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NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
image

eye 22,823

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This illustration shows the relative sizes of the Sun and the Earth by placing them impossibly close together.
Topics: What -- Sun, What -- Earth
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig07-012
NASA Images
by NASA/A. Hobart (CXO)
movies

eye 6,084

favorite 17

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This animation of a supernova explosion demonstrates what happens when a massive star explodes and creates a shell of hot gas that glows brightly in X-rays. These X-rays reveal the dynamics of the explosion.
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-15v3
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
movies

eye 501

favorite 2

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This artist's animation illustrates a massive asteroid belt in orbit around a star the same age and size as our Sun. Evidence for this possible belt was discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope when it spotted warm dust around the star, presumably from asteroids smashing together. The view starts from outside the belt, where planets like the one shown here might possibly reside, then moves into to the dusty belt itself. A collision between two asteroids is depicted near the end of the...
Topics: What -- Sun, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Constellation, What -- Puppis, What -- Venus,...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-10v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
movies

eye 585

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"The further on the edge, the hotter the intensity," sings Kenny Loggins in "Danger Zone," a song made famous by the movie "Top Gun". The same words ring true for young, cooler stars like our sun that live in the danger zones around scorching hot stars, called O-stars. The closer a young, maverick star happens to be to a super hot O-star, the more likely its burgeoning planets will be blasted into space. This artist's animation illustrates how this process works....
Topics: What -- Sun, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-08v2
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech
movies

eye 106

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NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is a galactic ghost buster, spotting hidden massive stars and other monsters lurking in our galaxy.
Topic: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-20v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
image

eye 123

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This artist's concept depicts a distant hypothetical solar system, similar to the one recently discovered with the Spitzer Space Telescope [ http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/happenings/20051214/index.shtml ]. In this artist's rendering, a narrow asteroid belt filled with rocks and dusty debris, orbits a star similar to our own Sun when it was approximately 30 million years old (about the time Earth formed). Within the belt a hypothetical planet also circles the star. Using the Spitzer's...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Sun, What -- Earth, What -- Saturn, What -- Jupiter
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig05-027
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
image

eye 16,391

favorite 3

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This artist's concept shows what the very early universe might have looked like, just after its first stars began bursting onto the scene. Scientists theorize that the universe arose around 13.7 billion years ago in an explosion known as the Big Bang. Almost instantaneously afterward, matter began clumping together due to quantum fluctuations. Gravity kicked in next, causing those clumps to grow into larger clouds of invisible hydrogen gas (colored blue here). Eventually, around 200 to 400...
Topics: What -- Sun, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-22b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
movies

eye 260

favorite 3

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This artist's concept animation shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two "hot Jupiter" worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system. The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into...
Topics: What -- Jupiter, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Visible Light, What -- Constellation,...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-04v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
image

eye 95

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This artist's concept shows a brown dwarf surrounded by a swirling disk of planet-building dust. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope spotted such a disk around a surprisingly low-mass brown dwarf, or "failed star."¯_ The brown dwarf, called OTS 44, is only 15 times the size of Jupiter, making it the smallest brown dwarf known to host a planet-forming, or protoplanetary disk. Astronomers believe that this unusual system will eventually spawn planets. If so, they speculate that OTS 44's...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- OTS, What -- Jupiter, What -- Earth
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-06b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
movies

eye 655

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This artist's animation depicts the explosive death of a massive star, followed by the creation of a disk made up of the star's ashes. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was able to see the warm glow of such a dusty disk using its heat-seeking infrared vision. Astronomers believe planets might form in this dead star's disk, like the mythical Phoenix rising up out of the ashes. The movie begins by showing a dying massive star called a red giant. This bloated star is about 15 times more massive than...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Phoenix, What -- Sun, What -- Constellation, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-10v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/L. Cieza (UT Austin)
image

