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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  October 6, 2022 5:00am-5:30am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. washington accuses beijing and moscow of protecting north korea from tougher un sanctions after pyongyang fires two new missiles into the sea of japan. french fuel stations run dry as strike action over pay and conditions puts 60% of the nation's oil refineries out of action. translation: the french are beginning to see the consequences at the pumps, we are seeing a shortage of diesel and petrol at all service stations. the decision by the world's
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major oil producers to cut production is described as "short—sighted" after oil prices are pushed to a three—week high. and — a symbol of the economic crisis facing lebanon. the bbc speaks to a lebanese mp who held up a bank, to take out her own money. i apologise to all the people i frightened, but how does that compare to the despair, anger and grief i feel every day? hello and welcome. russia and china have been accused of shielding north korea from further un sanctions over its weapons programme. at a security council meeting, the us ambassador said they'd given pyongyang blanket protection. shortly afterwards, north korea fired two new ballistic missiles into the sea. the un security council discussed north korea's test firing of another ballistic missile overjapan on tuesday. that missile travelled 4,500km before falling into the pacific ocean.
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well, here's what the us ambassador had to say. the dprk has enjoyed blanket protection from two members of this council. these two members have gone out of their way to justify the dprk's repeated provocations and block every attempt to update the sanctions regime. in short, two permanent members of the security council have enabled kim jong—un. dr kelly, a professor of political science at pusan national university joins us now from south korea. so, joins us now from south korea. north korea now lé six so, north korea now launched a six missile in less than two weeks, what do you think they are up to? weeks, what do you think they are up to?— are up to? it's a pretty rigourous _ are up to? it's a pretty rigourous testing - are up to? it's a pretty - rigourous testing regimen, not clear to me if it is connected to any particular event, the us
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mid—term elections are coming up, the vice president was in the region, i'm not sure that is why this is happening, the north koreans don't tell us often so it is hard to regulate, the larger issue is negotiations with the nuclear programme has broken down, it has been a while since that happened with president trump, and north korea is leaning into the nuclear weapons as the core of their military strength so they need to do a regular regimen of testing and i think thatis regimen of testing and i think that is what this is, that's why we have seen so much testing this year, that's where the core strength of the north korean military is now. the? korean military is now. they described — korean military is now. they described this _ korean military is now. they described this as _ described this as countermeasures to the south korean military drill? how real do they see the threat of these military drills?— military drills? that has been a debate for _ military drills? that has been a debate for a _ military drills? that has been a debate for a while, - military drills? that has been a debate for a while, my - military drills? that has been i a debate for a while, my sense is the drills are not that threatening to north korea most of the drills are designed to respond to contingency that erupts because of some kind of breakdown of power, we don't
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have plans of invading or conquering north korea, us position is not very belligerent, south korea hasn't been struck many times and north korea has not struck back, and a general sense the exercise they provide a reason for north korea to do the tests, why are they floating up these missiles, the real intent is deterrence and national security, they use it for propaganda purposes, they have been testing missiles the last two weekends, this programme has been going on for a while. at the security counts missile, the north accused the south of stronger sanctions? that assessment _ stronger sanctions? that assessment is _ stronger sanctions? that assessment is correct . stronger sanctions? that | assessment is correct the stronger sanctions? that - assessment is correct the issue with china north korea as they have not forced the sanctions very well this is one reason we don't need to sanction north
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korea again for these missile tests, the real issue is not so much more enforcement which is when the north korean had their banks cut out, hoping, that has been a real problem because there is the war in ukraine but china has always been back and forth on how much it wants to push north korea, china finds the geopolitical area quite favourable, south korea would be allied to the united states, china has obliquely supported north korea and doesn't want to sanction the regime and sanctions turned up, i think that assessment is basically correct, chinese and russians could do more but they arejust not doing it. strike action over pay and conditions has put 60% of oil refineries in france out of action. petrol stations are running out of supplies, especially in the north of the country. wendy urquhart reports.
