that, _ full-blown annual budget? i'm not one to answer that, to _ full-blown annual budget? i'm not one to answer that, to be - full-blown annual budget? i'm not one to answer that, to be honest, | full-blown annual budget? i'm not| one to answer that, to be honest, i just don't know. do one to answer that, to be honest, i just don't know— just don't know. do you think it is more than _ just don't know. do you think it is more than 40? _ just don't know. do you think it is more than 40? there _ just don't know. do you think it is more than 40? there is - just don't know. do you think it is more than 40? there is a - just don't know. do you think it is more than 40? there is a lot - more than 40? there is a lot of detail. ithink— more than 40? there is a lot of detail. i think it _ more than 40? there is a lot of detail. i think it is _ more than 40? there is a lot of detail. i think it is important. detail. i think it is important you understand what we are trying to do, naga. we have to actually quickly last friday to give people the confidence —— we had to act really quickly. at the start of this year, 160 million cubic metres of gas flowed through nordstrom one, that is now sitting bubbling at the bottom of the north sea tensioner from acts of sabotage. imagine what that would have done to the price of energy if we have not been able to give consumers and businesses
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confidence that we would cap the average household's energy bill at £2500. now, having done that, having come forward with that really big fiscal intervention, it is very important that we can talk to the country about how we are going to pay for that. that will take time, thatis pay for that. that will take time, that is about increasing the long—term trend rate of growth, that is about solving issues like access to affordable child care about building the homes that the nation needs to stop a lot of detail in there, naga. needs to stop a lot of detail in there. naga-— needs to stop a lot of detail in there, nana. :, :, , .,, , there, naga. you have emphasised the amount of detail _ there, naga. you have emphasised the amount of detail in _ there, naga. you have emphasised the amount of detail in the _ there, naga. you have emphasised the amount of detail in the 40 _ there, naga. you have emphasised the amount of detail in the 40 pages. - amount of detail in the a0 pages. the office for budget responsibility says it has been asked by the chancellor to produce a first draft of its economic forecast by the 7th of its economic forecast by the 7th of october. when that draft is given to the chancellor, when do we get to seeit? to the chancellor, when do we get to see it? i to the chancellor, when do we get to see it? .. to the chancellor, when do we get to see it? ~ , :, , see it? i think we should see it when it has _ see it? i think we should see it when it has the _ see it? i think we should see it when it has the right _ see it? i think we should see it when it has the right level- see it? i think we should see it when it has the right level of l when it has the right level of detail and confidence behind it. sorry, ijust want detail and confidence behind it. sorry, i just want to pick up detail and confidence behind it. sorry, ijust want to pick up on that. the right level of detail and confidence, let's break this down. can you have too much detail? you
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have to have _ can you have too much detail? you have to have the _ can you have too much detail? yet have to have the right level of detail. i was a finance director for 11 years. of course everybody wants their budget and therefore cast tomorrow, but you also want something that reflects all of the latest information that is available at that moment in time, and something that will endure, not something that will endure, not something you will have to revise too quickly. that is just a balance and a trade—off, the chancellor asked the 0br to prepare that by the second half of november. weill. second half of november. well, this one is by the — second half of november. well, this one is by the 7th _ second half of november. well, this one is by the 7th of— second half of november. well, this one is by the 7th of october, - second half of november. well, this one is by the 7th of october, for - one is by the 7th of october, for what has already been announced. so when it comes to confidence, surely, you have seen what has happened in the markets. the bank of england has had to intervene because of the exacerbating effects of this fiscal event, we have been told to call it. surely be sooner something is published regarding that fiscal event, that is when the confidence will be lifted, wouldn't it? {iii will be lifted, wouldn't it? of course, but it has to be the right
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thing that you publish. publishing drafts, whether it is the draft production schedule for your morning programme or a draft budget, if that is a working draft, it is a balance to be struck between something that will move along that will change... it isjust facts, will move along that will change... it is just facts, though, isn't it? taking into account all of the information available at the time. as i say, things are moving. we are doing with incredible challenges that are happening across the developed world, it all dates back to the 2ath of february when vladimir putin metres his unwarranted aggression in ukraine, that has had huge impacts on the energy market. this country has done a good job about coming forward and diversifying its energy supplies, but there's more to do and diversifying its energy supplies, but there's more to do- diversifying its energy supplies, but there's more to do and that has fed into inflation, _ but there's more to do and that has fed into inflation, obviously. - fed into inflation, obviously. prices in august, as you are well aware, 9.9% higher than they were 12 months ago. rate of inflation at roughly 10%.
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months ago. rate of inflation at roughly 1096-— months ago. rate of inflation at rou~hl 10%. , , ., roughly 10%. yesterday the german rate of inflation _ roughly 10%. yesterday the german rate of inflation at... _ roughly 10%. yesterday the german rate of inflation at... to _ roughly 10%. yesterday the german rate of inflation at... to be - rate of inflation at... to be honest. — rate of inflation at... to be honest. i _ rate of inflation at... to be honest, i don't _ rate of inflation at... to be honest, i don't care - rate of inflation at... to be honest, i don't care about| rate of inflation at... to be i honest, i don't care about the german rate of inflation, i am talking about the uk rate of inflation and how it affects us. i inflation and how it affects us. i think it is important for inflation and how it affects us. i think it is important for reviewers, with respect, that we contextualise... with respect, that we contextualise. . .- with respect, that we contextualise. .. , ., with respect, that we contextualise... , ., ., :, contextualise. .. the german rate of inflation does _ contextualise. .. the german rate of inflation does not _ contextualise. .. the german rate of inflation does not affect _ contextualise. .. the german rate of inflation does not affect the - contextualise. .. the german rate of inflation does not affect the triple . inflation does not affect the triple lock. the uk rate of inflation is 10%, roughly. when rishi sunak was chancellor, he promised to increase state pensions and universal credit in line with inflation. let's stop at that point, 10%, are they going to be increased in line with inflation, benefits?- to be increased in line with inflation, benefits? with respect, we are not _ inflation, benefits? with respect, we are not going _ inflation, benefits? with respect, we are not going to _ inflation, benefits? with respect, we are not going to do _ inflation, benefits? with respect, we are not going to do the - inflation, benefits? with respect, | we are not going to do the normal operating grant of benefits including pensions, that is something that secretaries of state will be working on in the coming weeks. :, ., ., ~ ., weeks. 0k, rather than make an announcement... _ weeks. 0k, rather than make an announcement... but _ weeks. 0k, rather than make an announcement... but the - weeks. 0k, rather than make an - announcement... but the government has committed — announcement... but the government has committed to _ announcement... but the government has committed to honour _ announcement... but the government has committed to honour and - announcement... but the government has committed to honour and fulfil - has committed to honour and fulfil the current comprehensive spending review, so that includes the overall package of money for public sector
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at... �* ,:, , , package of money for public sector at...�* , at... i'm sorry, it is about whether or not you — at... i'm sorry, it is about whether or not you agree — at... i'm sorry, it is about whether or not you agree to _ at. .. i'm sorry, it is about whether or not you agree to honour- at... i'm sorry, it is about whether or not you agree to honour a - or not you agree to honour a promise. you promised it would be in line with the rate of inflation. there is now speculation that it is going to be done in line with earnings, which, as you can see with strike action around the country and pay negotiations, is not going to be the same as inflation. so which is it? are you keeping your promise or are you changing? the it? are you keeping your promise or are you changing?— it? are you keeping your promise or are you changing? the promise i make is that we will — are you changing? the promise i make is that we will go _ are you changing? the promise i make is that we will go through _ are you changing? the promise i make is that we will go through the - is that we will go through the normal process for operating benefits underlying secretaries of state to decide and bring forward their own plans —— uprating. it is simply adhering to the process and not commenting on speculation. i not commenting on speculation. i don't see that it is speculation. we have had a chancellor who said that benefits would rise in line with inflation. inflation, 9.9% in the uk. now there is speculation that it
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won't. :, :, , :, uk. now there is speculation that it won't. :, ., ., , . won't. naga, you have 'ust conceded that it is absolutely — won't. naga, you havejust conceded that it is absolutely speculation. - that it is absolutely speculation. so it is going to be honoured? irhuihat so it is going to be honoured? what i and colleagues _ so it is going to be honoured? what i and colleagues are _ so it is going to be honoured? turret i and colleagues are doing so it is going to be honoured? rmsgii i and colleagues are doing is putting in place the detailed reforms behind the growth plan that will increase the uk's rate of growth from 1% to 2.5% over time. that grows the overall size of the pie, that is how we can continue to afford great quality public services and benefits for the most vulnerable, which, by the way, if you look at what the government has done on things like the cost of living, yes, it has given £a00 to every household to help with the cost of living this winter, but for the 8 million most vulnerable, that is £1200. so if you look at our actions, this is a government that is on the side of the most vulnerable.— is on the side of the most vulnerable. andrew griffith, financial secretary _ vulnerable. andrew griffith, financial secretary to - vulnerable. andrew griffith, financial secretary to the i vulnerable. andrew griffith, - financial secretary to the treasury, very grateful for your time here on
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breakfast, thank you very much. thank you very much. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. the winner of our pick of the season coming up in a short while, but first, let's talk a little bit about drought. this is seen as a reservoir near sheffield, the reservoir is well below average at the moment, this was just a week or so ago, and believe it or not, while the rain is falling across the country, we definitely need it today. reservoir start are lower than we would expect normal for this time of year, usually about to start picking up again, still 11 out of 1a areas in england are in drought, and unless we get plenty more rainfall, that will continue all the way into 2023. as i said, there will be some rainfall today. let me show you where the rainfall totals will be totting up. the darker blue colours and hills and the rest where we could see up to around a0 metres of
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rain, maybe between five and ten millimetres expected across some southern cat of england. every drop, though, for some of you as needed. but we start dry and bright before that rain arrives, some mist and fog across parts of england. but the rain will dominate the day for many of you. suddenly a wet start in parts of northern ireland, western scotland at the moment, winds gusting up to around 70 moles per hourin gusting up to around 70 moles per hour in the western isles. gale force winds and rain spreading across the rest of scotland across the rest of the afternoon, also into parts of wales and northwestern. eventually reaching east anglia and the south—east but not until later in the day, one or two spots staying dry during daylight hours, but the winds will strengthen. using a bit across parts of scotland and northern ireland later on where things will brighten up for the afternoon, some sunshine and showers but fewer and fresher, 12 to 15 celsius the highs here, 16 to 17 in the south—east. some even rain for the south—east. some even rain for the late commute across east anglia and the south—east, clearing during the first part of tonight. tonight will be a study of clear spells and
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showers, shower is most frequent in the north and west. ok, a little bit cooler than last night for some of you, but the breeze is enough to stop the frost from forming. into saturday, another blustery day, nowhere near as windy as today. a bright day for many southern and eastern areas before cloud increases in the south—west later. some showers across scotland, northern ireland, another good, maybe north wales as well, but they will come and go. a couple spots staying dry, fresh in a northern and western areas in the breeze, but feeling a touch warmer the further south and east you go. saturday night into sunday, all ice on what this developing weather system will do and how far north and how quickly that spreads rain in across southern counties of england and wales, because it could bring some heavy rain at times to london for the london marathon. please lend your support to those running if it is raining, dawn waterproofs, you will probably need them during the morning more than the afternoon at the moment, but that could change. but certainly some heavy rain for a time. away from that, a few showers
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in western scotland, but many places are staying dry with some sunny spells away from the south. and even if you see the rain, it will brighten up later on, temperatures a little bit higher on sunday for scotland, northern ireland and northern ireland, compared with what we have seen —— what we will see over the next few days. and then we get our pick of the season were not for the summer, chosen by you, tens of thousands for votes, and this was the stunning picture that won, a beautiful sunrise. the stunning picture that won, a beautifulsunrise. red the stunning picture that won, a beautiful sunrise. red sky in the morning not always a warning, can also be a winner, too. back to you both. :, : also be a winner, too. back to you both. :, . , ' ., :, :, both. how much did his 9 have to do with the fact — both. how much did his 9 have to do with the fact that — both. how much did his 9 have to do with the fact that he _ both. how much did his 9 have to do with the fact that he won _ both. how much did his 9 have to do with the fact that he won that? - both. how much did his 9 have to do with the fact that he won that? to i with the fact that he won that? to be honest, not denuding them, but i think that is a perfect weather watcher 9. no cumulus clouds in the sky there, though. watcher 9. no cumulus clouds in the sky there. though-— sky there, though. your 9 could be a storm, sky there, though. your 9 could be a storm. rain. — sky there, though. your 9 could be a storm, rain, thunder, _ sky there, though. your 9 could be a storm, rain, thunder, lightning, - storm, rain, thunder, lightning, that would be a stunning picture. can you imagine being in that boat,
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matt, at that time of day? i can you imagine being in that boat, matt, at that time of day?- matt, at that time of day? i would be in my element. _ matt, at that time of day? i would be in my element. sunrise, - matt, at that time of day? i would be in my element. sunrise, best. matt, at that time of day? i would i be in my element. sunrise, best time of the day for me as well, and to see a sky like that, one that are literally some rain on the way. trust you. thanks, matt. the time now is 7-50- _ they're a lifeline for many visually impaired people, but a backlog in the waiting list for new guide dogs means users are now facing a wait of up to two years for a new one. they include bbc news correspondent sean dilley, whose guide dog sammy is going into retirement after eight years. he's been telling gem o'reilly why sammy is so important to him. we lose our dogs twice. we we lose them when they hang up the harness, and we lose them when they pass on. and we know that's the reality, and so when we sign up to train with our dogs, we know that one day, this day is coming. come on. let's go. good. good boy.
