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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  July 8, 2022 3:12am-4:31am PDT

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we were supporting her but we were hurting. my wife and i were also hurting. >> reporter: a community devastated by determined. students spent the day making shirts with a message of strength. >> what can we do? we had to take action to not only heal personally, but also help heal the community. >> reporter: a community now streaming to this vietnam memorial honoring fallen soldiers and now those killed at a celebration of our freedom. little cooper's family launched a gofundme to help with medical bills. as for the investigation, there are now new questions about whether the suspect's father could be liable. he cosigned his son's gun application and reportedly insists he did nothing wrong. jericka? >> adriana diaz, thank you. former minneapolis police officer derek chauvin was sentenced on federal civil rights charges today in the murder of george floyd. chauvin got 21 years to run concurrently with his state sentence.
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the 46-year-old addressed the floyd family, saying he wished them all the best in their life. chauvin sparked international outrage two years ago when he killed george floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes during an arrest. well, now to the passing of a hollywood icon. actor james caan. tonight tributes are pouring in on social media from fans and his fellow actors. cbs' mark straussman looks back on a legendary career that respond six decades. >> reporter: sonny corleone, the godfather's oldest son was volatile. >> you got to get up close like this, ba-da-bing! >> reporter: but james caan the actor was versatile and surprisingly vulnerable as barbra streisand's husband in "funny lady," john wayne's sidekick in "el dorado, and the father of an elf. >> you look like you came from the north pole. >> that's exactly where i came from! >> i fought always to never be
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the same person. i never wanted to be the same person. >> reporter: a tough kid from new york city, caan played football at michigan state. acting he tried on an impulse. millions watched him in brian's song, the 1971 made for tv movie about two chicago bears teammate, one black, one white dying from cancer. >> i'll see you tomorrow. >> if you say so. >> reporter: caan could be self-destructive. a cocaine addiction, near financial ruin, four marriages. but he always fought back from misery. >> the profanity bothers you? >> it has no nobility. >> reporter: when he played a hobbled writer held hostage by a crazed fan. >> see what you made me do! >> reporter: caan also liked to tweet photos from movie sets, which felt like home to him. >> i enjoy working. i have a lot of laughs and i get respect too sometimes. >> reporter: james caan was 82. >> reporter: james caan was 82. mark
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we cannot forget the children in places like syria, born in refugee camps, playing in refugee camps, thinking of the camps as home. please call or go online to givenowtosave.org today. with your gift of $10 a month, your gift can help children like ara in afghanistan, where nearly 20 years of conflict have forced the people into extreme poverty weakened and unable to hold herself up, ara was brought to a save the children's center, where she was diagnosed and treated for severe malnutrition. every dollar helps. please call or go online to givenowtosave.org today. with your gift of $10 a month, just $0.33 a day. and thanks to special government grants that are available now, every dollar you give can multiply up to ten times the impact. and when you use your credit card, you'll receive this special save
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the children tote bag to show you won't forget the children who are living their lives in conflict. every war is a war against children. please give now. well, there is encouraging news for cash-strapped shoppers. after battling inflation for months, many shoppers are getting a big break as retailers take an unexpected approach. cbs' carter evans has details tonight in our money watch report. >> it's just racks on racks on racks of clearance. >> reporter: it's a big surprise
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for shoppers burdened by rising prices. >> is this really $6.64, was 21? >> reporter: deep discounts across the country. >> it's a retail armageddon. >> reporter: and retail consultant bert flickinger says that's good news for shoppers. >> biggest discounts consumer electronics, sporting goods, on apparel, clothes, accessoriacce >> reporter: it was cargo stuck in a traffic jam at sea during the pandemic. well, now those ships have come in at a time when inflation is forcing consumers to cut back. >> too many goods in too many stores chasing too few shoppers with too few dollars. >> reporter: he estimates some stores are overstocked by more than 30% and there is just no place to put everything. target just admitted it needs to right-size its inventory and plans include additional markdowns. the additional goods often end up at liquidators like bargain hunt that sales up to 70% offretail.