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workers at total energy down till nine days ago ringing operations at two refineries and two storage facilities to a grinding halt, strikes are also affecting two exxonmobil refineries in france. cgt union representatives talking for a 10% wage increase a massive io% wage increase a massive investment plan an extra temporary workers but so far totalenergies is refusing to give in to demands. translation: the french are beginning to see the consequences at the pumps, the refineries have shut down and we are beginning to see a shortage of petrol, diesel at all service stations. the french _ all service stations. the french government - all service stations. the french government has| all service stations. tue: french government has already been forced to tap reserves to top up supplies but ministers continue to insist there is no need to panic. continue to insist there is no need to anic. �* ,, �* need to panic. translation: we are closely _ need to panic. translation: we are closely monitoring _ need to panic. translation: we are closely monitoring the - are closely monitoring the situation with industry actors we have drawn from the
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strategic stockpiles here and there, in order to supply station and allow people to fill up their vehicles and go to work or take children to school. ., , ., ., , ., school. petrol stations are runnina school. petrol stations are running dry _ school. petrol stations are running dry all _ school. petrol stations are running dry all over- school. petrol stations are running dry all over the i running dry all over the country, especially in the north where one in three stations are suffering shortages.— stations are suffering shortaaes. ., ., , ., shortages. the authorities have sla - ed shortages. the authorities have sla ed a shortages. the authorities have slapped a ban _ shortages. the authorities have slapped a ban on _ shortages. the authorities have slapped a ban on people - shortages. the authorities have slapped a ban on people fillingl slapped a ban on people filling up slapped a ban on people filling upjerry cans and slapped a ban on people filling up jerry cans and other containers, with petrol or diesel. the us has criticised the decision of opec+ — which includes major oil producers such as russia and saudi arabia to cut production. president biden called it short—sighted. the move immediately pushed up oil prices to three—week highs. robert mcnally is founder and president of the energy consultancy firm rapidan energy. he is a former white house official who is usually washington based, but has been at the opec+ meeting in vienna. what do you make of this decision? tt what do you make of this decision?—
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what do you make of this decision? , ., ,., ., decision? it is an important, if not historic— decision? it is an important, if not historic decision, - decision? it is an important, if not historic decision, for i if not historic decision, for the last year or so opec meetings have been a little boring, they have done the same thing every month, more or less we have got used to it, no real press conference, but this was very different, they met in person in vienna they held a press conference to explain their views and for the first time since march 2020, they made a big production cut, a quarter cut of 2 million barrels a day but that only translated to i million barrels a day but that only translated toi million barrels a day of real oil supply lost. an important move for the first time in a long time from opec plus. time in a long time from opec lus. ., , ., ., , plus. to explain the reasons behind the _ plus. to explain the reasons behind the decision? - plus. to explain the reasons behind the decision? in - plus. to explain the reasons behind the decision? in a i behind the decision? in a nutshell. _ behind the decision? in a nutshell, stability. - behind the decision? in a nutshell, stability. the i behind the decision? t�*t —. nutshell, stability. the opec plus was worried, at the drop in oil prices since the summer, they don't have a problem with crude oil prices haven't retraced the 30 or so barrel it went up since march, they weren't worried about that they weren't worried about that they
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were concerned oil prices were on a trajectory to keep on falling, even before, below the levels they were at when russia invaded ukraine, they thought the oil market was getting disorderly, broken, disconnected from fundamentals and they needed to inject some certainty and clarity, and to signal to the market they would do what it would take to prevent the collapse with oil prices. prevent the collapse with oil rices. ~ ., prevent the collapse with oil rices. ~ . ., ., prices. what will it mean for ordinary consumers - prices. what will it mean for ordinary consumers at - prices. what will it mean for ordinary consumers at the l ordinary consumers at the petrol pumps? tt ordinary consumers at the petrol pumps? ordinary consumers at the etrol mums? , , . , petrol pumps? it probably means the decline _ petrol pumps? it probably means the decline in _ petrol pumps? it probably means the decline in the _ petrol pumps? it probably means the decline in the pump - petrol pumps? it probably means the decline in the pump price - the decline in the pump price you have been seeing since summer, which is caused mainly by the decline of the global price of crude oil., the goal of opec plus is to put a floor in prices, the risk is that oil prices could march back up, this fall, and winter, and of global crude oil prices go up your local pump price will go back as well. i don't think that will be due to anything opec plus has done, global oil