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after more than eight years of working with sean, guide dog sammy is set to retire, and sean may have to wait two years for his next dog. i'm inviting you along to do something which i don't think has been done before. you're going tojoin me and sammy on our final working walk. i've been doing this for 22 years with you and your predecessor, sammy. good boy. i was born with congenital blindness with a number of conditions. i lost poor partial sight that i had by the time i was 1a. and so my guide dog journey started when i was 16. a dog has a working life, and they would come to a point where they slowed down. sammy is slowing down. he's ten. i don't think the words actually exist to express the gratitude i have for sammy and my mobility, and i know i'm slightly struggling to say this, because when sammy leaves me, it will leave a huge hole in my heart. potentially two years without a guide dog is...
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it's a big thing. since the pandemic, guide dog partnerships in the uk have decreased from around 5,000 to a,000 because puppy breeding was stopped for volu nteer a nd staff safety, so it will take longer for sean to find his partnership. we would want him to be getting a dog as soon as we could. i think the most important thing to say, though, is that it is absolutely the right do- for the right person at the right time. a dog is not for everybody, but for me, it means i can live the life i want to live and have the independence i need to have. the charity guide dogs is now in the process of finding sean a new dog. i trust sammy with my life, and he trusts his with mine, and what we have is a partnership beyond any words that exist. so when i hang that harness up, it's going to say, "that's your end of watch, that is, sammy. that's your service done,
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and you deserve your retirement." and we'rejoined now by sean and sammy. good morning. i am reunited with the s. good morning. i am reunited with the s- after a good morning. i am reunited with the spy after a month- — good morning. i am reunited with the spy after a month. what _ good morning. i am reunited with the spy after a month. what was - good morning. i am reunited with the spy after a month. what was it - good morning. i am reunited with the spy after a month. what was it like i spy after a month. what was it like when ou spy after a month. what was it like when you were _ spy after a month. what was it like when you were first _ spy after a month. what was it like when you were first with _ spy after a month. what was it like when you were first with him? -- l when you were first with him? -- with this when you were first with him? » with this boy. it was emotional, and for the first bit of time he was a bit quiet, like i remember you. liam, i want to say at�*s liam. you have had a great bit of fun so far. sammy is a time of my mother, and my mother knows how grateful i am for that. —— sammy has retired with my mother. here we are worth sammy's non—guiding lead. mother. here we are worth sammy's non-guiding lead.— non-guiding lead. does he fall back into that help _ non-guiding lead. does he fall back into that help mode? _ non-guiding lead. does he fall back into that help mode? he _ non-guiding lead. does he fall back
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into that help mode? he tries - non-guiding lead. does he fall back into that help mode? he tries to, l non-guiding lead. does he fall back into that help mode? he tries to, i | into that help mode? he tries to, i need to not _ into that help mode? he tries to, i need to not let _ into that help mode? he tries to, i need to not let him, _ into that help mode? he tries to, i need to not let him, though. - into that help mode? he tries to, i need to not let him, though. no i need to not let him, though. no offence to michael caine, but i have my cane here. a ghost dog as an obstacle avoid. but with this cane, you use techniques. guide dogs have given me 35 hours of refresher training, iam given me 35 hours of refresher training, i am so gratefulfor them. every of these chips are things i have collided with, this roller ball, this is a key i have been using for a month. to compare one with the other is actually quite hard to do. it with the other is actually quite hard to do-_ with the other is actually quite hard to do. , :, , i. ., , hard to do. it shows you what sammy does in terms — hard to do. it shows you what sammy does in terms of _ hard to do. it shows you what sammy does in terms of avoiding _ hard to do. it shows you what sammy does in terms of avoiding those - does in terms of avoiding those obstructions. so what happens now, sean? ~ a, . . obstructions. so what happens now, sean? ~ : . ., :, sean? when in march we decided along with my guide — sean? when in march we decided along with my guide dogs _ sean? when in march we decided along with my guide dogs mobility _ with my guide dogs mobility specialist marco that it was time for... :, . :, specialist marco that it was time for... :, _, ., specialist marco that it was time for... :, ., specialist marco that it was time for... ., _, ., my
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specialist marco that it was time for... ., _, ., ,.,y m for... can he come and say hello? of course. for... can he come and say hello? of course- a — for... can he come and say hello? of course- a very _ for... can he come and say hello? of course. a very special— for... can he come and say hello? of course. a very special co-presenter. | course. a very special co—presenter. we knew this was upcoming, we have just had a pandemic as we heard in that expertly told story there, the puppy that expertly told story there, the puppy breeding programme stopped, and if you think about that, that is huge. there were not crowds to condition a doctor. i have got top matching requirements, risen from busy crowds in london to dog that works fast —— tough matching requirements. i am after a bitterly rocking horse in many ways. so we started the application process, it took me three months to redo, that is because they want to make sure that the person in the dog are going to work safely together. there is a need for a dog that you will be able to look after the dog's welfare, because sammy is more important to me, and he will always be my boy, than anything. sorry, this is unusual, because normally i appear
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as a correspondent. you unusual, because normally i appear as a correspondent.— unusual, because normally i appear as a correspondent. you are actually uuite as a correspondent. you are actually quite moved — as a correspondent. you are actually quite moved today, _ as a correspondent. you are actually quite moved today, new? _ as a correspondent. you are actually quite moved today, new? when - as a correspondent. you are actually quite moved today, new? when you| quite moved today, new? when you came in, you are apologising for the piece, it is really emotional... mat piece, it is really emotional... not for gem's — piece, it is really emotional... not for gem's piece! _ piece, it is really emotional... not for gem's piece! no, _ piece, it is really emotional... not for gem's piece! no, but - piece, it is really emotional... not for gem's piece! no, but you - piece, it is really emotional... not for gem's piece! no, but you were really emotional. _ for gem's piece! no, but you were really emotional. the _ for gem's piece! no, but you were really emotional. the bond - for gem's piece! no, but you were really emotional. the bond you i for gem's piece! no, but you were | really emotional. the bond you two have, you brought in his past, can we show that?— we show that? yes. i was walking round the hotel— we show that? yes. i was walking round the hotel this _ we show that? yes. i was walking round the hotel this morning - we show that? yes. i was walking l round the hotel this morning soon, it is the dog's. yeah, whatever! bird it is the dog's. yeah, whatever! and these are gold _ it is the dog's. yeah, whatever! and these are gold dust, obviously. we cannot do anything in the bbc without this. and sammy has his own, which is lovely. and other security guards as stringent with sammy's pass as they are with others? hie. i pass as they are with others? no, i will be frank _ pass as they are with others? no, i will be frank with _ pass as they are with others? no, i will be frank with you, _ pass as they are with others? no, i will be frank with you, this - pass as they are with others? no, i will be frank with you, this one - will be frank with you, this one would not scan. it is just in a
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mental he was issued with. fin would not scan. it isjust in a mental he was issued with. on a ractical mental he was issued with. on a practical note. — mental he was issued with. on a practical note, there _ mental he was issued with. on a practical note, there will - mental he was issued with. on a practical note, there will be - mental he was issued with. on a practical note, there will be lots of people watching those who may be have given to guide dog in the past. what can people do to help the problem at the moment? it problem at the moment? it is important _ problem at the moment? it is important to _ problem at the moment? it is important to say _ problem at the moment? it is important to say that - problem at the moment? it is important to say that i - problem at the moment? it 3 important to say that i am not speaking as guide dogs, i volunteer as a fundraiserfor them. speaking as guide dogs, i volunteer as a fundraiser for them. they have lost a third of their volunteer puppy lost a third of their volunteer puppy raisers, those numbers are stark. ~ :, puppy raisers, those numbers are stark. ~ ., :, :, .,, stark. what do you do as a puppy raiser? you _ stark. what do you do as a puppy raiser? you have _ stark. what do you do as a puppy raiser? you have to _ stark. what do you do as a puppy raiser? you have to have - stark. what do you do as a puppy raiser? you have to have a - stark. what do you do as a puppy raiser? you have to have a dog i stark. what do you do as a puppy i raiser? you have to have a dog from about eight — raiser? you have to have a dog from about eight to _ raiser? you have to have a dog from about eight to 12 _ raiser? you have to have a dog from about eight to 12 weeks _ raiser? you have to have a dog from about eight to 12 weeks old - raiser? you have to have a dog from about eight to 12 weeks old i - about eight to 12 weeks old i believe, all the way through to 1a months. these people are heroes, they have the dogs when they are chewing things, when they are maybe making puddles in supermarkets, and you have to apologise for the dog. the video that we caught there, please listen to that podcast, because it is a different version, they have them due the hardest time, and i think at the moment, the idea of anybody willing to come forward
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and say we are going to do that, it changes my life, and ijust have to say, if you have done that past or present, thank you. i say, if you have done that past or present, thank you.— say, if you have done that past or present, thank you. i have a friend to have done _ present, thank you. i have a friend to have done that. _ present, thank you. i have a friend to have done that. there's - present, thank you. i have a friend to have done that. there's no - present, thank you. i have a friend| to have done that. there's no point pretending, there are emotions attached to that, because you take the dog on and the sure knowledge that you will pass it over at some point, because obviously, as you do, you get attached to the dog.- you get attached to the dog. that's ri . ht. a you get attached to the dog. that's right- a dog _ you get attached to the dog. that's right. a dog does _ you get attached to the dog. that's right. a dog does not _ you get attached to the dog. that's right. a dog does not qualify - you get attached to the dog. that's right. a dog does not qualify as - you get attached to the dog. that's right. a dog does not qualify as a l right. a dog does not qualify as a guide dog, sometimes, and puppy raisers can have those dogs passed back. there is something i would not mind mention, which is really important. as we know, i am a bbc correspondent. i am important. as we know, i am a bbc correspondent. iam having important. as we know, i am a bbc correspondent. i am having to do my job in a different way with my cane, because it is about a third of the speed. if i may, i hope this does not sound too over i would like to thank colleagues who i am working with. as a correspondent, you work with. as a correspondent, you work with producers or camera operators all the time, some you may not have worked with before or four years. it is different, it is slower. i am having to teach sighted coding
