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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 3, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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a high stakes battle over the supreme court. nominee brett kavanagh is set to face tough questions this week as democrats blast the white house for refusing to release tens of thousands of documents related to the judge. >> if he's so proud of his conservative credentials, show us the record. stand before us. >> also tonight, the emotional editorial written bi-monthly ee tibbetts' father. he calls on americans not to use his daughter's death to advance their political agenda. in southern california, several people are missing. more than a dozen others injured after two recreational boats collide. five of the eight vick timds of a deadly bus crash have been identified, and a mom gives birth to twins just hours after
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surviving the horrific collision. and the massive tornado touches down in michigan as a line of intense storms roll across the midwest. good evening, i'm elaine key hanoi. they are getting red he for an all-out battle over brett cav na o gnaw. the senate confirmation heergds begin on tuesday. democrats accuse the white house of withholding thousands of pages of documents related to the judge. weda jiang reports. >> reporter: democratic senator dick durbin is demanding president trump release the records from judge brett kavanagh's work in the white house for former president george w. bush. >> if we're lucky, we will see 6%, 6% of all of the documents that have been produced. so, if he's so proud of his conservative credentials, shows us the record. stand before us. trust the american people and will they'll trust.
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>> reporter: the trump administration is citing executive privilege to withhold 100,000 pages of records. an attorney for mr. bush revealed the decision in this letter to the chairman of the senate judiciary committee. senate minority leader chuck schumer reacted swiftly, declaring, we're witnessing a friday night document massacre. adding, it has all the makings of a cover up. but majority leader mitch mcconnell said the outrage is unfounded. >> so far i believe the only senators who have met with this nominee and didn't have negative things to say about him were democrats who had already announced beforehand they were going to oppose him. >> reporter: the chairman of the judiciary committee, senator chuck grassley released a statement supporting the decision to hold some recor d pvided numbers of how many kavanagh-related documents have been turned over. more than 400,000, the most of recent supreme couar
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lines. >> senor g very fair, more documents given than any person in the supreme court. >> it is not normal because we are not able to see 100,000 documents that the archivist because the administration said we can't see them. >> reporter: the white house is defending its decision saying the production of documents in this case is entirely consistent with others in which nominees had experience in the executive branch and that the judiciary committee has received all the documents it formally requested. confirmation hearings for judge kavanagh are set to start on tuesday. elaine? >> weija jiang, thank you. senator john mccain has made his final journal i. for decades he lived a public life. this last held sunday in annapolis, maryland was private. hundreds of people lined the entrance to the u.s. naval academy to say a final farewell to an american hero.
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waving american flags and holding signs of admiration, they watched as the hearst carrying senator john mccain past the gates for a private burial service. it capped a five-day public procession to honor mccain's life and legacy. mccain's closest friend in the senate, lindsey graham. >> i also want america to understand there is a lesson from this week. it's not about who came and who said what at the funeral. military service is appreciated. everybody loved the fact that john was willing to die for his country. >> following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, a young mccain attended the u.s. naval academy and graduated in 1958. the six-term arizona senator was laid to rest alongside admiral chuck larson, his long-time friend and u.s. naval classmate. the decision to be buried next to each other was made 20 years ago as described by the senator in his recent memoir, the wrestless wave. >> and then take my leave, bound for a place near my old friend
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chuck larson in the cemetery on the severn back where it began. >> and in a poignant send off, the navy academy performed a missing man fly over with four f-18 fighter jets. one of them pulling off and heading to the heavens as a identifiab final tribute to mccain's life of service. senator mccain died august 25th after a battle with brain cancer. he was 81 years old. when the body of 20-year-old mollie tibbetts was found in an iowa corn field, her father says he set out to celebrate his daughter's extraordinary life. now he says he needs to defend her legacy. tony dokoupil reports. >> mollie tibbetts, an incredible young woman is now permanently separated from her family. >> reporter: president trump picked up on the death of mollie tibbetts almost immediately after the authorities charged a mexican immigrant said to be here illegally with her murder.
