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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2022 10:00pm-10:30pm BST

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liz truss now says the mini—budget could have been better handled, but says there'll be no u—turn on the scale of the tax cuts. i do stand by the package we announced, and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly, because we had to act. but i do accept we should have laid the ground better. let's not muddy the water with this other thing, this tax cut for wealthy people right now, when the priority needs to be on everyday households. we'll be looking at the government's signals on spending cuts — and at a new week ahead on the financial markets. also tonight:
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indonesia mourns the 125 people lost in a stampede during a football match. explosions on the frontline in eastern ukraine, as its soldiers battle for every inch of territory. we have to be careful here. we've been told there is a russian sniper operating from that direction. for the troops here, this is a grind — day and night — a hard battle to hold this position and stop the russians from pushing into bakhmut. and they came in all shapes, sizes and costumes — more than 40,000 runners have taken part in this year's london marathon. good evening. the government should have "laid the ground better" before unveiling its plan for major tax cuts — the prime minister admitted today, acknowleding the turmoil on the financial markets that
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followed the mini—budget nine days ago. she did, however, defend its content, including removing the top rate of income tax for the highest earners. tonight, another prominent conservative has questioned that policy — as the party gathers in birmingham for its annual conference. 0ur political editor chris mason is there. the first party conference for a new leader is meant to be a celebrate aree affair, even in a difficult time for the country, something of a victory lap. and yet here we are, for liz truss at her first conference and tonight a second former cabinet minister tells this programme that they think her plans are misguided and more than that, grant shapps tells us that 45p tax rate being got rid of for the highest earners will not command a majority of support in the house of commons and so is doomed to fail. it is worth saying that those who are
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speaking out publicly against liz truss at the moment are those who did not back herfor the leadership in the first place. but they are illustrative of a deeper well of private anguish here. liz truss facing the music. smile for the cameras. this is what close scrutiny looks like when you are a prime minister and chancellor, especially after the week they've had. a penny for what they're whispered small talk was about after their big joint decisions had huge consequences. earlier, in a bbc interview, the prime minister's first acknowledgement that she'd made mistakes. i do want to say to people that i understand their worries about what has happened this week and i do stand by the package we announced and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly, because we had to act, but i do accept we should have laid the ground better.
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i have learnt from that and i will make sure that in future we do a betterjob of laying the ground. 0ne element of the budget plans that angers many conservative mps is the tax cuts for the very highest earners, and so there is an obvious question. are you absolutely committed to abolishing the 45p tax rate for the wealthiest people in the country? yes, and it's part, laura, it is part of an overall package of making our tax system simpler and lower. but i think it's worth noting in the package we announced, the vast majority of that package is the energy package. an energy package costing billions but overshadowed by the tax cuts. did you discuss scrapping the top rate with your whole cabinet? no, no, we didn't. it was a decision that the chancellor made. cabinet isolated from what was coming, a prime minister isolated after what came next.
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market turmoil and the pound plunging almost as fast as the confidence of conservative mps. watching, with his verdict on what he'd heard, a familiar face, no fan of liz truss, who is still not convinced. the sheer risk of using borrowed money to fund tax cuts, - that is not conservative. to have as your principal decision the headline tax move, _ cutting tax for the wealthiest, that is a display _ of the wrong values. it's not unusual for left—wing protesters to rather noisily articulate their opposition to the conservatives outside their conference, but what is striking this year if there are blunt voices of opposition to the prime minister inside too. tonight, another intervention from another former cabinet minister who told me the cut in tax for the richest is so unpopular, mps will reject it.
