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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 30, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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today at one... a breakthrough in the treatment of alzheimers disease that's been described as momentous. a breakthrough in the treatment of alzheimers disease — the drug lecanemab — has been described as momentous. it isa it is a drug that will slow the disease. , , ,., . it is a drug that will slow the disease. , . , , disease. this is so exciting because we are getting _ disease. this is so exciting because we are getting the _ disease. this is so exciting because we are getting the results, - disease. this is so exciting because we are getting the results, the - we are getting the results, the first results at the drug are successfully treating the underlying cause. at the moment though the drug's impact is relatively small and there are some serious side effects. also this lunchtime... britain's failing railways — new figures show the highest number of cancellations since records began eight years go. times every single day and hope beyond hope i'm not going to be
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stranded anywhere. why the funfairs of afghanistan are now men only with women banned by the taliban from many leisure facilities. commentator: and it's rashford! cheering. and after beating wales, england now prepare to face senegal in the last 16 of the world cup. and coming up on the bbc news channel... england's first test in pakistan in 17 years could be delayed by a day after 1a players and staff are hit by a virus in rawalpindi. hello. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. it's been hailed as a momentous and historic breakthrough — a drug which,
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for the first time, seems to slow alzheimer's, the most common form of demenita. the drug — lecanemab — only works in the early stages of the disease and it does have serious side effects — but scientists believe it could herald a new era of treatment. our medical editor, fergus walsh, reports. could you get the broccoli out of the fridge for me, please? yeah. 0k. david essam is 78 and has early stage alzheimer's. it's taken away his independence. he's now totally reliant on me or other people around him. he used to be a joiner, but no longer remembers how to use his woodworking tools. i would have liked to have still been making my furniture, which i can't do. so i'm just going to show you the hippocampus. and that's where all our short term memory is stored. and what you can see is that structure is very small and shrunken and replaced by fluid,
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because of the disease. alzheimer's gradually destroys key areas of the brain involved in memory and understanding. david is one of nearly 2,000 patients who took part in a major trial of a new drug, lecanemab. as normal, if you just lift your arm up there for me. it involved having an infusion every two weeks. lecanemab didn't stop alzheimer's... i'lljust get you started here. ..but over 18 months, it slowed its progression by about a quarter. this is so exciting because now we're getting results, the first results that are indicating that the drug is successfully treating the underlying cause and is slowing down the symptoms of cognitive impairment, and also the behavioural symptoms associated with alzheimer's disease. in alzheimer's, progressive damage is inflicted on the brain by the build—up of a rogue protein called amyloid.
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lecanemab works by clearing amyloid from the brain. david and his wife cheryl can't be sure if the drug is making a difference, but they're delighted to have taken part in the trial. when we first began this two and a half years ago, we didn't necessarily think it would help us, but we felt we were doing something and could help future generations. it's just a horrible, nasty thing. if somebody can slow it down and then eventually get it stopped altogether, you know, it'd be brilliant. at least half a million people across the uk are living with alzheimer's, by far the most common form of dementia. lecanemab is designed to help those in the early stages of the disease, but if it gets approved, that will still mean there'll be a huge demand for the drug.
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the manufacturer says it could be on the market next year. we're already talking with regulators here. we will be filing in early january. we would hope that this might be available from september time in the uk. you look good when you laugh, you look happy. — the drug has potential side effects such as brain swelling. but despite all the limitations, this is a significant moment in the fight against alzheimer's. fergusjoins me now. you say it is a significant move, how excited should we be about this? it is rare that i use the term breakthrough, but i think it is merited today. why? it is an imperfect drug, it only has modest benefits and only suitable for people in the early stages of the disease, but it's people in the early stages of the disease, but its proof of principle
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that the underlying mechanism of alzheimer's can be tackled and slowed. a bit like but we had the earliest drugs for hiv, they were not terribly good, but better drugs followed. there are more than 100 alzheimer's treatments currently in trials and i think eventually we will see this being used in combination with other treatments that tackle another rogue protein that tackle another rogue protein that attacks the brain. we are going to need a revolution in diagnostics if we are going to identify patients in the early stages of alzheimer's because at the moment, only 1%, 2% who are given a diagnosis of dementia have the test to confirm that they have the presence of amyloid in the brain.- that they have the presence of amyloid in the brain. fergus, thank ou ve amyloid in the brain. fergus, thank you very much _ amyloid in the brain. fergus, thank you very much indeed. _ amyloid in the brain. fergus, thank you very much indeed. fergus - amyloid in the brain. fergus, thank. you very much indeed. fergus walsh there. one in every 26 trains has been cancelled over the past year, the highest level since records began eight years ago. avanti west coast had the highest cancellation rate at 8%, according to the latest data.