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>> you heard about today illega very sadly from mexico, and you saw what happened to that incredible beautiful young woman. should have never happened. illegally in our country. >> reporter: almost as quickly the family of mollie tibbetts pushed back, asking that mollie's death not be used to advance an anti-immigrant agenda. and this weekend the family's push became an emotional plea in an op-ed bi-monthly -- mollie's father rob. don't appropriate her soul in advances she believed were profoundly racist. it appeared a day after donald trump, jr., the president's name sake, wrote his own highly political piece for the paper, l arguing in favor of his father's proposed border policies including the wall. mollie was murdered by an illegal alien, he wrote, and her murder would never have happened
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if we policed our southern border properly. this weekend some of iowa's latino residents held a vigil at the state capital in des moines where there reportedly has been an increase in harassment and threats against members of their community in the wake of mollie's murder. >> we are very concerned with what's going to happen here on out, concerned about our families. >> reporter: that concern mollie's father addressed in his op-ed seeming to address president trump in in the process. to foment is a disgrace to our flag. it is the opposite of leadership, it is shameful. er >> reporter: immigrants commit fewer crimes not more than those born in the u.s. as for the man accused of killing mollie tibbetts he is held on a $5 million bond adds he waits trial. >> tony, thank you. the cbs overnight news will be right back. . every fire department every police department
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. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> in arizona, phoenix police say an arrest warrant has been issued for a man suspected of kidnapping his two sons. an amber alert remains in effect for two boys. police say de mass coronado is now driving a green pickup truck. his white truck was found near a home where authorities believe the 47-year-old shot and killed the boy's mother and another man on saturday. coronado and his sons' mother are married, but police say they've been living apart for the past few months. >> there has been documented reports of domestic issues here between the couple at this location in the past. >> investigators believe coronado may be taking the boys to mexico.
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a frantic search is underway on a river near the border of arizona and california. rescue teams are looking for several people thrown into the fast-moving waters after two boats collided head on. mireya villareal has the story. >> 50 miles an hour on the river. topock restaurant. 12 people in the cove resort. >> they're reporting heavy debris field and victims scattered on various vessels. >> reporter: the sheriff's department received numerous 911 calls about a crash involving two boats on the colorado river. today parts of the river are closed as dive teams continue to search for four missing people. the crash happened nur the mojave regional park about 290 miles east of los angeles. it's a popular recreational spot that was crowded with people for the labor day weekend. investigators believe one boat was heading north and another was heading south when they hit
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head on at about 50 miles per hour. all 16 people were ejected. passing boaters were pulling people from the water and fire officials say the currents were so strong, some rescues were happening between three and five miles from the accident site. in all, nine people were taken to local hospitals and treated. one was flown to las vegas in critical condition. fire officials investigating tell us that speed and the lack of daylight were factors in this accident. elaine? >> thank you. we now know the names and age of five victims killed in new mexico thursday. federal investigators are trying to determine what led to the violent collision between the greyhound bus and tractor-trailer. here's demarco morgan. >> reporter: eight people died after a semi crashed head on into a greyhound bus thursday along new mexico's interstate 40 near the arizona border. the national transportation safety board is inspecting the big rig looking at its tires,
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tilts brakes and mangled axel. this photo provided by the feds the bus is up right, metal puckered and windows shattered. >> we have subpoenaed information for blood, for toxicological purposes as well as medical records of the driver. >> reporter: the new mexico office of the medical investigator has released the names and ages the of some of the victims. the bus was carrying 47 passengers, eight people including the bus driver were killed. new mexico state police believe a tire failure caused the semi truck to jackknife, cross over the median and slam into the bus head on. drive transportation, inc., a california-based trucking company is under scrutiny over improper maintenance of the truck's tires. fear of lawsuits claims the driver was negligent, jag failed to adequately how to maintain control of a semi-truck and trailer when a tire blows out. tato at the wheel of the big rit
