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tv   CNN Newsroom With Poppy Harlow and Jim Sciutto  CNN  May 30, 2022 6:00am-7:00am PDT

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in different ways. it doesn't mean gabe kapler isn't calling his local official and asking for them to do something. what he's saying is, for me, right now, i'm going to do something that's unheard of in baseball. this is the first time you've ever seen something like this. whether he goes through it or not, it was bold for him to do it because if you step outside the lines, people get upset. >> it's bold. getting a lot of attention. there's a lot of heartbreak right now and trying to turn that into constructive help. thank you very much. cnn's coverage continues right now. good morning, everyone. i'm poppy harlow. glad year with us for this special edition of "cnn newsroom." the pressing question, how could this happen? devastated families are demanding answers as we are learning that up to 19 officers stood in the hallway of robb elementary in uvalde, texas, for more than 45 excruciating minutes. while children inside the classroom, with the gunman, kept calling 911 over and over again,
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begging for help. this morning the justice department is stepping in at the request of the mayor to investigate the police response to this mass shooting. specifically why it took so long to take down that gunman. today we will see the first of several funeral services remembering the lives lost in this tragedy. over the weekend, president biden and the first lady met with the families of victims and with first responders in uvalde, the president vowed once again as we've heard so often in america, to do something about gun violence. it was the second time in less than two weeks that the president mourned alongside families whose loved ones died in the mass shooting. we are covering this story, of course, from every angle. our reporters and corespondents are standing by. let's bring you our senior legal correspondent, paula reed. great to have you here. you broke this yesterday, that the justice department is going
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to step in. they will review all aspects of the law enforcement response to the shooting at robb elementary. do you have a sense of what they think they can determine here and what change it might lead to? >> well, poppy, this is such a significant development in its ongoing investigation. as we've seen, officials in texas have been under enormous scrutiny for how law enforcement responded to this shooting and these conflicting accounts, conflicting timelines that they have been giving the public in the wake of this attack. now, interestingly, this review is actually requested by the city's mayor. poppy, at this point, the justice department is about the only entity that can come in and credibly and objectively assess exactly what happened here. in a statement the justice department said the goal of this review is to provide an independent account of law enforcement actions and responses that day and to identify lessons learned and best practices to help first responders respond to active
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shooter events because we know there will likely by other active shooter events. this is not a criminal investigation. this is a review being conducted by the justice department's office of community oriented po policing. they have conducted similar reviews into law enforcement response to the terrorist attack in san bernardino as well as the pulse nightclub shooting. now, i read those two reviews. it appears the way this is going to work is that investigators are going to go to the scene. they're going to take in any audio or visual evidence. they'll talk to witnesses. they're going to try to talk to first responders. they're, of course, going to talk to victims. they're going to review what exactly happened here, what went right and, moreover in this case especially, what exactly went wrong. as i said, this is not a criminal investigation. this is also not a civil rights investigation, like what the justice department did in ferguson, chicago, other cities where they examine police departments. but depending on what they find in this review, if they find any evidence of criminality, that is
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certainly something they could pass on to prosecutors for additional action. but we know, charging law enforcement officials for anything they do in the course of their official duty is a very high bar. >> and the real question is, how do you change things so this never happens again? paula reid, thank you for being with that reporting you broke. we appreciate it. today we'll see the first of several services for the 19 children and 2 teachers murdered in uvalde, including amerie jo garza. her father shared his outrage over the police response with cnn. listen to this. >> they needed to act immediately, you know. there's kids involved. you know, there's a gun involved. there's an active shooter. wanting to do harm. those are recipes for disaster. as soon as you get there, somebody should have gotten off the car, jumped the fence, slammed open the door as fast as he got in there and tried to change the outcome.
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>> let's go to our correspondent adrienne joining us from a memorial site right by robb elementary school. they begin today, right, the funerals begin today, one after the next, after the next. there will be visitations for both amerie jo garza and rodriguez. what else can you tell us? >> reporter: leave learned so much about these 19 students and i want to focus on the two who are having their visitation and rosary today. amerie jo garza died trying to call 911 with a cell phone. her father says she received two weeks ago for her 10th birthday. in the photo that's paired with her obituary, she's wearing this beautiful violet dress and she's smiling, yet her family says their sweet, loving, sassy little diva hated dresses but she still wore them.
