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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 16, 2019 3:00am-4:00am PST

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impeachment showdown. democrats make a last-minute push for bipartisan support, even as republicans rally around the president. >> this president believes he is above the law and accountable to no one. >> they have zero evidence. also tonight, winter on its way. a whiteout hits the plains this last week of fall, snarling traffic and chilling football fans and players as it heads east. global climate talks end without a big breakthrough, but lots of heated rhetoric about a crisis. plus beatdown. a texas college student sues a fraternity after a vicious attack caught on camera. >> we're calling the cops! a service station in maryland changes lanes, charging into the future. and breaking barriers. the new face raising the bar at
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the nutcracker. >> there's never been a marie that looks like you. >> well, if i'm the first person, then i want to make it count. ♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. history will be made this week on capitol hill for only the third time in u.s. history, the house of representatives withhold a vote to impeach the president. democrats accuse president trump of abuse of power and obstruction of congress. the president was fighting back on twitter this weekend, again insisting there was no crime. and as nicole killian at the white house reports, republicans are joining him in the battle. >> reporter: the full house of representatives is said to take the final step on impeachment on wednesday, voting on two articles, abuse of power and obstruction of congress. are you confident you have the
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majority to impeach the president? >> i am confident. >> reporter: the vote is widely expected along party lines, but there could be cracks. >> you can vote against impeachment and still disagree with some of the policies or some of the behavior. >> reporter: conservative groups are targeting democrats in 31 congressional districts president trump won in 2016. >> the real question is how big will the jail break be by the democrats. >> reporter: among them, new jersey congressman jeff van drew, a conservative democrat who is expected to become a republican. >> what he is reacting to is the public polling that shows he can't get renominated. >> reporter: the senate is getting ready for the president's possible trial expected in january. >> i am clearly made up my mind. i'm not trying to hide the fact that i have disdain for the accusations and the process. >> reporter: senate republicans have been closely coordinating strategy with the white house. >> we wouldn't be doing our job if we weren't working hand in hand with the senate to clear the president of this charade.
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>> reporter: but democrats argue that violates their oath of impartiality as objective jurors. >> it's why i'm so disappointed in my colleagues. this see no evil, hear no evil attitude, that they don't want to look at anything that mice disagree with their world view of republicanism and this president. >> reporter: president trump calls the impeachment process a hoax and vows to win. meantime cbs news has learned some freshmen democrats are recruiting michigan congressmen. justin amash to serve as impeachment manager in an impeachment trial. the independent left the republican party after saying the president committed impeachable acts. elaine? >> nicole killian, thank you. it's not just congress that's divided on impeachment. a new cbs news poll today finds americans are as well. 46% believe the president should be impeached. 39% disagree. and 15% say it's too soon to decide. cbs news elections and surveys director anthony salvanto is in
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our washington bureau. so anthony, have the impeachment hearings had any impact at all? >> not a lot, elaine. you see that speech with certainly more people saying he deserves impeachment than not. but on the abuse of power and obstruction of congress, we find splits, about 50-50. now democrats are certainly in favor and approve of the articles impeachment, but beyond that, not a lot dramatic has changed. it still comes down to whether or not folks approve of the president's job in the first place. >> and anthony, across the super tuesday states, let's look at the democrats seeking to unseat donald trump. you find joe biden with the edge this week and michael bloomberg who just got into the race in 50 place. any numbers suggest he can catch the front-runners? >> he does a little better with people who think the party was moving in too liberal a direction. but that's not a lot of democrats, only about a quarter. he is hoping to capitalize. if democrats come through the earlier states like iowa and new hampshire and aren't satisfied,
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and half of voters don't know about his past support for dramatic causes. so that's one leading indicator maybe. we'll have to watch, elaine. >> all right, anthony salvanto in our washington bureau, thank you. the sixth democratic presidential debate on tap for later this week in los angeles is in jeopardy tonight. all seven candidates scheduled to appear have pledged to boycott the debate in support of striking workers at the site. farrahi farrah faisal has the details. >> what do we want? a contract. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> reporter: food workers are promising to picket outside the last democratic debate of the year. >> i'm not going to cross a picket line. i never have and i'm not going to start now. >> reporter: senator elizabeth warren was the first presidential candidate to tweet her support for workers of unite here local 11. the rest of the candidates said they would not cross the picket line outside loyola marymount university, the site of the debate on thursday. >> i think it's a terrible look for the democratic party to have
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a debate and that runs afoul of union work rules. >> what do we want? >> contract! >> reporter: the workers began picketing on campus last month where they serve and prepare the meals. the union says the company that contracts them, sodexo canceled the negotiations. >> we've got to resolve the issue, get the wages and health care that the workers deserve. >> reporter: the union buy-cott isn't the only national dilemma. nine candidates are demanding the dnc change the polling and fundraising rules used to dictate debate participation. they say the current rules have cut down the diversity of the field. dnc signaled they're unlikely to change the rules for january. dnc chairman tom perez has not yet decided whether he'll change the rules for the february and the march debates. meanwhile, the union for the food workers is about to meet with sodexo, the company on tuesday. it's quite possible they may meet a little sooner, elaine. >> farrah, thank you.
