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NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 



2 nd REVIEW 2019-2020 

INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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Table of Contents 


FIGURES.vi 

TABLES.vii 

ACRONYMS.IX 

FOREWORD BY THE EXECUTIVE MAYOR.12 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER’S OVERVIEW.13 

THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF THE IDP DOCUMENT.14 

CHAPTER ONE:.16 

1.1 District Geography.16 

1.1.1 Guiding Parameters.17 

1.1.2 The popular mandate across Spheres of Government.17 

1.1.3 The National Development Plan (NDP): Vision 2030 .17 

1.1.4 National Growth Path.18 

1.1.5 Mpumalanga Growth and Development Path.19 

1.1.6 Sustainable Development Goals.20 

1.1.7 State of the Nation Address (SONA) and State of the Province Address.20 

1.1.8 Local Government Back to Basics Strategy.21 

1.2 IDP REVIEW PROCESSES.23 

1.2.1 Review Activities.23 

1.2.2 The Integrated Development Plan.24 

1.3 Adoption Process.29 

1.4 Community and Stakeholder Analysis.30 

1.5 NDM Political commitment for the Five years in council.33 

1.6 Participation by Traditional Authorities.34 

1.7 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.35 

CHAPTER TWO:.37 

2.1 INSTITUTIONAL PRIORITY ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS.37 

2.1.1 Council’s Vision, Mission and Goals.37 

2.1.2 Strategic Goals.37 

2.1.3 NDM Priority Development Issues.40 


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CHAPTER 3 


41 


3.1 Brief Socio-economic overview.41 

3.1.1. Demographics.41 

3.1.1.1. POPULATION GROUP, GENDER AND AGE.42 

3.1.5.4. Population Density.42 

3.1.1.2. NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS.44 

3.1.2. Economy.44 

3.1.2.1. Gross Value Added by Region (GVA-R).47 

3.1.3. LABOUR.48 

13.1.3.1. Labour Force participation rate.48 

3.I.3.2.Total Employment.49 

3.1.4.lncome and Expenditure.50 

3.1.4.1. Number of Households by Income category.50 

3.1.4.2. Human Development Index (HDI).51 

3.1.4.3. Gini Coefficient.51 

3.1.4.4. Poverty.53 

3.1.5. Household Infrastructure.61 

3.1.7. Tourism.70 

CHAPTER FOUR.77 

4.1 Developmental Issues.77 

4.2 KPA1: Institutional Development and Municipal Transformation.77 

4.2.1 Issue 1: Powers, Duties and Functions.77 

4.3 Issue 2: Organisation Restructuring and Transformation.82 

4.3.1 Human Resource Management and Development Unit (Purpose and objective of the department).82 

4.3.2 Occupational Health and Safety.83 

4.3.3 Employee Health and Wellness.84 

4.3.4 Legal Services.84 

4.3.5 Integrated Development Plan (IDP):.85 

4.3.6 Performance Management System (PMS):.86 

4.3.7 Research & Development:.87 

4.3.7.1 Community Satisfaction survey.87 

4.3.8 Information and Communication Technology (ICT):.89 

4.4 KPA 2: GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION.89 

Issue 4: Good Governance and Communication.89 

4.4.1 Background and Problem Statement.89 

4.4.2 Internal Audit Function:.89 

4.4.3 Audit Action Plan.91 

4.4.4 Risk Management.91 

4.6.1 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION.93 

4.6.2 Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC).96 

4.7 KPA 3: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.97 

4.7.1 Issue 20: Economic Development and Job Creation.97 

4.7.2 Summaries of Sector Specific Strategies.101 


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4.7.3 Sector Interventions.103 

4.7.4 Conservation, Tourism and Culture.105 

4.7.5 Rural Development & Land Reform.110 

4.8 KPA4: FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY AND VIABILITY.114 

4.8.1 Issue 3: Financial Viability.114 

Committee system for procurement under the SIPDM Policy.119 

4.9 KPA 5: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT.120 

4.9.1 Issue 6: Health.120 

4.9.2 HIV/AIDS.124 

4.10 Issue 7: Education.126 

4.11 Issue 8: Welfare.129 

4.12 Issue 9: Culture, Sport and Recreation.132 

4.13 ISSUE 10: SAFETY AND SECURITY.141 

4.14 Issue 11: Emergency Services.143 

4.15 FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICES.147 

4.16 ISSUE 21: TRANSVERSAL.150 

4.17 Issue 12: Water and Sanitation.157 

4.18 Issue 13: Electricity Supply.161 

4.19 Issue 14: Roads and Storm Water.164 

4.20 KPA 6: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS AND RATIONAL.166 

4.20.1 Regional Overview.166 

4.20.2 Issue 5: Spatial Restructuring and Service Provision.167 

4.21 Issue 15: Transportation.177 

4.21 Issue 16: Land Reform and Land Administration.180 

4.22 Issue 17: Human Settlements.183 

4.23 Issue 18: Environmental Management.191 

4.24 Issue 22: Climate and climate change.197 

4.25 Issue 19: Waste Management.199 

CHAPTER FIVE.204 

5.1 NDM’S DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES, OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES, KPI PER KPA AND PROJECTS.204 

5.2 STRATEGIC SCORECARD.208 

CHAPTER SIX:.226 

6.1 Key Sector Plans.226 

CHAPTER SEVEN:.229 

7.1 FINANCIAL PLAN.229 

7.2.2 Operating Transfers and Grant Receipts.230 

7.23 Main operational expenditure categories for the 2019/20 financial year.230 

CHAPTER EIGHT:.232 

8.1 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.232 

8.1.1 Background and Introduction.232 

8.1.2 Objectives of Performance Management.232 

8.2 Performance monitoring flow chart is illustrated as follows:.232 

CHAPTER NINE: PROJECTS.233 


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Projects by Sector Departments 


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FIGURES 

Page 

Figure 1: Geography of the district.16 

Figure 2: Popular mandate for government.17 

Figure 3: IDP review process.23 

Figure 4: Activities involved in the idp review process.24 

Figure 5: Integrated sustainable human settlements and improved quality.38 

Figure 6: NDM priority development issue’s.40 

Figure 7: Population density - Nkangala, Mpumalanga and national, 2016 [number of people per km]).43 

Figure 8: Gross domestic product (GDP).45 

Figure 9: GDP contribution - local municipalities.47 

Figure 10: Industry contribution to gdp at basic prices (constant 2011 &2016).47 

Figure 11: Labour force participation rate.48 

Figure 12: Geography by official employment status.49 

Figure 13: Gini coefficient - Nkangala, Mpumalanga and national].52 

Figure 14: Gini coefficient Locals.52 

Figure 15: Number and percentage of people living in poverty.53 

Figure 16: Percentage of people living in poverty LM’s.54 

Figure 17: Poverty gap rate by population group.55 

Figure 18: Poverty gap rate -LM’S.55 

Figure 19: Highest level of education: age 15+.57 

Figure 20: Highest level of education: age 15+ LM’S.58 

Figure 21: Literacy rate.59 

Figure 22: IHS crime index.60 

Figure 23: IHS crime index - Nkangala, Mpumalanga and national.61 

Figure 24: Households by dwelling unit type.62 

Figure 25: Sanitation backlog.64 

Figure 26: Households by type of water access.65 

Figure 27: Water backlog.66 

Figure 28: Households by type of electrical connection.67 

Figure 29: Households by refuse disposal.68 

Figure 30: Refuse disposal Nkangala.69 

Figure 31: Tourists by origin.72 

Figure 32: Growth in tourism (using bednights) by origin.73 

Figure 33: Tourism spend per resident capita.74 

Figure 34: HIV+ estimates and AIDS Death Estimates.76 

Figure 35: Overall community satisfaction: NDM.88 

Figure 36: NDM spatial structure and economic activities.106 

Figure 37: Geology and minerals in NDM.108 

Figure 38: The memorial plague inspired by mandela’s from robben island prison.136 

Figure 39: Total number of pregnancies per circuit .155 

Figure 40: Below indicate piped water inside dwelling in percentage.158 

Figure 41: Below indicate flush toilet connect to sewerage.158 

Figure 42: Electricity connection.163 

Figure 43: Regional map.167 

Figure 44: NDN regional context.169 

Figure 45: Mining activity.172 

Figure 46: Bus passenger dissatisfaction percentage .178 

Figure 47: Taxi passenger dissatisfaction percentage. 178 

Figure 48: Transit orientated development concept. 179 

Figure 49 Land Claims.181 


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Figure 50: State land and land claims.182 

Figure 51: Percentage of Households with access to formal Housing.186 

Figure 52: Major development corridors.188 

Figure 53: SDF. 189 

Figure 54: SDA’S. 190 

Figure 55: Investment Framework.191 

Figure 56: Outlining sustainable development dimension .192 

TABLES 

Page 

Table 1: Nkangala district demographic profile.16 

Table 2: Job drivers.18 

Table 3: Job pillars.19 

Table 4: SONIA anc SOPA.20 

Table 5: Roles and responsibilities in idp process.28 

Table 6: IDP review process.29 

Table 7: October community outreach meetings for the 2018/19 financial year.31 

Table 8: Summary of the issues raised in community outreach meeting per municipality.31 

Table 9: NDM political commitment for the five years in council.33 

Table 10: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities & threats (swot) of NDM.34 

Table 11: The vision, mission, values & strategic goals of NDM.37 

Table 12: The developmental objectives.38 

Table 13: NDM strategic goals' alignment to Ims.39 

Table 12: The strategic goals' alignment to the ndp & 2030 developmental goals.39 

Table 15: Total population-nkangala.41 

Table 16: Population group, gender and age-nkangala district municipality, 2016(number).42 

Table 17: Population Density - Nkangala and The Rest of Mpumalanga, 2006-2016.43 

Table 18: Number of Households-Nkangala, Mpumalanga and National Total, 2006-2016).44 

Table 19: Gross domestic product (GDP) - NDM.45 

Table 20: Gross domestic product (GDP) - local municipalities.46 

Table 21: Regional contribution - nkangala.46 

Table 22: Economic contribution and growth.48 

Table 23: Total employment - nkangala, mpumalanga and national.49 

Table 24: Unemployment rate per Municipality in the District.50 

Table 25: Households by income categories.50 

Table 26: Human development index.51 

Table 27: Percentage of people living in poverty by population group -NDM.53 

Table 28: Poverty rate (lower bound) - nkangala district municipality.56 

Table 29: Pass rate.56 

Table 30: Overall crime index.60 

Table 31: Households by dwelling unit type].62 

Table 32: Informal dwelling backlog.63 

Table 33: Households by type of sanitation.63 

Table 35: Households by type of sanitation LM’s.64 

Table 35: Households by type of water access.65 

Table 36: Households by type of electrical connection LM’s.67 

Table 37: Electricity connection - NDM.68 

Table 38: Households by refuse disposal -LM’s.69 

Table 39: Number of trips by purpose of trips -NDM.70 

Table 40: Trips by purpose of trip -NDM.71 

Table 41: Total number of trips by origin.71 

Table 42: Bednights by origin of tourist.72 


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Table 43: Trips per province.72 

Table 44: Total tourism spending.73 

Table 46: Total spending as % share of GDP.75 

Table 47: HIV prevalence rate per local municipality.75 

Table 48: Number of persons living with disability per disability classification.76 

Table 49: Division of functions and powers between the ndm and local municipalities.77 

Table 50: Departments and section 56 managers within the district.81 

Table 48: Staff establishment in NDM.81 

Table 49: NDM employee profile.81 

Table 50: Total number of people with disability within the district.82 

Table 51: Audit Performance of LMs-3 year-term.90 

Table 52: Level of Governance with the Audit Function in the LM.90 

Table 53: NDM Strategic Risks.92 

Table 54: Ward Committees in NDM.94 

Table 55: Wards within the NDM.94 

Table 56: CDWs within the NDM.95 

Table 57: Anchor Project within NDM.100 

Table 58: Cooperatives that have received Grant Support in NDM.103 

Table 59: GRAP.117 

Table 60: Municipal Health Services Projects. 121 

Table 61: Mobile Clinics and Points.123 

Table 62: HIV prevalence.124 

Table 63: Provincial Performance in descending 2008-2018 . 127 

Table 64: District Performance for Mpumalanga Province: 2013- 2018. 128 

Table 65: Performance of schools per local municipalities under Nkangala District Municipality: 2013- 2018. 128 

Table 68: Age Categories of Older Persons in NDM. 130 

Table 69: Access to Services. 131 

Table 70: Identified disability categories in NDM.132 

Table 69: Safety and security Projects 2018/19 and 19/20 financial year. 143 

Table 70: Disaster Priority Harzards. 144 

Table 71: Implemented projects. 146 

Table 72: Priority Projects for 2019/2020. 146 

Table 76: Employment and Unemployment Rate - Female. 151 

Table 77: Women empowerment issues.151 

Table 78: Youth Employment Rate within the District.153 

Table 79: Status of Electricity License.16 

Table 80: Status of High mast lights and transmission lines.162 

Table 81: households by type of electrical connection] .162 

Table 82: Indaba recommendations on electricity.164 

Table 83: Storm water and roads status quo.164 

Table 84: PRAM Grant.165 

Table 85: Municipal Access roads.165 

Table 86: Functions for PRAM Grant.166 

Table 87: Area of Local Municipality.167 

Table 89: Housing demands.174 

Table 90: Housing Stock.175 

Table 91: Informal Settlements.175 

Table 92: NDM Strategic Development Areas.175 

Table 94: Outstanding Land Restitution Claims Submitted per Municipality.180 

Table 95: Land Tenure Status in the District.183 


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ACRONYMS 


ABET 

Adult Based Education and Training 

AIDS 

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 

ARDF 

Agricultural Rural Development Funding 

ASGISA 

Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative 

forSA 

BBBEE 

Broad Based Black Economic 

Empowerment 

BCP 

Business Continuity Plan 

BCP 

Biodiversity Conversation Plan 

BNG 

Breaking New Ground 

BPO 

Business Process Outsourcing 

BRAIN 

Business Referral and Information Network 

CASP 

Comprehensive Agricultural Support 
Programme 

CBIS 

Contractor Based Individual Subsidy 

CBOs 

Community Based Organisations 

CDSM 

Chief Directorate for Surveys and Mapping 

CDW 

Community Development Worker 

CETA 

Construction Education and Training 
Authority 

CHBC 

Community Flome Base Care 

CHRD 

Cultural FHeritage Resource Database 

CIF 

Capital Investment Framework 

CLARA 

Communal Land Rights Act 

CMIP 

Consolidated Municipal Infrastructure 
Programme 

CPA 

Community Property Association 

CPF 

Community Policing Forum 

CPPP 

Community Public Private Partnership 
Programme 

CPTR 

Current Public Transport Record 

CSAR 

Central South Africa Railway 

CSIR 

Council for Scientific and Industrial 

Research 

DAC 

AIDS Council 

DARDLEA 

Department of Agriculture, Rural 
Development, Land and Environmental 
Affairs 

DBSA 

Development Bank of Southern Africa 

DEDT 

Department of Economic Development and 
Tourism 

DSD 

Department of Social Development 

DFA 

Development Facilitation Act 

DoH 

Department of Health 

DLA 

Department of Land Affairs 

DHS 

Department of Human Settlements 

DORA 

Division of Revenue Act 


DPWRT 

Department of Public Works, Roads and 
Transport 

DCOGTA 

Department of Coorpoerative Government 
and Traditional Affairs 

DTI 

Department of Trade and Industry 

DM 

Municipality 

DMA 

Management Area 

DMC 

Disaster Management Centre 

DME 

Department of Minerals and Energy 

DMP 

Disaster Management Plan 

DPW 

Department of Public Works 

DRP 

Disaster Recovery Plan 

DWAF 

Department of Water and Sanitation 

ECA 

Environmental Conservation Act 

EDMS 

Electronic Document Management System 

EIA 

Environmental Impact Assessment 

EIP 

Environmental Implementation Plan 

EHS 

Environmental Health Services 

EMP 

Environmental Management Plan 

EMS 

Environmental Management System 

EPWP 

Expanded Public Works Programme 

FAR 

Floor Area Rational 

FBS 

Free Basic Services 

FBE 

Free Basic Electricity 

FET 

Further Education Training 

FPA 

Fire Protection Association 

FUA 

Functional Urban Area 

GET 

General Education and Training 

GDP 

Gross Domestic Product 

GDS 

Growth and Development Summit 

GGP 

Gross Geographical Product 

GIS 

Geographic Information System 

GVA 

Gross Value Added 

HDI 

Human Development Index 

HET 

Higher Education and Training 

HIV 

Human Immunodeficiency Virus 

HRDP 

Human Resource Development Plan 

HOD 

Head of Department 

IBBD 

Industrial and Big Business Development 

ICRMP 

Integrated Cultural Resources 

Management Plan 

ICT 

Information and Communication 

Technology 

IDP 

Integrated Development Plan 

IEDP 

Integrated Economic Development Plan 

IFSNP 

Integrated Food Security Nutrition 
Programme 

IGR 

Intergovernmental Relations 

IEM 

Integrated Environmental Management 


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IMEP 

Integrated Municipal Environmental 
Programme 

INEPBPU 

Integrated National Electrification 

Programme Business Planning Unit 

INTAC 

Integrated Nature-based Tourism and 
Conversation Management Project 

IPA 

Irreplaceable Area 

IS 

Information System 

ISF 

Integrated Spatial Framework 

ISRDP 

Integrated and Sustainable Rural 
Development Programme 

IT 

Information Technology 

UP 

Integrated Transport Plan 

KPA 

Key Performance Area 

KPI 

Key Performance Indicator 

LAR 

Land Audit Report 

LDO 

Land Development Objective 

LDP 

Land Development Principles 

LED 

Local Economic Development 

LM 

Local Municipality 

LOA 

Leave Of Absence 

LRAD 

Land Redistribution for Agricultural 
Development 

LUM 

Land Use Management 

LUMB 

Land Use Management Bill 

LUMS 

Land Use Management System 

MAM 

Multi Agency Mechanism 

SDGs 

Sustainable Development Goals 

MDCSR 

Department of Culture, Sports and 

Recreation 

MDHSS 

Mpumalanga Department of Health and 
Social Services 

MDE 

Mpumalanga Department of Education 

MEC 

Member of Executive Council 

MFMA 

Municipal Finance Management Act 

MHS 

Municipal Health Services 

MIG 

Municipal Infrastructure Grant 

MLL 

Minimum Living Level 

MPG 

Mpumalanga Provincial Government 

MPCC 

Multi-Purpose Community Centres 

MPRA 

Municipal Poverty Rates Act 

MRDP 

Mpumalanga Rural Development 

Programme 

MSA 

Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000 

MSIG 

Municipal Systems Improvement Grant 

MSP 

Master Systems Plan 

MTEF 

Medium Term Expenditure Framework 

MTGS 

Mpumalanga Tourism Growth Strategy 

MTSF 

Medium Term Strategic Framework 

NDPGF 

Neighbourhood Development Partnership 
Grant Fund 


NEDA 

Nkangala Economic Development Agency 

NEDLAC 

National Economic Development & Labour 
Council 

NEMA 

National Environmental Management Act 

NEPAD 

New Partnership for Africa's Development 

NER 

National Electricity Regulator 

NDM 

Nkangala District Municipality 

NGO 

Non-Governmental Organization 

NHRA 

National Heritage Resources Act 

NLP 

National Land Care Programme 

NSDP 

National Spatial Development Perspective 

NWMS 

National Waste Management Strategy 

OHSA 

Occupational Health and Safety Act 

OLS 

Operating Licence Strategy 

PA 

Protected Area 

PGDS 

Provincial Growth and Development 

Strategy 

PHC 

Primary Health Care 

PHP 

Peoples Housing Programme/Process 

PLAS 

Proactive Land Acquisition Strategy 

PMS 

Performance Management System 

PPP 

Public Performance Areas 

PRUDS 

Provincial Rural and Urban Development 
Strategy 

PSC 

Project Steering Committee 

RDP 

Reconstruction and Development Plan 

REDS 

Regional Electricity Distribution System 

REED 

Regional Economic Enterprise 

Development 

RIDS 

Regional Industry Development Strategy 

RSA 

Republic of South Africa 

RSC 

Regional Service Council 

SABS 

South Africa Bureau of Standards 

SACOB 

South Africa Chamber of Business 

SACTRP 

South Africa Council for Town and 

Regional Planners 

SAHRA 

South African Heritage Resources Agency 

SALGA 

South Africa Local Government and 

Administration 

SAMAF 

South African Micro Finance Apex Fund 

SANAC 

South African National AIDS Council 

SANCO 

South Africa National Civic Organization 

SAPS 

South African Police Service 

SAR 

South African Railways 

SDA 

Spatial Development Areas 

SDLC 

System Development Life Cycle 

SDF 

Spatial Development Framework 

SEAM 

Strategic Engagement and Agreement 

Matrix 

SEDA 

Small Enterprise Development Agency 

SETA 

Sector Education Training Authority 


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SEMP 

Strategic Environmental Management Plan 

SLA 

Service Level Agreement 

SMART 

Specific - Measurable - Accurate - Realistic 
- Time-Based 

SMME 

Small Medium and Micro Enterprises 

SoER 

State of the Environment Report 

SUPA 

Service Upgrading Priority Area 

SWOT 

Strength, Weaknesses. Opportunities and 
Threats Analysis 

TLC 

Transitional Local Council 


TOD 

Transit Orientated Development 

TRC 

Transitional Regional Council 

UN 

United Nations 

URDP 

Urban and Rural Development Programme 

VIP 

Ventilated Improved Pit Latrine 

WMAs 

Water Management Areas 

WMP 

Waste Management Plan 

WSA 

Water Services Authority 

WSDP 

Water Services Development Plan 


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FOREWORD BY THE EXECUTIVE MAYOR 

TO THE N KAN GALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 2019-2020 IDP 

(INTERGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN) 

The 2019-2020 Integrated Development Plan (IDP) of Nkangala District Municipality (NDM) is the second review 
of the five-year strategic Plan Document which was informed by the objectives and targets which were extensively 
consulted with the various internal and external stakeholders. It includes the community’s inputs through the Public 
Participation Mechanisms employed by the District Municipality, according to Section 28 of Municipal Systems Act 
No. 32 of 2000. Subsequently the IDP was adopted in May 2019. 

The IDP is the key instrument that guides and inform all planning and development within the Municipality. This 
review, seek to speed up service delivery, taking into account the Municipality’s most critical development and 
internal transformation needs, the alignment of Resources and the capacity of the Municipality based on the 
obtaining environment, in a quest to improve the quality of life of the citizens and combating the triple challenge of 
inequality, poverty and unemployment. It is our considered view that this plan will indeed create an enabling 
environment with favourable conditions for inclusive economic growth and development for the benefit of all. 

This Plan is undoubtedly, encapsulated in the Vision of NDM for long term development trajectory. Furthermore, 
the Intergovernmental Relations amongst the three spheres of government is enhanced and promoted through the 
IDP process within the guiding policy frameworks, legislation, guidelines and regulations that seek to give direction 
for the Country’s development agenda. The National Development Plan Vision 2030 (NDP) the Mpumalanga 
Growth Path the Millennium Development Goals are some of the documents that inform this IDP for the next five 
years. In addition, the SoNA (State of the Nation Address) the SoPA (State of the Province Address) as well as 
the SoDa (State of the District Address) have highlighted some milestones to be implemented in this government 
term. Economic Transformation, Job creation, Poverty Alleviation, Energy, Water and Sanitation, Investments, 
Social Development and Infrastructure Development, have been prioritized. 

Naturally, the IDP strategy seek to address the service delivery challenges, outlining the Council’s operational 
strategies, and key performance indicators and performance targets, so as to ensure good governance and 
effective Service delivery of basic needs to the citizens. 

We are confident that if we all shoulder the wheel and work as a team, the Communities, Private Sector and 
Government and all stakeholders, each playing their roles, we shall certainly make a positive difference in making 
the quality of life of our people better. 


CLLRTHEMBI SARAH MASILELA 
EXECUTIVE MAYOR 


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MUNICIPAL MANAGER’S OVERVIEW 


The IDP is the key instrument to achieve developmental local governance for decentralised, strategic, participatory, 
implementation orientated, coordinated and integrated development, it is actually the mechanisms for realising 
Municipalities’ major developmental issues in order to improve the quality of life of citizens within NDM. It seeks 
to speed-up service delivery by securing a buy-in of all relevant role-players and provides government departments 
and other social partners with a clear framework of the Municipality’s development trajectory to harness 
implementation efforts. 

In term of Local Government: MSA (act 32 of 2000) section 25(1) each municipal council must, within a prescribed 
period after the start of its elected term, adopt a single, inclusive and strategic plan for the development of the 
municipality, therefore as prescribed in Municipal System Act 32 of 2000. NDM has developed the five (5) year 
2017/22 strategic plan which was adopted by council by the 30 th May 2017 and is currently conducting its second 
review (2019/20) of the IDP. 

The District integrated development plan (IDP) strategic document which contains municipal plan as a district it 
was developed through chapter 4 of the Municipal System Act, community consultation with community and 
stakeholder. The consultative processes conducted during IDP outreach and IDP/PMS forum and IDP/Budget 
indaba to enhance and strengthen relationship with the community towards bettering the lives of the people. 

NDM council have adopted new vision: “’Improved quality of life for all” Through the new vision of the District 
municipality, the District key focus priorities during the implementation of the 5 year IDP will be ensuring provision 
of service delivery with singular preference provision of water supply, paving of roads, job creation and lastly 
ensuring integrated human settlement to mitigate the triple challenges which are faced in South Africa as whole 


The District will continue to be exemplary in the execution of its functions in a manner that strengthens and fast- 
tracks the implementation of its socio-economic transformation agenda in our communities and further deepen 
local democracy. 


I would like to take this opportunity to thank all that contributed in assisting the Municipality to realise its goals and 
objectives. 


M M SKOSANA 
MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


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THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF THE IDP DOCUMENT 


This document is the 2019/20 IDP review of the Nkangala District Municipality (NDM), and it represents the second review of 
the 5-year strategic plan of the Council. The strategic objectives and targets contained herein culminate from the extensive 
systematic and structured internal and external multi-stakeholder consultation through various Public Participation 
mechanisms with the Community and stakeholders within the Nkangala District Municipal area of jurisdiction. 

In terms of the MSA, Section 25 (1)each Municipal Council must, within a prescribed period after the start of its elected term, 
adopt a single, inclusive and strategic plan for the development of the Municipality which, inter alia, links, integrates and co¬ 
ordinates plans and takes into account proposals for the development of the Municipality and aligns the resources and capacity 
of the Municipality. As far as the status of the IDP is concerned, Section 35 of the Act clearly states that an integrated 
development plan adopted by the Council of a Municipality is the principal strategic planning instrument, which guides and 
informs all planning and development, and all decisions with regard to planning, management and development, in the 
Municipality. It binds the Municipality in the exercise of its executive authority, except to the extent of any inconsistency 
between a Municipality’s integrated development plan and national or provincial legislation, in which case such legislation 
prevails. Section 36 furthermore stipulates that a Municipality must give effect to its integrated development plan and conduct 
its affairs in a manner that is consistent with its integrated development plan. 

The IDP is the key instrument to achieve developmental local governance for decentralised, strategic, participatory, 
implementation orientated, coordinated and integrated development. Preparing an IDP is not only a legal requirement in terms 
of the legislation but it is actually the instrument for realising Municipalities’ major developmental responsibilities to improve 
the quality of life of citizens. It seeks to speed-up service delivery by securing a buy-in of all relevant role-players and provides 
government departments and other social partners with a clear framework of the Municipality’s development trajectory to 
harness implementation efforts. 

Furthermore, it promotes intergovernmental co-ordination by facilitating a system of communication and co-ordination between 
local, provincial and national spheres of government. Local development priorities, identified in the IDP process, constitute the 
backbone of the local governments’ budgets, plans, strategies and implementation activities. Hence, the IDP forms the policy 
framework on which service delivery, infrastructure development, economic growth, social development, environmental 
sustainability and poverty alleviation rests. The IDP therefore becomes a local expression of the government's plan of action 
as it informs and is informed by the strategic development plans at national and provincial spheres of government. The 
document entails the following chapters: 


Chapter One: p rovides the Background and introduction and legislative and policy framework guiding socio-economic 
development in South Africa, with a particular focus on the local government sphere. Provisions of policy instruments such as 
the Medium Term Expenditure Framework, National Spatial Development Perspective, National Growth Path, State of the 
Nation Address, the 12 National Outcomes, Provincial Growth and Development Strategy of Mpumalanga Province and the 
Vision 2030 constituent of socio-economic targets linked to the Sustainable Development goals are outlined. 

Furthermore, deals with the process followed during the drafting of the 2019/20 IDP of council. Key activities include amongst 
others adoption of the District Framework/ Process Plan. October 2018/19 and March 2019 Community Outreach Programme 
meetings respectively, discussions that took place through varying Council structures such as Mayors’ Forum; Municipal 
Managers Forum; IDP/ PMS Forum meetings as well as IDP/LED Working Group meetings. The outcomes of all these 
engagements were taken into cognizance during the drafting of this document. 

Chapter Two: deals with vision and mission of the District, principles and values as well as the key focus areas of council. 

Chapter Three: provides a relatively comprehensive outline of key indicators as far as socioeconomic development status of 
the District in the areas of, inter aiia, demography, unemployment, literacy levels, economic activity and income distribution. It 
is evident that Emalahleni and Steve Tshwete are the key drivers of the economy of the District. Thembisile Hani and Dr J S 
Moroka are the most affected by underdevelopment and high levels of service backlog. Emakhazeni and Victor Khanye local 
municipality, due to their limited economic concentrations and transactions are experiencing relatively modest levels of 


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economic growth and development. In all the municipalities there are signs of existence of poverty pockets within the periphery 
of the urban areas where most informal settlements, townships and rural areas are found. 

Chapter Four: deals with rural development. Key issues highlighted include the need for programmes aimed at income 
augmentation, development of rural infrastructure, tourism development, land reform and security of tenure, food security, 
sustainable livelihoods, education, health, safety and security, development of small enterprises and cooperatives as critical 
elements of rural development. 

Chapter Five: outlines IDP priority issues. Each of the IDP 20 Priority issues identified by NDM are analytically captured in the 
form of a problem statement and the emanating challenges that must be attended to in the immediate future. 

Chapter Six: deals with the NDM’s Development Objectives Strategies and Key Performance Indicators and Projects to be 
implemented in the immediate future. 

Chapter Seven: deals with the integration of the Sector Plans, Strategies and Plans in relation to each of the 20 Priority Issues 
of the District. 

Chapter Eight: outlines the District Financial Plan. 


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CHAPTER ONE: 


1.1 District Geography 

Nkangala District Municipality comprises six local municipalities namely, Emakhazeni, Steve Tshwete, Emalahleni, Victor 
Khanye, Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka local municipalities. Emalahleni Local Municipality accounts for the largest 
population estimate at 395 466 or 30% followed by Thembisile Hani Local Municipality with a population estimate of 310 458 
or 23.7%, Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality at 249 705 or 19%, Steve Tshwete Municipality at 229 831 or 18%.Victor Khanye 
Local Municipality at 75 452 or 5.8% and Emakhazeni Local Municipality at 47 216 or 3.6% are the two smallest municipalities 
within the District and the area covers a total area of approximately 16,892 square kilometres.Table 3 below provides a 
summary of the population estimates in the Nkangala District Municipality as per the National Census by Stats SA, 2011 and 
community survey 2016. 


Table 1: Nkangala District Demographic Profile 


NAME 

POPULATION 

% 

HOUSEHOLDS 

2011 

% 

HOUSEHOLDS 

2016 

% 

Emalahleni Local Municipality 

395 466 

30 

119 874 

34 

150 420 

36 

Thembisile Hani Local Municipality 

310 458 

23.7 

75 634 

21 

82 740 

20 

Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality 

249 705 

19 

62 162 

17 

62 367 

15 

Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

229 831 

18 

64 971 

18 

86 713 

21 

Victor Khanye Local Municipality 

75 452 

5.8 

20 548 

6 

24 270 

6 

Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

47 216 

3.6 

13 722 

4 

14 633 

3 


'Source: Stats-SA 2011, CS 2016) 


Figure 1: Geography of the District 



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1.1.1 Guiding Parameters 


Within the multitude of government policy frameworks, legislation, guidelines and regulations that seek to advocate for the 
path, pace and direction for the country's socio-economic development agenda, the section below focuses on Vision 2014; 
Popular Mandate across Spheres of Government;); the National Development Vision 2030 (NDP); Mpumalanga Vision 2030; 
National Growth Path; the Mpumalanga Growth Path; Millennium Development Goals; State of the Nation Address (SONA); 
sustainable development goals (SDG’s) and State of the Province Address (SOPA). 


1.1.2 The popular mandate across Spheres of Government 


Guided by the Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), the Vision for Government as a whole is to build a society 
that is truly united, non-racial, non-sexist and democratic. Central to this is a single and integrated economy that benefits all. 
Within the context of achieving objectives of growing the economy, tackling poverty and unemployment as well as social- 
inclusion, the popular mandate for Local Government and the mandate for National and Provincial government is determined 
as depicted in figure 2. These are the key matters that government planning and budgeting processes must focus on. 

Figure 2: Popular mandate for government 



A POPULAR MANDATE FOR LOCAL 


A POPULAR MANDATE FOR 

Guided by the 
Reconstruction and 
Development 

DEVELOPMENT 

♦ Build Local Economies to create 


NATIONAL AND PROVINCIAL 

Programme (RDP), our 

more employment decent work 


♦Creation of work and 

vision is to build a 

and sustainable livelihoods; 


sustainable livelihoods 

society that is truly 

♦ Improve Local Public Services and 


♦Education 

united, non-racial, non- 

broaden access to them; 


♦Health 

sexist and democratic. 

♦ Build more united, non-racial. 


♦Crime 

Central to this is a 

integrated and safer communities; 


♦Rural Development 

single and integrated 


including land reform, food 

economy that benefits 
all. 

Vision 2014: ANC 
Manifesto 

♦ Promote more active community 
participation in Local Government; 

♦ Ensure more effective, 

accountable and clean Local 
Government that works together 
with National and Provincial 
Government 


production and security. 

_/ 

_ :_ J 


_ J 


1.1.3 The National Development Plan (NDP): Vision 2030 

The National Development Plan developed by the National Planning Commission and unveiled on 11 November 2011 states 
that: 

South Africa can eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030. It will require change, hard work, leadership, and 
unity. Our goal is to improve the life chances of all South Africans, but particularly those young people who presently 
live in poverty. The plan asks for a major change in how we go about our lives. In the past, we expected government 
to do things for us. What South Africa needs is for all of us to be active citizens and to work together - government, 
business, communities - so that people have what they need to live the lives they would like. 


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The plan helps us to chart a new course. It focuses on putting in place the gears that will enable people need to grasp 
opportunities; such as education, public transport and to broaden the opportunities through economic growth. 

The plan is aimed at reducing poverty and inequality. It advocates for a shift in the way government operates and invest 
towards budgeting and spending on programmes and projects that will help people improve their own lives and those of their 
children and the communities they live in. South Africa can become the country we want it to become. It is possible to get rid 
of poverty and reduce inequality in 20 years. We have the people, the goodwill, the skills, the resources - and now, a plan. 

This will be achieved by prioritising the following initiatives: 

• An economy that will create more jobs 

• Improving infrastructure 

• Transition to a low-carbon economy 

• An inclusive and integrated rural economy 

• Reversing the spatial effect of apartheid 

• Improving quality of education, training and innovation 

• Quality health care for all 

• Social protection 

• Building safer communities 

• Reforming the public service 

• Fighting corruption 

• Transforming society and uniting the country 


1.1.4 National Growth Path 

The New Growth Path must provide bold, imperative and effective strategies to create the millions of new jobs South Africa 
needs. It must also lay out a dynamic vision for how we can collectively achieve a more developed, democratic and equitable 
economy and society over the medium-term, in the context of sustainable growth. 

The shift to a New Growth Path will require the creative and collective efforts of all sections of South African society. It will 
require Leadership and strong governance. It takes account of the new opportunities that are available to us, the strength we 
have and the constraints we face. We will have to develop a collective National will and embark on joint action to change the 
character of the South African economy and ensure that the benefits are shared more equitably to all our people, particularly 
the poor. 

JOBS DRIVERS: 

Substantial Public investment in infrastructure both to create employment directly, in construction, operation 
and maintenance as well as the production of inputs, and indirectly by improving efficiency across the economy; 
Targeting more labour-absorbing activities across the main economic sectors-the Agricultural and Mining Value 
Chains, Manufacturing and Services; 

Taking advantage of new opportunities in the knowledge and green economies; 

Leveraging social capital in the social economy and the public service; and 
Fostering Rural Development and Regional Integration. 


Table 2: Job Drivers 


JOBS DRIVER 1: 

Infrastructure: 

1. Public Investment creates 250 000 jobs yearly in energy, transport, water and 
communication infrastructure and housing through to 2015 

JOBS DRIVER 2: Main 

Economic Sectors: 

• 300 000 in Agriculture smallholder schemes 

• 145 000 jobs in agro processing by 2020 

• 140 000 additional jobs in Mining by 2020, and 200 000 jobs by 2030, not counting the 
downstream and side stream effects. 

• 350 000 jobs as per the IPAP2 targets in Manufacturing by 2020 


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• 250 000 jobs in Business and Tourism by 2020 

JOBS DRIVER 3: 

Seizing the Potential 
of new economies 

• 300 000 jobs to Green Economy by 2020. 

• 80 000 in 2020 and 400 000 jobs in 2030 in Manufacturing and the rest in Construction, 
operations and maintenance of new environmentally friendly infrastructure. 

• 100 000 jobs by 2020 in the knowledge-intensive sectors of ICT, higher Education, Healthcare, 
Mining-related technologies, Pharmaceutical and biotechnology. 

JOBS Driver 4: 

Investing in Social 
and public Services 

• 250 000 jobs by NGOs like Co-ops and Stockvel. 

• 100 000 jobs by 2020 in Public Services (Education, Health and Policing). 

JOBS DRIVER 5: 

Spatial Development 
(Regional Integration) 

• 60 000 direct jobs in 2015 and 150 000 jobs in 2020 through exports within SADC. 


1.1.5 Mpumalanga Growth and Development Path 

Two Scenarios were modelled to qualify what rate of Economic growth is desirable to significantly reduce unemployment in 
Mpumalanga in the foreseeable future: 

• SCENARI01 : The 15% unemployment rate by 2020-Firstly through creating on average 69 400 net jobs annually 
for the next 10 years. Secondly, accelerated and sustained economic growth of approximately 5.3% annually. 

• SCENARIO 2: The 15% unemployment rate by 2025-Firstly through creating 70 600 net jobs annually for the next 
15 years. Secondly, through accelerated and sustained Economic growth of approximately 4.6% annually. This 
apparently the preferred Scenario. 

