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tv   CNN Newsroom With Poppy Harlow and Jim Sciutto  CNN  May 10, 2022 6:00am-7:00am PDT

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forget to download the "5 things" podcast every morning. >> $195 million. >> i mean, that's a lot. >> you could buy 195 $1 million pieces of art there. >> do you think it is worth that? >> i won't answer that question. i do love andy warhol. i like looking at it, which i can do for free. >> it is beautiful. cnn's coverage continues right now. good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. >> i'm jim sciutto. overnight at least one person has died, several others injured after russian forces bombed the southern port city of odesa. it has been a big target in recent days. officials say several buildings on fire after hypersonic missiles, super fast missiles, hit a shopping mall and two hotels in the area. often civilian targets. plus, devastating images coming out of kharkiv, in the
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northeast. car seats and strollers litter the highway after russian troops attacked a civilian evacuation convoy, again. civilians as targets there. officials say a 13-year-old girl was among several whom the russian forces killed in that attack. we'll have much more from ukraine in just a moment. we're also following the dramatic deadly end to this 11-day manhunt. escaped alabama inmate casey white is in custody this morning. former corrections officer vicky white is dead after police chase ended in a crash in indiana. officials say vicky white died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. casey white is facing extradition to alabama for arraignment. we'll get you an update just ahead. we begin, though, this morning, in ukraine, cnn international correspondent scott mclean recording from lviv. scott, you know, odesa has been a big target in recent days. i heard from folks there about the danger they're facing. what do we know about the latest attack? >> reporter: the locations here,
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jim, are all over the map. and it is really hard to understand what any of this strategic values of any of these places might actually be. there was a series of warehouses hit by one missile, potentially, that's some kind of strategic target. others are really truly a mystery. seven missiles according to the ukrainians hit a shopping mall, one of the biggest shopping malls in southern ukraine, in the northern part of odesa, this is the place where it looks like any other american mall, it has tons of international brands that were set to spend tens of millions of dollars expanding that mall. and so it is not really clear what the value was there. one person was killed, but it is remarkable there weren't more. the reason being is that it was actually closed at the time because of a government imposed curfew that started on sunday night and only lifted this morning. they were also two hotels hit, one of them was a seaside hotel, right on the beach in southern odesa, and it was owned by -- still is owned by a pro russian
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businessman and often frequented by some of russia's elites. there is another hotel, second one in a village south of odesa, outside the city, and it is in a little village there, that is very close to a bridge that has been struck a lot recently, jim. this is the only bridge, only rail or road connection between the far southwest part of ukraine and the rest of the country, not really clear whether that hotels with in fact the intended target or something else. here is what the mayor of odesa had to say about the most recent round of strikes. >> translator: regular peace process was taking place. the curfew saved us all. some people ask why do we need these excessive measures of precaution? we can see now that they are not excessive. many said there is no way they would dare to attack a hero city on the 9th of may. they dared to attack and they did conduct a sneaky and deadly attack on the 9th of may.
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>> reporter: that curfew obviously likely saving a lot of lives at that shopping mall there and hotels perhaps as well, jim. one other thing to point out, that is what is getting a little bit of attention from the ukrainians is the fact that they say that three of these missiles that were fired were kindle missiles, these are significant because it is the second time they have been used during this conflict. these are -- they have a longer range than a normal missile. they can be fired from planes, they're harder for missile defense to detect and they have a way bigger payload as well, they can do more damage, jim. >> some of most advanced missiles in the world to target a shopping mall. this is the incredible detail of the way in war is being fought there. civilians as targets. scott mclean, thank you so much. 100 civilians remain trapped in the azovstal steel plant in mariupol. overnight, russia struck the area again with heavy artillery. ukraine says the plant was
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shelled by russian forces all day. officials say russia's attempts to storm the facility, however, have failed. >> can i say will -- people, we are at war. i will outlive you all. mariupol, we are fighting here. people, do recompose yourself? how do you like aazovstal. azovstal is holding on to the russians. while we are here, we are fighting to the last. >> over the weekend, ukraine said that all women, children and elderly people had been evacuated from azovstal and that most of the remaining civilians are thought to be men. the deputy commander there says several people are badly wounded, need to be evacuated immediately. and taking refuge there for weeks now, from the russian assault. >> cnn learned that president biden recently told his top national security officials in terms of the leaks about u.s. intelligence sharing with
