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tv   CNN Newsroom With Pamela Brown  CNN  May 28, 2022 5:00pm-6:00pm PDT

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we will not stand for this. enough is enough. we will not let those people who are motivated by hate separate us or make us feel fear. >> of course it was not the right decision, it was the wrong decision, period. >> they needed to act immediately. there's kids involved. there's a gun involved.
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there's active shooter. >> how an 18-year-old can get this militarized weaponry anywhere is beyond me. please stay engaged. >> don't forget them, please. i beg you. >> show them to the world. when he died, i died with him. >> we cannot outlaw tragedy but can he can make america safer. we can finally do what we have to do to protect the lives of our people and of our children. i'm pamela brown in washington. you are in "the cnn newsroom." it is member aerial day wee memorial day weekend, a time to honor and men and women who have served the military.
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and there is grief and shock over two horrific shootings over the last two weeks. tomorrow president biden will travel to uvalde, texas to mourn with a community heartbroken by two state school massacres. look at your screen, these 19 children, mere fourth graders, slaughtered along with their two teachers. tonight, long lines of people are enduring near 100-degree heat to place flowers and other remembrances at the memorial outside the school. they are somber, they are respectful, and they are incredibly patient. this afternoon in buffalo, new york, vice president kamala harris attended the funeral of ruth whitfield, the last to be buried of the ten people murdered in the racist supermarket attack two weeks ago today. harris spoke to the nation and the whitfield family. >> i cannot even begin to express our collective pain as a nation for what you are feeling in such an extreme way.
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to not only lose someone that you love but through an act of extreme violence and hate. and i do believe our nation right now is experiencing an epidemic of hate. >> in texas, parents are planning funerals for their children. there is also growing outrage over the police response. over an hour passed between the first 911 call and when the gunman was shot and killed, that's despite 19 law enforcement officers outside the classroom doors, taking no action as they waited for more equipment, according to texas officials. let's begin with cnn's adrienne bouddas. >> reporter: pam, there is a mix of anger, sadness, disappointment, and shock. that shock after the clear picture of the 911 timeline came
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in. but it's not so much when they're telling us. it's the emotions that are on display. take a listen for yourself. [ crying ] this video was captured moments ago. we were here live on tv, speaking with you, when the family of one of the victims showed up here at the memorial. and as she walked away, i'm told that is the aunt to one of the 19 students that died. she just kept saying, "my god, my god." and she was speaking in spanish. and there has just been an outpouring of support. as far as the eye could see for most of the afternoon i've seen folks off-camera, lined up, some who drove hours just to pay their respects.
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the line, it's just been so long, we've seen lines like that when people are waiting to get something free or a concert ticket. but the people who have come here aren't here to get anything but they're here to give and show their support for these families. this afternoon learning it took nearly an hour for members of law enforcement to kill that shooter. an hour after the initial 911 call came in around 11:30 in the morning from a panicked teacher. there are a lot of families hurting as they prepare to bury their loved ones. two funeral homes are handling arrangements. some of those ceremonies will be public. others will be private. the funeral homes have started uploading obituaries of the third and fourth graders who lost their lives at this school. and for some, the shooting is still sinking in. this is where i want to bring in
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our digital reporter, ella alazar. she's been here in the community, on the ground talking to people. thank you for joining us. the folks here have seen so much hurt and darkness. the shock of the shooting is starting to disappear, but there's still pain. what have you seen? >> absolutely, you know, it's something huge to be here. the emotional damage these people have gone through is evident. there is so much sadness. but between the tragedy, there are so many people who drove hours, traveled across the country to be here with the people of you'uvalde. it's been incredibly heartwarming. one story of kindness that stood out to me was yesterday, patrick carlson, who drove hours to be here, the first stop he made was to walmart. he filled his car with toys. he's been in the town square, his table covered in toys. these kids who haven't smiled in
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days, they're processing something that's just unbelievable, but when they see toys, they see a smile, they approach him, so shy, but by the end of it they're laughing, they're hugging him. he has been in tears, he says, from the reactions of the children that they've been getting. but he's just one of hundreds of people who have come to be with the community and there are so many more ready to stand with uvalde. >> reporter: you touch on something so key, these children haven't been able to smile. they should be smiling, laughing, and playing, because this is the first official weekend of their summer break. graduations were canceled. and you talk about toys, along with that, something i've seen in this area, there have been people showing up, but i've seen food trucks and people eating. and it's almost as if food is comforting for the soul in these dark times. >> yeah, absolutely. you can tell that the food is a big part of the culture here. everybody knows that you come together and you eat, you can't help but smile and feel so happy. and at the end of the day food is a love language for a lot of