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prices are in a titanic battle between powerful bearish or negative forces like the risk of a recession with h oil prices go down, on the other hand the potential for a prices go down, on the other hand the potentialfor a huge supply lost due to looming eu sanctions, which makes them go up sanctions, which makes them go up stop it is the battle of those forces which will determine the pump prices will see around the world.- determine the pump prices will see around the world. what does this the -- _ see around the world. what does this the -- tell — see around the world. what does this the -- tell us _ see around the world. what does this the -- tell us about - see around the world. what does this the -- tell us about is - see around the world. what does this the -- tell us about is a - see around the world. what does this the - coalition, out is a - see around the world. what does this th saudi alition, out is a - see around the world. what does this th saudi arabia out is a - see around the world. what does this th saudi arabia u few 5 a - tells us opec months ago? it tells us opec - producers _ months ago? it tells us opec - producers and _ months ago? it tells us opec - producers and oil- plus producers and oil producers issfss’ij as producers including rush as part of this group, they are going to prioritise what they have always prioritised, stability of prices, united states was the opec of the world from 1932 to 1972, texas was the equivalent of saudi arabia and they took steps that
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sometimes were deeply unpopular in the rest of the country in order to keep oil prices stable, because the alternative, to opec plus managing the oil market, is worse, it is opec plus not managing the oil market, you get the wild crude oil price volatility, which in their view and rightly helps nobody, produces, consumers, or anybody. produces, consumers, or anybody-— produces, consumers, or an bod. , ., ., anybody. great to get your analysis- _ and later, we'll be getting the view from new york on the decision to cut production. that's in around 30 minutes' time. let's get some of the day's other news. in ukraine, president volodymyr zelensky has repeated that ukraine's counter—offensive against russian forces is continuing to gain ground, after russia's president putin said he expected the situation in illegally annexed regions to stabilise. in his nightly address, mr zelensky said three more villages were liberated in the southern kherson region on wednesday. the coastguard in greece says that at least 15 would—be immigrants have died and dozens more
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are missing after two boats sank in separate parts of the country's maritime waters. the bodies were recovered off the eastern island of lesbos. president biden has travelled to florida to see for himself the damage caused by hurricane ian. during his visit, he met with republican governor ron desantis, who could be his rival in the 2024 presidential race. the two men are at odds politically and over climate change, which scientists blame for the strength of florida's hurricanes. in iran, protests against the government have entered their third week, following the death of a 22—year—old woman in police custody. schoolgirls and students have been defying the country's strict laws on wearing head coverings after mahsa amini was detained for not wearing her hijab correctly. herfamily allege she was beaten by officers in the country's morality police. bbc persia's rana rahinpour has the story. laughter and giggling this was nika shakarami.
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singing a typical shy teenager seen here singing karaoke with friends. singing she was killed by iran's security forces a few days before her 17th birthday. singing she was one of thousands of teenagers protesting against the islamic republic of iran. opposition is growing. even schoolchildren have joined the protests, including this 14—year—old girl. translation: a lot of teachers do act with us but they don't dare to say anything. boys have not chanted any slogans yet, but they show their protest in some sort of ways, pupils are burning the pictures
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chanting and showing their middle finger to the ideology that has oppressed them for years. it all started three weeks ago with the death of this woman, 22—year—old mahsa amini. she died in the custody of the notorious morality police. she was accused of not wearing the hijab properly. with restrictions on reporting on the ground, videos shared online are vital evidence in understanding how things are unfolding. the bbc and independent media are not allowed to report from iran, butjournalists here across bbc persian and bbc monitoring have been gathering videos from social media and speaking to witnesses tracking where protests broke out in the first few weeks. by using landmarks, the team can pinpoint the location of the protests. we've analysed more than 1,000 videos verifying at least 300 protests since amini's death.
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the protests have continued despite ayatollah ali khamenei's warning on monday that they were riots orchestrated by the west. his warning hasn't scared these young girls who no longer want to see his face in their classrooms. instead, they wrote their dreams behind his framed picture — equality and freedom — to turn this page of iran's history. rana rahimpour, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: we meet the lebanese mp who's become the latest angry depositor to force a crisis—hit bank to return their savings. this was a celebration by people who were relishing their freedom. they believe everything's going to be different from now on, they think their country will be respected in the world once more, as it used to be, before slobodan milosevic took power.
