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tv   Americas Newsroom  FOX News  May 27, 2022 6:00am-8:00am PDT

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8:00 and 11:00 amongst our guest folds of honor president dan rooney, tunnel to towers frank siller. they spend their lives giving back to those who serve and their family. >> watch one nation as well as "fox & friends" weekend live from nascar. we'll honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice all weekend long. thanks for being here this morning, everybody. >> bill: well done. good morning, 9:00 in new york city. what did happen in texas? many trying to clarify the response to the worst school shooting in that state's history. the updated timeline raising more questions than answers. let's go through it together. good morning, i'm bill hemmer. dana has time off today. julie banderas joins me as she has for the last couple of days here. julie on this friday, good morning to you and welcome. >> julie: good morning, bill. mourning families today growing increasingly angry at the conflicting information they've recently gotten from police.
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for instance, officials initially said an officer had engaged the gunman before he entered the school. but now we're being told that is not true. in fact, the shooter was outside the school for about 12 minutes before entering through an unlocked door. >> bill: all that adding to the confusion after police waited for about an hour before entering the classroom and killing the shooter. texas dps on the front lines of the investigation. the shifting timelines, the shifting facts were the focus of a contentious news conference that took place yesterday afternoon that went a bit like this. >> it was reported that a school district police officer confronted the suspect that was making entry. not accurate. he walked in unobstructed initially. >> how did he get in? it was supposed to be locked during the school day. >> so right now during the
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investigation it appeared as unlocked. so we will look at that and try to corroborate that if that's what we can. >> wasn't there a school officer on campus? was that school officer armed? that's what we've been told. >> at this time, no, no, there was not an officer readily available. >> that's a tough question. again it goes back. our job is to report the facts. >> what were the officers doing between 11:44 and 12:45. >> you guys have said he barricaded himself. [inaudible] >> i have taken all your questions into consideration. we'll be doing updates. >> we've been given a lot of bad information. clear all of this up. >> the timeline to the best of our understanding. the suspect's grandmother was shot, 911 called around 11:20
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a.m. eight minutes later at 11:28 the killer crashes his truck near the school. two minutes later another 911 call reporting shots were fired outside of that school. >> julie: then at 11:40 the gunman enters the building. three minutes later, 11:43 the school goes on lockdown. kids are declared safe. one minute later officers arrive but retreat because of gunfire. >> bill: one hour later tactical team goeps in. so many questions left unanswered. we start to start with bill melugin reporting live in uvalde this morning. there was a congressman on air 90 minutes ago suggesting the killer was arrested as a juvenile. that wasn't the case. it was a different kid. is there anything else authorities in texas want to clear up as of now, or will it come later, bill? >> good morning to you.
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there certainly is. i'm told that a press conference is planned at 11 a.m. local time and they'll release significant new details into this investigation. particularly with the timeline. you guys mentioned the timeline as we know it. i'm told the timeline is going to change and they believe they have the information down literally to the second now. so we're expecting new information and a more concrete, firm timeline in an announcement later on this morning. you mentioned off the top as well that that report that the shooter had been arrested as a juvenile years ago for plotting a mass shooting, i'm told that report is incorrect. that did not happen. those were two other teenagers and didn't involve ramos the shooter. this video, these photos here images yesterday in uvalde. the mother of the shooter,
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adriana reyes yesterday. rocking back and forth with the rosary. she said she was praying. as for her mother, the grandmother the shooter shot before he committed the mass shooting. she is now stable. she had surgery and is unable to physically talk, though. also fox news spoke with the family members of xavier lopez, one of the boys who passed away in the shooting. they had a lot of questions not only why it happened but how it was able to happen particularly with security at the school. why was a door open? where were the police? here is what they had to say. >> they know what the school guidelines are. what happened to the security? >> i don't understand exactly what happened but i think they should have gone ahead and secured that back door. >> it was a bad situation which has never happened.
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a lot of kids got killed. >> again, bill, we're waiting for that 11:00 a.m. local time press conference, noon eastern where again i'm told by law enforcement sources the timeline will change again a little bit. they believe they have it down second by second now after reviewing surveillance video and they also tell me they are planning to release significant new details. what that is we'll find out. >> bill: i want to go to the end of the timeline, bill. it is critical. if there was time wasted trying to take down the killer there are students possibly in this classroom that may or may not have been alive or saved at that point. if there were 19 kids killed in the same room along with two adult teachers, how many students were in that room who got out and lived through it? do we know that answer? >> we do not know but that is going to be one of the biggest questions. if police took a really long time to try to rebreach that
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room to get back into that room, the criticism will be there could have been children who were still alive bleeding out. a chance to save some of these people. if they waited outside for backup and waited for the tactical team to arrive every second counts in this type of situation. we know since columbine law enforcement reaction to a mass shooting is no longer to set up a perimeter and wait for a tactical team. they're supposed to go to the sours and take them out. the assumption is supposed to be every gunshot could be a life being taken. if it's revealed they waited a very long time to go back in while there were little children still alive in that classroom, that is going to be a very tough pill to swallow. we don't know. it's a hypothetical. maybe if they survived the initial shooting in a case where seconds or minutes matter and gotten to a hospital sooner things could have changed, right? we'll wait to see what dps
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announces later this morning. they have the timeline. we don't. we can owe speculating. i am told they have significant new information they plan to release. >> julie: i want to dive deeper into the family dynamic of the suspect, the shooter. the mayor of uvalde had told us the other day on this program it was the grandmother that called 911. she can't speak now because she was shot in the face had surgery and is recovering. the mother is seen grieving. the father has come forward and said that he wished he had been killed instead of someone else. what was the relationship between the son and his parents? was it a bit of a tumultuous relationship. there was an argument between the mother and father and police were called which perhaps led to the reason why he was living with his grand parents. >> it sounds like there was definitely some sort of strained relationship there. i did see the father's interview where he said he had wished that he had killed him
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instead and that he believed he would have killed him because his son frequently told him you don't love me. he was living with his grand parents on and off and other reporting the initial argument with his grandma started over a cell phone bill. i guess the grandma would take him off her plan or something like that and he didn't like that. that initially started some sort of an argument and ended with him shooting her in the face apparently. yes, by all accounts and reporting we've heard out there, it does seem there was some sort of a tumultuous relationship within that family and why he was living with his grand parents. >> bill: a long day today. bill melugin down there in uvalde. want to bring in chad ayers. he will join us for a moment. we brought john to talk school safety and security and what we'll learn throughout the day here. if you can hear me, chad, what are we missing on our
