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tv   New Day With John Berman and Brianna Keilar  CNN  May 17, 2022 5:00am-6:00am PDT

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trained navy pilots be part of a top secret u.s. program? could they be coming from a foreign adversary? or somewhere else? whatever they are, the intelligence report concedes a handful of uaps appear to demonstrate advanced technology, some without discernible means of propulsion. >> the speeds they're exhibiting as well as the flight characteristics, there is no platform or really energy source that i'm aware of that could allow something to stay in the air as long as these objects were. >> reporter: the only thing certain is that they exist. >> the big question is whose is it and where is it from and what are the intentions and what are the full capabilities and is there something we can learn from it? >> reporter: so those are some big questions, right? don't expect all of them to be answered today. though, john, there will be a closed classified hearing after today's public hearing, which should get under way in just about one hour. >> closed hearing, that's where the fun stuff is all going to come out. kristin fisher, thank you very much. "new day" continues right
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now. good morning to viewers here in the united states and all around the world. it is tuesday, may 17th. i'm john berman. brianna is off this morning. chief white house correspondent kaitlan collins with me in new york. we have live pictures of the white house this morning, very shortly president biden about to depart for buffalo, to meet with the families of those killed in the racist mass shooting there. moments ago, officials told us the president will condemn, quote, the terrorism motivated by a hateful and perverse ideology that tears at the soul of our nation. and he will call on americans to give hate no safe harbor and to reject the lies of racial animus that radicalize and divide us. he will also call for federal
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legislation to try to keep guns from the mentally ill. this morning we're getting new details about the suspected shooter. cell phone video taken by an eyewitness at the moment he was taken into custody by police, new evidence shows he spent several months carefully planning the attack. >> he was here, we found some things that show that he was here in early march, and then again we know that he was here on friday, basically doing a reconnaissance on the area. >> a manager at the market where this attack took place told abc news she saw the gunman at the store on friday, the day before the attack. he was wearing the same camouflage outfit he wore during the shooting and told him to leave that friday because it looked like he was bothering customers. we're learning more about how the suspect wrote on line he considered attacking churches or elementary schools but hesitated because of the security at schools. he was easily able to purchase a firearm including one he used to
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kill ten people, despite the fact he was given a mental health evaluation less than a year ago, which he claimed online lasted only 15 minutes. cnn has obtained a photo of the two rifles he brought with him to the site of the attack, writing appears all over the weapons, including a racial slur, and the phrase white lives matter. >> joining us now is the mayor of buffalo, byron brown. mr. mayor, thank you so much for being with us this morning. i know you're about to see president biden and we also have been told that president biden is going to call for federal legislation to try to keep guns from the mentally ill. how do you feel about that proposal? >> i like the proposal. i think it is very important. i think it should happen. we see all too often in communities across the country mentally ill people out in the community, they need support, they need services, and people who are not in their right frame of mind should certainly not have access to weapons.
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>> mayor, i know you're grieving along with your community, you're also leading the city of buffalo now through this very difficult period. only made more difficult by the possibility of copycat attacks. people maybe trying to emulate what happened there. how many have you had and what has happened in buffalo with that? >> law enforcement is on the highest alert here in buffalo at all levels. federal, state, buffalo police, perry county sheriffs, working together very seamlessly. there have been a number of internet messages about crimes potentially being committed, phone calls made already yesterday and the day before two people were arrested. law enforcement is taking this very seriously. and following up on any messages
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put out looking like they -- looking like the individual or individuals are trying to copy or spread fear in our community. >> all these new details coming about, coming out about the suspected shooter and the plans he had, including that the supermarket, the tops supermarket, may not have been his final target, that he had plans for attacks beyond that. you know the community so well, what have you been told about what else he intended to target? >> his goal, if he got out of the supermarket successfully, was to walk down jefferson avenue and try to kill as many people on the street as he possibly could. fortunately aaron salter, the security officer in the supermarket, a retired buffalo police officer, engaged the suspect, slowed him down. we believe prevented more loss of life inside the supermarket.