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saturday, newtown, connect marks 20 years since the school shoot. but last night thanks to their high school football team, the day ended in celebration. with the game tied, seconds to go, and fog drifting in, newtown quarterback jack street hit riley wood with the bomb. he crossed the goal line and the crowd erupted in cheers as time expired. newtown won the state championship. the new drug treatment promising hope against advanced breast cancer. how a service station in maryland is charging into the future. plus, the new ballerina breaking barriers on an old christmas tradition.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> winter is officially set to arrive this week on saturday, but it already looks like the real deal in big parts of the country. a whiteout in kansas city, missouri, made getting around tough on the roads and on the gridiron where the chiefs played the broncos. tonight, winter advisories and winter storm warnings are up from colorado all the way to pennsylvania. jeff berardelli is here with what's ahead. jeff, looking like a messy monday. >> we have snow, ice and the threat for severe weather. monday, showers, thunderstorms. the possibility of isolated tornadoes in the southeast with an enhanced risk for severe weather in place likes jackson, alexandria, up to tupelo.
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moving east as we head to the later part of the day into birmingham. now the cold part of the storm. plenty of snow in places like cast city. that moves east across the ohio valley to places like indianapolis. tomorrow morning don't be surprised in d.c. or philly if you wake up to a few snowflakes. it shouldn't be a big deal. and as the day moves on into new york city, the snow breaks out. it will be mixed with ice as well. by tuesday morning, it turns to rain and the heavier snow moves north into upstate new york and parts of new england as well. places like boston and hartford could see ice and snow from the system. it all winds down later on tuesday. but it will drop ice and snow in its wake. you see that swath of ice across the nation's middle. and as far as snowfall goes, not going to be a lot of snow. it's a narrow band, generally 2 to 4, but some places picking up 6 inches, especially interior parts of new england. >> all right, jeff, thank you. >> you're welcome. united nations climate talks ended in madrid today with more alarms and little action. ian lee reports. >> reporter: these are the warning signs our climate is in
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trouble. >> we're talking about 60, 70 -- >> reporter: 200-foot flames this weekend raced across the australian outback. more than 100 fires are burning across the country, taking their toll on wildlife and people. in sydney, the smoke is so bad, it's like smoking 32 cigarettes a day. greenland is losing ice seven times faster than it was in the '90s, leading to rising sea levels and coastal flooding. this week the world's struggle to respond to the crisis at a u.n. climate summit in madrid. >> we are a little confused about what documents are being discussed. >> we're starting to get a little lost. >> we are kind of lost. >> reporter: to stop global temperatures from rising, scientists say countries must cut grown house gas emissions. >> the planet is on fire, and our window of escape is getting harder and harder to reach the longer we fail to act. >> reporter: frustrated activists dumped manure outside the meeting saying the you know
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stops here. but delegates inside didn't act, at least decisively. >> we don't support such language. >> reporter: the united states is one of the countries opposing strong action, but the effects of climate change have already hit home. this year saw devastating floods in the midwest that destroyed farms and destroyed livestock, and fires continue to grow more severe. the warnings are there, but who is listening? ian lee, cbs news, london. a student at texas state university is suing the national chapter of pi kappa phi after an alleged assault caught on camera. laura podesta has the violent video. >> reporter: the video captures the frantic screams of a texas state university student, the moment he says a group of pi kappa phi fraternity brothers started attacking him. the october incident landed his client in the hospital. he couldn't go to class for weeks. >> head injury, spinal injuries,