Table 3: Job Pillars 


PILLAR 1: JOB CREATION 

PILLAR 2: INCLUSIVE AND 

SHARED ECONOMIC GROWTH 

PILLAR 3: SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION 

- Growth in Labour Absorbing 

- Costand Ease of doing Business; 

- Rural Nodal Development; 

Sectors; 

- Increased competitiveness; 

- Rural Land Tenure transformation; 

- Green Jobs; 

- Beneficiation; 

- Food Security; 

- EPWP2; 

- Community led Local Economic 

- Agricultural Development; 

- Youth Employment Initiatives; 

Development; 

- Transport and Logistics; 

- Value Chain Initiatives between 

- BBBEE; 

- Social Economy; 

small and large Enterprises; 

- Municipal Land and Asset 

- SMME Development & Support’; 

- Industry Diversification; 

ownership; 

- Labour/Skills Development; 

- Increased Labour & regulatory 

- ICT Deployment; 

- Infrastructure Development & 

efficiency; and 

- Innovation and the knowledge 

Maintenance; 

- Support to Co-ops and Informal 

Economy; 

- Finance & Funding; 

Business; 

- SMME Development & Support'; 

- Land & Water Resource 

- SMME Development & Support’; 

- Labour/Skills Development; 

Management; and 

- Labour/Skills Development; 

- Infrastructure Development & 

- Sustainable Human Settlements. 

- Infrastructure Development & 

Maintenance; 


Maintenance; 

- Finance & Funding; 


- Finance & Funding; 

- Land & Water Resource 


- Land & Water Resource 

Management; and 


Management; and 

- Sustainable Human Settlements. 


- Sustainable Human Settlements. 



PILLAR 4: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN 

PILLAR 5: ENVIRONMENTAL 

PILLAR 6: REGIONAL CO- 

DEVELOPMENT 

SUSTAINABILITY 

ORDINATION 


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Quality Basic Education; 
Community /Heritage 
Education; 

Access to quality Healthcare; 
Social Assistance & Insurance; 
Social Infrastructure; 

Safe Communities. 


- Waste Management; 

- Energy Efficiency; and Renewable 
Energy Source. 


- Joint Initiatives between MP and 
Neighbours; and 

- Sub-Corridor Development. 


1.1.6 Sustainable Development Goals 

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals for the period 2015-2030 are: 


• End poverty in all its forms everywhere 

• End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture 

• Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages 

• Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all 

• Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 

• Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 

• Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work 
for all 

• Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation 

• Reduce inequality within and among countries 

• Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 

• Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 

• Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts (in line with the United Nations Framework Convention 
on Climate Change) 

• Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development 

• Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat 
desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss 

• Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build 
effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 

• Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development 


1.1.7 State of the Nation Address (SONA) and State of the Province Address 

Table 4: SONA and SOPA 


Commitments 

SONA 

SOPA 

Infrastructure 


• Ensuring that our people have access to 
basic services to improve their quality of life. 

Small, Medium, 
and Micro sized 
Development 

• Focusing this year on significantly expanding our 
small business incubation programme 

• Prioritisation of targeted skills development and 
capacity building programmes for smallholder 
and emerging black farmers. 

• Focus on high value agricultural products with 
export potential such as our fruit, wine and 
vegetable industries, as well as poultry and red 
meat. 

• we shifted our focus towards developing 
young farmer entrepreneurs to actively 
participate in this sector. 

• Through the use of the GNP model 
empower and support the development of 
smallholder farmers within the Province's 
agricultural sector. It is envisaged that 
through the model, we shall support 


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smallholder farmers, local bakeries, as well 
as the Youth Transport SMMEs 

Local Economic 
Development and 
Growth 

• Need to find new and larger markets for our 
goods and services. 

• Establishing special economic zones that are 
dedicated to producing specific types of 
products, such as clothing and textiles. 

The Province continues to establish and 
enhance the agro processing facilities to assist 
farmers to benefit through the commodity 
value chain. 

Jobs, especially 
for youth 

• Accelerate inclusive economic growth and create 
jobs 

• As government, we have decided that the 
requirement for work experience at entry-level in 
state institutions will be done away with. 

• Growing the economy and creating decent 
employment to address the triple challenges 
of unemployment, poverty, and inequality; 

Land, Housing 
and Human 

settlements 

• Government will be expanding the People’s 
Housing Programme, where households are 
allocated serviced stands to build their own 
houses, either individually or through community- 
led housing cooperatives. 

• Strategically located land will be released to 
address human settlements needs in urban and 
peri-urban areas. 

• We are resolute that all taverns, shebeens and 
liquour outlets near school premises must be 
shutdown 


Education 

• Government will continue providing free 
education to tertiary level. 

• Improving the quality of education 

• we have relaunched Marapyane College 
and converted it into a Farmer Training 

Centre. 

• Focus in Early Childhood Development and 
establish an Early Childhood Development 
Institute (ECDI). 

Social and Health 

• Government will lead the campaign to include 
men and boys as active champions in the 
struggle against gender-based violence. 

• Improving our health care system to ensure 
that we increase life expectancy and 
mitigate the negative impact of HIV and 

AIDS, and other opportunistic diseases; 

Government and 

governance 

• Pro poor focus 

• Step up the fight against corruption and state 
capture. 

• Strengthening the capacity of the state to 
address the needs of the people 



1.1.8 Local Government Back to Basics Strategy 

1.1.8.1 Background 

COGTA has done a review of South Africa’s 278 municipalities, which has revealed that we still have a journey to reach the 
ideal municipality we envisage. The top third municipalities have got the basics right and are performing their functions at least 
adequately. Within this group, there are a small group of top performers that are doing extremely well. In these municipalities 
there are innovative practices to ensure sustainability and resilience. This small core represents the desired (ideal) state for 
all our municipalities. The middle third of municipalities are fairly functional, and overall performance is average. While the 
basics are mostly in place and the municipalities can deliver on the main functions of local government, we also find some 


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areas of poor performance or decline that are worrying signs. The bottom third of municipalities are frankly dysfunctional, and 
significant work is required to get them to function properly. Among others we find endemic corruption, councils which do not 
function, no structured community engagement, and poor financial management leading to continuous negative audit 
outcomes. There is a poor record of service delivery, and functions such as fixing potholes, collecting refuse, maintaining 
public places or fixing street lights are not performed. While most of the necessary resources to render the functions or maintain 
the systems are available, the basic mechanisms to perform these functions are often not in place. It is in these municipalities 
that we are failing our people dramatically, and where we need to be intervening urgently in order to correct the decay in the 
system. Institutional incapacity and widespread poverty have undermined the sustainability of the local government project, 
leading in some instances to a serious breakdown in services. 

Some of the problems we face are: 

• A collapse in core municipal infrastructure services in some communities, resulting in services either not being 
provided at all, or provided at unacceptably low levels. 

• Slow or inadequate responses to service delivery challenges are in turn linked to the breakdown of trust in the 
institutions and councillors by communities. 

• Social distance by our public representatives is a major cause for concern. This reflects inadequate public 
participation and poorly functioning ward councillors and committees. 

• The viability of certain municipalities is a key concern. The low rate of collection of revenue continues to undermine 
the ability of municipalities to deliver services to communities. 

• Municipalities also need to be driven by appropriately skilled personnel and their correct placement, and there are 
for too 

• Many instances both of inappropriate placements and skills not measuring up to requirements. 

• This is compounded by widespread instances of rent seeking and corruption amongst public representatives and 
business, reflecting a broader breakdown in the values and good governance principles that should be guiding the 
people we have elected or appointed to run the local government system and those that do business with 
government. 

The so-called service delivery protests are a reflection of community frustration with these failures, especially in economically 
marginalised communities who experience real or perceived indifference from government officials and politicians. While these 
protests have generated a negative narrative and perceptions for municipalities, we must recognise them as a serious 
indictment of our ability to serve our people. 


1.1.8.2 The Mandate of Back to Basic Strategy 

Local Government Back to Basic Strategy is a guiding tool driven by GOGTA with aim of making the local government to focus 
on its constitutional mandate and further to ensure that it remain focus on this mandate of providing the basics services such 
as clean drinking water, sanitation, electricity shelter, waste removal and roads etc. this strategy provide a basic direction for 
local government to understand where we are, where we could be and what needs to be done to improve performance, and 
further set a direction for how can the municipalities get basics right. 

Goal of Local Government Back to Basic Strategy: The main goal of this strategy is to improve the functioning 
of municipalities to better serve communities by getting the basics right. 

Back to Basics Strategy is driven through Back to Basics- Programme for change: The Back to Basics 
programme for change emphasise the change in our paradigm to focus on serving peoples and not extractive elite 
by the implementing the following aspects as part of Back to Basics Programme for Change: 


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A differentiated approach: The differentiated approach is a transformational agenda of back to Basic strategy with 
four priorities focusing in Public engagement, good governance, financial management and technical capacity 

Defining roles and responsibilities: All the spheres of government have a stake in contributing to service delivery 
their roles need to be clearly defined by means of: 

National government programmes of support and enforcement 

o Basic Services: Creating conditions for decent living 

o Good governance 

o Public Participation: Putting people first 

o Sound financial management 

o Building Capable Institutions and Administrations. 

Provincial Government programmes of support and enforcement 

o Basic Services: Creating decent living conditions 


1.2 IDP REVIEW PROCESSES 

1.2.1 Review Activities 

The review process has considered the assessment of the District’s performance against organisational objectives as well as 
implementation delivery, the recommendations of the stakeholder consultation and public participation, IDP engagement 
processes and also any new information or change in circumstances that might have arisen subsequent to the adoption of the 
2019/20 IDP. 


Figure 3 depicts a schematic representation of the review process followed. 


Figure 3: IDP Review Process 




The manner in which the review was undertaken is outlined in the Municipal Framework/Process Plans, which were prepared 
and adopted by Municipalities by August 2018 subsequent to the adoption of the District Framework Plan in July 2018. 


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Figure 4: Activities Involved in the IDP Review Process 




1 

PHASE 0: PREPARING FOP REVIEW 

3 

Framework Plan 

3 

Process Plan 

4 

PHASE 1: ANALYSIS 

5 

Sector and Spatial Analysis 

6 

institutional Preparedness 

7 

Service delivery gaps 

8 

Outline development priorities 

PHASE ?: REFINE OBJECTIVES * STRATEGIES 

9 

10 

Outline vision, mission & goals 

11 

FormJete/conflrm strategies 

12 

Priortise Sector programme 

13 

PHASE 3: PROJECTS 

14 

OuMine pnortise development projects 

15 

Design profects/^rogramme 

16 

Set project Targets & irwteators 

17 

PHASE 4: ilTEGRATE 

18 

krteyate irter-sector /departmental projects 

19 

Advertise tor public comment 

20 

0P INDABAs 

21 

PHASE 5: ADOPTION BY MUNICIPAL COUNCIL 

22 

Adoption by LMs 

23 

Adoptcn by District 

24 

BUDGETRIG 

25 

Draft and adopt budget 

26 

IMPLEMM 1 TATlOtl & MOfHTORIIIG 

27 

Approve SCOP 

28 

S57 (MSA) contracts signed 

29 

COMMUNITY PARTICR>ATIOII 

30 

IDP & Budget 


3rd Quarter 1 4th Quarter 1 si Quarter 

Jun Jul Aug Sep ' Ocl Nov Dec ' Jan 1 Feb 


2nd Quartet 


3rd Charter 


4th barter 


Mat Apt May Jt.r Jul Any iep Ml M • 




1.2.2 The Integrated Development Plan 
1.2.2.1 Introduction and Background 

The Municipal Systems Act of 2000, Section 35 states that an integrated development plan (IDP) adopted by the Council of a 
municipality is the principal strategic planning instrument which guides and informs all planning and development, and all 
decisions with regard to planning, management and development, in the municipality. Thus, the IDP is the only plan, in terms 
of the legislation, that is available to municipalities for them to strive to progressively achieve the objects of local government 
mentioned above. The IDP process also provides an opportunity for the municipality to debate and agree on a long term 
vision for the development of the municipality. The IDP also promotes intergovernmental co-ordination by facilitating a system 
of communication and co-ordination between local, provincial and national spheres of government. Among the core 
components of an IDP, the following matters must also be outlined in the IDP: 

* the municipal Council’s vision for the long term development of the municipality with special emphasis on the 
municipality's most critical development and internal transformation needs; 

■ an assessment of the existing level of development in the municipality, which must include an identification of 
communities which do not have access to basic municipal services; 

■ the Council’s development priorities and objectives for its elected term, including its local economic development 
aims and its internal transformation needs; 

■ the Council’s development strategies which must be aligned with any national or provincial sectoral plans and 
planning requirements binding on the municipality in terms of legislation; 

■ a spatial development framework which must include the provision of basic guidelines for a land use management 
system for the municipality; 

■ the Council's operational strategies; 

* applicable disaster management plans; 

■ a financial plan, which must include a budget projection for at least the next three years; and 


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■ The key performance indicators and performance targets determined in terms of the Performance Management 
System. 

1.2.2.2 The IDP Review Process 

In July 2018 Nkangala District Municipality adopted the district IDP Framework plan, these documents were adopted according 
to the MSA Legislative requirement the adopted document adopted to guide the planning of the district. 

The Framework for integrated development planning is the mechanism to ensure alignment and integration between the IDPs 
of the Nkangala District Municipality and local municipalities of which is Steve Tshwete, Emakhazeni, Emalahleni, Thembisile 
Hani, Victor Khanye and Dr JS Moroka and Nkangala 

According to Section 27(1) of the Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000, “Each district municipality, within a prescribed period 
after the start of its elected term and after following a consultative process with local municipalities within its area, must adopt 
a framework for integrated development planning in the area as a whole” 

Furthermore, the Municipal Finance Management Act 56, 2003 requires a municipal council to review its integrated 
development plan annually. The review of the DP should be based on the previous financial and budgetary performance. 
Therefore, the council is required to amend IDP based on its annual review. 

The function of the framework is to bind both the district municipality and local municipalities in the area and is aimed at proper 
consultations, coordination and alignment between the planning process of the district municipality and various local 
municipality. The IDP Framework plan is developed to ensure that the IDP, budget and performance management systems 
(PMS) are all components of one overall development planning and management system. The IDP sets out what the 
municipality aims to accomplish, how it will do this. The PMS enables the municipality to check to what extent it is achieving 
its aims. The budget provides the resources that the municipality will use to achieve its aims. 


1.2.2.3 The IDP and IGR 


The IDP is the key instrument to achieve developmental local governance for decentralised, strategic, participatory, 
implementation orientated, coordinated and integrated development. Preparing an IDP is not only a legal requirement in terms 
of the legislation but it is actually the instrument for realising Municipalities’ major developmental responsibilities to improve 
the quality of life of citizens. It seeks to speed-up service delivery by securing a buy-in of all relevant role-players and provides 
government departments and other social partners with a clear framework of the Municipality’s development trajectory to 
harness implementation efforts. 

Nkangala District is comprised of six Local Municipalities. All six are one team, and must focus their efforts and energy into 
one vision of the district, knowing what direction to take. Focus in turn creates impact and can change people’s lives for the 
better. On the other hand, the administration should and must ensure implementation of all our plans and resolutions. However, 
there is still more that needs to be done. The following issues pertinent challenges that remain a concern within the District: 

• High unemployment especially amongst our youth. 

• Adverse audit outcomes in our Local Municipalities 

• Poor revenue collection. 

• Maintenance of infrastructure 

• Increased service delivery protests 

• Mushrooming of informal settlements 

• Under expenditure in capital projects 

As a District remain committed to the development of the physical, socio-economic and institutional environment in order to 
alleviate poverty and promote infrastructure development coupled with job creation. 

Integrated development planning also promotes intergovernmental co-ordination by facilitating a system of communication 
and co-ordination between local, Provincial and national spheres of government. Local development priorities, identified in the 
IDP process, constitute the backbone of the local governments’ budgets, plans, strategies and implementation activities. 
Hence, the IDP forms the policy framework on which service delivery, infrastructure development, economic growth, social 


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development, environmental sustainability and poverty alleviation rests. The IDP therefore becomes a local expression of the 
government’s plan of action as it informs and is informed by the strategic development plans at national and provincial spheres 
of government. 

Further, in terms of the division of functions and powers between District and Local Municipalities as per S83 and S84 (1) 
of the Structures Act, a District Municipality has the following functions and powers: 

• A District Municipality must seek to achieve the integrated, sustainable and equitable social and economic 
development of its area as a whole by ensuring integrated development planning for the District as a whole 

• Integrated development planning for the District Municipality as a whole including a framework for integrated 
development plans for the Local Municipalities within the area of the District Municipality. 

Moreover, in terms of S29 (2) & (3) of the MSA a District Municipality must plan integrated development for the area of the 
District Municipality as a whole but in close consultation with the Local Municipalities in that area. Distribution of Roles and 
Responsibilities within Municipalities 

As stipulated in Section 2 (b) of the Systems Act, a municipality consists of: 

■ the political structures 

• and administration of the municipality, and 

■ the community of the municipality 

It will be critical that the distribution of roles and responsibilities within the municipality are clearly outlined. The summary of 
the roles and responsibilities of the discussed external and internal role players is as follows. 

Table 5: Roles and responsibilities in IDP Process 


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DUTIES OF MUNICIPAL COUNCIL 

DUTIES OF MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION 

DUTIES OF COMMUNITIES 

■ The Council of a municipality has the right to govern on its 
own initiative the local government affairs of the local 
community; 

■ Exercise the municipality’s executive and legislative 
authority, and to do so without improper interference; and 

■ Finance the affairs of the municipality by charging fees for 
services and imposing surcharges on fees, rates on 
property, other taxes, levies and duties 

■ Exercise the municipality’s executive and legislative 
authority and use the resources of the municipality in the 
best interests of the local community; 

■ Provide, without favour or prejudice, democratic and 
accountable government; 

■ Encourage the involvement of the local community; 

■ Strive to ensure that municipal services are provided to the 
local community in a financially and environmentally 
sustainable manner; 

■ Consult the local community about— 

o The level, quality, range and impact of municipal services 
provided by the municipality, either directly or through 
another service provider: and 

o The available options for service delivery 

■ Give members of the local community equitable access to 
the municipal services to which they are entitled; 

■ Promote and undertake development in the municipality; 

■ Promote gender equity in the exercise of the municipality’s 
executive and legislative authority; 

■ Promote a safe and healthy environment in the 
municipality; 

• Contribute, together with other organs of state, to the 
progressive realisation of the fundamental rights contained 

■ Be responsive to the needs of the local 
community; 

■ Facilitate a culture of public service and 
accountability amongst staff 

* Take measures to prevent corruption; 

* Establish clear relationships, and facilitate co¬ 
operation and communication between it and 
the local community; 

■ Give members of the local community full and 
accurate information about the level and 
standard of municipal services they are entitled 
to receive; 

■ Inform the local community how the 
municipality is managed of the costs involved 
and the persons in charge. 

■ Forms the machinery of a municipality 

■ Undertake the overall management and co¬ 
ordination of the planning process; 

■ Ensure that all relevant actors are 
appropriately involved in municipal planning 
processes, 

■ Ensure that the planning process is 
participatory, strategic and implementation 
orientated and is aligned with and satisfies 
sector planning requirements; 

■ Respond to comments from the public on the 
draft IDP and budget 

■ Horizontal alignment and other spheres of 
government to the satisfaction of the municipal 
Council; 

■ Contribute to the decision-making processes of the municipality 

■ Submit written or oral recommendations, representations and 
complaints to the municipal Council or to another political structure 
or a political office bearer or the administration of the municipality; 

■ To prompt responses to their written or oral communications, 
including complaints, to the municipal Council or to another political 
structure or a political office bearer or the administration of the 
municipality; 

■ To be informed of decisions of the municipal Council, or another 
political structure or any political office bearer of the municipality, 
affecting their rights, property and reasonable expectations; 

■ To regular disclosure of the state of affairs of the municipality 
including its finances 

■ To demand that the proceedings of the municipal Council and those 
of its committees must be open to the public, subject to section, be 
conducted impartially and without prejudice; and be untainted by 
personal self-interest; 

■ To the use and enjoyment of public facilities: and 

■ To have access to municipal services which the municipality 
provides, 

■ Members of the local community have the duty when exercising 
their rights, to observe the mechanisms, processes and procedures 
of the municipality; 

■ Members of the local community have the duty to pay promptly 
service fees, surcharges on fees, rates on property and other taxes, 
levies and duties imposed by the municipality: 

■ To respect the municipal rights of other members of the local 
community; 

■ To allow municipal officials reasonable access to their property for 
the performance of municipal functions; 

■ To comply with by-laws of the municipality applicable to them. 


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in Sections 24 (safe and healthy environment), 25 (access 

* Ensure that the needs and priorities of the 

■ The community must fully participate in governing their 

to property), 26 (access to housing), 27 (access to Health 

community are reflected in the IDP. 

municipality by attending IDP meetings 

care, food, water and social security and 29 (access to 

■ To ensure that the public participates fully and 

■ The community must inform its municipality of their 

education) of the Constitution. 

meaningfully in developing the municipal IDP 

developmental needs, their problems, challenges and priorities 

Councilors, ward committees and CDWs 

process. 

(e.g. Lack of roads, housing, electricity, clean water, etc.). 

■ Major link between the municipal government and the 


■ Participate and influence municipality’s budget 

residents. 


■ To be fully involved in the planning processes 

■ Link the planning process to their constituencies and/or 


■ To provide relevant information to the Councilors, ward 

wards; 


committees and CDWs 

■ Be responsible for facilitating the organization of public 


■ To participate in ward and community meetings and raise their 

consultation and participation; 


developmental aspirations, service delivery challenges and 

■ Ensure the municipal IDP and municipal budget are linked 


issues 

to and based on priorities needs of their constituencies. 


■ To assist in facilitating implementation and monitoring of projects 

■ To participate and inform government programmes such as 
community policing forums 

■ Make recommendations on any matter affecting the ward to the 
ward committees and ward Councilor or through the ward 

Councilor and ward committees 


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1.3 Adoption Process 


Subsequent to the adoption of the District Framework Plan, a Local Municipality must prepare and adopt a Process Plan to 
guide the planning, drafting, adoption and review of its integrated development plan. The Process Plan, as anticipated in 
Section 28 of the Systems Act, must be 'set out in writing’. The Process Plan should seek to provide a mechanism that 
ensures certain minimum quality standards of the IDP process and a proper coordination between and within the spheres of 
government. The adopted Process Plan binds the Local Municipality. The Process Plan of a Local Municipality must be 
informed by the District Framework Plan. 

The process followed by a Municipality to draft its integrated development plan, including its consideration and adoption of the 
draft plan must in terms of S29 (1): 

• be in accordance with a predetermined programme specifying timeframes for the different steps; 

• through appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures established in terms of Chapter 4, allow for: 

• the local Community to be consulted on its development needs and priorities; 

• the local Community to participate in the drafting of the integrated development plan; and 

• Organs of state, including traditional authorities, and other role players to be identified and consulted on 
the drafting of the integrated development plan; 

1. provide for the identification of all plans and planning requirements binding on the Municipality in terms of national 
and Provincial legislation; and 

2. Be consistent with any other matters that may be prescribed by regulation. 

The Process Plans of Municipalities must include, inter alia: 

• A programme specifying the timeframes for the different planning steps; 

• Appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures for consultation and participation of local communities, organs of 
state, traditional authorities and other role-players in the IDP drafting process; and 

• The identification of all plans and planning requirements binding on the Municipality in terms of National and Provincial 
legislation 

Municipalities are required to consult the local Community before adopting the process and after adoption of the process Sub- 
Section 3 stipulates that a Municipality must give notice to the local Community of particulars of the process it intends to follow. 
Thus, as per the former issue the draft Municipal Process Plans must be presented to the Municipal consultation fora and 
special meetings may also be held with the identified stakeholders and communities. In terms of the latter mater, communities 
must be informed of the adoption of the Process Plans, through the available Municipal communication channels. This matter 
is dealt with in detail under Section 3 of this document. 

The pertinent processes and timeframes framework is provided for in the next section under the IDP review phases. 
Municipalities must, in terms of the legislation, abide by the indicated processes and timeframes. 

Table 6: IDP Review Process 


IDP Phases 

Alignment Activity 

Timeframe 

Phase 0: Adoption of 
Framework Plan and 

Process Plan 

Adoption of the final District IDP Framework Plan 

July 2018 

Phase 1: Analysis 

Assessment of the previous IDP performance, level of development 
& backlogs (IDP Steering committee). 

District-wide outreach issues and coordinate ensure alignment with 

Key Development Priorities 

September and October 
2018 


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Phase 2: Refinement 
of objectives and 
Strategies 

Strategic Lekgotla 
2018 

Gap analysis of the municipal identified key development priorities of 
the municipality will be done during District IDP Strategic Lekgotla. 
Development of strategies which will be aligned with any national 
and provincial sectoral plans. 

Facilitate and organise local municipalities IDP/PMS Rep Forum and 
IDP Technical workshops to discuss identified priority issues and 
objectives for the financial year with sector department and relevant 
stakeholders 

November and December 

2018 

Phase 3: Projects 

Consolidate municipal issues and develop district-wide priority issues 
Project identification for the current financial year which will be 
informed by local municipalities priority issues 

Project Planning Coordination 

January-February 2019 

Phase 4: Integration 

IDP/Budget Indaba 

Arrange internal IDP Steering Committee meeting to discuss 
prioritised projects to be funded in the IDP for the 2019-2020 
financial year 

Integration of Sector department planned projects and Programmes 

Submission of draft IDP to MEC COGTA and National Treasury 
for comments 

The District advertise its draft 2019/20 IDP in April 2019 for public 
comments. 

March -April 2019 

Phase 5: Adoption of 
the Final 2019/20 

IDP 

Adoption of Annual budget and IDP for 2019/20 

Submission of Final IDP to MEC COGTA and National Treasury for 
comments 

The District will advertise its Final 2019/20 IDP in June 2019 for 
public notice 

May 2019 

Public Participation, 
Implementation and 
monitoring 

Ongoing 


1.4 Community and Stakeholder Analysis 

The Municipal Systems Act of 2000, Section 35 states that an integrated development plan (IDP) adopted by the Council of a 
municipality is the principal strategic planning instrument which guides and informs all planning and development, and all 
decisions with regard to planning, management and development, in the municipality. Thus, the IDP is the only plan, in terms 
of the legislation, that is available to municipalities for them to strive to progressively achieve the objects of local government 
mentioned above. The IDP process also provides an opportunity for the municipality to debate and agree on a long term 
vision for the development of the municipality. The IDP also promotes intergovernmental co-ordination by facilitating a system 
of communication and co-ordination between local, provincial and national spheres of government. 

Nkangala District Municipality undertakes its annual community outreach programme to consult with, and give feedback to 
communities within the six constituent Local Municipalities therein on issues pertinent to their development towards 'a better 
life for all’. All local municipalities within the District’s area of jurisdiction are visited twice per Financial Year. The meetings are 
attended by Councillors from the District and local municipalities, Provincial Sector Departments, Office of the Premier, 
traditional leadership, community members, service providers and parastatals as well as civil society at large. 

The Community Outreach Programme aims at improving communication and interaction between the District, the local 
municipalities and the community at large on issues of service delivery and development. In a nutshell, the purpose of the 
meetings is therefore: 

■ To afford the community of the local municipalities an opportunity to guide the planning and budgeting process of 
Nkangala District Municipality through highlighting needs important for the development of their respective wards 
and municipality at large. 


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■ To provide a platform for the community to participate and inform the IDP of the District. 

■ To assess the extent to which the current programmes/projects’ initiatives implemented by Local Municipality, 
Nkangala District Municipality and Provincial Sector Departments address local developmental needs and concerns 

* To afford the municipalities an opportunity to present to their communities programmes and projects that seeks to 
strategically address the developmental needs and concerns of our communities as identified in the proceeding 
engagements and I DPs. 

■ To afford the Municipality and the community an opportunity to appraise the implementation progress and challenges 
in terms of all projects that are implemented in local communities. 


Table 7: October community outreach meetings for the 2018/19 financial year 


DATE 

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 

TIME 

MEETING VENUE 

11 SEPTEMBER 2018 

Dr. JS MOROKA LM 

14:30 

LODING OPEN GROUND 

12 SEPTEMBER 2018 

STEVE TSHWETE LM 

14:30 

ADELAIDE TAMBO HALL 

21 OCTOBER 2018 

EMAKHAZENI LM 

10:30 

SAKHELWE COMMUNITY HALL 

31 OCTOBER 2018 

THEMBISILE HANI LM 

10:30 

TWEEFONTEIN OPEN GROUNDS 

N/A 

EMALAHLENI LM 

10:30 

CANCELLED DUE TO SERVICE 

DELIVERY PROTESTS 

N/A 

VICTOR KHANYE LM 

10:30 

CANCELLED DUE TO VIOLENT 

DISRUPTIONS OF OUTREACH 

MEETINGS 


Table 8: Summary of the issues raised in the September- October 2018 community outreach meeting per municipality: 


Priority Need 

THLM 

DRJSMLM 

STLM 

VKLM 

EMKLM 

EMLM 

Provision of Water Supply 

s 

s 

✓ 




Gravelling of roads 


s 





Tarred road 


V 





Sanitation 







RDP Houses 


s 



✓ 


Access to Health Services 
(24 Hrs Clinics and 

Hospitals 



✓ 


✓ 


Improved clinic services 

s 


✓ 




Libraries 

s 

s 





Sport and recreation 

Facilities 

s 

V 

✓ 




Provision of Electricity and 
Infrastructure 







Provision of Storm Water 
Drainage 







Provision And Access to 
Quality Education 
(renovations, maintenance 
and need for Primary and 
Secondary schools 





•/ 



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Land Use Management For 
Advancement Of Human 

Settlement. 







Building/maintenance of 
infrastructure 





•/ 


Access/bus roads 


s 





High mast light/street lights 


s 





Local Economic 

Development 

s 

s 





Provision of basic services 

at farm wards 





•/ 



Table 7.1: March 2019 community outreach meetings for the 2018/19 financial year 


1 Date 

Local Municipality 

Time 

Venues | 

7 MARCH 2019 

DRJSMOROKA LM 

10:30 

GA-MORWE COMMUNITY HALL 

7 MARCH 2019 

STEVE TSHWETE LM 

14:30 

TOKOLOGO OPEN GROUND 

10 MARCH 2019 

EMAKHAZENI LM 

10:30 

NICOLAS NDLOVU COMMUNITY 

HALL 

13 MARCH 201916 

THEMBISILE HANI LM 

10:30 

KWAGGAFONTEIN HALL 

17 MARCH 2019 

EMALAHLENI LM 

10:30 

EXT 5 EMPUCUKWENI SCHOOL HALL 

N/A 

VICTOR KHANYE LM 

10:30 

CANCELLED DUE TO VIOLENT 
DISRUPTIONS OF OUTREACH 


MEETINGS 


Table 8.1: Summary of the issues raised in the March 2019 community outreach meeting per municipality: 


Priority Need 

THLM 

DRJSMLM 

STLM 

VKLM 

EMKLM 

EMLM 

Provision of Water Supply 

S 

s 

✓ 




Gravelling of roads 


s 





Tarred road 


s 





Sanitation 






V 

RDP Houses 


s 



✓ 


Access to Health Services 
(24 Hrs Clinics and 

Hospitals 





V 

S 

Improved clinic services 

s 






Libraries 

s 




V 


Sport and recreation 
Facilities 

s 

s 

•/ 



V 

Provision of Electricity and 
Infrastructure 






S 

Provision of Storm Water 
Drainage 


V 





Provision And Access to 
Quality Education 
(renovations, maintenance 





•/ 



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and need for Primary and 
Secondary schools 







Land Use Management 

For Advancement Of 

Human Settlement. 







Building/maintenance of 
infrastructure 






V 

Access/bus roads 


s 





High mast light/street lights 


s 





Local Economic 
Development 

s 

✓ 

✓ 




Provision of basic services 

at farm wards 

V 




•/ 



1.5 NDM Political commitment for the Five years in council. 

Table 9: NDM Political commitment for the Five years in council 


Priority Issue 

Commitment 

WATER AND 

SANITATION 

• Improving access to water by upgrading the Belfast WTW, Waterval Boven WTW and Dullstroom 
WTW. Upgrading of bulk water infrastructure in Gugulethu, Emgwenyaand installations of meters 
in Dullstroom in Emakhazeni. Geohydrological study for water sources on 7 villages, water 
reticulation in Phake and upgrading of water network in Siyabuswa in Dr J S Moroka. Construction 
of 11km bulk line from Phola to Wilge in Emalahleni. In conjunction with Steve Tshwete LM we 
will construct the bulk water line from the reclaimed mine water. Geohydrological study for water 
sources in Thembisle Hani 


• Ensuring district-wide increase in sanitation by upgrading of Kriel Ga-nala WWTW, upgrading of 
2.5km pap & vleis and Klarinet Pine Ridge 4 km bulk sewer lines in Emalahleni. Upgrading of 
Dullstroom WWTW in Emakhazeni, construction of water bourne system in Moloto in Thembisile 
Hani, upgrading of bulk sewer line in Kgomo Street in Victor Khanye. 

• Ensuring the supply of water to farming communities. 

• Ensuring the upgrading of Water Treatment Works in Delmas. 

ELECTRICITY 

• Expanding the electrification programme to the remaining areas and rolling out solar energy and 
erecting high mast lights in constituent local municipalities. 

ROADS AND 

STORMWATER 

• Prioritize access roads, bus shelters and bridges and ensure the use of labour intensive projects 
(use of paving block) for municipalities. 

• Ensuring the upgrading of main municipal roads or streets through paving. 

• Ensuring the establishment of functional transport fora for local municipalities. 

• Ensuring the development of a standard for the laying of tar and paving of roads in all 
municipalities. 

LOCAL 

ECONOMY AND 

JOB CREATION 

• Ensuring the continuation and intensification of the Emerging Contractor Development 
Programme. 

• Strengthening structures of Local Economic Development. 

• Upscaling cooperatives to mainstream economic development. 

• Ensuring that the district develops special programmes targeting youth cooperatives and 
enterprises. 

• Promoting local procurement of goods and services to increase local production. 

• Encouraging the growth of SMMEs, cooperatives and informal traders through centralized 
procurement. 


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Priority Issue 

Commitment 

• Expediting the establishment of the Nkangala Development Agency to drive district wide 
investment and infrastructure development 

INTERGRATED 

HUMAN 

SETTLEMENT 

• Enhancing the capacity of local municipalities to accelerate the upgrading, formalization and 
integration of informal settlement. 

• Ensuring that serviced land is available and sold to affording community members. 

• Ensuring that municipalities develop integrated and coordinated planning and development 
strategies to deal with social exclusion, environmental threats, economic inefficiencies, decaying 
infrastructure and impact of new technologies. 

• Promoting better connected and coordinated rural towns and villages for sustainable growth and 
development. 

• Availing state owned land to respond to rapid urbanization, economic development and settlement 
of communities. 

• Ensuring the development of by-laws to avert the mushrooming of informal settlements and land 
invasion in constituent local municipalities. 

• Ensuring continues assistance to constituent local municipalities through formalization and 
township establishment 

ENVIRONMENTAL 

AND WASTE 

MANAGEMENT 

• Strengthen the district's Air Quality Management function and ensure the enforcement of relevant 
legislation on private companies. 

• Monitor air quality within the District and enforcement thereof. 

• Ensuring that the district works with national and provincial government in the implementation of 
climate change mitigation and adaption measures 

COMMUNITY 

HEALTH 

• Promoting health, preventing diseases and strengthening the delivery of primary healthcare. 

• Ensuring functionality of HIV/AIDS Councils in the district. 

• Ensuring the effectiveness of campaigns on HIV & AIDS, TB and other chronic illnesses in the 
district. 

• Ensuring improvement of water quality in the district. 

• Ensuring the intensification of in-loco inspections of food premises within the district. 

• Ensuring the establishment of functional clinic committees and hospital boards. 

FARM DWELLERS 

• Ensuring the provision of water and solar energy to farm dwellers 

• Ensuring the installation of water borne sanitation for farm dwellers 

• Ensuring the enforcement of the Extension of Security of Tenure Act 62 of 1997 and the Labour 
Tenants Act no 3 of 1996 to strengthen the fight against unlawful evictions of farm dwellers 

• Investigating and establishing an in-house legal aid clinic to provide legal advice and assistance 
on pro-bono basis for farm dwellers. 

• Ensuring the speedy facilitation and resolution of labour tenants claims lodge with the Department 
of Rural Development and Land Reform 

• Ensuring the Security of Tenure for farm dwellers 

• Ensuring the speedy implementation of the One Household One Hectare Policy for farm dwellers 
to promote food security. 


1.6 Participation by Traditional Authorities 

The Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, 1998 (Act 117 of 1998) S81 states that traditional authorities may 
participate in Council matters through their leaders and those traditional leaders must be allowed to attend and participate in 
any meeting of the Council”. The Act further stipulates that the Council should give traditional authorities a chance to express 
their views if the matter in question directly affects the area of a traditional authority. It is therefore of vital importance that they 
continue to contribute in enhancing Community participation in Council matters and in government at large. 


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The institutionalization of the house of Traditional leadership is a process that is at its teething stage, given the divergent views 
that still exist on the roles to be played by traditional leaders. Legislation has been promulgated to introduce the institution 
into Local Governance. It is therefore the duty of both the National and Provincial Government to support and fund training 
programmes for Traditional leaders on the operations of Local Government and the phasing in of the Institution as a player in 
the Municipal Councils. 

About nine (9) Traditional Leaders who have been gazetted by the MECof COGTA, are now members of the Nkangala District 
Municipality Council. 