eye 101

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Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or "protoplanetary disk," that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars. Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called, Polycyclic Aromatic...
Topics: What -- Serpens, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Earth, What -- Constellation, Where --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig06-026
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
movies

eye 799

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This artist's animation illustrates the universe's early years, from its explosive formation to its dark ages to its first stars and mini-galaxies. Scientists using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found patches of infrared light splattered across the sky that might be the collective glow of clumps of the universe's first objects. Astronomers do not know if these first objects were stars or "quasars," which are black holes voraciously consuming surrounding gas. The movie begins with a...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Sun, Where -- Milky Way Galaxy
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-22v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
movies

eye 479

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NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope finds a delicate flower in the Ring Nebula, as shown in this animation. The outer shell of this planetary nebula looks surprisingly similar to the delicate petals of a camellia blossom. A planetary nebula is a shell of material ejected from a dying star. Located about 2,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra, the Ring Nebula is also known as Messier Object 57 and NGC 6720. It is one of the best examples of a planetary nebula and a favorite target of...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Earth, What -- Constellation, What -- Lyra, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-07v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/K. Gordon (Univ. of Ariz.) & GALEX Science
image

eye 215

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The many "personalities" of our great galactic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, are exposed in this new composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The wide, ultraviolet eyes of Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveal Andromeda's "fiery" nature -- hotter regions brimming with young and old stars. In contrast, Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes show Andromeda's relatively "cool" side, which includes embryonic stars hidden in...
Topics: What -- Andromeda, What -- Galaxy Evolution Explorer, What -- Explorer, What -- Spitzer Space...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig06-024
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
image

eye 101

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This artist concept depicts a quadruple-star system called HD 98800. The system is approximately 10 million years old, and is located 150 light-years away in the constellation TW Hydrae. HD 98800 contains four stars, which are paired off into doublets, or binaries. The stars in the binary pairs orbit around each other, and the two pairs also circle each other like choreographed ballerinas. One of the stellar pairs, called HD 98800B, has a disk of dust around it, while the other pair does not....
Topics: What -- Constellation, What -- Sun, What -- Pluto, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig07-013
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
movies

eye 185

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This artist's concept of Tempel 1 illustrates the comet's shape, reflectivity, rotation rate and surface temperature, based on information from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope. Measurements from the Great Observatories indicate that the comet is a matte black object roughly 14 by 4 kilometers (8.7 by 2.5 miles), or about one-half the size of Manhattan. It rotates about once every 41 hours. The sunlit side of the nucleus is glowing warmly, and the nightside is about the...
Topics: What -- COMETS, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Sun
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-13v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
movies

eye 261

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This artist's animation depicts a faraway solar system like our own -- except for one big difference. Planets and asteroids circle around not one, but two suns. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such solar systems might be common in the universe. The movie begins by showing two snug, sun-like stars. It then pans out to show an Earth-like planet and a surrounding disk of asteroids and comets. Spitzer did not see any planets directly, but it detected dust that is kicked up from...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Sun, What -- Earth, What -- COMETS
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-05v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech
movies

eye 278

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The first images from the Spitzer Space Telescope, the fourth element of NASA's Great Observatories program.
Topic: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2003-06v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/M. Morris (UCLA)
image

eye 94

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The double helix nebula. The spots are infrared-luminous stars, mostly red giants and red supergiants. Many other stars are present in this region, but are too dim to appear even in this sensitive infrared image. The double helix nebula is approximately 300 light-years from the enormous black hole at the center of the Milky Way. (The Earth is more than 25,000 light-years from the black hole at the galactic center.) This false-color image was taken by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer...
Topics: What -- Earth, What -- MIPS
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig06-004
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Megeath (University of Toledo)
image

eye 119

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This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Orion nebula, our closest massive star-making factory, 1,450 light-years from Earth. The nebula is close enough to appear to the naked eye as a fuzzy star in the sword of the popular hunter constellation. The nebula itself is located on the lower half of the image, surrounded by a ring of dust. It formed in a cold cloud of gas and dust and contains about 1,000 young stars. These stars illuminate the cloud, creating the beautiful...
Topics: What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Orion, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-16a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
movies