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ukrainians, those leaks need to stop. let's bring in former director of communication for u.s. national intelligence. there has been a lot of pushback as we know, the president believes the leaks have not been helpful and overstated america's role while underplaying the role that ukraine played in using that intelligence. ukrainian leadership as well. when you look at all the recent headline, biden's direct messaging to top officials, do you expect those leaks on intel sharing to stop? >> well, i think the president sent a clear message to the intelligence officials and intelligence officials tend to listen to the president in this regard. look, you know, erica, they have not denied the fact that the united states is sharing intelligence with the ukrainian government. we have been doing that since the start of this conflict. in fact, some officials have acknowledged publicly that we're sharing intelligence, as i talked to people over the past 24 hours, i didn't get any pushback on the idea that early on in this conflict, that was designed to spend a message to
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putin, but i think the president's concern is really related to the specificity of the intelligence being shared. look, since the start of this conflict, the united states has been very concerned about giving the appearance that we are active participants in this. that's the reason why we are not putting troops on the ground and why we don't have airplanes in the sky over -- skies over ukraine. but intelligence is a powerful tool, just like those other tools and so the president is concerned that if people don't understand those tools, and if people are talking about very specific intelligence that we're sharing, that they may misunderstood, misinterpret that. >> what has been interesting about this conflict from the beginning is that the biden administration deliberately shared what would normally be classified intelligence assessments of russian military intentions, its military power. we saw that in the leadup to the invasion. but also since then deliberately revealing what u.s. intel knew about russian plans since -- for
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disinformation. i mean, there is a little bit of a pick and choose here, what kind of intel you want out and what kind of intel you don't want out, correct? >> yeah. yeah, unfortunately, that's exactly right. i've said to intelligence officials, i've been -- i was surprised at the level of intelligence sharing, of public acknowledgement of intelligence sharing that the intelligence community engaged in early on in this conflict, as i said at the outset, there was some deliberate effort there to send a message to putin that we're watching, and to be very clear that he was not going to be able to communicate with his commanders, to communicate with other leaders in the russian government, without the united states keeping an eye on him. but since the beginning, the idea has been to share information up to a point, so when we're talking about operational level intelligence and tactical level intelligence, the president is concerned
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because that's a bridge too far. so the idea here was general intelligence, are we watching, yes, are we sharing intelligence, yes, but with when we get into the specifics or battlefield intelligence, that is -- makes the intelligence community, and makes the president very uncomfortable. >> shawn turner, great to have you with us this morning. thank you. >> thanks. we want to share you some video in to cnn, of a woman being rescued from the rubble of a russian attack in donetsk. you will see paramedics carrying her out of a basement using a blanket. i want to warn you the video is tough to watch.
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>> you see there, they were eventually able to get her on to a stretcher, loaded into that ambulance to be evacuated. just ahead, the dramatic ending to an 11-day manhunt for an accused murderer and the corrections officer who broke him out of jail. what he is now saying after that corrections officer died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. president biden expected to speak today about what steps he can take to curb rising inflation. the real question, of course, will it have an impact? later, nearly a third of
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and carbon capture. we may not know just what lies ahead, but it's only human... to search for it. this morning, investigators say a former alabama corrections officer basically master mined the jail break that ended last night with her death and the capture of the inmate she helped es escape. it was a dramatic ending to that 11-day manhunt. casey white and vuk vicky white were found in evansville, indiana, their car crashed following a police pursue. >> officers say vicky white then shot herself in the car, later
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died from that wound. casey white, on the right, is now back behind bars. cnn's miguel marquez is live in evansville. miguel, the lauderdale county sheriff tells cnn special arrangements have been made for when casey white will be brought back. what do we know and what does he face next? >> reporter: yeah, he faces a different place to be held and certainly a greater degree of watchfulness from officials there. if and when he gets back, because there is a lot of steps now that have to take place in evansville. this thing ended in -- you said dramatic and truly it is. vicky white, in that final chase, when they finally caught on to them here in evansville, she actually called 911 herself, says the sheriff here, and told them that she had a gun, that she had it to her head, and before sheriffs were able to disable their car, they hit the car, it was on a grassy area, they pushed it over on its side