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understanding right now? >> you know, i think honestly, bill, i don't want to jump to conclusions yet. i think this afternoon's press conference will help a lot to lay out the timeline more. but if what we're hearing initially is true that we made it into that school and sat there for 40 minutes or an hour until we made entry, we have a major issue. let's look at the parkland shooting and we fwhoe may wha* happens if you go in and save lives and you were talking about it. you bleed out in 3 to 5 minutes and less than a half of 1% if you go into cardiac arrest because of blood loss to survive. i want to wait until the next press conference comes out. we have to do a better job training across this country. >> bill: chris from the f.b.i. was on yesterday afternoon with neil cavuto and he deals a lot
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with school security across the country and made an interesting point not talked about a lot. he believes now as he travels throughout the country and looks at more school districts and keeping kids safe in the classroom they are on their back foot ever since covid. do you agree with that? have you found that to be the case? >> absolutely. millions of dollars were spent to put plastic barriers up in classrooms. all this funding going towards covid. we have seen a backslide in providing training. i think so many times even smaller towns unfortunately think it can't happen here. unfortunately these events are happening at alarming rates. active shooter rates are up 53%. we have to get away from check the box training and we showed a video at the beginning of the school year. i talked about it the other night. it's time we evaluate the type
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of training we're giving our students and teachers, effective training, and not just saying we did our active shooter training and we're good to go. we have 19 little kids who lost their lives and two teachers and again it will take some time to really dig into this after-action report but i really think hopefully we get a lot more answers this afternoon. >> julie: the lockdown situation is one that is really raising a lot of questions. the school was under lockdown because there was an active shooter in the area. okay. but locked down means the doors are locked. this shooter was able to minutes after the police had tried to apprehend him, get through the back door of a school, a door that was unlocked while parents were outside desperately trying to get into the school. police didn't get into the school but somehow this guy did. there is obviously a problem in the protocol. the lack of training and all the focus and resources going
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into covid. what should happen in a school when they go under lockdown? >> so there are several things you have to look at. i'm a firm believer that all school doors should be locked. classroom doors. i don't care if a students goes to the restroom. the door needs to be shut and locked. the teacher's castle to keep the students safe. i'm a firm believer having one entrance and a catch breezeway in the front of the school where they have to be buzzed in. evacuation is the best chance to survive. the idea in all situations that we lock down and keep these kids in the classroom, i totally disagree with. if the gunman is inside the school or a classroom he is not outside. i'm a firm believer in saying if we can safely get these kids out windows and other doors and get them away, get them away. i will have superintendents say
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what if we lose a szmyd i would much rather be looking for your lost kid in the woods than looking at them dead in a classroom. >> bill: many thanks, chad. we'll wait on more news out of texas and when that happens 11:00 a.m. briefing from bill melugin that he announced a moment ago. the governor will talk at 4:00 this afternoon and we'll on all of that throughout the day. news overseas, the u.s. foreign policy focus is on the war in ukraine. china poses the bigger long term threat. how the administration is working to counter that coming up here. >> julie: closing arguments getting underway in the trial of a former clinton campaign lawyer charged with lying in the trump/russia probe. we have the latest from the courthouse. >> bill: on your money meat prices spiking in time for memorial day weekend and the start of grilling season. how will we deal with that this hot summer coming up. >> the food prices is just
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>> bill: there will be closing arguments this morning in the trial of former clinton campaign attorney michael sussman. he declined to testify in his own defense during this case. he is charged with one count of lying to the f.b.i. when he shared part of a new debunked trump/russia story. >> closing arguments began 15 minutes ago. no new evidence or witnesses. all of that is in and has been submitted. right now this is a chance for both sides to try and convince jurors and refresh them of
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their stories. even legal experts agree in this case it is complicated. there is a lot of evidence and a lot to talk about. at the end of the day it's about a former clinton campaign attorney named michael sussman. he is charged with lying to the f.b.i. specifically the man on screen right f.b.i. general counsel james baker. sussman came to baker in september 2016 and said he had information linking the trump organization to a russian bank with kremlin ties via a computer serve. john durham said the lie is when sussman told baker he was delivering the information on his own, not on behalf of any client. durham argues that sussman went on behalf of the clinton campaign and showed billing evidence that he says proves it. sussman's team said he did nothing wrong and has had a long working relationship with the f.b.i. and would never lie to the bureau. yesterday judge christopher cooper read instructions in the jury and to weigh several important questions chiefly was
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sussman's statement false, fictitious and material to the investigation and did michael sussman act knowingly or willfully with intention to break the law and was the statement made in the executive branch of government, meaning the f.b.i. if jurors believe the government proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt they are instructed to find sussman guilty. the judge said today he has a hard out for the long weekend at 2:30 p.m. deliberations may begin in part. possible a verdict today but very unlikely. deliberations will probably begin on tuesday after the long weekend and a verdict after that. >> bill: nice to see you in washington, d.c., thank you. >> even as president putin's war continues we remain focused on the most serious long term challenge to the international order posed by the people's republic of china. they are the only country with both the intent to reshape the
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international order and increasingly the economic, diplomatic, military and technological power to do it. >> julie: secretary of state antony blinken explaining why the biden administration plans to leverage international support against russia's invasion of ukraine into a bigger coalition to counter china. michael allen is a former special assistant to george w. bush and former senior director for counter proliferation strategy at the national security council. thank you for talking to us. we heard blinken there talking about the world's opposition to russia's invasion of ukraine but what he talks about is a larger threat, a larger long-term threat and that is the threat of china. what's our position? what should our position be? what should the biden administration's position be on tackling that threat in the future? >> thanks so much for having me. secretary blinken laid out a
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strategy yesterday that the united states should invest and align with its allies and compete with china. i thought it was a rather soft speech given the stakes. i thought it should have been more about how to blunt and confront china. one, china has doubled the size of their military over the last 10 years. i would have liked to have heard more about what the united states' strategy is to deter china in asia. and i would like to hear more about how american jobs are affected by the confrontation with china. at a minimum they would steal billions of dollars of intellectual property through cyber theft and other means and we need to get a handle on these things so we have a foreign policy that helps with the united states workers. >> julie: blinken says the u.s. has to rely on alliances, trade and investment to counter china. how does the u.s. put enough financial pressure on china to
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lessen their threat? >> we need to reach out in a more wholesome way to our allies in the region. the biden administration did put forth a measure this past week on an economic arrangement but i would have wished it would have been more aggressive. how are we going to lock china out of allies or potential ice and countries in southeast asia that are on the fence? we need and the europeans need to help invest in those countries so they don't fall into china's orbit and eventually come back and harm the united states. >> julie: okay. u.s. efforts to impose new sanctions i want to talk about this on north korea blocked by china and russia. how is the reliance impacted world order? >> you've seen it already in the russian invasion of ukraine. china is taking the oil and gas that russia can no longer sell in europe and elsewhere and otherwise just helping bail them out in general.