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she loved meals from chick-fil-a and her favorite drink, a vanilla bean frappuccino from starbucks. you know, those drinks are sweet and tasty on hot summer days here in texas. it's almost like a milkshake and there's no coffee in those drinks. her classmate, rodriguez was ambitious. her mom said she loved the color green and jalapeño. as an a and b honor roll student, she was already thinking about college as a fourth grader. she dreamt of becoming a marine biologist because she loved studying animals and wildlife. and we are at this memorial, poppy, as you mentioned, in the heart of town. people have shown up here before sunrise. when they show up, they walk along the sidewalk. it's easy to notice the sea of flowers and also see glowing candles. many of those candles scented.
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the smell is almost soothing for this community in such deep sorrow. i spoke with a woman who's lived here nearly all her life. she said the shock of the shooting is starting to go away but the pain gets heavier every day. i also spoke with the border patrol agent whose wife is a counselor at the school. she's been counseling families since this happened. we've been telling folks how close this community is and how connected it is. we're starting to see and hear more of those stories, poppy. >> adrienne, we're so thankful you're there to bring them to us. let's focus on a huge question this morning and for months ahead, how could this happen? what went wrong and what can we learn? joining me now to discuss is edward dobrowski, now researching gun violence at case western university. thank you for joining us. >> good morning. how useful do you think the department of justice getting involved here will be?
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>> i think that's incredibly critical at this stage. as your reporter noted, the source of this review has to be somebody credible, objective, transparent, and accurate. and i cants think of a better spot than the cop's office. >> paula said they can make some referrals if there's going to be criminal prosecution. we'll see. but can they do anything forward looking? the reality is the lessons were known here, since columbine. we knew, go toward the shots, the sound of the gunfire, and go right away and go fast. >> that's going to be one of the critical questions that need to be answered. they have fast experience with state and local law enforcement. they can call on the experience of anybody else within doj, whether that's fbi, atf, any u.s. attorneys or any other
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legal sources ultimately, you're right. it's going to be what happened in those minutes that had this misjudgment occur that they believed it was a barricade and not still an active shooter scenario. it's extremely troubling. >> when you look at the texas commission on law enforcement training manual, on how to handle active shooter situations, it clearly states a, quote, officer's first priority is to move and confront the attacker. it goes on to say, a first responder unwilling to place the lives of the innocent above their own safety should consider another career. all law enforcement in texas are trained under these exact guidelines. they could not be more clear. how can you square that with what we saw happen? or you can't? >> i can't. and also in those guidelines it talks about -- they give an example. if an officer forces an attack under a room or area where the
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isolated cannot escape, can do no more harm, the officer is not obligated. i don't see any of those criteria are met. one of the challenges with any critical incident or dynamic tactical situation is you have to make the right call based on the information you have and the resources you have and not the information and resources you want. and the training and the expertise and experience are what's supposed to inform that correct pathway to the right decision. >> yeah. you have spent 30 years, right, three decades plus focused on firearm-related violent crimes. and a lot of your work is toward focusing on opportunities for more research, including focusing on gun violence as a public health issue. really an epidemic in this country. and you've emphasized the need to study it and address it that way as a systematic issue. now, there's debate over that, but most of the medical professionals agree with you on
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that front. why do you think that would change things? >> you have to apply cross-disciplinary and reach out to other expertises to look at this through different lenses. the public health approach to this -- look, i spent a lot of years going into neighborhoods, repeatedly conducting investigations and making arrests and you see the same victims, the same suspects, communities that are constantly impacted by this. and i can tell you from my experience in cleveland, we had emergency department doctors working with us to try to intervene younger and younger kids as they were seeing them come into their emergency department. it's an all sources, all resource issue. you can't say this one thing is
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going to fix it. >> as you noted, perpetrators are younger, younger. thank you very much. >> thank you. at any moment now, president biden will return to the white house after speaking and spending time trying to comfort families with the first lady in uvalde over the weekend. in a few hours he's set to observe memorial day at arlington national cemetery. we'll have that ahead. you'll hear from a 9-year-old boy who saw the gunman with his own eyes and then saw his teacher got shot in the leg. two child psychologists will join me to talk about how our children can cope with this trauma. later, inflation, high gas prices, thousands of flights canceled, all plaguing the first big travel weekend of the summer. what to expect in the months ahead. she's getting graded on her green investments with merrill. a-plus. still got it. (whistle blows) your money n never stops workig for you with merrill, a bank of america company. hitting the road, not all 5g networks are created equal. t-mobile covers more highway miles with 5g than verizon.