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still trying to recover. >> reporter: he is now suing the local and national chapters of pi kappa phi. he alleges they have a history of hazing, violence, and encouraging the consumption and overconsumption of alcohol. >> things need to change. >> reporter: fraternities are under the microscope nationwide. at syracuse university, social activities for all fraternities are suspended after members of one were accused of using racial slurs. earlier this week, police at florida state university arrested four students including a fraternity president in connection to a hazing incident. john heckinger is the author of the book "true gentlemen: the broken pledge of america's fraternities." he says despite these episodes, fraternities are more popular than they've ever been, but they're also feeling pressure to change. >> i think that sustained outside pressure from cell phone
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videos, from students speaking out will make a huge difference. many fraternity chapters have responded to a rash of lawsuits that have put them into financial peril. >> reporter: regarding the alleged attack in austin, texas state university tells cbs news in a statement as soon as the university was notified of the incident in october, pi kappa phi was suspended. and elaine we also reached out to the national chapter of the fraternity. they say they do not comment on pending litigation. >> disturbing video, laura, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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alice loves the smell of gain so much, she wished it came in a fabric softener too.
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[throat clears] say hello to your fairy godmother, alice. oh and look they got gain scent beads and dryer sheets too! . there is new hope in the battle against breast cancer, a disease that's expected to be diagnosed in more than 265,000 americans this year, killing nearly 42,000. dr. jon lapook tells us about a new drug that's remarkably precise in targeting tumors. >> reporter: 49-year-old dikla benzeevi has been living with breast cancer for 17 years. as the cancer spread to her lungs, she tried 15 different drugs. >> i've had multiple surgeries, spine surgery, lung surgery, breast surgery. i think i counted 2,000 pills. it's crazy. >> reporter: last year her
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doctors at ucla skin cancer center suggest she join a trial of a new therapy targeted specifically at ben zeevi's disease. her-2 positive breast cancer meaning it's metastatic, meaning it's widely spread. >> metastatic cancer today is not curable. 98% of patients who have the disease will get worse or grow, in spite of having aggressive therapies. >> reporter: her2 gene occurs in about 20% of patients with metastatic disease. targeted therapies like herceptin often stop working as the cancer becomes resistant. in this trial, the drug for now labeled ds-8201 was tested in 184 patients. tumors shank in 61% and disappeared in 6%. >> my tumor is stable. there are no new tumors, and it's staying stable, which is a good sign. >> reporter: dr. ian krop is one of the authors.
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>> so this new drug works basically by selectively delivering high concentrations of chemotherapy directly to the cancer cell. it's essentially like a guided missile. >> reporter: cancer growth was halted for an average of 16 months, longer than what is usually seen with current therapies. >> patients were able to get back on with their lives and not have to worry about their cancer so much while the drug was working. >> reporter: this drug came with serious side effects, including severe lung injury that caused two deaths. so the safety of the drug will certainly be a concern going forward. the fda has decided to fast track the approval process, meaning if all goes well, the drug could become available as early as next year. dr. jon lapook, cbs news, new york. coming up, a gas station in maryland pulls the pumps, speeding ahead of the curve. when we were looking for a roommate,
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he wanted someone super quiet. yeah, and he wanted someone to help out with chores. so, we got jean-pierre. but one thing we could both agree on was getting geico to help with renters insurance.
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♪ yeah, geico did make it easy to switch and save. ♪ oh no. there's a wall there now. that's too bad. visit geico.com and see how easy saving on renters insurance can be. ♪when you have nausea, heartburn, indigestion,♪ ♪upset stomach, diarrhea. try pepto liquicaps for fast relief and ultra-coating. ♪nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea.♪ get powerful relief with pepto bismol liquicaps. your cold's gonna make you a zombie tomorrow. wrong. new mucinex nightshift fights my cold symptoms so i can sleep great and wake up human. don't eat me i taste terrible. fight your worst symptoms so you can sleep great and wake up human. new mucinex nightshift cold and flu. it's the first in the nation. a maryland gas station owner recently dug up all his pumps and plugged into the future.