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it is the same story with north korea, iran, venezuela and other countries around the world that seek to thwart the united states. so it's a challenge to the united states to have two big authoritarian powers like russia and china allied so closely. i didn't hear much in the strategy yesterday about how to split those two countries like president nixon and henry kissinger did so many years ago. we have to get a handle on that. >> julie: thank you so much for talking to us. have a wonderful weekend. thank you. >> bill: 26 past the hour. julie progressives making moves in the voting booths having victories in democratic primaries. are the moderates in the power becoming an endangered species. paying for an airline ticket this summer will not come cheap.
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>> bill: 9:31. shortened trading day on wall street. open now after yesterday's rally. will we end an eight-week slide? they're all down double digits since the start of the year. the pain on your screen there. tech-heavy nasdaq getting the worst of it down 25%. see where we go today here in new york. inflation still putting a strain on american wallets. personal consumption, which is the measure the federal reserve likes to use to monitor inflation went up 6.3% in april compared to a year ago. that's just below the four-decade high set last month. still outpacing wages. steve moore, former economic advisor for president trump and austan goolsbee had the same job under obama. the friday money team. welcome back. the headline is this.
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inflation slowed in april but still the highest level we have seen, steve, in 40 years. the effect of that is what and for how long? >> well, a little bit of good news for the memorial day weekend that that inflation rate did come down from over 8% down to 6 1/2%. we'll take whatever good news we can get. that's the good news, bill. the bad news is that you are still seeing this inflation rate continue to outpace worker incomes. so every month that goes by where that happens, workers are getting poorer. paychecks are shrinking. the other thing i have to mention is gas prices are still very high. in fact, as high as they have been in 30 or 40 years. and that -- when energy prices go up, that tends to lead to higher prices in just about everything else including food and travel. so we're not out of the woods yet at all on inflation. >> bill: austan, how do you see
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it today? steve sees a little good news in here. go ahead. >> i don't know if i woke up with a soft pillow or what. i mostly agree with what steve just said there. there is some good news. the new month of inflation, which are the increment we got from month over month rather than looking back for the whole year, those -- inflation is coming down. hopefully that's a trend. i think steve is also right. we're definitely not out of the woods with the war in ukraine, you've got fuel prices and oil prices at really unprecedented highs. and that will bleed over into the rest of the economy. it is going to be a costly summer, i think. >> bill: i'm seeing some indications that consumption is starting to drop. and if that's the case, then demand is starting to back off. nonetheless the points you make are valid. here is what americans will
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find over the weekend when they grill out with families. ground beef up almost 15%. steaks up 12%. bacon is up almost 18% and on and on the list goes there. we have a number yesterday that gdp. the growth in the first quarter of this year, was revised lower so the number is actually worse than we thought initially. >> it was a little bit lower. i think the number was negative 1.5%. this quarter so far the economy is growing somewhere between 1 and 2%. we don't know exactly. the economy has been stalled out and i just want to make one other quick point about energy. joe biden made a statement this week that seemed to suggest he likes high gas prices. he said this is the price -- >> bill: it was going to be so good. hang on, hang on. >> i disagree with it whatever
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it was. >> bill: steve, your line locked up. we did not hear the end of your sentence, finish it. >> i was saying the biden had said this is the price we pay for the green energy transition. and so he seemed to be kind of applauding these high gas prices and people are paying $5 to $6 a gallon aren't too happy? >> bill: do you disagree with that, austan? >> nobody is happy. i filled my car, $83. so let's hope we get out of the circumstance that we're in. i think on the gdp the one thing why that number for the first quarter was as low as it was we had tremendously high growth last year and rolled over the odometer when the years changed. there was a dramatic 3 percentage point reduction in the national growth rate because of the fall of
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government spending. so if this bleeds over into reduced consumption, that is kind of what the fed is trying to do. they're trying to slow consumption to slow growth. they don't want to do it too much. >> bill: slow the demand. a tricky wire to walk. have a good memorial day weekend. austan and steve, i know you guys will be grilling out together as you continue the discussion. see you next friday. >> julie: airlines are bracing for a summer of possibly record breaking travel as americans emerge. the average round-trip flight costs 28% more than pre-covid but that does not seem to be keeping families from hitting the skies this holiday weekend. there is good news. fox business's grady trimble is live at o'hare international
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airport in chicago with more. good morning. >> good morning. the average round-trip ticket will cost you just under $400 for domestic flight but a lot of people we talked to say they are willing to pay up because as you said, they're tired of being cooped up. aaa anticipates this memorial day weekend will be a huge one especially compared to before the pandemic. they expect 3 million people to fly. an increase of 25% from just last year. it is not quite to pre-pandemic levels, though. take a look at chicago o'hare, one of the busiest airports in the country this weekend and just about every weekend. people are happy to be hitting the skies once again. looking forward to the rest of the summer. adobe predicts bookings will be up 1% from before the pandemic. you mentioned jet fuel prices are rising. so because of that people will be spending more. 9% more on airfare. for now the people we talked to
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here say they're willing to do that. listen. >> i wish it was a lot cheaper. i would like to be able to travel a lot more. >> i think summertime and everyone likes to get out. we spent two years stuck at home. >> that is what we're hearing time and time again this memorial day weekend as 3 million people take to the skies. ticket prices are up but for now they're -- they want to get outside and go somewhere new for the first time for a lot of people in about two years and they also said that the mask mandate being lifted nudged them in the direction of traveling and made them feel comfortable again to hit the skies. >> julie: it has nudged people back into society and people are spending money at restaurants and airfare. a good thing to see. thank you very much. >> bill: as we honor america's heroes this memorial day, our next guests are raising awareness for an issue many of our troops and veterans face every day. the bipartisan bill that could make a big and positive impact
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on their lives next.
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>> julie: progressive democrats notching is string of primary wins and aoc backed jessica cisneros is trying to add yet another one in texas. her race against moderate incumbent henry cuellar appears headed for a recount. all this raising new questions about the future of the party's moderates. chad pergram has more from capitol hill this morning. >> the number of moderate democrats is dwindling and party is tilting to the left on abortion, climate change and big business. moderates lack a mega phone. the squad captures most of the attention and the party veers away from the center.