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technique on the spot, and it is not even an issue, and i are workplaces where it was, so i am immensely grateful to you for what is absolutely making me able to do the job as effectively as i did before. i hope that guide dogs staff know how much i appreciate how much you guys do, because people might say it is two years, how can they with its two years? it is genuinely not their fault, it is a similar situation that the comedian guide dog school... i was speaking at a conference in greece the other day, they are doing everything they can so it hurts now really badly. —— the canadian guide dogs. they are doing everything the can, and i'm just very grateful. everything the can, and i'm 'ust very gratefuli everything the can, and i'm 'ust ve rrateful. :, , :, very grateful. that is well said. no need to apologise, _ very grateful. that is well said. no need to apologise, it _ very grateful. that is well said. no need to apologise, it matters, - very grateful. that is well said. no need to apologise, it matters, it i need to apologise, it matters, it makes a difference, and as much as people adapt, brilliant, but your life, she said, could be a lot
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easier, a lot quicker more efficient, though the benefits there. sammy is very comfortable, he has actually fallen asleep. also, sean, whose nose is increasingly close to my secret biscuit.- close to my secret biscuit. every presenter _ close to my secret biscuit. every presenter has — close to my secret biscuit. every presenter has that. _ close to my secret biscuit. every presenter has that. he - close to my secret biscuit. every presenter has that. he is - close to my secret biscuit. every i presenter has that. he is gradually workinr presenter has that. he is gradually working his — presenter has that. he is gradually working his way — presenter has that. he is gradually working his way closer _ presenter has that. he is gradually working his way closer and - presenter has that. he is gradually working his way closer and closer i presenter has that. he is gradually| working his way closer and closer to the biscuit territory. i working his way closer and closer to the biscuit territory.— the biscuit territory. i need a new name for mike _ the biscuit territory. i need a new name for mike kane, _ the biscuit territory. i need a new name for mike kane, on - the biscuit territory. i need a new name for mike kane, on twitter, | the biscuit territory. i need a new- name for mike kane, on twitter, and what the biscuit has surely got? thank you forjoining us, sean. headlines are coming up. == thank you forjoining us, sean. headlines are coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. under pressure — after a chaotic week on the financial markets, the prime minister and chancellor will today meet the head of britain's independent economic forecaster. higher bills for millions of people, as the new energy price cap kicks in. from midnight tonight, the annual bill for a typical household will rise to £2,500 — double what it was last winter. calls for a national rollout of the chickenpox vaccine, to protect the most medically vulnerable children in the uk. after 30 years, sue barker walked away from wimbledon for the final time this year. she'll be with us to reflect on life
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as the bbc�*s voice of tennis. there may be dry, bright or misty at the moment but to grab a waterproof, wet and windy weather on the way for all. the full forecast will be here on breakfast. it's friday the 30th of september. our main story. following days of chaos in the financial markets, the prime minister and the chancellor will meet the head of the uk's independent economic forecaster today. the talks with the office for budget responsibility are being seen as an attempt to build confidence following widespread criticism of last week's mini budget. simonjones reports. seeking to regain the confidence of the markets. in an unusual move, both the prime minister and the chancellor will meet the chairman of the office
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for budget responsibility after a slump in the value of the pound, uncertainty over mortgages, and a week of extreme financial volatility. the watchdog had offered to prepare a draft forecast in time for last friday's mini budget, but that was rejected by the government. forecasts of the uk's economic outlook are usually published to accompany major financial announcements. it's led to accusations ministers were trying to avoid scrutiny, and that that has in part driven the lack of confidence in the markets. now the 0br, its costings methods and forecasts is seen by many as central to the plan to restore stability. but in a series of bbc interviews yesterday, the prime minister seemed keener to talk about cutting taxes and capping energy bills than surging mortgage costs. prime minister, it sounds like you're saying, "crisis? what crisis?" i'm not saying that at all. i think we're in a very serious situation. it's a global crisis which has been brought about by the aftermath of covid and putin's war in ukraine. the government says the bank of england independently sets interest rates.
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but more than 1,000 mortgage products have been withdrawn due to forecasts of rising interest rates. and listen to the reaction of the question time audience when one woman describes the impact it's having on her. i was actually in the process of getting a mortgage as a young person, and i was told my initial interest rate would be a.5%. and i was told today that the lender has pulled that offer. and now the best offer that i can get is about 10.5%. gasps. whoa! wow. the chancellor has told conservative mps the government is working at pace to show the markets it has a clear plan. but as they prepare to gather for their conference in birmingham, with labour well ahead in the polls, some tory mps need convincing, too, that the government is on the right path. simon jones, bbc news. our political correspondent leila nathoo is at westminster for us now. good morning. we have this meeting happening today. to what end, that is the question, and whether or not it will actually believe any of the
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pressure on the government is now in light of all the criticism post mini budget. in a good money. it was really interesting that the prime minister herself is going along to this meeting was that you would expect the chancellor to be meeting the 0br. remember there will be in a statement at the end of november and he will be looking ahead to that. the prime minister to go along is a recognition that the 0br should have been involved in the first place, thatis been involved in the first place, that is what many people are arguing that is what many people are arguing that for last friday's announcements they should have been an independent set of economic forecasts to go alongside the government plans. that is the whole point of having an independent forecast and it is something that gives projections, a sense of trustworthiness and credibility and some tory mps at least are hoping that is what this meeting between them will restore. have a listen to what the treasury minister andrew griffith had to say about the meeting earlier. i minister andrew griffith had to say about the meeting earlier.- minister andrew griffith had to say about the meeting earlier. i think a meetinr about the meeting earlier. i think a meeting between _ about the meeting earlier. i think a meeting between the _ about the meeting earlier. i think a meeting between the prime - about the meeting earlier. i think a i meeting between the prime minister, the chancellor and the 0br shows the
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importance of getting that forecast i’ilht importance of getting that forecast right and _ importance of getting that forecast right and it's a very welcome thing to see _ right and it's a very welcome thing to see of— right and it's a very welcome thing to see. of course the 0br itself is independent, they must do that in their own — independent, they must do that in their own time. i think the chancellor has asked them to report back by— chancellor has asked them to report back by the — chancellor has asked them to report back by the 23rd of november. 30 back by the 23rd of november. sc this is back by the 23rd of november. this is all back by the 23rd of november. sr this is all about trying to restore some calm both within the tory party and of course outside to the government economic plans which the prime minister at liz truss and the chancellor at kwasi kwarteng were very clear they want to press ahead with, despite the reaction in the markets. there was no sense that they were going to change course, but of course there is still a lot of nervousness within the tory party about how this is all coming across, how this has landed, and the politicaljudgments involved in the announcements in the first place. the polls that came up last night, of course just a snapshot and an election is still a long way away, but one paul wright to put labour on 33 point lead, quite an astonishing set of figures for the party to be
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digesting just weeks after appointing a new leader, and of course ahead of their conservative party conference beginning in birmingham this weekend. indeed. alwa s birmingham this weekend. indeed. always good _ birmingham this weekend. indeed. always good to _ birmingham this weekend. indeed. always good to talk _ birmingham this weekend. indeed. always good to talk to _ birmingham this weekend. indeed. always good to talk to you, - birmingham this weekend. indeed. always good to talk to you, leila i always good to talk to you, leila nathoo for us in westminster. the new energy price cap comes into effect at midnight — meaning higher bills for millions of people on standard and default tariffs. the annual bill for a typical household will rise to £2,500 — double what it was last winter. that figure is a rough guide because the price cap is applied to a unit of gas or electricity — so the more you use, the more you'll pay, as colletta smith explains. as energy prices go up, everyone's talking about how they're trying to keep their bills down. use the dryer quite often, but now i'm tending to leave the washing overnight on the maiden and then finishing off only for ten minutes in the dryer. as i'm on my own, i don't really
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want to put the central heating on — just put the gas fire on instead. i've got a wood burner so, yeah, i am economising. just became a way of life j of having things running, not turning things off. and i think that's. now had to change. the government has limited tomorrow's energy rise, but a typical bill is still going up byjust over £500. this is the weekend that those price rises will start to feel real for millions more households. as the weather gets colder outside and people stick the heating on, it's much tougher decisions that will have to be made — limiting baths, timing showers, avoiding the oven, and putting on a lot more layers inside the house just to make sure that bills don't get out of hand. the new cap is on the price your supplier can charge you per unit of energy. for dual—fuel customers paying by direct debit, it'll be 3ap per kilowatt hour for electricity, and for gas it's 10.3p per kilowatt hour.
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and then daily standing charges are added on top of that. so everyone's bill will look totally different, depending on how much energy they use. if you use more energy, you'll be charged more — there's no maximum price for a bill. there is a bit of extra help, with £a00 gradually being knocked off your bills for the next six months. there's no need to contact energy suppliers to receive the government support packages, but the advice does remain the same — that if people are worried about their energy bills, then their supplier should be their first port of call. but those working with the most vulnerable say for people already in fuel poverty, that isn't enough help. we are seeing, increasingly, individuals going to unregulated lending, such as...typically loan sharks. helen's organisation is trying to get people who are financially, physically or emotionally vulnerable to register with them, so that energy firms can do more to help them.