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welcome back. next hour president biden and first lady jill biden will host a breakfast in honor of memorial day and will go to arlington national cemetery for a ceremony where the president will speak after laying a wreath at the tomb of the soldier of the unknown soldier. let's get to jeremy diamond. a very significant weekend for the president and first lady. also significant for them, very personally, they will visit the grave of their late son in delaware on this, the seventh anniversary of his death. what more can you tell us about that they'll do today? >> reporter: that's right. president biden has just touched down here back at the white house. before he did that, he did visit the grave of his son, beau biden who died on seven years ago today. president biden is set to go to
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arlington national cemetery to participate in the somber ceremony at the tomb of the unknown soldier and he'll deliver remarks at arlington. it is notable, while we don't have a preview of president biden's remarks for today, this is the first memorial day that he will be honoring the lives of fallen service members since that withdrawal of u.s. forces from the war in afghanistan. 2,461 americans died in that war. that was something that president biden said as he pulled out those troops that he did not want to risk of lives of more service members by prolonging that war. very notable, later this afternoon the president will also participate in a tree-planting ceremony on the south lawn of the white house. he and the first lady alongside the family members of fallen service members will plant a magnolia tree on the south lawn. >> jeremy, before you go, just speak about what we saw this weekend, yesterday in uvalde, texas. i mean, the president once again for the second time in two weeks going to comfort survivors and
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victims' families in another horrific mass shooting. he also, once again, promised action. >> reporter: that's right. listen, president biden arrived in uvalde with plans to provide some measures of comfort, is what he said, to those grieving family members. he left, though, with a promise to take action. to, quote, do something as you face these chants from uvalde residents to take action on gun reform. one of those residents, ben gonzalez, he was one of those people chanting at the president. here's what he said to our colleague. >> at a certain point in time it's going to be on us because we vote these people in to represent us. and they're not representing us. it's heartbreaking because things like this happen. something needs to be doen. something. we need change. we need help. and my biggest fear is nothing's going to change. six months from now, uvalde is just going to be uvalde and it's just going to be history and nothing will have changed. >> reporter: look, president
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biden spent over three hours with some of those grieving families behind the scenes. he placed flowers in front of that memorial at robb elementary school. now the question from some of these uvalde residents and people across the country, what is actually going to happen? the white house said they believe they have limited, if any, options as it relates to executive action. they believe it's up to congress to do something. will congress act? we know chris murphy is one of the democratic senators working with at least five republican lawmakers to potentially try and find a path to compromise. he says he believes he is seeing more likelihood for action now, working with more republicans now than at any time since that sandy hook shooting nearly ten years ago. we'll have to wait sxee whether it actually produces any results. poppy? >> or even just on the state level. look at florida after parkland. major changes can happen on the state level if state legislatures act. jeremy diamond at the white house, thanks very much. we have seen deadly gun violence across the country this holiday weekend. so far at least two dozen people
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were shot in multiple shootings across the country just over the weekend. in oklahoma, one person was killed, seven others injured including a 9-year-old child at a memorial day event over the weekend. also there were shootings in tennessee, nevada, georgia, where most of those wounded were teenagers. this weekend's gun violence follows deadly mass shootings at the elementary school in uvalde, texas, at the supermarket in buffalo, new york, and a church in southern california. nadia romero has more on this. what more can you tell us about what happened this weekend? >> reporter: good morning, poppy. the first thing you'll notice is how widespread are these shootings. gone are the days where we only talk about shootings in large metropolitan areas. let's first start with taft, oklahoma. it's about 45 miles outside of tulsa. there one person was killed, seven others shot in what was supposed to be a fun memorial day festival with 1,500 people, families in attendance. instead, a shooting happened. police there say that a suspect
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has turned himself in. now let's move to chattanooga, tennessee, about a mile or so from the tennessee aquarium, six people were shot. two of them with life-threatening injuries. the police there tell us that most of the people involved were young people, teenagers or in their early 20s. listen to the mayor of chattanooga talk about his frustrations. >> kids have always gotten into scuffles with each other. it's a tale as old as time. what is new is they now have access to handguns and firearms that leave behind bodies instead of bruise and bruised egos. i can't say this enough. easy access to illegal guns is killing kids and our community has a responsibility to put a stop to it. >> reporter: and that is what a lot of people are talking about. what can we do? and especially when you're seeing shootings happening in grocery stores, in churches or on the interstate. that's what happened in henderson, nevada. on the interstate, multiple
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people were shot. seven people were injured in that shooting. police are still investigating that and looking for a suspect. poppy, i want to share this number with you. we checked in with the gun violence archive. they keep track of mass shootings. that's when four or more people are shot in a particular incident. so far this year there have already been more than 225 mass shootings in this country. we're not even halfway through the year. >> more mass shootings than days so far this year. nadia, thank you very much for the reporting. as millions of people hit the road this holiday weekend, you obviously are feeling the pain at the gas pump. we'll talk about those new high gas prices. relief may not come any time soon, next. it was time for a nunormal with nucala. nucala is a once monthly add-on treatment for severe eoeosinophilic asthma that can mean less oral steroids. not for sudden breathing problems. allergic reactions can occur. get help right away for swelling of face, mouth, tongue, or trouble breathing.