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>> we see this. there are wall street earnings calls where they openly admit to the fact that they are just raising prices because they think that they can and it has very little to do with actual supply chain issues. >> abortion is a good example. there aren't many pro-life democrats left. moderate democrat henry quie ar is locked in a runoff battle with jessica cisneros. cuellar says he won but nothing is official. top house democratic leaders like np and clyburn backed cuellar but -- >> we need members of congress who will have the guts to stand up to these very, very powerful people. [cheering and applause]
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>> moderate democrats stephanie murphy is retiring. oregon dem -- the power of the moderates in congress is waning. >> democrat party used to talk about being the party of the big tent. i don't think that's the case any longer. i think they tried to narrow their focus and look at some of the policies that they continue to drive and, you know, to be as i was a pro-life democrat almost does not exist any longer. >> liberal democrats prevailed in primaries and gerrymandering favors left wing democrats, too. julie. >> julie: that's okay. i butchered every name in the introto your talk. we're even. chad pergram. thank you. >> bill: our next guests are calling on lawmakers to help our heroes who suffer from health issues stemming from exposure to burn pits while serving our country overseas. this is captain raphael barboza
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served in the military for 23 years all over the world suffering from stage 4 colon cancer linked to toxic exposure to burn pits. he is with me now in st. paul along with john stewart. veterans advocate and tv host. welcome this friday and thank you for being here today. moving a rock in washington, d.c. can be a hard thing to do but it looks like it is happening. it is happening in the following way. put this on screen. the department of defense estimates that 3.5 million american troops. an extraordinary number, blown away when i saw it from recent wars have suffered enough exposure to the smoke to cause health problems. do you believe now you are on the verge of victory in helping these men and women? >> well, certainly we're in a better position than we were a year ago, a better position than we were three years ago and certainly 10 to 15 years
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ago when this fight began with people like leroy and rosie torres. our troops were exposed to what are called burn pits. how the military got rid of everything from paper waste and human waste and jet fuel and body parts. those veterans are suffering the same types of health effects as the first responders down at ground zero which is i guess you could consider the original burn pit. and finally we've gotten some movement. senators tester and moran have come to a bipartisan agreement with the help of the house in terms of the pact act and the help of the secretary that has assuaged a lot of questions. they put it all together. like everything else in this country we're six to eight
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senators away from finally getting this rock over the hill. but any delay continues to cost the lives of veterans. i think captain barbosa is a great example of a heroic individual suffering the effects of the burn pits but decided to take action and advocate for the veterans so no one else has to go through what he has gone through. >> bill: on that point, captain. you served in kosovo, iraq and afghanistan. you suffer from stage 4 cancer as i mentioned a moment ago. do you recall being near a burn pit when you were overseas as jon rightly describes a giant garbage pit burning with jet fuel. do you remember a moment or time near there where you thought i don't feel good here? >> good morning, bill. yes, definitely. i was a pilot in iraq and i remember that the burn pit was literally on the approach to
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the runway. so as we were coming home from a mission, we could literally tell where the airfield was by the burn pit in our camera. that's how close to our work area and the work area of all the mechanics and air crews lived close to the airfield. so the burn pits were every single -- it was a calculation at the time to get rid of all waste. that probably was a little short sighted. and in afghanistan it was the same story during my time there. i was in afghanistan 2003-2004 and there it was much more archaic setup. we burned our waste just about every day. >> bill: how are you doing today? >> we take it one day at a time, bill. that's all you can do when you
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are in my situation. >> bill: my best of luck to you on that. one more quick thing here as we think about memorial weekend, jon. the veteran suicide rate is 52% higher than the non-veteran suicide rate. you have a big rally over the weekend and you are going to be there. how important is it for you just to make sure that the focus does not leave these men and women who served our country? >> you know, it's incredibly important. there is a small percentage of americans who bear the brunt of america's wars. and it is a tiny percentage and it is the veterans and their families and oftentimes their caregivers. and out of sight, out of mind. when it is time for war, we always have the money, man, get the credit card out and put down that $6 trillion to go to war for 20 years, and then we try and balance the budget on the backs of veterans as they are coming home to reintegrate
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and assimilate and deal with all the health problems. and the purchase dense of that reintegration, the burdens of fighting your own government that you have just recently sacrificed to protect and defend also leads to a lot of the mental health stresses and financial stress. the pact act doesn't solve all their problems but it removes at least some of the burden and obstacles and it starts to switch the burden of proof back to the government as opposed to the veterans. >> bill: when they get it done, we'll bring you back, okay? at that point you can declare victory 10 years later. thank you, jon. thank you, captain. >> thank you so much. >> bill: have a good memorial weekend. thank you, men. >> julie: more questions surface over the police response to the devastating texas school shooting. we go back to uvalde as we wait for a new update next.
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>> julie: closing arguments expect ed today in the $50 million defamation trial after six weeks. both parties closed their rebusal cases yesterday capping over 100 hours of live streamed testimony. let's bring in criminal defense attorney jonna spilbor. this has been more of a circus than anything but it has been entertaining to say the least. all right. so in the end, okay, this is a defamation lawsuit, not a lawsuit to prove their was domestic violence. that seemed to be the center of every single witness's testimony. do you believe that johnny depp's lawyers were able to prove that amber heard is guilty of defamation and therefore he is innocent and do you believe there will be money exchanged? >> okay.