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aaron salter is a hero. buffalo police responded also extremely quickly, getting there in about a minute while the active shooter situation was still ongoing, were able to get him to surrender to buffalo police authorities. and also saving more lives that would definitely have been lost if this individual had been allowed to escape the supermarket and go into the community. >> you've known -- you knew aaron salter for years, correct? >> i knew aaron salter for many years. i knew his late parents. family man, community protector, someone who believed in protecting and serving the community, took it very seriously, and even after retirement from a career in the buffalo police department he continued to protect and serve the community as a security
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officer, someone who was very well respected on the buffalo police department, and well respected in the community. >> so, president biden, again, who you are about to meet with very shortly, we have been told by the white house he's going to talk about fighting the terrorism motivated by a hateful and perverse ideology that tears at the soul of our nation. i want you to talk about this, this hateful and perverse ideology. in the way that it is reaching people, how do you think it is being disseminated across the c country? >> well, it is certainly being disseminated through social media, social media is a way that this hateful ideology, racist ideology, other forms of hate are being spread across the country, ways that americans are being radicalized in ways of hate, and hate speech, and
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hateful theories, false information, false theories. the president is absolutely in the right direction, focusing on reining that in, on condemning it and taking steps to prevent it from continuing. so much hate has been proliferated on social media, but also on the airwaves of american television and those things have to be looked at very seriously and they have to be reined in. >> mayor byron brown of buffalo, we appreciate the work that you're doing. thank you so much for being with us this morning. >> thank you very much. joining us now is shannon martinez, a former white supremacist who is now a fellow for the polarization and extremism research innovation lab, also known as peril, at american university. shannon, thank you for joining us this morning, because this has really put something like this at the forefront of the national conversation when you look at what this suspect wrote
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online, what he said, these online hateful screeds he had and i wonder what stands out to you given your past experience. >> thank you so much for having me. part of the work that i have been doing over the last 25 years is mentoring people as they leave these ideologies and networks and world views. and one of the things that completely stands out to me is that this is not just like an isolated case. that we heard a lot like he radicalized online alone or whatever, but we're talking about transnational networks and that have immense influence, that stoke the likelihood of accelerating to violence and the utilization of violence to bring about, you know, violence, white supremacists or anti-semitic attacks, to basically bring down western civilization. and that this fits in the mold with the christchurch shooters,
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with el paso shooters, with the norwegian attacks, that have happened, that this is an ongoing pattern that we hitherto have really been completely ineffective in combatting in any meaningful way. >> one of the things that infuriates people about this case is there was an interaction point, a touch point between law enforcement and this suspect, it happened more than a year ago when he wrote something about a murder/suicide and then did speak with people in an evaluation. he wrote about that moment. he said he was forced to wait for hours, for like 15 to 20 hours, but then the actual interview itself only lasted 15 minutes. this is from "the new york times," the suspect's newly discovered online coast casts doubt on the thoroughness of his health evaluations. i had to spend 20 hours in the er waiting for somebody to give me 15 minutes to talk to me. this proved the u.s. healthcare
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system is a joke. obviously 15 minutes not enough to discern that something like this might happen. so how do you find out something like this might happen? how do you do a better job in that touch point discovering something like this? >> if i'm not mistaken, there were many touch points that there were concerned peers, concerned teachers, that there had been multiple interaction points along the way. i think one of the things that we can do better is we all know what people who aren't thriving look like. and we need to include specific questions about racism, anti-semitic beliefs and include questions about direct questions about their attitudes about the legit maization of outilizing violence as a tool. spending more time than 15 minutes assessing someone, if we take him at his word, which, you know, maybe we should and maybe
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we shouldn't, if we take him at his word, that that was only a 15-minute interaction, that, you know, again, that is very highly problematic. if you have someone in your life or that, you know, that you are assessing or whatever you and you feel like they are in fact radicalizing to hate, violence or dehumanization, there are people like me out there that you can reach out to, to help you, like, guide them through this process, help you understand what you're seeing, what questions that you could be asking. >> i guess that raises the question of what are the signs of radicalization then. you had this past experience, what does it look like? what should people be paying attention for? because oftentimes when you seeing some like this, people who went to class with them, or knew them or they worked for them, they say, oh, he was quiet, he kind of hung out by himself, but is there anything else that people should be looking for given everything he had written online that somehow