eye 274

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This movie shifts from the well-known visible-light picture of Messier 104 taken by the Hubble Space Telescope to infrared views from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Messier 104 is commonly known as the Sombrero galaxy because in visible light, it resembles the broad-brimmed Mexican hat. However, in Spitzer's striking infrared view, the galaxy looks more like a "bull's eye." Viewed from Earth, the spiral galaxy is seen nearly edge-on, just six degrees away from its equatorial plane....
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC),...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-11v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/J. Hora (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
image

eye 210

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The Helix Nebula, which is composed of gaseous shells and disks puffed out by a dying sunlike star, exhibits complex structure on the smallest visible scales. In this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, infrared light at wavelengths of 3.2, 4.5, and 8.0 microns has been colored blue, green, and red (respectively). The color saturation also has been increased to intensify hues. The "cometary knots" show blue-green heads due to excitation of their molecular material from...
Topic: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-01a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
image

eye 86

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This artist's concept shows microscopic crystals in the dusty disk surrounding a brown dwarf, or "failed star." The crystals, made up of a green mineral found on Earth called olivine, are thought to help seed the formation of planets. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected the tiny crystals circling around five brown dwarfs, the cooler and smaller cousins of stars. Though crystallized minerals have been seen in space before -- in comets and around other stars -- the discovery...
Topics: What -- Earth, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- COMETS, What -- Discovery
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-21b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
image

eye 62

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These artist's concepts of Tempel 1 simulate an optical view of the comet (left), next to the simulated infrared view (right). The images illustrate the comet's shape, reflectivity, rotation rate and surface temperature, based on information from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope. Measurements from the Great Observatories indicate that the comet is a matte black object roughly 14 by 4 kilometers (8.7 by 2.5 miles), or about one-half the size of Manhattan. Spitzer detects...
Topics: What -- COMETS, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-13a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
movies

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This artist's animation illustrates the hottest planet yet observed in the universe. The scorching ball of gas, a "hot Jupiter" called HD 149026b, is a sweltering 3,700 degrees Fahrenheit (2,040 degrees Celsius) -- about three times hotter than the rocky surface of Venus, the hottest planet in our solar system. The planet is so hot that astronomers believe it is absorbing almost all of the heat from its star, and reflecting very little to no light. Objects that reflect no sunlight are...
Topics: What -- Jupiter, What -- Venus, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Visible Light, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-09v1w
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech)
movies

eye 106

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This 18-second animation zooms in on Herbig-Haro 46/47 and its embedded protostar with molecular outflows. Spitzer/IRAC lifts the cosmic veil and transforms the dark and opaque cloud seen at visible light wavelengths to a spectacular view of a previously unseen protostar and its bipolar outflows.
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2003-06v4
NASA Images
by NOAO; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech/C. Engelbracht (University of Arizona)
image

eye 63

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This image composite compares a visible-light view (left) of the "Cigar galaxy" to an infrared view from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of the same galaxy. While the visible image shows a serene galaxy looking cool as a cucumber, the infrared image reveals a smokin' hot "cigar." The visible-light picture of the Cigar galaxy, also called Messier 82, shows only a bar of light against a dark patch of space. Longer exposures of the galaxy (not pictured here) have revealed...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-09a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
movies

eye 318

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This artist's animation shows a brown dwarf surrounded by a swirling disk of planet-building dust. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope spotted such a disc around a surprisingly low-mass brown dwarf, or "failed star." The brown dwarf, called OTS 44, is only 15 times the size of Jupiter, making it the smallest brown dwarf known to host a planet-forming, or protoplanetary disk. Astronomers believe that this unusual system will eventually spawn planets. If so, they speculate that OTS 44's disk...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- OTS, What -- Jupiter, What -- Earth
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-06v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Bourke (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA) & c2d Legacy Team
image

