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tv   [untitled]  CSPAN  June 4, 2009 3:00pm-3:30pm EDT

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protects me and every other passenger to a greater extent than any other procedure we have now. we aren't doing this because we want to do it. we are doing it because we have people around the world who want to kill us, want to destroy our way of life and they have utilized commercial airliners for that purpose in the greatest attack in our nation's history since pearl harbor. this is a device which helps us take advantage of our technological know-how to gain an advance on the enemy. i would hope we would not do this by way of this amendment. i thank the gentleman for yielding. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from pennsylvania's time has expired. the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: thank you, mr. chairman. i'd like to yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. chaffetz: whole body imaging does exactly what it's
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going to do. it takes a 360-degree image of your body. now, i want to have as much safety and security on the airplanes. i'm flying there every week, but there comes a point in which in the name of safety and security we overstep that line and we have an invasion of privacy. this happens to be one of those invasions of privacy. now, i understand what the gentleman from california expressed his concern. let me be clear that this amendment on whole body imaging only limits primary screening. it can be used as secondary screening. you may have people with artificial hips or knees and they may elect to go through this type of screening. it's perfect for them. but to suggest that every single american, that my wife, my 8-year-old daughter needs to be subjected to this i think is absolutely wrong. the technology to blur out your face. the reason is there's such great specificity on their face that they have to protect it because of privacy. in other limited parts you can see specifics with the degree of certainty that according to the t.s.a. is quoted in the
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"usa today," you can actually see the sweat on somebody's back, end quote. they can tell the difference between a dime and a nickel. if they can do that they will see things that i don't think they should be looking at in order to secure a plane. you don't need to see my wife and daughter naked in order to secure the plane. now, there are some people that says there is a radio communication. there's distance. well, it's just as easy to say there's a celebrity or there's a member of congress or there's some weird-looking person. there is communication. there are those that say, well, you can't record the devices. well, many of us have mobile phones or have these little cameras that there's nothing in this technology that would prohibit the recording of these. . there is going to be a breach of security. and i want our planes to be as
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safe and secure as we can, but at the same time, we cannot overstep that and have this invasion of privacy. i urge my colleagues to vote in support of this amendment. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from utah. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. mr. chaffetz: i would like to have a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from utah will be postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 11 printed in house report 111-127. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from guam rise? ms. bordallo: mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: amendment number 11, printed in house report 111-127
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offered by mrs. bordallo of guam. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 474, the gentlewoman from guam and a member opposed each will control 20 minutes. the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. bordallo: i thank congressman thompson and congresswoman jackson lee for their support of this amendment. my amendment is simple and straightforward. it would require the assistant secretary of t.s.a. to conduct a study and make recommendations on specific methods by which airports in the u.s. territories, including the guam international airport in my district, can best and most cost effectively comply with existing security regulations, specifically, it asks t.s.a. to review compliance with part 1544 and 1546 of title 49 of the federal regulations relating to the issue of co-mingling of
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passengers at u.s. airports. it would evaluate alternatives and identify the costs for their impleatation. it is to identify sources of federal and nonfederal financing to determine the preferred alternative. guam is a small hub, mr. chairman, for a domestic airline. our airport on guam facilitates the daily transiting of international passengers to destinations in the united states, other pacific islands, major cities in the pacific rim, including, japan, korea, taiwan and australia. the security arrangement requires significant resources to be expended in constant around the clock monitoring by security personnel to prevent the co-mingling of transiting and departing passengers. the security enhancements made subsequent to the terrorist attacks of september 11, 2001, particularly with respect to
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preventing the co-mingling of passengers at our airports all across the country have been costly and in some cases difficult to fully implement. moreover, the current decrease in tourist arrivals and departures due to the economic downturn erodes the financial capability of small airports to implement such security improvements. the guam international airport authority has been operating from a waiver from the t.s.a. for several years. the t.s.a. and the guam international airport agree that the temporary solution which amounts to placement of removable par tissue ons and use of security staff to prevent co-mingling of passengers in their movements throughout the terminal is not feasible for the long-term. however, the cost of implementing security arrangements and improvements at the guam airport to ensure compliance is costly and since other security enhancements and expansion of the airport have
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completely obligated the passenger facility charge. the amendment before us, mr. chairman, simply looks to provide options for solving this problem on guam and potentially, as well as other airports in the u.s. territories. more importantly, it would provide guidance for funding and implea mentation of these improvements. i thank the chairman and his committee staff for his work with me and for the record, i urge passage of the next amendment, number two, sponsored by congressman jackson lee and congressman hastings and i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman from guam reserves the balance of her time? ms. bordallo: i yield back. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? mr. dent: i rise to claim opposition to the amendment, although i have no real objection.