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evaded people? >> i have found that most people really mischaracterize the people that they think are at highest risk, that they think that they're, you know, poorly educated, not very intelligent, that they're -- that they are, like, really identifiably socially isolated, they come from broken families and that's really not true. unfortunately the signs of radicalization are the same signs of all of the ways that we as adults and community members, we know the people who aren't thriving. it is very easy to see people who aren't thriving. that is the highest risk. those are the people that are at highest risk, people who feel alienated alone, they don't feel like they belong anywhere, they're struggling with a lack of agency in their life, oftentimes they're incredibly intelligent and really want to know why things are the way that they are, they crave significant, feel like they don't have everything that they
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should have, which looks like a whole lot like other stuff. by the time you know and see signs for sure that somebody is, you know, putting, you know, 1488 on things or whatever, that they're already so incredibly far down the pipeline and on the trajectory, it is going to be incredibly hard to pull them out at that point because they're firmly entrenched in that echo chamber. and it will be -- it is much more difficult to help someone off ramp once they are already that far in. so for me it is looking a few steps ahead, and, like, okay, what are their attitudes about violence, are they increasing their speech about utilizing violence, about justifying the use of violence, about tearing down civilization. >> shannon martinez, thank you so much for helping us understand this, even as our attention and focus is on the victims, the people who suffered through this and their families, those are the people the president will be meeting with today in buffalo. shannon, thank you so much. >> thank you. so as we speak, voters in
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pennsylvania, north carolina at the polls for some of the most consequential primary races of the entire election season. we're also paying close attention in ukraine after overnight there were heavy casualties outside of kyiv, after russian missiles struck far from the front lines. cnn is on the ground and we'll give you a live report next. more protection, more sun, more joy. neutrogena® beach defense® the suncare brand used most by dermatologists and their families, neutrogena® for people with skin. ♪ ♪ ihoppy hour starting at $6 at 3pm only from ihop. download the app and join the rewards program toda hybrid work is here. it's there. it's everywhere. but for someone to be able to work from here, there has to be someone here making sure everything is safe.
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in several key states across the country, voters are lining up for the last day of primary voting. the first polls close at 6:00 tonight, and the spotlight is on pennsylvania, because in the republican senate primary there tv personality mehmet oz has been endorsed by former president trump, he's facing off against former hedge fund ceo david mccormick and kathy barnette, who surged late in the race. on the democratic side, lieutenant governor john fetterman is hoping to hold off congressman conor lamb and state representative malcolm kenyatta. he's also recovering from a minor stroke and will miss tonight. >> doug mastriano, endorsed by president trump very late in the game and also endorsed the big lie is battling lou barletta and former u.s. attorney bill mcswain and businessman dave white. the winner will face pennsylvania attorney general josh shapiro, running unopposed for the democratic nomination.
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in pennsylvania, not the only place we're watching. in north carolina, several republicans competing to win the seat held by senator richard burr now. congressman ted budd received trump's endorsement, facing off against former governor pat mccrory, matt walker and marjorie eastman. another big race people are watching in north carolina, voters will decide if congressman madison cawthorn should get to keep his seat after a first term filled with a lot of controversies to say the least. his opponents are former district republican chair michelle woodhouse and chuck edwards. >> joining us now to discuss the pennsylvania races is jonathan tumari, national political reporter for "the philadelphia inquirer." this has been such a chaotic race, period, but also in the last several days. so i wonder the best way to do reporting on these races is to be there on the ground. i wonder what you've seen and what you're going to be looking for tonight besides who wins. >> so, it has been absolutely chaotic. and nobody has really been able