eye 65

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Two rambunctious young stars are destroying their natal dust cloud with powerful jets of radiation, in an infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The stars are located approximately 600 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called BHR 71. In visible light (left panel), BHR 71 is just a large black structure. The burst of yellow light toward the bottom of the cloud is the only indication that stars might be forming inside. In infrared light (center panel), the baby stars are shown as...
Topics: What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Visible Light
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig07-005
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech
movies

eye 504

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This artist's animation shows the explosion of a massive star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that the star exploded with some degree of order, preserving chunks of its onion-like layers as it blasted apart. Cassiopeia A is what is known as a supernova remnant. The original star, about 15 to 20 times more massive than our sun, died in a cataclysmic "supernova" explosion viewable from Earth about 340 years ago. The remnant is...
Topics: What -- Cassiopeia, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Sun, What -- Earth, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-19v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC-Caltech)
movies

eye 442

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This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed "Sedna," in relation to the rest of the Solar System. Starting at the inner Solar System, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna...
Topics: What -- Sedna, What -- Mercury, What -- Venus, What -- Earth, What -- Mars, What -- Pluto, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-05v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
movies

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This animation begins with a stunning false-color picture of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. It is made up of images taken by three of NASA's Great Observatories, using three different wavebands of light. Infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope are colored red; visible data from the Hubble Space Telescope are yellow; and X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory are green and blue. Located 10,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia, Cassiopeia A is the...
Topics: What -- Cassiopeia, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-14v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/M. L. Giroux (East Tennessee State University)
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High resolution images from NASA's Spitzer infrared telescope and GALEX ultraviolet telescope show the difference in the distribution of young and old stars in the Arp 65 pair of interacting galaxies. In the short-wavelength infrared at 3.6 microns (first image), cool old stars are bright, so the beautiful grand design spiral patterns in the old stellar disks are visible. In contrast, at longer infrared wavelengths, at 8 microns, bright clumps of young stars are detected (second image). The...
Topics: What -- GALEX, Where -- Minnesota
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig05-005
NASA Images
by OPO/STScI
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Professor Lyman Spitzer, Jr. mountain climbing in the 1950s in the Swiss Alps above Zermatt, Switzerland. Both Professor Spitzer and his wife, Doreen, climbed the Matterhorn.
Topic: Where -- Switzerland
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2003-05b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/N. Smith (UC Berkeley)
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A Luminous Blue Variable star (inset) in our galaxy, named HD168625, surrounded by a bipolar nebula that is similar to the one around SN1987A. SN1987A was a supernova that exploded in 1987 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and was the nearest supernova in about 400 years. The diagram explains the bipolar nebula around HD168625, which has a geometry that makes it a near twin of the famous nebula around SN1987A. Rings near the equator are sometimes seen around stars that shed mass from their...
Topics: What -- Earth, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig07-003
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/M. Hancock (E. Tenn. State Univ.)
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A pair of interacting galaxies might be experiencing the galactic equivalent of a mid-life crisis. For some reason, the pair, called Arp 82, didn't make their stars early on as is typical of most galaxies. Instead, they got a second wind later in life -- about 2 billion years ago -- and started pumping out waves of new stars as if they were young again. Arp 82 is an interacting pair of galaxies with a strong bridge and a long tail. NGC 2535 is the big galaxy and NGC 2536 is its smaller...
Topics: What -- Galaxy Evolution Explorer, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Explorer
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig07-002
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/G. Melnick (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
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In the quest to better understand the birth of stars and the formation of new worlds, astronomers have used NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to examine the massive stars contained in a cloudy region called Sharpless 140. This cloud is a fascinating microcosm of a star-forming region since it exhibits, within a relatively small area, all of the classic manifestations of stellar birth. Sharpless 140 lies almost 3000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cepheus. At its heart is a cluster of...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Earth, What -- Constellation, What -- Cepheus, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-07a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Kennicutt (University of Arizona) and the SINGS Team
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On August 25, 2003, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope blasted into the same dark skies it now better understands. In just two years, the observatory's infrared eyes have uncovered a hidden universe teeming with warm stellar embryos, chaotic planet-forming disks, and majestic galaxies, including the delightfully odd galaxy called NGC 4725 shown here. This peculiar galaxy is thought to have only one spiral arm. Most spiral galaxies have two or more arms. Astronomers refer to NGC 4725 as a ringed...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Constellation, What...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig05-011
NASA Images
by NASA/ESA/R. Sankrit and W. Blair (Johns Hopkins University)
image

