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Research 
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EDI Intertrends 
Western Europe 

1989-1994 




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This Reseach Summary is a precis of a full research report, EDI Intertrends — Western Europe, 
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EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Abstract 



Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) is the electronic transfer of structured 
business data between computer applications in different organisations. 
EDI is process-to-process communication in machine-readable formats 
that overcomes organisational difficulties in computers, protocols and 
data formats. 

EDI is emerging as an area of increased focus, and this report examines 
the development of this strategically important and fast-growing market 
opportunity in Western Europe. The report provides an assessment of the 
current size of the market, the strategies employed by the leading 
Network Services' vendors, EDI software market directions and the 
growing role of professional services organisations. 

The market is analysed by individual country with forecasts through to 
1994, including an assessment of the major development forces that are 
driving market growth. The report also includes survey-based findings on 
EDI user managers' concerns regarding standards, integration, vendor 
viability and the importance of EDI in the development of the single 
European market. 



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© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Summary Contents 



A. Introduction 1 

B. Market Opportunities 2 

C. Standards and Industry Associations 3 

D. Vendor Opportunities 5 

E. Country Markets 6 

F. Vertical Sectors 6 

G. Development Forces 6 

Report Table of Contents 9 

Report Exhibits List 13 

Programme Description 17 



© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Research Summary 



This Research Summary provides a precis of the content of INPUT'S EDI 
Intertrends — Western Europe, 1989-1994 report, part of INPUT'S 
international EDI programme. 



Introduction INPUT'S EDI Intertrends— Western Europe, 1989-1994 report, produced 

as part of INPUT'S international Electronic Data Interchange programme, 
examines the Western European EDI market, providing a comprehensive 
investigation and analysis of developments in this strategically important 
area. The report contains: 

• Market analyses of the individual country markets of France, West 
Germany, UK, Italy, and Spain, as well as the Benelux and Scandi- 
navian markets, with forecasts through to 1994. 

• An assessment of the major development forces that are driving market 
growth. 

• The strategies employed by the leading network services and software 
vendors. 

• Analysis of the role of professional services in the EDI market. 

• Country rankings of the leading vendors in the EDI Software and 
Services market based on user expenditures. 

• Survey-based findings on EDI managers' concerns regarding key issues 
such as network and data security, standards, integration and vendor 
viability. 

• A commentary on the key EDI issues as Europe moves towards the 
single European market. 



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1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



1 



EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



EDI Intertrends — Western Europe, 1989-1994 is the definitive report for 
organisations interested in or involved in EDI. 



REASONS FOR USING EDI 




• Reduction in costs 






• Fewer errors 






• Faster turnaround 






• Improved customer service 






• Competitive tool 






• Increased productivity 






• Improved management control 







B 

Market Opportunities INPUT' s EDI Intertrends— Western Europe, 1989-1994 report sizes tiie 

current EDI market around $30 million in 1989, forecasting that it will 
grow at a compound annual growth rate in excess of 50% over the five- 
year forecast period. 

input's forecast includes third-party EDI network services, software 
and professional services, but excludes consumer applications such as: 

• electronic shopping 

• electronic banking 

• automated teller networks 

• point-of-sale terminals 

• airline reservation systems 

• credit authorisation systems 

• "captive" networks 

Whilst these systems do use electronic "forms" to transfer information, 
the applications generally use specialised terminal devices to communi- 
cate with dedicated computers and are not computer-to-computer, appli- 
cation-to-appUcation implementations; that use proprietary data formats 
rather than pubtic standards. 



2 



© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



The report recognises that the UK is the only market that has reached any 
level of maturity, but highUghts how the opening up of private, internal 
EDI networks, coupled with the realisation of a large number of pilot 
projects in Western Europe, will result in the major economies of France 
and West Germany showing higher rates of growth than the UK during 
the forecast period. 

The report also looks at the development of EDI within and across indus- 
try sectors and at the small number of organisations that have fully inte- 
grated EDI into their business philosophies and external operations and 
are moving towards volume implementation covering a growing number 
of documents and messages in the trading cycle. 

The report looks at the corporate requirement to streamline information 
flow, which is making the adoption of EDI such an important strategic 
application in the context of the single European market. 