1.7 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats 

The synopsis of the key internal and external environment concerns confronting NDM and its Local Municipalities indicating 
the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats were reviewed during the Strategic Lekgotla as follows: 


CD 

fi> 

3 

CD 

</> 

(/) 

CD 

c/> 


Table 10: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats (SWOT) of NDM 
Internal and external communication 

Audit Committee (not all the local municipalities make use of the shared audit committee) 
Insufficient skills to exploit existing opportunities 
Huge backlogs in infrastructure (homeland heritage) 

Deteriorating rural infrastructure (such as road infrastructure) 

Uncoordinated development and service delivery 
Retention of key personnel 
Weak audit outcomes of some local municipalities 
Effective functional internal Audit, risk and MPAC and institutional capacity 
Capacity to assist local municipalities to improve on service delivery 
Effective Policies 
Financial reporting and budgeting 

Good financial management with the above average financial ratios in terms of liquidity 
Planning and rezoning (formalisation) of local municipalities 
Effective ICT governance Framework implementation 
Strong skills development 

Successfully established intergovernmental fora which are all functional 
Strong political and administrative leadership 
Stable political environment 


c/i 
« • 

(3 

=s 

U2 


• Key LED anchor projects identified (Kusile Power Station, Rust de Winter Development Initiative, 
Zithabinseni-Loskop tourism belt, Agro-processing, Catalytic Converter, Truck and logistics hub, the 
N4 Maputo Development corridor, Moloto Rail Development Corridor and MPCCs) present great 
opportunities to attract investors 

• Tourism opportunities: Ndebele foundation, Mdala nature reserve, Mkholwane lodge, a proposed 
cultural village, arts, craft and tourism information centre (Waterval/Kameel River); historic sites e.g. 
Siyabuswa tree (struggle victim commemoration), Ikageleng school (dates to 1880), Icon of Ndebele 

ig culture: Easter Mahlangu 

o 

• Tourism marketing initiatives exists and established tourism attraction e.g. The Trout Triangle, Loskop- 

i; Zithabiseni tourism precinct 

® • Strong tourism and government services sectors 

• Culturally diverse communities 

• Resuscitation of Mafutha-1 (model from Sasol) 

• Reviving of the Zithabiseni tourism belt within Nkangala e.g. R573/N11 

• Close proximity to Gauteng - a great tourism source market and export opportunities 

• Located on the strategic N4 route/Maputo Corridor 

• The Maputo corridor is a provincial priority 


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Threats 


• Large areas of State owned land 

• Land is available at low-cost for implementation of projects including tourism, light and heavy industry 

• Diversification into manufacturing and construction 

• Business: SMME development and some ASGISA needs identified - cultural village, retail 
development, rehabilitate Marapyane shopping centre, Siyabuswa mall (land identified) 

• Capitalise on the positive perception of the region as offering consistent service excellence 

• Good access to basic infrastructure 

• Good road infrastructure 

• Rehabilitation of coal dumps and mine land 

• Railway lines leading from area to two harbours (Maputo and Richards Bay) 

• Stable Economic Growth 

• NDM is a peri-urban municipality that can tap into CRDP and Urban Renewal Programmes 

• Availability of Natural resources (e.g. Coal) 

• Home of coal mining and energy companies 

• Existing steel cluster 

• Strong agriculture, mining, tourism and government services sectors 

• Good Climatic conditions conducive to maize farming 

• Developed National Legislation and Guidelines 

• Supportive external stakeholders 

• NDM is the industrial Hub in the Province (Energy and Manufacturing) 

• Cultural and economic pattern spreads beyond the district into other provinces 

• Mobilise private sector to promote green economy and promote renewable energy 

• Availability of under-developed/ undeveloped land for attracting investors 

• Learnerships and bursaries 

• Technical Vocational Educational Institutions in the District (FETs) 

• Available labour force 

• Reasonably priced undeveloped land 

• Working public private partnership initiatives 

• High unemployment rate, poverty, underdevelopment and HIV/AIDS 

• Informal land invasion 

• Rehabilitation of mined areas 

• Coal mining is a diminishing resource 

• Heavy reliance on primary sectors and dependence on limited large sectors 

• Competing water requirement needs 

• Large distance between rural settlements and amenities offered by towns, with poor public transport 

• Poverty and low skills levels among the community 

• High illiteracy level 

• Insufficient research and development (to capitalise on the manufacturing companies) 

• Climate changes (natural disaster, food security, industrial emissions) 

• Foreign owned business 

• Substance abuse 

• Electricity supply 

• Population growth 

• No strong diversified industries to drive economic activities and underdeveloped sectoral opportunities 

• Vast, sparsely populated area with low population densities 

• Dispersed and fragmented urban structure and poor accessibility to service centres for rural 
communities 

• Declining growth rate of RSC replacement levy grant at NDM 

• Cash flow problems at some local municipalities might affect financial viability 

• High inflation rate and credit rating of the country 


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CHAPTER TWO: 


2.1 INSTITUTIONAL PRIORITY ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS 

2.1.1 Council’s Vision, Mission and Goals 

The District convened its Annual Strategic Lekgotlaon the 29-30 November 2018. As legislated in MSA act 32 of 2000 chapter 
5 Section 25(1), (2) and 3(b). Furthermore, is to evaluate the District’s Developmental achievements, challenges and agree 
on corrective actions which is aligned with our vision and mission of the district. 

The Vision, Mission, Values and Strategic goals were review and recommended as follows: 


Table 11: The Vision, Mission, Values & Strategic Goals of NDM 



Improved quality of life for all 

Mission 

The NDM is committed to the improvement of the physical, socio-economic and institutional 
environment in order to address triple challenges through sustainable development and service 
excellence. 

Values 

• To promote and pursue key national, Provincial and local development goals as enriched in 
vision 2030 

• To be inclusive and caring organization 

• To be democratic transparent, accountable and participative in pursuance of our objectives 

• To be responsive to the needs of citizens and Partner-Local Municipalities 

• To cultivate a work ethic focused on performance, achievement and results 

• To be democratic in the pursuance of our objectives 

• To show mutual respect, trust and ensure high levels of co-operation and discipline in our 
dealing with one another 


2.1.2 Strategic Goals 

Strategy is about those broad priorities that are to be pursued in order to achieve the vision and mission. Once the high level 
strategic goals are developed, the BSC serves as the device for effective translation and implementation of manageable 
strategic objectives, outcomes, programmes and developmental strategies. The Strategy map of Nkangala District Municipality 
is articulated in the diagram below and clearly indicates two different strategies - growth and excellence: 


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Figure 5: Integrated Sustainable Human Settlements and Improved Quality 




The strategic goals represented in the strategy map above are aligned to developmental objectives that were developed by 
the municipality and are depicted in the table below: 


Table 12: The Developmental Objectives 


Developmental Objectives 

Strategic Goals 

Integrated Sustainable Human Settlements and improved 
quality of household life 

Integrated Regionalized Planning 

Efficient, competitive and responsive economic 
infrastructure network 

Sustainable Infrastructure and Service Provisioning 

Decent employment through inclusive economic growth 

Inclusive Economic Growth 

Inculcate and improve financial sustainability and 
management 

Sound Financial Management 

Responsive, accountable, effective, efficient and sound 
Governance System 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Skilled and capable workforce supportive of inclusive 
growth 

Competent, Innovative and Accountable Team 

Vibrant, equitable and sustainable rural communities and 
food security 

Healthy Social Environment 

Protection and enhancement of environmental assets and 

natural resources 

Healthy Social Environment 


The District Municipality must ensure that it aligns its strategic goals with the National and Provincial goals and priorities. The 
table underneath reflects the Nkangala strategic goals’ alignment to Local Government Key Performance Areas. 


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Table 13: NDM Strategic Goals'Alignment to LMs 


Key Performance Areas 

Nkangala Strategic Goals 

KPA1: Institutional Development and 
Transformation 

Competent, Innovative and Accountable Team 

KPA 2: Good Governance and Public 

Participation 

Sound Electronic Governance 

KPA 3: Local Economic Development 

Inclusive Economic Growth with Sustainable Development 

KPA 4: Financial Viability and Financial 
Management 

Sound Financial Management 

KPA 5: Basic Service Delivery and 

Infrastructure 

Healthy Social Environment 


Sustainable Infrastructure and Service Provisioning 

KPA 6: Spatial Rationale 

Integrated Regionalized Planning 


The strategic goals and outcomes, their statements/definition as well as alignment to Key Performance Areas, National 
Development Plan and 2030 Developmental Goals: 


Table 13: The Strategic goals'Alignment to the NDP &2030 Developmental Goals 


Strategic Goal 

Outcome 

Healthy Social Environment 

Improved quality of life, effective and efficient service delivery 

Inclusive Economic Growth with Sustainable 
Development 

Diversified and sustainable regional economy by 2030 

Sound Financial Management 

Financial sustainability 

Sustainable Infrastructure and Service 
Provisioning 

Deliver various infrastructure projects for sustainable economic 
growth and service provision to communities 

Integrated Regionalised Planning 

Integrated economic space and sustainable human settlements by 
2030 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Clean Audit results and satisfied and participative communities 

Competent, Innovative and Accountable Team 

High performing and effective employees 


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2.1.3 NDM Priority Development Issues 
Figure 6: NDM Priority Development Issue’s 



1. Powm, Outm jnd Functions 


2 Organisation ftestructurine and Transformation 


3 Financial Vtabdty 


4 Good Governance and Communication 


S. Spitul Restructure and Scute Provision 


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CHAPTER 3 


3.1 Brief Socio-economic overview 

It is important to clearly understand the development context within which the District operates, to effectively plan and deliver 
services to the residents of NDM. This chapter provides an overview of the NDM's demographics, the needs of its population 
as well as anticipated changes or trends in these areas during the rest of the term of office. The District reflects on substantial 
information from recent reports and research conducted including the 2011 national Census conducted by Stats-SA and 2016 
Community survey. Information on level of development therein is elucidated through statistics from the Census 2011, 
Community Survey 2016, other Data Enhancing Agencies like HIS Global Insight and varying Sector Departments are detailed 
in the relevant sections throughout this chapter. 

3.1.1. Demographics 

Population statistics is important when analysing an economy, as the population growth directly and indirectly impacts 
employment and unemployment, as well as other economic indicators such as economic growth and per capita income. 


Table 15: TOTAL POPULATION-NKANGALA 



2007 

2011 

2016 

Average Annual 
growth 

Victor Khanye 

64,900 

74,100 

82,300 

2.41 % 

Emalahleni 

340,000 

389,000 

440,000 

2.60% 

Steve Tshwete 

179,000 

224,000 

262,000 

3.88% 

Emakhazeni 

47,800 

46,400 

48,000 

0.04% 

Thembisile Hani 

279,000 

307,000 

337,000 

1.91% 

Dr JS Moroka 

237,000 

246,000 

253,000 

0.64% 

Nkangala 

1,148,173 

1,287,698 

1,422,063 

2.16% 


(Source Stats 2011 and 2016) 


The table above shows the population of the district per municipality and the average annual growth. All of the municipalities 
have seen growth from 2011 to 2016 however Steve Tshwete local municipality showed the highest population growth with 
an average annual growth rate of 3.9%, followed by Emalahleni local municipality with an average annual growth rate of 
2.6%. The Emakhazeni local municipality had the lowest average annual growth rate of 0.04% relative to the other within 
Nkangala District Municipality. This figures show where people are moving to and settling which means that basic service 
provision needs to be intensified in these areas to accommodate their growth and prevent land invasions, service delivery 
strikes and informal settlements. 


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3.1.1.1. POPULATION GROUP, GENDER AND AGE 


Table 16; POPULATION GROUP, GENDER AND AGE-NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2016(NUMBER) 


African White Coloured Asian 



Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

00-04 

71,400 

70,700 

4,760 

4,740 

708 

675 

450 

402 

05-09 

64,100 

64,300 

4,690 

4,890 

791 

740 

479 

485 

10-14 

53,200 

53,200 

3,730 

3,860 

731 

778 

336 

321 

15-19 

52,000 

51,300 

3,500 

3,630 

632 

596 

278 

306 

20-24 

56,900 

59,300 

4,030 

4,260 

636 

633 

279 

403 

25-29 

66,700 

72,600 

4,530 

4,770 

701 

774 

379 

665 

30-34 

62,100 

69,100 

5,410 

5,180 

757 

844 

567 

828 

35-39 

47,700 

51,400 

5,100 

5,220 

774 

774 

554 

821 

40-44 

33,600 

34,400 

4,110 

4,110 

605 

557 

432 

535 

45-49 

26,900 

25,800 

3,610 

3,680 

433 

510 

337 

433 

50-54 

25,000 

24,000 

4,000 

3,870 

458 

406 

203 

285 

55-59 

20,000 

20,500 

4,090 

4,020 

327 

289 

209 

228 

60-64 

18,200 

16,600 

3,700 

3,670 

254 

209 

223 

183 

65-69 

13,500 

11,700 

2,890 

2,900 

191 

136 

124 

153 

70-74 

8,500 

6,590 

2,230 

2,000 

79 

70 

122 

99 

75+ 

10,300 

6,290 

3,050 

2,120 

124 

60 

85 

64 

Total 

630,000 

638,000 

63,400 

62,900 

8,200 

8,050 

5,060 

6,210 


In 2016, the Nkangala District Municipality's population consisted of 89.18% African (1.27 million), 8.88% White (126 000), 
1.14% Coloured (16 200) and 0.79% Asian (11 300) people. The largest share of population is within the young working age 
(25-44 years) age category with a total number of 487 000 or 34.2% of the total population. The age category with the second 
largest number of people is the babies and kids (0-14 years) age category with a total share of 28.9%, followed by the 
teenagers and youth (15-24 years) age category with 239 000 people. These statistics indicate that the district municipality 
has a very young population which is dominated by the youth. This can be an advantage for the district as it has a huge labour 
force. However, if the economy of the district cannot adsorb them then huge unemployment and the social issues that 
accompany it will follow. Economic growth, skills development and education are the critical issues that government in 
partnership with all other sectors need to focus on in order to have a significant impact on the majority of the people in the 
district. 

3.1.5.4. Population Density 

Population density measures the concentration of people in a region. To calculate this, the population of a region is divided 
by the area size of that region. The output is presented as the number of people per square kilometre. 


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Figure 7: POPULATION DENSITY - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL, 2016 [NUMBER OF PEOPLE PER 
KM] 


90 


Population density - Number of people per kmA 2 

Nkangala, Mpumalanga and National Total, 2016 


80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 

0 


84.8575 


56.2637 


45.6296 


Nkangala Mpumalanga National Total 

Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 


In 2016, with an average of 84.9 people per square kilometre, Nkangala District Municipality had a higher population density 
than Mpumalanga (56.3 people per square kilometre). Compared to South Africa (45.6 per square kilometre) it can be seen 
that there are more people living per square kilometre in Nkangala District Municipality than the province average. 

TABLE 17: POPULATION DENSITY - NKANGALA AND THE REST OF MPUMALANGA, 2006-2016 


Nkangala_Gert Sibande_Ehlanzeni 


2006 

68.51 

31.41 

56.23 

2007 

69.86 

31.50 

56.80 

2008 

71.53 

31.58 

57.54 

2009 

73.32 

31.71 

58.34 

2010 

75.20 

32.01 

59.24 

2011 

76.84 

32.32 

60.05 

2012 

78.41 

32.65 

60.81 

2013 

80.04 

33.01 

61.66 

2014 

81.68 

33.40 

62.53 

2015 

83.27 

33.78 

63.40 

2016 

84.86 

34.18 

64.30 

Average Annual growth 

2006-2016 

2.16 % 

0.85% 

1.35% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


In 2016, Nkangala District Municipality had a population density of 84.9 per square kilometre and it ranked highest amongst 
its piers. In terms of growth, Nkangala District Municipality had an average annual growth in its population density of 2.16% 
per square kilometre per annum. It was also the region that had the highest average annual growth rate. In 2016, the region 
with the lowest population density within Mpumalanga Province was Gert Sibande with 34.2 people per square kilometre, it 
was also the region with the lowest average annual growth rate of 0.85% people per square kilometre over the period under 
discussion. 


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3.1.1.2. NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS 


If the number of households is growing at a faster rate than that of the population it means that the average household size is 
decreasing, and vice versa. In 2016, the Nkangala District Municipality comprised of 404 000 households. This equates to an 
average annual growth rate of 2.88% in the number of households from 2006 to 2016. With an average annual growth rate of 
2.16% in the total population, the average household size in the Nkangala District Municipality is by implication decreasing. 
This is confirmed by the data where the average household size in 2006 decreased from approximately 3.8 individuals per 
household to 3.5 persons per household in 2016. 


Table 18: NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS-NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2006-2016 



Nkangala 

Mpumalanga 

Nkangala as % of 
province 

2006 

304,000 

961,000 

31.6% 

2007 

312,000 

978,000 

31.9% 

2008 

322,000 

999,000 

32.2% 

2009 

332,000 

1,020,000 

32.6% 

2010 

340,000 

1,030,000 

32.8% 

2011 

348,000 

1,050,000 

33.1% 

2012 

357,000 

1,070,000 

33.4% 

2013 

366,000 

1,090,000 

33.7% 

2014 

375,000 

1,110,000 

33.9% 

2015 

388,000 

1,140,000 

34.1% 

2016 

404,000 

1,180,000 

34.3% 


2006-2016 


Average Annual Growth 


2 . 88 % 


2.03% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


Relative to the province, the Nkangala District Municipality had a higher average annual growth rate of 2.88% from 2006 to 
2016. A reduction in the household size means that there are fewer people sharing resources. In Nkangala two issues have 
been seen to influence this trend large in migration of labourers who have left their families elsewhere to reside in the district 
more especially Steve Tshwete and Emalahlenei Areas secondly the provision of Housing has assisted families to have their 
own homes and reduce overcrowding of poor households.it is important to mention that there are numerous other factors that 
also contribute to the increase in households such as the availability of funding to Black Households, increase in socio 
economic status of people and changing preferences of living arrangements. As government more household might increase 
the demand for more housing and housing typologies this might also have an impact on the demand for services. 


3.1.2. Economy 

The economic state of Nkangala District Municipality is put in perspective by comparing it on a spatial level with its 
neighbouring district municipalities, Mpumalanga Province and South Africa. The section will also allude to the economic 
composition and contribution of the regions within Nkangala District Municipality. 

The Nkangala District Municipality does not function in isolation from Mpumalanga, South Africa and the world and now, more 
than ever, it is crucial to have reliable information on its economy for effective planning. Information is needed that will empower 
the municipality to plan and implement policies that will encourage the social development and economic growth of the people 
and industries in the municipality respectively. 

3.1.2.1 Gross Domestic Product by Region (GDP-R) 

The Gross Domestic Product (GDP), an important indicator of economic performance, is used to compare economies and 
economic states. 

GDP-R can be measured using either current or constant prices, where the current prices measures the economy in actual 
Rand, and constant prices measures the economy by removing the effect of inflation, and therefore captures the real growth 
in volumes, as if prices were fixed in a given base year. 


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Table 19: GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT (GDP) - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, -2006-2016(R 
BILLIONS, CURRENT PRICES) 



Nkangala 

Mpumalanga 

National Total 

Nkangala as % of 
province 

Nkangala as % of 
national 

2006 

45.5 

122.7 

1,839.4 

37.1% 

2.5% 

2007 

55.0 

146.7 

2,109.5 

37.5% 

2.6% 

2008 

65.4 

169.5 

2,369.1 

38.6% 

2.8% 

2009 

71.3 

182.4 

2,507.7 

39.1% 

2.8% 

2010 

79.9 

202.9 

2,748.0 

39.4% 

2.9% 

2011 

91.0 

227.2 

3,023.7 

40.1% 

3.0% 

2012 

102.0 

254.0 

3,253.9 

40.2% 

3.1% 

2013 

105.6 

268.5 

3,539.8 

39.3% 

3.0% 

2014 

110.9 

289.3 

3,807.7 

38.3% 

2.9% 

2015 

114.4 

305.0 

4,049.8 

37.5% 

2.8% 

2016 

120.5 

327.9 

4,338.9 

36.8% 

2.8% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


With a GDP of R 121 billion in 2016 (up from R 45.5 billion in 2006), the Nkangala District Municipality contributed 36.76% to 
the Mpumalanga Province GDP of R 328 billion in 2016 increasing in the share of the Mpumalanga from 37.06% in 2006. The 
Nkangala District Municipality contributes 2.78% to the GDP of South Africa which had a total GDP of R 4.34 trillion in 2016 
(as measured in nominal or current prices). It's contribution to the national economy stayed similar in importance from 2006 
when it contributed 2.47% to South Africa, but it is lower than the peak of 3.13% in 2012. 


Figure 8: Gross Domestic Product (GDP) 


Gross Domestic Product (GDP) 

Mpumalanga Province, 2016 



Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 

The Nkangala District Municipality had a total GDP of R 121 billion and in terms of total contribution towards Mpumalanga 
Province the Nkangala District Municipality ranked highest relative to all the regional economies to total Mpumalanga 
Province GDP. This ranking in terms of size compared to other regions of Nkangala remained the same since 2006. In terms 
of its share, it was in 2016 (36.8%) slightly smaller compared to what it was in 2006 (37.1%). For the period 2006 to 2016, 
the average annual growth rate of 1.0% of Nkangala was the second relative to its peers in terms of growth in constant 2010 
prices. 


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TABLE 20: GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT (GDP) - LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES OF N KAN GALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 
2006 TO 2016, SHARE AND GROWTH 



2016 

(Current prices) 

Share of district 
municipality 

2006 

(Constant prices) 

2016 

(Constant prices) 

Average Annual 
growth 

Victor Khanye 

7.10 

5.89% 

3.79 

4.83 

2.45% 

Emalahleni 

53.72 

44.56% 

42.03 

36.71 

-1.35% 

Steve Tshwete 

42.87 

35.56% 

19.77 

29.72 

4.16% 

Emakhazeni 

3.74 

3.10% 

2.01 

2.59 

2.59% 

Thembisile Hani 

7.04 

5.84% 

3.51 

4.60 

2.75% 

Dr JS Moroka 

6.09 

5.05% 

3.70 

3.99 

0.75% 

Nkangala 

120.54 


74.81 

82.44 



Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


Steve Tshwete had the highest average annual economic growth, averaging 4.16% between 2006 and 2016, when compared 
to the rest of the regions within the Nkangala District Municipality. The Thembisile Hani local municipality had the second 
highest average annual growth rate of 2.75%. Emalahleni local municipality had the lowest average annual growth rate of - 
1.35% between 2006 and 2016. 

Table 21: Regional contribution to economy 



Gert Sibande 

Nkangala 

Ehlanzeni 

Total 

Agriculture 

35.1% 

22.4% 

42.5% 

100% 

Mining 

29.7% 

63.6% 

6.7% 

100% 

Manufacturing 

39.8% 

32.6% 

27.6% 

100% 

Electricity 

24.5% 

40.2% 

35.4% 

100% 

Construction 

22.7% 

30.3% 

47.0% 

100% 

Trade 

25.3% 

27.3% 

47.4% 

100% 

Transport 

27.6% 

30.3% 

42.1% 

100% 

Finance 

20.2% 

30.7% 

49.1% 

100% 

Community services 

23.1% 

26.8% 

50.1% 

100% 

Total 

27.7% 

38.1% 

34.2% 

100% 


Table above illustrates the contribution of the district towards the province’s economy per industry in comparison with the 
other 2 districts in the province. Nkangala is the largest contributor in mining with 63.6% giving it an absolute advantage in the 
Province. The second industry is electricity 40.2% followed by manufacturing where it contributes 32.6% which second in the 
province after Gert Sibande District. The District is the Highest Economic Contributor in the province at 38.1%. The District 
although doing well in comparison, has also inherited the social implication that comes with a growing economy such as 
migration which has led to a high growth in population and the emergence of informal settlements. Strong forward planning 
and investment is necessary to accommodate the growing population in terms of housing and services, secondly diversification 
of the economic industries from over reliance in mining is necessary for the future prosperity of the district. 


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FIGURE 9: GDP CONTRIBUTION ■ LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES OF NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2016 
[CURRENT PRICES, PERCENTAGE] 


Gross Domestic Product (GDP) 
Nkangala District Municipality, 2016 


Victor Khanye 
6% 

Dr JS Moroka 
5% 


■ 

Thembisile Hani 



6% 



■ 

Emakhazeni 



3% 




Victor Khanye 
Emalahleni 
Steve Tshwete 
Emakhazeni 
Thembisile Hani 
Dr JS Moroka 


Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 


The greatest contributor to the Nkangala District Municipality economy is the Emalahleni local municipality with a share of 
44.56% or R 53.7 billion in 2016, increasing from R 24.1 billion in 2006. The economy with the lowest contribution is the 
Emakhazeni local municipality with R 3.74 billion in 2016 growing from R 1.39 billion in 2006. 


3.1.2.1. Gross Value Added by Region (GVA-R) 


Figure 10: Industry Contribution to GDP at basic prices (constant 2011 & 2016) 


Community 

services 

10.8% 


Finance 

9.3% 


Transport 


Construction 
2.5% 

Utiliti 

8.9% 


2011 


Agriculture 

1.7% 



Manufacturii 

11.6% 


2016 


Community Agriculture 
services i 8% 

11.6% 


Finance 

10 . 1 % 


Transports? 



Construction Manufacturing 

2.7% 11.83 


The Nkangala District Municipality's economy is made up of various industries. The GVA-R variable provides a sector 
breakdown, where each sector is measured in terms of its value added produced in the local economy. In 2016, the mining 


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sector is the largest within Nkangala District Municipality accounting for R 41.1 billion or 37.3% of the total GVAin the district 
municipality's economy. The sector that contributes the second most to the GVA of the Nkangala District Municipality is the 
manufacturing sector at 12.0%, followed by the community services sector with 11.4%. The sector that contributes the least 
to the economy of Nkangala District Municipality is the agriculture sector with a contribution of R 2.18 billion or 1.98% of the 
total GVA. 

3.1.3. LABOUR 

The Labour force forms the backbone of any economy and is a direct effect on the national triple challenges. Nkangala 
district Municipality is Mpumalanga’s biggest economic contributor. This chapter summarises the sectors in which people are 
employed and their contribution to the employment rate. 


TABLE 22: ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION AND GROWTH 


Local municipal area 

% contribution to 
Mpumalanga economy 
2015 

Average annual economic 
growth 

1996-2015 

Average annual economic growth 
2015-2020 

Emalahleni 

20.9% 

2.4% 

1.9% 

Steve Tshwete 

13.4% 

2.7% 

2.1% 

Victor Khanye 

3.2% 

5.2% 

2.5% 

Thembisile Hani 

2.7% 

3.1% 

2.0% 

Emakhazeni 

1.0% 

2.0% 

1.1% 

Dr JS Moroka 

0.7% 

-4.7% 

0.9% 


Emalahlenin and Steve tshwete local Municipality are the biggest contributors to the district economy however their economic 
growth has been slow and declining as opposed to that of victor Kanye and thembisile hani. The table above shows that 
economic growth of the local municipalities has been under 5% except for victor Khanye Local Municipality at 5.2% in the 
period between 1996 and 2015 and is expected to perform poorly in the 2015 to 2020 period with the highest growth estimated 
at around 2.5% for victor Khanye Local Municipality. 


3.1.3.1. Labour Force participation rate 

Figure 11: Labour Force participation rate 


Private 
households 
10 


2011 


2016 

Private households 


Agricult. 


Community 

services 

14.1% 


Finan 

10 . 6 %' 



8 . 8 % 


Mining 

16.5% 


Community 


Manufacturing 
8 . 1 % 


Transp/... 


Trade 

20.3% 


tilities 

3.4% 


Construction 
7.7% 



Agriculture... 


Mining 

13 . 7 % 


Financi 

12 . 3 % 


Transpor 


anufact 
uring 
8 . 3 % 

Utilities 

2 . 3 % 


Trade 

18 . 0 % 


Construction 

9 . 4 % 


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Figure 11 summarises the participation rate per industry towards employment for 2011 and 2016. Although mining is the 
biggest industry in the district it is not the biggest employer in the district. Trade in both 2011 and 2016 was absorbing the 
largest amout of labourers. In order to address unemployment in the district investing in trade (industry) is crusail. 

3.1.3.2. Total Employment 

Employment data is a key element in the estimation of unemployment. In addition, trends in employment within different 
sectors and industries normally indicate significant structural changes in the economy. Employment data is also used in the 
calculation of productivity, earnings per worker, and other economic indicators. Total employment consists of two parts: 
employment in the formal sector, and employment in the informal sector. 

TABLE 23: TOTAL EMPLOYMENT - N KAN GALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2006-2016 [NUMBERS] 



Nkangala 

Mpumalanga 

2006 

263,000 

877,000 

2007 

278,000 

917,000 

2008 

296,000 

961,000 

2009 

300,000 

958,000 

2010 

297,000 

931,000 

2011 

306,000 

942,000 

2012 

316,000 

975,000 

2013 

331,000 

1,020,000 

2014 

345,000 

1,070,000 

2015 

352,000 

1,100,000 

2016 

356,000 

1,110,000 

Average Annual growth 

2006-2016 

3.05% 

2.40% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 

Figure 12: GEOGRAPHY BY OFFICIAL EMPLOYMENT STATUS 


>- 

o 


GEOGRAPHY BY OFFICIAL EMPLOYMENT STATUS 


1600000 

1400000 

1200000 

1000000 

800000 

600000 

400000 



NO" OF PEO 

o 

Mpum 

alanga 

DC31: 

Nkanga 

la 

MP311 

: Victor 
Khanye 

MP312 

Emalah 

leni 

MP313 

:Steve 

Tshwet 

e 

MP314 

Emakh 

azeni 

MP315 

Themb 

isile 

MP316 

: Dr JS 

Morok 

a 

■ Employed 

969771 

355478 

21843 

138548 

85968 

13671 

61605 

33844 

P Unemployed 

448126 

152250 

8573 

52114 

21101 

4783 

36139 

29539 

■ Discouraged work-seeker 

150844 

42554 

2477 

9612 

5092 

1573 

13477 

10321 

■ Other not economically active 

1020806 

319641 

17712 

81494 

50252 

11243 

84188 

74753 

■ Not applicable 

1450392 

438207 

24848 

113698 

67419 

15945 

115049 

101248 


LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 


Employed ■ Unemployed ■ Discouraged work-seeker ■ Other not economically active ■ Not applicable 


(Source: 2011 Statistics South Africa) 


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Emalahleni and asteve tshwete Local Municipality are the larges employers in the district followed by thembisile hani. This 
lead to large in migration to the areas for employment which inturn leads to high demands for services such as affordable 
housing and basic services. Secondly in also leads the high traffic going in and out of the areas on a dayly basis which puts a 
strain on transport infrastructure. There is a need of affordable intergrated transport systems to cater to the differnet 
communters. 


3.1.3.3 Unemployment 

Table 24: Unemployment rate per Municipality in the District 


Local Municipal Area 

Unemployment rate 

2014 

Unemployment rate 

2017 

Share of Mpumalanga’s 
unemployed 

Victor Khanye 

24.8% 

25.9% 

1.9% 

Emalahleni 

24.6% 

27.2% 

12.2% 

Steve Tshwete 

16.8% 

17.6% 

4.6% 

Emakhazeni 

22.5% 

22.5% 

0.9% 

Thembisile Hani 

36.1% 

39.7% 

9.2% 

Dr JS Moroka 

45.2% 

48.7% 

7.1% 


nd 

Nkangala’s unemployment rate was the 2 highest amongst the districts of Mpumalanga. Unemployment rate for females 
34.3% and that of males 26,7%. Youth unemployment rate according to the Census figures 39.6% - challenge with especially 
very high youth unemployment rate of females. Concern about the high unemployed youth & especially females - relatively 
low level of education and inadequate skills impact negatively on their employability. Importance of quality and relevant 
education and training in line with the economic needs of the province - important role of the University of Mpumalanga & 
TVETs. 

3.1.4. Income and Expenditure 

In a growing economy among which production factors are increasing, most of the household incomes are spent on purchasing 
goods and services. Therefore, the measuring of the income and expenditure of households is a major indicator of a number 
of economic trends. It is also a good marker of growth as well as consumer tendencies. 

3.1.4.1. Number of Households by Income category 

The number of households is grouped according to predefined income categories or brackets, where income is calculated as 
the sum of all household gross disposable income: payments in kind, gifts, homemade goods sold, old age pensions, income 
from informal sector activities, subsistence income, etc.). Note that income tax is included in the income distribution. 

Income categories start at RO - R2, 400 per annum and go up to R2, 400,000+ per annum. A household is either a group of 
people who live together and provide themselves jointly with food and/or other essentials for living, or it is a single person 
living on his/her own. These income brackets do not take into account inflation creep: over time, movement of households 
"up" the brackets is natural, even if they are not earning any more in real terms. 

TABLE 25: HOUSEHOLDS BY INCOME CATEGORY - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2016 
[NUMBER PERCENTAGE] 



Nkangala 

Mpumalanga 

National Total 

Nkangala as 
% of province 

Nkangala as 
% of national 

0-2400 

50 

145 

1,930 

34.3% 

2.6% 

2400-6000 

893 

2,630 

34,800 

33.9% 

2.6% 

6000-12000 

8,330 

25,600 

330,000 

32.5% 

2.5% 

12000-18000 

16,600 

51,600 

660,000 

32.2% 

2.5% 


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18000-30000 

44,400 

143,000 

1,780,000 

31.1% 

2.5% 

30000-42000 

43,900 

142,000 

1,770,000 

30.9 % 

2.5% 

42000-54000 

38,700 

123,000 

1,530,000 

31.4 % 

2.5% 

54000-72000 

40,700 

126,000 

1,610,000 

32.4 % 

2.5% 

72000-96000 

39,500 

115,000 

1,480,000 

34.3% 

2.7% 

96000-132000 

37,600 

103,000 

1,370,000 

36.4% 

2.7% 

132000-192000 

37,900 

98,500 

1,320,000 

38.4% 

2.9% 

192000-360000 

49,200 

123,000 

1,710,000 

39.9% 

2.9% 

360000-600000 

26,800 

68,900 

1,110,000 

39.0% 

2.4% 

600000-1200000 

15,700 

42,100 

797,000 

37.2% 

2.0% 

1200000-2400000 

2,930 

8,810 

229,000 

33.3% 

1.3% 

2400000+ 

295 

1,000 

36,600 

29.4% 

0.8% 

Total 

404,000 

1,180,000 

15,800,000 

34.3% 

2.6% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


It was estimated that in 2016 17.42% of all the households in the Nkangala District Municipality, were living on R30, 000 or 
less per annum. In comparison with 2006's 41.28%, the number is about half. The 192000-360000 income category has the 
highest number of households with a total number of 49 200, followed by the 18000-30000 income category with 44 400 
households. Only 50 households fall within the 0-2400 income category. 

3.1.4.2. Human Development Index (HDI) 

• HDI is the combination of three basic dimensions of human development: A long and healthy life, knowledge and a 
decent standard of living. A long and healthy life is typically measured using life expectancy at birth. Knowledge is 
normally based on adult literacy and / or the combination of enrolment in primary, secondary and tertiary schools. 


Table 26: Human Development Index 


Local Municipal Area 

Human Development Index 

2011 

2016 

Steve Tshwete 

0.63 

0.67 

Emalahleni 

0.63 

0.66 

Emakhazeni 

0.56 

0.62 

Victor Khanye 

0.56 

0.61 

Thembisile Hani 

0.49 

0.55 

Dr JS Moroka 

0.48 

0.55 


(Source 2011&CS 2016) 


3.1.4.3. Gini Coefficient 

The Gini coefficient is a summary statistic of income inequality. It varies from 0 to 1. 

If the Gini coefficient is equal to zero, income is distributed in a perfectly equal manner, in other words there is no variance 
between the high and low income earners within the population. In contrast, if the Gini coefficient equals 1, income is 
completely inequitable, i.e. one individual in the population is earning all the income and the rest has no income. Generally, 
this coefficient lies in the range between 0.25 and 0.70. 


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FIGURE 13: GINI COEFFICIENT - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2006-2016 [NUMBER] 


0.66 

0.65 

0.64 

0.63 

0.62 

0.61 

0.60 

0.59 

0.58 

0.57 

0.56 


Gini coefficient 

Nkangala, Mpumalanga and National Total, 2006-2016 



2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 
■ Nkangala ■ Mpumalanga n National Total 

Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 


In 2016, the Gini coefficient in Nkangala District Municipality was at 0.59, which reflects a decrease in the number over the 
ten-year period from 2006 to 2016. The Mpumalanga Province and South Africa, both had a more unequal spread of income 
amongst their residents (at 0.602 and 0.628 respectively) when compared to Nkangala District Municipality. 

FIGURE 14: GINI COEFFICIENT 


GINI COEFFICIENT 


0.59 


0.58 


0.57 


0.56 


0.55 


0.54 


0.53 


0.584512 



Victor Khanye Emalahleni Steve Tshwete Emakhazeni Thembisile Hani DrJSMoroka 

■ Seriesl 

Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 


In terms of the Gini coefficient for each of the regions within the Nkangala District Municipality, Emalahleni local municipality 
has the highest Gini coefficient, with an index value of 0.585. The lowest Gini coefficient can be observed in the Thembisile 
Hani local municipality with an index value of 0.552. 


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3.1.4.4. Poverty 


The upper poverty line is defined by Stats-SA as the level of consumption at which individuals are able to purchase both 
sufficient food and non-food items without sacrificing one for the other. This variable measures the number of individuals 
living below that particular level of consumption for the given area, and is balanced directly to the official upper poverty 
rate as measured by Stats-SA. 


FIGURE 15: NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE LIVING IN POVERTY 


780,000 

760,000 

740,000 

720,000 

700,000 

680,000 

660,000 

640,000 

620,000 

600,000 


Number and percentage of people in poverty 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 



2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 


58 % 

57 % 

56 % 

55 % 

54 % 

53 % 

52 % 

51 % 

50 % 

49 % 

48 % 


^■Number of people in poverty 
^“Percentage of people in poverty 

Source: IHS Markit Reqiona / explorer version 1160 


In 2016, there were 753 000 people living in poverty, using the upper poverty line definition, across Nkangala District 
Municipality - this is 14.28% higher than the 659 000 in 2006. The percentage of people living in poverty has decreased 
from 57.37% in 2006 to 52.93% in 2016, which indicates a decrease of 4.44 percentage points. 

TABLE 27: PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE LIVING IN POVERTY BY POPULATION GROUP - NKANGALA, 2006-2016 
[PERCENTAGE] 



African 

White 

Coloured 

Asian 

2006 

63.3% 

0.8% 

34.4% 

6.8% 

2007 

61.7% 

1.2% 

33.3% 

7.1% 

2008 

62.8% 

2.0% 

36.8% 

9.0% 

2009 

62.2% 

3.0% 

39.0% 

11.1% 

2010 

59.6% 

2.7% 

39.4% 

9.0% 

2011 

58.0% 

2.4% 

38.3% 

7.8% 

2012 

57.3% 

2.6% 

39.1% 

8.6% 

2013 

56.8% 

2.6% 

39.6% 

9.4% 

2014 

57.3% 

2.6% 

39.3% 

10.6% 

2015 

57.2% 

2.7% 

37.7% 

11.2% 

2016 

58.5% 

2.8% 

38.4% 

12.7% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


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In 2016, the population group with the highest percentage of people living in poverty was the African population group with a 
total of 63.3% people living in poverty, using the upper poverty line definition. The proportion of the African population group, 
living in poverty, decreased by 4.87 percentage points, as can be seen by the change from 63.34% in 2006 to 58.47% in 2016. 
In 2016 38.38% of the Coloured population group lived in poverty, as compared to the 34.43% in 2006. The Asian and the 
White population group saw a decrease in the percentage of people living in poverty, with a decrease of -5.9 and -2.02 
percentage points respectively. 

FIGURE 16; PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE LIVING IN POVERTY 


80% 

70% 

60 % 

50% 

40% 

30% 

20 % 

10 % 

0 % 


0.54294 


Percentage of people living in poverty 
Nkangala District Municipality, 2016 


0.662632 


0.492519 


0.42245 


0.394459 


0.679813 




Victor Khanye Emalahleni Steve Tshwete Emakhazeni Thembisile Hani DrJSMoroka 


Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 


In terms of the percentage of people living in poverty for each of the regions within the Nkangala District Municipality, Dr JS 
Moroka local municipality has the highest percentage of people living in poverty, using the upper poverty line definition, with 
a total of 68.0%. The lowest percentage of people living in poverty can be observed in the Steve Tshwete local municipality 
with a total of 39.4% living in poverty, using the upper poverty line definition. 

3.1.4.5. Poverty Gap Rate 

■ The poverty gap is used as an indicator to measure the depth of poverty. The gap measures the average distance of the 
population from the poverty line and is expressed as a percentage of the upper bound poverty line, as defined by Stats- 
SA. The Poverty Gap deals with a major shortcoming of the poverty rate, which does not give any indication of the depth, 
of poverty. The upper poverty line is defined by Stats-SA as the level of consumption at which individuals are able to 
purchase both sufficient food and non-food items without sacrificing one for the other. 