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the problem is, and i noticed this talking to my constituents this weekend, that what they are seeing is money being borrowed in order to fund tax cuts for the better off whilst they themselves are having to, for example, take on a second shift, anotherjob, in order to pay for the rise in interest rates and mortgage rates. but let's not muddy the water with this other thing, this tax cut for wealthy people right now when the priority needs to be done everyday households. in yourjudgment, will the prime minister be able to get these budgetary measures through the house of commons? no, unfortunately, and really this is the backstop, i don't think the house is in a place where it's likely to support that. how helpful is it to intervene publicly now, so soon after a new prime minister has taken office? i mean this to be entirely helpful. there is a way through this but the way through isn't put fingers in the ear, tin ears, and just push on. not yet a month in the job, liz truss�* first party conference as prime minister
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is anything but a honeymoon. in the next few days here, she will need to douse her party and the country in bucketfuls of reassurance. chris mason, bbc news, in birmingham. we're still seven weeks away from the date given by the government to set out how it plans to lower public debt. today, liz truss didn't rule out cuts in public spending. the global financial markets are just beginning their trading week and tomorrow, the chancellor will address the conservative party conference. 0ur economics editor, faisal islam is here. does it make a difference that she did have this acknowledgement today that the mini—budget could have been handled better? i that the mini-budget could have been handled better?— handled better? i think that acknowledgement - handled better? i think that acknowledgement contains | handled better? i think that - acknowledgement contains within it an implicit admission that the mini—budget, that there was a connection at least in part between the mini—budget and debt markets last week and that is closest to the consensus thinking in markets and in economics that hard numbers were
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needed. but this does also raise some challenges because hard numbers need some clear policies and we also heard from the prime minister that there wouldn't be any tax rises to fill any fiscal holes. that they want growth to do some of the job but that is down to the independent forecasters to decide whether the plans will generate enough growth. so you're left with spending cuts and considerable spending cuts. we don't know exactly how much but somewhere between a view tens of billions of pounds and several tens of billions of pounds, depending on all those factors that i identified. that is highly immaterial. you are talking about a spending cap package the size of george 0sborne's austerity package in the 2010s if those numbers are correct and the choices are either cut back on infrastructure, built environment, roads, buildings, but what will you do in that case with the promises to level up? you also have the possibility of cutting back on
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departmental spending at a time, post—pandemic, when many hospitals and schools and courts are doing post—pandemic catch up. or cutting back on benefits and tax credits. so challenge either way and it becomes a political challenge. thank you. let's no political challenge. thank you. let's go back— political challenge. thank you. let's go back to _ political challenge. thank you. let's go back to birmingham i political challenge. thank you. l let's go back to birmingham and speak again to chris mason. when you put of all this together politically, does she have a problem on her hands within the conservative ranks? , ., , ., , ranks? there is no question, she absolutely _ ranks? there is no question, she absolutely does. _ ranks? there is no question, she absolutely does. people - ranks? there is no question, she absolutely does. people here - ranks? there is no question, she i absolutely does. people here want her to succeed because herfate is tied to theirs, but there is a deep well of worry here. as one senior figure put it to me, first impressions matter because first impressions matter because first impressions are lasting in the first impressions are lasting in the first impressions for many people of the new prime minister have been terrible. there were one or two people whispering that the prime minister cannot survive this but far more people are saying that would be absurd to try and remove her so soon in office. but they fear that her reputation won't survive this, even
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if she manages to. in the short term, there is this attempt to try and remove some of the unpopular elements of her budget plans, particularly that tax cut for the richest, with those voices saying it will not pass parliament. what we will not pass parliament. what we will get from the prime minister and chancellor as soon as tomorrow when he is on bbc breakfast and the today programme is an attempt to reassure, but at the same time, to stick to his and her plans, at least for as long as the party will stand it will not pass parliament.— long as the party will stand it will not pass parliament. what we will aet from not pass parliament. what we will get from the _ not pass parliament. what we will get from the prime _ not pass parliament. what we will get from the prime minister - not pass parliament. what we will get from the prime minister and l get from the prime minister and chancellor as soon as tomorrow when he is on bbc breakfast and the today programme is an attempt to reassure, but at the same time, to stick to his and her plans, at least for as long as the party will stand them. chris, thank you very much. and you can keep across all the updates, news and analysis from the conservative party conference on bbc news 0nline — that's bbc.co.uk/news — and by using the bbc news app. memorials are being held in indonesia, after at least 125 people were killed in a stampede at a football stadium — after police fired tear gas at fans who had invaded the pitch.