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the chair: without objection, jarred for five minutes. mr. dent: i would like to say i support the amendment. guam international airport does not serve passengers traveling internationally from those passengers traveling domestically. there is no separation either by a separate floor or wall. prior to 9/11, the co-mingling of domestic international travelers was not a concern. guam international is concerned about the security implications of the current system and looking for a long term solution to prevent co-mingling of international passengers. this amendment would require that the t.s.a. review the current procedures in place at the airports of the u.s. territories and make recommendations to the airports and how best to address the co-mingling of passengers. i yield at this time to the chair of the committee on transportation and infrastructure protection, congresswoman jackson lee. ms. jackson lee: i would like to
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applaud the gentlelady from guam for this foughtful amendment. mr. speaker, if we are going to have homeland security, we must have expanded homeland security and that includes our territories. this amendment directs t.s.a. to identify in its report funding sources to recover the costs of any long-term security improvements that would be needed at these airports in the territories. i believe this is crucial. this is a seamless and important part of homeland security. and i would ask my colleagues to support it, which includes u.s. territories, especially the guam international airport, which is subject to significant fluctuations in passenger volume pause of the passenger volume. this is a good amendment and i ask my colleagues to support it. the chair: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from pennsylvania. mr. dent: i yield back. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from guam. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of
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the chair, the ayes have it and the amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 12 printed in house report 111-127. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington rise? mr. hastings: i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: amendment number 12 printed in house report 111-127 offered by mr. hastings of washington. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 474, the gentleman from washington, mr. hastings, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from washington. mr. hastings: i thank my colleagues, ms. jackson lee of texas and mr. rogers for co-sponsoring this very important amendment. highly trained canine teams have been trained in the united states since 1973. dogs are extremely reliable in their mobility and makes them invaluable in screening all types of cargo quickly and effectively. as we approach the august, 2010 deadline to screen cargo
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transported on passenger airlines, it is critical that t.s.a. is prepared to deal with all types of cargo without unnecessarily slowing down. within my district, cherry growers transport half of the cherries they export on passenger airlines. my amendment would increase the number of canine teams specifically dedicated to air cargo by a minimum of 100 dogs. the need for additional canines is clear. the seattle-tacoma airport began screening all of its air cargo earlier this year. in order to meet the needs, t.s.a. will bring canine teams to the pacific northwest and other parts of the country during the cherry harvest to ensure all cherries are screened this a timely manner. once the 100% requirement goes into effect next year, the burden on all these canine teams will only increase. at a time when our economy is
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struggling, we should not be adding new rod blocks for american farmers and businesses. i strongly urge my colleagues to support, keeping our skies secure without interrupting commerce and voting yes on the hastings-jack son lee-rogers amendment. i reserve. the chair: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from from texas. ms. jackson lee: i rise in opposition to the amendment although i do not oppose the amendment. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for five minutes. ms. jackson lee: i thank the full committee chairman and mr. dent. it was a pleasure to work with mr. hastings and mr. rogers. iize in support of the hastings-rogers-jackson lee amendment. i appreciate their willingness to work with me on this important amendment. we have towered the homeland
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security sites that have had canines and heard from airports who say give me one good dog and we provide security. t.s.a.'s canine teams are important and effective tools for securing all modes of transportation in the united states. the use of canine teams has managed what few security measures can boast. they are well liked. our committee worked hard to re-affirm our support for canine teams in explosion detection. i'm proud to have led these efforts. this amendment rounds out these important provisions as we speak, t.s.a. continues its work meeting the 100% cargo screening requirement established by the 9/11 act. let me indicate that i'm very proud of the language we have about 100% cargo screening. it is one that we worked with the department of homeland security. we worked with mr. markey. we worked with our chairman and our ranking member of both committees, the subcommittee and