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some people don't want to have their circumstances taken into account, but a lot do. and i think the onus is on large organisations to take that into consideration when it's put in front of them to prevent foreseeable harm, to really give people the support that they need if they're asking for it. pre—payment customers can still buy at the cheaper rate if you top up today, and for everyone else without a smart meter or a fixed deal, then it's worth taking a meter reading this weekend to make sure you're billed correctly. and keep on with those little savings. where we fill the kettle, joe tends to fill it up a little bit too much, as if our neighbours are coming in for coffee! laughter. colletta smith, bbc news in manchester. a 3a—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of olivia pratt—korbel, the nine—year—old girl who was shot dead in her home in liverpool last month. our reporter mairead smythjoins us
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now from the headquarters of merseyside police. just take us through the latest developments. aerie just take us through the latest developments.— just take us through the latest developments. just take us through the latest develo-ments. ~ ~' :, , ., ., , developments. we know this man was arrested in the — developments. we know this man was arrested in the dovecot _ developments. we know this man was arrested in the dovecot area _ developments. we know this man was arrested in the dovecot area of - arrested in the dovecot area of liverpool last night. ten men have now been questioned in connection with the killing of olivia pratt—korbel, but nobody has been charged. in the area where that man was arrested is the area where olivia was killed on monday the 22nd of august. it happened after two men had burst into her home, one of them being chased by a gunman. neither were known to the family and when the gun was discharged it killed olivia pratt—korbel and injured her mother cheryl. since then merseyside police have tried to find the man responsible for that killing. they have tried to find the guns used in that attack. we know that two guns were used but nobody has been held
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accountable. last week crime stop is “p accountable. last week crime stop is up it —— crime stoppers offered a £200,000 reward to be given to the person who gives the information that leads to the conviction of the killer of olivia pratt—korbel. mairead, thank you. some breaking news, at least 23 people have been killed, 28 others wounded. there has been a missile strike on a convoy of vehicles near the southern ukrainian city of zaporizhzhia. this comes as vladimir putin prepares to hold a ceremony in moscow today to formally annexed for parts of ukraine. that is a move denounced by the west. our russia editor steve rosenberg is in moscow for us this morning. we have been reporting this news coming through. strike action in zaporizhzhia, interestingly considering the referendum is taking
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place. 23 killed, 28 others wounded. the attacks continue. that place. 23 killed, 28 others wounded. the attacks continue.— the attacks continue. that is not beinr the attacks continue. that is not being reported _ the attacks continue. that is not being reported yet _ the attacks continue. that is not being reported yet in _ the attacks continue. that is not being reported yet in the - the attacks continue. that is not being reported yet in the state l being reported yet in the state media here, orat being reported yet in the state media here, or at the news —— all of the news is about the signing ceremony coming up later today, saint george hall in the kremlin palace where, it seems, vladimir putin will start the process of incorporating, that is the phrase being used, these ukrainian territories into the russian federation. basically annexation. putin is pushing ahead, it seems with axing about 15% of ukrainian territories —— and mixing 15% of ukrainian sailors won't change anything. they will still see this territory as their land. rochette will not have international support for this. will not have international support forthis. quite will not have international support for this. quite the opposite. vladimir putin does not seem to care about russia will not have support.
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putin is pushing ahead. irhihvzit about russia will not have support. putin is pushing ahead.— about russia will not have support. putin is pushing ahead. what do we know about — putin is pushing ahead. what do we know about what _ putin is pushing ahead. what do we know about what is _ putin is pushing ahead. what do we know about what is happening - putin is pushing ahead. what do we know about what is happening in i know about what is happening in those regions, how those changes are being reflected in russia and the general mood and what message is coming through to the russian people i will tell you about the mood because i remember back in 201a when russia annexed crimea and of course that sparked international condemnation and sanctions against russia but it also sparked a wave of patriotism, adriatic favour and some support of the annexation of crimea. the situation today is different. i was asking people what they thought about the prospect of their country about the prospect of their country about to get even bigger, people in russia. there was no excitement, people were worried and nervous and of course they are because seven months ago russia invaded ukraine, a few days ago vladimir putin
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announced what he called a partial mobilisation, which seems to be on a larger scale, mobilisation, which seems to be on a largerscale, hundreds mobilisation, which seems to be on a larger scale, hundreds of thousands of russian citizens being called up and sent off to the front line. you have a sanctions starting to bite. so of course there is a lot of nervousness, a lot of concern, nobody knows how this will end. {lilia nobody knows how this will end. ok, thank ou nobody knows how this will end. 0k, thank you very much. steve rosenberg for us in moscow. search—and—rescue efforts are continuing in the us state of florida after hurricane ian caused widespread destruction. boats and helicopters are being used to reach flood—stricken communities. the death toll is still unknown — though an official in one county, charlotte, said ten people had died there. the first coins featuring king charles iii have been unveiled by the royal mint. a special commemorative £5 coin and a 50 pence piece will be the first to feature the king's portrait — with some expected to go into circulation within weeks.
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for most children, chickenpox is a mild illness from which a full recovery is expected. but for some of the most medically vulnerable young people, it can be life—threatening. there are growing calls for the national rollout of a chickenpox vaccine, after a rise in cases of children with hepatitis. john maguire has been speaking to one family who've been affected. like any two—and—a—half—year—old, clara is a bundle of activity and energy. a world away from when she first contracted hepatitis from a virus injanuary. she'd gone to nursery that day. i was at work and got a call mid—morning from clara's nursery to say they were a bit concerned because they'd seen some yellowing around her groin area when they were changing her nappy. went straight to the gp, who acted, you know, really quickly — thought there was something not quite right there but didn't know what it was. hadn't seen jaundice in a two—year—old before.
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so we went straight to the emergency department at bristol royal infirmary, where i stayed with her all day, really, while they were doing tests. more and more doctors were coming in, having a look at her, and you think, "this isn't something that's, you know, they're going to give us some antibiotics and go home." i knew pretty much straight away that there was something not quite right. it became clear that clara needed a liver transplant. once a donor was found, the operation took place, but her recovery wasn't straightforward. so there's the realisation that you've got really sick child. and then there's, "is there something we can do about it?" because we knew nothing about liver disease, did we? yeah, you are just taking it literally an hour at a time and hoping that, you know... just hoping for stability, really. and there were, you know, bumps in the road, there were a lot of them. there were a few occasions where she went into theatre while we were there and, you know, that seeing her get wheeled away does not get easier
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whenever it happens — you know, seeing her put to sleep and putting your faith in these doctors when they've got your baby. yeah. tough. it was tough. yeah. she spent three months in the birmingham children's hospital — at one point being treated for a collapsed lung. it's a place she's expected to revisit often, and a place where important steps were taken. watching her learn to walk again was an amazing thing, in that it was progress, wasn't it? yeah, it was, it was. that's our life now — something will happen, we'll have a blood test and something might be off and we'll go back to birmingham. and, you know, we always say to ourselves, it's the safest place for her if something isn't quite right. and, actually, clara's quite happy there! you know, it's a familiar environment. good girl. daddy. she knows the nurses, she knows the setup, and we just have to make sure she has her trolley! she's happy. she'll take her dollies and she'll push her trolley round the ward. in common with all organ recipients,
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clara takes drugs to ensure her body doesn't reject her liver. that means her immune system is partly reduced, so she's at increased risk from viruses. she will be like that for the rest of her life, so itjust means that — especially as she's tiny, you know — it's our responsibility today to make sure that she's protected. it's about slowly introducing her to germs again and, you know, trying to allow her to be a normal two—and—a—half—year—old and, you know, picking up dirt and me not having a complete, you know, panic attack every time she picks up some mud. cup of tea? oh, i'd love a cup of tea, please. thank you. at around this age, most parents would be more than happy for their children to contract chickenpox. but the virus isn't as innocuous as you might think. many countries vaccinate against chickenpox, and some doctors believe we should follow suit. there was the chat that we had before we were discharged, you know, the liver nurses sat down with us and we got reams and reams of information. but that was the...
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they made it very, very clear that, you know, this is incredibly serious if she gets exposed to chicken pox — you know, they need to know straight away, basically, and then there is a course of action. and also the fact that she's so young. so if you've been exposed to it in your life, you may have antibodies. so if she was a little older, then maybe it wouldn't be as much of an issue. but clearly for those that are very young, chickenpox itself is highly dangerous to her. there's been this increase in cases of child hepatitis, so there are lots of other parents, you know, like us, unfortunately. there are a growing number of us now who have these incredibly vulnerable children. ready, ready, ready? clara faces a lifetime of treatment, and always being aware of what could put her at risk. but with medication, and doubtless advances in science, there's no reason why she can't live a full, happy, and hopefully very long life.