EXHIBIT B 



THE EDI MARKET IN WESTERN EUROPE 

1989-1994 



3 



300 r 



^ 200 



100 



0 



[3 Network Services 

Software 
0 Professional 
Services 




1989 



CAGR 



1994 



Standards & Industry 
Associations 



The report looks at the evolving role of standards in the EDI market. EDI 
involves the transmission of data in one of several standard formats, with 
EDIFACT (Electronic Data Interchange For Administration, Commerce 
and Transport) emerging as the most likely standard for international 
trade. 



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e 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



3 



EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Whilst conceding that the widespread use of EDIFACT will enable 
communication across industry lines and will create a market for addi- 
tional interchange applications, INPUT notes that the majority of users 
are still at an early stage with EDI and argues that industry-specific or 
national standards (e.g., ODETTE and TRADACOMS) will continue to 
play a vital role in the development of the market. INPUT concludes that 
multiple standards will not represent a significant impediment to the 
development of the EDI market: standards supporting international trade 
are increasingly available and X.400 is working to overcome incompat- 
ible systems and support internetwork communications. 

The report also looks at the role of industry and trade associations, usu- 
ally comprising competitors who are working together to define the 
messages required, using whatever is available internationally with 
regard to syntax and message standards. INPUT assesses the importance 
of development groups, which mirror the different sectors of the indus- 
try, in stimulating EDI growth. 

EXHIBIT C 



EDI STANDARDS RELATIONSHIPS 




4 



© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 INPUT 



D 

The report highlights the varieties of EDI: Point-to-point, directly be- 
tween trading partners; or the most widely used option, by means of 
third-parties. INPUT reviews the role of these third-party firms, which 
serve as collection and switching services, and which perform store-and- 
forward tasks as well as other processing services. 

The report also considers the new lines of business that EDI is providing 
for software vendors and professional services firms: The integration of 
EDI with other applications is a key issue, as is the implementation of 
EDI in several functional areas in order to incorporate the application into 
the overall strategy of an organisation. INPUT concludes that it will be 
users who will ultimately benefit from this intense industry competition 
through a variety of choices in competitive pricing and improved fea- 
tures. Profitablity for vendors, however, remains elusive and is likely to 
remain so for some time. 



EXHIBIT D 



PROBLEMS OF DIRECT EDI 



Vendor Opportunities 




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e 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



5 



EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



E 

Country Markets 



The report looks at how telecommunications deregulation has helped to 
maintain the buoyancy of the EDI market, in particular the UK, where 
the market benefitted from the liberalisation of service provision in the 
early 80s with the privatisation of British Telecom and the introduction 
of competition in the form of Mercury. 

Against this, the UK has seen the arrival of a number of multinational 
players attracted by the rewritten rules and the promise of profitable 
investment as traffic can be diverted from the national networks onto 
their own systems. 

The report shows how the stages of EDI development vary markedly 
across Western Europe. INPUT notes how a higher percentage of EDI 
communications in mainland Europe is being carried out via direct links 
between trading partners rather than the UK clearinghouse approach. 



EXHIBIT E 



THIRD-PARTY VERSUS DIRECT EDI 
(Western Europe) 

Total Western Europe 



□ Third-Party 
^ Combination 

□ Direct 
Source: INPUT User Survey 




6 



©1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



F 

Vertical Sectors The report provides a vertical market sector analysis and forecast, which 

shows the manufacturing sector to be the largest EDI user, reflecting the 
benefits of EDI in enabling just-in-time manufacturing techniques and 
consequent improvements in inventory levels. 

The retail and distribution sectors are also key markets for EDI, reflecting 
the reach of the large third-party networks and the drive towards improv- 
ing pan-European communications, as evidenced by the number of proj- 
ects being carried out in the areas of transport, customs and distribution 
throughout Europe. Additionally, INPUT anticipates that the banking and 
financial sectors will show high rates of growth over the forecast period. 





WESTERN EUROPEAN 
VERTICAL MARKET EDI 




Others 
Transport ^-r^ 




Process 
Manufacturing 






Discrete 
Manufacturing 


Services 








Distribution/Retail — 





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© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



7 



EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



G 

Development Forces 



Finally, INPUT considers the development forces — the "intertrends" — 
that are driving EDI. The deregulation of the public telecommunications 
networks in Western Europe; the lack of technological distinction be- 
tween data processing, office automation and telecommunications; and 
the growing commitment to the network as a framework for conducting 
business are all leading to the existence of faster, cheaper networks. 