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people. so that's another instance of kindness. there is an owner of a restaurant here, it was his birthday on thursday, and he said after the shooting he didn't know how he would ever cook again. something that brings him so much joy, how could he do something that brings him happiness when he feels the opposite? but he decided to come together for the community and fed 60 families, chicken wings, mac and cheese, tacos, those are the things the people here need. there's no way we can heal people in just a day. but if food is one thing that will make someone smile, it goes a long way especially in a time of darkness like this. >> not only is he giving to those who are hurting but it seems like he got something out of it too, it sounds like he was almost emotionally paralyzed, saying he couldn't go on to cook and that's something he loves and enjoys. you talk about the town square why where the toys were. i was over there and 2noticed
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there were dogs providing comfort. some folks were sitting on the grass petting those animals. >> so there's a lot of comfort dogs that have been here, eight of them, golden retrievers, they're with the lutheran church char charities. i talked to one of their leaders and crisis responders. the story she gave me about what these dogs are doing for these children, it brings you to tears. these kids who haven't smiled in days. they are now talking to an animal. they don't want to talk to a human but they're talking to an animal, they're hugging it and they feel so much better. >> reporter: ella, thank you for joining the conversation. ella shared a few examples of folks in the community providing hope in darkness. after we get through the information about the timeline, healing has to take place. this community has to find a way to move forward. but they need to do that with time and have the space to
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breathe. and it's just so nice to see people coming from near and far, providing their support. >> we saw the worst of humanity with the shooting and now we're seeing the best of humanity, all these people coming together to help and to give hope. adrienne and ella, thank you both. if you would like to help people coping with the aftermath of the xo shooting, go to cnn.com/aftermath. shootings happen in the u.s. over and over again. cnn's tom foreman says that's not the case in other countries. >> reporter: the nation was shocked last summer. it's had some of the world's toughest gun laws since a mass shooting in 1996. mass shootings became extremely rare. in the wake of the new attack, the government announced even tighter restrictions, including mandatory medical tests for
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mental illness or instability in would-be gun owners. >> my thoughts are very much with the families of all those who have tragically lost their lives, absolutely appalling incident. >> reporter: large-scale shootings have triggered limits on gun ownership and access in numerous countries and gun control advocates point to them as proof that mass shootings can be dramatically reduced. >> a gunman killed two dozen people and injured several others. >> reporter: despite a strong gun culture and stiff political resistance in australia, the government banned automatic and semi-automatic weapons. there's been only one mass sheetisheet i shooting since. canada has enacted registration
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requirements in response to mass shootings there. a slaughter in nova scotia in 2020 spurred opponents to say those controls don't work in gun advocates noted a downward trend in gun deaths over the past 20 years. >> we know that other countries in response to one mass shooting have been able to craft laws that almost eliminate mass shootings. >> reporter: after 51 people were killed in new zealand in 2019 by an australian gunman who targeted mosques, the government in six days went after military-style semi-automatic weapons, high capacity magazines, and more. >> every semi-automatic weapon used in the terrorist attack on friday will be banned in this country. >> reporter: and the prime minister said just this week, they are not done. >> there are still obviously guns that are misused in new
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zealand. i won't sit here and say that our system is perfect. but we saw something that wasn't right and we acted on it. and i can only speak to that experience. >> reporter: gun rights supporters insist you can't prove these regulations reduced mass shootings or that they would work in america. but these countries believe they have found a key to cutting down on gun violence. and it starts with the guns. tom foreman, cnn, washington. you're in "the cnn newsroom." up next, the common denominator in many of these recent shootings, troubled young men. what warning signs should we watch out for and why is that, by the way, why is it always troubled young men for the most part? and anderson cooper's special report on the war in ukraine as seen through a mother's eyes. we'll be right back. >> the chances for us to die here in kyiv are equal to the
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chances for us to die on the road. and another thing. i want my children to be alive, of course. but both physically and spiritually. i want them to be strong. i want them to be free. (sighs wearily) here i'll take thahat! (excited yell) woo-hoo! ensure max protein. with thirty grams of protein, one gram of sugar, and nutrients to support imimmune health. bipolar depression. it made me feel trapped in a fog. this is art inspired by real stories of bipolar depression. i just couldn't find my way out of it. the lows of bipolar depression can take you to a dark place. latuda could make a re difference in your symptoms. latuda was proven to significantly reduce bipolar depression sympts and in clinical studies, had no substantial impact on weight. this is where i want to be. call your doctor about sudden behavior changes or suicidal thoughts. antidepressants can increase these in children and young adults. elderly dementia patients have increased risk