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These images represent views of Kepler's supernova remnant taken in X-rays, visible light, and infrared radiation. Each top panel shows the entire remnant. Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. Astronomers have color-coded those data so they can be seen in these images. The bottom panels are close-up views of the remnant. In the bottom, center image,...
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-15b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
image

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What does an extremely young planetary system look like? The answer depends on your point of view -- literally! Astronomers are very interested in the chemical composition of the inner regions of discs around young stars; after all, our own solar system formed from similar material. To probe the chemistry of different regions in the disc, you have to view the system at just the right angle. In nature, stars are randomly oriented on the sky, so even though astronomers may be looking at similar...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-20d
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/C. Beichman (Caltech)
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This graph of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicates that stars with known planets (blue) are more likely to have "debris disks" than stars without known planets (red). Debris disks are made up of dust and small rocky bodies, like comets. They are the leftover remnants of the planet-building process. Our solar system has a debris disk called the Kuiper Belt, which is filled primarily with comets. Until now, these disks had not been detected around any stars with known...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- COMETS, What -- Unity
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-22b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
image

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This artist's concept depicts the pulsar planet system discovered by Aleksander Wolszczan in 1992. Wolszczan used the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico to find three planets - the first of any kind ever found outside our solar system - circling a pulsar called PSR B1257+12. Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars, which are the collapsed cores of exploded massive stars. They spin and pulse with radiation, much like a lighthouse beacon. Here, the pulsar's twisted magnetic fields are...
Topics: What -- Beacon, What -- Earth, What -- Discovery, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, Where -- Puerto...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-10c
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
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This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two "hot Jupiter" worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system. The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic...
Topics: What -- Jupiter, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Visible Light, What -- Constellation,...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-04d
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
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This artist's concept shows a Jupiter-like planet soaking up the scorching rays of its nearby "sun." NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope used its heat-seeking infrared eyes to figure out that a gas-giant planet like the one depicted here is two-faced, with one side perpetually in the cold dark, and the other forever blistering under the heat of its star. The illustration portrays how the planet would appear to infrared eyes, showing temperature variations across its surface. The planet,...
Topics: What -- Jupiter, What -- Sun, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Constellation, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-18b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/N. Flagey (IAS/SSC) & A. Noriega-Crespo (SSC/Caltech)
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This majestic view taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells an untold story of life and death in the Eagle nebula, an industrious star-making factory located 7,000 light-years away in the Serpens constellation. The image shows the region's entire network of turbulent clouds and newborn stars in infrared light. The color green denotes cooler towers and fields of dust, including the three famous space pillars, dubbed the "Pillars of Creation," which were photographed by NASA's...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Serpens, What -- Constellation, What -- Infrared Array...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-01b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/J. Hora (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
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NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope finds a delicate flower in the Ring Nebula, as shown in this image. The outer shell of this planetary nebula looks surprisingly similar to the delicate petals of a camellia blossom. A planetary nebula is a shell of material ejected from a dying star. Located about 2,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra, the Ring Nebula is also known as Messier Object 57 and NGC 6720. It is one of the best examples of a planetary nebula and a favorite target of...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Earth, What -- Constellation, What -- Lyra, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-07a
NASA Images
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Spitzer seen against the infrared sky. The band of light is the glowing dust emission from the Milky Way galaxy seen at 100 microns (as seen by the IRAS/COBE missions). The Spitzer solar panels also double as a solar shield that always faces the sun, protecting the cold observatory from the sun's heat.
Topics: What -- Sun, Where -- Milky Way Galaxy
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=SIRTF_ir_back
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