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FIGURE 17: POVERTY GAP RATE BY POPULATION GROUP - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 
[PERCENTAGE] 


Poverty gap rate 

315% Nkangala District Municipality, 2016 

31 . 0 % 

30 . 5 % 

30 . 0 % 

29 . 5 % 

29 . 0 % 

28 . 5 % 

28 . 0 % 

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 

Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 

In 2016, the poverty gap rate was 29.7% and in 2006 the poverty gap rate was 31.1%, it can be seen that the poverty gap 
rate decreased from 2006 to 2016, which means that there were improvements in terms of the depth of the poverty within 
Nkangala District Municipality. 

FIGURE 18: POVERTY GAP RATE - VICTOR KHANYE, EMALAHLENI, STEVE TSHWETE, EMAKHAZENI, THEMBISILE 
HANI AND DR JS MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES,2016 [PERCENTAGE] 



31 % 


30 % 

30 % 

29 % 

29 % 

28 % 

28 % 

27 % 

Victor Khanye Emalahleni Steve Tshwete Emakhazeni Thembisile Hani DrJSMoroka 

Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 


Poverty gap rate 

Nkangala District Municipality, 2016 


0.305515 


0.295666 


0.285587 


0.284307 0.284159 


0.3075 


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In terms of the poverty gap rate for each of the regions within the Nkangala District Municipality, Dr JS Moroka local 
municipality had the highest poverty gap rate, with a rand value of 30.8%. The lowest poverty gap rate can be observed in 
the Emakhazeni local municipality with a total of 28.4%. 


Table 28: Poverty rate (lower bound) - Nkangala District Municipality 


Local Municipal Area 

Poverty rate 
(lower bound) 

2011 

Poverty rate 
(lower bound) 

2016 

Poverty numbers 
(lower bound) 

2016 

Steve Tshwete 

21 . 2 % 

26 . 0 % 

68 155 

Emalahleni 

22 . 0 % 

28 . 0 % 

123 320 

Emakhazeni 

31 . 1 % 

32 . 6 % 

15 675 

Victor Khanye 

33 . 3 % 

37 . 9 % 

31 201 

Thembisile Hani 

47 . 9 % 

48 . 3 % 

163 029 

Dr JS Moroka 

51 . 4 % 

50 . 1 % 

126 518 


(Source Stats-SA 2011 & CS 2016) 


3.1.4.6. Education 

Educating is important to the economic growth in a country and the development of its industries, providing a trained 
workforce and skilled professionals required. 

The District has 502 schools spread across the six Municipalities, of the 502 schools, 133 are Secondary Schools, 13 are 
Combined Schools whilst 356 are Primary Schools. There are 20 Circuits in the District with Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile 
with the highest number of Circuits. 


Table 29: Matric Pass Rate Per Local Municipality 


Local municipal area 

2014 

Grade 12 Pass Rate 

2017 

2018 

Admission to B 
degree studies 
2018 

Steve Tshwete 

85.6% 

77.9% 

84.3% 

40.7% 

Emakhazeni 

85.7% 

81.6% 

82.2% 

28.1% 

Victor Khanye 

74.6% 

82.5% 

81.5% 

32.8% 

Emalahleni 

81.9% 

80.9% 

79.1% 

31.5% 

Dr JS Moroka 

73.8% 

67.1% 

77.1% 

24.7% 

Thembisile Hani 

77.1% 

67.5% 

74.9% 

23.0% 

Nkangala 

78.8% 

73.5% 

78.7% 



Source: Department of Education 


Nkangala’s grade 12 pass rate deteriorated slightly from 78.8% in 2014 to 78.7% in 2018, which was the second highest of 
the 4 education districts. Steve Tshwete had the highest grade 12 pass rate in the District and Thembisile Hani the lowest in 
2018. In general, a good improvement in the pass rate between 2017 and 2018, except for Emalahleni and Victor Khanye. 
There is a concern about Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka with pass rates in the bottom 5 of the province and also low 
admission rates to degree studies of less than 25%, and in the bottom 3 of the 17 municipal areas. These numbers contribute 
to the impact on youth unemployment - employability of the youth. The challenge is to accommodate the educated young 
people in the area - inadequate economic opportunities. 


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FIGURE 19: HIGHEST LEVEL OF EDUCATION: AGE 15+ - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 
[PERCENTAGE] 


Highest level of education: age 15+ 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 

■ Matric & Postgrad degree 


■ Matric & Bachelors degree 

Matric & certificate / 
diploma 

■ Matric only 

■ Certificate / diploma 
without matric 

■ Grade 10-11 


■ Grade 7-9 


■ Grade 3-6 


■ Grade 0-2 

■ No schooling 

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 

Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 

The education measure represents the highest level of education of an individual, using the 15 years and older age 
category. (According to the United Nations definition of education, one is an adult when 15 years or older. IHS uses this cut¬ 
off point to allow for cross-country comparisons. Furthermore, the age of 15 is also the legal age at which children may leave 
school in South Africa). 

Within Nkangala District Municipality, the number of people without any schooling decreased from 2006 to 2016 with an 
average annual rate of -2.85%, while the number of people within the 'matric only' category, increased from 161,000 to 
271,000. The number of people with 'matric and a certificate/diploma' increased with an average annual rate of 5.38%, with 
the number of people with a 'matric and a Bachelor's' degree increasing with an average annual rate of 7.55%. Overall 
improvement in the level of education is visible with an increase in the number of people with 'matric' or higher education. 



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FIGURE 20: HIGHEST LEVEL OF EDUCATION: AGE 15+, VICTOR KHANYE, EMALAHLENI, STEVE TSHWETE, 
EMAKHAZENI, THEMBISILE HANI AND DR JS MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES 2016 [PERCENTAGE] 


Highest level of education: age 15+ 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 

100% 

90% 

80% 

70% 

60% 

50% 

40% 

30% 

20 % 

10 % 

0% 

Victor Khanye Emalahleni Steve Emakhazeni Thembisile Dr JS Moroka 

Tshwete Hani 



■ Matric & Postgrad 
degree 

■ Matric & Bachelors 
degree 

Matric & certificate / 
diploma 

■ Matric only 

■ Certificate / diploma 
without matric 

■ Grade 10-11 

■ Grade 7-9 

■ Grade 3-6 

■ Grade 0-2 

■ No schooling 


Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 


3.1.47. Functional literacy 

IHS defines functional literacy as the number of people in a region that are 20 years and older and have completed at least 
their primary education (i.e. grade 7). 

Functional literacy describes the reading and writing skills that are adequate for an individual to cope with the demands of 
everyday life - including the demands posed in the workplace. This is contrasted with illiteracy in the strictest sense, meaning 
the inability to read or write. Functional literacy enables individuals to enter the labour market and contribute towards economic 
growth thereby reducing poverty. 


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FIGURE 21: LITERACY RATE - VICTOR KHANYE, EMALAHLENI, STEVE TSHWETE, EMAKHAZENI, THEMBISILE HANI 
AND DR JS MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES, 2016 [PERCENTAGE] 


Functional literacy rate 
Nkangala District Municipality, 2016 

85 % 

80 % 

75 % 

70 % 

65 % 

Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 



Victor Khanye Emalahleni Steve Tshwete Emakhazeni Thembisile Hani DrJSMoroka 


In terms of the literacy rate for each of the regions within the Nkangala District Municipality, Emalahleni local municipality had 
the highest literacy rate, with a total of 87.9%. The lowest literacy rate can be observed in the Dr JS Moroka local municipality 
with a total of 75.1%.Crime 

The state of crime in South Africa has been the topic of many media articles and papers in the past years, and although many 
would acknowledge that the country has a crime problem, very little research has been done on the relative level of crime. 
The media often tend to focus on more negative or sensational information, while the progress made in combating crime is 
neglected. 

3.1.4.8. IHS Composite Crime Index 

The IHS Composite Crime Index makes use of the official SAPS data, which is reported in 27 crime categories (ranging from 
murder to crime injuries). These 27 categories are divided into two groups according to the nature of the crime: i.e. violent 
crimes and property crimes. IHS uses the (a) Length-of-sentence and the (b) Cost-of-crime in order to apply a weight to each 
category. 

3.1.4.9. Overall crime index 

The crime index is a composite, weighted index which measures crime. The higher the index number, the higher the level of 
crime for that specific year in a particular region. The index is best used by looking at the change over time, or comparing the 
crime levels across regions. 


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FIGURE 22: IHS CRIME INDEX - CALENDER YEARS (WEIGHTED AVG / 100,000 PEOPLE) - N KAN GALA DISTRICT 
MUNICIPALITY, 2005/2006-2015/2016 [INDEX VALUE] 


Overall, Violent and Property Crime Index 

Nkangala, 2005/2006-2015/2016 


250 



200 



150 



100 



50 



0 

4 


# N # 


■OverallCrime Index 
^^Violent Crime Index 

Property Crime Index Source: IHS Markit Reqional explorer version 1160 

TABLE 30: OVERALL CRIME INDEX - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY AND THE REST OF MPUMALANGA, 
2005/2006-2015/2016 [INDEX VALUE] 



Nkangala 

Gert Sibande 

Ehlanzeni 

2005/2006 

140.14 

119.66 

110.30 

2006/2007 

131.87 

114.13 

108.67 

2007/2008 

114.42 

105.94 

97.09 

2008/2009 

123.27 

110.55 

98.78 

2009/2010 

113.68 

108.71 

93.02 

2010/2011 

101.44 

94.12 

84.55 

2011/2012 

96.55 

87.21 

77.30 

2012/2013 

88.45 

83.91 

71.42 

2013/2014 

81.67 

82.28 

65.02 

2014/2015 

81.74 

81.45 

62.68 

2015/2016 

82.64 

80.57 

63.57 

Average Annual growth 

2005/2006-2015/2016 

-5.14% 

-3.88% 

-5.36% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


In 2015/2016, the Nkangala district municipality has the highest overall crime rate of the sub-regions within the overall 
Mpumalanga Province with an index value of 82.6. Gert Sibande district municipality has the second highest overall crime 
index at 80.6, with Ehlanzeni district municipality having the third highest overall crime index of 63.6. It is clear that all the 
crime is decreasing overtime for all the regions within Mpumalanga Province. Gert Sibande district municipality has the second 
lowest overall crime index of 80.6 and the Ehlanzeni district municipality has the lowest overall crime rate of 63.6. It is clear 
that crime is decreasing overtime for all the regions within Mpumalanga Province. The region that decreased the most in 


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overall crime since 2005/2006 was Ehlanzeni district municipality with an average annual decrease of 5.4% followed by 
Nkangala district municipality with an average annual decrease of 5.1%. 


FIGURE 23: IHS CRIME INDEX - CALENDER YEARS (WEIGHTED AVG / 100,000 PEOPLE) - NKANGALA, 
MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2015/2016 [INDEX VALUE] 


Overall, Violent and Property Crime Index 

Nkangala, Mpumalanga and National Total, 2015/2016 

250 


200 


150 


100 


50 


0 

Nkangala Mpumalanga National Total 

■ OverallCrime Index ■ Violent Crime Index ■Property Crime Index 

Source: IHS Markit Reaionat explorer version 1160 

From the chart above it is evident that property crime is a major problem for all the regions relative to violent crime. It is 
evident that the property crime is a major problem for all the regions relative to rest crime indices. 

3.1.5. Household Infrastructure 

Drawing on the household infrastructure data of a region is of essential value in economic planning and social development. 
Assessing household infrastructure involves the measurement of four indicators: 

Access to dwelling units 
Access to proper sanitation 
Access to running water 
Access to refuse removal 
Access to electricity 



A household is considered "serviced" if it has access to all four of these basic services. If not, the household is considered to 
be part of the backlog. The way access to a given service is defined (and how to accurately measure that specific Definition 
overtime) gives rise to some distinct problems. IHS has therefore developed a unique model to capture the number of 
households and their level of access to the four basic services. 

A household is defined as a group of persons who live together and provide themselves jointly with food and/or other 
essentials for living, or a single person who lives alone. 

The next few sections offer an overview of the household infrastructure of the Nkangala District Municipality between 2016 
and 2006. 


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3.1.5.1. Household by Dwelling Type 

Using the Stats-SA definition of a household and a dwelling unit, households can be categorised according to type of 
dwelling. The categories are: 

Very formal dwellings - structures built according to approved plans, e.g. houses on a separate stand, flats or 
apartments, townhouses, rooms in backyards that also have running water and flush toilets within the dwelling. 

Formal dwellings - structures built according to approved plans, i.e. house on a separate stand, flat or apartment, 
townhouse, room in backyard, rooms or flat let elsewhere etc., but without running water or without a flush toilet within 
the dwelling. 

Informal dwellings - shacks or shanties in informal settlements, serviced stands, or proclaimed townships, as well as 
shacks in the backyards of other dwelling types. 

Traditional dwellings - structures made of clay, mud, reeds, or other locally available material. 

Other dwelling units - tents, ships, caravans, etc. 

FIGURE 24: HOUSEHOLDS BY DWELLING UNIT TYPE - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 
2016 [PERCENTAGE] 


Households by dwelling unit type 

Nkangala, Mpumalanga and National Total, 2016 

100% 

90% 

80% 

70% . . . ^Traditional 

60% 

50% . . . Informal 

40% 

30% 

20% 

10% | ■ Very Formal 

0% 

Nkangala Mpumalanga National Total 

Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 

Nkangala District Municipality had a total number of 147 000 (36.37% of total households) very formal dwelling units, a total 
of 190 000 (47.03% of total households) formal dwelling units and a total number of 53 400 (13.23% of total households) 
informal dwelling units. 

TABLE 31: HOUSEHOLDS BY DWELLING UNIT TYPE 


Other dwelling 
type 



Very Formal 

Formal 

Informal 

Traditional 

Other dwelling 
type 

Total 

Victor Khanye 

11,300 

8,180 

3,210 

515 

324 

23,500 

Emalahleni 

74,000 

33,500 

27,600 

3,240 

816 

139,000 

Steve Tshwete 

46,100 

21,000 

10,300 

1,890 

635 

79,900 

Emakhazeni 

6,850 

5,060 

1,400 

1,070 

81 

14,500 

Thembisile Hani 

4,000 

68,100 

6,820 

3,690 

344 

83,000 

Dr JS Moroka 

4,510 

54,000 

4,070 

838 

170 

63,600 


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Total 146,777 189,823 53,393 11,248 2,371 403,612 

Nkangala 

Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 

The region within the Nkangala District Municipality with the highest number of very formal dwelling units is Emalahleni local 
municipality with 74 000 or a share of 50.43% of the total very formal dwelling units within Nkangala District Municipality. 

The region with the lowest number of very formal dwelling units is Thembisile Hani local municipality with a total of 4 000 or 
a share of 2.72% of the total very formal dwelling units within Nkangala District Municipality. 

TABLE 32: INFORMAL DWELLING BACKLOG 


Local Municipal area 

Number of households ir 

2011 

informal dwellings 

2016 

Share of total household 

2011 

s 

2016 

Victor Khanye 

3158 

3 290 

15.4% 

13.6% 

Emalahleni 

23138 

34 845 

19.3% 

23.2% 

Steve Tshwete 

9190 

12 480 

14.1% 

14.4% 

Emakhazeni 

1 537 

1 694 

11.2% 

11.6% 

Thembisile Hani 

7 678 

6 915 

10.2% 

8.4% 

Dr JS Moroka 

4813 

4 093 

7.7% 

6.6% 


Sources Stats-SA 2011 & CS 2016 


3.1.5.2. Household by Type of Sanitation 

Sanitation can be divided into specific types of sanitation to which a household has access. We use the following categories: 
No toilet - No access to any of the toilet systems explained below. 

Bucket system - A top structure with a seat over a bucket. The bucket is periodically removed and the contents 
disposed of. (Note: this system is widely used but poses health risks to the collectors. Most authorities are actively 
attempting to discontinue the use of these buckets in their local regions). 

Pit toilet - A top structure over a pit. 

Ventilation improved pit - A pit toilet but with a fly screen and vented by a pipe. Depending on soil conditions, the pit 
may be lined. 

Flush toilet - Waste is flushed into an enclosed tank, thus preventing the waste to flow into the surrounding 
environment. The tanks need to be emptied or the contents pumped elsewhere. 

TABLE 33: HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE OF SANITATION - NKANGALA 


Local Municipal area 

Number of households w 

2011 

thout hygienic toilets 

2016 

Share of total households 

2011 

2016 

Victor Khanye 

3 742 

3 373 

18.2% 

13.9% 

Emalahleni 

34 160 

41 552 

28.5% 

27.6% 

Steve Tshwete 

9 780 

15713 

15.1% 

18.1% 

Emakhazeni 

2941 

2 573 

21.4% 

17.6% 

Thembisile Hani 

68 022 

73 411 

89.9% 

88.7% 

Dr JS Moroka 

52 450 

50 738 

84.4% 

81.4% 


Nkangala District Municipality had a total number of 221 000 flush toilets (54.65% of total households), 56 400 Ventilation 
Improved Pit (VIP) (13.96% of total households) and 114 000 (28.16%) of total household's pit toilets. 


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TABLE 34: HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE OF SANITATION 



Flush toilet 

Ventilation 
Improved Pit 
(VIP) 

Pit toilet 

Bucket 

system 

No toilet 

Total 

Victor Khanye 

20,500 

380 

1,540 

625 

435 

23,500 

Emalahleni 

101,000 

6,790 

27,300 

509 

3,130 

139,000 

Steve Tshwete 

67,600 

5,200 

4,100 

1,660 

1,410 

79,900 

Emakhazeni 

12,000 

229 

1,240 

82 

860 

14,500 

Thembisile Hani 

8,690 

22,400 

48,800 

940 

2,140 

83,000 

Dr JS Moroka 

10,300 

21,300 

30,700 

242 

992 

63,600 

Total 

Nkangala 

220,568 

56,357 

113,657 

4,061 

8,970 

403,612 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


The region within Nkangala with the highest number of flush toilets is Emalahleni local municipality with 101 000 ora share 
of 45.98% of the flush toilets within Nkangala. The region with the lowest number of flush toilets is Thembisile Hani local 
municipality with a total of 8 690 or a share of 3.94% of the total flush toilets within Nkangala District Municipality. 

FIGURE 25: SANITATION BACKLOG - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 [NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS 
WITHOUT HYGIENIC TOILETS] 


Sanitation backlog 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 

140,000 



110,000 

105,000 

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 


Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 

When looking at the sanitation backlog (number of households without hygienic toilets) over time, it can be seen that in 2006 
the number of Households without any hygienic toilets in Nkangala District Municipality was 130 000, this decreased 
annually at a rate of-0.28% to 127 000 in 2016. 

3.1.5.3. Households by Access to water 

A household is categorised according to its main access to water, as follows: Regional/local water scheme, Borehole and 
spring, Water tank, Dam/pool/stagnant water, River/stream and other main access to water methods. No formal piped water 
includes households that obtain water via water carriers and tankers, rain water, boreholes, dams, rivers and springs. 


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FIGURE 26: HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE OF WATER ACCESS - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 
2016 [PERCENTAGE] 


100% 

90% 

80% 

70% 

60% 

50% 

40% 

30% 

20 % 

10 % 

0% 

Nkangala Mpumalanga National Total 

Source: IHS Markit Reaional explorer version 1160 

Nkangala District Municipality had a total number of 155 000 (or 38.44%) households with piped water inside the dwelling, a 
total of 169 000 (41.80%) households had piped water inside the yard and a total number of 31 700 (7.86%) households had 
no formal piped water. 

TABLE 35: HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE OF WATER ACCESS - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2016 [NUMBER] 


Local Municipal area 

Number of households 

2011 

without access* 

2016 

Share of total households 

2011 

2016 

Victor Khanye 

882 

3 177 

4.3% 

13.1% 

Emalahleni 

6 273 

13 792 

5.2% 

9.2% 

Steve Tshwete 

1 194 

4 082 

1.8% 

4.7% 

Emakhazeni 

642 

1 686 

4.7% 

11.5% 

Thembisile Hani 

3 459 

4 768 

4.6% 

5.8% 


Households by level of access to Water 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 


No formal piped 
water 


■ Communal piped 
water: more than 
200m from dwelling 
(Below RDP) 

■ Communal piped 
water: less than 
200m from dwelling 
(At RDP-level) 

■ Piped water in yard 


■ Piped water inside 
dwelling 


The regions within Nkangala District Municipality with the highest number of households with piped water inside the dwelling 
is Emalahleni local municipality with 72 600 or a share of 46.78% of the households with piped water inside the dwelling 
within Nkangala District Municipality. The region with the lowest number of households with piped water inside the dwelling 
is Emakhazeni local municipality with a total of 6 980 or a share of 4.50% of the total households with piped water inside the 
dwelling within Nkangala District Municipality. 


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FIGURE 27: WATER BACKLOG - N KAN GALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 [NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS 
BELOW RDP-LEVEL] 


Water backlog 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 

50,000 



42,000 

41,000 

40,000 

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 
Water backlog - number of households below RDP-level 

Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 

When looking at the water backlog (number of households below RDP-level) over time, it can be seen that in 2006 the 
number of households below the RDP-level were 43 300 within Nkangala District Municipality, this increased annually at 
0.85% per annum to 47 200 in 2016. 

The total number of households within Nkangala District Municipality increased at an average annual rate of 2.88% from 
2006 to 2016, which is higher than the annual increase of 1.97% in the number of households in South Africa. With high in- 
migration into a region, the number of households increases, putting additional strain on household infrastructure. In the 
short to medium term this can result in an increase in the number of households not living in a formal dwelling, as the 
provision of household infrastructure usually takes time to deliver. 

3.1.5.4. Households by Type of Electricity 

Households are distributed into 3 electricity usage categories: Households using electricity for cooking, Households using 
electricity for heating, households using electricity for lighting. Household using solar power are included as part of 
households with an electrical connection. This time series categorises households in a region according to their access to 
electricity (electrical connection). 


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FIGURE 28: HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE OF ELECTRICAL CONNECTION - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND 
NATIONAL TOTAL, 2016 [PERCENTAGE] 


100% 

90% 

80% 

70% 

60% 

50% 

40% 

30% 

20 % 

10 % 

0% 


Households by electricity usage 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 



Nkangala Mpumalanga National Total 


■ Not using electricity 


■ Electricity for lighting 
and other purposes 


■ Electricity for lighting 
only 


Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 


Nkangala District Municipality had a total number of 34 800 (8.63%) households with electricity for lighting only, a total of 
322 000 (79.77%) households had electricity for lighting and other purposes and a total number of 46 800 (11.60%) 
households did not use electricity. 

TABLE 36: HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE OF ELECTRICAL CONNECTION - VICTOR KHANYE, EMALAHLENI, STEVE 
TSHWETE, EMAKHAZENI, THEMBISILE HANI AND DR JS MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES, 2016 [NUMBER] 



Electricity for 
lighting only 

Electricity for 
lighting and other 
purposes 

Not using electricity 

Total 

Victor Khanye 

3,880 

17,400 

2,200 

23,500 

Emalahleni 

3,520 

103,000 

32,300 

139,000 

Steve Tshwete 

4,720 

69,300 

5,900 

79,900 

Emakhazeni 

4,290 

8,400 

1,770 

14,500 

Thembisile Hani 

7,300 

72,400 

3,330 

83,000 

Dr JS Moroka 

11,100 

51,200 

1,280 

63,600 

Total 

Nkangala 

34,825 

321,973 

46,814 

403,612 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


The region within Nkangala with the highest number of households with electricity for lighting and other purposes is 
Emalahleni local municipality with 103 000 or a share of 32.08% of the households with electricity for lighting and other 
purposes within Nkangala District Municipality. The Region with the lowest number of households with electricity for lighting 
and other purposes is Emakhazeni local municipality with a total of 8 400 or a share of 2.61% of the total households with 
electricity for lighting and other purposes within Nkangala District Municipality. 


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TABLE 37: ELECTRICITY CONNECTION - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 [NUMBER OF 
HOUSEHOLDS WITH NO ELECTRICAL CONNECTION] 


Local Municipal 

area 

Number of households not 

connected* 

Share of total households 


2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

Victor Khanye 

3 062 

1 585 

14.9% 

6.5% 

Emalahleni 

31527 

40 721 

26.3% 

27.1% 

Steve Tshwete 

5 782 

7 458 

8.9% 

8.6% 

Emakhazeni 

2 209 

2 074 

16.1% 

14.2% 

Thembisile Hani 

5 673 

1 636 

7.5% 

2.0% 

Dr JS Moroka 

1 927 

912 

3.1% 

1.5% 


3.1.5.5. Households by Refuse Disposal 

A distinction is made between formal and informal refuse removal. When refuse is removed by the local authorities, it is 
referred to as formal refuse removal. Informal refuse removal is where either the household or the community disposes of the 
waste, or where there is no refuse removal at all. A further breakdown is used in terms of the frequency by which the refuge 
is taken away, thus leading to the following categories: 

Removed weekly by authority 
Removed less often than weekly by authority 
Removed by community members 
Personal removal / (own dump) 

No refuse removal 

FIGURE 29: HOUSEHOLDS BY REFUSE DISPOSAL - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2016 
[PERCENTAGE] 


100% 

90% 

80% 

70% 

60% 

50% 

40% 

30% 

20 % 

10 % 

0% 


Households by access to refuse removal 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 



Nkangala Mpumalanga National Total 


No refuse removal 


■ Personal removal 
(own dump) 


■ Removed by 
community members 


■ Removed less often 
than weekly by 
authority 

■ Removed weekly by 
authority 


Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 


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Nkangala District Municipality had a total number of 199 000 (49.33%) households which had their refuse removed weekly by 
the authority, a total of 8 890 (2.20%) households had their refuse removed less often than weekly by the authority and a total 
number of 152 000 (37.70%) households which had to remove their refuse personally (own dump). 

TABLE 38: HOUSEHOLDS BY REFUSE DISPOSAL - VICTOR KHANYE, EMALAHLENI, STEVE TSHWETE, 
EMAKHAZENI, THEMBISILE HANI AND DR JS MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES, 2016 [NUMBER] 



Removed 
weekly by 
authority 

Removed 

less often 
than weekly 
by authority 

Removed by 

community 

members 

Personal 

removal 
(own dump) 

No refuse 

removal 

Total 

Victor Khanye 

17,400 

912 

571 

3,520 

1,090 

23,500 

Emalahleni 

93,400 

2,520 

5,620 

27,100 

10,500 

139,000 

Steve Tshwete 

66,100 

2,550 

1,790 

8,010 

1,460 

79,900 

Emakhazeni 

9,500 

443 

853 

3,210 

453 

14,500 

Thembisile Hani 

6,320 

501 

7,670 

62,900 

5,560 

83,000 

Dr JS Moroka 

6,280 

1,970 

4,080 

47,400 

3,870 

63,600 

Total 

199,093 

8,892 

20,578 

152,164 

22,886 

403,612 


Nkangala 

Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 

The region within Nkangala with the highest number of households where the refuse is removed weekly by the authority is 
Emalahleni local municipality with 93 400 or a share of 46.93% of the households where the refuse is removed weekly by the 
authority within Nkangala. The region with the lowest number of households where the refuse is removed weekly by the 
authority is Dr JS Moroka local municipality with a total of 6 280 or a share of 3.16% of the total households where the refuse 
is removed weekly by the authority within the district municipality. 

FIGURE 30: REFUSE REMOVAL - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 [NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS 
WITH NO FORMAL REFUSE REMOVAL] 



When looking at the number of households with no formal refuse removal, it can be seen that in 2006 the households with no 
formal refuse removal in Nkangala District Municipality was 158 000, this increased annually at 2.15% per annum to 196 000 
in 2016. 


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The total number of households within Nkangala District Municipality increased at an average annual rate of 2.88% from 2006 
to 2016, which is higher than the annual increase of 1.97% in the number of households in South Africa. With high in-migration 
into a region, the number of households increases, putting additional strain on household infrastructure. In the short to medium 
term this can result in an increase in the number of households not living in a formal dwelling, as the provision of household 
infrastructure usually takes time to deliver. 

3.1.7. Tourism 

Tourism can be defined as the non-commercial organisation plus operation of vacations and visits to a place of interest. 
Whether you visit a relative or friend, travel for business purposes, go on holiday or on medical and religious trips - these are 
all included in tourism. 

3.7.1. Trips by purpose of trips 

■ As defined by the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UN WTO), a trip refers to travel, by a person, from the time 
they leave their usual residence until they return to that residence. This is usually referred to as a round trip. IHS likes to 
narrow this definition down to overnight trips only, and only those made by adult visitors (over 18 years). Also note that the 
number of "person" trips are measured, not household or "party trips". 

The main purpose for an overnight trip is grouped into these categories: 

Leisure / Holiday 
Business 

Visits to friends and relatives 
Other (Medical, Religious, etc.) 

TABLE 39: NUMBER OF TRIPS BY PURPOSE OF TRIPS - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 [NUMBER 
PERCENTAGE] 



Leisure / 

Business 

Visits to friends 

Other (Medical, 

Total 


Holiday 


and relatives 

Religious, etc) 


2006 

144,000 

73,400 

489,000 

101,000 

808,000 

2007 

158,000 

72,100 

516,000 

97,000 

843,000 

2008 

165,000 

75,400 

560,000 

86,200 

887,000 

2009 

169,000 

82,400 

583,000 

94,500 

929,000 

2010 

184,000 

98,000 

620,000 

111,000 

1,010,000 

2011 

198,000 

108,000 

671,000 

121,000 

1,100,000 

2012 

213,000 

119,000 

736,000 

131,000 

1,200,000 

2013 

231,000 

114,000 

849,000 

143,000 

1,340,000 

2014 

226,000 

107,000 

854,000 

139,000 

1,330,000 

2015 

223,000 

100,000 

905,000 

139,000 

1,370,000 

2016 

240,000 

107,000 

975,000 

150,000 

1,470,000 

Average Annual growth 





2006-2016 

5.22% 

3.84% 

7.15% 

4.00% 

6.18% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


In Nkangala District Municipality, the Visits to friends and relatives, relative to the other tourism, recorded the highest average 
annual growth rate from 2006 (489 000) to 2016 (975 000) at 7.15%. The type of tourism with the highest volume of tourists 
was also the Visits to friends and relative's tourism with a total number of 975 000 annual tourists and had an average annual 
growth rate of 7.15%. The tourism type that recorded the lowest growth was Business tourism with an average annual growth 
rate of 3.84% from 2006 (73 400) to 2016 (107 000). 


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TABLE 40: TRIPS BY PURPOSE OF TRIP - N KAN GALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2016 [PERCENTAGE] 


Region 

Total tourism spend 
(R-million) 

Tourism spend as % of 
GDP (current prices) 


2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

Nkangala 

2 486 

4 490 

2.7% 

3.7% 

Victor Khanye 

95 

178 

2.0% 

2.5% 

Emalahleni 

777 

1 343 

1.7% 

2.4% 

Steve Tshwete 

796 

1 670 

2.6% 

3.9% 

Emakhazeni 

436 

758 

17.7% 

20.3% 

Thembisile Hani 

264 

377 

5.9% 

5.4% 

Dr JS Moroka 

120 

166 

2.9% 

2.7% 


The Visits to friends and relatives at 66.23% has largest share the total tourism within Nkangala District Municipality. Leisure 
/ Holiday tourism had the second highest share at 16.32%, followed by Other (Medical, Religious, etc) tourism at 10.18% and 
the Business tourism with the smallest share of 7.26% of the total tourism within Nkangala District Municipality. 

3.7.2. Origin of Tourists 

In the following table, the number of tourists that visited Nkangala District Municipality from both domestic origins, as well as 
those coming from international places, are listed. 

TABLE 41: TOTAL NUMBER OF TRIPS BY ORIGIN TOURISTS - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 
[NUMBER] 



Domestic tourists 

International tourists 

Total tourists 

2006 

650,000 

158,000 

808,000 

2007 

671,000 

172,000 

843,000 

2008 

701,000 

187,000 

887,000 

2009 

727,000 

201,000 

929,000 

2010 

775,000 

237,000 

1,010,000 

2011 

843,000 

255,000 

1,100,000 

2012 

917,000 

281,000 

1,200,000 

2013 

1,060,000 

282,000 

1,340,000 

2014 

1,050,000 

281,000 

1,330,000 

2015 

1,110,000 

254,000 

1,370,000 

2016 

1,190,000 

282,000 

1,470,000 

Average Annual growth 
2006-2016 

6.24% 

5.94% 

6.18% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 

The number of trips by tourists visiting Nkangala District Municipality from other regions in South Africa has increased at a 
very high average annual rate of 6.24% from 2006 (650 000) to 2016 (1.19 million). The tourists visiting from other countries 
increased at a relatively high average annual growth rate of 5.94% (from 158 000 in 2006 to 282 000). International tourists 
constitute 19.12% of the total number of trips, with domestic tourism representing the balance of 80.88%. 


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FIGURE 31: TOURISTS BY ORIGIN - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2016 [PERCENTAGE] 


Tourism - tourists by origin 
Nkangala District Municipality, 2016 


Domestic tourists 


l International tourists 


Domestic tourists 
81 % 



International tourists 
19 % 


Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 


3.7.3. Bed nights by origin of tourist 

■ A bed night is the tourism industry measurement of one night away from home on a single person trip. 


The following is a summary of the number of bed nights spent by domestic and international tourist within Nkangala District 
Municipality between 2006 and 2016. 

TABLE 42: BEDNIGHTS BY ORIGIN OF TOURIST - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 2006-2016 [NUMBER] 


2006 

2,740,000 

797,000 

3,530,000 

2007 

2,900,000 

827,000 

3,730,000 

2008 

3,100,000 

875,000 

3,980,000 

2009 

3,210,000 

940,000 

4,150,000 

2010 

3,320,000 

1,150,000 

4,470,000 

2011 

3,400,000 

1,300,000 

4,700,000 

2012 

3,410,000 

1,530,000 

4,940,000 

2013 

3,250,000 

1,760,000 

5,010,000 

2014 

3,080,000 

2,040,000 

5,120,000 

2015 

2,950,000 

2,080,000 

5,030,000 

2016 

3,090,000 

2,460,000 

5,550,000 

Average Annual growth 
2006-2016 

1.22 % 

11.92 % 

4.61% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 

From 2006 to 2016, the number of bed nights spent by domestic tourists has increased at an average annual rate of 1.22%, 
while in the same period the international tourists had an average annual increase of 11.92%. The total number of bed 
nights spent by tourists increased at an average annual growth rate of 4.61% from 3.53 million in 2006 to 5.55 million in 
2016. 

Table 43: Trips per province 


Main Destination 

Day Trip 

Quarter 1 

Quarter 2 

Western Cape 

538 

14.3 

418 

11.1 

Eastern Cape 

507 

13.4 

405 

10.8 

Northen Cape 

142 

3.8 

176 

4.7 

Free State 

133 

3.5 

176 

8.2 

Kwazulu Natal 

283 

7.5 

310 

8.3 


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North West 

400 

10.6 

313 

25.2 

Gauteng 

868 

23.0 

949 

25.2 

Mpumalanga 

305 

8.1 

326 

8.7 

Limpopo 

515 

13.6 

629 

16.7 

Unspecified 

82 

2.2 

58 

1.5 


FIGURE 32: GROWTH IN TOURISM (USING BEDNIGHTS) BY ORIGIN - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY, 
2006-2016 [NUMBER] 


Growth in tourism (using bednights) 

Nkangala, 2006-2016 

6,000,000 
5,000,000 
4,000,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
1,000,000 

0 

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 
^^Domestic tourists ^—International tourists Total tourists 

Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 



3.7.4. Tourism spending 

In their Tourism Satellite Account, Stats-SA defines tourism spending as all expenditure by visitors for their trip to the particular 
region. This excludes capital expenditure as well as the shopping expenditure of traders (called shuttle trade). The amounts 
are presented in current prices, meaning that inflation has not been taken into account. 

It is important to note that this type of spending differs from the concept of contribution to GDP. Tourism spending merely 
represents a nominal spend of trips made to each region. 

TABLE 44: TOTAL TOURISM SPENDING - NKANGALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2006-2016 [R 
BILLIONS, CURRENT PRICES] 


Nkangala Mpumalanga National Total 


2006 

1.6 

8.5 

126.9 

2007 

1.7 

9.4 

138.7 

2008 

1.9 

10.5 

152.5 

2009 

2.0 

10.8 

153.4 

2010 

2.3 

12.0 

167.2 

2011 

2.5 

12.9 

174.6 

2012 

3.0 

15.3 

199.9 


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2013 

3.4 

17.1 

218.3 

2014 

3.8 

19.2 

238.7 

2015 

3.9 

19.5 

238.1 

2016 

4.5 

22.5 

266.9 

Average Annual growth 

2006-2016 

11.19% 

10.19% 

7.72% 


Source: IHS Markit Regional eXplorer version 1160 


Nkangala District Municipality had a total tourism spending of R4.49 billion in 2016 with an average annual growth rate of 
11.2% since 2006 (R 1.55 billion). Mpumalanga Province had a total tourism spending of R 22.5 billion in 2016 and an average 
annual growth rate of 10.2% over the period. Total tourism spending in South Africa increased from R 127 billion in 2006 to 
R 267 billion in 2016 at an average annual rate of 7.7%. 

3.7.5. Tourism Spend Per Resident Capita 

Another interesting topic to look at is tourism spending per resident capita. To calculate this, the total amount of tourism 
spending in the region is divided by the number of residents living within that region. This gives a relative indication of how 
important tourism is for a particular area. 

FIFURE 33: TOURISM SPEND PER RESIDENT CAPITA - NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY AND THE REST OF 
MPUMALANGA, 2006,2011 AND 2016 [R THOUSANDS] 

Tourism spend per resident capita 

g ooo Mpumalanga, 2006,2011 and 2016 

8,000 
7,000 
6,000 
5,000 
4,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
0 

Nkangala Gert Sibande Ehlanzeni 

■2006 ■ 2011 ■ 2016 

Source: IHS Markit Regional explorer version 1160 



In 2016, Nkangala District Municipality had a tourism spend per capita of R 3,160 and an average annual growth rate of 8.84%, 
Nkangala District Municipality ranked lowest amongst all the regions within Mpumalanga in terms of tourism spend per capita. 
The region within Mpumalanga Province that ranked first in terms of tourism spend per capita is Ehlanzeni district municipality 
with a total per capita spending of R 8,040 which reflects an average annual increase of 8.26% from 2006. 

3.7.6. Tourism Spend as a Share of GDP 

This measure presents tourism spending as a percentage of the GDP of a region. It provides a gauge of how important tourism 
is to the local economy. An important note about this variable is that it does not reflect what is spent in the tourism industry of 
that region, but only what is spent by tourists visiting that region as their main destination. 