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john maguire, bbc news, north somerset. i'm very pleased to say that clara, most importantlyjoins us. no offence to the parents if you wave, clara... you will see yourself in the screen. clara was giving us a running commentary on the garden, the swing and the wendy house. time and rachael, mum and dad. professor adam finn and rachael, mum and dad. professor adam firm is also here. you as a family have been through an immense ordeal and anyone who watched that film, you have been through a lot. how are things right now? :, ., :,
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now? right now we are doing well. she has had _ now? right now we are doing well. she has had relative _ now? right now we are doing well. she has had relative stability - she has had relative stability throughout the summer, which was really at one point all that we hoped for. we have been getting out and about and doing things slowly trying to get back out and letting her he a normal girl again. that her be a normal girl again. that whole thing _ her be a normal girl again. that whole thing about _ her he a normal girl again. that whole thing about the phrase you used, getting out and about, being normal, therein lies the rub because you are... i don't want to misquote you are... i don't want to misquote you but i think you said you are terrified of what leading a normal life for a two—year—old would be in clara's case sign we are very privileged to have access to the health care that we do, and clara has an opportunity to have a great, full life. unfortunately she will remain vulnerable for the rest of her life so she will be vulnerable primarily to infection and her life so she will be vulnerable primarily to infection— her life so she will be vulnerable primarily to infection and we have had a couple _ primarily to infection and we have had a couple of _ primarily to infection and we have had a couple of instances - primarily to infection and we have had a couple of instances where l primarily to infection and we have i had a couple of instances where she has had _ had a couple of instances where she has had infection but the reality is that as _ has had infection but the reality is that as parents we will have to be
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vigilant— that as parents we will have to be vigilant of— that as parents we will have to be vigilant of her as she grows into adolescence and an adult, we will have _ adolescence and an adult, we will have to _ adolescence and an adult, we will have to teach her how to manage it as she _ have to teach her how to manage it as she gets— have to teach her how to manage it as she gets older. titre have to teach her how to manage it as she gets older.— have to teach her how to manage it as she gets older. are you not being urred and as she gets older. are you not being urged and encouraged _ as she gets older. are you not being urged and encouraged to _ as she gets older. are you not being urged and encouraged to expose - as she gets older. are you not beingj urged and encouraged to expose her to illness? , :, urged and encouraged to expose her to illness? , ., ., urged and encouraged to expose her to illness? , :, ., ., . to illness? there is a real balance that white you — to illness? there is a real balance that white you hear _ to illness? there is a real balance that white you hear the _ that white you hear the old—fashioned think, "let them play in the mud and eat worms because it is good for them." it is a different case but there is an element. that is it and we _ case but there is an element. that is it and we are _ case but there is an element. that is it and we are just _ case but there is an element. that is it and we are just starting to try and explore and find that boundaries within.— try and explore and find that boundaries within. things like takinr boundaries within. things like taking her— boundaries within. things like taking her swimming, - boundaries within. things like taking her swimming, which l boundaries within. things like | taking her swimming, which is boundaries within. things like i taking her swimming, which is a boundaries within. things like - taking her swimming, which is a huge step for us, which is normalfor most parents, to take their children to the swimming pool. iriiuihat most parents, to take their children to the swimming pool.— to the swimming pool. what about when she is _ to the swimming pool. what about when she is in _ to the swimming pool. what about when she is in the _ to the swimming pool. what about when she is in the playground - to the swimming pool. what about when she is in the playground and | when she is in the playground and you have other snotty kids, we are getting to that point of the year. we have started in the summer, which is what we were advised to do. i am with her all the time, sol is what we were advised to do. i am with her all the time, so i do a quick... does this look safe for
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her, are we ok? if anything is too busy at the moment i take her out of the situation but there will be a time when i am not to be there and it is about educating her. iriiuihille time when i am not to be there and it is about educating her.— it is about educating her. while we talk to the professor, _ it is about educating her. while we talk to the professor, clara, - it is about educating her. while we talk to the professor, clara, could| talk to the professor, clara, could you do us a picture, are you good at drawing? could you draw something for us? you need something to lean on, here you go. let's talk to adam finn. on, here you go. let's talk to adam firm. the point is, we are talking to rachael and tom, this is the chickenpox vaccine because their art vulnerable children out there and we understand this concept post covid agrees to speak to you so much about vulnerable people. what is being thought about now?— vulnerable people. what is being thought about now? more broadly, eve one thought about now? more broadly, everyone thinks — thought about now? more broadly, everyone thinks about _ thought about now? more broadly, everyone thinks about vaccines - thought about now? more broadly, everyone thinks about vaccines in l everyone thinks about vaccines in terms of their ability to protect individuals and that is true of that covid vaccine so you immunise your child so they don't get sick. most
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of the vaccines we use actually do much more than that, they eliminate the circulation of infections in the population and they will protect everybody, including people who have not had the vaccine or maybe have had it and it is no longer protecting them, but for whatever reason. certainly they protect little girls like clara, so she would be equally at risk of measles, for example, but we don't seek measles because nearly all children get immunised against measles. so turn the argument around, what is the reason for not having a vaccination programme? the evidence ofthe vaccination programme? the evidence of the risks and _ vaccination programme? the evidence of the risks and benefits _ vaccination programme? the evidence of the risks and benefits have - vaccination programme? the evidence of the risks and benefits have to - of the risks and benefits have to really be looked at carefully. there is a cost involved in buying a vaccine and delivering it and you have to look at the amount of illness you would prevent versus the cost of delivering the programme. in the case of chickenpox at the other complication is that it is a virus that once you have it you have it for life and it can come back as
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shingles later in life. you have to take all of that into account. i take all of that into account. i thought getting it chickenpox was a good thing as a kid, you have it and thenit good thing as a kid, you have it and then it goes and you have the virus but you are less likely... you don't want it as an adult.— want it as an adult. there is this widespread _ want it as an adult. there is this widespread misconception - want it as an adult. there is this | widespread misconception about chickenpox that somehow it is a mild illness and might be a good thing to have it. actually, what we are not seeing, we are not seeing the wood for the trees because so many children get a box, virtually all children, and art mildly ill. there is an ignorance about the children who end up in hospital and really sick with it. if there was note mild chickenpox we would think of it as a serious illness like we did it with meningitis. there is no such thing as mild meningitis. there arejust as mild meningitis. there arejust as many children in hospital with chickenpox as meningitis. {iii as many children in hospital with chickenpox as meningitis.- chickenpox as meningitis. of the vaccine exists _ chickenpox as meningitis. of the vaccine exists at _ chickenpox as meningitis. of the vaccine exists at this _ chickenpox as meningitis. of the vaccine exists at this moment i chickenpox as meningitis. of the vaccine exists at this moment in | vaccine exists at this moment in time and you can ask for it and it cost between £120 and £200. the point is that everyone has to do it, or the majority have to have it, for
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it to be effective. it cannotjust be something based on an individual basis, so what is the next stage, what is the process in getting it so it is widespread? if what is the process in getting it so it is widespread?— what is the process in getting it so it is widespread? if you pay for the vaccine and _ it is widespread? if you pay for the vaccine and have _ it is widespread? if you pay for the vaccine and have your _ it is widespread? if you pay for the vaccine and have your child - vaccine and have your child immunised and your child is protected against chickenpox, it does work in that way. but what we now need to do is look at all of the evidence around chickenpox, what the burden of chickenpox is, and work out on the latest evidence whether thatis out on the latest evidence whether that is something that changes the decision and that is what we do all the time, we look for new evidence and in bristol in the last few years we have been working really hide at this, looking at all the kids coming in with chickenpox, how ill they are at the impact it is having on their families. all of that evidence goes into the pot to decide what to do. i into the pot to decide what to do. i am listening to you, i promise, but i'm slightly distracted because we have a picture. i don't know if this will show up very well. what is this picture of, can you tell me? what is
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it? ~ , , , ., picture of, can you tell me? what is it? ~ , , , :, :, that picture of, can you tell me? what is it?— that is - picture of, can you tell me? what is it?— that is your i it? murphy is our dog. that is your do ? it? murphy is our dog. that is your dog? your— it? murphy is our dog. that is your dog? your dog _ it? murphy is our dog. that is your dog? your dog is _ it? murphy is our dog. that is your dog? your dog is called _ it? murphy is our dog. that is your dog? your dog is called murphy. i it? murphy is our dog. that is your l dog? your dog is called murphy. can we see that? it is in pencil, it is hard to see. maybe you can see. that is a lovely picture, and is this your garden, as well? it is is a lovely picture, and is this your garden, as well?- is a lovely picture, and is this your garden, as well? it is as wild as that. your garden, as well? it is as wild as that- as _ your garden, as well? it is as wild as that. as we _ your garden, as well? it is as wild as that. as we listen _ your garden, as well? it is as wild as that. as we listen to _ your garden, as well? it is as wild as that. as we listen to the - as that. as we listen to the professor _ as that. as we listen to the professor go _ as that. as we listen to the professor go through - as that. as we listen to the professor go through as that. as we listen to the -rofessor ro throu:h the as that. as we listen to the professor go through as that. as we listen to the -rofessor ro throu:h the science, professor go through the science, thenit professor go through the science, then it comes to your reality, doesn't it? we can hear it, that makes a lot of sense, and then there is tomorrow and what do you do tomorrow, what do you do with clara? it is difficult. tomorrow, what do you do with clara? it is difficult-— it is difficult. incredibly difficult. _ it is difficult. incredibly difficult. we _ it is difficult. incredibly difficult. we just - it is difficult. incredibly difficult. we just have l it is difficult. incredibly. difficult. we just have to it is difficult. incredibly - difficult. we just have to keep doing, keep going and exposing her to life, you know, and two things, but doing it sensibly and being educated and there will come a time when something will not be quite
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right and we will have to have a hospital stay. that is our life now, that will happen. but we have the team in birmingham and if there where an exposure to chickenpox, we know the process. we know it is a call, a hospital admission, and that will happen at some point. obviously it is a huge worry but... that's, you know... it is a huge worry but... that's, you know- - -_ it is a huge worry but... that's, you know... school starts in two ears for you know... school starts in two years for clara. _ you know... school starts in two years for clara. she _ you know... school starts in two years for clara. she cannot - you know... school starts in two years for clara. she cannot havej you know... school starts in two - years for clara. she cannot have the chickenpox — years for clara. she cannot have the chickenpox vaccine herself so it is about _ chickenpox vaccine herself so it is about getting her local community of children— about getting her local community of children the vaccine and then clearly— children the vaccine and then clearly part of that is a national roll-out — clearly part of that is a national roll—out and hopefully that will mean — roll—out and hopefully that will mean she will have limited time off school— mean she will have limited time off school and — mean she will have limited time off school and things like chickenpox are so— school and things like chickenpox are so prevalent in schools, which means _ are so prevalent in schools, which means if— are so prevalent in schools, which means if she has an exposure in her classr _ means if she has an exposure in her class i'm _ means if she has an exposure in her class, i'm sure we'll well have to take _ class, i'm sure we'll well have to take her— class, i'm sure we'll well have to take her out. whether she has it or
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not. :, .. take her out. whether she has it or not. :, ~' , :, take her out. whether she has it or not. :, ,, i. . take her out. whether she has it or not. :, ,, . ., take her out. whether she has it or not. :, . :, not. thank you so much for coming in toda . i not. thank you so much for coming in today- i love — not. thank you so much for coming in today. i love that _ not. thank you so much for coming in today. i love that little _ not. thank you so much for coming in today. i love that little ta-dah. - today. i love that little ta—dah. can you give us another ta—dah, clara? no. laughter she is not here to perform for you! thank you, clara, it has been a long time coming. tom, rachael, adam, clara, thank you. breakfast is on bbc one until 9:15 this morning — then it's time for morning live with janette and gethin. good morning. good morning. coming up on morning live... with borrowing money getting harder than ever, we investigate why your credit score could be making things worse, without you even realising. plus, rav's here to help you spot a sneaky tactic phone scammersl are using right now, - to try and steal your cash in his warning of the week. 80% of us are targeted by fraudsters on the phone. sadly some criminals have figured out a way to make their cons even more convincing by utilising "real texts" companies send to their customers.