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train companies say they are working to improve services. today, the transport secretary, mark harper, is meeting mayors from northern england to discuss what's going wrong on the railways. 0ur transport correspondent katy austin is at manchester piccadilly station for us this lunchtime. yes, for months now, passengers, businesses and politicians across the north of england in particular have been complaining that services have been complaining that services have deteriorated. late last month a group of mayors called for the government to urgently intervene. and today mark harper, the transport secretary is due to come here to manchester to meet with the mayors. although one in the northeast said he will be attending remotely because the trains are too unreliable to come and they are expected to discuss what the situation is and what the solutions might be. delays, crowds and cancellations have become a fact of life are many rail passengers and not only when there is a strike.
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commuters in manchester told us they were fed up. well, i had that random cancellation on friday and it wrecked my day. my train out of euston which was cancelled. that was it. and then all the trains after that were sold out. so i ended up getting on a train late in the evening. so you would like to think that that is an irregular occurrence, but it isn't. it is every day, i wake up and check the app and it is sort of, hit or miss whether it is going to run on that day, whether it is going to be on time. forjenna, getting from home in chester to herjob as an vet in greater manchester has become increasingly stressful. she says that delays and cancellations regular mean being late or having to pay for a taxi. so, what impact is this having on you and your life? i mean, everything. it is emotionally exhausting.
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it is absolutely exhausting to constantly have to look at the train times every single day and hope beyond hope that i'm not going to be stranded anywhere. financially, it is a lot because you are coming to work to make money and then you spend literally more than your day's wage on getting home. and it is exhausting. in the year up to the 12th of november, 3.8% of britain's trains have been cancelled. that is the highest since these records began eight years ago. avanti west coast had the highest proportion of cancellations at 8%. govia thameslink which runs southern, thameslink, great northern and gatwick express, was second at 6.5%. next transpennine at 5.8%. a group of mayors want the government to intervene to help the situation in the north of england improve. if this was happening in london or the southeast, there would be an uproar. so, the secretary of state is someone that could resolve this problem and find a solution. so that is what we will be saying to him today. those stats include problems caused by infrastructure or weather,
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but not strike days or trains cancelled in advance. train companies have apologised for disruption. avanti and transpennine say they have had lots of staff off sick and a backlog of drivers training. govia thameslink said the long—term effect of the pandemic and staff sickness had affected its performance, plus other problems like severe weather. it said it had a plan to improve. avanti is still running a reduced timetable after drivers stopped offering to work overtime in the summer. it is gradually increasing services again and says its new timetable will not rely on overtime. transpennine also says not having a rest day working agreement in place with drivers gives it less flexibility with the rota. whatever the problems, passengers just want solutions to come down the track. katy austin, bbc news. the ukrainian government says a new hotline for russian soldiers to surrender — is now getting a hundred calls a day.
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by calling the hotline or entering details through messenger apps, russian troops can arrange the best way to surrender to ukrainian forces. it's called the i want to live project. 0ur ukraine correspondent, james waterhouse, has been listening to some of the calls from russian soldiers. a ukrainian message for russian soldiers. "what are you fighting for?" asks this propaganda video. at one point, it offers cash for giving up weapons or machinery. before two numbers appear... ukraine's surrender hotline. from frontline, to phone line. this secretive operation takes place in kyiv. 0ne call operator who we've kept anonymous says she gets up to 100 inquiries a day.