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the dalai lama, the exiled spiritual leader of tibet, has won this year's nobel peace prize. as the parade _ was reaching its climax, two grenades exploded and a group of soldiers - jumped from a military truck taking part in the parade, and ran towards the president, firing from — kalashnikov automatic rifles. after 437 years, the skeletal ribs of henry viii's tragic warship emerged. but even as divers worked to buoy her up, the mary rose went through another heart—stopping drama. i want to be the people's governor. i want to represent everybody. i believe in the people of california. cheering and applause this is bbc news, the latest headlines. washington has accused beijing and moscow of protecting north korea from tougher un sanctions — after pyongyang
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fired two new missiles into the sea of japan. let's turn to somalia now, where aid agencies and local officials are warning of a looming catastrophe, with hundreds of thousands of people in the country threatened by starvation after the worst drought in a0 years. somalia is in the horn of africa, and has a long history of droughts. but a succession of them, turbo—charged by climate change, has driven many people from their homes. al—shabab militants who control parts of the country seen here in black, restrict the delivery of aid. and it's in these areas where more than half of the people affected by the current drought live. you can see on this map — which show a hunger crisis at its worst is looming. our africa correspondent andrew harding travelled by air to baidoa. he sent this special report. the parched plains of southern somalia, and the heart of what could soon be declared a famine. we've come to the dusty city of baidoa, in a region plagued for years
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by conflict, and now, by the worst drought in four decades. child cries in the main hospital, severely malnourished children in every bed. some fighting for breath. this crisis has been years in the making, and yet it feels like a distracted world has been caught off guard. we need more supplies. we need more actors on the ground and people moving around to provide support to the population. or localised famine will turn into something much bigger? definitely. on the outskirts of baidoa, hundreds of thousands of people have already gathered in search of food. 50—year—old habiba is building a shelterfor herfamily. "there's nothing left on our farm," she says. "there's no reason to go back there." climate change is to blame for much of this, but there are other factors.
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as you can't fail to notice, most of the adults here and around these camps are women. and that's because of somalia's conflict, which has ground on for three decades or so in one form or another. and, indeed, the front lines, such as they are, are about four kilometres away from where we are now. gunfire this footage shows somali government forces advancing further north, seizing territory from a formidable islamist militant group, al—shabaab. but in much of the countryside, communities remain trapped by the conflict, unable to receive aid. two—year—old naima has made it to safety in baidoa and is finally getting help. but her mother, too afraid to reveal her identity, told us that
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her relatives at home had just called to say they were now in hiding after more fighting broke out in their village. and so, a fragile nation grapples with climate change and drought, against a backdrop of unending conflict. andrew harding, bbc news, baidoa, somalia. in lebanon, banks are refusing to allow people to withdraw money from their accounts because the country's currency has plummeted in value. the bbc�*s rachel thorn spoke to one woman who held up her bank with a toy gun. some viewers may find scenes in this report upsetting. yelling. this woman is about to rob a bank. she is using a toy gun but those inside don't know that and they are terrified. last month, 27—year—old sali hafiz stormed a branch in lebanon's capital, beirut, with her sister but this wasn't a typical bank heist. sali and her sister took
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$13,000 of their own money. now on the run, she says she had no other choice. translation: i lost hope. i was desperate because my sister was dying. sali's other sister has a brain tumour but the family can't access their savings to pay for the treatment, because of withdrawing restrictions imposed by banks. it was a toy gun. someone could have had a heart attack or pulled their own gun. do you accept that you put people at risk? translation: even if that did happen, it would be the banks| to blame and not me. i apologised to all the people i frightened but how does that compare despair, anger and grief i feel every day, knowing my sister is dying? people raiding banks to retrieve their own money is becoming more
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common in lebanon. in september there were five robberies in just one day. and that's because people are struggling. since the financial crisis in 2019, banks have stopped people from withdrawing more than $400 a month. while the lebanese pound has lost 90% of its value. banks have only partially reopened since the latest raids. people have been queueing, filing in one by onejust to use an atm, and that's people with savings. more than three quarters of the population are now living in poverty. lebanon's interior minister has condemned the raids, saying security forces would impose law and order. at the bank sali held up, the chairman says they are pressing charges. well, definitely, it is wrong, trying to get money by force or violence. this is a country of law. we have to have laws. we understand the anger and we are angry also at the situation.