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TABLE 45: TOTAL SPENDING AS % SHARE OF GDP - N KAN GALA, MPUMALANGA AND NATIONAL TOTAL, 2006- 
2016 [PERCENTAGE] 



NKANGALA 

MPUMALANGA 

NATIONAL TOTAL 

2006 

3.4% 

6.9% 

6.9% 

2007 

3.1% 

6.4% 

6.6% 

2008 

3.0% 

6.2% 

6.4% 

2009 

2.8% 

5.9% 

6.1% 

2010 

2.8% 

5.9% 

6.1% 

2011 

2.7% 

5.7% 

5.8% 

2012 

2.9% 

6.0% 

6.1% 

2013 

3.2% 

6.4% 

6.2% 

2014 

3.4% 

6.6% 

6.3% 

2015 

3.4% 

6.4% 

5.9% 

2016 

3.7% 

6.9% 

6.2% 


HIV/AIDS 

Table 46: HIV prevalence rate per local municipality 


Local Municipal Area 

HIV prevalence rate 
2012 

HIV prevalence rate 

2013 

Thembisile Hani 

26.4% 

30.2% 

Dr JS Moroka 

25.7% 

30.4% 

Victor Khanye 

30.0% 

38.9% 

Emalahleni 

40.6% 

40.7% 

Steve Tshwete 

52.3% 

43.1% 

Emakhazeni 

40.0% 

45.5% 


'Department of Health) 


The HIV prevalence rate in the district is over 30% for all local municipalities is very high. The district along with its locals is 
focusing of HIV aids awareness and ediucatuion in an effort to minimise future transmissions and to encourage helathly 
wellbeing of the HIV/ Aids infected and affected. 


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Figure 34: HIV+ ESTIMATESand AIDS DEATH ESTIMATES 


HIV+ estimates and AIDS death estimates 

Nkangala, 2007-2021 

300,000 



50,000 

0 


ofc 5 r\\ c& 7T >75 76 ,0) ,-.0 


HIV+ estimates 


AIDS death estimates 


10,000 

9,000 

8,000 

7,000 

6,000 

5,000 

4,000 

3,000 

2,000 

1,000 

0 


Source: IHS Markit Repional explorer version 1160 

Presenting the number of HIV+ people against the number of people living with AIDS, the people with AIDS added up to 8130 
in 2007 and 4700 for 2017. This number denotes a decrease from 2007 to 2017 with a high average annual rate of-5.34% (or 
-3430 people). For the year 2017, they represented 0.33% of the total population of the entire district municipality. 

PERSONS LIVING WITH DISABILITY 

Table 47: Number of persons living with disability per disability classification 



Walking 

Communicating 

Hearing 

Seeing 

Remembering 

No difficulty 

1238798 

1279214 

1252825 

2338 

1254800 

Some difficulty 

41742 

16629 

38426 

142352 

34373 



Persons living with disabilities are entitled to the same services as people living without. Therefore, service 
provision should also cater for the needs for these persons. Access to specialised schools, health care and even 


public transportation are essential in the improvement of the quality of life of persons living with disabilities. 


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CHAPTER FOUR 


4.1 Developmental Issues 

The developmental issues are analysed hereunder within the following six (6) Key Performance Areas (KPA) of the District: 

KPA1: Institutional Development and Municipal Transformation 

KPA 2: Good Governance, Intergovernmental Relations and Public Participation 

KPA 3: Local Economic Development 

KPA 4: Municipal Financial Viability and Management 

KPA 5: Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development 

KPA 6: Spatial Development and Rationale 

4.2 KPA 1: Institutional Development and Municipal Transformation 

4.2.1 Issue 1: Powers, Duties and Functions 

4.2.1.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The Constitution recognises a Municipality’s right to govern on its own initiative, the affairs of its Community, subject to the 
National and Provincial Legislation as provided for in the Constitution. 

It also emphasises the responsibility of Municipalities to utilise this Constitutional space prudently and in the interest of 
development locally. Municipalities must provide democratic and accountable government without favour or prejudice. They 
must furthermore use their Constitutional space by exercising their Legisltative and Executive Authority, and use the resources 
of the Municipality in the best interest of the Municipality and communities therein. 

Local Government derives its Legislative and Executive Powers from the Constitution, within which original Powers and 
Functions are listed in Schedule 4B and 5B respectively. The obvious significance of this lies in the fact that these Powers of 
Local Government cannot be removed or amended by National or Provincial Legislation. They cannot be changed other than 
through an amendment of the Constitution. 

Subsequently, the former MEC for Local Government in the Province, Honourable Candith Mashego-Dlamini amended a 
notice establishing Nkangala District Municipality (Notice No 300 of 2000) by promulgating Government Notice No 144 of 2003 
in the Government Gazette (No 959) of 26 May 2003. 

Wherein the adjusted Division of functions and Powers between the District Municipality and its constituent Local Municipalities 
by way of Table 46 below: 

Table 48: Division of functions and powers between the NDM and Local Municipalities 



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POWERS AND FUNCTIONS 

DELMAS 

DR. JS 
MOROKA 

EMALAHLENI 

EMAKHAZENI 

STEVE 

TSHWETE 

THEMBISILE 

(d) 

Domestic waste-water 
and sewage disposal 
systems 

Delmas 

Dr. JS 
Moroka 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Thembisile 

(e) 

Solid waste disposal 
sites 

Delmas 

Dr. JS 
Moroka 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Thembisile 

(f) 

Municipal roads which 
form an integral part of a 
road transport system for 
the area of the District 
Municipality as a whole 

Delmas 

Dr. JS 
Moroka 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Nkangala 

(9) 

Regulation of passenger 
transport Services 

Nkangala 

(h) 

Municipal airports serving 
the area of the District 
Municipality as a whole 

Nkangala 

Nkangala 

Emalahleni 

Nkangala 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Nkangala 

(0 

Municipal environmental 
health Services 

Nkangala 

(j) 

Firefighting Services 

Delmas 

Nkangala 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Nkangala 

(k) 

The establishment, 
conduct and control of 
fresh produce markets 
and abattoirs serving the 
area of a major 
proportion of the 
Municipalities in the 

District 

Nkangala 

Dr. JS 
Moroka 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Nkangala 

Nkangala 

(1) 

The establishment, 
conduct and control of 
cemeteries and 
crematoria serving the 
area of a major 
proportion of the 
Municipalities in the 

District 

Delmas 

Dr. JS 
Moroka 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Thembisile 

(m) 

Promotion of local 
tourism for the area of 
the District Municipality 

Nkangala 

Nkangala 

Nkangala 

Nkangala 

Nkangala 

Nkangala 

(n) 

Municipal public works 
relating to any of the 
above functions or any 
other functions assigned 
to the District Municipality 

Delmas 

Dr J S 
Moroka 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Thembisile 

(o) 

The receipt allocation 
and, if applicable, the 
distribution of grants 
made to the District 
Municipality 

Nkangala 

(P) 

The imposition and 
collection of taxes, levies 
and duties as related to 
the above functions or as 
may be assigned to the 
District Municipality in 
terms of national 
legislation. 

Nkangala 


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This adjustment of the Division of Functions and Powers between the Nkangala District Municipality and its constituent Local 
Municipalities was confirmed by the former Minister of the then Department of Provincial and Local Government (DPLG) 

In terms of Section 84 of the Local Government Municipal Structures Act, most of the functions adjusted for allocation to Local 
Municipalities are originally District Municipalities' Powers and Functions. 

Below are some of the relational challenges that may still need further inter-spherical attention: 

■ Physical Planning functions for Emakhazeni, Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka were allocated to the Nkangala 
District in 2003, and has since been re-assessed which reflects that capacity issues still prevail at these 
Municipalities; 

* The issue of land administration between the Municipalities and the traditional leaders within the former homeland 
areas needs to be addressed; 

* The question of service boundaries for Provincial and National spheres of government needs further attention with 
a view of alignment of these with Municipal boundaries to facilitate service delivery. 


4.2.1.2 NDM Organisational Leadership Capacity 

Culminating from Municipal Elections in August 2016, the new NDM Council was constituted to lead the District over a period 
of Five (5) years. 

Administratively, this Team of Councillors will be ably supported by the five (5) line function departments: viz; the Office of the 
Municipal Manager (constituted of Information Communication Technology (ICT) Unit, Planning and economic Development, 
Internal Audit Unit, and Public Liaison, Legal Service and Municipal Support); Performance management system responsible 
for them 

Nkangala District Municipality (NDM) is a category C Municipality with a Mayoral Executive system as contemplated in 
sections 7 and 9 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, Act 117 of 1998. Furthermore, the District Institutional 
arrangement is divided in two whereby there is Political Structure and Administration. 


4.2.1.3 Political structures within the District 



MMC SOCIAL 

CLLR CL 
MARABA 


CHIEF WHIP 
CLLR KJ BOSHOMANE 


MMC LED 

CLLR KT 
POOKGADI 


MMCDPU 

CLLR SH 
MAHLANGU 


SPEAKER 
CLLR LS NDINISA 


MMC 

CORPORATE 
CLLR RC 

MAHLOBOGANE 


MMC FINANCE 

CLLR GT 
MTHIMUNYE 


MMC TECHNICAL 
CLLR U DIKGALE 


4.2.1.4 Political Structures within the Nkangala District Municipality 

The NDM has the following political structures which are accountable to Council 

o Mayoral Committee which is headed by the Executive Mayor. 


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To perform its duties, the Mayoral Committee is assisted by Portfolio Committee appointed in terms of Section 80 of the 
Municipal Structures Act of 1998. The Section 80 Committees are headed by Members of the Mayoral Committee 
(MMCs). 

o Section 79 Committees 

These are oversight committees established in terms of Section 79 of the Municipal Structures Act of 1998, and are 
aligned to municipal departments namely: 

(a) Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC) (main oversight committee) 

(b) Corporate Services 

(c) Infrastructure Development 

(d) LED 

(e) Finance 

(f) Development Planning 

(g) Social Services 

(h) Rules & Ethics 

o The Council has also appointed an Audit Committee in terms of Section 166 of the MFMA which is an independent 
advisory committee of council 


2.1.5 Top Administration Structure 


■V 

AT MATJrYA 
General Manager: 
Planning And 
Economic 
acvwloprwnt 


' -\ 

JPMAJIGAN 
Manager Planning and 
Economic Deyekjpmervt 


T MATO ANE 
General Manager: 
Sodal Services 

~[ 


VM MAH LAN GU 
Manager Sodal 
Services 


NN VGWENYA 
General Manager 
Corporate Services 

l 


TA SEGOANE Manager 
Corporate Services 




MMSXOSANA 
MjrecapaJ Manager 




Vacant 

Municipal Economist 


o The Municipal Managers office (PMS, ICT, Internal Audit and Risk management, Legal Services and Municipal 
Support) 

o Department of Technical Services 

o Department of Social Services 

o Department of Corporate Services 

o Department of Finance 

o Department of Planning and Economic Development 


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Table 49: Departments and Section 56 Managers within the District 


Department 

Section 56 Managers 

Filled/Vacant 

Department of Technical Services 

Mr DJD Mahlangu 

Filled 

Department of Corporate Services 

Ms Nancy N Ngwenya 

Filled 

Department of Social Services 

Ms Tebogo Matoane 

Filled 

Department of Finance 

Ms Alice Stander CFO 

Filled 

Department of Planning and Economic 
Development 

Mr Amos Matjiya 

Filled 


4.2.1.6 Employment Equity Plan of the District 

The Nkangala District Municipality Employment equity plan has been developed and approved by Council by 30 June 2018 
and the filling of vacancies to be in line with the approved Employment Equity Plan. 


4.2.1.7 Staff Establishment Report 


Table 50: Staff Establishment in NDM 


Department/Unit 

Total Positions 

Total Filled 

Positions 

Vacant 

Audit Committee 

5 

5 

0 

Risk Committee 

1 

1 

0 

Planning Tribunal 

6 

6 

0 

Staff Establishment 

Executive Mayor 

5 

4 

1 

Speaker & Council Whip 

4 

3 

1 

Municipal Manager 

1 

1 

0 

Risk 

2 

2 

0 

Internal Audit 

3 

2 

1 

ICT 

6 

6 

0 

PMS 

7 

6 

1 

Legal 

4 

1 

3 

Municipal Support 

2 

2 

0 

Finance 

3 

1 

2 

Corporate 

37 

36 

1 

Technical 

42 

41 

1 

Social Services 

69 

62 

7 

Fire DR JS Moroka 

37 

36 

1 

Fire Thembisile 

37 

36 

1 

PED 

22 

18 

4 

Total 

293 (12 Fire Reservists) 

268 

25 (15) 

Funded) (10 
Unfunded) 


4.2.1.8 NDM Employee profile 

Table 51: NDM Employee profile 


Occupational Level 

Male 

Female 

Total 


A 

w 

1 

C 


A 

W 

1 

C 


Top Management 

1 





3 

1 



5 

Senior Managers 

20 



1 


9 

1 



31 

Professional qualified and 
experienced staff 

31 

1 


" 


41 

3 

4 


80 

Skilled academic and technical 

43 

1 


- 


48 

1 

2 


95 


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Semi-Skilled 

27 

1 


- 


28 




56 

Total Permanent 

122 

3 


1 


129 

6 

6 


268 

Total Staff of the District 

243 

6 


2 



12 

12 


275 


4.2.1.9 Total Number of people with Disability within the district 

Table 52: Total Number of people with Disability within the district 


Occupational Level 

Male 

Female 

Total 


A 

w 

1 

C 


A 

W 

1 

c 


Top Management 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 



- 


Senior Managers 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2 


- 

- 

2 

Professional qualified 
and experienced staff 

- 

- 

" 

- 

- 

1 


- 

- 

1 

Total Permanent 

1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

Total Staff of the District 

1 

- 

- 

- 


3 

- 

- 

- 

4 


4.3 Issue 2: Organisation Restructuring and Transformation 

The institutional Lekgotla discussions resolved that there should not be any changes to the Organisational Structure since it 
needs to align with the term of Council i.e. 2020 and the decision was also endorsed by Council. 

4.3.1 Human Resource Management and Development Unit (Purpose and objective of the department) 

The effective and efficient functioning of the District Municipality is through skilled human capital, the implementation of sound 
human resources practices and strengthened Performance Management Systems that encourage and support local 
Municipalities in delivering on their mandate. Associated with this is a focus on organisational design and capacity building to 
enable Municipalities to respond to challenges faced. In this manner corporate governance, transparency and accountability 
will be improved. 

Filling of approved vacant positions, appointment of persons with disabilities, promoting the culture of performance at all 
levels of Council, the coordination, integration of the PMS for the NDM and the LMs, to build capacity of Councillors and 
employees and implementing the electronic Document Management System, will be the strategic focus area which NDM will 
be engaged on. 

4.3.1.1 Skills Development and Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) 

Government has promulgated/instituted a new SETA Grant Regulation, which came into effect on 1 April 2013, which effected 
major changes in the SETA grant administration. It is anticipated that the pace of skills development in the country at large 
will improve as the bulk of the funds will now be channelled to scarce and critical skills. The challenge however with this 
regulation is that the mandatory grant that has been allocated to institutions for submitting their Workplace Plans and Reports 
have been reduced from 50% to 20%. This will now require organisations to budget more for training than before. The benefit 
that the new Regulations will bring is the fact that the adjustment from 50% to 20% was meant to increase the grants aimed 
at developing scarce and critical skills. 

The Nkangala District Municipality needs to develop and capacitate its employees and councillors to ensure they able to 
provide services to the communities in a more efficient and effective way. Among others the modes of capacity building for 
staff and councillors is lifelong learning, multi-skilling and retraining to ensure capacitating them on new development in the 
fields of work and political responsibilities 

The municipality conducts skills audit annually to inform its Workplace Skills Planning. This is to ensure that employees and 
councillors are appropriately skilled in their respective areas of work. 

Administration and human resources and skills development 

Skills development is one of the key issues that are critical in enhancing and empowering human capital within the municipality. 
According to the National Development Plan of 2012 South Africa generally experiences a shortage of critical skills in the key 
sectors of the economy. These skills are required to drive the economy and ensure efficiency and effectiveness within public 
administration. The Nkangala District Municipality is therefore an exception. In order to address these challenges, the NDM 
needs short to medium measures. Beyond the internal capacity-building programme, the National Development Plan’s 2030 
Vision proposes among others the following: 


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• A solid basic foundation, consisting of early childhood development, general education at school as well as adult 
education and training; 

• Articulation of demand for skills; 

• Securing a supply of skills, especially scarce skills, and innovation and Research & Development. 

In aligning its strategies with the National Development Plan 203 Vision the NDM’s HRDS identifies eight strategic 
objectives as follows: 

• To reposition HRM towards fulfilling its strategic role to line function 

• To conduct a comprehensive and scientific organizational skills audit 

• To provide a Just in time service to line function 

• To capacitate and professionalize the HR Staff 

• To develop clear and precise HRM Standard Operating Procedures 

• To develop legislation aligned HRM Policies 

• To attract the right talent into the organization 

• To provide performance enhancing education, training and development for staff 


4.3.1.2 Recruitment and Selection of Employees 

Recruitment and Selection of employees is based on the Recruitment, Selection and Appointment Policy of the institution and 
in line with the Employment Equity Plan Numeric Goals. The list of vacant positions in the institution are identified and to 
augment the EE Plan there are specific targets groups mainly the designated groups (Africans, Women and People with 
Disabilities) as described by the Employment Equity Act No.55 of 1998. NDM extend further their efforts to implement equity 
across the entire staff compliment by also including the targeting of underrepresented groups which are (Male and Female 
Coloureds, Male and Female Indians, White Males) the recruitment and selection is conducted fairly, impartially and 
objectively. With regard to the employment of previously disadvantaged it also reiterate the fact that consideration needs to 
be made with regard to the employment of staff in line with the employment equity plan targets. The institution has always 
been striving to achieve that by earmarking the underrepresented groups within the organization Male and female Coloureds, 
Male and Female Indians, White Females and Males and People with Disabilities) in line with the funded vacant positions, 
that is our adverts for positions clearly indicates the preferred designated group to apply. 

Though the challenge always remains that the targeted underrepresented groups have a shortage of required relevant skills 
to fill these positions. The district is in the process of developing a training facility to address the skills shortage. 

The strategy that the organization has in place is to target the representative groups like People with Disability Desk 
coordinated at Office of the Premier to ensure that we extensively reach out to the underrepresented groups, same as for the 
other groups. 

4.3.2 Occupational Health and Safety 

4.3.2.1 Introduction and Background 

Parliament has promulgated the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 85 of 1993 which enjoins employers within the Republic 
of South Africa to ensure the health and safety of their employees in their workplace. This is also an important element in 
workplaces as it ensures employee productivity. According to this Act, it also remains the responsibility of the employees to 
also take reasonable care in terms of their own health and that of their fellow employees. 

Thought the Nkanagala District Municipality generally complies with this legislation, there are however minor day-to-day 
challenges that arise due some few structural defects, slips and fall of employees and defects of facilities. These challenges 
however receive substantial attention from responsible officials immediately they arise. The Municipality’s compliance rate 
with the OHSA is estimated at 90%. The remaining 10 % is occupied by the day to day operational risks/ hazards as mentioned 
above. 

4.3.2.2 Challenges and proposed interventions 

The following are the strategies available to address challenges stipulated above: 

• Providing training and refresher courses to of employees on all the aspects of OHS, 

• Giving clear instructions the employees on do’s and don't’s 

• Conducting baseline risk assessment 

• Conducting Continuous risk assessment such as regular a Complex OHS inspection, updating various OHS 
registers such as risk register, incident register, hygienic register, first aid register 


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• Advocacy campaign on risk and hazards within the institution. 

• Hazard awareness, this is done through displaying caution, warning signs to assist employees on identifying 
dangerous aspects within the organization. 


4.3.3 Employee Health and Wellness 

4.3.3.1 Introduction and Background 

Employees are an integrated part of the both the workplace and the society at large. They are affected by adverse health 
factors occurring in these environments. Due to health hazards prevalent within the workplace and society in general, 
employee productivity is affected due to high rate of absenteeism and sloppiness at work among others. A good health style 
should be encouraged in workplaces and society as a whole. 

The Nkangala District municipality has developed policies, strategies and programmes to address such matters to ensure 
workforce productivity is enhanced at all times. Employee Assistance Program in the municipality is currently managed by 
service provider who provide proactive programs that deal with financial management matters and both physical and 
psychological needs of employees. Employees who are already affected by these challenges are given proper attention. 

The appointed Service Provider has an annual plan which is implemented quarterly to assist the employees with their life 
challenges. Services such as testing HIV/AIDS, Cholesterol, sugar diabetes, and vision, audiometric and other activities are 
offered to the employees free of charge. There is also a dedicated telephone line for employees who needs psychological 
assistance in coping and handling life situations that they are confronted with, and their information is held confidential. 

4.3.3.2 Challenges and proposed interventions 

The following challenges are prevalent within the NDM 

• High levels of stress, 

• increased absenteeism, 

• alcohol abuse, 

• financial problems 

• underutilization of EAP by the employees. 

To address these challenges, the municipality provides assistance through the appointed Service Provider as reported above. 

4.3.4 Legal Services 

4.3.4.1 Background and mandate 

Key amongst the tasks that will be covered by this service includes, but not limited to the following: 

Development and standardisation of employment contracts, management of contracts and service level agreements between 
NDM and service providers, development and promulgation of By-Laws and administration of Council Litigation and Personnel 
matters on behalf of and/or against NDM. Administration of Litigation and Personnel matter, which mainly are claims lodged 
by third parties in the different Courts of South Africa, against the municipality on different issues. These matters are handled 
by legal services with the assistance of external attorneys who are approved to be in the municipality’s panel of attorneys. 

NDM has a staff compliment of ± 250 persons, some of whom are employed on fixed term contracts, whilst others are 
permanently employed. Irrespective of the duration of the employment all the employees are expected to sign an employment 
contract which clearly stipulates the terms and conditions of their employment. It is against this backdrop that the 
standardisation of employment contracts within the Municipality remains a key task that must be continuously undertaken as 
a strategic tenant to enhance good governance. 


As per the one of the mandates of the Legal Unit, in assisting the Local Municipalities with promulgation of their by-laws and 
their Standing Rules and Orders, NDM has assisted the Steve Tshwete, Thembsile Hani, Victor Khanye, Dr JS Moroka , 
Emakhazeni Local Municipalities with reviewing their Standing Rules and Orders. In addition to that, NDM has assisted some 
of the LMs with their prioritised by - laws, at their request where they lack financial capacity to promulgate their own by-laws. 

The Legal Services Unit also attends to: 


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• Provide guidance and legal advice to Council; 

• Assessment of all litigation cases levelled against the Municipality on probabilities of the prospects of the cases; 

• Developing and implementing all forms of contracts and service level agreements; 

• Facilitate the signing of contracts and service level agreements; 

• Work together with the Project manager in Monitoring of implementation of contracts; 

• Assisting with development and/or reviewing of by - laws and promulgation thereof, for Council and Local 
municipalities within the jurisdiction of Nkangala District Municipality, i.e. Emalahleni Local Municipality, Emakhazeni 
Local Municipality, Steve Tshwete Local Municipality, Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality, Victor Khanye Local 
Municipality and Thembisile Hani Local Municipality; 

• Review of council standing rules and orders for Council; 

• Provide legal advice and assistance to Local Municipalities within the jurisdiction of Nkangala District Municipality, 
i.e. Emalahleni Local Municipality, Emakhazeni Local Municipality, Steve Tshwete Local Municipality, Dr JS Moroka 
Local Municipality, Victor Khanye Local Municipality and Thembisile Hani Local Municipality; 

• Reviewing the delegations of Powers for NDM. 

4.3.4.2 Identified challenges within the unit and recommended strategies are as follows: 

• Non-performance or failure of service providers to perform in terms of the contracts and prosed strategy is that 
contract management training and electronic contract management system through a programme of procurement 
of contract management system 

• training of the 2015 GCC edition 

4.3.5 Integrated Development Plan (IDP): 

The Constitution instructs a Municipality to structure and manage its administration, budgeting and planning processes to give 
priority to the basic needs of the Community, and to promote the Social and Economic Development Community. Municipalities 
are also under duty to participate in National and Provincial development programmes. 

The most important instrument that the Municipality uses to implement these Constitutional instructions is Integrated 
Development Plan (IDP), which should consolidate all the Municipal Planning into a comprehensive strategy that is linked to 
the Municipal Budget. It is important to note that the IDP is an Intergovernmental process, in that it is articulation of Local, 
National and Provincial planning within the Municipal area. 

Even though a Municipality has the right to govern on its own initiative the Local Government affairs of its Community, the 
Constitution requires that this right be subject to National and Provincial legislation. Section 25(1) (e) of the Municipal Systems 
Acts clearly states that an IDP adopted by a Municipal Council must be compatible with national and Provincial development 
plans and planning requirements binding on the Municipality in terms of legislation. The synergy, alignment and coordination 
between the development plans of the three spheres of government (i.e. IDP, PGDS, and NSDP & NDP) take precedence in 
order to achieve proper coordination and alignment of development initiatives within the region. 

Implementation monitoring of all IDP projects is pivotal. Impact monitoring and evaluation of all projects inclusive of projects 
implemented by Sector Departments, the NDM, Local Municipalities within the NDM, and key social partners on an ongoing 
basis. Shared understanding of key priority issues of the communities and the broader strategic developmental trajectory will 
lead to better coordination, alignment of programmes and improved impact on the ground. 

Monitored IDP implementation is the key to the realisation of government socio-economic developmental agenda. 
Accordingly, within the context of the interdependence and inter-relatedness between the three spheres of government impact 
monitoring and evaluation of all projects implemented by national and provincial sector departments, the NDM, Local 
Municipalities within the NDM, and key social partners must be strengthened. Thus, a shared understanding of key priority 
issues of the communities and the broader strategic developmental trajectory will lead to better coordination, alignment of 
programmes and improved impact on the ground. 


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District IDP/PMS Forum will be key in this regard, and will be utilised as the Monitoring vehicle for the implementation of the 
IDP of the District. This is over and above quarterly Consultants Meetings, where all Service Providers providing Services to 
the District are reporting on progress of all their respective projects, the challenges, and remedial measures are suggested 
where applicable. 

4.3.6 Performance Management System (PMS): 

The planning Framework for Local Government is premised on the notion that the formulation of a plan is not sufficient, but 
adequate implementation is key to the success of Local Government. It is against this backdrop the White Paper on Local 
Government states that Performance Management is critical in ensuring that plans are being successfully implemented, and 
have the desired impact, and that resources are being used efficiently. 

As a result, a Legal Framework for Performance Management is coupled with the IDP, where the principal purpose of 
Performance Management is to ensure that the work of all Political Structures, Political Office Bearers and the Municipal 
Administration is based on and seeks to realize Council Developmental Objectives as articulated in the IDP. A critical 
expression of this notion is the requirements that the content of the Performance Agreements for the Municipal Manager, and 
Managers reporting to the Municipal Manager must be directly linked to the IDP. 

One of the key Principles of Municipal Administration in the Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000 is the instruction to 
Municipalities that their Administration must be performance oriented. A Municipality must promote a culture of Performance 
Management among the Municipality’s Political Structures, Political Office Bearers and Councillors as well as within its 
Administration. 

The Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000 expects the Municipality to operate in accordance with a Performance Management 
System. Furthermore, the Municipal Council must annually review its overall performance in achieving the Developmental 
Objects of Local Government as outlined in the Constitution. To this end, each Municipality must establish a Performance 
Management System, which is a Framework that describes and represents how the Municipality’s cycle and processes of 
Performance Planning, Monitoring, Measurement, Review, Reporting and Improvements will be conducted, organised and 
managed, and also determines the roles of different role players. It should ensure that a Municipality administers its affairs in 
an economical, effective, efficient and accountable manner. 

The Performance Management System should be embedded in the circumstance of the Municipality, must be commensurate 
with its resources, suited to its circumstances and, most importantly, in line with the priorities, objectives, indicators and targets 
contained in the IDP. 

Coordination and integration of PMS for Nkangala District Municipality and Local Municipalities, capacity building for 
Councillors and employees, retention of skills and institutional memory as well as streamlining of the organizational structure 
are some of the issues that still need to be improved. Alignment and coordination of initiatives and programmes of external 
service providers with that of Local Municipalities also needs attention, whilst some progress have been achieved in this 
regard, there is evidently still much that needs to be done pertaining overall organisational performance in the immediate to 
long-term future. 

Agreement on an integrated PMS across all three spheres of government will also be sought. Key in this activity will be the 
ability of individual performance of officials to the overall performance management and relevant monitoring and evaluation 
systems pertaining to relevant Municipal IDPs. To this end, Nkangala District Municipality has prioritised the strengthening of 
its PMS through automation across all levels of administration. 

The main purpose of reviewing the aforementioned strategies is to determine the extent to which they respond to the Nkangala 
District Municipality’s Integrated Development Plan (IDP) priorities, objectives, strategies and Performance measurements, 
also reflected and amplified in the Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP). 

In light of the abovementioned challenges and issues the following will be undertaken: 

■ Enhance the capacity of the Nkangala District Municipality to perform all its Performance Management issues through 


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training, capacity building and staffing; 

■ Fast track the cascading of Performance Management System (PMS) to all levels in the Municipality by following the 
automated system approach; 

■ Work towards a coordinated, standardized and integrated PMS practice throughout the District by supporting constituent 
Local Municipalities with their Performance Management system and related issues; 

* Ensure timely preparation, submission and assessments of the in-year performance reports of the Municipality as 
required by the Legislation; 

■ Ensure that Annual Performance Agreements are fully linked to the Nkangala District Municipality's SDBIP. 

4.3.6.1 Individual Performance Management 

The best type of performance management system adopts a cascading or “rolling-down” of performance objectives from top 
to bottom. In order to ensure that Nkangala District Municipality meets and delivers on its Municipal Scorecards KPAs and 
KPIs at a high standard, it is proposed that the Performance Management Results and Competency-based methodology be 
followed to ensure that the process of employee performance management is cascaded throughout the municipality. 
Therefore, Nkangala District Municipality must cascade PMS to all levels of the organisational structure for the Financial year 
2019/2020. Currently NDM cascaded PMS up to level 10 for 2018/2019 financial year. 

Performance agreements for employees lower than section 56 must be based on their signed job descriptions. Recruitment 
of employees is further subject to the signing of a Performance Agreement within ninety (90) calendar days after assumption 
of duty and annually after commencement of the new financial year. 

4.3.7 Research & Development: 

In recent times Community members have confronted Municipalities across the Country with the challenges of violent Service 
Delivery related protests. Whilst this has not been that much rife in our District as a whole, there are to some degree, few 
Local Municipalities within NDM which were not spared from this unfortunate scourge. The White Paper on transforming 
Service delivery states that improving the delivery of services means redressing the imbalances of the past and while 
maintaining the continuity of service to all levels of society, focusing on meeting the needs of the society. Research plays a 
major role in identifying the exact service provision needs for the communities and the service delivery gaps that exist within 
our communities. 

In order to address the service delivery protests, the following areas of research will need to be regularly and progressively 
attended moving forward: 

• The priority needs of the community 

• Community level of satisfaction with Municipal Services provided; 

• The manner in which the public participation function is strengthened; 

• The manner in which the systems and processes of service delivery related information is communicated to the 
public must be continually enhanced and sustained; and 

• The impact of violent Public protests on sustainable provisioning of Service Delivery 

4.3.7.1 Community Satisfaction survey 
Introduction 

During the 2018/19 financial year the district municipality conducted a service delivery community satisfaction survey to assess 
the level of satisfaction community members on various service delivery mandates. The results of the survey are summarised 
as follows: 


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Figure 35: Overall Commnunity Satisfaction: NDM 
: Overall satisfaction n = 10752 


Overall Satisfaction with Municipality Services 



Neutral, no opinion, 
474,4% 


In figure 13 above, people rated the overall services delivery by the district municipality as follows: 

• 33.0% (1491) said that the services are of satisfactory, but have room for improvement. 

• 4.0% (474) remained neutral have no opinion. 

• 50.0% (5322) said that the services are poor with room for improvement. 

• 13.0% (1369) said that the services are extremely dissatisfactory. 

The areas of strength that have emerged from the survey are as follows: 

• Most respondents were young adults people ages between 18-44 years. 

• 73.0% of residents said that they live in brick houses. 

• 81.0% said that they have electricity supply to their household. 

• 53.0 said that they have tarred streets. 

• 70.0% of residents said that they have cleaned piped water supply to their household. 

• 66.3% of household have access to flush toilets. 

• 51.2% said that municipality conduct refuse removal at least once a week. 

• 60.0% said that the fire and rescue staff was adequately capable 

• 76.1 % said they know how to contact the Fire and Rescue services in case of an emergency. 

The areas needing improvement that have emerged from the survey are as follows: 

• 40.6% said that municipality does not respond quickly to damages by repairing roads and bridges. 

• 18.0% rated the sanitation services as extremely dissatisfied. 

• 27.6% (2051) said that municipality does not conduct refuse removal at least once a week. 

• 38.6% (2686) do not know about municipality conserving rare species. 

• 44.9% (2888) said that the municipality does not sufficiently protect water bodies against pollution within its 
jurisdiction. 

• 22.0% (1614) said that the services are poor with room for improvement. 

• 12.9% (947) said that the services are extremely dissatisfactory. 


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4.3.8 Information and Communication Technology (ICT): 


The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) within Nkangala District Municipality (NDM) is crucial in the 
underpinning of the NDM and its local Municipalities IDP, while serving as the key to strategic discussions on land and spatial 
issues, Community development, economic and social issues. ICT is the vehicle for service delivery. 

Since Nkangala District Municipality provides infrastructure and resource management to the area of governance, it is vitally 
important that a service of high quality is provided to all stakeholders at affordable rates and within reasonable timeframe. 
Thus, a need for the computerization of systems within NDM in an effort to becoming e-compliant is crucial and thus the unit’s 
primary objective is to serve the immediate needs to the District concerning the application and operation of its computer 
systems and access to information on local networks and the public internet by the relevant stakeholders. 

Whilst the primary objectives of the ICT section are to serve the immediate needs of the District concerning the application 
and operation of its computer systems and access to information on local networks and the public internet by the relevant 
stakeholders: the following remain the main objectives for the existence of the ICT 

• Implementation of e-Government within the District. 

• Enablement of access to information for all relevant stakeholders, for instance GIS & business intelligence 

• maintenance and implementation of ICT’s within the District Municipality to fact-track support to LM’s 

• Management and maintenance of hardware, networks, infrastructure, and provision of general ICT support. 

• Management of Information System in line with the vision and mission of NDM. 

• Provide the necessary support to all the Local Municipalities under NDM’s jurisdiction. 

• Management of the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) of all current and proposed systems. 

• Serve as a One-stop Shop for the District to all citizens. 

In supplementing the internal capacity-building programme, the District will continue to ensure that its systems are relevant 
and resourceful to all stakeholders, and that such systems become an integral marketing instrument of the District. 

Challenges: 

• Non-adherence or Non-Compliance to ICT Governance Imperatives. 

• Inadequate Procurement processes for ICT equipment (e.g. for repairs and maintenance) 

• Lack or Inadequate Asset Management Processes (e.g. Software value VS hardware and Disposal of ICT 
equipment) 

• Understaffing, and Knowledge and Skill deficiency 

4.4 KPA2: GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 
Issue 4: Good Governance and Communication 

4.4.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The progressive and sustained empowerment of the entire Community on issues relating to Municipal Governance, economic 
development and job creation, health, safety and skills development remains pivotal for the sustainability of the District as a 
whole. Hence, establishment of inclusive, sound and viable governance and public participation structures must remain the 
priority of the District and its constituent Local Municipalities in both urban and rural aspects, and in accordance with population 
dynamics therein. 

4.4.2 Internal Audit Function: 

The District established an Internal Audit Unit (IAU) in terms of section 165(1) of the Local Government: Municipal Finance 
Management Act, Act 56 of 2003 (MFMA). The internal audit unit operates in terms of the risk-based internal audit plan adopted 
by Council Furthermore, the internal audit unit performs their duties in terms of the Internal Audit Charter. 

4.4.2.1 Shared Audit and Performance Committee: 

The District has established a shared Audit Committee in terms of Section 166(6)(a) of the Local Government: Municipal 
Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003 (MFMA). The Audit Committee performs its duties according to the Audit and 
Performance Committee Charter approved by Council. The over-arching challenges faced by the Audit and Performance 
Committee are non-attendance by certain Local Municipalities and senior management from the Municipalities. 

In the last 4 years’ majority of Municipalities within the District performed fairly well. Hence numerous Awards from varying 
institutions in recognition of this performance. However, the last two financial years have seen indifferent performance in some 


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of the Municipalities in the District. Most municipalities have regressed in the 2017/18 financial year on issues of internal 
controls, irregular expenditure and the lack of implementation of Internal Audit and AG recommendation. 

Table 51 below depicts the audit performance of all Municipalities in the last 3 years. 

Table 53: Audit Performance of LMs-3 year-term 


MUNICIPALITY 

2015/16 

2016/17 

2017/18 

Nkangala District Municipality Unqualified (CA) 

Unqualified (CA) 

Unqualified 

Emakhazeni 

Qualified 

Qualified 

Qualified 

Victor Khanye 

Qualified 

Qualified 

Qualified 

Thembisile Hani 

Qualified 

Unqualified 

Qualified 

Steve Tshwete 

Unqualified 

(CA) 

Unqualified 

Unqualified 

DR. J S Moroka 

Local Municipality 

Qualified 

Qualified 

Disclaimer 

Emalahleni Local Municipality 

Disclaimer 

Qualified 

Qualified 


Within the context of ‘operation clean audit’, the District has developed a clear programme of Action aimed at addressing 
issues raised in the management report produced by the Auditor-General. 

Challenges to be addressed 

■ Poor or no progress on previous issues raised by AG 

* Poor understanding of performance management 

* Implementation of new GRAP standards on annual basis 

* LM’s that is not part of the shared Audit Committee 

* Review and implementation of policies 

* Poor internal controls and/or implementation of internal controls 

* Shortage of skilled staff and capacity limitations 

* Non effective leadership - oversight & monitoring of compliance 

* Poor financial and multi-year planning 

■ Poor record keeping 

* Lack of Business continuity plans for risk as well 

■ Misstatement on Financial statements 

■ Over or understatement of performance information 

■ Lack of IT audit skills. 

Achievements 

* Incorporation of Thembisile Hani Local Municipality into the Shared Audit and Performance Committee 

■ Quality assurance readiness conducted for Nkangala District Municipality, Thembisile Hani Local Municipality, 
Emakhazeni Local Municipality and Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

■ Filling of all Internal Audit vacant positions at Emalahleni Local Municipality and Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

The current Status Quo with regard the level of governance within the Audit function at each Local Municipality is highlighted 
in the following Table. 


Table 54: Level of Governance with the Audit Function in the LMs 


Municipality 

Functionality of 
audit committee 

Functionality of 
Internal Audit 

Shared Services with 
NDM on Audit Committee 

Shared Services with 
NDM Internal Audit 

Applied for Interim 
Audit to AG 

VKLM 

No 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 

DRJSMLM 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

THLM 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

EMAK LM 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 


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STLM 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

EMAL LM 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

NDM 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

N/A 

No 


4.4.3 Audit Action Plan 

4.4.3 Audit Action Plan 

During the 2018/19 financial year the auditor general has found that District did not manage to maintain good quality submitted 
annual financial statements and annual performance report, as there were material misstatements which were identified during 
the audit process and further recommended that the municipality should correct the misstatements for re-submitting of such 
annual financial statements and annul performance reports. There were also findings on compliance to legislation regarding 
local content. The municipality has developed an audit action plan to address these findings. The action plan addresses the 
forty (40) findings that the AG raised by identifying actions and plans to rectify them and attaching timeframes to each action. 
This ensures that the same findings do not emerge in the next audit and more importantly it ensures effect governance prevails. 