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adntrol >> repter:ay the bus ha three-.76-seat belts for its passengers and the agency is working to determine where everyone was seated at the time of the crash, elaine. >> dimarco, thank you. forecasters predict more severe weather for parts of the midwest. a massive tornado touched down in west michigan saturday evening. some buildings were damaged, but no one was injured. the line of thunderstorms stretches from kansas up to wisconsin. the national weather service says some areas could experience more heavy rain, flash floods, and severe hail. coming up next, desk fans or space heaters, the science behind the office temperature wars. and why a change in diet helped a
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[stomach gurgles] ♪when you have nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea... girl, pepto ultra coating will treat your stomach right. nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea.♪ try new pepto with ultra coating. the debate overwork place temperatures is heating up again. the issue took center stage during the gubernatorial debate in new york. so, what do women, men and science have to say about it? here's nikki battiste. >> my opponent lives in the world of fiction, i live in the world of fact. >> reporter: there was a chill in t night. >> moving the goal post and have a whole different set of rules. >> reporter: not from the icy exchanges between actress turned
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gubernatorial candidate cynthia nixon and andrew cuomo, but from the actual temperature. she says office temperatures are more sexist. a warm 76 degrees, it is 69 and i have the goosebumps to prove it. >> why is it that time and again women have to be the ones freezing cold at work? >> reporter: senior advisor rebecca katz says governor cuomo is known for preferring brisk temperatures and nixon's office unsuccessfully tried to raise the temp. she heated it wednesday night showing polar opposite office temperature preferences. >> i keep two jackets here. >> reporter: at the herald public relations firm in new york city, we also found an office divided by the thermostat. >> you have summer on one side and winter on the other side. >> reporter: while some men use desk bands and shorted sleeves, we found some women bundled up and using space heaters.
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>> women should know that they're not crazy. it's not all in their head. >> reporter: cbs news medical contributor dr. tara narula says there is a science why women feel colder. >> it has to do with thermo regulation and metabolic rate and clothing differences. >> reporter: a 2015 study found most office temperatures are set using a 1960s formula that relies on the metabolic rate of an average man. dr. narks arula says men tend to be could have for theable with the temperatures in the low 70s and women in the mid to high 70s. >> finding a point in the middle where both men and women could be happy would be the ideal situation. >> reporter: we have our own thermostat battles here at cbs news so we decided to take a look at the temperature using this temperature gun. we are getting a reading of 72 degrees. nikky battiste, cbs news, new york. >> still ahead, champion runner shalane flanagan shar sleep disturbances keep 1 in 3 adults up at night. only remfresh uses ion-powered melatonin
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shalane flanagan won the new york city marathon last year, the first american woman to achieve that feat in decades. and now she's an author for the second time. she co-wrote the cookbook, run fast, cook fast, eat slow. norah o'donnell ran some questions by her. >> look at the emotion of shalane flanagan -- >> reporter: when shalane flanagan won the new york city marathon last summer, she punctuated with the grit and swagger of the street she just conquered. >> you can't take this away from me, this is my moment. >> reporter: a history making moment as flanagan at the age of 36 became the first american woman in 40 years to break the tape in new york. this summer she announced she's coming back for more. you're back in new york. >> every time i come here i feel like this magical sense incites the excitement in me and the passion for running so i had to come back. >> reporter: do you think you're
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born an elite runner? yourself a marathoners or runner. you're rewarded. >> reporter: it's hard earned and concentrated on diet. >> we grew up in a come tour of college in carolina fat would make you fat. so we were eating everything low fat. little did we know we were eating more sugar and processed foods. >> reporter: with the help of her best friend nutritionist, she has replaced processed foods with healthy fats. >> the thai quinoa salad, i can make it for multiple meals, lunch or dinner. >> reporter: the way you changed your diet has prolonged your career? >> i believe the way she taught me to incorporate healthy fats and a whole some diet has extended my career. i don't think i'd be sitting here talking to you and running at a high level if it weren't for the fact that i changed my diet. >> reporter: plan began says she
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hopes her cookbook can help fellow runners. while marathon train sergio garcia a solitary sport, she says it's helping other athletes, especially women, that is most rewarding. how does that make you feel to know that there are so many women who admire you, want to be like you? i mean, you're growing the sport. >> that is maybe, you know, the greatest compliment. thankfully the greatest contribution i've made. winning is great, but i think having a positive effect around you, the circle and how you affect people, it's great to be a great runner but more important to be a good person. because if i elevate them it's going to elevate me. >> that is "cbs this morning" co-host norah o'donnell. up next, why they let their house go to the dogs.