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into a ditch, she had pulled the trigger and killed herself, they believe. they're not entirely sure that's the entire story. casey white was taken to the hospital, he was booked into the sheriff's office here. overnight. now the question is whether or not he had anything to do with her death. if he did, says the sheriff here, there is an automatic going on with regard to vicky white right now. if he did have anything to do with her death, he may be charged here. if not, it may -- he may just face an extradition hearing, and then head over back to alabama at some point. look, all of this started and was very, very well rehearsed by both individuals, it seems. vicky white prior to breaking him out of jail, you know, sold her house at a great loss, bought cars, bought men's clothing, went on to an adult toy store, all of that before, and then on the 29th of april,s
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they when she took him out of the correctional facility he was in, her car, that correction cars was found in tennessee, on the 6th of may. and then a second car, an suv that was known to be hers was found and there were two cars here, a ford they spotted them in and they finally were captured in a cadillac as they tried to escape. we hope to hear more shortly from the sheriff here in evansville. back to you guys. >> miguel marquez with the latest on the ground for us. thank you. also here now, lenny depaul. good to have you with us. we're hearing that they believe that vicky white was the mastermind here. something that also stood out to me a short time ago, the sheriff told miguel, my colleague there, that casey was pretty candid with investigators and
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cooperative. what does that tell you? what can we read into that, if anything? >> well, i mean, that's expected and good morning, erica. the u.s. marshals, you know, being the premiere agency in the department of justice in the manhunting world, they did a great job with this, with the sheriff's department when that car chase ended, what i found was a little strange when he exited that vehicle, he threw his hands up and said i did not shoot my wife. she killed herself. i didn't -- that had me scratching my head when he made that statement. that tells me he may be covering something up, not sure, they'll get to the bottom of that. >> so as they continue with that part of the investigation, based on what you have seen here, do you believe they had help alon the way? >> i don't think so. i think she tried orchestrate that, we know she set the table months ago by selling her house, i think $90,000, purchased that car for cash two days before they jumped. and, you know, also the ford that was in play. what is important is the u.s.
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marshals, you know, they put out the appropriate intel, they had their pictures plastered all over the place, thanks to you guys, social media was fired up, very difficult to hide in plain sight. those tattoos were very recognizable. and that fellow that was in the car wash, you know, we saw something a little strange, he took it a step further, looked at video, identified casey white, and then he did the right thing and made the phone call. so when the marshals got that, they canvassed the area, knew she -- he jumped into an older cadillac, canvassed the area, found the car at a hotel, set up surveillance and she was coming in and out with a wig on and finally they saw him and we all know how it ended. >> how does her death complicate this investigation? >> if at all? >> well, it just -- it is -- it doesn't complicate the investigation. he's already doing a life sentence. he's looking at a death penalty with another homicide that was possibly committed by him. if in fact he was involved with, you know, the death of vicki,
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just another, you know, just another case for him to -- that he needs to deal with. but as far as the fugitive investigation goes and how that went, it was done by the numbers and the u.s. marshals, sheriff's department, i give them all the salute, they did a great job. >> lenny depaul, thank you. new video shows a ukrainian assault from the air on a russian tank. this as russia reinforces its presence in the east, tries to make advances there. we'll have the latest from the front lines just ahead. a cfp® l can help you build a complete financial plan. visit letsmamakeaplan.org to find your cfp® professional. ♪ what's the #1 r retinol brand used most by dermatologists? it's neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair® smooths the look of fine lines i1-week, deep wrinkles in 4 so you caniss wrinkles goodbye! neutrogena®
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the u.s. ambassador to the united nations tells cnn this morning the ukrainian aid bill is critical for that country to defend itself, while also touting the bill's bipartisan support. >> both sides have been supportive of the president's initiative, and i think that they all understand that if we are not there to continue that support, what it would mean for the ukrainian effort to defend themselves against the russians. >> we had two republicans on this broadcast in recent days saying they support that as well as democrats. ambassador thomas-greenfield's comments come as president biden is urging lawmakers to immediately pass this supplemental funding for ukraine, now totals $40 billion.