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have died of overdoses. i'm voting yes on h to recall chesa boudin now. we can't wait one more day when people are dying on our streets. getting away this memorial day weekend has not been easy for many of you. millions of drivers are paying nearly ten-year high prices for gas and air travelers facing thousands of cancellations. pete at reagan international airport. 15 million people expected to travel this memorial day, is that right? >> reporter: yeah, it's a huge test for the airlines. not only is this the first major travel rush since the end of the
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man mask mandate. 2 million people being screened per day at airports across the country, according to the tsa. that number, about 90% of where we were back in 2019 before the pandemic. and the tsa has foreshadowed we may see numbers at or above pre-pandemic levels as this holiday travel period drags on, as the summer begins. you know, aaa forecasted that about 39 million people would travel 50 miles or more over the five-day memorial travel period. that number not that far off from where we were in 2019. the vast majority traveling by car, even though these gas prices are sky high. the national average for a gallon of regular $4.79. the aaa says drivers simply remain undaunted even in spite of these high gas prices. >> you think the numbers will be
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all that far off from the projection? >> our projections have always been pretty accurate, but we've never been trying to project in an environment like this. >> reporter: overall, travel on the airlines has been relatively smooth. 2100 cancellations in the united states but 100 at delta air lines. it says it will cancel about 100 flights a day in the month of july to maintain predictability in this schedule facing these big staffing shortages, poppy. >> wow. one thing on top of the next. pete, thanks for being on top of it for us. drivers seeing the highest inflation adjusted gas prices in a decade, also much higher cost for food. this holiday weekend, cnn business leader matt mcginn is with us. no sign from your reporting that these prices are going to ease up any time soon? >> unfortunately, that's right, poppy. the problem is that supply can't keep up with demand. russia's invasion of ukraine has
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set off these global shock waves in energy markets. that's why we've seen the national average hit $4.62 nationally according to aaa. that's up 44 cents in just the past month. for context, the average was $3.05 a gallon last memorial day. even if you adjust for inflation, this is the highest gas price that we've seen in memorial day weekend in a decade. that is despite the fact that president biden has released emergency oil from the strategic petroleum reserve. more than anyone has ever released before. we were invited by the white house to take a tour of the strategic petroleum reserve. after the tour, i asked energy secretary jennifer granholm about gas prices. she said the president is, quote, obsessed with high gas prices. >> he's responding to the current situation. he knows and he's obsessed with the fact that gas prices are so high and people are hurting. and this is a global issue. so, what can he do?
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so, you can get the oil and gas industry to release more supply but you accelerate clean energy. you can walk and chew gum, you can do both. the fact that we're paying these prices is almost an exclamation point on the fact we need to move to clean energy so we're not in this position in the future. >> for now we remain very much subject to the whims of the global energy market and relying on fossil fuels. it's about 30% more expensive to fill up your tank today than it was the day before russia invaded ukraine. and granholm conceded to me that even the most powerful person on the planet only has so much influence here. as she put it, presidents don't control gas prices. despite the fact that prices are very high, poppy, an estimated 35 million people traveling by car this holiday weekend. >> airline prices are a lot, too.
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matt egan, thanks. a great interview. people can see a lot more of it on cnn business. ahead, heartbreaking account from one of the children inside robb elementary school as the gunman massacred small children and their teachers. his mother says he is dealing with night terrors. how can parents help their children cope with this trauma? that's what we'll talk about next.