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there are different calls. they tend to happen more in the evening or nighttime. it's because, she says, it's the only time they're alone. we've been given some recordings and used actors to voice them. hello. this is the centre for surrender into captivity. hello. i was given this number and was told that this is how you can voluntarily surrender. i'm in kherson region. first, can you please go on telegram, find the "i want to live" chat bot and complete the questionnaire. i can't. they took our phones. ijust don't understand exactly what to do when ukrainians come. do i drop to my knees, or what? when you're on the front line, call us right away. i'm not alone here. there's a group of people. they say here in russia they will put us to jail for ten years. often it's part desperate, part frustrated, or lost, l because they don't fully understand how the hotline works _ and whether it's notjust a setup.
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once they're located, more instructions are given. we're not told what they are. we haven't been mobilised yet, but we are already here. i will purposefully speak in a convoluted way. when do i call? for more information and save time, go to our telegram channel called "i want to live". so it's not fake? it's the only channel where all official information is posted about procedures and how things happen. you don't have to leave your phone number because it identifies you, and we really recommend you having an old phone handset on you. ok, i'll take a closer look. thank you. goodbye. this is a big part of the information war. both sides need prisoners of war to free their own and quieten critics. for outnumbered ukraine, it's hoped that this helpline will weaken their bigger opponent.
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it is interesting on the issue of prisoners of war how the pendulum swung. earlier on, it was ukraine that suffered the most captures. but since september, the momentum has very much gone the other way. to fight in wintry conditions, that takes discipline and training. and for ukraine, they are seeing that as an opportunity with russia's partial mobilisation of men. they are hoping this information campaign along with continued military offences will allow them to keep re—taking territory. but it is easier said than done as the conditions do continue to deteriorate. james, thank you very much indeed. james waterhouse for us in ukraine. and the time is just 1a minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime. the drug lecanemab slows the disease
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in its early stages — opening up what could be a new era of treatment. and still to come... boston prepares to welcome the waleses ahead of the earthshot prize on friday. coming up on the bbc news channel. gareth southgate says england's big game experience from the 2018 world cup and last year's euros will help them as they prepare for another knockout match in a major tournament against senegal. at the world cup, england are preparing to face senegal this weekend. it follows their comfortable 3—0 victory against wales last night — meaning that wales are now out of the tournament, which had been their first for more than 60 years. our sports correspondent, john watson joins us from the qatari capital doha. john, heartbreak for wales. but expectations now for england?
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that is right. england take their spotin that is right. england take their spot in the last 16 of this world cup where they face senegal on sunday. frustration of course for the wales fans who will be packing their bags and heading home after that defeat. they needed that win to stand any chance of qualifying but i think a huge amount of pride goes with them having been able to watch wales compete at the first world cup since 1958 and of course huge hopes for those fans and the national team as a whole that this world cup can serve as a springboard to qualify for many more at major tournaments in the future. heading home, heads held high, but with little to show for their time in qatar. in truth, this was a tournament where wales's performances didn't really match their passion. having made history by simply getting here, it now feels like the end of an era. i think it was just the old guard. it'sjust, you know,
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they've gone past their peak. players like ramsey, bale orjoe allen, like they have exceeded their limit at the moment. and, you know, the other players around them really are not on that level. they did well to get here. it's the taking part that counts? it's the taking part that counts. and i've loved every second of being here. the few number of welsh people in the ground, i thought we made a lot of noise. sang a lot of songs. gareth bale spent much of last night on the sidelines, too. injured and off at half time, his influence is waning, but his international career not over yet. i'll keep going as long as i can and as long as i'm wanted. so it's a difficult moment now, obviously. but yeah, we go again. in the rather hot light of day there are plenty of questions over where wales go from here and whether they've got what it takes to qualify for another major tournament. speaking to bbc breakfast, one former international says this world cup will have helped.