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full committee. we want 100% screening. the canine teams that will be deployed will ensure t.s.a.'s success. mr. hastings, mr. rogers and i have offered what i perceive to be a thoughtful amendment. and i urge my colleagues to support it. i thank mr. hastings and mr. rogers for their collaboration. with that, i'm going to yield become. the chair: the gentlewoman from texas yields back. the gentleman from washington. mr. hastings: i yield myself the balance of the time. i thank my colleague for her thoughtful remarks and working with us. agri business is big and the cherry season is in a tight time frame and it is important that nothing slows down the process of getting these cherries to market. i thank my friend from guam for endorsing this amendment. i urge my colleagues to vote for the amendment. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from washington. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion the e of the chair, the ayes have it
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and the amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 13 printed in house report 111-127. for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina rise? butt combut i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: amendment number 13 printed in house report 111-127 offered by mr. butterfield of north carolina. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 474, the gentleman from north carolina, mr. butterfield, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina. mr. butterfield: i rise in support in support of the underlying bill, the transportation security administration authorization act of 2009. this is a necessary bill that will help to safeguard the american people. and i want to commend my friend and colleague, chairman thompson from mississippi, for steering this legislation through this process. your leadership does not go unnoticed by members of this body and the american people and
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we thank you. we thank the ranking member of this committee, mr. king of new york, for his leadership and for his work on homeland security as well as the other members of the committee. i particularly want to thank the hard working staff of the homeland security committee for all that they do and the work they have done in getting this legislation to the floor today. mr. chairman, i offer a very simple amendment to h.r. 2200. it authorizes a study on the feasibility of combining facial and iris technologies for rapid identification in airport security checkpoint lines. the study would focus on merits of using the combined technologies and the potential for use. researchers tell us that this new technology holds great promise for providing highly reliable, efficient, unobstructtive and accurate way to establish and identify identities. unlike names and dates of birth
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which can be changed from time to time. byo metrics are impossible to duplicate. it is being collected by the department of homeland security through its u.s. visit program. this invaluable information helps prevent people from using fraudulent documents to attempt to enter our country illegally. collecting this information protects travelers' identities in the event travel documents are lost or stolen. one of my constituents had his passport stolen and has been unable to travel in more than one year. this technology would have made the issueance of travel documents a less cumbersome process. utilizing advance technologies like special cameras or imaging systems of did-d and 3-d facial
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technology, they could analyze the data in a few short seconds. the collection analysis and identification of an individual, mr. chairman, would only take as much as it takes a person to go through that dreaded security line at the airport. in fact, the security would be sped up and significantly lessen the time an individual spends in time. by combining the facial and iris recognition data, t.s.a. officials would get an accurate identification of an individual an would have the opportunity to investigate further if necessary. effective use of these databases to confirm or discover personal identities is critical in maintaining our national security. travel is made safer and again the technology is nonintrucive. this study, mr. chairman, requested under this amendment would also help to identify any specific environmental and operational factors that might limit these biometric
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capabilities and provide insight and information for biometric acquisitions and procedures. it is my hope, therefore, that members will support this amendment. it is a commonsense approach using technology to increasing the level of security at checkpoints. i want to remind my colleagues that this technology is totally, totally nonintrucive and has the potential for improving accuracy and efficiency and safety for t.s.a. personnel and travelers alike. and so mr. chairman, thank you for recognizing me. thank you, mr. chairman, for giving me this time. at this time i am going to reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from north carolina reserves the bance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? mr. dent: i rise to support this amendment. the chair: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. dent: this makes it an exciting new possibility for
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people approaching a security checkpoint. imagine someone with a warrant or fleeing that can be identified as a threat before entering the sterile area of an airport? we may be years away from break throughs in this technology but it certainly does hold some real promise. some would argue this technology goes too far or invades one's privacy but any individual going to a checkpoint must provide identification. this system, if proven effective, could ensure that documentation provide at the checkpoint is in fact authentic. so for all those reasons, i would urge my colleagues to support this butterfield amendment. it makes sense. and i strongly urge its adoption. at this time i'd yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from pennsylvania yields back the baffle his time. the gentleman from north carolina. mr. butterfield: i want to thank the gentleman for his support of this amendment and thank him very much for his work here in this body.