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but this time norm is seeing somebody different. >> it didn't make to it the stores. it's not dog-eared or wrinkled or ruffled having been on a shelf. >> every available space is filled with product. >> reporter: the inventory overload is even hitting small business owners like toy seller maryam al hammami. did you ever since you'd be in a position what target and walmart is going through? >> i remember thinking i'm glad aim not them, but then i realized i am them. >> reporter: her suppliers keep raising prices. so she is trying to store those extra product until demand comes back. >> it's a better option than purchasing it for 20% more next month. >> reporter: in retail analysts say the biggest bargains are still to come after labor day, but what about returns? well, retailers don't want to advertise this, but with all those full warehouses, in many case, customers are getting refunds, but the retailers are saying go ahead and keep the
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items. don't bother returning it. jericka? >> carter evans, definitely waiting until after labor day. thank you. we turn now to the fight against climate change. rising sea levels are threatening to wash away america's early history. jamestown, virginia was the first permanent english settlement in the new world, and it's now listed among the nation's most endangered historic sites. in tonight's "eye on america," cbs' kris van cleave takes us there to explain the mounting threat. >> reporter: fighting to save history. more than 400 years after the first european settlers arrived, jamestown, virginia is struggling to survive. not the passage of time but the ravage of climate change. >> we are concerned that if we don't take action, jamestown will be lost. >> reporter: what would america lose if this site is allowed to sink? >> i think part of its soul. >> reporter: elizabeth kostelny runs the nonprofit overseeing
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the colony's site and is now racing to save it from water. >> jamestown is incredibly important. it tells a national story about our per sentence, our democracy, and the beginnings of our race relations. >> reporter: the jamestown colony marked the start of representative government in the new world. it's where pocahantas married john rolfe. and it remains the site of hidden history waiting to be unearthed. how often do you find things of significance here? >> every single day. >> reporter: but the river is rising, up over 18 inches in the last century. and so-called 100-year storms now hit every five years. david givens is the director of archaeology. >> jamestown holds supreme in terms of world heritage. this place is in our minds where you draw the line in the sand about sea level climate rise and cultural heritage. >> reporter: that was shoring up the seawall with 96,000 tons of granite to help deflect the
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force of ever strengthening storms. but the biggest threat to jamestown isn't the rising river. it's this swamp that's literally devouring history as it grows. >> increasingly have water from both sides and below? >> we have it from both sides, below, above. we're getting attacked from all sides. >> reporter: leading jamestown's fight against climate change is michael lavin. >> we're going to have to raise buildings, raise roads, do salvage archaeology, put in berms, pump systems to truly save jamestown. >> reporter: but saving it will likely require tens of millions of dollars over the next five years to keep this american treasure from being washed away. for eye on america, i'm kris van cleave in jamestown, virginia. >> there is a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news." tennis superstar rafael nadal makes a stunning annou
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smell irreresistible.. the axe efeffect. i get blbladder leakaks. i i didn't wanant to feel l e i wawas wearing g the pads i wowore when i i was twelve. ththen i trieded the always d discreet papads. they fitit perfectlyly in the p places they'r're supposeded to. look how m much it hololds, and itit still statays thin! itit's the prorotection we deserveve! the abortion clinic at the heart of the supreme court case that overturned roe v. wade closed today. it was mississippi's only clinic. a judge refused the facility's request for a temporary restraining order. attorneys for the clinic are asking the state supreme court to block the law and let it reopen next week. well, tennis superstar rafael nadal pulled out of his upcoming semifinal match at wimbledon today. his problems started when nadal tore a muscle in his abdomen earlier in the tournament. he aggravated the injury during yesterday's quarterfinals. his family members in the stands urged him to stop during a
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medical time-out, but he played on to win. well, today he decided he couldn't keep going. up next, from athletes to civil rights leaders, 17 americans receive the nation (male) there are many voices in today's world. everyone is voicing their opinions about everything, and jesus is no exception to that. what if there was a clear voice telling you exactly who jesus is? (male announcer) join dr. david jeremiah as he teaches who jesus is and what that means for your life. tune in to dr. jeremiah's new series, "christ above all", on the next "turning point", right here on this station.
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17 extraordinary americans visited the white house today to receive the nation's highest civilian honor, the presidential medal of freedom. former congresswoman gabby giffords never stopped fighting, and today she and other honorees were draped with the medal of freedom. for giffords, it was a reminder that even after being shot at point-blank range 11 years ago, she continues to lead a campaign against gun violence. >> proof that we can channel the pain and sorrow we see too often in america into a movement that will prevail. >> reporter: from gold medalist megan rapinoe, the first soccer player to receive the honor, to simone biles, who's not only the
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most decorated american gymnast with 32 olympic and world championship medals, but also a powerful advocate for mental health and victims of sexual assault. >> you can do anything you put your mind to. and to just speak up, use your platforms, be authentic, be yourself. >> reporter: there was 91-year-old civil rights attorney fred gray, who represented rosa parks. >> one of the most important civil rights lawyers in our history. fred's legal brilliance and strategy desegregated schools and secured the right to vote. >> reporter: and paved the way for people like dr. julieta garcia, the first hispanic woman to serve as a college president. covid kept actor denzel washington from attending. >> this is america. >> reporter: but he along with the other medal recipients represent the genius, the hard work, the best of america. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us later for "cbs mornings" and follow us online any time at
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cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm jericka duncan. this is cbs news flash. i'm matt pieper in new york. japan's former prime minister shinzo abe has been shot. he was giving a speech outdoors at a campaign event at the time. japanese media reports that he was in heart failure and says the gunman made no attempt to get away, sitting down after firing two shots and is now in custody. the most transmissible variant yet of the coronavirus is threatening a fresh wave of infections in the united states. it comes as the european union medicines agency says many nations there are seeing a record number of cases. and sandra douglas morgan makes nfl history. she has been named the new