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it is an order of magnitude bigger than aid so far. he warned existing aid will run out nine days from today. joining us is former spokesperson for the ukrainian president voeldlodymyr zelensky yulia mendo. this is quite an increase, by multiples, really. i wonder what impact you think it will have on the battlefield, and crucially how quickly these weapons can get to the battlefield. >> erica, jim, thank you for having me. let me say that the u.s. support in every mean, every step of ukraine's battle for independence and democracy is actually critical. i know the previous package of $3.5 billion is actually almost exhausted. so it is very critical to get through this new package as fast as possible. and in this case i need to -- i need you to understand clearly
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the shift of attitude of ukrainians and army of ukrainians and ukrainians towards the war. if a month ago the president of ukraine volodymyr zelenskyy was saying we wanted the situation back to the level where it was before there are large scale invasion start, before 24 of february so that we move russian troops to the territories where they were before that. in occupied donbas and occupied crimea. right now we hear different messages that the ukrainian authorities believe that we can take back all ukrainian occupied territories, and this is a great shift because ukrainian authorities understand that we have enough support right now, that the ukrainian soldiers, ukrainian army and volunteers, have so much support that we actually can restore the sovereignty of ukraine back, it
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was before russian invasion in 2014. so this huge shift depends on the western support and also on the u.s. support that is actually leading in this help to ukraine. >> so highlighting there why that aid is so crucial. president biden expressed some concern about putin not being able to find a way out of this war. we have heard over the last several weeks concerns about a cornered putin and that he may double down. are you concerned at this point, even with that very positive outlook, that there could be more coming from russia because vladimir putin can't find a way out? >> you know, you're absolutely correct. i'm speaking positive because we need to have hope, we need to move forward with the defense of our country. we're not giving up, right. but we expect anything from vladimir putin, we understand he's the one threatening the world with nuclear. we understand he's the one who is preparing even -- right now
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to fight ukraine from north. by the way, today, lukashenko, alexander lukashenko, who says he's the president of belarus was sending really concerning messages about troops to war. so in this case, of course, we do not expect that anything that their attitude will be going milder, that they would like to move toward peace, but we also understand that if putin does not see strength, if he sees that he can push and he can move forward, then he will not stop. so only the best negotiator here is ukrainian army. but the authorities of ukraine say that if he prefers peaceful talks, then, of course, we will move forward with this. but this means that we need cease-fire and we need to stop this brutal killing, mass killing of ukrainians in our territory. >> good to have you back with us today. thank you. >> thank you, erica and jim.
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thank you. we do have new video of a ukraine an attack on a russian tank near kharkiv. watch closely you'll see the explosion there. this drone footage taken close to a location where russian forces recently attacked a convoy, and there it is, of civilian vehicles, killing several people, trying to flee to safety. joining me now to discuss the war in ukraine, the latest, retired army major general paul eaton, the former commanding general of the coalition military assistance training team in iraq. general, good to have you back. we see a lot of video like the one we just showed and understandably the ukrainian military wants to advertise its successes. i was speaking to a european diplomat last night who said the truth is we don't have great vision into the day to day status of the battlefield on the eastern front. that in some ways the u.s. and nato share more intel with ukrainians in that direction than they share back. i wonder if you agree with that view? do we know definitively what is
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happening out there? >> jim, no, we don't. certainly i don't. during the second gulf war we had hundreds of embedded media and mr. rumsfeld -- thousand soda straws looking at what was going on. but we got feedback from our very courageous reporters out there embedded with u.s. units. we don't have that now and the footage we get is episodic, it does not create a picture of the battlefield that most of us would really like to see. >> yeah, i was one of those embedded reporters in northern iraq. let me ask you this, we have seen over the last 24 hours part of what has been an ongoing effort by russia to punch through ukrainian lines in the east there, punch through and then surround ukrainian forces. and they crossed a key river out there near severodonetsk, and
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then apparently the ukrainians had the ability to counterattack. i just wonder, based on the soda straw view that you and i are getting of that battlefield, what is your assessment of where russian efforts stand in the east right now? >> they -- the russians continue to be disorganized from a component of combined arms operations. indirect fire, direct fires, and aviation assets. so it is a largely artillery based army, mass fires, less frequent use of precision weapons, and when we talk about mobility, countermobility, when you're relied upon a single pontoon bridge, in the vicinity, that is a huge opportunity to exercise, by the ukrainian army,
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to frustrate the russian movement, to the west. so i think that we organized russian army, they have failed to make good use of the time they took to reorganize. so it is -- they have not fixed the sins of the past that existed and the initial assault on kyiv. >> soviet military strategy, just pound and pound and pound with military artillery. ben wallace in a speech yesterday, he made an interesting point, the russian soldiers are using pine logs, wood, as a sort of makeshift protection for their tanks, we're also hearing accounts, u.s. intel accounts of russian field commanders disobeying orders in effect. what does that tell you about the morale as we know it of russian forces now? >> sorry, did you catch me
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there, general eaton? we lost him. we'll continue to the -- the conversation with general eaton and others as we get that fixed. still to come here, president biden will address the nation's rising inflation and record gas prices this morning. he's putting a lot of the blame on president vladimir putin. why? we'll discuss next. refresh italiano subway now has italian-style capicola on the new supreme meats and mozza meat. just like my nonna kes when she cooks! i don't cook. wait, what?