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at this time, mr. chairman, i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from california, a hardworking member of this homeland security -- the chair: the gentleman from north carolina has 45 seconds remaining. mr. butterfield: i yield to the gentlelady from california 45 seconds. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for 45 minutes. ms. richardson: this would have facial and iris recognition that would eye bentify individuals at security checkpoints. this study authorizes the ability that we can consider environmental and operational factors and any capabilities that would hinder future acquisitions. as a member of this committee i support mr. butterfield and our chairman in support of this bill. i ask my colleagues to do the same. i reserve 10 seconds to clear up this amendment. mr. butterfield: mr. chairman, i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from north carolina yields back the balance of his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from north carolina. all those in favor say aye. all those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it.
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the amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 14 printed in house report 111-127. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. roskam: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 14 printed in house report 111-127 offered by mr. roskam of illinois. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 474, the gentleman from illinois, mr. roskam, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. roskam: i want to thank chairman thompson and the homeland security committee for working with me on this amendment and appreciate their attitude very much and their openness to this suggestion. this is a fairly straightforward amendment and what it's trying to do is mirror the resources of the federal government and to make sure they're in sync with the needs of local transit systems. this actually developed out of a homeland security working group dialogue that i had in my congressional district. i represent the west and
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northwest suburbs of chicago, and a wide range of commuters. we have bus lines and rail lines in the chicago area and there's a certain level of vulnerability. so last march i invited some of the leadership of the public transit systems and some of the security agencies to really offer ideas. and this is one of the ideas that they had. they said, look, we have needs at the local level and there are resources at the federal government, but sometimes those two things aren't really in sync. and so what this is it says simply that the assistant secretary of homeland security will hold hearings if this amendment was passed and those hearings are really about the subject of whether current allowable uses of grant funds are sufficient to meet the daily needs of the -- the daily security needs and the transit security needs of these local agencies. then after that happens, after that conversation happens in
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these hearings to come back to congress and to report. and i think that this is one of these areas where there's a great deal of common ground. there's uncertainty sometimes at the state and local level about how federal funds fit into their agenda. we all know that we in the congress are trying to help and this is a structured way to have that conversation. because when it comes down to it there's nearly 12 million americans that are riding on passenger trains each day. and that six times as many as fly in our sky. and i think this is a wide use of resources and urge adoption of the amendment. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from illinois reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? mr. thompson: mr. chairman, while opposed to the amendment i ask unanimous consent to claim time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes.
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mr. thompson: mr. chair, mr. roskam's amendment builds on this effort to require t.s.a. to engage in an open and constructive dialogue on the security priorities that matter most to state and local transit agencies. in these difficult times, it is more important than ever that we make sure that our state and local transit agencies are able to maximize their limited resources to implement effective and cost-effective security programs. mr. roskam's amendment supports that effort. therefore, i urge my colleagues to vote aye on this amendment. and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from mississippi reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from illinois. mr. roskam: mr. chairman, you know, i want to thank the gentleman for his support and just want other point for the record. the amendment is endorsed by the american public transportation association. i am not aware of any opponents and i appreciate the gentleman's support and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from
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illinois yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from mississippi. mr. thompson: i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from illinois. all those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, proceedings will now resume on those amendments printed in house report 111-127 on which further proceedings were postponed in the following order.
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