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president of the las vegas raiders, and with it she becomes the first black woman to hold the title with an nfl team. for more news, download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs news, new york. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> tonight british prime minister boris johnson is stepping down following months of scandals, but he's not laving right away. the embattled leader says he will stay on until his successor is chosen in early september. johnson's nearly three years in office have been plagued by controversy, including his handling of coronavirus and his hosting of alcohol-fueled government parties during the pandemic. the white house is closely watching who takes over and where that person stands on issues regarding the european union and other policies that
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directly impact the u.s. government. there are also indications that the uk support for ukraine will not change. the prime minister called president volodymyr zelenskyy today to reassure the leader that his country will continue to send military aid and support. cbs' charlie d'agata starts us off tonight from london. charlie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, jericka. it was an extraordinary day here at downing street. a day of political upheaval and drama played out on the most powerful street in the country. a prime minister who fought his entire career to be here now forced out of office, humiliated by his own party. in defeat and yet still defiant, boris johnson stepped up and stepped down. >> i want you to know how sad i am to be giving up the best job in the world. but them's the breaks. >> reporter: broken finally by a rebellion and rapid-fire resignations of more than 50
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members of his government. >> as we've seen at westminster, the herd instinct is powerful. when the herd moves, it moves. >> reporter: sunk by one scandal too many after it emerged that johnson knew about the sexual misconduct history of an employee he promoted and apparently lied about it. that triggered this week's avalanche. it may not be the end quite yet, but it's close, says political analyst john sokol. >> it's like trying to hold a greased piglet, he is so slippery. today the greased piglet has been turned into sliced bacon. >> reporter: the rule-bending rebel approach to life and politics that marked johnson's nearly three-year reign may have ultimately led to his downfall. the charismatic friend of the people who parlayed his promise to exit the european union to a landslide conservative victory, a lead squandered by a series of
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scandals, accusations of lying, and political blunders. today's speech didn't offer any apologies, no contrition, a resignation speech that somehow avoided the word "resignation." instead, a list of the pm's greatest hits. >> delivering the fastest vaccine roll-out in europe, the fastest exit from lockdown, and in the last few months, leading the west in standing up to putin's aggression in ukraine. >> reporter: yet even as boris johnson exits the stage, the intrigue and drama continues. the prime minister said today that he would stay until his successor is chosen. that could be in the fall. but many in his party want the prime minister to leave number 10 immediately. jericka? >> memorable figure for sure. charlie d'agata in london tonight, thank you. wnba star brittney griner pleaded guilty today to drug charges inside a moscow area courtroom. she's been detained since
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february after vape canisters with cannabis oil were allegedly found in her luggage. here is cbs' caitlin huey-burns. >> reporter: pleading guilty to drug charges in russian court, griner said she accidentally packed cannabis oil in her bag. >> i would like to plead guilty on the charges. i had no intention on breaking any russian law. >> reporter: the wnba star has been in russian custody since february, and pressure is now building on the biden administration to bring her home. >> we are not ever going to be quiet until she's home safely. >> reporter: the president responded to a letter griner wrote him from prison pleading for action. he called griner's wife wednesday, telling her he is working to secure brittney's release as soon as possible, as well as paul whelan and other u.s. nationals that are wrongfully detained. but the whelan family is still waiting for their call from the president. >> presidential calls are not
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dispositive. they're not what's going to result in your family member being released. and then they do it for some people and not for others. >> griner's guilty plea. what kind of impact does this have on the negotiations to try to bring her home? >> it will have no impact on negotiations. we're going to do everything that we can to bring home brittney griner safely and also make sure that we bring paul whelan back home as well. >> reporter: jonathan franks is a consultant that worked on the release of marine veteran trevor reed in a prisoner swap earlier this year. >> a number of strategic reasons why people would enter a guilty plea, even if they are in fact innocent. that may be what happened here. >> reporter: griner's legal team hopes that her guilty plea will lead to a less severe sentence, and they also hope the court takes into account her contributions to russian sport, adding that she wanted to take responsibility for her actions. jericka? >> all right. we'll see if this strategy works. thank you, caitlin.
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well, now to the passing of a hollywood icahn. actor james caan. tonight tributes are pouring in on social media from fans and fellow actors. cbs' mark strassmann looks back on a legendary career that spanned six decades. >> reporter: sonny corleone, the godfather's oldest son was volatile. >> you got to get up close like this, ba-da-bing! >> reporter: but james caan the actor was versatile and surprisingly vulnerable as barbra streisand's husband in "funny lady," john wayne's cowboy sidekick in "el dorado" and the father of an elf. >> you look like you came from the north pole. >> that's exactly where i came from! >> i fought always to never be the same person. i wanted never to be the same person. >> reporter: a tough kid from new york city, caan played football at michigan state. acting he tried on an impulse. millions watched him in "brian's song," the 1971 made for tv movie about two chicago bears
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teammates, one black, one white, dying from cancer. >> i'll see you tomorrow. >> if you say so. >> reporter: caan could be self-destructive. a cocaine addiction, near financial ruin, four marriages. but he always fought back from misery. >> the profanity bothers you? >> it has no nobility. >> reporter: when he played a hobbled writer held hostage by a crazed fan. >> see what you made me do! >> reporter: caan also liked to tweet candid photos from movie sets, which felt like home to him. >> i enjoy working. i have a lot of laughs and i get respect too sometimes. >> reporter: james caan was 82. mark strassmann, cbs news, atlanta.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> i'm scott macfarlane in washington. thank you for staying with us. summer is here, and across the nation, millions of young athletes are gearing up for football and soccer training camps. but there is a growing concern among parents that these sports could cause long-term damage to their kids. earlier this week, the family of the late nfl star demaryius thomas revealed he had signs of the degenerative brain condition cte when he died in december. now the family of the late soccer star scott vermilion is