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our fal story tonight may give you paws. it is about an unusual home in south carolina that's rescued more than 10,000 dogs. here's tony dokoupil once again with the tale. >> reporter: ron danta and danny robert shaw's home isn't really for people. >> you live in a doghouse. >> yes. we are the guest. we have a king size bed that we share with about 15 to 18 dogs a night. >> reporter: actually, there are 86 dogs here right now. what's this dog's name? a humphrey. >> this one? >> mona. >> this one? >> isabel. >> reporter: and that means 86 different animals in need of daily care. >> we wake up 5:30ish and somebody will start singing. one of the dogs sleeping in the kitchen likes to sing in the morning. >> reporter: i think some people
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might call it howling. >> no. >> reporter: danny and ron's doghouse is an unusual dog rescue. launched in 2005 when they decided to take in some dogs made homeless by hurricane katrina. how long were you planning to be involved? >> a couple weeks. >> yeah. >> reporter: but there was always another dog in need of rescue. and they decided the best way to prepare any dog for a new family was to welcome it into their own. >> by living in our house, number one, they get a lot of human contact. number two, they get pack contact from the other dogs. >> reporter: since 2005, danny and ron have taken in and adopted out more than 11,000 animals. sounds expensive. >> it's very expensive. >> reporter: which is why they also recently welcomed in some film makers. money from "life in the doghouse," the documentary, will go to shelters including their t from you? >> we get a lot more from them
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aniv them. >> reporter: turns out, not everything in the doghouse is for the dogs. tony dokoupil, cbs news, ren berg, south carolina. >> that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. congress gets back to work after this labor day weekend and lawmakers are facing a big to-do list. at the top is the heated fight to confirm the next supreme court justice. tomorrow the senate begins confirmation hearings for brett kavanagh. democrats are vowing to block president trump's nominee. now the white house is refusing to release thousands of pages of documents related to kavanagh. that has some democrats accusing the trump administration of a cover up. here's weija jiang. >> i've seen these documents. >> reporter: democratic senator dick durbin is demanding president trump release the records from judge brett kavanagh's work in the white
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house for former president george w. bush. >> if we're lucky, we will see 6% -- 6% of all of the documents that have been produced. so if he's so proud of his conservative credentials, show us the record. stand before us. trust the american people and they'll trust you. >> reporter: the trump administration is citing executive privilege to withhold 100,000 pages of records. an attorney for mr. bush revealed the decision in this letter to the chairman of the senate judiciary committee. senate minority leader chuck schumer reacted swiftly, declaring, we're witnessing a friday night document massacre. adding, it has all the makings of a cover up. but majority leader mitch mcconnell has said the outrage is unfounded. >> so far i believe the only senators who have met with this nominee and didn't have negative things to say about him were democrats who had already announced beforehand they were going to oppose him. >> reporter: the chairman of the judiciary committee, senator chuck grassley, released a
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statement supporting the decision to hold some records and provided numbers of how many kavanagh related documents have been turned over. more than 400,000, the most of recent supreme court nominees. on capitol hill, committee members are divided along party lines. >> senator grassley has been very fair, more documents given than any person nominated in the supreme court. >> it's not normal because we are not able to see 100,000 documents that the archivist has just -- because the administration has said we can't see them. >> reporter: the white house is defending its decision, saying the production of documents in this case is entirely consistent with others in which nominees had experience in the executive branch and that the judiciary committee has received all the documents it formally requested. confirmation hearings for judge kavanagh are set to start on tuesday. elaine? >> weija jiang, thank you. senator john mccain has made his final journey.