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here is kris van cleave. >> reporter: let the charging begin. after 60 years as the local takoma park, maryland gas station, rs automotive is now the first in the country to fully convert to all electric charge. >> i didn't know i was going to be the first. that was a big surprise, you know. >> reporter: there is no guarantee it will be a success. less than 2% of cars in the u.s. are electric, and then there is the price, maybe 8 to $15 a car for about 30 minutes plugged into one of the four charging stations. are you worried it's going to work? >> when i started my business, the repair shop in 1997, that was the biggest challenge of my life. i mean, financially, we had about $200 in our checking account, and i took a big gamble. that was a really big gamble. this is nothing, sir. >> reporter: the city approached dooley, who came from the u.s. from india 33 years ago about the idea. but it was a conversation at the dinner table with his daughter teresa, then a high school senior that convinced him.
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>> i think climate change is like one of the biggest issues that we're kind of facing in america. >> she said oh, dad, you got to do it. that's really good. great idea. and she went on and on and on and talked about the environment, global warming. >> reporter: this is kind of your doing? >> i feel like it definitely was a lot of my dad. he was the one who did most of the work. but i was happy that i was able to convince him to create this change. >> reporter: a change aimed at plugging into a greener future. kris van cleave, cbs news, takoma park, maryland. next, the changing face of an old christmas tradition.
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we end tonight with a christmas tradition. "the nutcracker" has been performed by the new york city ballet for more than 50 years, but this year it features something new. ♪ >> reporter: each year students from the famed school of american ballet star in this annual presentation of "the nutcracker." the school was founded by world renowned choreographer george balanchine in 1994. but for dancers of color, getting there often meant encountering invisible barriers. >> when you are a minority in any environment, there is an added struggle. >> reporter: ayesha ash attended the school in the 1990s and
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performed with the new york city ballet for more than seven years. she says it was sometimes the small things, like nothing having proper hair products or stage makeup that sent a message about whether she truly belonged. >> i remember the girls that got in with were given many different palettes and things to choose from. and i sort of got a lipstick and that was pretty much it, and maybe a powder. i don't really have much for you. >> think about your shoulders, and lift. >> reporter: ash now '70s the diversity committee at the school of american ballet, and her experiences have helped pave the way for this moment. ♪ 11-year-old charlotte nebres, whose grandparents hail from trinidad and the philippines, soaring on center stage at lincoln center, the firstbla black ballerina ever to play the role here. >> since 1954, there has never been a marie that looks like you. what do you think about that? >> well, at first when i found
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that out, it was a little bit surprising, but then it sunk in that, well, if i'm going to be doing this role and i'm the first person, then i want to make it count. so i really wanted to make it special for everyone in the audience and for the people on the stage as well. >> reporter: for ayesha ash, it's a full circle moment. >> it's so nice to meet you, sweetheart. >> i think less about what it means to me, and i think much more about what it's going to mean to all of those little girls that see her and can see themselves and see a chance, see an opportunity. that's huge. >> reporter: what is it that you hope people watching in the audience feel or think about when they see you performing on stage? >> well, i want them to feel empowered because you get to see someone like you on stage, and it makes you think oh, well, maybe i can do that too, because
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she did it, then i can. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. history will be made this week on capitol hill. for only the third time in u.s. history, the house of representatives will hold a vote to impeach the president. democrats accuse president trump of abuse of power and obstruction of congress. the president was fighting back on twitter again this weekend, insisting there was no crime. and as nicole kill reports a the white house, the republicans are joining him in the battle. >> reporter: the full house of representatives is said to take the final step on impeachment on wednesday, voting on two articles, abuse of power and obstruction of congress. are you confident you have the majority to impeach the president? >> i am confident.