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talking about his cte diagnosis, which came after he died nearly two years ago. he was 44 years old. it was the first public diagnosis of the disease in a former major league soccer player. 13 million american children play soccer, and some medidical researchers say even mild but respective hits to the head can be a risk. dr. jon lapook has the story. >> reporter: scott vermilion played five seasons for major league soccer teams. >> vermilion, trying to slide it, releasing. >> reporter: including his hometown kansas city wizards and dc united. he was also a devoted father to his two children, eva grace and braden. what was it like with you dad when you were young or growing up? >> he was quick witted. he was compassionate. >> when we were younger he was more outgoing and happier as person. >> reporter: at age 5, vermilion started playing soccer. from the very start, he was a
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standout. how many goals would he score? >> by halftime, he'd have six or seven. >> reporter: this is where scott played? >> it is. >> reporter: scott's father watched his son reach the heights of soccer. at age 26, an ankle injury ended his career. but scott seemed to be moving forward with a new career in nursing. looking back, was there a moment that his personality changed? >> yeah. there was something off:00 the way he was acting. >> reporter: did you ever link the changes in his personality and in his behavior to his soccer career? >> no, no. >> reporter: dave vermilion says his son started drinking too much and abusing the painkillers he was taking for his injury. over the next decade, scott tried rehab several times but kept relapsing. and what would he say? >> he would say dad, i have to take care of this myself. and i said, well, you're not taking care of it yourself. >> poppa's. >> yep. >> reporter: the change was obvious to his ex-wife and their
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two children. >> the things that he promised he would be there for were like life-changing big moments for us. he said he was going to brigham's graduation and didn't show because he said he had to work. >> reporter: how did you find out that he had died? >> i first found out -- it was on christmas. >> reporter: in december 2020, a friend found scott vermilion in his house. he was not breathing. >> my stepdad aaron called me up. i kind of knew right away, everyone was crying. >> reporter: vermilion had died from a combination of alcohol and muscle relaxers. the family began to suspect that the game he loved had damaged his brain. they turned to dr. anne mckee, director of boston university's center for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. >> or cte. >> that wasn't normal for a 44-year-old man. >> reporter: dr. key found an abnormal protein suggestive of cte in areas of vermilion's brain that control memory and organization of thought. >> it's cte and only cte. that was the only thing that was
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wrong with his brain. >> reporter: dr. mckee believes concussions are not the only cause of cte. >> those balls are coming from a great distance at a tremendous velocity, and that impacts the head and causes rapid acceleration, deceleration and rotation to the brain. the professionals have longer years of exposure, but kids, kids who play high school sports, they're at risk for these changes. >> reporter: dave vermilion says during scott's many years of playing soccer, he had only one concussion. substance abuse and unexplained personality changes are early signs of cte. >> they can't control their brain. and they start isolating themselves from people who care about them. we see hundreds of cases. why aren't we doing more to prevent this? >> reporter: major league soccer, which governs the professional teams vermilion played for declined our request for an on camera interview. when we asked about their protocols for blows to the head
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that don't cause concussions, the league said it follows the up to date science and cited its spotter program to identify head injuries and removing from play any player with a suspected head injury. for scott vermilion's family, the report from boston university brings some answers but also regrets. >> i wish in those four years that this was going on i could have spent more time with him and been a little bit, again, more compassionate. >> there is definitely some closure there, though. >> yeah. >> reporter: how so? >> just knowing the fact that his brain wasn't like processing the way a normal person would process. it's not like he intentionally was doing this. he wanted to get help. he wanted to be there for us. he was just sick and had this disease. >> the gift that the vermilion family has given us with her openness and sharing their story with us is awareness. it's so important that that
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you saidid that you u would se yourur eyebrow o off for a #klolondike ( ( ding ) ( shaving g buzz ) oooooooh. ( all laugughing ) ♪♪ what woululd you do for a klondikeke ♪ onone prilosecec otc in the m morning blocksks excess acacid productn for a fufull 24 hoururs. unlike pepepcid, which ststops workining aft. 2424 hour prototection. prilososec otc one e pill, 24 h hours, zero h heartburn.. ♪ the pop music band coldplay is in the middle of a world concert tour. this summer they're in europe. if you happen to be in poland tonight, they'll be on stage in
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warsaw. in addition to catchy tunes, the emmy award winners are at the forefront of making their music accecessible to people with disabilities. nate burleson sat down with the band before their schedule took them overseas. >> repororter: their sound, it unmistakable. ♪ i used to t the rule ♪ > reporter: a and their relatitionship with their fans undeniablele. ♪ it's part of what makes coldplay resonate in nearly every corner of the globe. >> well, 20 years ago, we first came to america and we got bottled on stage. >> reporter: like literally? >> yeah. someone threw their keys. >> reporter: they didn't even want to drive home? >> exactly. >> or maybe it's someone else's key. >> that's probably true. ♪ i swam across, i jumped across for you ♪ >> reporter: but those days are
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long behind them. the british rockers who burst on the scene in america more than two decades ago have a worldwide reach like few other modern bands. ♪ how long before i get in, before it starts, before i begin ♪ >> reporter: they've sold more than 100 million records. winners of seven grammys, have charted 24 top ten tips and have been a beacon for gay rights, environmental protection and philanthropy. inclusion is a big part of coldplay's message. >> i'm thrilled. >> reporter: just ask fan mike rivera. >> i've been following coldplay for over 20 years, and my wife and i got married in california and saw a show there. and now we're back here, and i'm here with my two children. >> reporter: he is a loving husband and father who is hard of hearing. >> coldplay means a lot for us. for them to be providing interpreters, the light show, the subpacks, all of this accessibility for the community is very exciting.