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we put ourselves at a level now where we expect to be qualifying for major tournaments every time they come around and just the experience that everybody would have had as a country from being here. hopefully that can spur us on to bigger and better things in the future. on the pitch, wales were humbled at this world cup. across three games it's hard to hide the tactical and physical deficiencies, but off the pitch, well, this still was a moment of history, one of national unity and self—belief, reminding the world that wales does have plenty to celebrate. hwyl griffiths, bbc news, doha. back tojohn in doha. let's talk about england. is marcus rashford now are certain for england? he rashford now are certain for encland? , rashford now are certain for england?— rashford now are certain for encland? , ., ., england? he is now the top scorer at this world cup _
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england? he is now the top scorer at this world cup for _ england? he is now the top scorer at this world cup for england _ england? he is now the top scorer at this world cup for england and - england? he is now the top scorer at this world cup for england and joint. this world cup for england and joint top scorer in the world cup as a whole after his two goals last night, one of course a brilliant free kick adding to the one he scored against iran in the opening england victory. and a personal moment from marcus rashford after scoring the free kick last night as he dropped his knees and pointed to the sky and this is what he had to say was behind the celebration. unfortunately, i lost one of my friends a couple of days ago. he's had quite a long battle with cancer, so it's, you know, i'm pleased i managed to score for him. he's always been a big supporter of mine. and yeah, he'sjust a great person i'm pleased to have come into my life, really. gareth southgate the england manager has time to ponder his selection for the big game to come with a full five days to prepare his team now for the last 16 tie. but there can be no mistakes now as is the case
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with knockout football, it will be make or break for england and with knockout football, it will be make or breakfor england and if they lose now they will be out of they lose now they will be out of the world cup. there world cup journey would come to an end. back to you. journey would come to an end. back to ou. , ., journey would come to an end. back to _, ., ~ journey would come to an end. back to ., to you. john watson, thank you. personal bikers _ to you. john watson, thank you. personal bikers at _ to you. john watson, thank you. personal bikers at royal- to you. john watson, thank you. personal bikers at royal mail- to you. john watson, thank you. l personal bikers at royal mail have become a fresh strike in a row over pay and conditionsjoining become a fresh strike in a row over pay and conditions joining tens of thousands of other workers including nurses and ambulance staff and railway workers walking out this winter as the cost of living crisis bites. sorry conway is our employment correspondent and joins us now from a picket line. i’m us now from a picket line. i'm behind some _ us now from a picket line. i'm behind some of— us now from a picket line. i“n behind some of the biggest unions in the country here involved in industrial action, the rmt represents railway workers, the cwu represents railway workers, the cwu represents postal workers, the ucu represents postal workers, the ucu represents colleges and universities and the health union unison. unison
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havejust announced that and the health union unison. unison have just announced that paramedics in five regions in england will be walking out and that could be before christmas. distracts work? earlier this week bt announced a 15% pay increase its lowest paid workers and thatis increase its lowest paid workers and that is following a strike by bt open which employees. barristers also called off a strike following a 15% pay increase. the government says the number one economic priority is to combat inflation so they are urging pay restraint. it is a difficult time ahead for the government and for private sector employers. hsbc has said it will close 114 bank branches across the uk from april next year. it said the decision was driven by a significant fall in the number of people using them since the pandemic. our business correspondent caroline davies is here.
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it seems like a large number, what is behind this? it is it seems like a large number, what is behind this?— is behind this? it is about a iuarter is behind this? it is about a quarter of— is behind this? it is about a quarter of the _ is behind this? it is about a quarter of the existing - is behind this? it is about a | quarter of the existing bank branches. it is mostly down to the fact that customers are using online banking more but also this is connected to the pandemic they say for the people may be had to find an alternative to banking and personal. 0f alternative to banking and personal. of course it is not the only bank to have close branches. in the last few years since january 2015/5000 bank branches and building society branches and building society branches have been closed or scheduled for closure. it says of course some people cannot bank online or will not bank online there are areas worst affected, perhaps rural areas with not so good broadband connections or those with elderly populations and consumer groups are saying these people need some form of protection and access to cash. ., ., ., ,, i. ~
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to cash. caroline, thank you. a ro al to cash. caroline, thank you. a royal aide _ to cash. caroline, thank you. a royal aide has _ to cash. caroline, thank you. a royal aide has resigned - to cash. caroline, thank you. a royal aide has resigned after i to cash. caroline, thank you. a i royal aide has resigned after black british charity boss was asked at a reception held by the queen consort what part of africa she was from. buckingham palace said the comments were deeply regrettable and the individual concerned wanted to express her profound apologies for the hurt that had been caused. in afghanistan, an increasing number of restrictions are being imposed on women by the taliban government. in the past month, women have been banned from parks, gyms and swimming pools. girls are still barred from secondary schools in most of the country — and women are restricted from working in some sectors. from kabul, yogita limaye reports. rare moments ofjoy in a country where so much is often bleak and sad. but the mothers of these children
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denied the right to be a part of the memories they're making. women aren't allowed in parks anymore. barred from the simple pleasure of a bit of fun with family and friends. this is only a male privilege now, one that many from the ruling taliban appear to enjoy, while they block half of the country's people from it. i'm not allowed inside the park. this is the closest that i or any other woman can get to it. there are some who'd say that this move doesn't really impact most of the country, because at this point, having a fun evening out is a luxury that a majority of the people simply cannot afford. but that's not the point. it's about the symbolism of the move and what it tells us about the intent of the taliban.