4.4.4 Risk Management 

4.4.4.1 Problem Statement 

In order to improve quality of life for all the municipality adopted Enterprise Risk Management which provides a framework 
for risk management, which typically involves identifying particular events or circumstances relevant to the municipality’s 
objectives (risks and opportunities), assessing them in terms of likelihood and magnitude of impact, determining a response 
strategy, and monitoring process. Risk management still viewed as a compliance issue in most municipalities, enterprise 
risk management is not integrated in day to day operations of the municipalities, misalignment of risk assessment process 
with planning process of the municipalities, lack of business continuity planning and non-implementation of risk management 
mitigation strategies. 

4.4.4.2 Risk Management Unit primary objectives: 

The Risk Management Unit primary objective is to assist NDM in embedding risk management and leverage its benefits to 
enhance performance by facilitating the risk management process and assist the Municipality to achieve, among other 
things, the following outcomes: 

■ More sustainable and reliable delivery of services; 

■ Informed decisions; 

■ Reduced waste; 

■ Prevention of fraud and corruption; 

■ Better value for money through more efficient use of resources; 

■ Better outputs and outcomes through improved project and programme management. 

■ Provides certainty in achieving the goals and objective 

■ Safeguarding of municipal assets and employees; 

* Support Risk Management Units of Local Municipalities in implanting Risk Management. 

4.4.4.3 Risk Management Governing Structures 

Shared Risk Management Anti-Fraud and Anti-Corruption Committee: 

The Shared Risk Management Anti-Fraud and Anti-Corruption Committee is an oversight committee appointed by the 
Accounting Officer / Authority to assist them to discharge their responsibilities for risk management. The committee is made 
up of both independent members appointed by the Municipal Council and members of Executive/Senior Management. The 
independent member of the committee whose is the chairperson of the committee is shared with the five local municipalities 
namely Steve Tshwete, Thembisile Hani, Emalahleni, Emakhazeni, Victor Khanye Local Municipalieties. 

The Committee advises the municipal council, the accounting officer and management of the municipality on matters relating 
to- 

* Risk management; 

* Fraud and corruption 

* Fraud Prevention and detection 

■ Effectiveness of proposed management interventions 

■ Effectiveness of the internal control system relevant to risk identified 

■ Any other issues referred to it by the municipality 

■ Business Continuity Planning 


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4.4.4.4 Fraud and Corruption 

Nkangala District Municipality subscribes to the principles of good corporate governance, which require conducting business 
in an honest and transparent fashion. The municipality is also committed to fight fraudulent behaviour at all levels within the 
municipality. The Municipality has taken a stance that management of fraud and corruption risk is the responsibility of everyone 
in the municipality. 

Activities Taken by NDM to Deter Fraud and Corruption 

I. NDM annually review and approved the following policies as part of measures to fight fraud and corruption; 

• Fraud and Corruption Policy; 

• Fraud and Corruption Strategy; 

• Whistle blowing policy; 

• Risk Management Policy; 

• Risk Management Strategy; 

• Risk Management, Anti-fraud and Anti-Corruption Committee Charter; and 

• Risk Appetite and Tolerance Framework. 

II. NDM annually conduct fraud and corruption risk assessment to identify potential fraud and corruption risks 
exposure within the municipality. This process also ensures that actions to address the identified risks are 
developed and implemented. 

III. Anti-Fraud and Anti-Corruption awareness workshop: 

Anti-fraud and Anti-Corruption awareness workshop/Training are held annually for both political office bears and 
officials. 

Challenges to be addressed: 

■ Lack of business continuity Plan and Business Continuity Management; 

■ Misalignment of risk assessment process with planning process of the municipalities; 

■ Non and Slow implementation of risk management mitigation strategies. 

■ Inadequate human capacity under risk management units. 

4.5 Nkangala District Municipality 2019/20 Strategic Risks: 

Ten (10) Strategic Risks were identified and action plans to address the risks were also developed by management: 

Table 55: NDM Strategic Risks 


Risk 

No 

Key Performance Area 

Strategic Objective 

Risks/Threats 

1 

KPA 1: Institutional Development 
and Transformation 

Competent, Innovative and 
Accountable Team 

Inadequate organizational 
performance 

2 

KPA 2: Good Governance and 
Public Participation 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Adverse audit outcomes 

3 

KPA 2: Good Governance and 
Public Participation 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Failure to retain clean audit 

4 

KPA 2: Good Governance and 
Public Participation 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Systems Failure 

5 

KPA 3: Local Economic 
Development 

Inclusive Economic Growth with 
Sustainable Development 

Inadequate support of 

SMME's, cooperatives and 
informal traders 

6 

KPA 4: Financial Viability and 
Financial Management 

Sound Financial Management 

Inability to achieve financial 
sustainability 

7 

KPA 5: Basic Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 

Healthy Social Environment 

Inadequate swift water rescue 
response 

8 

KPA 5: Basic Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 

Healthy Social Environment 

Inadequate provision of basic 
environmental health services 

9 

KPA 6: Spatial Rationale 

Integrated Regionalized 

Planning 

Mushrooming of Informal 
settlements 

10 

KPA 5: Basic Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 

Sustainable Infrastructure and 
Service Provisioning 

Inadequate reduction of 
service delivery backlogs 


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4.6.1 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 


4.6.1.1 Background and problem statement 

According to Chapter 4 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, a Municipality’s Governance Structures consists of 
the Political Structures, Administration and Community of the Municipality. In the Spirit of Cooperative and Accountable 
Governance, the NDM has institutionalised a Community Outreach Programme that aims at improving communication, 
interaction and accountability between the District, the Local Municipalities and the Community at large on issues of service 
delivery and development. 

Councillors attend the meetings from the District and Local Municipalities, Provincial Sector Departments, traditional 
leadership, Community members, service providers and parastatals as well as civil society. All Local Municipalities within the 
District’s area of jurisdiction are visited twice per Financial Year in August/September and January/February to table projects 
that have been approved and budgeted for by the District, and assimilate developmental issues for the subsequent Financial 
Year respectively. Mechanisms on enhancing the impacts of this programme will be progressively explored. 

4.6.1.2 Mechanisms for Public Participation in NDM 

Mechanisms for Public Participation utilized by the District Municipality through the following: 

• IGR Forum 

District IDP/PMS Representative Forum is functional and seating as scheduled on quarterly basis. The issue of 
inclusivity is highly prioritised in the constitution of the Forum, where all the organised formations and interest groupings 
across the District are represented at the Forum. This Forum plays a pivotal role in the development, review and 
implementation of the District’s I DP within a collective therein. Whilst majority of the Working Groups are seating as 
planned, there are those that are either not seating at all, or are not adequately functioning as envisaged pertaining to 
the nature of issues discussed therein. 

• CEOs Forum: 

Constituent of the CEOs of Big Business and Executive Mayors of the six constituent Local Municipalities and the Executive 
Mayor of NDM has been established as of June 2012. The primary aim of the Forum is to engage all the CEOs on the role of 
their Companies on the developmental Agenda of the District, and to strategically direct their investments with the primary aim 
of ensuring coherent development throughout the District. 

• Oversight outreach meetings 

The Council’s Oversight Committees visits service delivery sites to get an update on progress made and interact with 
affected communities. Community members are invited to attend Council sittings through a well-advertised year plan and 
are also allowed to oversight meetings. 


• Key issues raised by communities during the outreach meeting held by Nkangala District 
Municipality are as follows: 

Key service delivery issues 

Key services delivery emanating from outreach meetings: Local Municipalities 

• Provisions of water and sanitation 

• Electricity and installation of high mast lights as well as street lights 

• Provision of storm water drainage and roads 

• Infrastructure maintenance 

• Service delivery in farm wards 

• Employment creation which is sustainable 

Key service delivery emanating from outreach meetings: Sector Departments 

• Improved clinic services operating for 24 hours with sufficient health personnel 

• More RDP houses and repairing of poorly build houses 


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• Additional classrooms due to increase in population 

• Housing 

4.6.1.3 Functionality of ward committees and Activities of Community Development Workers (CDW) 

Ward committees and CDWs provides for door step services and reports thereof are submitted on monthly basis to the 
Speaker. However, efforts should be made to provide for adequate feedback to affected individuals and communities about 
the status of their respective requests. 

4.6.1.4 Ward Committees: 

The broad-based capacitation of the Community on issues relating to economic development and job creation, health, safety 
human settlement especially township development and education remains understandably high on the developmental 
agenda of the NDM. Furthermore, the establishment of an efficient Ward Committee System in all constituent Local 
Municipalities (both in the urban and rural areas), and the implementation of a system of Community Development Workers 
in the District, must remain high on the drive to deepen democracy therein. The emergence of social media should be 
maximised so as to reach out to other important stakeholders especially the youth and middle income earners who usually do 
not attend community meetings. 

Ward committees submitted weekly reports which contains service delivery issue as per wards and also delivers doorstep 
service such IDs, SASSA and social welfare as part government programmes. 


Table 56: Ward Committees in NDM 


Local Municipalities 

Number of ward committees 

Thembisile Hani 

320 

Dr. JS Moroka 

310 

Emalahleni 

340 

Steve Tshwete 

290 

Victor Khanye 

90 

Emakhazeni 

80 

TOTAL 

1340 


4.6.1.5 Challenges of ward committees 

• Geographical spread and vastness of the wards which makes it difficult to access all households especially in 
Emakhazeni, Victor Khanye &STLM 

• Poor quality of reports submitted within all LMs 

• Lack of prompt response from municipalities on issues submitted by ward committees within all LMs 

• Political infightings. 

Based on the above mentioned challenges identified by the District Municipality the following are mechanisms in place to 
mitigate the challenges as follows: 

• NDM will have Capacity building on report writing, communication, project management and legislation for all LMs 
enhance their reporting skills and quality of work 

According to Table 57 below, the number of Wards within the District remain 143 Wards. This indicates that the number of 
Ward Councillors within the District also remain to 284 within respective Local Municipalities, and that additional CDWs to 
support these new Wards will be needed moving forward. 


Table 57: Wards within the NDM 


Municipality 

2011 wards 

2016 Wards 
proposed 

Change 

No of Councillors 

Victor Khanye 

09 

9 

No changes proposed 

17 

Dr JS Moroka 

31 

31 

No changes proposed 

62 

Emalahleni 

34 

34 

No changes proposed 

68 

Emakhazeni 

08 

8 

No changes proposed 

15 

Steve Tshwete 

29 

29 

No changes proposed 

58 

Thembisile Hani 

32 

32 

No changes proposed 

64 


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NDM 

143 

143 

No changes proposed) 

284 (for all LM’s) 


The Mpumalanga COGTA has to-date deployed 159 CDWs in the Nkangala District in 2018/19 with the idea to have at least 
one CDW in each ward. This objective to-date has not been adequately achieved, but COGTA is currently trying to address 
the shortfall. The Nkangala District took a resolution for the CDWs to be actively involved with Ward Committees, chaired by 
the Ward Councillor. Below the number of CDWs and wards without CDWs 

These are critical structures of local governance, and are located closer to communities in all the Local Municipalities in order 
to enhance Community participation in the affairs of Municipalities. 

Table 58: CDWs within the NDM 


Municipalities 

Number OfCDW’S 

Wards Without CDW’s 

Dr. Js Moroka 

35 

08,13,25 

Thembisile FHani 

36 

06,09,17 

Victor Khanye 

07 

05,07 

Emalahleni 

42 

25.26,28,32,33 

Steve Tshwete 

30 

05,11,12,10,13,14,15,17 

Emakhazeni 

10 

04,07 

Total Number OfCDW’S 

160 

23 


4.6.1.6 Media Liaison and Marketing (Electronic and Print Media): 

The Public Liaison Unit seeks to facilitate a seamless communication and interface between the Nkangala District Municipality 
and the Community it serves, this entails communication through national and local media. The Nkangala District Municipality 
utilizes both electronic and print media to improve and broaden communication within its jurisdiction. As far as communication 
through radio is concerned, the District is continuing to work with national radio station, IKwekwezi FM, Thobela and 
Ligwalagwala, which broadcasts in the three dominant languages spoken within the region. The radio stations are used for 
current affairs news, talk shows and news interviews. In addition to other mechanisms such as loud-hailing, the NDM also 
uses radio stations for advertising meetings, workshops, conferences, summits and other functions that the District holds. 
Community radio stations such as Nkangala Community Radio Station (KCRS), Greater Middelburg FM and Moutse are also 
utilised in advertising and marketing the NDM. 

A strong working relationship has also been established with print media that exists in the Nkangala DM. Communication 
through the print and social media is done through local, regional and national newspapers, websites, magazines and District 
newsletters. Furthermore, Communication still requires to be enhanced between the Provincial and Municipal Structures, e.g. 
feedback to the Municipalities from IGR structures, mainly the Premier's Coordinating Forum (PCF). 

• Promotional Materials 

In order to reinforce the flow and the dissemination of information and Community participation, promotional materials are 
developed, availed and widely distributed. To promote corporate branding and enhance effective and efficient communication 
and public participation”. 

Overall, the following remains pertinent to towards NDM functioning in a good corporate governance manner. 

• Prioritisation of capacity building through skills development for all employees and Councillors 

• Continually review and ensure optimal usage of all the ICT systems within Nkangala District Municipality viz GIS, 
EDMS, Intranet, Website, financial and FIR and project management systems and other ICT supported systems; 

• Increase NDM service turn- around time through ensuring compliance of the NDM with e-Government initiative and 
Electronic Transactions and Communication Act; 

• Continuously capacitate the internal users on various in-house systems; 

• Establish and maintain an efficient and integrated governance system based on the principles of accountability and 
commitment to the delivery of Services and sustainable development; 

• Develop an effective, well-skilled and representative administration capable of taking and implementing decisions 
and driven by an organisational culture based on results, cost effectiveness and service excellence with the mind of 
providing a service that is community /client orientated; 

• Improve the foundations for human development in the Nkangala District including participation in and quality 
through ECD, ABET, GET, FET and HET; 


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• Facilitate improvement of the local supply of critical and scarce skills in order to reduce reliance on imported skills 
and create more opportunities for the communities to take up available opportunities; 

• Advance employment equity and BBBEE through skills development; 

• Improve and building partnerships between the National Systems for Innovation, Research and Development 
(science), and local industry as well as FETs; 

• Development of a capacitation strategy for the District and constituent Local Municipalities with respect to PMS, 
Engineering, Integrated Development Planning and Municipal Planning; 

• Appointment of persons with disabilities; 

• Deepen a culture of highly efficient, effective and accountable Organization through promoting a culture of 
performance among Councillors; 

• Inculcate a culture of Performance Management throughout the entire Organization, and ensuring that it is fully 
(automated); 

• To build capacity of Councillors and employees (engineering, planning, performance monitoring and evaluation are 
some of the critical skills that are required); 

• Implementing an Electronic Document Management System for the District Municipality. 

• Increased dissemination of information through sustained development and distribution of Newsletters by all 
Municipalities within the District. 


4.6.1.7 IGR and International Relations & Public Participation 

The Constitution of South Africa declares that government is comprised of National, Provincial and Local spheres of 
government that are distinctive, interdependent and interrelated. It therefore states that all organs of state must promote and 
facilitate Intergovernmental Relations within the context of cooperative government. This initiative will further strengthen peer 
learning and best practice sharing. Initiatives are in place to harness effective leadership and communication with all 
stakeholders. In terms of International Relations, however within NDM we do not have a personnel fully responsible for MGR 
functionality as is currently done on ad-hoc basis by the Assistant Manager: Public Participation. 


4.6.2 Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC) 

4.6.2.1 Background 

The Municipal Public Accounts Committee is a committee of the municipal council established in terms of Section 79 of 
the Local Government Municipal Structures Act (Act 117 of 1998) to act instead of Council as an overseer of the executive 
and management and act as protectors of morality on behalf of the residents. This in line with principle of separation of 
powers, and also the object of Local Government expressed in Sections 95 and 152 of the Constitution of the Republic 
of South Africa of 1996 respectively and the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 which also 
requires a certain of oversight by the municipality over the executive authority. The Nkangala District Municipality 
established the MPAC and adopted its terms of reference in September 2016. The composition of the MPAC represents 
the political demographics of the municipality as required by Section 160 (8) of the Constitution. 

4.6.2.2 Role of the Municipal Public Accounts Committee 

The primary function of the MPAC is to exercises oversight over the executive functionaries of council and to ensure 
good governance in the municipality. To achieve this, the MPAC interrogates information, documents and reports 
produced by the executive functionaries of council, conduct public hearings to solicit and consider views and inputs from 
members of the public with regard to the performance of the municipality and develop an oversight report with 
recommendations to council. The Nkangala District municipality has adopted terms of reference of the MPAC which 
outlines in details powers and functions of this committee. The terms of reference are reviewable annually. 

Challenges 

• A need to understanding and internalising the system of separation of powers, good governance and 
accountability within the municipality 

• Lack of public participation in MPAC activities 

• Lack of adequate capacity by MPAC members to effectively execute MPAC mandate 


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4.7 KPA3: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


4.7.1 Issue 20: Economic Development and Job Creation 

The focus on this strategic pillar is the need to enhance economic development, job creation and poverty alleviation through: 

• Economic Diversification 

• Research Studies and Plans 

• Trade and Investment Promotion 

• Tourism Development and Marketing 

• Institutional Development 

• Green Economy Mainstreaming 

• Business Development, Retention and Expansion. 

4.7.1.1 Functions of LED 

• Planning and co-ordinating government socio-economic improvement stratagems and inventiveness spear-headed by 
our social partners within the framework of the IDP; 

• Diversification of the economy by promoting Agriculture, tourism, SMMEs, Cooperatives and Informal Traders 
development; 

• Formulating LED programmes which include District and Local Municipalities to co-ordinate and co-operate on 
policies, and LED inventiveness; 

• To collect and disseminate economic information to Local Municipalities and other stakeholders with LED 
interventions. 

• EPWP 

• To Implement Rural Development and Land Reform strategies through Agri-parks model. 

In addition to the LED unit, the Nkangala District Municipality has established the Trade and Investment office. The Trade and 
Investment office has a mandate to develop and implement targeted programmers and projects to support investment and 
trade promotion within the district, working in collaboration with government and the private sector. The office offers SMMEs, 
investors and other economic agent with the following services: 

■ Facilitating feasibility studies & business plans 

■ Facilitating access to funding through DFIs and private funders 

■ Assisting with obtaining factory space and/or land 

■ Facilitating joint ventures via the identification of local partners 

■ Providing opportunities for emerging B-BBEE businesses 

■ Providing counselling and training to SMMEs regarding export issues 

■ Advising local business on technical trade issue 

■ Facilitating access to national and local government incentives 

■ Hosting and coordinating business events/exhibitions and delegations to promote Nkangala as a premier trade and 

investment destination 

4.7.1.2 Background Problem Statement 

Nkangala District Municipality’s Local Economic Development Unit is tasked with a responsibility of strategic planning in 
respect of formulation of Regional and Local Economic Development strategies. This done through coordination of district 
economic development and sectorial cluster plans in consultation with all relevant stakeholders within the district. LED 
initiatives are managed and controlled in accordance with roles and functions of both the district and local municipalities. 
Nkangala District Municipality is also responsible for customization of a guiding framework for Local Economic Development 
for coordination of related activities to promote LED. (EPWP and Rural Development, Agriculture) 

Challenges 

Nkangala District Municipality’s Local Economic Development Unit is tasked with a responsibility of strategic planning in 
respect of formulation of Regional and Local Economic Development strategies. This is done through coordination of district 
economic development and sectorial cluster plans in consultation with all relevant stakeholders within the district. LED 
initiatives are managed and controlled in accordance with roles and functions of both the district and local municipalities. 
Nkangala District Municipality is also responsible for customization of a guiding framework for Local Economic Development 
for coordination of related activities to promote LED. (EPWP and Rural Development, Agriculture and Tourism) 


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Challenges 


• Poor funding of LED and capacity in Municipalities 

• SMME, Co-operatives policy excluding Informal economy Support 

• Tourism Development and branding Strategy 

• Agriculture, Tourism and mining competition for land 

• Slow pace of Agri-Park Development 

• Impact of SLP implementation in the mining communities 

• Slow pace on NDM anchor projects on take by investors 

• Limited funding options for cooperatives and SMMEs due to lack of security 

• Slow up-take of NDM anchor projects by investors 

• Lack of local incentives to attract investors 

• High electricity and production input costs 

• Un-diversified economic base (high dependence on mining) 

• Poor business management skills by local cooperatives and SMMEs 

• Poor impact of SLP and CSI implementation by mines and big industries on local communities 

• Shortage of land and for industrialization and local economic development 

• Slow pace of Agri-Park and development of linkages with farming communities 

• Lack of a defined tourism offering and tourism route 

• Low economic growth 

• High unemployment 

• Gross inequality 

• Lack of funding and capacity to develop new products or maintain existing assets e.g. the bad state of assets like 
Zithabiseni, Botshabelo and Kghodwana. 

• Under-utilisation of regional product offerings which reduces capacity to maintain tourism facilities e.g. Zithabiseni, 
Witbank Dam, and Sports facilities in Emalahleni 

• Poor state of domestic access roads linking some cultural and heritage assets. Domestic road access to assets that 
are touted as major District cultural tourist attractions is poor and some are accessible only through specialised 
vehicles e.g. Botshabelo. 

• There are no tourist-friendly transport management systems. The local transport systems favour tourists who have 
their own vehicles and a foreign tourist would find it very difficult to navigate the region. This is exacerbated by a 
lack of knowledge of the location of District tourism assets by public transport personnel. 

Proposed interventions 

• More budget allocation to ensure creation of jobs and to appoint qualified managers for LED departments 

• Human capacity to engage at executive level. There is a need for a managerial position at local municipalities within 
the district 

• Merging of SMME’s and Co-operatives policies and also to include informal economy 

• Organize SMME’s to tap into social enterprise development programs. 

• Ensure the SMMEs access the funding that is allocated with MEGA for SMME’s Program 

• Development of Tourism Routes in Nkangala District. 

• Use of internationally renowned locals like Esther Mahlangu to sell a compelling cultural brand for the region. 

• All Mining Rights Application must be subject to comment by DEDT, MTPA and DARDLEA 

• Enhance funding for Project management processes 

• NDM and local municipalities must work together with DMR and mining houses in determining the need of the 
affected communities in a transparent approach(model) 

• Accelerate NEDA establishment to run with the projects/specialist in the interim 


4.7.1.3 Local Government 

The local spheres of government consist of municipalities which are established for the whole of the country. The executive 
and legislative authority of a municipality is entrusted in the municipal council. A municipality has a right to administer at its 
own initiatives, the local government undertakings of its civic, subject to national and provincial legislation as provided by the 
constitution. The national and provincial government may not compromise or encumber a municipality’s capability or right to 
exercise its powers or perform its functions (Constitution, RSA, 1996). 

The analysis of key LED challenges is based on the strategic review of 2006 national framework for LED. The 2014 frameworks 
for LED identified problem statement or key strategic challenges for LED as follows: 

(i) Poor intergovernmental relations on LED 


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Solidification, greater integration and closer cooperation among LED stakeholders and sector departments involved is 
fundamental for effective implementation of LED, such integration should spread to all economic development stakeholders 
including all spheres of government, business and community sectors. 

(ii) Productive Partnerships 

LED should be structured and organized in such a manner that it maximizes the potential for sincerity and prolific partnership 
between the private and public sectors. Equally important is the building of an effective private sector business development 
services sector to augment local competitiveness through benchmarking and upgrading of industrial clusters. 

(iii) A clear communication and knowledge sharing programme 

Disseminating good practice information is as much as important as communicating worst practice in LED so that the latter 
are avoided and former encouraged. Moreover, building LED networks and sustainable knowledge platforms are crucial for 
enhancing high level heads on the systemic learning. 

(iv) Capacity constraints 

The capacity of staff, improving the profile and professionalization of LED require significant investment. This is more so in 
urban and metropolitan municipalities wherein there is greater tendency of trivializing and equating LED to an insignificant 
back bencher aspect of broader municipal development. 

(vi) Differentiated approach on LED support 

The practice of LED in larger cities, small towns and poorer municipalities is not the same and so too is the scale of LED 
initiatives across these municipalities. Evidence based and contextually relevant differentiated LED support packages and 
approach needs to be applied at various municipalities. 

(vii) Funding for LED 

Addressing the financing and challenges for LED especially for less resourced municipalities outside of major cities is an 
important consideration for the national framework design. Funding should be geared towards targeting of investments and 
their coordination, be aimed at better coordination of fragmented funding resources and better defined with its products better 
packaged. 

(viii) Poor investments in economic information 

Improving economic data for understanding local economies, identifying competitiveness and enhanced LED planning are 
vital for effective LED. 


(ix) Dedicated focus on supporting the second economy 

Second economy programmes such urban renewal, informal economy; expanded public works programme, integrated rural 
development, small medium enterprises, youth development, national informal business development strategy and other 
related programmes need to occupy the centre stage of LED space as they are intrinsic to the nationwide job creation agenda. 

Nkangala is the economic hub of Mpumalanga and is rich in minerals and natural resources. The Districts' economy is 
dominated by electricity, manufacturing and mining. These sectors are followed by community services, trade, finance, 
transport, agriculture and construction. Mining and electricity generation are concentrated in the coal-rich area to the south 
with Middelburg and Emalahleni generating the bulk of the income. The manufacturing sector in Middelburg is increasing at 
an average annual rate of 16.3%, making it a major contributor to the district overall gross value added. Other mineral deposits 
include refractory (flint) and small deposits of gold, tin, copper, lead, manganese, uranium, nickel, cobalt and silver. 

Nkangala District municipality has made progress in the last few years, on economic development. The total value of the 
amount of goods and services produced by the District increased from R75 billion in 2010 to R103 billion in 2014 and is 
projected to reach 1.6 trillion in 2018. The growth of the mining industry has been critical to this growth with coal deposits such 
as refractory (flint), small deposits of gold, tin, copper, lead, manganese, uranium, nickel, cobalt and silver; making the bulk 
of the mining contribution. The Kusile power station is under way, which after completion will be the fourth largest coal-fired 
power station in the world. It will also be the first South African power facility to incorporate wet flue gas desulphurisation 
(FGD) technology, and will generate 4,800MW of power. These developments however, should not obscure the simultaneous 
socio-economic challenges occurring in the District, such as the fall in commodity prices, unemployment and persistent high 
poverty levels. 

The 2016 LED Strategy of Nkangala District Municipality identified several Anchor projects whose implementation will set the 
economy of NDM on an upward development path. Feasibility Studies and Business Plans were developed to guide the 
implementation of the said anchor projects as well as other Investment projects developed by the Six (6) Constituent Local 
Municipalities within NDM. The District has conducted due diligence on these projects and has adopted an Investment Guide 
with the objective of making these anchor projects marketable and implementable. The NDM is promoting these projects to 
private investors for investment the projects are in the following sectors: Tourism, Property and Infrastructure development, 
Mineral beneficiation, Agro-processing, and the green economy. 


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The Local government's developmental mandate encourages municipalities to address poverty, unemployment and 
redistribution in their local areas. Municipalities are also required to align their economic development plans with those of 
provincial and national government. 

Therefore, the NDM’s main priority is mobilising local resources and focus on District - wide initiatives through implementing 
the LED strategy with other sector plans resident in the LED sub-unit. The economic, social and physical resources within the 
District guided the approach towards and design of the local economic development strategy as well as the implementation 
thereof. LED strategy is an integral part of the broader strategic or Integrated Development Planning (IDP) process and the 
Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Planning (SDBIP) process. 

Below is the list of anchor projects within NDM as well as the capital requirements for each identified project. 


Table 59: Anchor Project within NDM 


No. 

Anchor Project 

Location 

Required Investment 

1 

Establishment of Catalytic 

Converter Plant 

Steve Tshwete 

R103 Million 

2 

Establishment of Steel and Metal 
Fabrication Flub 

Steve Tshwete 

R87 Million 

3 

Establishment of Glass Recycling 
Plant 

Dr JS Moroka 

R1.7 Billion 

4 

Establishment of a Bio-gas Plant 

Dr JS Moroka 

R39.5 Million 

5 

Establishment of Container 
shopping and business hubs 

District wide 

R100 Million 

6 

Resuscitation of the sawmill project 

Emakhazeni 

R27 Million 

7 

Establishment of Fly Ash 
Beneficiation Plant 

Emalahleni & Steve 
Tshwete 

R120 Million 

8 

Construction of High Altitude 

Sports centre 

Emakhazeni 

R5.3 Billion 

9 

Establishment of the Nkangala 
International Airport 

Victor Khanye 

R4.5 Billion 

10 

Establishment of SMME Flub 

Victor Khanye 

R25 Million 

11 

Establishment of a Business 
Convention centre 

Emalahleni 

R910 Million 

12 

Loskop and Rust De Venter 

Tourism Belt 

Thembisile Hani/ 

Steve Tshwete 

R1.6 Million 

13 

Establishment of a Mining Museum 
and Convention centre 

Emalahleni 

R256 Million 

14. 

Rust De Winter Theme Park 
Development 

Dr. JS Moroka 

R585 000.00 


The above anchor projects should be implemented within strategic clusters put forward by the Local Economic Development 
Strategy (2016). The LED strategy aims to optimise economic development in the District through guiding implementation of 
the anchor projects and a range of other development programmes. The LED strategy identified the following five thematic 
areas, critical to economic development in the District. 

A. Strategic Cluster One: Economic Diversification 

This cluster points to the need to diversify the economy of the District. This diversification should be implemented in form of 
mixed nodal centres, foreign direct investment (which have been considered critical to diversifying resource endowed 
economies); improving the quality of state institutions to deliver successful diversification facilitation; ensuring that proactive 
investment promotion is done on priority sectors and key developmental nodes; enhancing agriculture and agro-processing, 
adding value to mining products as well as supporting small medium enterprises and cooperatives. Following the hosting of 
the Mining and Big Industries Summit in May 2018, the NDM is in the process of establishing an oversight structure to facilitate 
the implementation of the resolutions of the summit. The strategic purpose of the Forum is to improve coordination between 
Government [at all levels], the mining industry and big industries in order to accelerate economic development, stimulate job 
creation and to enable stakeholders to collaborate meaningfully to up-scale the impact of their interventions in growing the 
economy of the Nkangala District. 

By the same token, existing and future Fluman Settlement patterns should be planned around economic development zones 
(Nodes, Corridors, etc.). This will balance out the interaction of demand and supply markets, and effectively develop the 


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identified development zones. Implementing the Memorandum of Understanding on Land use management planning, as well 
as the Land Tenure Strategy will play a major role in creating activity corridors which are sustainable in the long term. 

B. Strategic Cluster Two: Research and Marketing 

The Nkangala District has a strong focus on conducting research into key sectors of the economy to identify new opportunities 
for future projects. R&D and Innovation will be undertaken in collaboration with academic institutions, industry associations 
and business to promote the districts participation in the fourth industrial Revolution. The district aims to develop projects in 
Communication and Information Technology, industry Incubators, and innovation hubs. More research relating to economic 
development among the youth, women, people with disability, as well as research focusing on mainstay sectors should be 
conducted. The NDM is also engaging in targeted Trade and investment marketing for identified projects to improve the 
municipality’s ability to attract and retain investments and enhance export capability resulting in economic growth, that 
contributes to business growth, job creation and poverty reduction 

C. Strategic Cluster Three: Institutional Development 

The third strategic cluster focuses on Human Resource development within the municipality, as well as mobilization of 
resources for development initiatives. This should involve trainings, appraisal of performance and incentives such as regular 
awards, etc. The objective of this strategy is to ensure quality and efficient operations on the part of the municipality as a 
catalyst to development. 

D. Strategic Cluster Four: Green Economy Mainstreaming 

In this regard, the district has developed a Feasibility Study for the Integrated Waste in 2017. The approved Feasibility Study 
has identified alternatives that can be used for waste diversion from landfills. These alternatives are only possible if certain 
conditions are available and the deficiencies of the current system have to be rectified to ensure that a steady flow of feedstock 
can find its way to these alternatives. The closure of the identified waste management gaps is important to ensure that 
identified alternatives can be successful. The identified alternatives are as follows: 

• The establishment of a regional hub and spokes recycling model with the hub located in eMalahleni [Witbank] as a 
public/PPP initiative [Medium term] 

• The establishment of regional composting facilities operated by private operators or as a PPP [Short term] 

• The construction of a first phase biogas Waste to Energy plant as a PPP project [Long Term], 

E. Strategic Cluster Five: Business Retention, Attraction and Development. 

The fifth strategic cluster focuses on business development, retention and expansion. Ensuring that businesses prefer to be 
located in the District should involve improving the ease of doing business through policies of the municipality. This should be 
through creating to access credit and funding, mentorship and training initiatives as well as provision of locational based 
incentives. It is also important to consider establishment of industrial hubs in the various local municipalities such as Siyabuswa 
and Moripe in Dr JS Moroka, as well as all the other local municipalities within the District. A study needs to be commissioned 
to determine the feasibility of industrial hubs in all of the local municipalities. 

Agriculture and Rural Development: Agriculture as a sector is largely undeveloped. This pillar aims to increase employment 
and value addition in this sector. Traditional commercial farming is included and the potential growth in agro-processing 
activities must be investigated and exploited, to this end the NDM is collaborating with the department of agriculture to develop 
an Agro-processing hub, with links to the local farming communities in Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality. 

4.7.2 Summaries of Sector Specific Strategies 

4.7.2.1 Tourism Strategy 

In 2017, Nkangala District Municipality developed a Tourism Branding and Marketing Strategy encompassing all the 
six local municipalities of the district. The NDM Tourism Branding and Marketing Strategy seeks to provide strategic 
direction for tourism marketing and branding within NDM and to align municipal priorities with the needs of the tourism industry 
and key stakeholders. The strategy further seeks to feed into the national broad objectives of tourism which include amongst 
other things, increasing tourism revenue and the volume of tourism as well as enhancing the level of the culture of tourism 
and travel among South Africans 

The Tourism Marketing and Branding Strategy for NDM has to takes into consideration national, provincial and local goals 
as provided for in the overall national tourism sector strategies and cannot be crafted in isolation. The strategy is aimed at 
supporting National Government objectives to tackle the triple ills of poverty, unemployment and inequality. 

In order to fully exploit the tourism potential of the District to become a world-class tourist destination, a shared vision and 
strong partnerships need to be developed between the national, local authorities, private sector, and local communities. The 
marketing of well-branded tourism assets and products within NDM will create the necessary awareness and interest in 
targeted domestic and international markets. To this end, tourism in the District will succeed or fall on the following pillars: 


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• Full stakeholder collaboration with full government support 

• Effective institutional arrangements 

• Budgetary support at Municipal level 

• Funding of existing and new tourism business 

• Effective risk management 

• Product development & improvements 

• Effective destination marketing 

• Industry-led skills development 

• HR capacitation at Municipal level 

• LTO & RTO/DMO support 

The Nkangala District is predominantly a rural area that is made up of farming, nature reserves, forestry, and mining areas. It 
falls within the Mpumalanga grassland biome characterised by the escarpment and the Lowveld. The area is characterised by 
undulating grasslands which form a transitional zone between the grassland area and the savannah biome to the North. The 
region is situated in a mostly Malaria-free environment with lovely subtropical weather and summer rainfalls perfect for all year 
round tourism. It boasts a vast range of scenic beauty and natural features from towering mountains, waterfalls, to wildlife, 
making it a potent holiday destination for tourists. The region contains the grand mountains and rivers of the Mpumalanga 
highlands which presents the opportunity for adrenaline activities such as rock climbing, canoeing, hot air ballooning and 
paragliding etc. It is also gifted with a number of pristine rivers which have a number of dams. The cool climate has made 
some parts of the district some of South Africa's main fly fishing areas (Dullstroom and Belfast). The north-western region is 
characterized by mountainous terrain with lower agricultural potential and which largely accommodates game farms. There 
are a number of nature reserves of which the Loskop Nature Reserve is the most renowned. The rural nature of the district is 
great for both nature lovers and adventure seekers with the largely grassland areas in the District devoid of noise; offering 
tourists a peaceful, country-style setting for those intent on getting away from it all. A large part of the landscape is ideal for 
hikes, horse rides and 4X4 trails. Wild flowers like cosmos during spring are a major highlight in the region. 

In addition to the existing tourism clusters in NDM the following potential clusters have been identified in order to improve 
the tourism spread within the NDM 

• Mining cluster (mining activities & mining tours around Emalahleni Town/Middelburg); 

• Eco-Nature cluster (enhancing NR and surroundings found in Dr.JS Moroka and Thembisile LM); 

• Cultural, Historic & Political cluster (inter alia, utilization of Ndebele Culture and Heritage Sites); 

• Conference & Convention cluster (exploiting potential of conference market, logistically positioned around 
Middelburg/Emalahleni Town). 


47.2.2 Investment Attraction and Promotion Strategy 

A favourable investment environment is required for any type of development, regardless of sector or economic project. The 
success of the economic activities, to a degree, is dependent of investment interventions to improve the investment 
environment. Accordingly, The Investment Attraction and Promotion Strategy for Nkangala District Municipality seeks to 
promote local initiatives that contribute towards poverty reduction and unemployment in the District, as well as attracting both 
national and international investors in order to ensure that local human capital and resources are effectively integrated. 

In order to succeed in its quest to attract and promote investment within the district, there are a variety of considerations which 
NDM needs to take into account and implement such. These factors include, amongst others, the following factors: 

i. Lessons learnt from national and international success and failure in investment promotion, 

ii. Quality control to maintain investment promotion, attraction and retention through a reviewed strategic plan (i.e. 
adequate planning, implementation and management) to retainexisting investors and attract new investment through 
proactive marketing. 

iii. A coordinated institutional effort is necessary throughout the Municipalities, 

iv. Marketing and sales strategies to target the priority sectors and identification of external markets, 

v. A focus on a sectors competitive advantage and identification of opportunities, 

vi. Effective management of and access to information to targeted entities through a website with a database of 
downloadable documents in relation to the local investment climate and links to potential sources of assistance, 

vii. Provision of free advisory services and assistance to potential investors in the form of: 

• Information, advice and research, location scouting, site visits, and property searches, assistance with 
recruitment information and processes, identifying joint venture partners, facilitating networking among local 
companies, industry specialists, and educations and training organisations, supplier identification, profiling of 
Municipalities and facilitation of assistance with government departments, incentives, and regulatory processes. 


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viii. 'Provincial-level incentives are offered by a variety of agencies which target strategic priority objectives (sectoral, 
locational and employment based)', 

ix. Successful establishment of an economic development agency that has administrative and bureaucratic 
independence from government, and yet aligned to public economic and investment policy and planning. 