The report highlights the problems associated with the development of a 
critical mass of trading partners, where user organisations have been 
forced by suppliers to adopt EDI without being adequately prepared for 
the changed business practices required for the integration of EDI into 
the company's operations. 

INPUT concludes that where office automation failed to fulfill the hype 
surrounding its introduction and had a minimal effect on an organisa- 
tion's infrastructure, EDI — because it imports extemal influences and, 
more crucially, because it cuts across internal functions and depart- 
ments — will have a much greater influence in fundamentally altering the 
way companies conduct business. 



EXHIBIT G 



EDI DEVELOPMENT FORCES 



EDI 



Top Management Awareness 



1992 



Standards 



Cost benefits 



Critical mass 



Large users 



Industry associations 



Faster, cheaper networks 



8 



e 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS —WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Table of Contents 



Introduction 

A. Background 

B. Scope 

C. Methodology 

D. Related INPUT Reports 



Executive Overview 

A. EDI Usage Is Expanding Rapidly 

B. Western European EDI 

C. EDI- Associated Factors 

D. User Issues 

E. Principal Country Markets 

F. Principal Industry Sector Markets 

G. EDI Software & Services: Recommendations 

H. EDI Development Forces 



EDI Overview 

A. Background 

B. Before EDI 

C. Reasons for Using EDI 

D. Approaches to EDI 

E. Requirements for EDI 

F. Participants 

G. Software 



Market Analysis & Forecast 

A. Overall Growth 

B. Forecast Definition 

C. Aggregate Market Growth 



© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



9 



EDI INTERTRENDS— WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Table of Contents (Continued) 



D. Forecast Reconciliation 

E. Western European Market 

F. Competition 



Market Environment 

A. Development Forces 

1. Western European Network Environment 

2. Critical Mass 

3. Standards 

4. Cost Benefits 

5. National v. International 

6. Industry Associations 

B. Issues 

1. Security 

2. Legal 

3. Trading Relationships 

4. Management 

5. Pricing Trends 

6. Interworking 

C. Competitive Environment 

1. Network Services 

2. Software 

3. Professional Services 

4. Partnering 

5. The Role of Banks 

6. PTTs 

D. Country Markets 

1. Overview 

2. UK 

a. Market Size 

b. Network Services 

c. Software 

d. Professional Services 

e. Vertical Sectors 

3. France 

a. Market Size 

b. Network Services 

c. Software 

d. EDI Projects 

4. West Germany 

a. Market Size 

b. Network Services 

c. Software 



10 



e 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS —WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Table of Contents (Continued) 



5. Italy 

a. Market Size 

b. Network Services 

6. Scandinavia 

a. Market Size 

b. Network Services 

7. Benelux 

a. Market Size 

b. Network Services 

8. Spain 

a. Market Size 

9. Rest of Europe 
a. Market Size 



The User Environment 

A. Overall EDI Issues and Concerns 

1. Network/Data Security 

2. Software Maintenance 

3. EDI Compatibility with Other Applications 

4. EDI Standards 

5. Legal Issues 

6. Vendor Viability 

B. Third-Party Networks 

C. Interconnection 

D. EDI Software Issues 

1. Choosing the Software 

2. Software Features 

E. Implementation Issues 

1. Reasons for Implementation 

2. Implementation Execution 

F. Computer Platform Choices 

G. EDI Opportunities 

1. Applications 

2. Transaction Sets 



EDI into the 1990s 

A. EDI Development Forces 

B. Vendor Recommendations 

C. User Recommendations 



O 1969 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



11 



EDI INTERTRENDS —WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Table of Contents (Continued) 





A 

■ 


Appendix: Glossary of EDI Terms 




■ 

B 
■ 


Appendix: Vendor Questionnaires 




C 


Appendix: User Questionnaires 




■ 

D 


Appendix: Analysis of Interviews 



12 



e> 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS —WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Exhibits 



-1 EDI Usage (Western Europe) 