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>> reporter: the vote is widely expected along party lines, but there could be cracks. >> you can vote against impeachment and still disagree with some of the policies or some of the behavior. >> reporter: conservative groups are targeting democrats in 31 congressional districts president trump won in 2016. >> the real question is how big will the jail break be by te democrats. >> reporter: among them, new jersey congressman jeff van drew, a conservative democrat who is expected to become a republican. >> what he is reacting to is the public polling that shows he can't get renominated. >> reporter: the senate is getting ready for the president's possible trial expected in january. >> i am clearly made up my mind. i'm not trying to hide the fact that i have disdain for the accusations and the process. >> reporter: senate republicans have been closely coordinating strategy with the white house. >> we wouldn't be doing our job if we weren't working hand in hand with the senate to clear the president of this charade. >> reporter: but democrats argue
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that violates their oath of impartiality as objective perspective jurors. >> it's why i'm so disappointed in my colleagues. this see no evil, hear no evil attitude, that they don't want the look at anything that might disagree with their world view of republicanism and this president. >> reporter: president trump calls the impeachment process a hoax and vows to win. meantime cbs news has learned some freshmen democrats are recruiting michigan congressmen justin amash to serve as impeachment manager in an senate trial. the independent left the republican party after saying the president committed impeachable acts. elaine? >> nicole killian, thank you. it's not just congress that's divided on impeachment. a new cbs news poll today finds americans are as well. 46% believe the president should be impeached. 39% disagree. and 15% say it's too soon to decide. cbs news elections and surveys director anthony salvanto is in our washington bureau.
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so anthony, have the impeachment hearings had any impact at all? >> not a lot, elaine. you see that split with certainly more people saying he deserves impeachment than not. but on the abuse of power and as the democrats assert obstruction of congress we find splits, about 50-50. now democrats are certainly in favor and approve of the articles impeachment, but beyond that, not a lot dramatic has changed. it still comes down to whether or not folks approve of the president's job in the first place. >> and anthony, across the super tuesday states, let's look at the democrats seeking to unseat donald trump. yofind joe biden with the edge this week and michael bloomberg who just got into the race in fifth place. any numbers suggest he can catch the front-runners? >> he does a little better with people who think the party was moving in too liberal a direction. but that's not a lot of democrats, only about a quarter. he is hoping to capitalize. if democrats come through the earlier states like iowa and new hampshire and aren't satisfied, and half of voters don't know
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about his past support for dramatic causes. so that's one leading indicator maybe. we'll have to watch, elaine. >> all right, anthony salvanto in our washington bureau, thank you. the sixth democratic presidential debate on tap for later this week in los angeles is in jeopardy tonight. all seven candidates scheduled to appear have pledged to boycott the debate in support of striking workers at the site. farrah fazal has the details. >> what do we want? a contract. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> reporter: food workers are promising to picket outside the last democratic debate of the year. >> i'm not going to cross a picket line. i never have and i'm not going to start now. >> reporter: senator elizabeth warren was the first presidential candidate to tweet her support for workers of unite here local 11. the rest of the candidates said they would not cross the picket line outside loyola marymount university, the site of the debate on thursday. >> i think it's a terrible look for the democratic party to have a debate and that runs afoul of
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union work rules. >> what do we want? >> contract! >> reporter: the workers began picketing on campus last month where they serve and prepare the meals. the union says the company that contracts them, sodexo canceled their negotiations. >> we've got to resolve the issues, get the wages and health care that the workers deserve. >> reporter: the union buy-cott isn't the only natioal dilemma. nine candidates are demanding the dnc change the polling and fundraising rules used to dictate debate participation. they say the current rules have cut down the diversity of the field. dnc signaled they're unlikely to change the rules for january. dnc chairman tom perez has not yet decided whether he'll change the rules for the february and the march debates. meanwhile, the union for the food workers is about to meet with sodexo, the company on tuesday. it's quite possible they may meet a little sooner, elaine. >> farrah, thank you.