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and from how to prepare for the winter "twindemic" of flu and covid, to what you should do if you're having a panic attack. dr punam's here to answer as many of your questions as she can in her health clinic. plus, we've got a friday feast you | can tuck into for under a tenner. | i chef theo michaels shows us how i to make an impressive sharing board filled with chicken wings and patatas bravas. - that is how i say potatoes, as well! sounds perfect for a night in front of the telly, and here's a show for you to hinge on. the new bbc drama inside man. the actor who stars alongside stanley tucci and david tenant tells us why it will have you hooked in an instant. and ahead of our kym stepping onto the strictly dance floor - for a second time tomorrow, rhys is inspiring her- with some perfect—10 moves in strictly fitness. _ he is very excited. i thought i was the excited — he is very excited. i thought i was the excited one. _ he is very excited. i thought i was the excited one. too _ he is very excited. i thought i was the excited one.—
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he is very excited. i thought i was the excited one. see you at 9:15. it is that time of the morning. they mentioned patatas bravas and it is all i want docking or maybe you have some short time and we can help deliver let you catch up good morning from bbc london. i'm thomas magill. rail passengers are being urged only to travel into london if necessary on saturday because of stike action in a long—running dispute over pay. it's the first time members from the rmt, aslef and the tssa unions will walk out at the same time, so disruption is expected to be worse than on previous strike days. a reduced timetable shows thatjust 11% of rail services will operate on saturday. well, the strike could have a knock—on impact for those taking part in sunday's london marathon, as trains will start later than normal. but that won't stop one ukrainian
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refugee couple from tower hamlets who we've spoken to about why they're taking part in the run. they're raising money for united 2a, an initiative by president zelenksy to help their home country. they've been telling why taking part will help those back home. we can show all countries that war in our country is not stopped. we will show that ukrainians are very brave, strong, and we support our country now in london. we are going to be raising money for united _ we are going to be raising money for united 24 _ we are going to be raising money for united 24 platform. it is the initiative _ united 24 platform. it is the initiative of our president volodymyr zelensky. this money will help ukrainian people during this difficult time, during the war. energy prices are set to rise fom tomorrow for many londoners as the price cap increases. it means the average household gas and electricity bill will go up to £2,500. tonight on bbc london, we'll be joined by an energy expert, so if you have a question
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on bills, readings, or how to save energy, email us at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk. well, let's see how the tube is doing this morning. there's a good service on all lines so far this morning. now the weather with kawser. hello, and a very good morning to you. well, it's a chilly start and a dry start for many, but it is all set to change as we look ahead to today, with some wet and windy weather on its way. there will be some morning sunshine for a time, a bit hazy with some patches of mist around, some high cloud. there'll be some sunshine for a time, especially further towards the east. but during the course of the day, we're expecting some clouds, some outbreaks of heavy rain spreading in from the west. and with it, some strong winds gusting potentially up to 30—a0mph. so it will be a wet evening commute for many, but that weather system will then clear through, and by the end of the night, it will turn drier. one or two showers, some clear skies, and temperatures holding up at around 10—12 celsius with that milder air. but as we look ahead to the weekend,
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well, there is some uncertainty regarding this weather front here. it could potentially bring some wet and windy weather for a time that may last until sunday morning, so it could potentially affect the london marathon as well. so there is some uncertainty for the weekend. wet and windy today. there will be some rain overnight saturday into sunday, that may last during the morning, affecting the marathon. but after that, it should become drier for monday. and that's your forecast for now. that's it from me. i'll be back in half an hour, but for now it's back to naga and charlie. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the new energy price cap comes into effect tomorrow in england, scotland and wales. hannah is here to talk us through what it all means. i know you have had lots of
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questions from people who are just thinking, tomorrow is the day, what do i do? :, , ., :, :, do i do? yeah, there is a lot of confusion _ do i do? yeah, there is a lot of confusion out _ do i do? yeah, there is a lot of confusion out there. _ do i do? yeah, there is a lot of confusion out there. a - do i do? yeah, there is a lot of confusion out there. a lot - do i do? yeah, there is a lot of confusion out there. a lot of i do i do? yeah, there is a lot of - confusion out there. a lot of people on a direct debit will have already been contacted by their energy supplier, but as you were saying earlier, naga, there are lots of scams in iran. but you would never be asked for your personal information from your energy company, so if you're hearing that kind of thing, you should be aware of it —— a lot of scams around. one thing we can be pretty sure of is that from tomorrow, unless you're on a fixed tariff your energy costs will go up, as the price cap rises, so the amount suppliers are allowed to charge per unit increases. they won't go up as much as they could have done, after the government stepped in to freeze energy prices until 202a. but an average household bill is still forecast to go up to £2,500, an increase of 27%. now of course, most of us are not average, and your bill will always be calculated according to the amount of energy you use, not limited to a maximum price. here's a guide on how to interpret your bill,
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to give you a sense of what to look out for. the first thing to look at is the amount of money you've spent during the period the bill covers. you might see the words "total charges for this period." on this one, that's £100. you're also likely to have an account balance, £300 in our example. it could be in credit or debit, depending whether you've saved up some credit with your energy supplier over the past few months, or you've used more than you've paid for. if you're a direct debit customer, there will also be a figure that shows the monthly payment to be taken from your account. here, we're saying that's £a00. the next thing to know when you look at your bill is how your energy company has worked it out. do they really know how much you're using? if your bill is estimated, you may need to provide a meter reading. now, when we talk about the price cap, that's a cap on the amount you pay per unit of energy, not a limit on your total bill.
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so if you use more, your bill will be higher. that's why the unit rate is important. it tells you how much you're paying for each bit of energy you use. on our imaginary bill, we can see the person has been paying a unit rate of 27p per kilowatt hour, and then they're also paying the standing charge here at a0p per day. it's a fee to stay connected to the network. think of it like line rental, but for your energy. from october, the government's giving everyone a discount of around £66 a month for six months. you might see that as a reduction on your bill. or some suppliers are choosing to put the money directly into customers' bank accounts instead. and remember, if you do get into difficulty paying, there should be a way of contacting your energy supplier listed on your bill. always try to get in touch with them if you need more help. well, let's dig more into what people should be looking for in their bills with emily seymour, the energy editor at which?
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good morning, thanks for coming in. what is the scale of the problem for people struggling with their energy bills even before they go up? well. bills even before they go up? well, we do research _ bills even before they go up? well, we do research which _ bills even before they go up? well, we do research which tracks - bills even before they go up? well, we do research which tracks how consumers — we do research which tracks how consumers are feeling over the year at which? _ consumers are feeling over the year at which? we already know that in august— at which? we already know that in august 2020 two, six in ten people told us _ august 2020 two, six in ten people told us they had had to do an adjustment to the way they spend because _ adjustment to the way they spend because of rising prices, so bills are going — because of rising prices, so bills are going up again tomorrow, we know people _ are going up again tomorrow, we know people have _ are going up again tomorrow, we know people have already been struggling before _ people have already been struggling before that, so coming into this winter. — before that, so coming into this winter. it— before that, so coming into this winter. it is— before that, so coming into this winter, it is going to be difficult for a _ winter, it is going to be difficult for a lot— winter, it is going to be difficult for a lot of— winter, it is going to be difficult for a lot of people. find winter, it is going to be difficult for a lot of people.— for a lot of people. and we are tellinr for a lot of people. and we are telling people _ for a lot of people. and we are telling people this _ for a lot of people. and we are telling people this morning - for a lot of people. and we are telling people this morning to | for a lot of people. and we are - telling people this morning to take a meter reading. the last time that happened, it order energy suppliers, their websites crash, people did not get through, it did not go well, what is your message in terms of that? i what is your message in terms of that? , ~ what is your message in terms of that? , ,, , what is your message in terms of that? , ~ , ., that? i still think it is important to take a meter _ that? i still think it is important to take a meter reading - that? i still think it is important to take a meter reading today, | that? i still think it is important. to take a meter reading today, just so you _ to take a meter reading today, just so you know instantly how much energy— so you know instantly how much energy you have used in september, and therefore how much are using in october. _ and therefore how much are using in october, because that is when the prices _ october, because that is when the prices will— october, because that is when the prices will be more expensive. however. _
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prices will be more expensive. however, it is important to note that you — however, it is important to note that you can, for most suppliers, you can _ that you can, for most suppliers, you can backdate your meter readingsr _ you can backdate your meter readings, so if you uploaded in a couple _ readings, so if you uploaded in a couple of— readings, so if you uploaded in a couple of days' time, next week, so what _ couple of days' time, next week, so what happened last time as everybody tries to _ what happened last time as everybody tries to do _ what happened last time as everybody tries to do it at exactly the same timer _ tries to do it at exactly the same time, there was a big panic, so you don't _ time, there was a big panic, so you don't need — time, there was a big panic, so you don't need to— time, there was a big panic, so you don't need to do that, so it is worth— don't need to do that, so it is worth clocking what your readings are today — worth clocking what your readings are today because this is the last day they— are today because this is the last day they will be lower prices. let�*s day they will be lower prices. let's talk a little — day they will be lower prices. let's talk a little bit — day they will be lower prices. let's talk a little bit about _ day they will be lower prices. let�*s talk a little bit about prepayment meters as well, we have spoken as direct debits already. for people on a prepayment meter, how do the access to discount the government is giving people over the winter? you will vet giving people over the winter? you will get some _ giving people over the winter? you will get some part of the governments discounts just on your unit ratesr — governments discounts just on your unit rates, because of course the government and energy price guarantee is on the rates that you p5y~ guarantee is on the rates that you pay so— guarantee is on the rates that you pay. so that isjust guarantee is on the rates that you pay. so that is just taken care guarantee is on the rates that you pay. so that isjust taken care of automatically. there's also this £400 _ automatically. there's also this £400 payment which everybody gets. if £400 payment which everybody gets. it you _ £400 payment which everybody gets. it you are _ £400 payment which everybody gets. if you are on a direct debits, it will be — if you are on a direct debits, it will be paid to you to your energy