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to take your first question my grandfather used to say, julie, a thief will rob you but a liar will hang you. johnny depp's mission throughout the trial was to prove he is not an abuser because amber heard is a liar. there was example after example in this trial. my favorites are the thing that kicked this off was the picture of amber heard emerging from a courtroom with an alleged bruise on her face that allowed her to get a tro at the beginning of their divorce. we learned the bruise the next day was absent from a picture. the pictures paint a thousand words. she doctored that picture. number two, i think johnny depp's camp did a really good job of showing that in amber's own secretly recorded tapes that she basically came out and said to johnny depp and it was aired. no one is going to believe you, johnny. no one is going to believe that
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you, johnny depp, a man, is a victim of domestic abuse. those were her own words outside of court played inside of court. it shows her to be crazy and untruthful. if the jury buys that, johnny depp wins. will he get a big fat check? doubtful. >> julie: that's all the time we have. closing arguments are today. that means within the next few hours or so it will be done, they hand the case off to the jury and then the jury deliberates and they should take time most likely not with a verdict today. most likely next week. jonna spilbor, have a great weekend. >> tell them to leave. they want the media out of here so i'm telling you, leave these families alone. not only the ones that people
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got hurt but the other ones are suffering, too. my grandkids are suffering so i'm telling you, calm it down, media, calm it down. >> bill: emotions still high clearly in uvalde, texas and will be for some time. that community starting the very long process of living with tuesday's deadly shooting at robb elementary school. i'm bill hemmer. david has a day off. julie, good morning. >> julie: i'm julie banderas. president biden is heading to texas on sunday planning to meet with families and community leaders in uvalde as lawmakers in washington talk about a bipartisan agreement addressing gun violence. lucas tomlinson starts off the hour for us and joins us live at the white house this morning. >> good morning. president biden is in annapolis this morning speaking at the
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naval academy graduation and going to texas on sunday. the first press briefing congress was encouraged to act. >> we need congress to act on it and advance common sense measures that we know will save lives when it comes to gun violence. >> majority leader chuck schumer told his colleagues to expect a vote on gun control laws. he admitted it will be challenging. talks are underway. mitch mcconnell has dispatched john cornyn to reach out across the aisle to see if common ground can be reached after the two mass shootings in texas and new york just days apart. >> i think there is a sense of, you know, urgency that maybe we didn't feel before. we are going to try to work through this and see if we can find that common ground. that's what i think our goal should be. >> we will extend a hand of
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partnership to those who have been sitting on the sidelines. those who have chosen to side for the gun lobby. if we don't succeed, we're having votes. we're putting people -- >> joe manchin says he can't get the image of his grandchildren out of his mind. this thing feels different. he said it in 2018. the white house has 10 task forces from worker empowerment to property appraise all. why isn't there a task force on guns? >> why not make an official interagency task force? >> because we have a whole of government approach. we have a whole of government approach that i just mentioned that ambassador susan rice is leading. >> last week president biden said he is done working with republicans. if he wants to pass gun reform he will have to find 10 votes. julie. >> julie: thank you.
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>> school district police officer confronted the suspect that was making entry. that's not accurate. he walked in unobstructed initially. so from the grandmother's house to the school into the school he was not confronted by anybody. to clear the record on that. >> bill: texas public safety director yesterday afternoon as we learn about more in the school shooting in texas. officials updating the timeline significantly, too. changing key facts about events that day and the police response that followed. patricia, the sister of a teacher at the school and police officer who was at the scene as well. patricia, thank you for your time. i can't imagine what you are going through. we're with you today and i know your family is very close to the school and part of the reason why you wanted to come on today. your sister is a teacher and
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was inside that day. what did she do in her classroom with her students, patricia? >> she took them into a restroom. she has a restroom inside her classroom. took them in there and tried to comfort them and let them interact with each other in the restroom. her room door was locked and the restroom door. she had them in there and let them interact with each other to keep them calm. >> bill: did she tell you if she heard gunshots or something else? >> she did not hear the gunshots. there was another teacher next to her and went to her door telling her she had heard gunshots. the other teacher went back to her classroom, locked the door also and that's when they went to the restrooms and hid in the restrooms with the children. >> bill: what part of the school was this? it's a large facility. was it in the wing where the -- >> i believe she was -- no, she was on the other side of the
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building. >> bill: okay. >> her room is outside. >> bill: was there any announcement from the school that went over the p.a. system? >> that i'm not sure. i'm not sure if there was an announcement or some type of alarm system went off that they knew to -- or the other teacher had heard it they assumed already to go into lockdown. >> bill: i'm assuming this is around 20 minutes before 12 noon your time and if your sister took her students in the bathroom, how long were they there? >> she doesn't know. she doesn't recall how long they were there. she says it was a bit of a time that they were in there. >> bill: wow. how did they get out of the school eventually? >> they had some officers, i believe, had them escort them out. >> bill: how is she doing?
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>> she is doing okay. >> bill: can't imagine. it will be a long process. your brother is a police officer. >> yes, she herself doesn't want to return to school. >> bill: she does not want to go back to her job? >> i don't know to the job or to the school where the incident happened. >> bill: that's understandable. your brother is a police officer and he report evidence to the school as well that day, is that right? >> yes. he was one of the first ones on scene. >> bill: one of the first. what did he see when he arrived, patricia? >> when they arrived they had already -- the shooter was already shooting at them, towards them when they arrived. >> bill: how many cops were on the scene when your brother was there? >> i believe there was two officers before him. >> now, were all the cops -- were all the officers, were they outside the building or
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had anyone gone inside? >> yes, they had already gone inside after the shooter had entered, they eventually entered there. my brother was one of them. pretty much with all his shift were inside the building at that time. >> bill: so your brother, was he fired upon by the killer? >> yes, he was. >> bill: i'm assuming he was not hit, is that correct? >> he was not hit, correct. >> bill: how long was your brother inside the school? >> i don't know. he was in there for a while, what it seemed like but i'm not sure. >> bill: i'm assuming they all went outside the building. >> they all exited the building once the shooter was down. >> bill: okay. so he was in the school building. >> he was in there the entire time. >> bill: i'm assuming that was an hour? >> i don't know. i don't have -- i don't know
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how long he was in there for. i can't say. >> bill: was your brother part of the group that took down the killer? >> he was in the hallway. it was the bortac group that took him down. >> bill: patricia, is your brother aware of all the questions and confusion a lot of people have now based on what we were told initially and how the story? >> yes. >> bill: what does he say about that? >> he have knows that they were in there. he knows what happened. other people don't realize that they were in there because there were so many outside but there were other departments. it was the sheriff, the other police departments that came down to help that were outside trying to calm the parents down trying to not let them entering the building. there would have been more casualties. >> bill: i'm trying to get an understanding so our viewers and the country have a better understanding because the story has changed so significantly. are you saying that your
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brother went inside when he first arrived at the school and stayed inside and did not retreat as some have suggested? >> right. they did not retreat until the shooter was down. they were in there the entire time. people don't understand. people think that nobody was inside during that time. they were inside. they couldn't get to the shooter. the shooter would come out and shoot at them. so there was no way for them to just go in there and shoot. there were kids in there. kids that were still alive if there was crossfire there could be more casualties. >> bill: how did they get inside the room eventually? did they use a key or break down the door, how did that happen? >> i believe they used a key. i'm not too sure but i think that's what they did. they used a key to get in. >> bill: we have so many more questions.