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the number one, by far, the responsibility is on the politicians in this country. lebanon's lawmakers have been slow to respond to the economic crisis, and negotiations for a bailout from the international monetary fund continue to drag. without decisive political action, the future for lebanese people is increasingly bleak. rachael thorn, bbc news, beirut. time for all the sports news. hello there. with one emphatic win, chelsea have re—ignited their champions league campaign. they started their match against group leaders ac milan bottom of their table. but the 3—0 win moves them above the italian champions into second. it also gave new boss graham potter his first european win since taking over. french international wesley fofana opened the scoring midway through the first—half. and that was his first goal for the club. pierre emerick aubameyang
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and reece james both scored after the break to seal the win that puts chelsea into a qualifying position ahead of next week's return at the san siro. the performance and the attitude against a top opponent where to play well we had to add well and i thought we did. a clean sheet, three goals. we had to suffer, as well, which is good to do because you have to do that in a game at a top level in any game. so we are pleased with the players. they have worked hard this weekend it is a good start for us. elsewhere, erling haaland scored twice more for manchester city as they thrashed fc copenhagen at the etihad. that's 19 goals in just 12 games this season for the striker. riyad mahrez and julian alvarez were also among the scorers as city won 5—0 to make it three wins out of three in group g. also in city's group borussia dortmund won 4—1 at sevilla, who sacked their manager
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julen lopetegui after the game. salzburg are above both chelsea and ac milan in theirgroup after beating dinamo zagreb 1—0. elsewhere defnding champions real madrid have a 100% record after beating shakhtar donetsk 2—1 and both benfica and psg are still unbeaten after they drew 1—1. they're four points clear ofjuventus, who picked up their first win. novak djokovic is through to the 2nd round of the astana open in kazakhstan. he's looking for back—to—back tour titles after his victory in israel last week now, take a look at this, the launch of the spacex rocket from cape canaveral, in florida. heading for the international space station, the rocket has four crew members on board — including russian cosmonaut, anna kikina. nicole mann, the first native american in space, is the commander of the crew—five mission. that is on my bucket list, to
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see a rocket launch from cape canaveral. i will be back very shortly with all the top business stories.- shortly with all the top business stories. hello. it stays windy for the rest of the week. there will be a brief lull at the start of the weekend — we'll take a look at that in a moment. first of all, let's deal with thursday's weather — and, well, there'll be some sunshine to be had, there'll be some showers, though, and it will remain blustery — you can see the isobars close together on the pressure chart here. this one weak weather front will be the focus for some thicker cloud in places, weatherfronts pushing back in towards the northwest, as it will be turning wetter again later in the day, especially western scotland. much cooler start to the day than it was on wednesday morning, 5—10 degrees cooler in wales and england. a lot of sunshine here to begin the day. showers across parts of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england — in fact, a cloudy zone from north wales running across parts of the midlands
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and northern england will have some showery outbreaks of rain around. south wales, south—west england, you may catch a shower — most won't. east anglia and the southeast, dry, plenty of sunshine. parts of eastern scotland will stay dry and mostly sunny, as well. these are average wind speeds across northern areas — you may well see some gusts up to 50 mph or so. and as for temperatures, well, there's some warmth if you get that sunshine and/or out of the breeze, particularly across the eastern side of england. as i mentioned, it will be turning wetter across western scotland to end the day, as the weather fronts i showed you earlier start to move in. so, parts of scotland and northern ireland overnight and into friday morning will see some outbreaks of rain moving in. to the south of that may catch a shower — most places won't — a touch milder by friday morning. this area of rain accompanied by some gusty winds. the rain, quite heavy briefly, will continue moving southwards through england and wales on friday, and not reaching the southeast until close to dark, if not after in places. ahead of it, though, there will be a few showers, behind it, sunshine and showers feeling cooler, and fresher once again behind it. and this is why there's a lull
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at the start of the weekend — a ridge of high pressure moving in, something quieter before further weather fronts head in from the atlantic, for part two of the weekend on sunday. this is how saturday is shaping up — still a few showers around, mostly towards north—west scotland. for many places, a sunny start, some clouds going to build. there'll be further sunny spells. most places will stay dry, and the winds are lighter than they've been. daytime highs will be a touch lower than they've been, especially in england and wales. northern and western areas see further rain moving in on sunday, though southern and eastern england could well stay dry for another day. and another quieter period briefly on monday.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. # moving on up... growth, growth, growth. prime minister liz truss pledges to get the uk economy moving. what is moving on up though — the cost of borrowing for homeowners, businesses and the government itself. whenever there is change, there is disruption. not everybody will be in favour of change. but everyone will benefit from the result. a growing economy. estimated reading. analysts warn the cost of helping uk households with their energy bills
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could spiral to £140 billion if gas prices keep rising.

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