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the 19 children and 2 teachers killed in the uvalde mass shooting, we continue to hear more and more harrowing accounts from children who were there and survived it all. our dana bash sat down with daniel, a survivor of the shooting, and his mother, brianna ruiz. his cousin, ellie garcia was one of the 19 children killed in the attack. just listen to this. >> she just like shot four bullets into our class. but, like, her nose broke and then our teacher got shot in her leg and her torso, but she's all right. >> he was never in your classroom? >> uh-huh. >> because your teacher -- is it right that your teacher locked the door and broke the key? >> uh-huh. >> did you see his face? >> yeah. >> through the window? >> uh-huh. >> and describe what happened when you finally saw daniel.
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>> when he came out, it was over an hour later. he was actually one of the last ones from the back of his class coming out. there was a student that was struck in his classroom. when i saw her, i mean, she was just covered in blood because he had broken her nose with a stray bullet. when i saw that and i recognized the girl was in his class, it -- it sent a more terrifying chill through my body because i saw all his friends running out and i still hadn't seen him. finally towards the end when him and another friend came running out together, it -- it gave -- it gave me back -- like, i couldn't catch my breath, you know, but i ran straight to him and i just held him.
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>>. of course, she ran straight to him and just held him. a huge question right now is, how do you help children cope? children who have been through such a traumatic event like a school shooting or your own children who have seen it on television or read about it or heard about it from their friends? my next guests are psychologists who co-wrote the children's book "something happened in our park:standing together after gun violence." thank you both very much for being with me. doctor, let me begin with you. it's always important, i know, to tell our children the truth, right? even if it's horrible truth? >> yes. >> but how do you do that, especially for young children, you know, 7, 8, 9, 10, without terrifying them? >> that's a great question. i think one way is by letting your child give you a sense of where they're at. you can ask them, you know, have you heard about a school
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shooting that happened recently. what did you hear? what are your questions? and that way you can gauge the additional information you give them to what they're ready to hear. >> doctor, american school counselor association put together this list of tips to try to help parents because i think we often feel at a loss for words and what to say and how to help children most. they say, try to keep routines as normal as possible. kids gain security from the predictability of a routine, including attending school. how important is it to keep their lives, whether it's the survivors or other children who are now scared to go to school, as routine as they were before? >> well, i would certainly agree with those tips. what's also important is that you prepare your child for going back into an environment which
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has conditionally been a safe and happy place for them. but if they're going back into the school shooting where the shooting happened or the school in general, they're likely to have more fears, more anxiety. so, certainly talking to them about their fears and what -- you know, what to expect and the adults in their lives, both at home and at school, are doing everything they can to make sure that they're going to be safe. >> dr. hazzard, when i look at the world through the eyes of my children who are 4 and 6, they don't know this happened. they see the world as an utterly wonderful place, right? from what i've been reading from other psychologists is we still have to he remind our children that the world is a good place, even when horrifying things like this happen. how do you advise parents to do that? >> yes, i think it is an
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important balancing act for all of us taking care of children, so, we have to acknowledge that sometimes horrible things happen. if children have heard about this incident, as many have, allow them to express their feelings about it. but we do have to remind children that there are many good people who are taking care of them, that there's beautiful things in life, that there are positive things to look forward to in their future so that they don't get overwhelmed and lose hope. >> and, dr. collins, i think it's important to note the time that this is happening in. "the new york times" has a really fascinating survey and graphic example this morning of 362 school counselors on anxiety among children through the
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pandemic. and they quote one counselor saying, kids have the highest level of anxiety i have ever seen. anxiety about basic safety, a fear of what could happen. another in oregon said, i've seen more physical fights this year than in my 15 years combined. again, that was done right -- you know, just before the uvalde mass shooting. how does that heightened anxiety already in our kids tie into this now? >> i would say it certainly does tie into it. during the pandemic, most children were not in the traditional school setting. as you referenced early, routine is really important in children's lives. now they're transitioning back into a school setting, so there are adjustments that have to -- that are associated with that. you couple that with what's happening, you know, in our country with all of these school shootings and we would certainly expect there to be these very high levels of anxiety that was
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reported. what's important, again, is to be aware of what's going on in terms of where anxiety may be coming from, talking with children about what may be feeling -- what they may be feeling, helping them to develop better skills, you know, skill set other than the fighting that you mentioned. how can they talk about things in a way that does not increase their anxiety and result in more fighting. >> well, thank you both very much for being with us today. i think it's some comfort for parents trying to figure out how to help their children most. thank you very much. >> thank you. >> thank you for having us. >> of course. ahead, president biden just returned to the white house. he spoke about gun control on the south lawn. you'll hear what the president said right after this.