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the traumatic events in uvalde this week and buffalo, new york two weeks ago, have two things in common. guns and troubled young men. this formula is often a toxic combination behind mass shootings. the movie theater in aurora, colorado, sandy hook elementary, marjory stoneman douglas high school, and too many others to name. what's feeding this kind of murderous rage and is there any way to intervene before it turns deadly? joining me how criminologist casey jordan and drew weston, author of "the political brain and the undecided brain."
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casey, what does your research tell us about the single male shooters and what motivates them to act? >> you're right, pamela, they're being male has a lot to do with it. i know drew will talk about that. the recent research we've been looking at focuses on the strain of our youth culture, and the fact that we've been in a pandemic for two years has not helped because it has actually increased the isolation. we find that a lot of young people but especially males are really having a difficult time forming bonds with actual human beings. their parents, their friends and so on. they also have a lack of coping mechanisms to help simply deal with the stresses, the strains, the failures that come with growth and with the teenage years. it's part of life, failing, picking yourself up, and moving forward. people have a very low status for frustration. they want to act out and express their rage.
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and a lot of young people have been raised with less discipline, more permissiveness, more oversinoverindulgence, whi encourages them to act out. young men withdraw and can become tech-dependent, even tech-addicted, where their social media or escape into videogaming becomes the only world they're comfortable in. this can devolve into not just violent fantasies but when the going gets tough, violence seems to be the answer to their problems. >> drew, we spoke last night, you think people younger than 25 should be restricted from accessing or purchasing a gun because before then, an important part of their brains are not fully developed. what skills do we lack before reaching that age? >> yes, so the part of the brain we were talking about is the frontal lobes up here, we think of them associated with higher functioning. they're involved in things like our ability to regulate our
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impulses, our ability to regulate our emotions, our ability to think complexly and our ability to think ahead and see the consequences of our behavior. >> and i want to just follow up really quick with what you're saying. when you look at the shooters in uvalde and buffalo, they're both 18 years old. they both have access, they legally obtained their weapons. now, of course the one in buffalo, it was modified and so forth and that was illegal, but that's besides the point. importantly here, drew, what are the warning signs? >> the warning signs come as much as anything else from a -- and i approve sprobably should , the frontal lobes continue developing through the 20s, you see a continued rapid development through 25 and then it starts to decline. car rental companies and car
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insurance companies have known this for a long time, they looked at the actuarial tables and saw the association between younger drivers and car crashes and deaths from it and damage to people and to property. and they said, hertz and avis started saying, now we're not renting to anyone under 25, which is maddening to you if you're under 25, it's not fair. so that's one. the other thing that we see in the relation between brain development and the kind of state of mind that you see in these young men, and that is the development of psychotic disorders. psychotic disorders are disorders where you have a real break from reality, you have things like hallucinations and delusions. if you look at the writings of virtually all of these young shooters under 25, there are
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limits to diagnosis from a distance. but when you see the kind of stuff that's written in their manifestos, it's clear they're psychotic, they've had a break with reality. what you do see in advance, and this is something that every parent of a teenager should know, every school administrator, every teacher, every law enforcement officer, this information should be out there, that there are three types of symptoms you see in psychosis, that's after the person has had a break. one of them is called positive symptoms, it's not positive because they're good, it's called positive because it's something that's there that shouldn't be. things like hallucinations, hearing voices, seeing things, or delusions, false beliefs that make no sense but that you can't sway the person away from. then you have negative symptoms, things that should be there but are not, things like motivation, like normal emotional responses
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and the desire to be with other people. the third is disorganized symptoms. those are symptoms like the inability to speak in a way that makes sense, your words are often -- at the most extreme they're called word salad where your words aren't following from each other. but also disorganized behavior, things like not taking showers and not presenting yourself in a way that makes sense. also loss of concentration. the reason i mention those three is because what you see in the years or months leading up to a psychotic break, and i should say, most psychotic people are not violent, but one in five people under 25 who are developing psychotic thoughts do in fact have violent fantasies. and a subset of those are the ones who become dangerous. it is only a subset of those. but that's who you're looking at.