-2 The EDI Software and Services Market in Western 

Europe 1989-1994 
-3 EDI Markets Will Exceed Forecast 
-4 User Issues & Concerns (W. Europe) 
-5 Western European EDI Markets by Country, 1989 
-6 Western European EDI Markets by Vertical Sector, 1989 
-7 EDI Software & Services: Recommendations 
-8 EDI Development Forces 



-1 Without EDI 

-2 Reasons for Using EDI 

-3 Problems of Direct EDI 

-4 EDI: General vs. Specific 

-5 The Language of EDI 

-6 Participants in the EDI Market 

-7 Software Providers 



-1 U.S. Dollar Conversion and Inflation Rates 
-2 The EDI Market in Western Europe, 1989-1994 
-3 EDI Market Components 1989 
-4 Forecast Reconciliation 
-5 Western European EDI Software and Services, 
1989-1994 

-6 The EDI Market in Western Europe, 1989-1994 

-7 Western European EDI Software and Services Market 

by Country, 1989-1994 
-8 W. European EDI Software & Services — Country 

Markets 1989-1994 
-9 West European Vertical Market EDI 
-10 W. European Industry Segment EDI Expenditures, 1989 
-11 Leading Vendors — Western European EDI Market 



ETIE 



© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



13 



EDI INTERTRENDS —WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



INPUT 



Exhibits (Continued) 



-1 Current and 1994 Network Situation 

-2 Trade Facilitation Bodies 

-3 Structure of Edifact Board 

-4 EDI Standards Relationship 

-5 OSI Seven-Layer Reference Model 

-6 X400 Benefits— A Gateway between Different Systems 

-7 EDI Activity Found in Most Industries 

-8 EDI Introduction (Western Europe) 

-9 Third-Party Service Providers' Role in EDI 
-10 EDI Software Is Central to the System 
-11 The Western European Professional Services Market 
-12 Three Types of EDI Networks 
-13 The Western European EDI Market 
-14 UK EDI Market 1989-1994 

-15 Leading UK EDI Software & Services Vendors, 1989 
-16 1989 UK EDI Services Market 
-17 French EDI Market, 1989-1994 

-18 Leading French EDI Software & Services Vendors, 1989 

-19 French EDI Projects 

-20 West German EDI Market, 1989-1994 

-21 Leading West German EDI Software & Services 

Vendors, 1989 
-22 VASCOM Service 
-23 Italian EDI Market, 1989-1994 

-24 Leading Italian EDI Software & Services Vendors, 1989 

-25 Scandinavian EDI Market, 1989-1994 

-26 Leading Scandinavian EDI Software & Services 

Vendors, 1989 
-27 Benelux EDI Market, 1989-1994 
-28 Leading Benelux EDI Software & Services Vendors, 

1989 

-29 Spanish EDI Market, 1989-1994 
-30 Leading Spanish EDI Software & Services Vendors, 
1989 

-31 EDI Market, Rest of Europe, 1989-1994 
-32 Leading EDI Software & Services Vendors, Rest of 
Europe, 1989 



-1 User Issues and Concerns (Western Europe) 

-2 User Issues and Concerns (by Country) 

-3 User Ratings of Third-Party Networks (Western Europe) 

-4 User Ratings of Third-Party Networks (by Country) 

-5 User Concerns with Third-Party Networks 

-6 Third-Party vs. Direct EDI 



14 



© 1989 by INPUT. Reproduction Prohibited. 



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EDI INTERTRENDS —WESTERN EUROPE, 1989-1994 



Exhibits (Continued) 

-7 EDI Issues: How Important Is Network Interconnection? 

-8 Reasons for Network Interconnection 

-9 Buy or Build EDI Software Decisions (W. Europe) 

-10 Buy or Build EDI Software Decisions (by Country) 

-11 Software Features Importance (W. Europe) 

-12 Software Features Importance (by Country) 

-13 EDI Drivers 

-14 EDI Start-Up Reasons (Strategic) 

-15 EDI Implementation (W. Europe) 

-16 Computer Used for EDI (W. Europe and by Country) 

-17 EDI Usage (Western Europe) 

-18 Key Applications Integrated with EDI (W. Europe) 



-1 EDI Development Forces 

-2 EDI Vendor Recommendations 

-3 EDI User Recommendations 



© 1989 by INPUT. Reprodualon ProhibKed. 



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