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thank you for coming on today. my best to you, my best to your sister and your brother, your whole family and the town in texas as well. thank you for coming on and we'll stay in contact with you okay? >> yes. thank you. >> bill: thank you. patricia. >> julie: governor greg abbott canceled his appearance at the nra annual convention that happens to begin this morning in houston. critics are slamming the organization's decision to go on with the convention while organizers say they will use the meeting to discuss ways to make schools safer. alissa acuna is live with the latest on this in houston this morning. >> 55,000 people are expected to attend this annual event here for the nra. they will be met with three organized protests. the nra rejecting calls by critics to cancel the event issuing a statement saying it offers its sympathies to the
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families and victims adding, quote, although an investigation is underway and facts are still emerging we recognize this was the act of a lone deranged criminal. as we gather in houston, we will reflect on these events, pray for the victims. recognize our patriotic members and pledge to redouble commitment to making our schools secure. >> it's not about the second amendment or even though i had a child murdered by guns it is not. it is about what is our human right to live and it's about safety. >> that's the first thing the left has brought up obviously. infringe on people's second amendment rights. we can't hide behind tragedy. you have to have meaningful open dialogue about this. >> texas governor greg abbott, who was scheduled to speak here, will send a recorded video message. he will be in uvalde instead. musicians have canceled and texas senator john cornyn and
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dan crenshaw lawmakers saying it's due to scheduling conflicts. former president trump and ted cruz will be here for these speeches. in the history of annual meetings the only time it has canceled was in 2020 and 2021 due to the pandemic. in 1999, the nra was heavily pressured by government officials in colorado to cancel its annual meeting scheduled to take place in denver just 10 days after 12 students and a teacher were killed at columbine high school. it refused but did shorten the event from three days to one. julie. >> julie: thank you. >> bill: democrats bracing for the possibility of heavy losses come november. the outlook on mid-terms and what if anything they can do to soften that blow coming up here. julie. >> julie: a new study revealing important information about long covid. what you need to know. dr. marc siegel is up next.
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>> julie: a new cdc study shedding a lot of light on how many people have lingering symptoms of what is called long covid. at least 1 in 5 under 65 have had one such condition and greater for those over the age of 65. we bring in dr. marc siegel to talk to us about this. let's talk about this study. covid patients apparently twice as likely as uninfected people developing lung or even respiratory conditions
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including pulmonary emotion bollism. >> twice as likely to have a lung problem no matter what age. this study looked at over 300,000 people looking at electronic health records from one month after you have covid up to one year after you have covid. it is mostly delta or the original strain. they didn't look at omicron here and that's important. because my experience with omicron is i'm seeing less long covid and less long-term side effects. not none. the other thing they found was a lot of musculoskeletal problems and for people over the age of 65, more cognitive problems. 1 in 4 major problems over the age of 65, 1 in 5 under the age of 65. i must say, this is what we have found with previous studies and this just emphasizes what we already know. the other thing is this didn't look on the effect of vaccination. if you were vaccinated did it
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decrease your risk of long covid symptoms? we don't know. a huge study out of nature just this week showed only a 15% protection from vaccine which is disappointing. we were hoping the vaccine decreases your risk of long covid. we don't know how it applies to omicron and we don't know if boosters make it more likely you won't get long covid. that has to be answered. >> julie: even a second booster? >> again, i think the boosters and also packs loefsh i had decrease your chances of long covid by decreasing your symptoms now. the big study out of nature didn't prove that vaccination in general decreased long covid. i hope for that still. we need more information. >> julie: anyone's game with this latest strain. whether you are vaccinated, not vaccinated, you are subject to get it. medical conditions for patients more likely to develop than
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uninfected people according to the cdc, neurological. kidney favor, musculoskeletal conditions, blood clots, vascular issues. that's what we know now. there could be more long-term conditions we don't know about. >> summarizing what you just said it affects every major organ in the body. ones we didn't know about the. pancreas, kidney, liver. the newer strains are more immunoevasive. they can reinfect you and you can get it even if you've had covid or the vaccine before. the ba-2 that we're seeing in new york a lot is infecting people that have had it before and even with double boosters people are still getting it. they're definitely getting milder cases. this is a wake-up call you really can't say i had covid and i'm done with it. 1 out of 5 or 1 out of 4 over
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the age of 65 and one more point. if you have underlying medical conditions already, like if you have lung problems already you are even more inclined to have a problem from covid. >> julie: all right. marc siegel thank you. getting double boosted is better than not. that's a good message. >> absolutely. completely agree. thank you, julie. >> bill: so we're 24 minutes past the hour. keystone state. this warehouse is in pittsburgh that is now at the center of the political world. that state still undecided republican senate primary. where is the recount today? we'll check in. potential red wave in november? could it be bigger than before? new numbers that could spell more trouble for democrats in the mid-terms. ped in a fog. this is art inspired by real stories of bipolar depression. i just couldn't find my way out of it. the lows of bipolar depression can take you to a dark place. latuda could make a real difference
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ground following the process in harrisburg. hey there, bryan. >> good morning. pennsylvania's 67 counties can begin the recount votes today. despite the fact this race is still too close to call, dr. mehmet oz released a new video online claiming victory for the first time. >> i want to take a moment to express my deep thanks to the great people of pennsylvania who joined me so far on this journey and supported my campaign. i'm blessed to have earn the presumptive republican nomination for the united states senate. >> dr. oz leads mccormick by just under 1,000 votes triggering an automatic recount under state law. it must be finished june 7th. a live look at allegany county election warehouse in pittsburgh. they'll start next week. lehigh county and several others began today. smaller counties will likely
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finish today. recounts aside, though, some county boards are finishing their original counts. as of yesterday, pennsylvania's department of state estimates that there were 1100 republican mail, military and overseas ballot that need to be counted. 3800 uncounted provisional ballot cast by both parties and 850 republican undated mail-in ballots put aside pending litigation. tuesday in state court arguments will begin over the undated mail-in ballots that arrived on time but did not have the handwritten date on the outer envelope as required by law. mccormick camp wants the ballots to count and petitioned the pennsylvania security to pick up the court. mccormick decided to fight. the oz campaign says the math does not add up for mccormick to make up the difference. his online video proves they are confident this race is over. julie. >> julie: all right, bryan
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llenas. we shall see. >> bill: meanwhile more bad news for democrats on the mid-term scorecard. the cook political report just yesterday shifting its outlook on a dozen house races giving 10 of those races to republicans, 2 to democrats. want to bring in josh. on the outset how do you see it and does it square with what you are observing? >> they are anticipating the likelihood of a big red tsunami, it could sweep all kinds of candidates into office from red and blue states. the 35 number if republicans get that, it would be very significant. it would mean they would have more house seats than at any time in history since the great depression if that number was it. that 35 is a magic number i'm looking at. if you get a huge wave it would reach historic consequences if it got to 35 seats.