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and so when you see things like if you look at the shooters in all those cases that you mentioned, they all had on the positive symptom side, you saw the beginnings of these delusions. whether it was, in buffalo, delusions about black people, or the charleston shooter, delusions about black people, whether it was delusions that come from the political air, white supremacist ideas, whatever delusions were involved in thinking that somehow there was some link between this elementary school and why you will want to shoot up kids. normal people don't do that. you have to pretty much -- i'm sorry. >> no, finish your thought, then i want to go to casey quickly. go ahead, finish your thought. >> the second kind of negative symptoms, what you tend to see in these kids is you see social withdrawal. you see this in all these cases, the atlanta shooter, you see that kind of withdrawal.
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we saw it in -- we saw it in the teenager who just, you know, killed all those kids in uvalde. so -- >> because we're out of time, i'm going to actually interrupt. really quick, casey, why are these men, though? i want to get more into that, what drew just laid out, we talked about the brain, why is it men, if we can sum it up quickly? >> there are a lot of theories, but some of them are evolutionary. men believe they should be king of the mountain, testosterone, i hierarchal. privileged white men have a long tradition of being in charge. if they feel powerlessness they'll strike out at and destroy anyone who gets in their way. people who feel like they've had a life of being second class citizens tend not to rise up and commit this kind of violence. >> of course this does not mean most men are violent, it does not mean most people with mental
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health issues are. we know that's not the case, actually. but the data shows us, what we've been looking at is it's males and in the recent cases, young males who are engaged in these mass shootings. casey jordan, drew weston, thank you for helping us better understand what's going on here, we appreciate it. >> thanks for having us. guns are in and out leading cause of death for american children. they have eclipsed auto accidents which were the leading cause of child deaths for 60 years. for 2020, the most recent year with complete records, the cdc reports more than 45,000 children were killed in firearm-related incidents. mass shootings are appalling but only claim a small fraction of total victims. children die every day from guns in the u.s., every single day children die from guns in the u.s. take that in. mass school shootings were once extremely rare in the u.s. until april 20th, 1999, when two students laid siege to columbine
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high school in littleton, colorado, killing 13 of their fellow classmates and teachers and injuring two dozen others. that day those actions changed the conversation forever. there is no central database tracking school violence incidents but cnn research shows in the 23 years since columbine there have been at least 15 other mass school shootings where four or more victims were killed not including the shooter, most of these attacks carried out by a single gunman.
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i've lived in san francisco for 20 years. i'm raising my kids here. this city is now less safe for all of us. chesa boudin is failing to hold repeat offenders accountable. he prosecuted zero fentanyl drug dealing cases, even though nearly 500 people have died of overdoses. i'm voting yes on h to recall chesa boudin now. we can't wait one more day when people are dying on our streets.
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cybersecurity officials have confirmed the software vulnerabilities found in some dominion voting machines were not exploited in elections. conspiracy theorists have falsely claimed the 2020 election was stolen from donald trump. whitney, what did officials find
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during this review? >> they found there is a list of software issues that present the very small possibility of a problem. however, there are a long list of safeguards in place and the most significant is this. what the review found is that to actually manipulate someone's vote, a bad actor has to have physical access to the machine. in the real world, the chances of vote manipulation for these specific dominion voting machines is just really low. election experts say the physical access controls and other layers of defense along with post election audits really help mitigate the threat of votes actually being manipulated by cyberattacks. this federal warning notes that most jurisdictions using the machines have already adopted mitigations recommended by the agency. this person briefed on this also told cnn that dominion has provided updates to the machines to address these specific vulnerabilities. however the real impact here immediately, pam, is federal officials are very concerned about the possibility that just even putting out into the
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conversation that there's even a remote possibility of vote manipulation will create this torrent of disinformation. that is what federal officials are bracing for. >> because there's so much disinformation already. whitney, thank you so much. our anderson cooper got a look at the war in ukraine from a mother caught in the middle of it. >> the chances for us to die here in kyiv are equal to the chances for us to die on the road. why is roger happy? it's the little things carvana does. like giving him a real offer in two minutes and carvana's customer advocate caitlin picking up his car at promptly 10am. then paying him right ere on the spot. we'll drive you happy at carvana.