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>> you guys are doing something very special for the deaf and the hard of hearing community, which is giving them a new type of way to experience the music, the subpack. >> my partner, she said i got you a christmas present of a subpack. she said it's like what a f finnious eilish wears on stage. it's useful for someone like phineas to hear where the bass drum is, literally boom, boom. ♪ >> reporter: what type of feedback have you been getting from the deaf and the hard of hearing community? >> it's been pretty incredible to hear that people are coming and feeling part of a big community. and that's, you know, if we have one aim, that is that feeling of togetherness. >> reporter: coldplay started offering the subpack vests to fans on their current "music of the spheres" global tour.
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the company has been working with the deaf community for years, using their technology to help unlock the power of music. ♪ >> reporter: and coldplay has been providing sign language interpreters at their shows. >> music is waves, right? you can hear them, but you can also feel them. ♪ >> reporter: leo champion has been on the drums for coldplay for more than 20 years. >> makes us feel really extremely proud, also a little emotional because you hear wonderful stories about families who wouldn't ever think about going to a show because they're hearing impaired or deaf. >> it's crazy to be able to enjoy something like this with my dad on the same level as my friends can with their dad. a and the fact thahat cololdpla spearheadingng this is a hugugep in thehe rigight directionon. that makes me really excited for the future. ♪ >> repororter: coldldplay's actm has been consistent for years, and the band that once called themselves starfish traced their origins back to london in the
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mid-'90s, where music was all that mattered. you guys have been together since university. could you have ever imagined? the fame, the fortune, the record sales? or was it just about making good music? >> i mean, the first day i met chris and we started playing together, i did think this is maybe the best thing i have ever been involved in. >> reporter: johnny chris said meeting you was like falling in love. ♪ i'll be there by your side just to try and stop me ♪ >> reporter: and that connection is evident. is that a big part of why coldplay works so well? >> i think it's the main reason, absolutely. >> i think what makes a really good band is the chemistry. ♪ i feel your course in my blood ♪ >> it's the bad news bears when it's a team of not that amazing players, but something works in the chemistry. we've learned from people a bit before us, the u thes and the police and all those bands we
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look to what keeps bands together and what doesn't, and how do we resespect the chchemi? becaususe that seeeems to o be only thing we really have uniquely. ♪ > reporter: we talked about inclusiv inclusivity, promoting togetherness. what you guys are promoting is so needed on a very human level. is that a big part of where you guys are as a band today? >> i think that the world we really believe in is one wherer youu can havave extreremely dift tatastes but coco-exist. ♪ >> people can get convinced to be afraid of that group because they're different. >> reporter: of course. >> and the truth is we're really not that different to you. that sort of philosophy has grown with us. >> reporter: 1998 burleson with coldplay. the "overnight news" is back in two minutes.
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the move to go green is now taking hold in the world of retail food. anthony pera went shopping at the zero waste grocery store. >> reporter: the mighty bin market offers groceries without the prepackaged plastic. isabelle de milan opened the zero waste plastic-free grocery store in san diego as an option for environmentally conscious consumers like her. >> i tried really hard to go to regular grocery stores and find things not in packaging as well as nontoxic products. and it was just such a mission to find. >> reporter: but in here, customers can find many traditional grocery items as well as personal care and household products.
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they're stored in large bins and glass dispensers, meaning shoppers will need one of these to cut them in. customers can buy jars from the store. they can get a donated one or bring their own which can then be reused and refilled. like many grocery stores like this one are starting to pop up across the country, it's still very nitsche. cora chaffin is a food industry consultant. i think you're going to see more coming up in certain geographic areas where you have higher urban density and a consumer who is willing to go through greater inconvenience for that. >> reporter: he says the zero-free waste grocery stores face is changing human behavior. >> you may be tempted to shop in a certain is way, you're going to go with what's most price effective and convenient for you. >> it's going to be a learning curve. once you get a hang of it, people have told me they really enjoy this form of catching. >> reporter: de milan believes it can catch on.
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anthony pera, cbs news, san diego, california. >> and that's the "overnight news" news for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back later for cbs mornings, and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm scott macfarlane. this is cbs news flash. i'm matt pieper in new york. japan's former prime minister shinzo abe has been shot. he was giving a speech outdoors at a campaign event at the time. japanese media reports that he was in heart failure and says the gunman made no attempt to get away, sitting down after firing two shots and is now in custody. the most transmissible variant yet of the coronavirus is threatening a fresh wave of infections in the united states. it comes as the european union medicines agency says many nations there are seeing a record number of cases. and sandra douglas morgan makes nfl history. she has been named the new president of the las vegas raiders, and with it she becomes
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the first black woman to hold the title with an nfl team. for more news, download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs n s, new tonight, after mounting pressure from his own party, british prime minister boris johnson resigns. what it means for the united states and the war in ukraine. it's political turmoil for america's closest ally. why a defiant johnson ultimately agreed to step down, but the scandal-plagued leader isn't apologizing. brittney griner pleads guilty. we hear from the wnba star at her russian n court appeararanc. why the surprise plea may be a part of a larger strategy to get her out of prison. charges for the suspect's father? as the fbi loads strollers and chairs left on the parade route into a u-haul, the new questions tonight about the dad of the
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confessed shooter. does he bear responsibility for helping his son obtain a gun. breaking news. derek chauvin sentenced. a federal judge gives the former officer 21 years for violating george floyd's civil rights. remembering a hollywood icon. "the godfather" star james caan dies after a six-decade career. cbs' carter evans has a story about why you could see lower prices on your next purchase. and honoring great americans. the 17 civilians awarded the presidential medal of freedom at the white house. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> tonight british prime minist boris johnson is stepping down following months of scandals, but he's not leaving right away.