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it happened in malang, on the island ofjava, from where our correspondent valdya baraputri reports. and a warning that you might find parts of her report distressing. the night after the tragedy, indonesian supporters returned to the kanjuruhan stadium. dozens walked around the area holding candles and chanting prayers. the night ended with a defeat to the home club. supporters went to the pitch to express their disappointment to players and officials, and then indonesian police tear gassed the crowd and people ran to the exit, only to find that they were closed. tonight, people gathered at the statue of the club mascot, where they put flowers and candles. this man lost a friend he watched football games with, but he didn't go on that fateful day. he hopes his friend, a father of two children, will getjustice. translation: i am in shock. i thought the atmosphere at football
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games had been getting better — more family—friendly. behind me, people are remembering the victims of the tragedy. they pray and put candles at one of the gates that people tried to get out from, but failed. cornered and desperate supporters punched the wall to try to get out. more than 100 people died, some here on the scene, and many others at the hospital. valdya baraputri, bbc news. nato's secretary general says the recapture of a town in eastern ukraine — within the territory russia just declared it had annexed — shows that ukrainians can push back against vladimir putin's forces. the re—taking of lyman is a significant gain for ukraine, but there is a large part of the east and south of the country, which you can see here in red, which russia controls. in bakhmut, close to the frontline, our senior international
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correspondent 0rla guerin and camera journalist goktay koraltan have seen how the war is a punishing one for ukrainian soldiers. explosions. at the frontline with the guns in action, the order is — run. we reach ukrainian positions in the city of bakhmut. we can't say where. but the russians are close, we are told. just 400 meters away. troops are standing their ground here, but in this corner of the donetsk region, it's tough. 0leksandr leads the unit. and knows the cost of war... ..not only from fighting his own battles. "my brother died", he says, "but i don't know
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"where and when exactly, because he was drafted "by a different drafting office in a different region. "as well as my brother, a few of my comrades died." as battles rage just beyond the building, they deploy one of the key weapons of this conflict. drone buzzes. the drone operator has become a father since the war began. he has seen his baby son, carrillo, only once. he's fighting, he says, to stop the russians committing more atrocities. "i don't want them to do what they did in bucha", he tells me. "i lived in kiyv.
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"i understand very well what women feel. "if we are weak, they will come for ourfamilies." so, they defend every inch of territory. gunfire and explosions. we've been hearing plenty of shelling, but not just shelling. there's small arms fire, which suggests that the russians and the ukrainians are not far apart. we have to be careful here. we've been told there is a russian sniper operating from that direction. for the troops here, this is a grind — day and night — a hard battle to hold this position and stop the russians from pushing into bakhmut. president putin claims this is now his — part of the territory he officially annexed on friday. soldiers here say he's deluded. the city centre bears the scars of his attacks...
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..and echoes to the sounds of his war. imagine this was your home — torn to pieces. it seems abandoned. then, ludmilla peeks out. a pensioner who cannot walk — defenceless and terrified. she tells us most of her neighbours have gone and the building is leaking. "a man was killed in the yard yesterday", she says. but she and her husband don't have money to leave. at the cemetery, on the city's edge, a last goodbye for a loved one. there are plenty of fresh graves here for those killed in recent months. explosions
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suddenly, an exchange of shelling. in—coming rounds are getting closer. neither the dead nor the living are safe here. let's go, guys, let's go. let's go. 0rla guerin, bbc news, bakhmut. a man has died after a shooting in west belfast this afternoon. police say two masked men shot the victim multiple times in the donegal celtic fc social club before fleeing the scene. officers have launched a murder investigation and are urging anyone with information to contact them. votes are being counted in brazil after a presidential election that could bring about a return to power for a man first elected president 20 years ago. leftist luiz inacio lula da silva has been challenging the incumbent president, the right—wing jair bolsonaro.
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in his four year term, he's faced criticism for his handling of the economy and the pandemic — and for a surge in the destruction of the amazon rainforest, something lula is promising to overturn. brazil's electoral system requires that a candidate win more than 50% of the valid votes cast — otherwise the contest goes into a second round. 0ur south america correspondent, katy watson, is in sao paulo tonight. how is it looking? i am how is it looking? iam in how is it looking? i am in the heart of sao paulo, latin america's largest city in the city most closely associated with lula. in the last few hours, his fans have been gathering below me in expectation of a win. these elections have been billed as the most important elections for brazil since the country returned to democracy in the 1980s because the very future of the country's