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This movie compares a visible-light view of the "Cigar galaxy" to an infrared view from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of the same galaxy. The movie begins with the visible image of the galaxy looking cool as a cucumber, then fades into the infrared image, revealing a smokin' hot "cigar." The visible-light picture of the Cigar galaxy, also called Messier 82, shows only a bar of light against a dark patch of space. Longer exposures of the galaxy (not pictured here) have...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-09v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/D. Figer (STScI/RIT)
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The sky is a jewelry box full of sparkling stars in these infrared images. The crown jewels are 14 massive stars on the verge of exploding as supernovae. These hefty stars reside in one of the most massive star clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy. The bluish cluster is inside the white box in the large image, which shows the star-studded region around it. A close-up of the cluster can be seen in the inset photo. These large stars are a tip-off to the mass of the young cluster. Astronomers estimate...
Topics: What -- Sun, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Constellation, What -- Scutum, What -- Hubble...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-03a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/L. Cieza (Univ. of Texas at Austin)
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Baby stars are forming near the eastern rim of the cosmic cloud Perseus, in this infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The baby stars are approximately three million years old and are shown as reddish-pink dots to the right of the image. The pinkish color indicates that these infant stars are still shrouded by the cosmic dust and gas that collapsed to form them. These stars are part of the IC348 star cluster, which consists of over 300 known member stars. The Perseus Nebula can be...
Topics: What -- Perseus, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Constellation
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig06-027
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/O. Krause (Steward Observatory)
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These Spitzer Space Telescope images, taken one year apart, show the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (yellow ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (reddish orange). The pictures illustrate that a blast of light from Cassiopeia A is waltzing outward through the dusty skies. This dance, called an "infrared echo," began when the remnant erupted about 50 years ago. Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion 325 years ago. It consists of a...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Cassiopeia, What -- Constellation, What -- Earth
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-14a
NASA Images
by X-ray: NASA/CXC/Caltech/S.Kulkarni et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI/UIUC/Y.H.Chu & R.Williams et al.; IR: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R.Gehrz et al.
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This is a composite image of N49, the brightest supernova remnant in optical light in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Chandra X-ray image (blue) shows million-degree gas in the center. Much cooler gas at the outer parts of the remnant is seen in the infrared image from Spitzer (red). While astronomers expected that dust particles were generating most of the infrared emission, the study of this object indicates that much of the infrared is instead generated in heated gas. The unique filamentary...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, Where -- Large Magellanic Cloud
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig06-030
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/A. Marston (ESTEC/ESA)
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Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion). New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind...
Topics: What -- Constellation, What -- Cygnus, What -- Visible Light, What -- TRACE, What -- Spitzer Space...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-06b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/L. Rudnick (Univ. of Minn.)
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This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the scattered remains of an exploded star named Cassiopeia A. Spitzer's infrared detectors "picked" through these remains and found that much of the star's original layering had been preserved. In this false-color image, the faint, blue glow surrounding the dead star is material that was energized by a shock wave, called the forward shock, which was created when the star blew up. The forward shock is now located at the outer edge of...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Cassiopeia, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-19a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Spitzer is portrayed here first in visible light, then against the same background in the infrared.
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=vis-ir1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/ J. Hora (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
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The Helix Nebula, which is composed of gaseous shells and disks puffed out by a dying sunlike star, exhibits complex structure on the smallest visible scales. In this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, infrared light at wavelengths of 3.2, 4.5, and 8.0 microns has been colored blue, green, and red (respectively). The "cometary knots" show blue-green heads due to excitation of their molecular material from shocks or ultraviolet radiation. The tails of the cometary knots...
Topic: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig07-016
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI/CXC/UofA/ESA/AURA/JHU
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NASA's Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra space observatories teamed up to create this multi-wavelength, false-colored view of the M82 galaxy. The lively portrait celebrates Hubble's "sweet sixteen" birthday. X-ray data recorded by Chandra appears in blue; infrared light recorded by Spitzer appears in red; Hubble's observations of hydrogen emission appear in orange, and the bluest visible light appears in yellow-green.