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tomorrow night cnn brings you a unique look inside the war in ukraine through the eyes of a mother caught in the middle of it. our anderson cooper gives us a preview. >> thanks, pam. we've all seen a lot of images of the war in ukraine but this is something we haven't seen, the war through the eyes of one mother as she shelters in a basement with three children in kyiv. her name is elena. she was a tour guide before russia invaded. she posted videos about ukraine on youtube. when the bombs started falling, she decided to keep it rolling, keep a video diary of what she and her kids and her husband were experiencing. they moved into a basement shelter and have spent the entire war there every night, never knowing if they would survive through the night. i talked on elena on "360" a few weeks ago and was finally able to meet her in kyiv. when i saw the video she shot, i
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realized what an extraordinary thing it was. it's a view of war we've never seen before, intimate and personal. elena is lovely and thoughtful and a caring person. this is the war diary of elena. here is a brief clip. in the morning, against all odds, kyiv is still in ukrainian control. >> the latest update is that we are alive. i am alive. this is irena, she is sleeping on the floor. there are some other people in the shelter. they woke up, it's already morning, 7:00 in the morning. here are two sleeping on the small sofa here. it's very important that we survive the night. now the day has come. at night, everything looks much
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more scary for people. so as you can see, even many people are leaving the bomb shelter right now because it's after 7:00 in the morning. >> many in kyiv are leaving. long lines of cars clog the roads heading west. train stations around the country filled with families trying to get out. elena decides she and the kids will stay. >> i feel safe here. the chances for us to die here in kyiv are equal to the chances for us to die on the road. and another thing. i want my children to be alive, of course. but both physically and spiritually. i want them to stay strong. i want them to be free.
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>> elena's husband brings supplies for his family. he's volunteered to fight despite having no military training. he leaves quickly to rejoin his unit. [ crying ]
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her family, like so many others, have been through so much. it's given them a lot of strength to know the world is watching what happens in ukraine. i hope you can watch it sunday night. i think you'll come away with a whole new understanding what have war is like for civilians and especially for a mom and kids and a family. pam? >> so important to watch this. anderson cooper, thank you. "a mother's diary of war" airs tomorrow at 8:00 on cnn. toronto is one of the best food cities on earth.
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for state controller, only yiu will save taxpayers money. wait, who, me? me? no, not you. yvonne yiu. yvonne yiu. not me. good choice. for 25 years, yiu worked as an executive at top financial firms. managed hundreds of audits. as mayor, she saved taxpayers over $55 million. finding waste. saving money. because... yiu is for you. yiu is for you. exactly. yvonne yiu. democrat for controller. the choice for attorney general is clear. democrat rob bonta has a passion for justice and standing up for our rights. bonta is laser focused on protecting the right to vote and defending obamacare. but what's republican eric early's passion?