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winter is officially set to arrive this week on saturday, but it already locks like the real deal in big parts of the country. a whiteout in kansas city, missouri made getting around tough on the roads and on the gridiron, where the chiefs played the broncos. tonight winter advisories and winter storm warns are up from colorado all the way to pennsylvania. jeff berardelli is here with what's ahead. jeff, looking like a messy monday. >> we're going to get snow, ice and the threat for severe weather. we'll start with that. monday, showers, thunderstorms. the possibility of isolated tornadoes in the southeast with an enhanced risk for severe weather in place likes jackson, alexandria, up to tupelo. moving east as we head to the later part of the day into birmingham. now the cold side of the storm. we've had plenty of snow in places like kansas city. that moves east across the ohio valley to places like indianapolis. tomorrow morning don't be surprised in d.c. or philly if you wake up to a few snowflakes. it shouldn't be a big deal. and as the day moves on into new york city, the snow breaks out. it will be mixed with ice as well.
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by tuesday morning, it turns to rain and the heavier snow moves north into upstate new york and parts of new england as well. places like boston and hartford could see ice and snow from the system. it all winds down later on tuesday. but it will drop ice and snow in its wke. you see that swath of ice across the nation's middle. and as far as snowfall goes, not going to be a lot of snow. it's a narrow band, generally 2 to 4, but some places picking up 6 inches, especially interior parts of new england. >> all right, jeff, thank you. >> you're welcome. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> i'm elaine quijano. we've got a lot more to tell you about this morning, starting with package deliveries. between the post office, and fed ex, will be more than two million deliveries this season. the last mile is always the most expensive. >> reporter: it's morning in berkeley, california, and the kiwi bots are heading off to work. these four-wheeled robots navigate sidewalks and even crosswalks, taking food to hungry college students. and this is the future? >> this is the future. >> reporter: this is the future of delivery? >> exactly. >> reporter: it's a real world test of delivery by robot that
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sometimes collides with reality. the reality today is that delivery is a bigger business than ever. with online shopping, it's estimated the post office, fed ex and ups will process, sort and deliver more than 2 billion packages between thanksgiving and new year's eve. amazon's own fleet of delivery trucks is expected to handle 275 million holiday season shipments. and amazon is pushing the delivery envelope, offering prime members free one-day shipping. >> you have to offer free delivery now to be competitive it seems. >> yeah. >> reporter: and it's not reasonable, because it's expensive to deliver stuff. >> and it's never free, right? it costs money. the question is where do you get that money from. >> reporter: anne goodchild is director of the supply chain and delivery at the university of
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washington. the growth in home delivery is focusing attention on what logistics experts call the last mile. so they don't mean literally a mile. they mean the last piece of this supply chain. and the reason it's interesting is it's the most expensive mile of the whole thing. i've seen estimates of more than 50% of the cost is from that last mile. it's expensive because it's labor intensive. there is a driver who takes every package up to the front door. >> reporter: it's estimated that free ship willing cost amazon more than a billion dollars this quarter alone. which explains why shippers are looking at some radical new technologies to cut the cost of the last mile. >> this is the delivery drone that's going to be delivering to homes all across america. >> reporter: matthew sweeney is founder and ceo of a delivery drone startup called flirty.