47.2.3 LED Marketing Strategy 

The focus for the NDM and LMs LED marketing strategy to achieve marketing & branding issues for the District is: 

• To create a brand image and increase awareness of what NDM and LMs represent and what sets them apart 
from other municipalities (brand awareness) by firstly developing as branding strategy, a positioning 
statement and defining the core target segments. 

• To inform the target segments about the various LED activities and specifically the LED Anchor Projects by 
developing an integrated and a consistent communications campaign. 

47.2.4 SMME/Cooperatives Development. 

The development and support of Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) and Cooperatives in the district is one of the 
pillars of Local Economic Development. The district recognises the crucial role that small businesses in the region are playing 
to contribute to economic development, job creation and poverty alleviation. 

In order to assist SMMEs/ Cooperatives to thrive and become fully fledged business enterprises, there is an urgent need to 
capacitate and assist them to be able to conduct their businesses in an efficient and effective manner. The capacity building 
of the SMMEs/Cooperatives should take the form of amongst other things, conducting accredited training of 
SMMEs/Cooperatives and providing mentorship programmes for them. In order to support SMMEs and cooperatives the NDM 
signed Memorandum of Understanding with the Mineworker Development Agency; to cooperate in: Implementing social 
intervention initiatives in the District Municipality; 

■ Rolling out enterprise development initiatives; 

■ Rolling out agriculture development programmes; 

* Making available agriculture development expertise; 

* In tracking and identifying ex-mine workers with benefits due to them; 

■ Implementing skills development programmes and facilitating training in accordance with standards of Sector 
Education and Training Authorities (SETAs). 

Below list of Cooperatives who had received grant support from Department of Small Business Development; 


Table 60: Cooperatives that have received Grant Support in NDM 


Name of Co-operative 

LMs 

Town 

Sivuruvuru 

Emalahleni 

Witbank 

J and B Cut and jain fine carpentry 

Thembisile Hani 

Kwa-Mhlanga 

Thuthukani Poultry Farm 

Victor Khanye 

Delmas 

Sikgonile Construction and Projects 

Dr JS Moroka 

Siyabuswa 

Siyaphangela Multipurpose 

Thembisile Hani 

Kwa-Mhlanga 

Kangaroo Chicken Farmers Organisation 

Agricultural 

Dr JS Moroka 

Siyabuswa 

Maako Family Co-operative 

Thembisile Hani 

Kwa-Mhlanga 

Sjina Agricultural 

Thembisile Hani 

Kwa-Mhlanga 


47.2.5 LED Regional Industrial Roadmap 

The RIR provides a guideline that will promote industrial development and focused approach to economic development that 
elevates investment opportunities in both NDM and LMs. The NDM should focus on the investment environment sector, and 
catalytic project interventions to improve industrial development. The NDM has adopted a new development road map 
Nkangala Vision 2040(INPUT) 

4.7.3 Sector Interventions 

• Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry and Fishing Interventions 

Integrate current small-scale/emerging farmers into the commercial farming arena through the provision of training and 
support in terms of access to funding. Introduce the idea of forming cooperatives, inter alia, implement small-scale/emerging 


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farmer crop growing, animal farming, and forestry projects, promote the use of less water intensive techniques, in the 
interest of sustainability, by making an appropriate brochure available and/or offering community training. The NDM will also 
fast track the development of the Agro-processing park in Dr JS Moroka and ensure links with local farming communities 
who will supply feed-stock into the Agri-park. 

• Mining 

The NDM is cooperating with the mining sector to ensure that there is improvement in the impact of Social Labour Plans 
(SLP) and Corporate Social Investment (CSI) in the mining communities and labour sending areas. The mining sector 
should play a central role in ensuring the creation of secondary industries in mining towns. The mining and big industries 
summit held in May 2018, the summit had inter alia the following objectives: 

• Provide a platform for cross pollination of ideas between private and public sector to foster economic growth and 
development in communities surrounding mining operations and labour sending areas. 

• To support initiatives and processes aimed at promotion of socio economic development. 

• To provide information on the state and implementation of Social and Labour Plans and Corporate Social Investment 
in the mining sector. 

• To identify critical skills development areas to benefit mining communities. 

• To deliberate on the plan for revitalization of mining towns beyond coal mining in the NDM. 

• To create partnerships and collaborations on the economic growth in the NDM. 

• To deliberate on partnerships and possible agreements on infrastructure development and maintenance. 

The summit adopted a number of resolutions, and the NDM was tasked with coordinating and collaborating with other 
stakeholders to ensure that the resolutions gain resonance with the mining sector and that they are ultimately implemented. 
Some of the resolutions adopted are the following: 

• That the issue of radius of serviced community by mines and industries be eliminated to include the whole district 
and its local municipalities 

• That mining sector and industries should identify and avail opportunities for small businesses and cooperatives 

• That Interested and affected parties are consulted as per legislation before approval of mining licenses 

• That all stakeholders collaborate to work on provision of community facilities 

• Ensure that there is alignment between IDP’s and SLP’s and both DMR and District should lead and coordinate 
the process 

• That 20% of procurement by mines and industries be ring fenced for local businesses 

• That strategic engagement be held between District municipality and DMR to institutionalise the engagement 
between mining companies and government 

• That strategic partnerships be created between mines, industries and government to promote tourism 
programmes 

• That a database of those mining companies likely to face closure be compiled and programme for deployment of 
these skills in other areas be developed 

• That mines and industries ensure that local businesses be afforded core mining business opportunities as 
opposed to meagre opportunities 

• That cooperatives be facilitated in the area of transport businesses especially trucking 

• That Special Purpose Vehicles be developed to facilitate skills transfer between small and larger businesses to 
ensure that the former graduate from their current status 

• That international exchange programmes for skills transfer be undertaken to ensure that locals participate in large 
scale infrastructure projects by mines and government 

• That there should be transparency in the ownership and control of mines operating in the district to ensure 
compliance with mining charter requirements 

• That measures be undertaken to minimise the impact of pollution in the mining areas especially affected 
communities 

• That an oversight structure be established to deal with the resolutions of the mining summit 

• That a programme be developed to market small scale manufacturers 

• That business hubs be identified and developed in previously disadvantaged areas 

• That dedicated capacity be provided across municipalities to deal with conceptualisation and development of 
bankable business plans 

• That land parcels owned by MEGA and other state entities be identified and utilised for community economic 
development 

• That vegetable production value chains be developed 

• That efforts be undertaken to ensure development of agricultural training centre 

• That an intergovernmental structure facilitated by NDM be developed to facilitate public infrastructure provision 
(roads, water, electricity, refuse) to ensure that infrastructure drives economic development 


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• That strategic partnerships be developed between government and private sector especially for road infrastructure 
maintenance 

• That the political steering committee be strengthened to interact with national government around the rail issue 

• That alternative sources of energy be explored and that process should be led by DME/Eskom 

• That the coal value chain be unbundled to create economic opportunities 

• That an engagement of Eskom Power Generation value be explored to look at economic opportunities for 
communities 

• That electricity supply partnerships be developed between Eskom, NERSA and municipalities 

• That a study be commissioned on strategic partnership model that will work for Nkangala District Municipality 

• That public private partnerships be developed for infrastructure projects 

• Speed up establishment of Nkangala Economic Development Agency(NEDA) 

• That the technical school of excellence be developed 

• That the database of community skills be developed (community skills audit) 

• That in the next round of SLP Reviews, that focus should be on bulk infrastructure provision including roads 

• Food Products, Beverages and Tobacco Products Interventions 

Promote agro-processing through community road shows, establish an Agro-Processing Park in each local municipality, and 
ensure that each Agro-Processing Park contains an agro-processing incubator. The local agri-parks will provide inputs into 
the Agro-processing hub to be located in Dr JS Moroka. 

• Textiles, Clothing and Leather Goods Interventions: 

Develop a business plan for the establishment of organic cotton textiles and clothing community hubs in close proximity to the 
new organic cotton farms in each Local Municipality, source finance to fund project, investigate the possibility of expanding 
the organic cotton textile and clothing hubs to organic textile and clothing hubs using a variety of materials such as hemp and 
bamboo which have become popular. 

• Wood and products of wood, manufacture of articles of straw, manufacture of paper and paper products: 

Develop furniture training centres in appropriate local municipalities. 

• Agro-Pharmaceuticals 

Develop an agro- pharmaceutical cluster; pharmaceuticals should focus on developing country illnesses. 

• Chemicals 

A feasibility study should then be undertaken to determine which products are appropriate for manufacturing in Nkangala. 

• Machinery: 

A detailed study should be conducted to determine the feasibility of machinery manufacturing in NDM. 

• Automotive Industry: 

A market analysis should be conducted to determine whether there will be a demand for Nkangala’s exhaust systems. 

4.7.4 Conservation, Tourism and Culture 

The Nkangala District offers considerable tourism potential. The economy of the eastern areas of the District is already growing 
due to the increasing popularity of tourist destinations in the Emakhazeni Municipality. The natural beauty, rural character and 
popularity of fly-fishing are the main attractions to this area. The north western areas of the District also offer opportunities for 
tourism, through the consolidation of the various nature reserves and open spaces in this area. 

Concerning nature conservation and tourism, the western region of the District around Thembisile and Dr JS Moroka poses 
opportunities for the consolidation of nature reserves. The promotion of tourism opportunities in this region is essential to 
address the problems of poverty and unemployment affecting this area. The development of the Sun City resort in North West 
Province provides an example of how development of the hospitality and tourism industries achieved the integration of similar 
marginalised homeland areas, specifically Bafokeng, Mankwe and Madikwe, at physical and economic level. 

The extension and consolidation of various nature reserves and open spaces in the Thembisile and Dr.JS Moroka 
Municipalities could similarly unlock the tourism potential of this region. It is proposed that the Loskop Dam Nature Reserve 
be extended westwards across the mountainous area to functionally link to the Mabusa Nature Reserve and to the north 
towards the SS Skosana Nature Reserve. This system could eventually also be linked to the Mkhombo Nature Reserve and 
Mdala Nature Reserve in Dr JS Moroka. Further, towards the west this system could be supplemented and supported by the 
proposed Dinokeng Nature Reserve initiative in Gauteng Province. If properly developed, this belt of conservation areas could 
serve as a core area around which to develop a future eco-tourism and recreational precinct. 


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One of the biggest assets in this regard is the Zithabiseni Holiday Resort (in the middle of the Mabusa Nature Reserve) but 
which is neglected at this stage. This holiday resort, if restored to its previous glory, could serve to promote the Thembisile 
Local Municipality to visitors from Gauteng and overseas countries and to expose the area to the outside world. 

Figure 36: NDM Spatial Structure and Economic Activities 



HKAHMIA 

DISTRICT 

MUNICtPflLnV 

spatial structure 
Am 

ECONOMIC 

ACimiES 


■ Towns and Settlements 
' ~ I Nkangala District Boundary 
I I Local Municipality Boundary 
^ 1st - 2nd - 3rd Order Centie 
Mining 

■ Power Stations 

Mining and Agriculture 
Major Industrial Nodes 
Subsislance Fanning and 

H Eco / Agri - Tourism 
Extensive Agriculture 
Nature Reserves 


The northern and eastern regions of the Nkangala District already offer a variety of tourism opportunities associated with the 
scenic qualities, wetlands and conservation areas (refer Figure 36). A large part of the Emakhazeni Municipality forms part of 
the Trout Triangle, an area designated for tourism facilities associated with fly-fishing as part of the N4 Maputo Corridor 
initiative. 

The demarcation of a Tourism Belt and Focus Areas in the District will serve to promote and enhance the tourism potential in 
this area. It should be noted that the intention is not to reserve this area purely for tourism developments or to exclude tourism 
developments from any other area in the region. The intention is rather to focus investment and incentives in this area, to the 
benefit of poor communities in the northern regions and rural areas. This Tourism Belt incorporates sensitive wetlands and 
conservation areas, nature reserves and some of the proposed ecological corridors in the District, and the protection of these 
areas should be of high priority as part of this concept. 

In principle, tourism facilities should be promoted within this belt, but in terms of the following guidelines: 

■ Protection of prime agricultural land; 

* Ability to provide adequate infrastructure services to the developments; 

* Environmental protection and conservation; and 

* Protection of the rural character and scenic qualities of the area. 

The Tourism Belt could also serve as an area from which to promote the culture and traditions of the Ndebele residents in the 
north west of the District. The existing development potential thereof should be promoted through dedicated projects and 
strategic interventions. 

4.7.4.1 Tourism and cultural nodes/corridors 

The tourism or cultural nodes and corridors to be promoted throughout the District, include: 

■ Belfast which has the opportunity to serve as a tourism gateway, due to the fact that tourists underway to the Kruger 
National Park along the N4 or Dullstroom/Pilgrim’s Rest/Hoedspruit along the R540 (P81-1) have to travel through 
Belfast. This centre could therefore be used to promote the tourism opportunities in the Tourism Belt and the entire 
District. 


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■ The Bambi bypass route (R36) from Waterval Boven towards Montrose Falls in the Mbombela Municipal area which 
is already a very popular tourism route in the NDM area. 

■ Dullstroom, which is a major attraction point to tourists and is expanding rapidly. The major attraction to this area is 
however the rural character and scenic qualities, which should be protected from over-exposure and 
commercialisation. Associated with Dullstroom is the development of the R540 tourism corridor between Belfast, 
Dullstroom and Ladenburg towards the north. 

* Further to the southeast, it is important to enhance the Machadodorp-Badplaas-Mkhondo tourism corridor, which 
forms part of the SDF of the adjacent Gert Sibande Municipality (R541). 

* The cultural nodes in the Thembisile Local Municipality area, which have the potential to attract tourists into this 
area. There is a node situated to the south between KwaMhlanga and Ekangala. The Ngodwana Ndebele Village 
and Loopspruit winery are situated along the KwaMhlanga-Ekangala road (P255-1 (R568)) and form the main 
cultural/tourism node in this area. 

* In the southern parts of Thembisile the R25 (P95-1) route which links the N4 freeway to the Zithabiseni resort and 
the broader Mabusa Nature Reserve is an important tourism corridor. 

■ Another cultural area is proposed near the Klipfontein residential area to the north of KwaNdebele. This will link with 
the proposed tourism area on the eastern side of the Klipfontein-Kameelpoort road. 

* Other proposed tourism areas are at Sybrandskraal near Moloto, to the south of the Wolvenkop residential 
settlement near Verena, and at Zithabiseni in the Mabusa Nature Reserve. 

■ Middelburg and Emalahleni as accommodation (overflow) centre by utilising the strategic location between Gauteng 
and Nelspruit/Mbombela. 

47.4.2 Corridor Development Opportunities 

The N4 Maputo Corridor, N12 Corridor, and the Moloto Corridor hold significant opportunities for the Nkangala District area, 
both in terms of economic spin-offs from the corridor, and tourism potential. Activities capitalizing on the economic 
opportunities associated with these corridors should be encouraged to locate adjacent to the corridors (refer to Figure 35). 
The spatial development proposals and land-use guidelines that will guide development and which future development 
decisions will be based on. This could include intensive agriculture, agro-processing and hospitality uses. The significance of 
the railway lines in the District in terms of export opportunities to the Maputo and Richards Bay harbours should also be 
promoted. 

The N12 freeway has been classified as a development corridor in Nkangala as it links Nkangala with the industrial core of 
South Africa (Ekurhuleni Metro and Oliver Tambo International Airport) as well as the financial and commercial capital of South 
Africa - Johannesburg. Along the N12 corridor, development opportunities around Victor Khanye Municipality (Delmas town) 
and, to a lesser extent Ogies-Phola, should be identified and developed. 

Development along the N4and N12 corridor will be nodal in nature with a concentration of activities around some of the most 
strategically located access interchanges along these routes. Apart from the Emalahleni City and Middelburg areas, it is 
suggested that economic activity should also be actively promoted at Belfast and Machadodorp, as well as Delmas town along 
the N12 freeway. 

The specific section of route R555 between Emalahleni and Middelburg pose the opportunity for consolidation and 
enhancement of the economic opportunities in the form of a mainly Local Development Corridor. Desirable land uses along 
the corridor would include agro-processing, service industries for the agricultural sector, manufacturing, warehouses, 
wholesale trade, clean industries and hospitality uses. 

In terms of the conglomeration of settlements in the north-west of the District, the majority of future residential and economic 
development in the region should be promoted along the Moloto Rail Corridor (refer to Figure 35). 

The intention is that the Moloto Road and the proposed future Moloto railway line should serve as a Local Activity Spine 
promote development in and around all the major towns and settlements in these areas. 

The settlements along the Moloto Road are mainly dormitory residential areas and communities in these areas rely on the 
City of Tshwane for employment opportunities and economic activities. These former homeland areas were previously 
considered as “no go areas” during the apartheid regime, but now need to be integrated into the regional spatial structure and 
regional economy. By improving the regional linkages through these areas, regional traffic can be promoted to move through 
the area. This could improve the exposure of the area, thereby generating economic activities and stimulating a viable local 
economy. Functionally, this corridor would also link communities in Greater Sekhukhune and the Platinum activities along the 
Dilokong Corridor in Burgersfort, to Tshwane. The upgrading and maintenance of Moloto Road and/or the construction of the 
Moloto railway line and concentration of activities are however essential for the success of this initiative. 


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The Moloto Rail Corridor Project identified 24 potential railway stations along this corridor of which 20 are within the NDM area 
of jurisdiction. The Moloto Corridor Development Study furthermore suggested that future urban development be consolidated 
around these railway stations by way of Transit Orientated Development. 


47.4.3 Agriculture and Mining 

The agriculture sector is an important economic activity in the Nkangala District, which should be protected and promoted 
through the development of supplementary activities, such as agro-processing. The agricultural sector is critical for the 
development of the rural areas and the country as a whole because of its potential. Mining predominantly occurs in the 
southern regions of the District and is related to the power stations, although there is increased mining activity towards the 
northeast between Middelburg and Stoffberg-Roossenekal and up to Burgersfort where it links up with the Dilokong Platinum 
Corridor. 

In the southern regions, extensive farming, specifically in the form of crop farming is promoted. Extensive cattle and game 
farming is also promoted in the northern regions. Intensive agriculture is promoted along the N4 and N12 Corridors, to 
capitalise on the access to markets at local and regional level. Eco-tourism, agriculture and forestry are promoted in the 
eastern regions of the District, in support of the tourism sector. The north western regions of the District are characterised by 
subsistence farming and rural residential uses. The initiation of community farming projects is necessary to enhance the 
agricultural sector in this area and to address the high poverty levels. 

The District has considerable mining potential as reflected in Figure 36. The mining activities in the south of the region and 
especially in the Thembisile Municipality should be enhanced, to contribute to job creation for poor, unskilled workers. The 
regeneration of power stations, as well as the new power station in the Victor Khanye area could serve as catalyst to increased 
demand for coal reserves in the NDM area. 


Natural resources make a significant and direct contribution to the District economy due to the nature of the District economy, 
which is ‘resource based economy’ (coal, water, land capacity, geographical features, climate, conservation areas and 
ecosystems, natural features). 


Figure 37: Geology and Minerals in NDM 



NKANGALA 

mm 

MUNICIPALITY 

dEOLDQV 

Am 

MINERAL 

GEOLOGY 

Rooiberg + Pretoria Group 
Waterberg Group 
Karoo Sequence 
■ Surface Deposit - Alluvium 
Loskop Formation 
MINERAL POTENTIAL 

Continuous Coal Development 

Coal C 

Flint CL 

Gold Au 

Iron Fe 

LeadZinc.Vanadium PbZn.V 
Various Minerals 


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47.4.4 Business and industrial activities 

The occurrence of business activities in the District is closely related to the hierarchy of settlements. The business activities 
developed as a result of the demand for goods and services at service centres, such as Middelburg, Emalahleni, Delmas, 
Belfast and the smaller town and villages in the District, most of which act as central places to surrounding communities. 

The stimulation of business centres in the dormitory residential areas in the north west of the District is however necessary to 
enable the development of local economies. Development of nodes at Kwaggafontein and KwaMhlanga in the Thembisile 
Municipality, and Siyabuswa in Dr JS Moroka are proposed through the concentration of economic activities and social 
facilities. This requires strategic intervention in the form of service upgrading and investment programmes, of which the 
construction of the Moloto Rail Corridor and associated establishment of Transit Orientated Development are important 
components. 

Despite the fact that the CBDs of both Middelburg and Emalahleni City are well-developed and represent the two highest order 
activity nodes in the District, both areas are experiencing rapid decline and require some strategic intervention such as 
development incentives or restructuring initiatives to be implemented. The Emalahleni CBD has been declared an Urban 
Development Zone qualifying for Urban Renewal Tax Incentives, but more needs to be done to prevent these areas from 
further decay. As far as industrial activity is concerned, the existing industrial areas in Steve Tshwete (Columbus Steel) and 
Emalahleni (Highveld Steel) should be maintained and enhanced through service maintenance and upgrading programmes. 
These industrial areas would be the focus areas for heavy industries and manufacturing. 

The four industrial areas in the Thembisile and Dr JS Moroka Municipalities (KwaMhlanga, vicinity of Tweefontein, 
Kwaggafontein, and Siyabuswa) along the Moloto Road and the future Moloto Rail Corridor should be promoted in support of 
the stimulation of the local economy. The industrial area at KwaMhlanga holds the most potential in terms of the surrounding 
activities. It is proposed that a concerted effort be put in place to promote development and to facilitate the establishment of 
small industries and other commercial activities in this area. If this requires that the industrial area be expanded in future, this 
should also be considered seriously. 

The industrial potential of Belfast and Machadodorp to the east, and Delmas in Victor Khanye municipal area (agro-processing) 
to the west should also be promoted to capitalise on its strategic location in relation to the major transport network. 

47.4.5 Expanded Public Works Programme 
47.4.5.1 Current Status Quo District wide 

The fundamental strategies are to increase economic growth so that the number of the net new jobs being created starts to 
exceed the number of the new entrants into the labour market and to improve the education system such that the workforce 
is able to take the largely skilled work opportunities, which the economic growth will generate. Despite numerous efforts 
undertaken by government, unemployment in South Africa has remained stubbornly high. The on-going global economic 
downturn has made this even worse and has increased the number of unemployed in South Africa even further. This increases 
the need for the EPWP even further as it provides a unique policy instrument for government to create work opportunities and 
alleviate unemployment. 

The NDM EPWP implementation has been through a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the National Department of 
Public Works (NDPW) and Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA). The EPWP Learnership programme 
implementation was met with a number of challenges, which included delays in appointment of training providers and mentors 
and non-payment of stipends to the learners. (Number of EPWP Participants per LMs) 

During the implementation of the Fourth EPWP Group, NDM resolved to implement the EPWP learner-ships without the 
tripartite Agreement. The NDM developed an EPWP Implementation toolkit, which is an implementation guideline. Therefore, 
the fourth NDM EPWP learner-ships was managed and implemented by the Project Management Unit (PMU) and not through 
the MOA. 

The District has also adopted EPWP Policy and Implementation Toolkit (which year), which outlines all the processes to be 
followed in the implementation of EPWP in the District. NDM will focus on the following strategies to efficiently manage, monitor 
and evaluate EPWP programmes in their jurisdiction: 

Meeting key objectives: Greater labour intensity will be achieved through benchmarks to be set out through: 

1. That the total wage component should reach 30% of the total expenditure; 

2. That all community water and sanitation projects to meet EPWP criteria; 

3. That targets for labour intensity to be set per sector 

• EPWP Accountability 


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Oversight, responsibility and accountability should be divided for each sector for effective reporting and reviewal. 

• Improving Work Opportunities 

The minimum length of work opportunities and wage targets to be established per sector. 

• Reporting 

Proper reporting on key indicators such as job opportunities, person days of employment, demographic targets (women, youth 
and people with disabilities), training days, projects budgets, and projects wage rates be done on a quarterly basis and be 
made publicly available. 

• Training 

Training norms and standards to be established. All training to reach a level of norms and standards in defined skills, learner- 
ships or certificated NQF credits. Training provision to be cascaded to social and environmental sectors. 

• Working conditions 

EPWP wages paid should not be less than R75 a day. All workers to be provided with a work contract with minimum conditions 
and training entitlements. EPWP workers to be given protective clothing. 

• Monitoring and evaluation 

All projects to be adequately monitored and be evaluated for accuracy on reported outputs versus the targets. This can be 
done using internal auditors. EPWP officials to be provided with quarterly reports of progress per sector. 

• Participation by vulnerable groups 

This should be given priority since, the youth and women constitute the highest proportion of the unemployed. 

NDM made significant contribution to the creation of employment opportunities that includes: 

• Incentive grants: 

• Conditions of employment for EPWP Beneficiaries 

• Selection Processes of EPWP Workers 

• Child headed households 

• Household with one fully-time person 

• Monitoring and evaluation 

• Progress reporting 

4.7.5 Rural Development & Land Reform 

In 2009, the new Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (DRDLR) was created. Rural development and land 
reform remains one of the key priorities of government. Guided by the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), which is 
the first five-year cycle of the National Development Plan (NDP), the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform has 
repositioned itself and refocussed itself with the aim of successfully driving the transformation of the rural economy to achieve 
vibrant, sustainable and equitable rural communities. The main focus for the department is to create enabling environment to 
ensure that rural communities have greater opportunities to participate fully in the economic, social and political life of the 
country, supported by good legislation and policies that facilitate accelerated land reform, access to basic services, socio¬ 
economic infrastructure, skills development and job creation for the rural communities. To this end the department 
implemented an organisational renewal plan that increased efficiency and improved governance, accountability and 
transparency. It also instituted mechanisms to build its capacity and capability both to improve service delivery and to enhance 
the process of reporting for accountability. 

With regard to service delivery, Mpumalanga is committed to deliver meaningful service to our communities and to contribute 
towards the vision of creating vibrant, sustainable and equitable rural communities through the Rural Economic Transformation 
Model. The Institutional Roles and Roles and Role-relationships model is a high level dynamic representation of an institutional 
framework that defines and streamlines roles and responsibilities of the key players in the rural economy transformation space 
- organs of State, community-based governance structures, investors and communities represented by households. 

Another intervention which was announced by the President during his State of the Nation Address in 2015 is the 
establishment of Agri-Parks in each of the 27 poorest district municipalities to transform rural economies. To date the work 
has begun in earnest especially in Nkangala District Municipality. Agri-Parks will contribute immensely towards the 
revitalization of rural towns too. Rural rowns provide nearly all of the clean water to urban centres, provide the majority of 
domestic energy production and are the primary source of food production, investing in rural economies is vital to sustaining 
these resources. Nkangala District Municipality in collaboration with the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform 
has drafted the Agri-Park Master Plan in order to enhance rural development and agricultural development strategies for 
implementation. 


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Nkangala District Rural Development Plan 

In the financial year 2016/17 the Nkangala District Municipality working together with the Department of Rural Development 
and Land reform (DRDLR) they embarked on the process of drafting Nkangala District Rural Development Plan NDRDP. The 
plan aims to achieve the following main objectives: 

■ To develop a Rural Development Plan for number of functional regions; 

■ To address the need of the poor people who are in extreme poverty and who are subject to underdevelopment; 

■ To come up with interventions that will bring change in the livelihoods of people in rural communities; 

Identified Rural Functional Regions: the following three regions were identified as depicted on the bellow figure: 

Functional Region 1: The Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani poverty pockets characterised by extensive subsistence 
farming and latent tourism potential. The bulk of the population resides in areas under the management of traditional 
authorities. 

Functional Region 2: The NDM Highveld area characterised by coal mining, electricity generation and maize and livestock 
farming. Game farming occurs in the northern parts. 

Functional Region 3: The eastern escarpment which holds extensive potential for forestry, tourism and limited fruit farming. 

Identified rural functional area in details: Figure bellow shows the location and spatial extent of the twelve Rural Intervention 
Areas identified in the Nkangala District. These are briefly summarised as follow: 

* North-Western Region: 

• RIA 1.1: Representing the northern extents of the Dr JS Moroka Local 

• Municipality this area comprises a number of rural villages under traditional leadership. The main focus is 
subsistence farming 

• RIA 1.2: This area represents the functional tourism link between Rust der Winter in Limpopo, Dinokeng 
in Gauteng, and the Loskop Dam tourism precinct in Mpumalanga. It consists of four nature reserves 
located in Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani municipalities. These reserves have extensive tourism 
potential which is totally underutilized at present. 

• RIA 1.3: This is an area with high potential agricultural land (crop and livestock) which is ideal for the 
establishment of emerging commercial farmers in the north-western rural parts of the District. 


■ Highveld Region: 

• RIA 2.1: Represents rural areas surrounding Delmas Town (to the north and south-east). This is one of 
the most intensively utilized agricultural areas in Mpumalanga with a diversity of commodities produced 
and a wide range of associated agro industries established in/ around Delmas Town. 

• RIA 2.2: It includes rural communities around Ga Nala/ Kriel town in the southern extents of Emalahleni 
Local Municipality. Agricultural activity in the area is intense but open cast coal mining pose a severe 
threat to sustainability of agricultural production in this area. 

• RIA 2.3: This is a small rural cluster to the west of Witbank town and south of N4 freeway. It represents 
communities between Phola, Wilge and the new Kusile power station. 

• RIA 2.4: Several rural communities are located along route R544 to the north-west of Witbank en-route to 
Verena which is located in Thembisile Hani LM. 

• RIA 2.5: This broadly refers to the Doornkop community located to the north of Middelburg town along 
route Nil towards Groblersdal. This intervention area could be extended eastwards to also include 
Kwamakalane and Mafube which represent two small rural communities in a high potential agricultural 
area in the north-eastern parts of Steve Tshwete municipality. 


■ Eastern Escarpment Region 

• RIA 3.1: This represents the existing Wonderfontein rural node and the surrounding communities which 
hold enormous potential for intensified agricultural activity. This area also borders onto the N4 
development corridor. 

• RIA 3.2: Represents rural communities in far-north-western parts of Emakhazeni LM with Stoffberg being 
the nodal point. The area is intensively cultivated - mainly maize and soya along the Spekboom river. 

• RIA 3.3: Rural communities between Dullstroom and Tonteldoos, and Dullstroom and Mashishing form 
part of this intervention area. Historically, intensive fruit farming occurred in this area. 


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• RIA 3.4: This intervention area represents the rural communities in the south-eastern parts of Emakhazeni 
municipality which functionally links to rural communities in Chief Albert Luthuli municipality adjacent to 
the south (Manzana/Badplaas, Tjakastad, Elukwatini etc.). To the east it also includes all the rural 
communities between Emgwenya (Waterval Boven) and Ngodwana along route N4. 

■ Functional Region Features/ Issues to Be Considered 

• Functional Region 1: Rural North-West 

Agriculture 

- Distinguish between the three functional agricultural areas and establish emerging commercial crop 
farmers in the precinct south of Moloto Road. The central (livestock) and northern (subsistence) farming 
areas will comprise various forms of communal farming as these areas are under Traditional Leadership; 

- Optimally utilise downstream agro processing opportunities associated with the dominant value chains in 
the area and which could include the following: maize, vegetable, cotton, beef, feedlot, port, poultry, and 
tourism. 

- Formulate a regional water harvesting strategy and associated capacity building programme. Provide 
associated infrastructure required towards implementation 

- Refurbish the existing maize mill at Sybrandskraal close to Moloto and bakery facilities in Verena 
(Lekuntu), and Kwaggafontein (Lukuniti); 

- Investigate the possibility of establishing an auction facility in both local municipalities (Thembisile Hani 
LM and Dr JS Moroka LM), and the potential for associated feedlots in the central intervention area (RIA 
2 ) 

- Refurbish the abattoir facilities in KwaMhlanga and Leeuwfontein 

- Establish functional linkages with Pienaarsrivier, Settlers, Marble Hall and Groblersdal farming 
communities in Limpopo Province; 

- Development of Kameelrivier Agri-hub to support the Mpumalanga International Fresh Produce Market 
and associated Agri-Parks (MEGA) 

- Investigate the possibility of re-opening the Marapyane Agricultural College 

Tourism 

- Establish and brand a continuous tourism-route between the Dinokeng Nature Reserve and the Loskop 
Dam Nature Reserves 

- Investment in infrastructure: Zithabiseni Game Lodge and Conference Centre should be prioritised for 
renovations as an instrument for 

- unlocking business tourism and leisure tourism 

- Diversification of wildlife: Currently the belt consists of three of the big five animals. The Belt should 
diversify its product offering by providing alternative to up-market as well as budget travellers 

- Overcoming land claims: A co-Management Agreement model should be pursued in the light of multiple 
land claims on the belt; 

- Destination Marketing: The branding and marketing of the destination is essential to the success of the 
Tourism Belt 

Consolidating the operations of the belt into a joint effort: The five facilities along the belt must coordinate 
their activities into one wellcoordinated operational structure. Each facility will specialise in unique tourism 
services which will ensure that visitors can extract maximum value from visiting the belt. This eliminates 
competition among the facilities which amounts to a “race to the bottom” 

- The broad tourism development concept for the two reserves revolves around concentrating high impact, 
high volume facilities in the more accessible areas of the reserves, near the dam wall on the MKNR, near 
the Main Gate on the MDNR, and near the Mkholwane Gate on the MDNR. 

- Implement Mkhombo - Mdala Nature Reserve Business Plan 

- A beading and sewing workshop to be established for the community of KwaMhlanga. The workshop could 
be linked to tourism areas or alternatively informal trading structures could be erected at strategic points 


■ Functional Region 2: Highveld North 

Review the Doornkop Development Framework and Business Plan in view of broader Rural Intervention Area 2.5 

Consider establishment of additional FPSU’s at Rural Intervention Areas 2.4 and 2.5 

Determine if additional rural nodes/ agri-villages are to be developed in Kwamakalane and Mafube 

Determine ways and means for Rural Intervention Areas 2.4 and 2.5 to be incorporated into District Tourism Belt 

Optimally utilise downstream agro processing opportunities associated with the dominant value chains in each of 


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the five areas and which include the following: Maize, beef, feedlot, port, poultry, fruit and citrus (Delmas, Witbank, 
Middelburg) 

Production infrastructure in the Intervention Areas 

Tourism and Mining Value Chains could also be considered in northern and southern Rural Intervention Areas 
respectively. 

■ Functional Region 3: Eastern Escarpment North 

Rural Intervention Area 1: Wonderfontein 

Establishment of Agri-Village for beneficiaries at Wonderfontein 

Wonderfontein to become Farmer Production Support Unit - also serving Mafube and Kwamakalane in the Steve 
Tshwete area to the west; 

Establish more agro-processing facilities e.g. mill, abattoir in Wonderfontein 
Consider trout farming and tourism for community’s south of N4 
Strengthening of cherry farming in the Wonderfontein area 

* Rural Intervention Area 2: Stoffberg 

- Establishment of an Agri-Village for beneficiary communities at Stoffber 

- Stoffberg to become Farmer Production Support Unit 

- Possible establishment of biofuel plant based on soya bean production on farms south of Stoffberg. 

* Rural Intervention Area 3: 

Promote Fruit Farming: Peaches, cherries, apples and blueberries 
Dried fruit industry to be re-established around Dullstroom 
Promote tourism along secondary routes toward Tonteldoos etc. 

Forestry and associated mushroom farming in Komatiland Forest 

Rural Intervention Area 4: 

Establish new rural node along route R541 to serve local communities (Agri-Village?) to link with communities at 
Badplaas in Chief Albert Luthuli, Main focus: Livestock, tourism, trout farming, forestry and mushrooms. 

Strengthen horticulture along N4 towards Ngodwana to benefit local rural communities 


Food Security: 

Linked to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the pursuit of household and national food security is a constitutional 
mandate of the government that seeks to create an environment that ensures that there is adequate food available to all, now 
and in the future, and that hunger is eradicated. Equitable distribution of basic foods at affordable prices to poor households 
and communities remains a challenge. As confirmed in the 2008 Agricultural Summit of the District the government must 
create an environment that ensures that there is adequate food available to all, that communities grow their own food, protect 
the poor communities from the rising prices of food, and eradicate hunger. 

In order to address these challenges, the government must take the following practical steps: 

■ Promote food security as a way to lessen dependence on food imports. 

* Introduce food for all programmes to procure and distribute basic foods at affordable prices to poor households and 
communities. 

* Introduce measures to improve the logistics of food distribution such as transportation, warehousing, procurement 
and outsourcing in order to reduce food prices in the long term. 

* Continued enforcement of stronger competition measures must be used to act against food cartels and collusion, 
which inflate food prices. 

* Expand access to food production schemes in rural and peri-urban areas to grow their own food with implements, 
tractors, fertilizers and pesticides. 

* Supplementary government measures that support existing community schemes, which utilise land for food 
production in schools, health facilities, churches and urban and traditional authority areas must be initiated. 

* Ensure an emergency food relief programme, on a mass-scale, in the form of food assistance projects to the poorest 
households and communities including through partnerships with religious and other community organisations. 

4.7.5.1 Land and Agrarian reform: 

A comprehensive and clear rural development strategy, which builds the potential for rural sustainable livelihoods, particularly 
for African women, as part of an overarching vision of rural development. Strong interventions in the private land market 


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combined with better use of state land for social and economic objectives, must transform the patterns of land ownership and 
agrarian production, with a view to restructuring and deracialising the agricultural sector. 

The land reform programme must be intensified to ensure that more land is in the hands of the rural poor. Government should 
provide the rural poor with technical skills and financial resources to productively use the land and to create sustainable 
livelihoods. The existing land redistribution programme, introduce measures aimed at speeding up the pace of land reform 
and redistribution and promote land ownership by South Africans. However, this pace and successes and failures of the 
programme must be appraised. 

Notwithstanding the fact that rural areas remain divided between well-developed commercial farming areas, peri-urban and 
impoverished communal areas, economic development in the rural areas needs to go beyond land and agrarian reform. It 
must include affordable financing to promote economic development; support programmes and training in assisting co¬ 
operatives and small enterprises; public sector ventures; and strategies to develop appropriate industries including light 
manufacturing, handicrafts, services and tourism etc. This also requires the putting in place of the necessary economic 
infrastructure including IT services, roads and rail. 

Linked to the land reform programme must be an expanded agrarian reform programme. This programme must focus on the 
systematic promotion of agricultural co-operatives throughout the production cycle. Active promotion of agro-processing in the 
agricultural sector must also be promoted. Government must develop support measures to ensure more access to markets 
and finance by small farmers. 

Social grants are making a huge contribution to pushing back the frontiers of rural poverty, fighting hunger and improving 
potential for economic growth in rural areas. However, in the struggle to build a better life for all, grants are no substitute for a 
broader strategy of rural development and employment creation. 

Part of government measures to support rural development must include infrastructure development to produce thriving rural 
economies and ensure sustainable development. The expansion of basic infrastructure, which includes roads, electricity, water 
connections and public toilet systems in rural areas, becomes a central priority. Effective rural development programmes that 
ensure investment in infrastructure, services and training reaches those areas of the country that have been most adversely 
affected must be promoted. Relaxation of all the bottlenecks and the regulatory systems that could stifle self-improvement 
initiatives must also be prioritised. 

Issues of education, health, safety and security, LED, development of small enterprises and cooperatives are all critical 
elements of rural development. These issues are covered in detailed in the next chapter under the IDP Priority Issues. 