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for decades he lived a public life, but this last ceremony held sunday in annapolis, maryland was private. hundreds of people lined the entrance to the u.s. naval academy to say a final farewell to an american hero. waving american flags and holding signs of admiration, they watched as the hearst carrying senator john mccain passed the gates for a private burial service. it capped a five-day public procession to honor mccain's life and legacy. mccain's closest friend in the senate, lindsey graham. >> i also want america to understand, there's a lesson from this week. it's not about who came and who said what at the funeral. military service is appreciated. everybody loved the fact that john was willing to die for his country. >> reporter: following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, a young mccain attended the u.s. naval a cat am i and graduated in 1968. the six-term arizona senator was
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laid to rest alongside admiral chuck larson his long-time friend and u.s. naval classmate. the decision to be buried next to each other was made 20 years ago, as described by the senator in his recent memoir, the wresless wave. >> and then take my leave bound for a place near my old friend chuck larson in the cemetery on the severn back where it began. >> and in a poignant send off, the navy academy performed a missing plan fly over with four f-18 fighter jets. one of them pulling off and heading to the heavens as a final tribute to mccain's lifetime of service. senator mccain died august 25th after a battle with brain cancer. he was 81 years old. when the body of 20-year-old mollie tibbetts was found in an iowa corn field, her father said he set out to celebrate his daughter's extraordinary life. now he says he needs to defend her legacy. tony dokoupil reports.
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>> mollie tibbetts, an incredible young woman, is now permanently separated from her family. ck of mollie president trump tibbetts almost immediately after the authorities charged a mexican immigrant said to be here illegally with her murder. >> you heard about today with the illegal alien coming in very sadly from mexico, and you saw what happened to that incredible, beautiful young woman. should have never happened. illegally in our country. >> reporter: almost as quickly the family of mollie tibbetts pushed back, asking that mollie's death not be used to advance an anti-immigrant agenda. and this weekend the family's push became an emotional plea in an op-ed by mollie's father rob. do not appropriate mollie's soul in what she believed to be
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racist. a day after donald trump, jr., the apresident's name sake wrot a highly political piece arguing in favor of his father's proposed border policies, including the wall. mollie was murdered by an illegal alien, he wrote, and her murder would never have happened if we policed our southern border properly. this weekend some of iowa's latino residents held a vigil at the state capital in des moines where there has been an increase of harassment against members of their community in the wake of mollie's murder. >> we are very concerned with what's going to happen from here on out, very concerned about our families. >> reporter: that concern is something mollie's father addressed directly in his op-ed seemingly to invoke president trump in the process. to knowingly foment discord among races is a disgrace to our flag, he wrote. it is the opposite of leadership. it is shameful. national crime data show immigrants commit fewer crimes not more than those born in the u.s. as for the man accused of
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killing mollie tibbetts he is being held on a million dollar bond as he awaits trial. >> tony, thank you. a warrant is issued for a man suspected of kidnapping his two sons. an amber alert remains in effect for two boys. police say coronado is now driving a green pickup truck. his white truck was found near a home where authorities believe the 47-year-old shot and killed the boy's mother and another man on saturday. coronado and his sons' mother are married, but police say they have been living apart for the past few months. >> there has been documented reports of domestic issues here between the couple at this location in the past. >> it is believed coronado may be taking the boys to mexico. the cbs overnight news will be right back. olay ultra moisture body wash
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> a man who barely survived a shark attack in massachusetts is talking about his terrifying encounter and how he fought back. there have been a number of recent shark sightings on cape cod beaches, forcing officials to close them to tourists. bill litton was vacationing with his family two weeks ago when a shark bit his leg. the 61-year-old says he managed to escape by using a move he saw on tv. here's michelle miller. >> reporter: shark attacks are a rare occurrence in massachusetts. this was the first in the state since 2012. bill litton says he is a lucky man to be alive and he says he hopes others learn from his experience.
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you are a shark attack survivor. >> yeah. >> reporter: bit litton barely escaped with his life swimming offshore. >> i had gone 20 minutes. that's when my leg was seized. >> >> reporter: you said it was excruciating. >> very excruciating. >> reporter: did you see it? >> i felt like i was in a wrestling match because this animal was trying to flip me as i turned my head around to see a big head on my leg that belongs to the shark. and this was my advantage, as it turns out. >> reporter: his advantage, because of something he'd seen on tv. >> nature documentary 101, i knew dolphins always hit the gill. that's the place you go to attack the shark. >> reporter: so, what did you do? >> well, that's a defensive wound. i punched it on the gill. so if i hurt my hand, i think i hurt the shark. and it released and swam away.