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>> we've been secretly testing this technology in the desert for years, and this is the first time a film crew has come out and see it. >> reporter: he predicts that by christmas 2020, many packages will be delivered this way. >> ready for the release? >> here it is. >> there we go. >> reporter: see what we've got here. >> we've got two flirty shirts. we've also got a fragile flirty mug. >> reporter: i was kind of hoping for pizza. >> we can do that. >> reporter: in fact, they did it in new zealand in 2016, delivering pizza in a test of an earlier model drone. and the drone does not expect a tip. >> the labor cost of a drone delivery is less than the labor cost of any other form of delivery because the technology is autonomous. it flies itself. >> reporter: flirty's drone is guided by gps. sweeney won't reveal how much weight it can carry, but claims it can handle about 75% of all deliveries made in the u.s. today. the drone takes off from and
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lands on what flirty calls a portal. >> our vision to have a portal at every mall across america, every fed ex or ups for package delivery. our mission is to deliver whatever you want when you want it. >> reporter: six years ago, jeff bezos unveiled amazon's drone project. but flirty is part of an faa program with fast track program with approval and expects to beat amazon with airborne deliveries. in berkeley, the delivery robots roaming the streets are in close proximity to people. that is what's being tested. so this is a common sight in berkeley now? >> yes, yes, yes. >> reporter: and what's the reaction of people when they see these? >> yeah, people are very curious, yeah, and so far the reaction and people in berkeley have been very good. >> reporter: felipe chavez moved from colombia with a dream of building his robot delivery company close to silicon valley. his kiwi bots deliver food
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within about a mile of the university of california campus here. so there will be a time when we walk up and down this street passing robots and nobody be even notice? >> literally. and sometimes that happen here is in berkeley. at the beginning a lot of people were taking photo, super excited. now for some people, it's just normal. >> reporter: a robot delivering a burrito is just normal. >> exactly. >> reporter: one advantage of drones and robots, they can deliver on demand when someone is home to receive the package. that could help combat porch pirates, the thieves who see any newly delivered cardboard box as an irresistible opportunity. logistics expert anne goodchild looks al all those cardboard boxes and sees something else, the environmental impact. >> i think it's a good time to be in the cardboard industry. and i do hope that we can move to more reusable materials. the industry is still working this out. >> reporter: home delivery, however, may be better for the
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environment than customers driving their own cars to shop. >> trucks are bigger. trucks are heavier. trucks are more polluting. but we have to remember that that truck is actually like a bus for groceries. that truck is visiting many homes. and what our research shows is that the truck is more efficient. >> reporter: but that advantage can be lost in the rush for ever faster delivery. >> so one-hour delivery, two-hour delivery is not reducing congestion and is not reducing emissions. so there is no efficiency in th that, the way there is efficiency in a milkman who can deliver to 40, 50 homes in a single trip. >> reporter: indeed, let us not forget the milkman. >> well, i've been at it for three years, john, and i haven't soured on it yet. >> reporter: along with his puns, eric delivers organic milk in glass bottles in the san francisco area. >> it's just a lot easier to
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have it delivered. plus people like the old school aspect of it of, you know, getting a milk delivery. >> reporter: he brings a gallon to paula gillespie's house once a week. >> it's fantastic. >> reporter: it seems a little anachronistic today. >> yes, well, that would be me. i fit right in with that. >> reporter: because these robots deliver things to people. >> i hate it. i hate it. this is fulfilling a need that in my opinion is counterproductive to society. at least the society that i know and love. and it does not include robots and drones. >> reporter: do you really think that's possible, that a drone could put you out of business one day? >> yeah, at here's a simple true-or-false quiz for you. if you're between age 50 and 85, it's important for you to know the truth, so please listen closely.
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that's a zzzquil pure zzzs sleep. our liquid has a unique botanical blend, while an optimal melatonin level means no next-day grogginess. zzzquil pure zzzs. naturally superior sleep. let's say you're looking to do downsize and want a different style of living? how about buying a condo in an abandoned psychiatric hospital? believe it or not, some of them are pretty nice, lying the one near the shore of lake michigan. >> this is the third floor. i believe this is ward 18. this would have been a men's most disturbed ward. >> reporter: ray minervini jr. shows us the massive center of the old traverse city state hospital, nearly a quarter mile from end to end. inside, hallways that once held committed patients are now lined with homes. >> each one of these doorways
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was a 100--square-foot patient home. >> reporter: and now they are? >> condominiums. >> reporter: originally, it was more than 150 mental institutions built across america between the mid 1800s and early 20th century. >> so that's a pretty late addition. >> reporter: and this father and son developer team are responsible for bringing it back to life. >> it was a giant risk. it was something that nobody had ever attempted before, but the idea was that there is an opportunity here to save an old building that apparently nobody else was willing to step up to try to safe it. >> reporter: minervini jr. says his father's vision was to transform the abandoned institution into a place where people could work, shop, eat, and even live. and who are these people? what kind of people? >> i think they're out-of-the-box thinkers. if you say hey, i want to move into an old asylum, you're thinking differently than the typical person, right? because they were able to see the underlying value that was
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going to be preserve and reused. >> reporter: how many photos do you think you took as part of this project? >> hundreds if not thousands. >> reporter: chris crane is a trained architect turned photographer who spent six years visiting 70 institutions in 30 states. they were left abandoned after the advent of modern medicine and a shift toward deinstitutionalizati deinstitutionalization. >> these are the largest buildings of the time. they dominated the landscape, and there was nothing like them before. they were an american invention. >> reporter: his book "asylum: inside the closed state mental hospitals" shows how time stood still when they were emptied out. >> i sawtooth brushes, rooms that had been left behind as if people just left that day and never came back, operating theater, movie theater, bowling alleys. sadly, most of the places i photographed are no longer there. >> reporter: the asylums of their time weren't designed to be frightening. instead the hope was to heal patients with their beauty. lots of light, open spaces and sprawling grounds.