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the embattled leader says he will stay on until his successor is chosen in early september. johnson's nearly three years in office have been plagued by controversy, including his handling of coronavirus and his hosting of alcohol-fueled government parties during the pandemic. the white house is closely watching who takes over and where that person stands on issues regarding the european union and other policies that directly impact the u.s. government. there are also indications that the uk support for ukraine will not change. the prime minister called president volodymyr zelenskyy today to reassure the leader that his country will continue to send military aid and support. cbs' charlie d'agata starts us off tonight from london. charlie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, jericka. it was an extraordinary day here at downing street. a day of political upheaval and drama played out on the most powerful street in the country. a prime minister who fought his
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entire career to be here now forced out of office, humiliated by his own party. in defeat and yet still defiant, boris johnson stepped up and stepped down. >> i want you to know how sad i am to be giving up the best job in the world. but them's the breaks. >> r reporter: broken finally ba rebellion and rapid-fire resignations of more than 50 members of his government. >> as we've seen at westminster, the herd instinct is powerful. when the herd moves, it moves. >> reporter: sunk by one scandal too many after it emerged that johnson knew about the sexual misconduct history of an employee he promoted and apparently lied about it. that triggered this week's avalanche. it may not be the end quite yet, but it's close, says political analyst john sokol. >> it's like trying to hold a greased piglet, he is so slippery. today the greased piglet has
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been turned into sliced bacon. >> reporter: the rule-bending rebel approach to life and politics that marked johnson's nearly three-year reign may have ultimately led to his downfall. the charismatic friend of the people who parlayed his promise to exit the european union to a landslide conservative victory, a lead squandered by a series of scandals, accusations of lying, and political blunders. today's speech didn't offer any apologies, no contrition, a resignation speech that somehow avoided the word "resignation." instead, a list of the pm's greatest hits. >> delivering the fastest vaccine roll-out in europe, the fastest exit from lockdown, and in the last few months, leading the west in standing up to putin's aggression in ukraine. >> reporter: yet even as boris johnson exits the stage, the
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intrigue and drama continues. the prime minister said today that he would stay until his successor is chosen. that could be in the fall. but many in his party want the prime minister to leave number 10 immediately. jericka? >> memorable figure for sure. charlie d'agata in london tonight, thank you. wnba star brittney griner pleaded guilty today to drug charges inside a moscow area courtroom. she's been detained since february after vape canisters with cannabis oil were allegedly found in her luggage. here is cbs' caitlin huey-burns. >> reporter: pleading guilty to drug charges in russian court, griner said she accidentally packed cannabis oil in her bag. >> i would like to plead guilty on the charges. i had no intention on breaking any russian law. >> reporter: the wnba star has been in russian custody since february, and pressure is now building on the biden administration to bring her home. >> we are not ever going to be
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quiet until she's home safely. >> reporter: the president responded to a letter griner wrote him from prison pleading for action. he called griner's wife wednesday, telling her he is working to secure brittney's release as soon as possible, as well as the release of paul whelan and other u.s. nationals who are wrongfully detained. but the whelan family is still waiting for their call from the president. >> you know, the white house says on the one hand, presidential calls, presidential meetings are not dispositive. they're not what's going to result in your family member being released. and then they do it for some people and not for others. >> griner's guilty plea. what kind of impact does this have on the negotiations to try toe bring her home? >> it will have no impact on negotiations. we're going to do everything that we can to bring home brittney griner safely and also to be sure that we bring paul whelan back as well. >> reporter: jonathan franks is a crisis management consultant who worked on the release of
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marine veteran trevor reed in a prisoner swap earlier this year. >> a number of strategic reasons why people would enter a guilty plea, even if they are in fact innocent. that may be what happened here. >> reporter: griner's legal team hopes that her guilty plea will lead to a less severe sentence, and they also hope the court takes into account her contributions to russian sport, adding that she wanted to take responsibility for her actions. jericka? >> all right. we'll see if this strategy works. thank you, caitlin. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> the community of highland park, illinois is rallying together three days after that july 4th parade shooting. tonight there are new questions about whether the suspect's father could be held responsible for helping his son obtain the rifle used in the massacre. we're also learning more about some of the survivors, including one of the youngest victims. cbs' adriana diaz has more. >> reporter: the bullet that pierced 8-year-old cooper roberts' chest severed his spine.