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>> bill: a went to the cook political reporter. the line that sticks out to me the most. given that president biden's job approval is underwater in dozens of districts he carried in 2020, any democrat sitting in a single digit biden seat or a trump seat or even that biden carried about 10 or 15 points could lose. that's what the lot of republicans are saying for a year in washington if that's true, that's a wipe-out. >> it would mean that very few democrats in the house are safe. that even democrats who are used to winning comfortably in the last few elections would have to sweat out a reelection campaign. when you look at the cook ratings. house seats in connecticut, oregon, even in maryland outside of the washington, d.c. now competitive. these are seats we haven't paid
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attention to in a long time. not competitive in a long time. the republican wave is potential sloi big as we get closer to november these democrats could be in danger. >> bill: here is one of them. i've told you this before and i told you during the commercial break. one of the elections where things will happen that you can't predict. people will win in certain parts of the country you don't see is coming. oregon. a democrat is running for reelection. he lost. the new rating is toss-up. you think about the problems portland has had for a couple of years. oregon you could see huge swings or huge surprises in november. what do you think of that? >> it's a great point, bill. democratic governor in oregon is the least popular governor in the entire country. crime, violence, disorder are huge problems for oregon democrats. and like you mentioned, bill,
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the -- one of the few moderate democrats left in the house lost his primary and the democratic nominee will be someone much more progressive who may be out of step with the mood of that swing district. that is another issue that democrats are having to deal with. they have a very active left flank that is trying to unseat moderates in these primaries and in the swing district like that one in oregon it could be problematic in terms of winning in november. >> bill: the american people are heading into the summer break and this is what is going on with the direction for the country, right? democrats are satisfied, 24%. republicans 4%. independents are only satisfied by 18%. 5 1/2 months. can democrats reverse that trend? >> it will be very hard because there is not a lot in their control at this point that they can do. a lot of these sour feelings are because inflation is out of control and the economy does not look very healthy.
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looks like it is heading into possible recession territory according to some economists. the mood of the country very pessimistic. you see public perception locked in around now and those are not good numbers to get locked in on and some of the cultural issues from crime to immigration, to education that are not favorable to democrats in this year's election. there is not a lot democrats can do. a lot of the problems are outside of their control at this point. >> bill: thank you for your time and we'll talk again real soon. he is examining the changes out there. have a good weekend. >> thanks, bill. >> julie: i don't need to tell you this. gas prices may be soaring nationwide but not stopping a record number of americans from hitting the road this memorial day weekend. how are drivers keeping costs down is the question we'll address next. a look at the growing homeless crisis that is gripping los angeles. what is behind it? the man trying to find the answers next.
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>> we've taken a completely wrong approach to just about everything in the way that we've addressed homelessness. could we have done any worse, right? if we had intentionally tried to do worse.
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she's getting graded on her green investments with merrill. a-plus. still got it. (whistle blows) your money never stops working for you with merrill, a bank of america company. fanduel and draftkings, your money never stops working for you with merrill, two out of state corporations making big promises to californians. what's the real math behind their ballot measure for online sports betting? 90% of profits go to the out of state corporations permanently. only eight and a half cents is left for the homeless. and in virginia, arizona, and other states, fanduel and draftkings use loopholes to pay far less than was promised. sound familiar? it should. it's another bad scheme for california.
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self-driving cars. our power grid. water treatment plants. hospital systems. they're all connected to the internet... and vladimir putin or a terrorist could cause them all to self-destruct... a cyber 9-11 that would destroy our country. i'm dan o'dowd and i wrote the software that keeps our air defenses secure. i approved this message because i need your vote for u.s. senate to send a message... congress needs to fix this.
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>> julie: terrifying scene in new york city this week as a father and his 4-year-old son were robbed at gun point coming home from a yankee game. the nypd officials say the suspect followed them into the lobby of their apartment building, pointed his gun before making off with $30. anyone with information is encouraged to call the crimestoppers hotline. >> bill: getting ready for the long holiday weekend getting underway and drivers digging deeper than they ever have in a while to fill up the tank. average price record levels, jeff flock hitting the road. he is burning it up for you already. he have is live in atlantic city express way, there, new jersey it is. how is it going, jeff? pockets are growing empty. >> i tell you that's why we are headed to atlantic city. maybe if we gamble a little bit we can get some money back. it is going to be tough out there. but it looks like at least the
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beginning of this driving season as we take a look out at the atlantic city express way, it looks like it will be okay. the numbers for travel 39 million people going to travel one way or the other roads, planes, boats, the rest. that is an 8% increase from last year, 35 million folks roughly in cars despite the gas prices, which overnight came down for the first time since may 11th by 1/10 of a cent. it won't save you a lot but still a dollar and a half more than this time last year but people seem to be willing to travel so far. listen. >> folks are wanting to get out and do something. i think that's why despite record high gasoline prices, nationwide we've never seen that price before, that is why folks are getting out and doing
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things. >> i leave you with this one cautionary tale. something we haven't seen but we were expecting, demand destruction. people deciding not to drive and maybe not to drive as far and if you look at the numbers on that, 8.8 billion barrels per day demand. that's actually the lowest it has been since 2013 on average with the exception of the pandemic. people may be starting to pull back a little bit. >> bill: we're seeing that a little bit. i'm not seeing much traffic on that road. what is going on with that? >> i know, yeah. i guess atlantic city nobody wants to gamble. maybe they don't have the money. >> bill: all the gambleing is left for you. >> homelessness is by far the single biggest issue in los angeles right now.
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>> homeless encampments are encroaching and destroying the business community, the tourism industry, impacting the quality of life of our residential areas, contributing to the rise in violent crime and mystery while the homeless are dying in record numbers. we have the worst of everything possible is what we have today. >> julie: an eye-opening documentary from fox l.a. on the growing homeless population in los angeles county and the problem it is causing. our next guest taking a closer look at the root of this out of control issue in southern california. joining me now is the tv anchor alex michaelson. many of the homeless are mentally ill and drug addicted. we do know that. were you able to surmise the root of the homelessness problem? >> well, here in los angeles alone there are 40,000 people that are homeless. there are 70,000 people homeless in l.a. county,
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150,000 people homeless in california. all of them have different stories. as you mentioned mental illness, drugs a huge problem. there are also not ability for law enforcement to force a lot of people into treatment and so because of that, they end up on the street over and over again. that's not the only issue. there are also people that are coming out of the foster care system. people who can't afford their rent. there are people who are just struggling to get by. so every story is a little different, which means one solution isn't necessarily possible. you need a lot of solutions to this very nuanced issue. >> julie: covid is certainly to blame as well forcing so many people out on the streets either due to depression and drugs or homelessness and unemployment. a clip from your documentary about the failures in the system. let's watch. >> they need to get them off the streets. if they get there and don't get
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proper care they are going to die anyway. to me anyone who clings to the notion and the rhetoric around housing as the solution to homelessness is -- i consider that manslaughter. >> julie: what is the solution to homelessness? that's a good question. how do you help these people? >> well, a lot of it is trying to find a way to get people off the streets. permanent housing obviously is the goal but most of the people we talked to said there needs to be something else in place in the meantime. different things that have been tried include tiny homes which are small shelters that people can get into. but to find a place where a lot of these people get services because for the people that are mentally ill, for the people that are drug addicted, they need help. and if they don't have a process of getting help, they won't be able to get off the street. a lot of those people you talk to say they don't want to get off the street.