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a far cry from the fictionalized versions in film and tv. >> we see them in movies, sort of all the creepiness, but they were really designed to be something entirely different. >> right. i think the creepiness comes from the era of architecture. and then when the buildings are shuttered or closed down, the life goes away. they become the perfect backdrop for horror stories and things like that. >> reporter: over the course of 17 years, the family redeveloped more than half of the campus. >> these are like 100 square foot rooms have to be made larger for most of our residential uses. >> reporter: there are still a handful of buildings have haven't been touched. >> you actually walked people through spaces like this that this might want to be a place they would want to live. >> they had to sign a waiver saying they were in a building with toxic materials. wouldn't this be a fantastic place for a home? the people who didn't run out of the building screaming that said
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hmm, they had a figures. >> i said coy live here. >> reporter: susan krause, originally from new york was one of the first residents. >> thought it fit my personality. it was just perfect. i finally found my home. >> reporter: did you have any reservations about moving into a former asylum? >> no, not really, even though i do believe in the paranormal and i think it's possible there are other worldly creations out there. but no, i had none at all. >> reporter: and neither did the team behind the hotel henry, who reimagined the former buffalo state hospital as a hotel and conference center. in columbia, south carolina, developers are converting what used to be a state asylum into one of the largest downtown mixed use real estate projects in the nation. only a fraction of the original asylums are still standing today. and only a few can see them the way susan krause can. >> and this is really special. >> reporter: with her own private spider and a view from the top. >> reporter: wow.
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>> look at the view. oh, and it
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taking a christmas photo is a holiday tradition for many families, but somimes it's difficult to get the kids to smile on santa's lap. well, for some parents, getting a shot of their happy children is not at all what they had in mind. mark strassmann reports.
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>> reporter: santa's workshop, where everything is picture-perfect. >> that's a good one. >> reporter: this is photographer jeff rothman's studio. in here, a white christmas often turns blue. [ crying ] >> we have parents come in here hoping their kids will cry, and they leave disappointed if their kids don't. >> reporter: it turns out crying kids make hilarious holiday photos. kris kringle meet kris cringeworthy. >> kids are going to try cia no matter what. it's just that we can kind of accentuate that. >> when you look at your portfolio, you think this photographer is not good with kids. >> he's a jerk, yeah. >> reporter: rothman was floored parents wanted their kids to cry. he had 7,000 photo shoots available over six weeks. they sold out in ten minutes. what age is the sweet spot? >> 1 to 2 is -- >> reporter: waterworks? >> it's perfect. >> realistic. yeah, and this is what they do.
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they're not smiles and perfect. >> reporter: santa meets three new crying kids every ten minutes. >> if you really want to feel how a child cries, it hurts. and yeah, it does tug at my heart. >> reporter: but within seconds, all is calm, all is bright again. >> when they get older and their kids get older, they can sit around christmas and share those photos and laugh about it. >> reporter: but until then, it's anything but silent night. mark strassmann, cbs news, atlanta. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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it's monday, december 16th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." deadly weather. a storm system that brought ice and snow to the central u.s. is stretching east. impeachment showdown. a full house vote is coming this week as negotiations get under way for the senate trial. and harvey weinstein shocker. the disgraced former movie mogul says he deserves a pat on the back when it comes to women. back when it comes to women. captioning funded by cbs good morning from the studio 57 newsroom at cbs headquarters good morning from the studio 57 newsroom at cbs headquarters here in new york. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. this morning, a massive storm

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