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to kind of break ahead on this in the republican race, that is the one that has most intrigue that we'll be watching tonight, the republican senate primary. and you see a lot of voters who, you know, you had two extremely wealthy candidates, mehmet oz and david mccormick who spent a lot of money beating each other up on television and what you hear from some voters that turned them off to kind of both of them. i was with mccormick at a diner in pennsylvania this weekend and he was delivering his message and the voter he spoke with said, you know, if you had started with that instead of all the stuff i saw on tv, i probably would be with you from the start. she was considering him, but she was also considering kathy barnette, who has kind of emerged as the alternative to people who were -- who weren't sold on oz, weren't sold on mccormick, were tired of the ads and even though she's on a shoestring budget, she rocketed to the front here. we're waiting to see if that surge continues or if she hit her ceiling in one of the two big spending republicans ends up
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winning the race. >> it is so okay chaotic, we don't know how it is going to go, we rarely have known less about an outcome than about this race. if you put yourself in a time machine to tomorrow morning, tell us what lessons different possible scenarios would leave us with. what lesson would we get from an oz victory? what lesson might we get from a barnette victory? >> i think that the results will tell us a lot about donald trump's influence or not influence over the state of the republican party and over republican primary voters. he endorsed oz in the middle of a really close race, and he not only endorsed him, did a rally for him, put another statement out, called in to his closing event last night, did a robocall for him yesterday, so if oz wins in a really close race, i think you could say that trump had at least some influence that got him over the finish line. if barnette wins on the other hand, you would say that it is a
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victory for trumpism, but not trump because she echoes a lot of his political style, denying the election, kind of really sharp edged attacks, but he obviously did not endorse her and in fact urged people to vote for oz and not her. should mccormick win, you'll see some questions about trump's influence over the party, because mccormick sought trump's endorsement, calls himself an america first republican, but trump slammed him during the rally, urged voters not to support mccormick. if mccormick is still able to prevail, it shows that maybe trump's influence is not quite what we have seen in some other states. >> and it is not just the republican senate primary that has gotten so much attention, of course, but also the democratic senate primary is one to watch as well. what are you reading into that with fetterman going up against conor lamb and malcolm kenyatta? >> that race has not been as intense as a lot of us expected. there was an expectation you would see fetterman as this populist unusual figure running
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against lamb who is more of a conventional democrat, kind of in the joe biden mold, the bob casey mold, the other sitting senator from pennsylvania. fetterman held a really strong lead. i think if he does win, by as much as the polling shows, it will show us two things. one, the power of a unique personality, and a unique image, whic which fetterman has. you'll see a movement of democrats toward this more populous style of messaging and populous approach in swing states like pennsylvania, where as they often have been branded as the party of the elite, fetterman is trying to change that in a way and he sayses going to win back voters in a lot of areas that have abandoned democrats in recent years. i think that would be a shift, maybe one that is unique to fetterman, but certainly a shift for democrats from what we have seen in recent years when they have nominated people like hillary clinton and joe biden, katie mcginty for senate in pennsylvania in 2016. >> yeah. seems to be trying to change it
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one pair of cargo shorts at a time. we know you'll be covering it all for "the philadelphia inq inquirer". thank you for joining us this morning. >> thank you for having me. meanwhile in ukraine, mariupol is on the brink and why ukraine is giving up the fight there and ceding ground to russia. and just moments ago, president biden departed the white house heading to buffalo where he will meet with the victims of the hate-fueled massacre at the supermarket. you're probably thinking that these two are in some sort of lover's quarrel. no, no, no. they're both invested... in green energ and also each other. digital tools so impressive, you just can't stop. what would you like the power to do?
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to jurassic-themed at-home activities. join over 3 million members and start enjoying rewards like these, and so much more in the xfinity app! and don't miss jurassic world:dominion in theaters june 10th. a major development in ukraine overnight. ukraine appears to have given up fighting at the steel plant in mariupol that has been their last line of defense there. ukrainian authorities announced an end to what they're calling the combat operation in the besieged city. ukrainian troops have held out for weeks beneath the azovstal steel plantbombardment. mariupol here, you can see the russians have been trying to
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make gains all across the south here, including now with heavy bombardment in the port city of odesa. cnn's sara sidner is in and joins us live. sara. >> reporter: john, odesa was once a place where russians and ukrainians were very friendly. now there is a lot of hatred and fear growing. the remains of freshly bombed buildings, a hotel, and homes reduced to dust. the result of the latest russian missile attack in the odesa region, that has experienced strike after strike on places people live, work, and visit. this is russia's attempt to terrorize a target it desperately wants to possess. tell me what the strategic importance is of odesa. this is the sea gate of our country, he says. this is a city of legend.