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>> reporter: just like that? >> just like that. >> reporter: and then what? >> luckily there were people within yelling distance. i yelled help, and they heard me and they dragged me in and then things really took off. >> he's breathing, he's conscious, let's stop this bleeding. >> reporter: two nursing grads were among the beach goers. >> let's get him in the towel. a bunch of people started carrying him down. >> reporter: he was air lifted to a medical center where he was put into a two-day coma. how much blood did doctors say you lost? >> a full oil change. >> reporter: and underwent half a dozen surgeries. >> first walk of the day? >> reporter: he was discharged from the hospital. >> good job, perfect. >> reporter: and sent to rehab about ten days after the attack. will you be swimming in the ocean again? >> yes. >> reporter: without a single hesitation? >> there might be a hesitation there. i would probably very hesitantly go to that very same beach. it would freak me out a little
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to go to the same place. even though lightning never strikes twice. >> from birthday celebrations to college sports, balloons have been at the center of festivities for generations. but environmentalists are fighting to cut the use of air a major ing releasing them downside. now the movement has reached clemson university which for decades has started every home football game with its iconic balloon release. mark strassmann is at clemson's football stadium in south carolina. >> reporter: like all big-time football schools, clemson is big on its traditions. one of them is when players run down that hill. long-time fans will look up and notice that something is missing. after 35 years, the school is ending its massive release of balloons if the latest sign of a rising environmental debate. clem on's pregameeleasing 10,00 balloons, has been called the most exciting 25 seconds in college football.
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but then gravity kicks in. what goes up must come down. >> people wouldn't litter something on the ground, but then they might not think twice about letting a balloon go in the air. >> reporter: danielle co-found the the nonprofit, balloons blow. she considers balloons litter and a threat to wildlife. >> they're just releasing them by the thousands. >> reporter: she has targeted clemson and the university of nebraska which has its own balloon tradition. she rented this billboard in lincoln urging the school to end it. she started cleaning florida beaches as a kid and says she finds balloons that sailed hundreds of miles. how often have you found balloons? >> most of the time. >> reporter: she rejects the industry's argument that latex balloons are biodegradable. in her backyard shed she stored six years worth of balloons cleaned off beaches. which is the worst, the latex or mylar? >> latex, because that's more commonly found in the stomachs of dead animals.
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>> reporter: sea turtles mistake them for food. environmentalists disagree whether that threat can be fatal to wildlife. >> there is debate over how long they take to break down, but they are, in fact, biodegradable. >> reporter: loren a is executive director of the balloon council. >> we don't dispute that they sometimes find balloon fragments, but when they open them up, there can be anywhere between 5 and 25 things in their stomachs. >> reporter: do you understand why there is pressure to remove balloons as a potential threat? >> yes. but we'd like to see people's behavior changed. we are discouraging balloon releases, but we prefer education over legislation. >> reporter: but vosberg says it's time to pop the balloons. >> if they're so biodegradable how come i have them in my backyard from 6 1/2 years? the balloon pollution will still
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persist in the environment and keep washing up along the shores for many, many years to come. >> reporter: we reached out to the university of nebraska. they told us their balloons are biodegradable and they use only paper strength. as for clemson, they're planning a little switch. instead of balloons, they're going to go with even bigger fireworks shows all season long. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back. [stomach gurgles] ♪when you have nausea, heartburn,
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>> when the light sabers go on and the energy comes back to the saber, there's no way to explain that. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: for four nights in august, the epic "star wars" scores by composer john williams were performed live with the movies by theos fi philharmonic and david newman. >> lose the ability when you are performing a live score. >> yes. >> reporter: what are the challenges of conducting a score while the film is going on? >> it's thrilling. it's exactly the opposite of what you would think it would be. >> reporter: performing film music, you need to be more aggressive in a way. that doesn't mean loud or soft necessarily. even if it's soft, it just needs to be really focused. ♪ ♪
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>> reporter: newman has composed the scores of almost 100 films. hollywood composer alfred newman, helped define the genre during a 20-year run as music director at 20th century fox. how big is this trend? >> right now it's huge. >> reporter: five years ago, two companies began taking these concerts on the road. cine-concerts produces shows in 48 countries. they screened gladiator in rome at the coliseum. and harry potter at royal albert hall in london. while film concerts live works with orchestras around the world to showcase 16 movies including six scores compose bid john williams. >> i think my father's generation, even john's generation are absolutely flabbergasted by this.