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a few weeks ago, activist zarifa yakubi and three others were detained, another move that belies a hardening of the taliban's stance on women. there's more. this is badakhshan university in the north. female students weren't allowed to enter unless they wore a burqa. they have the opportunity... and this young student is now questioning what could come next. we're hiding her identity to protect her. every day when i wake up as a girl in afghanistan, i have to hear a new news day by day. these limitations came first, and we are waiting just, we are waiting to hear, it might be tomorrow they say you cannot come out from your home and you have to stayjust to your home. not far away, the taliban's morality police. its vice and virtue ministry. another place afghan women are barred from. i asked the spokesman why they were clamping down on women.
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translation: in the past 15 months we gave our sisters l the opportunity to go to parks and other tourist places. unfortunately, they were not following islamic rules. about schools, you have to ask the ministry of education, but with regards freedom of speech, women can ask for their rights. women aren't able to raise a voice, are they? because those who have have been jailed, or their protests have been stopped. translation: in every country, if a woman or man challenge - the orders of the state, they are stopped. in other countries, they have been killed. we have not done that. but if someone is raising their voice against the national interest, of course they will be silenced. the taliban's words don't scare some, like layla basseem. she's participated in multiple protests and recently set up this library for women, to counter the growing restrictions.
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translation: we are not afraid| of death or that the taliban might torture or threaten our families. we are scared of being omitted from society, and it's disappointing that the entire world is supporting the women of iran, but not the women of afghanistan. we feel broken and forgotten. half of the country's people uncertain about their future. trapped in the only nation in the world where teenage girls are barred from school. yogita limaye, bbc news, kabul. the prince and princess of wales will arrive in boston today for their visit outside the uk since the death of queen elizabeth. a star—studded ceremony for the earthshot prize — rewarding environmental innovation — will be held in the city on friday. our royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports from boston. it is a first visit to boston for the prince and princess of wales.
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a three day trip culminating in the earthshot prize ceremony. william and catherine come here with a sense of history. the royal couple arrived in washington this afternoon for their first visit together to the united states... diana was the last princess of wales to visit america. the princess's bright red woollen suit with its crystal carrington shoulder line, drew the crowd's admiration... her star power made a huge impact. but her son and his wife are said to want to carve out their own way of doing things. it is boston that will also be on show this week with the city's mayor as host. i remember growing up as a young girl in an immigrant family, my mother barely spoke english, but she followed princess diana's every step and just felt so connected. that is the power that i think the royal family has, the legacy. moulding that to this current
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moment and the actions and the the challenge to come together that we really need. boston is, of course, home to american royalty. president kennedy was born here, and his family remain strongly connected to the city. we choose to go to the moon. the work and words ofjfk still matter. his moonshot speech in 1962 inspired the whole earthshot vision. we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. he wanted ambition and urgency in space travel. earthshot shares the same values, fighting climate change. this is an important trip for the prince and princess of wales, both professionally and personally. a chance to establish themselves in their new roles on a global stage. but it's also the first time they've been to america since the duke and duchess of sussex moved here. there are currently no plans for william and catherine to meet harry and meghan.
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now boston and beyond are preparing to welcome the prince and princess of wales... final preparations are under way.. for the local media, a royal visit makes headlines. i think people are excited to see them. the places that they've chosen to go show a desire to really interact with bostonians. boston can be a very tough town. people here don't like a phoney. the prince and princess of wales will get to know this city well over the coming days as they take their message stateside. daniela ralph, bbc news, boston. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. looking a little bit foggy. there is a change in the way because after a mild but wet november we move tomorrow into the start of december with drier but colder
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weather. right now it is a bit murky out there

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