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family friend anthony loizzi struggled to describe his condition. >> he has undergone several surgeries since monday, including one last night during which doctors were finally able to close up his belly. >> reporter: cooper's mother was also shot in the leg. his twin brother hit by shrapnel. cooper, who loves sports, is now on a ventilator. >> they're not sure due to the severed spinal cord whether or not he'll be able to walk again in the future. >> reporter: days after the chaos, parts of the parade route are still frozen in time. today fbi agents loaded strollers, lawn chairs, and other items into a u-haul bound for a lost and found. >> it's so beautiful what people did. >> reporter: this memorial was built today. >> she became part of their lives. >> reporter: larry spatz knew jacki sundheim well. this is his daughter two decades ago in sundheim's preschool class. sundheim became his daughter's close friend and confidante. >> my daughter is devastated.
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we were supporting her but we were hurting. my wife and i were also hurting. >> reporter: a community devastated but determined. students spent the day making shirts with a message of strength. >> what can we do? we had to take action to not only heal personally, but also help heal the community. >> reporter: a community now streaming to this vietnam memorial honoring fallen soldiers and now those killed at a celebration of our freedom. little cooper's family launched a gofundme to help with medical bills. as for the investigation, there are now new questions about whether the suspect's father could be liable. he cosigned his son's gun application and reportedly insists he did nothing wrong. jericka? >> adriana diaz, thank you. former minneapolis police officer derek chauvin was sentenced on federal civil rights charges today in the murder of george floyd. chauvin got 21 years to run concurrently with his state sentence. the 46-year-old addressed the floyd family, saying he wished
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them all the best in their life. chauvin sparked international outrage two years ago when he killed george floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes during an arrest. well, now to the passing of a hollywood icon. actor james caan. tonight tributes are pouring in on social media from fans and his fellow actors. cbs' mark strassmann looks back on a legendary career that spanned six decades. >> reporter: sonny corleone, the godfather's oldest son was volatile. >> you got to get up close like this, ba-da-bing! >> reporter: but james caan the actor was versatile and surprisingly vulnerable as barbra streisand's husband in "funny lady," john wayne's cowboy sidekick in "el dorado," and the father of an elf. >> you look like you came from the north pole. >> that's exactly where i came from! >> i fought always to never be the same person.
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i wanted never to be the same person. >> reporter: a tough kid from new york city, caan played football at michigan state. acting he tried on an impulse. millions watched him in "brian's song," the 1971 made for tv movie about two chicago bears teammates, one black, one white dying from cancer. >> i'll see you tomorrow. >> if you say so. >> reporter: caan could be self-destructive. a cocaine addiction, near financial ruin, four marriages. but he always fought back from misery. >> the profanity bothers you? >> it has no nobility. >> reporter: when he played a hobbled writer held hostage by a crazed fan. >> see what you made me do! >> reporter: caan also liked to tweet candid photos from movie sets, which felt like home to him. >> i enjoy working. i have a lot of laughs and i get respect too sometimes. >> reporter: james caan was 82. mark strassmann, cbs news, atlanta.
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♪♪♪ ♪♪♪ smelell irresiststible. the e axe effectct. i i get bladdeder leaks. i didndn't want toto feel lie i was wewearing the e pads i wore w when i was s twe. then i i tried thehe alalways discrcreet pads.. ththey fit pererfectly inin the placeces they're susupposed to.o. lookok how much h it holds, and it stitill stays t thin! it's t the protectction we d deserve! well, there is encouraging news for cash-strapped shoppers. after battling inflation for months, many shoppers are getting a big break as retailers take an unexpected approach. cbs' carter evans has details tonight in our money watch report. >> it's just racks on racks on racks of clearance. >> reporter: it's a big surprise for shoppers burdened by rising prices.
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>> is this really $6.64, was 21? >> reporter: deep discounts across the country. >> it's a retail armageddon. >> reporter: and retail consultant burt flickinger says that's good news for shoppers. >> biggest discounts consumer electronics, sporting goods, on apparel, clothes, accessories. >> reporter: it was cargo stuck in a traffic jam at sea during the pandemic. well, now those ships have come in at a time when inflation is forcing consumers to cut back. >> too many goods in too many stores chasing too few shoppers with too few dollars. >> reporter: he estimates some stores are overstocked by more than 30% and there is just no place to put everything. target just admitted it needs to right-size its inventory and the retailer's plans include additional markdowns. the additional goods often end up at liquidators like bargain hunt that sales up to 70% off retail. but this time norm rankin is seeing something different.
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>> the condition of the product. it's never left the case. it didn't make it to the stores. it's not dog-eared or wrinkled or ruffled having been on a shelf. >> every available space is filled with product. >> reporter: the inventory overload is even hitting small business owners like toy seller maryam al hammami. did you ever since you'd be in a position to understand what target and walmart are going through? >> my first thought was i'm glad i'm not them, right? but then all of the sudden i realized i am them. >> reporter: but she is not having a fire sale just yet. her suppliers keep raising prices, so she is trying to store those extra supplies until demand comes back. >> so sitting on product that i purchased for 20% less is a better option than purchasing it for 20% more next month. >> reporter: and retail analysts say the biggest bargains are still to come after labor day. but what about returns? well, retailers don't want to advertise this, but with all those full warehouses, in many case, customers are getting refunds, but the retailers are saying go ahead and keep the items. don't bother returning it. jericka?