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message on the economy, top of the list for many is the country's skyrocketing inflation and the steps his administration will try to take to ease those rising costs. the message comes at a time when gas prices have been hitting another new record -- not in real terms, but another new record this morning, the national average of $4.37 a gallon. that's driving up the price for everything. jeremy diamond joins me now. jeremy, listen, the white house knows it has no silver bullet on this, no administration does, there are a lot of global national issues here, supply chain issues. but there is also funding and budgetary issues. what specific steps is the administration planning to take? >> reporter: well, first of all, jim, it is important to note this comes amid incredibly strong political head winds, the speech that president biden is going to deliver today, only 23% of americans acording to a cnn poll last week think the economy is in good shape. about 8 in 10 say they believe
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the government isn't doing enough to combat inflation. today president biden is going to try to fight that perception, outlining the step he's already taken, including high gas prices, the release of a million barrels a day from the preserve, helping to lower gas prices in the midwest in particular, and he's going to talk about some of the steps he would like to take including lowering costs for americans on prescription drugs and child care, many of those were included in the build back better act which failed in congress amid opposition not only from senate republicans, but also from a couple of key democrats including senator joe manchin. ultimately president biden is delivering a political speech here, he's going to try and draw contrast with what he's proposing, what he has done to combat inflation, with what the republicans are proposing, and for that he's going to narrow in on a proposal by senator rick scott from back in february that would require every single american to pay an income tax effectively raising federal taxes on millions of americans,
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75 million americans according to the white house's estimate. and it is going to require funding for social security and medicaid to be reapproved every five years, putting the programs in some kind of position of jeopardy. so ultimately here president biden about to slam what he's calling an ultra maga proposal, that proposal from senator rick scott and challenging republicans to use -- to not just use inflation as a talking point according to a white house official, but to ask them what they would actually do and to work with him on legislation to address these rising prices for americans. jim? >> jeremy diamond at the white house. tha thanks so much. less than six months to go until the midterm elections, the economy is top of mind for american voters as you likely know. and that is potentially a major liability for democrats. cnn senior data reporter harry enten joining me now. >> the buck stops here.
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the buck stops with the president. so if you ask people what is most important issue, economy, 50%, far and away the most. you ask people, okay, how much is joe biden's policies helping or hurting? 55% of americans say his policies are actually hurting, hurting. that's insane. whose views are you closer to on the economy? the republicans have a double digit advantage on that. so if you have a double digit advantage on the biggest issue, it is not much of a surprise if you look at the generic congressional ballot, who is favored on it. we asked -- cnn did an interesting thing, post and pre that supreme court leak that could overturn roe v. wade, what happened was though the change was within the margin of error, republicans had a bigger lead pre the leak than post the leak. >> so where does it figure in terms of abortion rights, in terms of importance for voters heading into the midterms? >> yeah, i don't think it is
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actually particularly very important, but i would also say that i think that abortion views in this country are quite complicated, where voters actually stand. so, you know, you can ask about abortion rights a lot of different ways. i had essentially a slide that shows all the different ways you can ask it. overturning roe v. wade, not popular at all. two-thirds of americans are against that. but then you say, okay, should abortion be mostly legal or mostly illegal? most americans say mostly legal, but it is lower than those who say that they want roe v. wade to stay. then you ask are you pro-choice or pro-life? less than a majority actually say they're pro-choice. when it comes to abortion in the second trimester, only about 34% of americans actually want it to be legal. the question is when you look at all those, okay, what is the best way of asking that question? what really gets to the heart of the issue? and there were five ballot measures since 2018 that essentially were limiting abortion rights. it passed in three states, didn't naspass in two states.
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you see a high correlation between mostly legal and mostly illegal question, in the five states you see in the nos where it was mostly legal that was the states where those abortion measures failed. in the three states where it said, okay, we want it to be mostly illegal, that is where it passed f you look at the states overall, about 36 states it is where mostly legal outruns mostly illegal, but there are in fact 16 states where mostly illegal outruns mostly legal. >> the bottom line is while this may not be the most important topic for people when thinking about voting right now, it is certainly top of mind for many americans. >> yes. >> and it is certainly being discussed. >> i think that's exactly right. it is a big talker. >> harry, appreciate it, thank you. parents say this worsening shortage of baby formula in the u.s. is turning into a crisis. the fda pledging to help. what are they doing? that's next.