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>> reporter: film music was sec third, fourth, you know -- >> it was really looked down on. >> reporter: that slowly began to change with "star wars." >> so in 1980, orchestras were very grumpy about flplaying fil music. they don't want to play film music because they think it's not very good. >> reporter: when alfred took over the boston pops, he used the orchestra to do new compositions for the empire strikes back. year after year he whittles away at it. >> teaches them what it is. i think what's happening now is unthinkable. without john actually willing to go to the boston pops and deal with that. >> do you smell something? >> reporter: pianist jill pearson has been with the l.a. philharmonic since 2001. >> this is one excellent way to
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do it. it's beautiful music. we enjoy playing. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: christopher still has been with the orchestra since 2007. do you have some memorable audience reaction over the years? >> i think there is something to be said for being a perfo havin. that's nice. when darth vader comes onto the screen and you have 18,000 people booing at you at the top of their lungs, that leaves a mark. >> reporter: it's a great moment for you. these concerts may be a sign of our times, but david newman notes film scoring can be traced back to some of the great classical composers of the 1930s. >> all these really famous europeans who were fleeing europe come to hollywood. >> that's right. >> but they're not willing to make the music subservient to the film. so i think that generation now seeing what's happening, i think they would be elated obviously.
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>> reporter: newman is encouraged that the art form he spent a lifetime pursuing is being enjoyed by fans not commonly associated with orchestral music. >> it is always a combination of a bunch of moving parts to make something greater than all the parts put together. and there is something profoundly meaningful about that. i don't know how to describe it any other way. when it works, there is nothing artistically that i have ever come across that's like that. >> reporter: if you're interested in finding a live film concert, website movies in concert lists every upcoming show around the world and there are a lot of them. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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our final story tonight may give you paws. it is about an unusual home in south carolina that's rescued more than 10,000 dogs. here's tony dokoupil once again with the tale. >> reporter: ron danta and danny robert shaw's home isn't really for people. you live in a doghouse. >> yes, we are the guests. we have a king size bed with share with about 15 to 18 dogs a night. >> reporter: actually there are 86 dogs here right now. what's this dog's name? >> humphrey. >> this one? >> mona. >> this one? >> isabel. >> reporter: that means 86 different animals in need of daily care. >> we wake up -- yeah. 5:30ish. one of
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eporter: someeopl might call it howling. >> no. >> reporter: their house is a dog rescue, launched in 2005 when they decide to take in some dogs made homeless by hurricane katrina. how long were you planning to be involved? >> a couple weeks. >> yeah. >> reporter: there was always another dog in need of rescue and they decided the best way to prepare a new dog for a family was to welcome it in their own. >> by living in our house they get a lot of human contact number two they get pack contact from the other dogs. >> reporter: since 2005 they have taken in and adopted out more than 11,000 animals. sounds expensive. >> it's very expensive. >> reporter: which is why they also recently welcomed in some film makers. money from "life in the doghouse" the documentary will go to shelters including their own. do you feel like you get as much from these dogs as they get from you? >> we get a lot more from them
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than i think we give them. >> reporter: turns out not everything in the doghouse is for the dogs. tony dokoupil, cbs news, renbern, south carolina. >> and that's the overnight news their this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, september 3rd, labor day. this is the "cbs morning news." a high stakes fight is expected to begin over brett kavanaugh, president trump's controversial supreme court nominee. >> if he's so proud of his conservative credentials, stand up. >> family and friends and colleagues say good-bye to senator and war hero john mccain. and firefighters rush to save artifacts from the

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