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they don't want the rules. they don't want all that and that's the really complicated part of it. some of it is changing the laws, some is more funding and some is rethinking what we're doing. clearly what we're doing right now is not working. it is not. people are dying every day. five people dying on the streets of los angeles every day from homelessness. >> julie: there is a correlation between homelessness and crime, though, unfortunately. during the pandemic in new york constituent was a mess. homelessness was out of control. crime has doubled. it has been a disaster. l.a. is no different. two years after l.a. mayor garcetti pledged to cut $150 from the city's police budget, can't understand why anyone would make a decision like that in the aftermath of the george floyd riots. and l.a. is seeing 390 some homicides, 397 in 2021. the most since 2006 with at
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least 139 murders so far in 2022. and other violent crimes including rape, aggravated assault also trending higher. according to the lrk apd homicide staff in the last year. 2021, 397. five months into 2022. there has already been 139 homicides. that's not painting a good picture. what is the mayor, what are the local politicians going to do about the crime? will they finally put the power into the police hands in order to try to get a handle on it? >> part of the complicated thing here in l.a. county we have a district attorney named george gascon who has made it his mission to try to have more progressive policies to try to make it easier for people to get out of jail and to make it harder to arrest people. because of that, some would say we've seen crime increase. there is a recount effort against him that is now underway just like there is a recount against the san
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francisco district attorney that is going on right now. and so we'll see what happens with that. it could change the policy. we have a mayor's race. but quickly, people want to watch our documentary on youtube for free. search for los angeles. >> julie: all right. lost angeles. i like the title. thank you very much. >> bill: celebrating the centennial of an american icon. monday marks the 100th anniversary of the lincoln memorial and all its majesty. how it honors our 16th president and continues to inspire our country. ...so you feel cool, night after night. for a limited time, save up to $500 on select tempur-pedic® adjustable mattress sets. veteran homeowners, this is the best time in history to turn your home equity into cash. save up to $500 on select tempur-pedic® because home values have climbed to all time highs.
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for adults with generalized myasthenia gravis who are positive for acetylcholine receptor antibodies, it may feel like the world is moving without you. but the picture is changing, with vyvgart. in a clinical trial, participants achieved improved daily abilities with vyvgart added to their current treatment. and vyvgart helped clinical trial participants achieve reduced muscle weakness. vyvgart may increase the risk of infection. in a clinical study, the most common infections were urinary tract and respiratory tract infections. tell your doctor if you have a history of infections or if you have symptoms of an infection. vyvgart can cause allergic reactions. the most common side effects include respiratory tract infection, headache, and urinary tract infection. picture your life in motion with vyvgart. a treatment designed using a fragment of an antibody.
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ask your neurologist if vyvgart could be right for you.
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xiidra is approved to treat the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease. don't use if you're allergic to xiidra. common side effects include eye irritation, discomfort or blurred vision when applied to the eye, and unusual taste sensation. got any room in your eye? ask your doctor if a 90-day prescription is right for you. and pay as little as $0. i prefer you didn't! xiidra. not today, dry eye. >> harris: america's warriors who gave their lives for our freedom. this weekend we remember and express our gratitude. a marine who was badly injured in iraq continued to serve. he will be with me. sergeant eddie wright, former
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boston police chief, marc thiessen, jimmy failla. a full show for a friday "the faulkner focus" top of the hour. >> bill: see you in a moment. monday marks the 100th anniversary of this wonderful sight. the lincoln memorial, 16th president honored in all of its marble majesty. we have more on the man and landmark itself. douglas kennedy. >> since 1922 the lincoln memorial has brought americans together. an idea that inspires one woman to do her job today. the cones have to be cleaned and the marble has to be maintained but what you are doing is preserving history. >> we're trying to preserve this beautiful building memorial for future generations. >> the architectural conservative tr national park service and spends her life caring for the stone and marble the make up the lincoln memorial.
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now celebrating 100 years as a national symbol of unity. ♪♪♪ >> the material itself represents a unified country. some coming from massachusetts, some coming from colorado and some from the heart of the confederacy. >> that's right. so the lincoln statue that you see in the chamber is white marble from georgia and the beautiful floor, that's tennessee pink marble. >> the index finger is raised, a plea of openness for southern states to return to the union. the memorial doesn't just honor our history, it has become part of our history. particularly civil rights history. in 1939, opera singer marian anderson performed a concert for an integrated audience
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after being blocked by the daughters of the american revolution from singing at constitution hall. since then the grounds are laid witness to over 100 protests for racial equality culminating in 1963 with one of america's most seminole moments. exactly why america's first black president chose the 99-foot tall monument for his pre-inaugural address. >> behind me watching over the union of these states sits the man who in so much ways made this day possible. >> they built it to memorialize a great mind but the grounds inspired great events. >> it was selected for that purpose. the lineup in the national mall, in line in the capital, washington monument to create this. >> john o'byrne is the president of the lincoln group. he has seen some of the same
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division plaguing the country that lincoln saw including ultrapartisanship. >> lincoln more than anyone understood how fragile democracy could be. >> he stood on the precipice of the great division of the country. his characteristics always brought him back to how do i pull this together? how did i reconcile the differences in this great nation? he always viewed himself of president of the entire country, not just the north. >> something he thinks about every day as she moves the lincoln marble. the stone here is really strong like democracy but you have to preserve it and care for it for it to last. >> yes that we do. it's really important for our future and for the history of america. >> an american future made possible by one man's historic sacrifice and the memorial that's honored him for 100 years. that's it from here. back to you bill and julie. >> bill: thank you.
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great story and great piece. a ton of history. thank you. we have to run, kid. have a great weekend and i'll see you tuesday. >> julie: do it again all next week? okay. >> bill: have a wonderful holiday weekend and enjoy family and friends especially in light of the events we've been all watching this past week. god bless and we'll see you next week. here is harris, bye-bye. >> harris: knocks fuss alert now. the families of the 19 children, two teachers killed in texas in that school shooting now adding outrage to all of their pain. the state department of public safety has changed its story on what exactly happened at uvalde's robb elementary school this week. some are accusing the local police of deadly inaction. i'm harris faulkner and you are in "the faulkner focus". officials now say that teenaged gunman fired shots for

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