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early wants to bring trump-style investigations on election fraud to california, and early says he'll end obamacare and guard against the growing socialist communist threat. eric early. too extreme, too conservative a short time ago in uvalde, texas, the family of a 10-year-old victim of the school shootings visited the growing memorial outside rob b elementary school. the week ahead will with be filled with funerals. cnn's boris sanchez looks at the victims, and the lives that will be forever cherished. >> reporter: three days after 21 innocent lives were taken, we are learning more about the loved ones this small town is
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grieving. >> done forget them, please! i beg you! >> reporter: miranda was 11 years old. a friend of her mother's told "the washington post," mir an dda was a fun, spunky, bright litt girl. 10-year-old torres, his aunt telling ksat he was a helpful person. he will be missed and never forgotten. row dri grez, also 10 years old. her mother anna says they wanted to attend college at texas a&m. and a touching facebook tribute, anna calls her daughter, quote, sweet, charismatic, loving, caring, loyal, free, ambitious, funny, silly, goal-driven. and her best friend. other victims' names have, also, been confirmed. leyla salazar, 11 years old. mckenna lee elrod, alethia
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ramirez, and jace, all just 10 years old and in a tragic twist, the husband of irma garcia, one of the murdered teachers, has also died. according to the arch diocese of san antonio, joe garcia suffered a heart attack after news of his wife's death and passed away on thursday. the couple had been married more than 24 years and were high school sweethearts. father morales of sacred he heart church in uvalde knew the family well and greeted irma as she waked into service sunday morning. he says a couple were a fixture in the community, and leave behind four children, who he privately consoled shortly after joe's death. >> i told the community that, in my own family, when we have had a -- a death, that it's the church and prayer that has g gotten us through all this. not that it takes the pain away. >> reporter: the garcias, among a list of names, of lives cut
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short. morales, uziaha garcia, halve year lopez, jose flores junior, lexie rubio, jacqueline ceaseres, ellie garcia, elijah torres. names that will forever be etched in the memories of those touched and affected by this horrible tragedy. >> the nation, showing to the world. >> our thanks to boris sanchez. it is hard for anyone who comprehend what we saw, again, at an american-elementary school. just looking at those little faces in boris's piece right there and it is almost impossible to find words befitting the 21 people lost to those bullets. by amanda gorman, the youngest
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poet ever at a presidential inauguration found a way. her poem, published in "the new york times" is called "hymn for the hurting." and i would like to read it to you. everything hurts. our hearts shadowed and strange. minds made moneyed and mute. we carry tragedy, terrifying and true. and yet, none of it is new. we knew it as home, as horror, as heritage. even our children cannot be children, cannot be. everything hurts. it's a hard time to be alive, and even harder to stay that way. while burdened to live out these days, while at the same time, blessed to outlive them. this alarm is now we know we
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must be altered. t that, we must differ or die. that we must triumph or try. thus, while hate cannot be terminated, it can be transformed into a love that lets us live. may we not just grieve but give. may we not just ache, but act. may our right to bear arms never blind our sight from shared arm. may we choose our children over chaos? may another innocent never be lost. maybe everything hurts. our hearts, shadowed and strange. but only when everything hurts, may everything change. a monster was attacking but the team remained calm. because with miro, they could problem solve together, and find the answer that was right under r their nose. or... . his nose.
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no matter who you are, being yourself can be tough when you have severe asthma. triggers can pop up out of nowhere, causing inflammation that can lead to asthma attacks. but no matter what type of severe asthma you have tezspire™ can help. tezspire™ is a new add-on treatment for people 12 and over... that proactively reduces inflammation... ...which means you could have fewer attacks, breathe better, and relieve your asthma symptoms. so, you can be you, whoever you are. tezspire™ is not a rescue medication. don't take tezspire™ if you're allergic to it. allergic reactions like rash or an eye allergy can happen. don't stop your asthma treatments unless your doctor tells you to. tell your doctor if you have a parasitic infection or your asthma worsens. sore throat, joint and back pain may occur. avoid live vaccines. by helping control your asthma, tezspire™ can help you be you. no matter who you are, ask your asthma specialist about tezspire™ today.
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migraine attacks? you can't always avoid triggers like changes in weather. qulipta™ can help prevent migraine attacks. you can't prevent what's going on outside, that's why qulipta™ helps what's going on inside. qulipta™ is a pill. gets right to work to prevent migraine attacks
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and keeps them away over time. qulipta™ blocks cgrp a protein believed to be a cause of migraine attacks. qulipta™ is a preventive treatment for episodic migraine. most common side effects are nausea, constipation, and tiredness. learn how abbvie can help you save on qulipta™.
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tonight, television takes a look at itself. >> what's on the idiot box? it's only an idiot box if an idiot is watching. i will tell you about the golden age in television. history of time. what we looked at was the platinum age. >> our obligation is to entertain. >> television should not be just entertainment. >> kun

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