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it is home to ukraine's largest black seaport, used both commercially and militarily. russia has already attacked its oil refinery. if putin's forces were to take the odesa region, ukraine's entire black sea coast would be controlled by russia. the mayor of odesa bristles at the idea. ukraine today is a maritime power, it will be a completely different state without access to the sea, without transport logistics, he says. we and our armed forces will do everything to prevent the enemy from entering. but the ties to the enemy run deep. historically and financially. before the war, russian tourists helped this ukrainian seaside city thrive. ideal, russians really liked our cuisine, our shops here, the sea, architecture and there were no problems. ole alexander is a historian who
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runs a tour guide company. he says pro russian politicians were voted into office regularly, the mayor was once friendly with russia, he himself spoke to us in russian. were you pro russian before and changed? i want to say i have always had pro odesa views, he says. but i love and respect the history of the city where i was born. everywhere you look in the city is a reminder of its russian history. there are statues of alexander p pushkin, considered a great poet. a sculpture used to be guarded and kept pristine, now it is soiled and a fresh ukrainian flag flies on it. there has been a long fight over whether to remove the symbols of imperialism in odesa. there is social demand, saying we need to get rid of the symbols, he says. not everyone agrees. odesa writer and this poet says
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the monuments should stand. the attitude was positive, we appreciate and respect catherine. today's events should in no way affect our attitude towards her. and there is this problem, if we remove the monument to catherine, we have to rename the square. it was named after carl marx, for a while after hitler, then again karl marx and here again after catherine. what name should we choose? but the more russian missiles wipe away lives here, the more fierce the argument to erase the physical reminders of its russian past. now, in that village which is about 40 kilometers from here in the city of odesa, we have now learned that a 6-year-old girl was injured, she has lost her leg, and is in a coma. three adults have also been injured in that attack. john? >> so much suffering.
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sara sidner, thank you for that report. new details this morning of the deadly shooting in a southern california church. what authorities now say is the potential motive. and the department of homeland security is preparing for a surge of migrants at the southern border as soon as a trump-era pandemic restriction is lifted in a matter of days. we're live at the border. k, pnc has helped over 7 million kids develop their passion for learning through h our grow up great initiative. and now, we're providing billioions of dollars for affordable home lending programs... as p part of 88 billion to suppt underserved communities... includuding loans for small businesses in low and moderate income areas. so everyone has a chance to move forward financially. pnc bank: see how we can make a difference for you. you love rich, delicious ice cream. but your stomach doesn't. that disagreement ends right now. lactaid ice cream is the creamy, real ice cream you lov
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to get things done for us. i approve this message, and all these shoes too. this morning, homeland security secretary mayorkas is on the u.s./mexico border, a notable visit given days from now the cdc is slated to lift the trump era emergency public health order restricting immigration at land borders. cnn's priscilla alvarez is live in mcallen, texas, with more. there have been big questions about whether or not dhs is ready for this change to happen. >> reporter: that's right, kaitlan. we're now less than a week away from the biden administration ending title 42, that's that public health authority that allows officials to turn migrants away at the u.s./mexico border. we're awaiting a court decision
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to see whether the biden administration will be able to move forward with the plans, but in the interim, homeland security secretary alejandro mayorkas is here in mcallen, texas, where he's meeting with border officials on exactly that, the anticipated end of title 42. now the real grand valley sector where we are is one of the busiest sectors on the u.s. southern border. it is also a state where the biden administration has met fierce resistance from the governor, texas governor greg abbott, who launched his own operation on the texas/mexico border and started busing migrants to washington, d.c. i asked secretary mayorkas yesterday whether the administration is able to collaborate with republican governors given that pushback, he told me, quote, we have collaborated with state and local leaders of both parties. it is unhelpful when actions are taken outside of a collaborative environment. those partnerships and the potential end of title 42 coming in just days expected to be topics of discussion as the secretary visits the border
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today, kaitlan? >> huge topics of discussion. priscilla, thank you. we have new details this morning in the deadly shooting at a church in laguna woods, california, where one person was killed and five wounded. the investigators say the 68-year-old suspect was upset about political tensions between china and taiwan. he was a u.s. citizen, who had immigrated from china decades ago. joining me is the district attorney of orange county, california, todd spitzer. thank you for being with us. talk to me about the possible motivation here. it sounds political, anti-taiwan sentiment. >> yeah, so thank you so much. and good morning. look, the defendant who we're going to be charging with criminal very, very serious crimes later on this morning here in orange county, california, he -- his family was from mainland china. he grew up in taiwan. there was a lot of anti-mainland china sentiment in those years when he grew up. and he was not treated well.