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democracy is in question. jair bolsonaro as he cast his vote said clean elections need to be respected and that is the problem. he has long called into question the electronic voting system, he has alleged fraud with no evidence to back it up but it is a narrative his supporters agree with. and now, whether it goes to a second round or it is won in the first round in the next hour or so, there is a lot of uncertainty. what many people are asking is if tropical trump as he is known will follow the example of donald trump and question the result or will he accept them peacefully? kat? and question the result or will he accept them peacefully? katy watson, in sao paulo. — accept them peacefully? katy watson, in sao paulo, thank _ accept them peacefully? katy watson, in sao paulo, thank you. _ and now the sport — with cricket, the london marathon and the manchester derby — over to chetan pathak. at the bbc sport centre, hello. good evening. england's first tour of pakistan in 17 years has ended in victory, after they beat the hosts by 67 runs to win their t20 series decider in lahore. 0ur sports correspondent
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andy swiss was watching. the tightest of series with the most one—sided of endings. but england won't mind that. under the lights of lahore, their batons had earlier blazed away. he lahore, their batons had earlier blazed away-— lahore, their batons had earlier blazed away. he has nailed that! dawid malan _ blazed away. he has nailed that! dawid malan set _ blazed away. he has nailed that! dawid malan set the _ blazed away. he has nailed that! dawid malan set the tone - blazed away. he has nailed that! dawid malan set the tone with l blazed away. he has nailed that! dawid malan set the tone with a | dawid malan set the tone with a swashbuckling 78 although pakistan's fielders gave them a hefty helping hand. they spilled a string of easy chances. forthe hand. they spilled a string of easy chances. for the home fans, just one of those days. by the time harry brook weighed in with a feisty a6, england, like the ball, were almost out of sight. pakistan's target, 210. but amid the clatter of early wickets, they never came close. and once reece topley had sent the bails flying, there was effectively game over. the victoria centre england's first visit to pakistan in 17 years and with the t20 world cup coming
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up, and even bigger trophy is now in their sites. andy swiss, bbc news. next to the manchester derby in the premier league. a reminder first that match of the day 2 is coming up on bbc1. there were nine goals at the etihad stadium. city beat united 6—3, as erling haaland become the first player to score three successive premier league home hat—tricks. his teammate phil foden also scored three, for his first hat—trick for city, who move back to within a point of the leaders, arsenal. there were first time winners in both the men's and women's elite races at today's london marathon. more than a0,000 runners took part as our sports correspondentjoe wilson reports. you'll know these footballers — starting lionesses. hooter hmm, celebrate the beginning. after this weekend's rail strikes, they were there on time for their hours on london's roads. watch out for the speed bumps. at back of this pack, you can spot yalemzerf yehualaw, tripping and falling. well, she rose. by buckingham palace, she'd lost the rest of the field.
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the mall has been the setting for such a scope of emotion in recent weeks. here was a 23—year—old ethiopian born to run — and to win. she's the champion in london in 2022. and from kenya, amos kipruto, the men's winner — two hours, four minutes, 39 seconds in his first london marathon. in the men's wheelchair race, daniel romanchuk had been waiting for his moment. tucked in, letting the leader marcel hug do the work, mile after mile. now, was that finally a gap? oh, no! well, hug of switzerland held off the american to win in a course record—time. prize money has risen to record levels for these wheelchair races. this was catherine debrunner, another swiss winner, in another course record in the women's event. it looked like spring. next year, the marathon returns to april. its soul always lies fundraising.
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the british heart foundation were city a �*s charity. for the first time, the london marathon persisted assisted wheelchairs so the care family from northern ireland could compete here together. joe wilson, bbc news. in golf, england's charley hull has won the ascendant lpga in texas. she shot a final round 6a to finish one shot ahead of china's xiyu lin, and win her first lpga tour title since 2016. red bull's sergio perez won the singapore grand prix. he overtook pole sitter charles leclerc at the start and led thereafter. leclerc finished second, with his ferrari teammate carlos sainz third. the championship leader max verstappen finished seventh, lewis hamilton ninth. that's all from me. back to you, mishal. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz schafernaker.