Topics: What -- Visible Light, Where -- M82
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig06-010
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech
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This video looks at the remarkable first two years of the Spitzer mission, which launched on August 25, 2003.
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=svg05-01
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/A. Kashlinsky (GSFC)
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The right panel is an image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stars and galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation. This infrared image covers a region of space so large that light would take up to 100 million years to travel across it. The left panel is the same image after stars, galaxies and other sources were masked out. The remaining background light is from a period of time when the universe was less than one billion years old, and most likely originated from the universe's very first...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Ursa Major, What -- Constellation
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-22a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Artist Rendition of Spitzer in its Heliocentric Orbit
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=earth_trailing2
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/L.Rebull (SSC/ Caltech)
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Eight hundred light-years away in the Orion constellation, a gigantic murky cloud called the "Witch Head" nebula is brewing baby stars. The stellar infants are revealed as pink dots in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Wisps of green in the cloud are carbon-rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are found on barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust on Earth. This image was obtained as part of the Spitzer Space Telescope Research Program for...
Topics: What -- Orion, What -- Constellation, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Earth, Where --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig06-020
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R.Hurt
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This "side-by-side" comparison image shows Spitzer's Delta II rocket in the late afternoon before launch. On the top is a photograph in visible light, while on the bottom is a false-color infrared image showing the launch vehicle in the way Spitzer would see it. The coldest surfaces in the infrared image are blue/black while the hottest ones are yellow/white. The comparison between these two images reveals many interesting features of infrared light. In many places the infrared image...
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ir001
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/W. Reach (Caltech)
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These images of the Jupiter-family comets Johnson (top) and Shoemaker-Levy 3 (bottom) were both taken with Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer (MIPS) at a wavelength of 24 microns. The fan-shaped region that stretches upward from Johnson's nucleus (yellow ball in the middle) represents the dust "tail" of the comet. Dust tails are created when small particles from a comet are swept backward by the Sun's radiation pressure. The image of Shoemaker-Levy 3 (bottom) does not show a dust...
Topics: What -- Jupiter, What -- COMETS, What -- MIPS, What -- TRACE, What -- Visible Light
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig05-008
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech)
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This 22-second animation uses an "infrared spotlight" to highlight differences between a visible-light image of Messier 81 and the Spitzer/MIPS+IRAC infrared view.
Topic: What -- Visible Light
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2003-06v3
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/StScI
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In a collaborative effort between NASA's three Great Observatories, astronomers have solved a cosmic mystery by identifying some of the oldest and most distant black holes. This animation fades between images taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope in the field known as the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, or GOODS. In the first picture, observations from Chandra show high-energy emissions believed to trace the presence of...
Topics: What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- TRACE, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2004-10v2
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
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This movie shifts from the well-known visible-light picture of Messier 104 taken by the Hubble Space Telescope to infrared views from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Messier 104 is commonly known as the Sombrero galaxy because in visible light, it resembles the broad-brimmed Mexican hat. However, in Spitzer's striking infrared view, the galaxy looks more like a "bull's eye." Viewed from Earth, the spiral galaxy is seen nearly edge-on, just six degrees away from its equatorial plane....
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST), What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC),...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-11v1w
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
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Three newly-discovered streams arcing high over the Milky Way Galaxy are remnants of cannibalized galaxies and star clusters. The streams are between 13,000 and 130,000 light-years distant from Earth and extend over much of the northern sky. Two of the newly discovered streams are almost certainly the remains of ancient star clusters. Known to astronomers as globular clusters, these giant stellar cities contain between tens of thousands and millions of stars. Though only about 150 globular...