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and apparently he's carried that resentment his entire both childhood and adult life. and he took this church opportunity to come after those congregants basically to come back and say, i'm going to get even with the way i was treated when i was raised in taiwan. >> that's horrific. we do understand as bad as this was, it could have been much worse. he had an entire arsenal with him. what have you learned? >> well, he had explosives, he had molotov cocktail devices, he had 15 magazines fully loaded with 9 millimeter rounds. he had two semi-automatic weapons and he chained the doors from the inside so that the congregants could not get out. he also picked a very vulnerable community. individuals from the age of 70 to 90. thank goodness there was a
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doctor there, dr. cheng, 52 years old, who charged the suspect. he took control of the suspect, but when he did that, he took a round to his body which proved to be fatal. the gun jammed as a result of that event. and that's whenc congregants and the pastor were able to overtake the suspect, subdue him, hog tie him and actually, you know, take control of the situation. i will tell you, john, that if that event had not occurred, in other words, if the gun had not jammed, that suspect, mr. chou, he was ready to kill everybody in that church. and today we're charging him with murder, use of a gun, special circumstances of lying in wait, five counts of attempted murder, and four counts of having explosives. it is my belief he was going to kill everybody and then blow up
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the church. >> again, it is a horrifying story if not for the sacrifice of dr. cheng, it could have been much, much worse. the fact that there was a political motivation, does this make it an act of terror to you and do you intend to seek the death penalty? >> well, let me break that down. first of all, we can add a hate crime enhancement. i'm working with the fbi and the u.s. attorney to further investigate this political animus or motive. so we can still add those charges at a later date. with respect to the death penalty as the elected district attorney, i'm going to have to weigh whether he -- we will seek life without the possibility of parole or death. and that's a very, very solemn duty. it is too early to say. but let me tell you i'm meeting with all the victims. i'm very aware that community sentiment but i'm also aware in california our governor has
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basically put a moratorium on the death penalty. so i will weigh all that in a future date, the most important thing today is that this defendant will be charged. he will be arraigned. and we will proceed with the justice system and we will get justice for these victims. >> mr. district attorney, i do appreciate your time this morning. thank you. >> thank you, john. thank you very much. all right, john lennon's son, julian, superstar in his own right, is here way special message for ukraine. (mom allen) verizon just gave us all a brand new iphone 13. (dad allen) we've been customers for years. (dad brown) i thought new phones were for new customers. we got iphone 13s, too. switched to verizon two minutes a ago. (mom brown) ours were busted and we still got a shiny new one. (boy brown) check it out! (d(dad allen) so, wait. everybody gets the same great deal? (mom allen) i think that's the point. (vo) iphone 13 on us for every customer. current, new, everyone. on any unlimited plan.
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♪ you may say ♪ >> john lennon's son, julian, once said he would only consider singing his father's timeless ballad "imagine" if it was the end of the world or close to t then he performed for stand up for ukraine. joining us this morning is julian lennon. thank you so much for being here with us. i just want to talk about what led to this moment, such a remarkable moment for you and the fact that you talked about publicly what would cause you to do that, and here we are. >> well, yeah, i mean it was, you know, the idea of performing this had been a very scary concept, even from when i first got into this business. but that's true that i did say that it would take something pretty major for me to even consider it.
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and when global citizen said do you have anything up your sleeve regarding the ukraine crisis, i said, the only thing that i could really think of that would have any kind of real impact was, you know, recording "imagine." and once i agreed to that, the anxiety level went through the roof, but fortunately we were able to pull it together in a very raw organic and natural state, with little to no production. and as performed as emotionally as possible. and as you can see from the results, youn d climbing that, know, we were all in it for the right reasons. that's for sure. >> i have to tell you, it is remarkable to hear you say it caused you anxiety, such a seasoned performer. it diminished the performance itself because obviously it is
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so good, you sound so good. was it worth it? now that you're at the other end of it and you see the reaction to it, talk about how it feels. >> yeah, it's amazing. and i wouldn't have put it out if i didn't feel that it was true, you know, and honest in its approach. it is not something i'll do again, that's for sure. but this was a one-time only, and i know this sounds weird, but it is, you know, there is a bit of relief after 30 years of, you know, of considering, you know, writing -- i mean singing and recording, you know, dad's song. so that was a one-time only and for the right reasons as i said. >> it sounded great. and we should say you have an upcoming album coming out called "jude", which the beatles fans, they know the implications of you coming out with an album titled that. we can't wait to hear it. thank you for being with us and congratulations on the success
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of this effort. >> my absolute pleasure. thank you very, very much. >> thank you, julian. >> thank you. overnight, at least 70 were injured as palestinian and israeli forces clashed outside of a funeral, the violence there only continuing to escalate. very shortly, president biden will land in buffalo. he will meet with the families of victims of the hate-filled attack at a supermarket there. this as we get new details about the suspect's plans to attack other targets. everybody ready? alexa, ask buick to start my enclave. starting y your buick enclave. i just love our new alexa. dad, i it's a buick. i love that new alexa smell. it's a buick. we need snacks for the team. alexa, take us to the nearest grocecery store. getting directions. alexa will get us there in no time. it's a buick. let's be real. don't make me turn this alexa around. oh my. it's painful. the buick enclave, with available alexa built in. ask “alexa, tell me more about buick suvs.”