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he's making our public schools white house says the fda is now working around the clock as a nationwide baby formula shortage appears to be getting worse. manufacturers say they are making as much formula as they can, still not enough to meet demand. >> this comes as new data shows the out of stock rate has reached 40%. cnn's senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is following the latest for us. so this obviously putting a lot of stress on parents. what is the administration doing about it? how can they actually help? >> yes, erica, we've been talking to parents who are really having a hard time finding the right formula for their baby, searching and searching, having friends search in other cities, going online. the white house says they're
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trying to increase production by various manufacturers trying to get the supply lines going much faster, and they say that they are really trying their hardest to get these numbers up. let's take a listen to white house spokesperson jen psaki. >> but the fda does -- is not just their responsibility in their view to ensure that we're meeting our obligations to protect americans. it is also their obligation to take steps to ensure supply can be met when they take these steps, so that is what they are very focused on. >> so sake also said that the federal government is trying to put special emphasis on the product lines that are the most popular that sort of need the most help. let's take a look at how bad this shortage is right now. when you look at the out of stock rates according to date assembly, for infant foormula i
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usually 2 to 8%, in april it was 31% and this month in may it's 40%. it's going in the wrong direction. parents really having a hard time. both of you are parents, and if you remember when your children are babies, children get used to a type of formula and other types really can bother their stomachs. we're talking to parents and hearing the kids screaming in the background. it is not fun for parents right now. >> going to the storm to find one particular kind, right, and then imagine coming to the store and seeing those empty shelves, thanks so much. up next, what caused queen elizabeth to miss the opening of parliament for the first time in f nearly 60 years. we're going to be live from london right after the break. digital tools so impressive, you just can't stop. what would you like the power to do? ♪ ♪
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for the first time in 59 years queen elizabeth missed the ceremonial opening of parliament. buckingham palace blamed mobility issues. in her place prince charles performed the duty doing that on her behalf this morning, and he was accompanied by his son prince william. >> and the crown there to on a pillow, cnn's nina joins us now. there have been questions about the queen's health including fears of covid. do we know where things stand? >> reporter: well, we know that buckingham palace issued a statement late in the day on monday, yesterday evening announcing that she wouldn't be taking part in this crucial
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ceremonial role that monarchs play opening the parliament here so that the legislative agenda can proceed and all those bills that the government wants to introduce or 38 that were introduced today can go through. it was decided very late in the day due to mobility problemsmsms that she's suffering that she would have to pull out of that and instead be replaced by her son prince charles and also his heir apparent prince william as well. it does raise questions about just how present the monarch is going to be in the months to come. we've got the platinum jubilee coming up in less than three weeks' time. big celebrations, military parades. gradually we're seeing the monarch remove herself from some of these big occasions, especially with these mobility issues. remember, she's 96 years old and perhaps what some royal watchers have been saying is we're seeing the gradual optics of a transition of power here towards
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her son the first time prince charles actually undertook this crucial moment of opening parliament and presenting the government's legislation, jim and erica. >> that gradual transition of power to prince charles, butt the fact that prince charles and william were jointly carrying out some of these duties today, i imagine that must be a deliberate choice. what is that message supposed to be? >> that's an excellent point, and i'm really glad you picked up on it. what some people who spend a long time watching the monarchy and the signaling in particular of this one of the longest monarchs we've ever seen and one of the longest heir apparent have been saying is this is cleverly choreographed to make sure there were two state counselors. the queen effectively yesterday evening had to sign a special decree saying that both prince william and prince charles could be there to act on her behalf. as you saw there, the crown was there on a pillow or a cushion as a mark of the monarch's
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presence, but essentially it was up to her heirs apparent to, you know, deliver the message here. this was also because people didn't want there to be an opportunity to talk about this being a regency if you like. there are only four state counselors who can take up this role, one of them of course is prince andrew and the other one is prince harry. neither of them at the moment undertaking royal duties. >> nina dos santos, appreciate it, thank you. good morning, top of the hour here, i'm erica hill. >> and i'm jim sciutto. we are following several major stories this morning. in odesa, ukraine, russian forces struck the region with hypersonic missiles, some of the most advanced weapons. this is what's left of a shopping mall there. hypersonic missiles striking a shopping mall, two hotels also damaged as well. at least one person dead, several others injured. the mayor there just stunned by

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