Topics: What -- Earth, Where -- Milky Way Galaxy, Where -- dwarf galaxy
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=sig07-008
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
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This artist's concept shows what a fiery hot star and its close-knit planetary companion might look close up if viewed in visible (left) and infrared light. In visible light, a star shines brilliantly, overwhelming the little light that is reflected by its planet. In infrared, a star is less blinding, and its planet perks up with a fiery glow. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope took advantage of this fact to directly capture the infrared light of two previously detected planets...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Sun, What -- Jupiter, Where --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-09b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/L. Allen (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
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The image composite compares an infrared image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to a visible-light picture of the same region (inset). While the infrared view, dubbed "Mountains of Creation," reveals towering pillars of dust aglow with the light of embryonic stars (white/yellow), the visible-light view shows dark, barely-visible pillars. The added detail in the Spitzer image reveals a dynamic region in the process of evolving and creating new stellar life. Why do the pictures...
Topics: What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Visible Light, Where...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-23a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)
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This artist's animation shows first what a fiery hot star and its close-knit planetary companion might look like close up in visible light, then switches to infrared views. In visible light, a star shines brilliantly, overwhelming the little light that is reflected by its planet. In infrared, a star is less blinding, and its planet perks up with a fiery glow. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope took advantage of this fact to directly capture the infrared light of two previously...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Sun, What -- Jupiter, Where --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-09v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
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This artist's animation demonstrates that an invisible galaxy shrouded in dust can become glaringly bright when viewed in infrared light. The movie begins with a visible-light view, showing a dark blob of a galaxy that is so shrouded in dust it appears invisible. The picture then transitions to what the same region of space might look like in infrared light. A galaxy appears out of the darkness, because its heated dust glows at infrared wavelengths. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope uncovered a...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2005-08v1
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/S. Stolovy (SSC/Caltech)
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Our Milky Way is a dusty place. So dusty, in fact, that we cannot see the center of the galaxy in visible light. But when NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope set its infrared eyes on the galactic center, it captured this spectacular view. Taken with just one of Spitzer's cameras (at a wavelength of 8 microns), the image highlights the region's exceptionally bright and dusty clouds, lit up by young massive stars. Individual stars can also be seen as tiny dots scattered throughout the dust. The top...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-02b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/L. Rudnick (Univ. of Minn.)
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This artist's concept illustrates a massive star before and after it blew up in a cataclysmic "supernova" explosion. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that this star -- the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A -- exploded with some degree of order, preserving chunks of its onion-like layers as it blasted apart. Cassiopeia A is located 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. It was once a massive star 15 to 20 times larger than our sun. Its fiery death...
Topics: What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Cassiopeia, What -- Constellation, What -- Sun, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2006-19b
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/H. Knutson (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
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This is the first-ever map of the surface of an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system. The map, which shows temperature variations across the cloudy tops of a gas giant called HD 189733b, is made up of infrared data taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Hotter temperatures are represented in brighter colors. HD 189733b is what is known as a hot-Jupiter planet. These sizzling, gas planets practically hug their stars, orbiting at distances that are much closer than Mercury is to our...
Topics: What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Jupiter, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-09a
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)
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This animation shows the first-ever map of the surface of an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system. The map, which shows temperature variations across the cloudy tops of a gas giant called HD 189733b, is made up of infrared data taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Everything else shown, for example the star and the lines, are artistic illustrations. The movie begins by showing a two-dimensional view of the map. Hotter temperatures are represented in brighter colors. The map is...
Topics: What -- Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), What -- Spitzer Space Telescope, What -- Jupiter, What --...
Source: http://sscws1.ipac.caltech.edu/Imagegallery/image.php?image_name=ssc2007-09v2w