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it looked lovely for the marathon runners today? it was and the rain was to the south of london. a tranquil entered the day with clear skies. i want to show you what is heading away this week. this is the jet stream, watch how the jet stream pushes the weather systems across the uk. really a lot happening over the uk. really a lot happening over the atlantic over the next few days and towards the end of the week, the jet stream is blowing right at us and pushing in plenty of showers. i am going to go over that again, i don't expect you to remember all of that. this is basically the headline, windy, rain or showers, a bit of sunshine in between but crucially it will stay quite warm in the south. at the moment, it's calm and still because we have high pressure which will be with us during the course of monday. it will be quite chilly in the south england. in the rural spots, be quite chilly in the south england. in the ruralspots, in be quite chilly in the south england. in the rural spots, in the south—east of east anglia, it might go down to two celsius early on monday morning but a lot of bright weather both in the morning and the afternoon for england and wales. thatjet afternoon for england and wales. that jet stream afternoon for england and wales. thatjet stream is starting to push in the weather systems and to
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northern ireland and western scotland by the time we get to monday afternoon. then through the course of the evening and into tuesday, that weather front will make a bit more progress into western parts of england and wales. but players from scotland and northern ireland. the winds will remain south—westerly ahead of that weather front. remain south—westerly ahead of that weatherfront. look remain south—westerly ahead of that weather front. look at the temperatures, 20 in london and norwich and 17 in belfast. so yes, unsettled and raining but warm. i'm going to concentrate on wednesday. the weather front will spawn low pressure across the uk, lots of isobars there, really gusty weather front with gale force winds. around coasts and inland but also northern wales, cumbria, south—west scotland could scoop up 50—100 millimetres of rain. at the end of the week, back to could scoop up 50—100 millimetres of rain. at the end of the week, back to sunshine could scoop up 50—100 millimetres of rain. at the end of the week, back to sunshine and could scoop up 50—100 millimetres of rain. at the end of the week, back to sunshine and showers. could scoop up 50—100 millimetres of rain. at the end of the week, back to sunshine and showers. it could scoop up 50—100 millimetres of rain. at the end of the week, back to sunshine and showers. it is could scoop up 50—100 millimetres of rain. at the end of the week, back to sunshine and showers. it is all happening this week! we need to get through to the weekend to get all of that weather behind us. thank you very much. that's all from us at bbc news at ten. but the news continues here on bbc one with our colleagues across the nations and regions,
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and the news where you are. from me, goodnight. hello. quite a hello, there. 0ctober started quietly but all that is about to change because this week, it looks very unsettled. it should be quite mild but mainly because it is going to be windy, and those are stronger winds will bring some rain or showers in from the atlantic as well. we start the week on a chilly note across england and wales, in particular, these are the temperatures in rural areas. that is going to be the coldest night ahead. but we've got the cloud coming in towards scotland and northern ireland on monday, the winds are picking up, some rain moving in. especially in the north—west where we'll see gales later. in wales, the winds will be lighter, it should be dry, there will be some sunshine at times. a bit hazy, mind you. and those temperatures up to a healthy 18 or 19 degrees. high pressure is keeping it dry on monday across england and wales, that is getting shunted out of the way by notjust one but two weather fronts in from the atlantic. the winds tending to pick up more overnight more widely and into tuesday.
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and we've got this band of rain moving down across scotland and northern ireland, that had doing in wales but in the afternoon rain tends to become light and patchy, followed by sunshine and showers in the north—west and the rain not meet chain in gearand the north—west and the rain not meet chain in gear and the south—east. some places are going to be raining on tuesday and wednesday, perhaps north wales but more especially cumbria and parts of scotland. there could be two to four inches of rain. the weather front is stalling across the uk because there is a wave forming along it, that actually deepens into a rather nasty area of low pressure, that could bring very windy weather into wednesday, and this rain that we start with in many areas will be heavy as well, followed by a lot of showers in the north—west, narrow band of rain going across england and wales, across... the winds could be sorely, windy day widely, but especially for england and wales, widespread gales,
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possibly up to 60 miles an hour. it will feel colder in scotland and northern ireland, there is some warmth for a while across the south—east and east anglia. the area of low pressure continued to deepen as it runs away from the uk, it could potentially be the first named storm, that heads to scandinavia and we are left with winds on thursday, gusty in the east of high ground, east of scotland and north—east of england. it is mainly northern areas of the uk that we will see showers perhaps longer spells of rain blowing in on a strong wind, further showers fewer showers, more in the way of sunshine and still warm, 19 or 20 degrees in the south—east. we end the week on a similar note, not as windy but wetter weather coming in scotland, northern ireland and opening and i wales. still it looks generally dry through the midlands and towards the south—east with temperatures 18 or 19 degrees. we still have some quite mild air across the uk for the start of the weekend, there is some colder air
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just waiting on the north and we could get a bit of that for the second half of the weekend as the wind direction changes we get more wind direction changes we get more wind around that area of high pressure and then the latest run in the model takes an area of low pressure down across northern areas on monday and into tuesday, perhaps limiting that colder air to the far north and keeping much of the country in the early part of next week into that milder air but still a lot of uncertainty about that but over the weekend we will have sunshine and showers, mostly in the north, and it is northern areas on monday that could see a spell of rain but in the south it looks largely dry.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: the polls are now closed in brazil's presidential elections — as two rivals from opposite ends of the political spectrum fight for power. the prime minister admits her government should have better communicated before the mini budget that sparked turmoil on the financial markets — and insists they'll be no u—turn on axeing the top rate of income tax. meanwhile, at the conservative party conference, the northern ireland minister, steve baker, has apologised for showing a lack of understanding to his irish and eu counterparts when making the case for brexit. one of the world's worst
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stadium disasters.

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