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>> carter evans, definitely waiting until after labor day. thank you. we turn now to the fight against climate change. rising sea levels are threatening to wash away america's early history. jamestown, virginia was the first permanent english settlement in the new world, and it's now listed among the nation's most endangered historic sites. in tonight's "eye on america," cbs' kris van cleave takes us there to explain the mounting threat. >> reporter: fighting to save history. more than 400 years after the first european settlers arrived, jamestown, virginia is struggling to survive. not the passage of time but the ravage of climate change. >> we are concerned that if we don't take action, jamestown will be lost. >> reporter: what would america lose if this site is allowed to sink? >> i think part of its soul. >> reporter: elizabeth kostelny runs the nonprofit overseeing the colony's original 22 acres
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along the james river, and is now racing to save it from water. >> jamestown is incredibly important. it tells a national story about our persistence, our democracy and the beginnings of our race relations. >> reporter: the jamestown colony marked the start of representative government in the new world. it's where pocahantas married john rolfe. and it remains the site of hidden history waiting to be unearthed. how often do you find things of significance here? >> every single day. >> reporter: but the river is rising, up over 18 inches in the last century. and so-called 100-year storms now hit every five years. david givens is the director of archaeology. >> jamestown holds supreme in terms of world heritage. this place is in our minds where you draw the line in the sand about sea level rise climate change and cultural heritage. >> reporter: that was shoring up the seawall with 96,000 tons of granite to help deflect the force of ever strengthening storms. but the biggest threat to
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jamestown isn't actually the rising river. it's this swamp that's literally devouring history as it grows. you increasingly have water from both sides and below? >> we have it from both sides, below, above. we're getting attacked from all sides. >> reporter: leading jamestown's fight against climate change is michael lavin. >> we're going to have to raise buildings, raise roads, do salvage archaeology, put in berms, pump systems to truly save jamestown. >> reporter: but saving it will likely require tens of millions of dollars over the next five years to keep this american treasure from being washed away. for "eye on america," i'm kris van cleave in jamestown, virginia. >> there is a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news." tennis superstar rafael nadal makes a stunning announcement at wimbledon.
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100% more e stain remomova. crest. the e #1 toothpapaste brand in ameririca. yoyou said thahat you woululd e your eyeyebrow off for r a #klondikike ( dingng ) ( shshaving buzzzz ) ooooohoh. ( alall laughingng ) ♪ whahat would yoyou do fofor a klklondike ♪♪ the abortion clinic at the heart of the supreme court case that overturned roe v. wade closed today. it was mississippi's only clinic. a judge refused the facility's request for a temporary restraining order. attorneys for the clinic are asking the state supreme court to block the law and let it reopen next week. well, tennis superstar rafael nadal pulled out of his upcoming semifinal match at wimbledon today. his problems started when nadal tore a muscle in his abdomen earlier in the tournament. he aggravated the injury during yesterday's quarterfinals. his family members in the stands urged him to stop during a medical time-out, but he played
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on to win. well, today he decided he couldn't keep going. up next, from athletes to civil rights leaders, 17 americans receive the nation's highest civilian honor.
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17 extraordinary americans visited the white house today to receive the nation's highest civilian honor, the presidential medal of freedom. former congresswoman gabby giffords never stopped fighting, and today she and other honorees were draped with the medal of freedom. for giffords, it was a reminder that even after being shot at point-blank range 11 years ago, she continues to lead a campaign against gun violence. >> proof that we can channel the pain and sorrow we see too often in america into a movement that will prevail. >> reporter: from gold medalist megan rapinoe, the first soccer player to receive the honor, to simone biles, who's not only the most decorated american gymnast with 32 olympic and world
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championship medals, but also a powerful advocate for mental health and victims of sexual assault. >> you can do anything you put your mind to. and to just speak up, use your platforms, be authentic, be yourself. >> reporter: there was 91-year-old civil rights attorney fred gray, who represented rosa parks. >> one of the most important civil rights lawyers in our history. fred's legal brilliance and strategy desegregated schools and secured the right to vote. >> reporter: and paved the way for people like dr. julieta garcia, the first hispanic woman to serve as a college president. covid kept actor denzel washington from attending. >> this is america. >> reporter: but he along with the other medal recipients represent the genius, the hard work, the best of america. >> that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us later for "cbs mornings" and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's
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capital, i'm jericka duncan. this is cbs news flash. i'm matt pieper in new york. japan's former prime minister shinzo abe has been shot. he was giving a speech outdoors at a campaign event at the time. japanese media reports that he was in heart failure and says the gunman made no attempt to get away, sitting down after firing two shots and is now in custody. the most transmissible variant yet of the coronavirus is threatening a fresh wave of infections in the united states. it comes as the european union medicines agency says many nations there are seeing a record number of cases. and sandra douglas morgan makes nfl history. she has been named the new president of the las vegas
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raiders, and with it she becomes the first black woman to hold the title with an nfl team. for more news, download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs news, new it's friday, july 8th it's friday, july 8th, 2022. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking overnight, japan's former prime minister is shot during a campaign speech. what we know about his condition and the suspected gunman. protecting access to abortion. president biden will reportedly take executive action today just weeks after the supreme court ended the nationwide right to the procedure. and brittney griner pleads guilty to drug charges in russia. how that will impact efforts to bring her home. well, good morning, and good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. we begin with brng

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