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eric early. too extreme, too conservative all right. some good news. some relief soap for families impacted by this nationwide baby formula shortage. thousands of pounds of formula headed to store shelves right now after being airlifted from germany to the u.s. it's promising news as retailers across the country are either low on supply or just out of formula. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen has been following all of this. she joins me now. yesterday in a pharmacy in florida, i saw one -- i saw one container of baby formula, and i thought, i mean, i hope, i guess, it's just one, and what if my children were of that age so it's been just terrifying for so many parents, but it's
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getting better now? >> that is terrifying just one. poppy, i wish i could tell you that i wish is getting better. help is on the way. >> okay. >> but parents won't see the results of this super, super quickly. let's go over what help is on the way. tens of thousands of formula from nestle was sent to stores this weekend. we've been asking, all right, when are parents going to see that formula? we've not gotten an answer and the fda has allowed an australian company to export enough for 27.5 million eight-ounce bottles. that's huge. much more than has been shipped already, but just giving the permission doesn't mean it's going to happen any time soon. also, the french company dannon, half a million cans is expected to reach parents in the first half of july so none of this help is coming from what we can see, you know, today. let's take a look at what some incredible moms are doing, poppy. i don't remember back when your kids were babies, the nursing and the pumping, it's a lot of
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work. >> yes. >> it's a lot of work. >> a lot. >> i want to -- it's a lot. so these ladies are amazing. i want you to introduce you to marie milan, a nurse in oregon. she has a 6-month-old, and she is donating pumped milk to a bank. she posted on instagram that in one day she donated more than a gallon of milk, that's a huge amount to donate in just one day. also, hillary demon, a filmmaker and a professor in pittsburgh, she's mom to 1-year-old remy. she's done nursing. probably, she was going to be done and finished but shoal keep pumping in kicks months just so she can donate the milk to parent who can't find formula and cory callahan, this one was amazing, people didn't even know this was possible. she has three daughters and stopped nursing the younger a year and a half ago. hasn't had milk with a year and a half and with help of folks from la leche milk she's trying to re-establish her milk supply
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so she can bust and give the milk to her home in missouri. this is a woman who is not even lactating, trying to relactate so she can donate milk, incredible time and effort. pumping is no fun, nobody loves pumping but these mothers are doing the time and effort and literally giving of their bodies to help other families poppy. >> a reminder of the good that still does exist in the world. elizabeth cohen, thanks for that story and thanks to the mothers as well. ukraine's president visits the front line of the war for the first time since the russian invasion. we have a live report ahead from krooif. she's getting graded on her green investments wiwith merrill. a-plus. still got it. (whistle blows) your money never stops working for you with merrill,, a bank of america company. from prom dresses to workouts and new adventures you hope the more you give the less they'll miss. but even if your teen was vaccinated against meningitis in the past
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right now russian forces are trying to surround ukranian troops in the eastern ukraine. ukranian officials say they have made significant advancements as they target russian forces near kherson. ukranian president volodymyr zelenskyy has traveled outside the kyiv region since the assault began. let's go to our matthew chance. what can you tell us about a very important significant for the president? >> reporter: very significant. it's not, of course, that we've seen acts of defiance from president zelenskyy's which has characterized his own presidency by doing things like this, but this is the first time since this conflict began back in february that president zelenskyy has venture outside of kyiv. you've seen him in the streets around the city. does a lot of interviews and
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speeches from his bunker inside the city center and this time right to the other side of the country, right to the place where the fighting -- close to where the fighting is taking place, the city of karchiev and they are trying to push the russians back in a very significant counteroffensive. that's something that the president wanted to acknowledge and he spent a significant amount of time speaking to soldiers on the ground and visiting, we're told, the actual front line positions which is very close to where the russian forces are still active and, of course, thanking the individual soldiers that continue to pay such a heavy sacrifice on the grounds on the front line. take a listen to what president zelenskyy has to say. >> >> translator: i would like
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to thank each one of you for your service. you risk your lives for all of us and our country. thank you for defending ukraine's independence. stay safe. >> well, elsewhere, of course in, that eastern ukraine area a lot of fierce fighting in the donbas area which the russians have said, again, is a priority for them to take, significant military goal for them in this conflict. >> matthew chance, thank you very much for your reporting live from kyiv for us today. it's the top of the hour. i'm poppy harlow. thanks for being with us. -ins a special edition of cnn "newsroom." and today a very, very sad day seeing the first of the funeral services for 19 children and 2 teachers and visitations for anne marie garcia and mait

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