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getting guns off our streets. one democrat's determined to get it done. attorney general rob bonta knows safer streets start with smarter gun control. and bonta says we must ban assault weapons. but eric early, a trump republican who goes too far defending the nra and would loosen laws on ammunition and gun sales. because for him, protecting the second amendment is everything. eric early. too extreme, too conservative for california. jackie speier leaves big shoes to fill.
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i rose through the ranks to captain in the army. expanded access to education as a nonprofit leader. had a successful career in business. and as burlingame mayor during the pandemic, raised the minimum wage, increased affordable housing, and preserved our bayfront open space. i am emily beach. i'll take my real-life experience to get things done for us. i approve this message, and all these shoes too. overnight, a funeral procession in jerusalem dissolving into violence. cnn's reporters covering the latest from around the world. >> reporter: i'm atika shubert in jerusalem. for the second time in less than
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a week israeli police have used violent force against palestinian mourners at a funeral. yesterday police used tear gas, stun grenades and rubber bullets. palestinians responded with bottles, rocks and fireworks. at least 71 people were injured in clashes that lasted almost an hour. that's according to the palestinian red crescent. one of the injuries was a man shot in the eye with a rubber-coated bullet. >> reporter: i'm patrick oppmann in havana, where many cubans that i spoke to said they're celebrating the news of the biden administration is lifting some sanctions on this island that will allow americans greater ability to visit cuba. it will also give cuban-americans more possibilities to send rem remittances back home to relatives and allow the u.s. embassy in havana the ability to issue more visas to cubans hoping to travel to the united states. the cuban government said that this is a step in the right
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direction, but still not enough and they're calling on washington to engage in direct talks with the cuban government to try and resolve many of the outstanding differences that still exist between the two governments. i'm david mckenzie in johannsburg. president biden has authorized the redeployment of u.s. special operations forces into somalia to counteract the threat of al qaeda-linked militant group. in his final days of office, president trump withdrew those troops and moved that a senior u.s. administration official now tells cnn was irrational. the pentagon says for troops to move in and out of the country was potentially dangerous and there will be less than 500 troops on the ground. on top of all that, we have also just learned president biden will host the leaders of finland and sweden at the white house this thursday to discuss their applications to the military alliance known as nato. which is, of course, rankled president putin.
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this is remarkable because that has been the big conferversatiof how will russia react to the applications, what will happen to the between period of them applying and being granted membership to nato and this is something putin didn't want to see happen. >> it is historically significant that they're making the applications. and the fact that the white house has scheduled this event so quickly shows you they know, they don't want to miss this moment, where is the president going on thursday? >> he's going asia, going to a trip to korea and japan as well and so it is a really big moment for the president on the world stage, but this is where everyone's attention has been, of course, what is happening in ukraine, what this moment looks like, and what it means. and we talked earlier about what's happening at the steel plant in mariupol, the ukrainian forces are ceding ground to the russians, but this shows you this has been a week of setbacks for the russian forces, for president putin, and moments like this because this is something that would not have happened most experts say if putin had not invaded ukraine.
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>> one important programming note, watch kaitlan until midnight tonight, election coverage at the white house, starting at 5:00 a.m. tomorrow morning again, right here on "new day." we'll be in washington for special post election night coverage, a huge day with many states and commonwealths voting in primary elections. cnn's coverage continues right now. good morning, i'm erica hill. >> i'm jim sciutto. right now, president biden and first lady are on their way to buffalo, where they will meet with the families of those killed in this weekend's racist mass shooting attack. these have become such familiar presidential trips in these times. during today's visit, biden plans to condemn the heinous act that left ten people dead, calling it, quote, terrorism motivated by hateful and perverse ideology that tears at the soul of our nation.

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