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provider— will be paid to you to your energy provider can offer your energy accountr — provider can offer your energy account, but if you are on a prepayment meter, you will get a text or— prepayment meter, you will get a text or an— prepayment meter, you will get a text oran e—mail or prepayment meter, you will get a text or an e—mail or letter in the post— text or an e—mail or letter in the post to — text or an e—mail or letter in the post to tell— text or an e—mail or letter in the post to tell you how to claim that money _ post to tell you how to claim that money it — post to tell you how to claim that money. it is £67 a month initially, and you _ money. it is £67 a month initially, and you will— money. it is £67 a month initially, and you will have to take a code to wherever _ and you will have to take a code to wherever you top up your prepayment meter _ wherever you top up your prepayment meter you _ wherever you top up your prepayment meter. you were just talking about scams. _ meter. you were just talking about scams. and — meter. you were just talking about scams, and we have seen a lot of those _ scams, and we have seen a lot of those going around, a lot of texts saying _ those going around, a lot of texts saying put — those going around, a lot of texts saying put in your bank details, these _ saying put in your bank details, these are — saying put in your bank details, these are thing to know is that none of the _ these are thing to know is that none of the energy providers need your bank— of the energy providers need your bank details or any personal information from you, so if anything does ask— information from you, so if anything does ask for— information from you, so if anything does ask for that, it will be a scam — does ask for that, it will be a scam. they will give you a code to id scam. they will give you a code to go on _ scam. they will give you a code to go on claimr — scam. they will give you a code to go on claim, but that is all they will need — go on claim, but that is all they will need. : go on claim, but that is all they will need-— go on claim, but that is all they willneed. :, , , will need. and of course, people are really struggling _ will need. and of course, people are really struggling to _ will need. and of course, people are really struggling to pay, _ will need. and of course, people are really struggling to pay, they - really struggling to pay, they should of course get in touch with their energy supplier to see what support is out there. thank you very much for coming in and talking to us this morning, emily.— this morning, emily. thank you. hannah, thanks _ this morning, emily. thank you. hannah, thanks very _ this morning, emily. thank you. hannah, thanks very much. - this morning, emily. thank you. hannah, thanks very much. all. this morning, emily. thank you. - hannah, thanks very much. all good advice. we will keep you up—to—date with that story and all the
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developments. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. some fog around so far this morning across parts of england. away from that, it's honest that for some of you. but it won't last, grab some of the process that is still dry with you at the moment because rain is on the way to just about all parts. that fog quickly cleared in the next few hours of the piece picks up. as well as wet, quite windy, windiest and wettest in parts of scotland and northern ireland. some of the heaviest bursts of rain will happen before it clears, out towards the far west. rain spreading now into some parts of eastern scotland through the rest of eastern scotland through the rest of this morning, to parts of north—west england, western parts of wales, too. by lunchtime, it will push into midlands and parts of eastern england. east anglia, south—east, some of you, specially further east you are, will stay dry as you head into evening here. temperatures higher still on 16 to 17 celsius. but the wind picking up around the rain bands, gusting at a0
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mph if not more. easing off later as we see something come back with a few showers for evening. temperatures dropping, a much fresher end to the day. the aim of this evening across southern and eastern parts of england, clearing by around midnight, then clear spells and showers. showers mainly across northern and western areas tonight, and temperatures through innate into tomorrow, kept up by the breeze, but still a bit cooler tonight across scotland and northern ireland compared with last night. then into the weekend, what of dry weather random saturday, especially further south and east. showers for scotland and northern ireland and northern england especially. sunday, switch things around, drier and brighterfurther switch things around, drier and brighter further north with lighter winds. furthersouth brighter further north with lighter winds. further south across parts of southern london and wales, potential for some heavy rain, which could impact the london marathon, too. things could change, i will update the forecast throughout the morning. the good thing as nobody wanted to warn when it comes to the london marathon, so good temperatures so
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far. �* :, , ., , far. brilliant temperature, 'ust the rain. far. brilliant temperature, 'ust the some — far. brilliant temperature, 'ust the rain. some people * far. brilliant temperature, 'ust the rain. some people like _ far. brilliant temperature, just the rain. some people like running - far. brilliant temperature, just the rain. some people like running in. rain. some people like running in the rain, but nature you get down there to support people.- there to support people. thanks, matt, there to support people. thanks, matt. take _ there to support people. thanks, matt, take care. _ a moment ago, they were all taking the mick out of me because i looked at the wrong screen. i bet you never did in all of your broadcasting career. bill did in all of your broadcasting career. : did in all of your broadcasting career-_ it - did in all of your broadcasting i career._ it happens, career. all the time! it happens, doesnt career. all the time! it happens, doesn't it? _ career. all the time! it happens, doesn't it? to _ career. all the time! it happens, doesn't it? to be _ career. all the time! it happens, doesn't it? to be fair _ career. all the time! it happens, doesn't it? to be fair to - career. all the time! it happens, doesn't it? to be fair to our- doesn't it? to be fair to our director, because charlie seems to be putting the blame that way, if you were told, matt is in naga's screen, you would kind of turn that way. our camera person that decided to let matt know who naga is. it’s a to let matt know who naga is. it's a lone to let matt know who naga is. it's a long programme- — to let matt know who naga is. it's a long programme. if— to let matt know who naga is. it's a long programme. if i _ to let matt know who naga is. it's a long programme. if i were - to let matt know who naga is. it's a long programme. if i were to - long programme. if i were to say, sue barker. _ long programme. if i were to say, sue barker, camera _ long programme. if i were to say, sue barker, camera five - long programme. if i were to say, sue barker, camera five now. - long programme. if i were to say, i sue barker, camera five now. apart i have cold up the wrong camera anywhere because you are on camera
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two, but there you go, what do i know? lovely to see you. you have been writing a story about your own life. has that been emotional? unbelievably so.— life. has that been emotional? unbelievably so. life. has that been emotional? unbelievabl so. ~ :, , , ., :, unbelievably so. what bits have got ou most? unbelievably so. what bits have got you most? going — unbelievably so. what bits have got you most? going back— unbelievably so. what bits have got you most? going back to _ unbelievably so. what bits have got you most? going back to my- unbelievably so. what bits have got you most? going back to myjunior| you most? going back to my 'unior da s into you most? going back to my 'unior days into this i you most? going back to my 'unior days into this dualism * you most? going back to my 'unior days into this dualism that h you most? going back to my 'unior days into this dualism that i h days into this dualism that i expected so much. i loved playing tennis, my dad had to drop me off at courts for me to play every single evening, ijust expected him to do that, even though it was a half—hour dry away, or if i got the bus, a couple of bus changes. —— a half—hour drive. everything my coach went through, all the sacrifices they made, and i think, did i thank them enough for what they did? because at the time, you are so swept up in your dreams that you don't think about it.— don't think about it. luckily for ou, don't think about it. luckily for your dreams — don't think about it. luckily for you, dreams came _ don't think about it. luckily for you, dreams came true. - don't think about it. luckily for you, dreams came true. to - don't think about it. luckily for you, dreams came true. to a i don't think about it. luckily for - you, dreams came true. to a certain extent, you, dreams came true. to a certain extent. yes- —
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you, dreams came true. to a certain extent, yes. let's _ you, dreams came true. to a certain extent, yes. let's take _ you, dreams came true. to a certain extent, yes. let's take a _ you, dreams came true. to a certain extent, yes. let's take a look. - yes! no point giving me numbers, just point to that one. good evening and welcome to london 2012. _
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have you had time to breathe and that those emotions go? hie. have you had time to breathe and that those emotions go?- that those emotions go? no, this ear's that those emotions go? no, this year's wimbledon _ that those emotions go? no, this year's wimbledon absolutely - that those emotions go? no, this| year's wimbledon absolutely blew that those emotions go? no, this - year's wimbledon absolutely blew me away from everything that happened. i knew it would be emotional, but i never imagined just how emotional that centenary day. it was made when roger federer came over and walked out centre court, i was so pleased he was able do that as a player this year, but for me to walk out and be on centre court, forjohn mcenroe to go off script and do that, to say, give it up for sue barker, and then to get a standing ovation, honestly, these are the people that watch wimbledon, and these are the people you do yourjob for. and then that
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man, tim henman, forthe you do yourjob for. and then that man, tim henman, for the first time in his life interrupted me to bring that tribute which was embarrassing but incredibly wonderful, to everyone to say such nice things, it was just a sendoff that i could not imagine, it was so far beyond that, it was just imagine, it was so far beyond that, it wasjust magical. imagine, it was so far beyond that, it was just magical. iriiiiellll imagine, it was so far beyond that, it was just magical.— it was 'ust magical. well deserved. and it was just magical. well deserved. and billie jean _ it was just magical. well deserved. and billie jean king, _ it was just magical. well deserved. and billie jean king, she _ it was just magical. well deserved. and billie jean king, she gave - it was just magical. well deserved. and billie jean king, she gave me. it wasjust magical. well deserved. i and billie jean king, she gave me my and billiejean king, she gave me my career, you know, if village and haven't won the battle of the sexes backin haven't won the battle of the sexes back in 1973, i member my coach phoned me up and said, suddenly, sue, your hobby is now your career. you had better explain, for those people who do not know that moment in time, billiejean king was challenged to take on bobby riggs, took on the challenge, as absurd as it was, shejust took on the challenge, as absurd as it was, she just went, all right, then. it was, she 'ust went, all right, then. : , , ., .,, then. absolutely, and it was the bi est then. absolutely, and it was the biggest global — then. absolutely, and it was the biggest global television - then. absolutely, and it was the biggest global television event i then. absolutely, and it was the i biggest global television event that they had ever been, and this was
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1973. i didn't realise how much it meant, ijust thought it 1973. i didn't realise how much it meant, i just thought it was 1973. i didn't realise how much it meant, ijust thought it was billie jean standing up for what she believed in, which obviously she was, but at the time, billiejean noticed that the men and women were sharing events, but suddenly there were more men playing anti—women were more men playing anti—women were getting squeezed out, and she knew she had to get a tour on its own if we were to survive, so she took this guy on and played the match of her life, and won it. —— and the women were getting squeezed out. it changed everything, we got sponsors, we started a tour around america, ijoined, and billiejean king sat me down and said, you have got to sell the tour, you have to make it happen. she was such a great meant aught to me. we started off in little country clubs in america with about 500 to 1000 people. within two years, we were selling out madison square garden because martin had joined, virginia, margaret cort, evonne goolagong, it was a who's who of tennis. so exciting to see tennis
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grow, it was wonderful to be a part of it. :, :, grow, it was wonderful to be a part of it. :, ., :, . . of it. you have got so much chutzpah and cheek- — of it. you have got so much chutzpah and cheek- i — of it. you have got so much chutzpah and cheek. i have _ of it. you have got so much chutzpah and cheek. i have been _ of it. you have got so much chutzpah and cheek. i have been listening - of it. you have got so much chutzpah and cheek. i have been listening to i and cheek. i have been listening to your book, actually, and what shall i say? the goal you had of showing up i say? the goal you had of showing up on the tennis court when you're coach of many years, who never charged you apart from £1, you can explain that in a moment, you knew you were not the best when your school was being scouted, but you were determined to show off, and even though you didn't have the technique, but you had talent, and you had pure grit and determination, which has obviously put you in good stead throughout your career. it is that one moment in time of that changed everything. it that one moment in time of that changed everything.— that one moment in time of that changed everything. it was, that day chanred changed everything. it was, that day changed my life- _ changed everything. it was, that day changed my life. i— changed everything. it was, that day changed my life. i sort _ changed everything. it was, that day changed my life. i sort of knew- changed my life. i sort of knew it as the time —— at the time because i love tennis, i was 11, it was my first year at the senior school, and
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arthur roberts, this famous coach in devon, turned up each year to select two players from each year, because this school was the best in the uk for five years in a row. this school was the best in the uk forfive years in a row. we this school was the best in the uk for five years in a row. we only had 198 pupils, and he turned up, he picked out the best straight away, and i thought, i am picked out the best straight away, and i thought, iam not picked out the best straight away, and i thought, i am not the second best but i have to get his attention, so i ran round like an idiot trying to look enthusiastic, and luckily he called me over. and it was because i had actually played a shot on the wrong foot and stayed bounced, and he thought, that is what i am looking for, notjust technique of how it is textbook, it is doing something often, and he selected me, so i went next week at eight and £1 for my tennis lesson. i was in the 11, and he said, do you know what this means? i said, no i won't. he said, it means you are paying me and therefore you can tell me what to do. i said, ok. he said,
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if you come back tomorrow and you don't pay me £1, can i tell you what to do? i thought, what a result of this is! and that is the only money i ever paid him. and i don't want you to think i am really tight, because i did try. we were not owning the huge amounts of money that the players are today, i think my whole prize money today, somebody reaches a semifinal at wimbledon once, they would properly have made more than i did, but it was still a lot of money. i kept asking mr roberts if i could pay him. he said, i don't want your money, you will need your money when you retire. i felt so guilty, i said, i am going to give you this money, sol felt so guilty, i said, i am going to give you this money, so i give him four checks for thousands of pounds, and what i didn't realise was that he went straight to my dad was that he went straight to my dad was that he went straight to my dad was that check and they both went down and opened up four unit trusts for me —— cheque. arthur died in the 1987, and i didn't know it at the time, and in 1989, the first of
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these unit trusts arrived on my doormat, the money he had invested was now five times the money. and then there was another 1a years later, another 1a years later. i just thought, what a man he was, you know, amazing. i just thought, what a man he was, you know. amazing-— know, amazing. i will give you the opportunity _ know, amazing. i will give you the opportunity to _ know, amazing. i will give you the opportunity to name-drop - opportunity to name—drop shamelessly. i want you to paint a picture of you playing doubles with bjorn borg. picture of you playing doubles with b'orn born. 3 picture of you playing doubles with b'orn borr. �*, , :, ., bjorn borg. let's 'ust savour that moment. the — bjorn borg. let'sjust savour that moment. the story _ bjorn borg. let'sjust savour that moment. the story i _ bjorn borg. let'sjust savour that moment. the story i have - bjorn borg. let'sjust savour that moment. the story i have heard| bjorn borg. let'sjust savour that l moment. the story i have heard is that ou moment. the story i have heard is that you and _ moment. the story i have heard is that you and bjorn _ moment. the story i have heard is that you and bjorn borg _ moment. the story i have heard is that you and bjorn borg on - moment. the story i have heard is that you and bjorn borg on one i moment. the story i have heard is. that you and bjorn borg on one side of the net, ali nastase on the other side of the net, i don't know who the other... side of the net, i don't know who the other- - -_ side of the net, i don't know who the other. . .- the - side of the net, i don't know who the other. . .- the wild i side of the net, i don't know who i the other. . .- the wild man the other... martina. the wild man of tennis the other. .. martina. the wild man of tennis at— the time, ilie nastase. how long did
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it take for you to get over the fact you were playing bjorn borg —— playing with bjorn borg? i you were playing bjorn borg -- playing with bjorn borg? playing with b'orn borg? i don't think i'm playing with bjorn borg? i don't think i'm over— playing with bjorn borg? i don't think i'm over it _ playing with bjorn borg? i don't think i'm over it still. _ playing with bjorn borg? i don't think i'm over it still. he - playing with bjorn borg? i don't. think i'm over it still. he changed the game. i was on a clay court, which helped us, because we were both playing mainly from the back of the court, and martina and ilie were coming in all the time. martina was serving, and bjorn borg said to me, ilie is going to try to come down this lane. martina's serve came to my forehand, exactly what bjorn said, he tried to cross, i went straight down the line, winner, and then we were up 0—30. bjorn said, it then we were up 0—30. bjorn said, it the same again, he is going to try it again. the crowd went mad, because they love it when the girl hits pasty man. ilie was not happy, so at the change of ends, we broke and went up to— one, who want to—
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one, he what passed me and said, don't ever do that again. —— went up 2-1. don't ever do that again. —— went up 2—1. bjorn stood up and said, don't talk to her. if you have anything to say, talk to me. and i thought, he is even more my hero now! and we won, and he never asked me to play again, but it doesn't matter, unbeaten record.— again, but it doesn't matter, unbeaten record. :, , :, unbeaten record. have you ever lost that delight. — unbeaten record. have you ever lost that delight, that _ unbeaten record. have you ever lost that delight, that awe, _ unbeaten record. have you ever lost that delight, that awe, in _ that delight, that awe, in the presence of great players? you have moved into broadcasting and had an amazing time. filth. moved into broadcasting and had an amazing time-— moved into broadcasting and had an amazing time. oh, i have had a great time. amazing time. oh, i have had a great time- could — amazing time. oh, i have had a great time. could not _ amazing time. oh, i have had a great time. could not have _ amazing time. oh, i have had a great time. could not have been _ amazing time. oh, i have had a great time. could not have been better. ii time. could not have been better. i didn't know what i was going to do, because i didn't have enough money, i had to get a job. if i haven't messed up in 1977 and won wimbledon, i probably wouldn't have had to, but every cloud. i have absolutely loved to have two careers that i have
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loved so much and travel the world and do the things, and tadhg a question of sport. i and do the things, and tadhg a question of sport.— and do the things, and tadhg a question of sport. i 'ust want to make h question of sport. i 'ust want to make sure people _ question of sport. i just want to make sure people know, - question of sport. i just want to make sure people know, you i question of sport. i just want to | make sure people know, you the french open. == make sure people know, you the french open-— french open. -- presenting a question _ french open. -- presenting a question of _ french open. -- presenting a question of sport. _ french open. -- presenting a question of sport. i - french open. -- presenting a question of sport. i did, - french open. -- presenting a question of sport. i did, butl french open. -- presenting a i question of sport. i did, but the dream was wimbledon. moving into tennis, the bbc let me do commonwealth games, olympics... you sa the commonwealth games, olympics... you say they like _ commonwealth games, olympics... you say they like you, you and at. don't forget that. this business is competitive, you have to bring not only in knowledge but also hard—working ethic. —— you earned it. i alluded to it, when you were a kid, you have to bring that to it. absolutely, and i think mr roberts gave me the tools to almost winter that can do, because he said never be afraid to take on a challenge.
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don't shy away from it. he said, always go for it, and do not be afraid to fail. in always go for it, and do not be afraid to fail.— always go for it, and do not be afraid to fail. in the book, you do not shy away _ afraid to fail. in the book, you do not shy away from _ afraid to fail. in the book, you do not shy away from a _ afraid to fail. in the book, you do not shy away from a question i afraid to fail. in the book, you do not shy away from a question of| not shy away from a question of sport, which came to an end for you, and you do not shy away from telling your side of that study, which is not, i will not have someone, in this case the bbc, laying out what you thought to be a false narrative about a sequence of events. yes. you thought to be a false narrative about a sequence of events. yes, it is such a shame, _ about a sequence of events. yes, it is such a shame, because _ about a sequence of events. yes, it is such a shame, because the - about a sequence of events. yes, it is such a shame, because the bbc. about a sequence of events. yes, it i is such a shame, because the bbc had told us we were going. they wanted told us we were going. they wanted to refresh the programme, which is absolutely fine, everybody has a right to do that, we do not own the programme. i have had 2a amazing years working with the most incredible people. we knew it was going to happen, it was just the way in which it happened under the way it was handled, and the way i think the bbc wanted me to sort of say that i was walking away from it, but i would never walk away from a job i love. i don't mind being replaced, absolutely fine, that happens. but it was just the way it was handled,
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and i think, you know, we regret the way it was handled, if we look back on it we could have handled it better, i think the bbc could have handled it better. it is just such a shame, because i loved it, and i don't look back on it badlyjust because of a couple of bad days and then some negative publicity, which i think affected quite a lot of people. i think affected quite a lot of r-eole. ~ :. i think affected quite a lot of healer ., ., ,, , i think affected quite a lot of r-eole.r ., ., ,, , ., i think affected quite a lot of v-eole. ., , ., ~ i think affected quite a lot of --eole.~ ., ., ,, , ., . people. what happens now? are you sto- alnt people. what happens now? are you stopping broadcasting? _ people. what happens now? are you stopping broadcasting? what - people. what happens now? are you stopping broadcasting? what are - people. what happens now? are you | stopping broadcasting? what are you going to do? i stopping broadcasting? what are you rroin to do? . stopping broadcasting? what are you rroin to do? , :, going to do? i will be 'oining you and the stands. h going to do? i will be 'oining you and the stands. i _ going to do? i will be joining you and the stands. i have _ going to do? i will be joining you and the stands. i have seen - going to do? i will be joining you and the stands. i have seen you| and the stands. i have seen you two round the tennis circuit. i am going to be a fan. i round the tennis circuit. i am going to be a fan-— to be a fan. i think you'll have a rood to be a fan. i think you'll have a good seat- _ to be a fan. i think you'll have a good seat- i— to be a fan. i think you'll have a good seat. i don't _ to be a fan. i think you'll have a good seat. i don't know, - to be a fan. i think you'll have a good seat. i don't know, but. to be a fan. i think you'll have a good seat. i don't know, but i i good seat. i don't know, but i will ro good seat. i don't know, but i will no back good seat. i don't know, but i will go back to — good seat. i don't know, but i will go back to wimbledon, _ good seat. i don't know, but i will go back to wimbledon, watch - good seat. i don't know, but i will go back to wimbledon, watch the | go back to wimbledon, watch the british players, watch thejuniors. i remember watching roger federer in 1998 and one of the outside courts thinking, wow. did 1998 and one of the outside courts thinking. wow-— 1998 and one of the outside courts thinking, wow. did you cry when you saw rover thinking, wow. did you cry when you saw roger federer? _ thinking, wow. did you cry when you saw roger federer? yeah, - thinking, wow. did you cry when you saw roger federer? yeah, that - thinking, wow. did you cry when you saw roger federer? yeah, that was| saw roger federer? yeah, that was sad. not saw roger federer? yeah, that was sad- not sad. _ saw roger federer? yeah, that was sad. not sad, he _ saw roger federer? yeah, that was sad. not sad, he is— saw roger federer? yeah, that was sad. not sad, he is 41, _ saw roger federer? yeah, that was
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sad. not sad, he is 41, he - saw roger federer? yeah, that was sad. not sad, he is 41, he has - saw roger federer? yeah, that was sad. not sad, he is 41, he has had i sad. not sad, he is al, he has had the most amazing career. the friendship _ the most amazing career. the friendship between those four, roger federer, rafa nadal, nowak djokovic, andy madley, we have enjoyed the competition, but they are friends as well. —— andy murray. the competition, but they are friends as well. -- andy murray.— well. -- andy murray. the battle to have them — well. -- andy murray. the battle to have them now _ well. -- andy murray. the battle to have them now have _ well. -- andy murray. the battle to have them now have four _ well. -- andy murray. the battle to have them now have four who - well. -- andy murray. the battle to have them now have four who were | well. -- andy murray. the battle to - have them now have four who were win the most grand slams, what an era we have been lucky enough to witness. you have been part of it. yes. have been lucky enough to witness. you have been part of it.— you have been part of it. yes, the 'o of you have been part of it. yes, the joy of working _ you have been part of it. yes, the joy of working on _ you have been part of it. yes, the joy of working on court _ you have been part of it. yes, the joy of working on court and - you have been part of it. yes, the| joy of working on court and talking to them all, it has been great fun. i have loved it. it has been lovely having you here this morning. just a little sampling of some amazing moments. you can hear loads of fabulous stories in sue's autobiography. it is cold calling the shots, it is out now. you are watching bbc breakfast, the time is 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. after a chaotic week on the financial markets. the prime minister and chancellor will today meet the head of britain's independent economic forecaster. the government continues to defend its plans. we to defend its plans. had to act really quickly last friday we had to act really quickly last friday to give people the confidence on energy. with the price of energy going up tomorrow... how is the current economic uncertainty affecting you? let me know any thoughts or questions you have on energy bills. you can reach me on twitter, @annitabbc, or using the hashtag bbcyourquestions. moscow prepares to hold a ceremony to mark the annexation of occupied
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territories in ukraine, but the us says it will never recognise russia's claims.

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