Concisely, the rural development strategies and initiatives must seek to address the following issues: 

• Fast-track delivery of infrastructure and targeted rural infrastructure; 

■ Fast-track delivery of social and basic services; 

■ Reducing distances between areas where communities reside and administrative centres; 

■ Reduce bureaucratic bottlenecks; 

■ Strengthen municipal planning and budgeting systems; 

■ Strengthen institutional capacity, skills, experience and implementation mechanisms in smaller municipalities; 

* Including land reform, and food production and security; rural people must participate in decision-making processes 
that affect their lives. 


4.8 KPA 4: FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY AND VIABILITY 

4.8.1 Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Financial viability and sound financial management are key elements to ensuring continuous ability of the institution to meet 
its mandate through: 

• Improved financial management and unqualified Municipal audit reports; 

• Ensuring fair and just allocation and distribution of resources within the District; 

• Building financially viable Municipalities and uphold and maintain sound financial management principles; 

• Upholding the principles of Batho Pele; 

• Rendering efficient and effective support services in a transparent and accountable manner; 

• Ensuring effective and efficient income and expenditure; asset and liability management; 

• Contributing towards the maintenance of a high credit rating. 


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• Each of these priorities is allocated to the appropriate units within the Finance Department responsible for the 
implementation thereof and is addressed within the performance plan, together with the key performance areas 

The supporting objectives of each unit are summarized as follows: 

I. Budget and Expenditure Management 

• Ensuring a legally compliant IDP-based Budget, which enhances financial sustainability. 

• Preparation of in year reports in terms of legislation. 

• Co-ordination, control, and monitoring of budget implementation. 

• Management and control of creditor administration, payment systems, processes and procedures. 

• Management and control project expenditure and payments 

• Management of personnel remuneration processes. 

II. Treasury and Asset management 

• Effective and efficient cash and investment management. 

• Effective and efficient asset management 

• Effective risk management and insurance provision for Council’s assets. Daily management of electronic fund 
transfers. 

• Preparation of annual financial statements in terms of legislation and GRAP standards. 

• Management, co-ordination and control of all revenue collection, including arrear debt management and credit 
control. 

• Effective and efficient liability management 

• Effective and efficient grant management 

III. Supply Chain Management 

• To procure goods and services based on the five principles; fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost 
effective; 

• To ensure that procurement of goods and services complies with applicable legislation and regulations 

• To ensure uniformity in supply chain management systems between organs of state in all spheres 

• To ensure procurement consistent with national economic policy concerning the promotion of investments and 
doing business with the public sector. 

• Effective and efficient demand management 

IV. Compliance management and system administration 

• Research, development, implementation and maintenance of efficient IT systems in compliance with mSCOA 
regulations 

• Insure overall compliance with financial regulatory environment 

• Implement, manage and maintain mSCOA 

• Submission of various financial reports to stakeholders 

• Mentoring and management of financial interns 

• Developing and maintain financial procedures 

General Financial Management 

• Skills development. 

• Performance management. 

• Departmental risk management. 

• Development and sustainment of internal controls. 

• Support to local municipalities. 

• Developing and maintain of finance related policies 


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4.8.1.1 Background and Problem Statement 

A number of Local Municipalities within the District have experienced cash flow challenges since 2014/15 financial year. 
Municipal financial sustainability and viability is about the ability to generate sufficient revenue to meet operating expenses, 
debt commitments and where applicable, to allow growth while maintaining service levels. The financial analysis reports for 
the District and its six local municipalities have highlighted various financial management challenges that effects the 
financial viability of the municipalities. These reports were given to each municipality to implement recommendations. 

I. District specific challenges 

• Declining RSC levy replacement grant and declining equitable share 

• Underfunded municipal health mandate 

• Unfunded fire services for Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka areas 

• Possible future impact on the revenue and debt management of new mandates 

• Assurance of 100% alignment between Budget, IDP, performance objectives and SDBIP 

• Macro-economic factors and challenges outside control of the district; 

• Implementation of Supply Chain Management policies to create jobs and stimulate local economy; 

• Continuous introduction of new GRAP standards 

II. Short-term Strategies 

• Development of a credible and cash-backed Budget. 

• Effective cash-flow management, forecasting and monitoring. 

• Effective management of operating and capital expenditure. 

• Effective maintenance of Municipal Standard Chart of Accounts (mSCOA) for the District. 

• Effective implementation of credit control and debt collection measures. 

III. Medium-term Strategies 

Implementation of a Revenue Enhancement Strategy, which includes the following: 

• Existing fees, tariffs and charges must be reviewed annually in order to ensure that the revenue attributable to 
fees and charges are maximized and that the bases for determining fees and charges are cost reflective and/or 
market related. 

• Identification and attraction of additional revenue streams through the Donor Management/Funding Strategy, in 
support of the NDM’s service delivery mandate. 

• Liaise with Portfolio Committee of National Assembly, NCOP, NT and FFC on decline of district RSC replacement 
grant. 

• National COGTA reconfiguration of municipality’s discussion document to be researched to see how it will affect 
NDM and it six local municipalities. 

IV. Long Term Strategies 

• Using entities to increase the municipal revenue 

• Establishment of metro for Steve Tshwete and Emalahleni Local Municipality 

V. Local municipality’s specific challenges 

Municipalities are still struggling in dealing with the issues raised by Auditor General and the following issues cut across 
a number of local municipalities within Nkangala District Municipality: 

• Ineffective financial management 

• Non-existence of fully functional Internal Audit Units, Risk Units, Risk and Audit Committees 

• High vacancy rate in key positions. 

• Auditing of performance objectives 

• Irregular expenditure 

• High distribution losses 

• Material impairment of debtors 

• Going concern issues 


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The below mentioned Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP) issues are also a challenge in the following local 
municipalities (LM): Table 61: GRAP _ 


Victor Khanye LM 

y GRAP 2, Cash Flow Statement, 
y GRAP 17, Property Plant and Equipment, 
y GRAP16, Investment Assets, 
y GRAP 31, Intangible Assets, 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

y GRAP 17, Property Plant and Equipment, 
y GRAP16, Investment Assets, 
y GRAP 31, Intangible Assets, 

eMalahleni LM 

y GRAP 2, Cash Flow Statement, 

S GRAP 17, Property Plant and Equipment, 
y GRAP16, Investment Assets, 
y GRAP 31, Intangible Assets, 

eMakhazeni LM 

■y GRAP 2, Cash Flow Statement, 
y GRAP 17, Property Plant and Equipment, 
y GRAP16, Investment Assets, 
y GRAP 31, Intangible Assets, 

Thembisile Hani LM 

y GRAP 2, Cash Flow Statement, 
y GRAP 17, Property Plant and Equipment, 
y GRAP16, Investment Assets, 
y GRAP 31, Intangible Assets, 


To further exacerbate the challenges faced by Local Municipalities, the following are challenges that are cross cutting 
amongst the municipalities: 

• Non-payment of Services; 

• Inadequate Implementation of municipal property rates Act. 

• Tariffs which are not cost-reflective; 

• Rising electricity cost and Inclining Block Tariff implementation; 

• Higher water purification cost due to pollution; 

• Implementation of free basic service (Indigent); 

• Growing dependency of intergovernmental fiscal grants, for everyday operations; 

• Low and underutilization of revenue base; 

• Macro-economic factors and challenges outside control of Municipalities; 

• Non-existence of Credible billing data - valuation roll and financial system descripencies; 

• Non elimination of irregular, unauthorised, fruitless and wasteful expenditure; 

• Non alignment of Budget with IDP and performance objectives; 

• No improvement of distribution losses; 

• Non adherence to minimum competency levels and loss of competent staff; 

• Inadequate procurement and contract management; 

• Implementation of Supply Chain Management policies to create jobs and stimulate local economy; 

• Lack of demand management and procurement plan. 

• Non-compliance to legislation 

• Poor asset management 

• Continuous introduction of new GRAP standards 

• Outdated procedures 

The following key strategies constitute a summary of the key strategies that have been identified for achieving the objectives 
of the district wide financial viability: 

Short-term Strategies 

• Development of a credible and cash-backed Budget. 

• Effective cash-flow management, forecasting and monitoring. 

• Effective management of operating and capital expenditure. 

• Effective maintenance of Municipal Standard Chart of Accounts (mSCOA) for the local municipalities. 

• Effective implementation of credit control and debt collection measures. 


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Medium-term Strategies 

Implementation of a Revenue Enhancement Strategy, which includes the following: 

• Enhancement of the current revenue base take into account the socio-economic factors of its surroundings and 
promote initiatives aimed at sustainable revenue growth. 

• Current revenue streams must be properly managed. Strategies must be introduced to reduce electricity and water 
losses to the absolute minimum. 

• Existing fees, tariffs and charges must be reviewed annually in order to ensure that the revenue attributable to 
fees and charges are maximized and that the bases for determining fees and charges are cost reflective and/or 
market related. 

4.8.1.2 NDM Strategic Priorities 

The financial objective of the NDM is to secure sound and sustainable management of the financial affairs of the District and 
to assist the six Local Municipalities within the NDM to be financially sustainable. The focus in this regard is on: 

• Rendering efficient and effective support Services in a transparent and accountable manner; 

• Ensuring effective and efficient income and expenditure management; 

• Contributing towards the maintenance of a high credit rating. 

• Contribute towards in-house capacity building to maintain Clean Audit. 

• Ensuring a legally compliant IDP-based budget that enhances financial sustainability. 

• Ensuring sustainable and improved revenue generation and collection. 

• Expanding the revenue base by identifying additional sources of revenue and ensuring sustainable growth in the 
revenue base. 

• Providing efficient and effective Cash Management and Asset Risk Management systems. 

• Providing efficient and effective expenditure management and control processes. 

• Ensuring a sound and legally compliant system of financial management, advice, control, accounting and 
reporting. 

• Providing effective and efficient Supply Chain Management processes. 

4.8.1.3 Financial Risks 

In order to maintain and improve the financial position of the NDM, certain risks need to be managed, while financial 
management practices need to be continuously improved. The key financial risks confronting the Municipality can be 
summarized as follows and are contained in the Strategic Risk Register: 

• Adoption of Council Resolutions without considering financial implications thereof 

• Appointments without considering financial implications thereof 

• Loss/theft of assets including mismanagement of assets 

• Deviation on normal supply chain management processes 

• Shrinked revenue growth and increased operational expenditure 

• Inadequate compliance with legislations 

• Inadequate implementation of audit recommendations form oversight structure 

• Inadequate implementation of mSCOA 

• Inability to spend on the allocated budget 

4.8.1.4 Supply Chain Management 

Guide and regulations for) SCM policies and the management of its various Bid Committees. 

Section 217 (1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act 108 of 1996) (The Constitution ) provides the 
basis for procurement and determines that: “ When an organ of state in the national, provincial or local sphere of 
government,or any institution identified in the national legislation,contracts for goods or services, it must do so in 
accordance with a system that is fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective”. 

The procurement of the municipality is managed, regulated and guided by the Municipal Finance Management Act Section 
112(1) which states that: A municipality must have a Supply Chain Management Policy which must be fair, equitable, 


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transparent, competitive and cost - effective and comply with a prescribed regulatory framework for municipal supply chain 
management, which must cover at least the following: 

(e) open and transparent pre-qualification processes for tenders or other bids; 

(f) Competitive bidding processes in which only pre-qualified persons may participate; 

(q) The delegation of municipal Supply Chain Management powers and duties, including to officials. 

Nkangala District Municipality is regulated by two Supply Chain Management Policies. 

The regulations stated above are aligned to the Supply Chain Regulations in Section 26 (1) which states that: 

A supply Chain Management policy must provide for: 

(a) A committee system for competitive bids consisting of at least - 

i. A bid Specification Committee; 

ii. A bid Evaluation Committee; 

iii. A bid Adjudication Committee; 

(b) The Appointment toy the Accounting Officer of the members of each committee, taking into account section 117 of 
the Act, 

Section 26 (2) states that: 

The committee system must be consistent with- 

(a) Regulations 27,28 and 29, and 

(b) Any other applicable legislation. 

The Second Supply Chain Policy the Municipality has and is regulated under is the System for Infrastructure 
Procurement and Delivery Management. This policy guides and regulates the procurement of the Infrastructure projects of 
the municipality. It has been framed around the five focus areas proposed by the National Planning Commission for the 
design of a procurement system and draws upon the work of the 2015 Public Sector Supply Chain Management Review. It 
forms an integral part of the Model SCM Policy for Infrastructure Delivery Management which has been issued as a 
Treasury guideline determining a standard for municipal supply chain management policies in terms of Section 168 of the 
Municipal Finance Management Act of 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003) in support of Regulation 3 (2) of the Supply Chain 
Management Regulations. 

Committee system for procurement under the SIPDM Policy 

A committee system under the SIPDM comprises of the Documentation Committee, Evaluation Committee and Tender 
Committee which shall be applied to all procurement procedures where the estimated value of the procurement exceeds the 
financial threshold for quotations and to the putting in place of framework agreements. 

• The evaluation committee shall, where competition for the issuing of an order amongst framework contractors takes 
place and the value of the order exceeds the financial threshold for quotations, evaluate the quotations received. 

• The persons appoint in writing as technical advisors and subject matter experts may attend any committee meeting. 

• No person who is a political officer bearer, a public office bearer including any councilor of a municipality, a political 
advisor or a person appointed in terms of section 12A of the Public Service Act of 1994 or who has a conflict of 
interest shall be appointed to a procurement documentation, evaluation or tender committee. 

• Committee decisions shall as far as possible be based on the consensus principle i.e. the general agreement 
characterized by the lack of sustained opposition to substantial issues. Committees shall record their decisions in 
writing. Such decisions shall be kept in a secured environment for a period of not less than five years after the 
completion or cancellation of the contract unless otherwise determined in terms of the National Archives and Record 
Services Act of 1996. 

• Committees may make decisions at meetings or, subject to the committee chairperson’s approval, on the basis of 
responses to documents circulated to committee members provided that not less than sixty percent of the members 
are present or respond to the request for responses. Where the committee chairperson is absent from the meeting, 
the members of the committee who are present shall elect a chairperson from one of them to preside at the meeting. 


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4.9 KPA5: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 


This KPA of the Council is targeted at meeting the priority needs of communities, address poverty and promote infrastructure 
development and maintenance through: 

■ Developing infrastructure to enable and ensure service provision that meets the priority of communities; 

■ Promoting Integrated Development Planning and the proper coordination and alignment of infrastructure development 
initiatives in the District through sector planning; 

■ Encourage and supporting the effective performance and functioning of Local Municipalities in ensuring access to 
basic Services within the District; 

■ Enhancing economic growth and development within the District through infrastructure project implementation. 

4.9.1 Issue 6: Health 

4.9.1.1 Background and Problem Statement 

In the previous IDP document of 2011-16 NDM Council confirmed this Developmental Issue and the challenges therein to be 
detrimental to the realisation of the Vision of the District. At the District level, District Health includes Municipal Health Services. 

4.9.1.2 Municipal Health Services Legal Framework 

As promulgated in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996 (as Amended), Schedule 4 Part A, health 
services are a functional area of National and Provincial legislative competence. In terms of Section 155 (6) (a) the Provincial 
government must provide for the monitoring and support of local government in the Province, albeit can be assigned to a 
municipality in terms of Section 156 of the Constitution. 

Furthermore, Section 156 provides that " A municipality has the executive authority in respect of, and has the right to 
administer- the local government matters listed in Part B of Schedule 4 and Part B of Schedule 5 one of which is Municipal 
Health Services (MHS). Section 84 (I) distinguishes Municipal Health Services as a function of District municipalities. 

In July 2004 the National Health Act, 61 of 2003 was promulgated and contains a clear definition of what Municipal Health 
Services are, and are listed as including: Water quality monitoring; Food control; Waste management; Health surveillance of 
premises; Surveillance and prevention of communicable diseases, excluding immunisations; Vector control; Environmental 
pollution control; Disposal of the dead; Chemical safety (the latter is a local municipal function but form an integral part of the 
EHS scope) but excludes port health, malaria control and control of substances - the powers and functions of these 
three areas of Municipal Health Services remain with the provinces. Nkangala District Municipality is currently running MHS 
unit with thirty-six (36) Environmental Health Practitioners (EHP’S), two (2) Community Service EHP’s and one (1) Divisional 
Manager filling all the vacant posts. 

The NDM as part rendering an effective Municipal Health Services, committed itself to fund Municipal Health Services functions 
throughout the District and procure all tools of trade for MHS. Nkangala District Municipality is implementing the National 
Environmental Health Norms and Standards and appointed service provider of the Water Quality Monitoring Laboratory to 
facilitate the implementation of Municipal Health Services. Their services include key amongst others, laboratory analysis of 
water samples for a list of identified indicators, the provision of sampling containers, sampling submission forms and analysis 
reports for the specified municipal Officials from all the six (6) local municipalities within Nkangala District Municipality to 
ascertain safe and or acceptable microbiological and chemical status of water sources. 

4.9.1.3 Municipal health Services Programmes 

a) Water Quality Monitoring 

Each local municipality is allocated the total number and types of water samples per quarter and will therefore be monitored 
on a monthly basis against the set targets and the budget. The water samples results are communicated with each LM to 
rectify noncompliance with SANS drinking water. 

b) Food safety and Control 

Food control as one of the functions of Municipal Health Services its objectives is to ensure that food hygiene and safety 
standards are adhered to as stipulated on regulation R638 of June 2018. Each LM is allocated the number of food premises 
to monitor and conduct inspection. For FY 2017/18 MHS unit inspected 4321 food premises from a target of 3600 food 
premises. Food samples are taken to check for compliance with food labelling and food safety regulations that also includes 
food condemnation. The municipality will continue to test on a regular basis during the 2019/20 financial year. 

c) Health Surveillance of Premises and prevention of communicable diseases 

The premises are inspected for any health nuisance that might emanate from the premises or caused by the owner or occupier 
of the premises. The premises include ECD’s, old age homes, prisons, guesthouses and hotels, schools, laundries, salons, 


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panel beaters, etc. All outbreak of any communicable diseases are investigated by EHP’s and ensure that the diseases is 
under control or eliminated. 

d) Disposal of the Dead 

The disposal of the dead is mainly dealing with funeral undertakers, mortuaries, crematorium and exhumations. EHP’s are 
inspecting this premises for compliance with regulations and norms and standards for Environmental Health, MHS unit 
inspected 300 mortuaries in FY2017/18 with a target of 260, the target remain the same for FY2018/19 and 2019/20 as the 
premises are being closed. 

e) Municipal Health Services Joint Operations 

Nkangala District Municipality (NDM) Municipal Health Services (MHS) conducted joint operation with Sector Departments 
and Local Municipalities as part of compliance. The operations were targeting shops formal and informal, taverns, mortuaries, 
creche and butcheries. 

f) Municipal Health Services Training 

Nkangala District Municipality (NDM) Municipal Health Services (MHS) conducted training to business managers, owners or 
facility staff and other stakeholders around the District. The training range from personal hygiene, food premises requirements, 
ECD’s, mortuaries requirements, food safety, and chemical safety. 

g) Municipal Health Services tariffs and spot fines 

NDM approved MHS tariffs for the current financial year, all the MHS satellite offices charge the community or public an 
administration fee per MHS activity, the activities include MHS functions that requires facilities or premises to pay 
administration fee for the certificates required by norms and standards for MHS and also stipulated in MHS by-laws. The spot 
fines will be issued as per approved fine list by the different magisterial courts. The fines will be paid at NDM offices or at 
court, for all the successful fines it will be an income for NDM. 

Table 62: Municipal Health Services Projects 


Project 

Budget R 000's 

2017/18 

2018/19 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

MHS Office Furniture 

R250 000 

R300 000 

R320 000 

R350 000 

R380 000 

Water Quality monitoring 

R1 650 000 

R1 537 000 

R1 629 220 

R1 740 000 

R1 800 000 

Office rental for six LM’s 

R 522 560 

R546 000 

R600 000 

R630 000 

R645 000 

Environmental Education 
and Awareness for all 

LM’s 

R210 000 

R240 000 

R270 000 

R360 000 

R420 000 

MHS marketing and 
Publicity material 

R104 500 

R109 020 

R120 000 

R150 000 

R170 000 

MHS material and 
supplies 

R115 000 

R150 000 

R160 000 

R190 000 

R210 000 

MHS protective clothing 

R50 000 

R210 000 

R250 000 

R3000000 

R350 000 

MHS training 

R110 000 

R150 000 

R160 000 

R180 000 

R210 000 

MHS Food sampling 

... 

R300 000 

R350 000 

R400 000 

R480 000 

Construction of MHS park 
home offices per LM each 
FY 

R2 350 000 

R1200 000 

R750 000 

R750 000 

R800 000 


Municipal Health Services Challenges 

• Appointment of Environmental Health Practitioners to comply with National Norms and Standards of 1:10 000 

• Ineffective rendering of MHS services due to budget constraints or limited budget. 

• Completion of effective Municipal Health Services information system within the whole district 

• No effective legal system that will deal with MHS issues including fines. 

• Environmental Health Practitioners community service salaries must be reconsidered 

• Transport for Environmental Health Practitioners community service 

Municipal Health Services priorities: 

• Rendering of effective and efficient Municipal Health Services (all elements of MHS) in all the local municipalities including 


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appropriation of Budget for the Financial Year 

• Implementation of the National Environmental Health Services Norms and Standards 

• Develop effective legal system that will deal with MHS issues including fines 

• Appointment of Environmental Health Practitioners to comply with National Norms and Standards of 1:10 000 

• Appointment of Environmental Health Practitioners community services each year with competitive salary. 

• Implementation of the NDM Water Quality Monitoring Programme including any water related outbreaks; 

• Implementation of food control and food sampling programme around NDM; 

• Rendering vector control on premises; 

• Implementation of health care waste and monitoring of waste management around NDM; 

• Implementation of the environmental health and environmental management awareness campaigns in all the local 
municipalities. 

• Implementation of health surveillance of premises; 

• Implementation of disposal of the dead. 

4.9.1.4 Primary Health Care Services 

South Africa commands huge health care resources compared with many middle-income countries, yet the bulk of these 
resources are in the private sector and serve a minority of the population thereby undermining the country’s ability to produce 
quality care and improve health care outcomes. Many of the public facilities, especially hospitals and clinics need to be 
revitalized. Accordingly, the government must expand on progress made in upgrading facilities in many public hospitals and 
clinics as part of a physical infrastructure programme. The government is determined to end the huge inequalities that exist in 
the public and private sectors by making sure that these sectors work together. Hence, the overwhelming support by state for 
the National Health Insurance (NHI) and the fact that the implementation of NHI should be fast-tracked, but done correctly 
within reasonable period. 

The department of health has completed the following completed projects, renovations and upgrades: 

• Allemansdrif Clinic Completed; 

• Watervall Clnic Completed; 

• KwaMhlanga Hospital Nurses Residence 

• Marapyane CHC Completed 

• Thembalethu CHC Completed 

• Middelburg Hospital Ward 15A 

• Nasaret & Extention 8 Clinic 

• Kwazamokuhle CHC 

• Siyathuthuka Clinic 

The following facilities were upgraded in 2017/18: 

• Mmametlhake hospital 

• Pankop community health centre 

• New Middelburg hospital 

• Lefiso Clinic; 

• Rockdale CHC; 

• KwaMhlanga Hospital; 

• DoH Nkangala District Office. 

On the broader health care services including the primary and secondary health care services, the government identified the 
following ongoing deficiencies and challenges: 

• Delays in the referral system; 

• Ineffective complaints systems; 

• Lack of cleanliness is a problem; 

• Insufficient communication between the public and the Department of Health; 

• Inconsistent compliance with the National Health Act; 

• Space in clinics, but also the opening hours of some clinic is of concern; 

• Inability to attract certain categories qualified health workers; 

• The need to ensure that the deaf (sign language) people can be assisted at the health facilities; 

• Lack of treatment and after care for the mental health care users; 

• Inconsistent drug supply to the health care facilities and insufficient pharmacy assistants within the district; 


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Insufficient patient transport and ambulances. 


Furthermore, the following challenges were identified during the NDM Community Outreach Meetings: 

• Lack of access to clinics; 

• Lack of enabling documents for welfare purpose; 

• Dept, of Home Affairs not attending LM meetings (outreach, IDP etc) 

• Lack of monitoring on welfare programmes; 

• Growth in drug and alcohol abuse; 

• No rehabilitation centres in the District. 

• No rehabilitation centres in the District. 

In an endeavour to enhance its effectiveness in providing Services to communities across the District, the Department of 
Health will continue to roll out Mobile Clinics as indicated in Table 63 below. 

Table 63: Mobile Clinics and Points 


Sub district 

Population 

Hospitals 

CHCs 

Clinics 


Functional 

Mobiles 

None- 

Functional 

Mobiles 

Total mobile 
points 

Dr JS 

Moroka 

270 481 

1 

10 

21 

1 

1 

15 

Thembisile 

Hani 

337 935 

1 

7 

14 

2 

2 

12 

Emalahleni 

436 108 

3 

5 

10 

6 

3 

118 

Victor 

Khanye 

82 821 

1 

0 

3 

3 

0 

68 

Steve 

Tshwete 

253 863 

1 

0 

13 

4 

3 

100 

Emakhazeni 

51 839 

2 

0 

7 

2 

2 

84 

Total 

1 433 047 

9 

22 

68 

18 

11 

396 


Against this backdrop, the District has identified amongst others the following priorities that must inform a major improvement 
in the health care system: 

• A need to embark on a massive HIV testing campaign; 

• Increase employment and training of doctors, nurses, health technicians and other health professionals; 

• Integrate and increase Community Health Workers; 

• Re-introduce and increase nurse training and reopen nursing schools and colleges; 

• Quarterly reports on mortality trends on stillbirth rate, infant mortality rate, maternal mortality rate and avoidable 
deaths; 

• Reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS and TB on individuals, families, communities and society by expanding access 
to appropriate treatment, care and support; 

• Strengthen the fight against AIDS through collaboration with partners (i.e. SANAC, business sector, etc) at all 
levels of society and accelerate implementation of the HIV/AIDS and STI plans; 

• Improve quality of health services and physical infrastructure revitalization; 

• Transfer of Municipal Health Services to the District municipality as per the Health Act; 

• Capacitate and implement the Batho Pele Principles in the public care facilities; 

• Finanlise the Provincialization of primary Health Care facilities in Emalahleni; 

• NDM to engage with LMs and DoH to ensure mobile clinics are available to farm /rural areas 


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4.9.2 HIV/AIDS 


4.9.2.1 Background and Problem Statement 

In an effort to deal with the challenge of HIV/AIDS, the government convened National AIDS Council. The main function of 
the AIDS Councils would be to deal with the ever-es calating problem of the epidemic in the country. These Councils were to 
be known as the South African AIDS Councils (SANAC). SANAC was devolved to Provincial, District and Local AIDS Councils 
throughout the country in all Provinces. In an attempt to actively manage HIV/AIDS pandemic 

According to the Department of Health, the most common causes of death in the region are namely; Tuberculosis, pneumonia, 
acute respiratory infections, bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, immune suppression/HIV/AIDS, head injuries arising from Motor 
vehicle accidents, gastro cardiac conditions, diabetes, mellitus, and stillbirths/prematurity. 


4.9.2.2 HIV AIDS Prevalence 

The HIV AIDS prevalence in the district remains a major concern confronting health care. 

Focus for impact 

1. Accelerate Prevention to reduce new HIV Infections by identifying high burdened areas to ensure appropriate and 
customized response 

2. Reduce Morbidity and mortality by providing treatment, care and adherence support 

3. Reach all Key Populations with customized and targeted interventions 

4. Address Social and structural drivers ensuring Aids Councils are functional at District, Local and Ward level 

5. Human rights education and awareness for communities 

6. Promote leadership and shared accountability for a sustained response 

7. Mobilize resources and maximize efficiencies to support 

8. Strengthen Strategic Information 

Table 64: HIV prevalence 


Sub District 

Ward with highest Positivity 

Rate 

Positivity Rate in the Ward 

District Positivity Rate 

Emalahleni 

Ward 29 

30,1% 

11.1% 

Steve Tshwete 

Ward 29 

26,1% 


Victor Khanye 

Ward 3 

23,9% 


Thembisile 

Ward 19 

21,3% 


Dr JS Moroka 

Ward 25 

16% 


Emakhazeni 

Ward 8 

11,1% 


The above mentioned wards per local municipality show the highest positivity rate indicating that our interventions can 
use these areas as our starting points for focus for impact. 


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4.9.2.3 HIV PREVELANCE 


2016 : HIV Positivity Rate (15 - 49 years) 


2016 : MUS (Male Urethritis Syndrome rate) 


MP N KANG ALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY: 9.2 % 


MP NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY: 24.4 % 



District 

HIV Pos Rate 
(15 - 49 years) 

NUM % 



District 

MUS 

NUM % 

6 

mp DrJS Moroka Local Municipality 

4.82 % 

13.89 % 

6 

mp Vi ctor Kha nye Local Municipality 

18.05 % 

3.38 % 

5 

mp Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

8.05 % 

5.08 % 


5 

mpThembisile Hani Local Municipality 

19.35 % 

14.16 % 


mpThembisile Hani Local Municipality 

8.46 % 

18.13 % 


4 

mp DrJS Moroka Local Municipality 

20.49 % 

10.26 % 


mp Victor Khanye Local Municipality 

11.20 % 

6.72 % 


3 

mp Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

23.74 % 

6.14 % 


mp Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

11.28 % 

16.74 % 


■ 

mp Emalahleni Local Municipality 

26.75 % ( V 


mp Emalahleni Local Municipality 

12.38 % | 


3 

mp Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

28.71 % 

20.78 % 








2016 : Delivery Rate (< 18 years) 


2016 : TB (Tested Positive) 

MP NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY: 6.1 % 


MP NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY: 6.9 % 


District /ery Rate (< 18 yt 

NUM % 



District 

: TB (Tested Po 

NUM % 

6 

mp Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 5.02 % 

12.68 % 


6 

mp Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

3.97 % 

4.08 % 

5 

mp DrJS Moroka Local Municipality 5.58 % 

16.22 % 


5 

mp DrJS Moroka Local Municipality 

4.51 % 


- 

n 

mp Emalahleni Local Municipality 6.01 % 



* 

mp Emalahleni Local Municipality 

7.07 % 


mpThembisile Hani Local Municipality 6.26 % 

24.94 %\ 


3 

mpThembisile Hani Local Municipality 

9.27 % 



mp Victor Kha nye Local Municipality 7.82 % 

7.59 % 



mp Victor Khanye Local Municipality 

9.89 % 

3.87 % 


mp Emakhazeni Local Municipality 12.20 % 

5.35 % 



mp Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

11.26 % 

17.75 % 


4.9.2.4 The negative impact of HIV/AIDS on the mining Sector 

The growing mining activities taking place in the district, mining sector makes extensive use of migrant labour with many 
mine workers accommodated in single-sex hostels and only paying occasional visits to their families 

• The Districts is experiencing migration of people from outside looking for job opportunities. 

• The increase of high transmission areas (Steve Tshwete & Emalahleni) where there are activities driving the virus 
e.g. Sex workers, truck drivers, etc. 

• More job opportunities favouring men which lead to women being more vulnerable. 


4.9.2.5 Higher Education 

Higher education institutions mostly clustered in specific areas: 

• We have FET’s colleges in the District with Emalahleni & Dr J.S Moroka Municipality having higher institutions like 
TUT, University of Mpumalanga and other colleges as compared to other municipalities hence the increase. 

• This leads to Emalahleni & Dr J.S Moroka experiencing flood of more activities associated with young people such 
as teenage pregnancy, substance abuse, intergenerational relationships, etc. 

• Steve Tshwete being closest to Emalahleni, both municipalities tend to be impacted in a similar way. 


4.9.2.6 Rural sites 

Other parts of the district are rural sites: VKLM, THLM, DRJS LM, and EMAK 

• In this areas it's where you find agricultural activities and/or tourism activities. 

• Most of this agricultural and tourism sites don't have structured services responding to HIV, STI & TB due to the 
nature of their work / business (Seasonal workers & no employee wellness programs). 

• Traditional circumcision contributed to the high stats of prevalence through HOT campaigns where young boys 
tested before they went to the mountain in Nkangala. 

• Also most of this places are hard to reach where access to services is very limited compared to urban areas 
especially by implementation partners (PEPFAR & Global Funded Organizations 

4.9.27 BORDERS 


The District has three key borders with Limpopo, Gert Sibande District and Gauteng Province: VKLM, EMAK, 
DRJSLM and THLM 

• These key borders do play a role in the drive of HIV: 

• The movement between GSD and NDM due to mining activities. 

• The movement between GP and NDM due to economic development activities (e.g. Transportation) linked to N4 
which its part of the Maputo Corridor & Moloto road. 


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• As people move around or passing through the district they access health services which in turn can affect the 
prevalence stats of the district. 

Critical Enablers 

• Awareness and Education for Communities 

• Capacity Building for Structures 

• Training on basic HIV Issues 

• Increase number of Tracers 

• WBOTS (Ward Based Outreach Teams) to be incorporate into the War Rooms 

• Mobiles to be deployed in isolated areas 

• Implementing Partners to service even most rural unreached areas 

The Department of Health; Nkangala District Municipality, has committed itself; as per discussions raised in the Strategic 
Lekgotla to implement and coordinate the following: 

It is compulsory that all Aids Council members attend all meetings including government department representatives. 

Punitive measures shall be applied to members who do not attend meetings. 

• A Provincial Integrated Plan which includes all Councils to be developed and be implemented during the next 
financial year. All role players must be responding to the same plan for maximum impact. 

• All Councils to prioritize and elevate the national HCT indicators to ensure that the Provincial dashboard improves 
from the red colour to green. 

• Development of NDM Transversal Strategy; 

• Intensification of HIV awareness campaign for the targeted groups (such as sex workers, truck drivers, neighboring 
minds and tertiary institutions; LAC & DAC Capacity Building Programme 

The District Aids Council having been launched and Institutionalized as early as 2006 in Nkangala District has in collaboration 
with the local municipalities, private and business sector and International Implementing partners such as GIZ and more 
recently Broad Reach have made decisiveness inputs to tackle HIV and AIDS, TB and STI’s. The implementing partners’ role 
has been mainly of Technical Support strengthening necessary coordinating structures to ensure functionality of District (DAC) 
and Local Municipality (LAC) levels also the development of Implementation Plans at local and district level which guide the 
response to ensure HIV and AIDS prevention, care and support. 

4.10 Issue 7: Education 

4.10.1 Background and Problem Statement 

Higher education and Technical and Vocational Education Training and basic Education 

Nkangala District currently have 1 TVET College with 5 campuses located in the following local municipalities, namely, Steve 
Tshwete (Middelburg campus), Emalahleni (Mpondozankomo and Witbank), Dr. J. S Moroka (CN Mahlangu) and Emakhazeni 
(Watervalboven) with Delmas campus in finalization stages. The district municipality is also having campuses of higher 
learning namely University of Mpumalanga Siyabuswa Campus and Tshwane University of Technology Emalahleni Campus. 
Furthermore, in order to ensure that the TVETs and universities contribute to the skills gaps in the region, a retention strategy 
in the form of amongst others, bursaries, workplace opportunities and internship programmes need to be agreed to with private 
sector. 

Although the above-named challenges have been noted, the following short-term and long-term intervention strategies have 
been put forward by the Department to improve performance at schools, namely: 

• The identification of all schools that continuously achieve a pass rate below 50% in grade 12 examinations; 

• The adoption of all the affected schools by departmental officials, and ongoing support to teachers; 

• Establishment of the regional monitoring teams to monitor and report on the implementation of the intervention 
programmes; 

• Establishment of additional Nkangala TVET college campus and Skills centre in Thembisile Hani Local Municipality 

• In addition, curriculum development and improve programme to respond to the skills needed by youth and industries 
within the region. 

4.10.2 District Pressure Points 

The following are the pressure points in the District with schools experiencing overcrowding. These areas might need 
additional facilities or new schools as a strategy to alleviate growth. 

• Moloto and KwaMhlanga area in Thembisile Hani Local Municipality; 


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• Emalahleni area in Klarinet and Kwaguqa Exts; 

• Parts of Steve Tshwete in Ext 24 & 18 and Rockdale; 

• Overcrowding at Botleng Ext 3, 4 & 5. Note that the Department has managed to operationalize two schools with 
mobile classrooms. 

• Insufficient ablution facilities in other schools within the region. 


4.10.3 Regional challenges confronting Education in Nkangala 

• Population movement for economic reasons in the District has had a negative effect on schools in Dr. JS Moroka 
and parts of Thembisile Hani as there is idling capacity of facilities including learner classroom ratio that is 
decreasing; 

• Overcrowding in some schools due to perception by parents of school performance. This trend places a huge 
demand for provision of new facilities in growth points and also results in facilities not being utilized optimally; 

• Farm schools have the lowest enrolment which varies from 50 - 120 learners and this impact negatively on quality 
of learning and teaching (multi grade teaching). This scenario makes it practically difficult to plan for provision of 
facilities as most of these schools are not sustainable; The department of education in Mpumalanga has placed 
interim long term measures to construct the new Emakhazeni Bearding Schools and Steve Tshwete Boarding school 
to permanently eliminate the problem. 

• There is a glaring backlog on provision of classrooms, administration blocks, specialized centers in the District and 
kitchens for NSNP etc. 

• overcrowding of learners is still a challenge, though it is partly addressed through mobile classrooms 

• Ageing infrastructure that is prone to natural disasters; 

• Water supply in schools with municipal bulk water connection in Thembisile and Dr. JS Moroka Local Municipality. 


4.10.4 Grade 12 Performance per Province 

The 2014 grade 12 results for the country depicts a great improvement in that in 2008 the pass rate was 51.8.5%, which in 
turn dropped to 47.9% in 2009 and steadily increased from 56.8% to 64.8% and 70 in 2666012. In 2013 and 2014, the results 
further improved to 77.6 % and 79%, respectively. According to the Mpumalanga Department of Basic Education (MDoBE)'s 
records, Nkangala had 146 public schools, which sat for grade 12 examinations. In terms of the geographic spread of these 
schools a majority thereof (41 and 45) are located in Thembisile Hani and Dr J S Moroka municipality respectively. This spread 
is in line with the population spread of these areas. 

The following table 28 presents the Provincial Performance in descending order for the past seven years: 


Table 65: Provincial Performance in descending 2008-2018 


Provinces 

200-8 

2009 

2010 

2011 

2012 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

Free State 

71,6 

69,4 

70,7 

75,7 

81,1 

87,4 

82,8 

81,6 

88,2 

B9.8 


W.Cape 

78,7 

75,7 

76,8 

82,9 

82,8 

85,1 

82,2 

84,7 

85,9 

B4.4 


Gauteng 

76,3 

71,8 

78,6 

81,1 

83,9 

87 

84,7 

84,2 

85,1 

86.0 


N. West 

67,9 

67,5 

75,7 

77,8 

79,5 

87,2 

84,6 

81,5 

82,5 

32.1 


N. Cape 

72,7 

61,3 

72,3 

68,8 

74,6 

74,5 

76,4 

69,4 

78,7 

77.6 


MPU 

51,8 

47,9 

56,8 

64,8 

70 

77,6 

79 

78,6 

77,1 

74.8 

79.0 

KZN 

57,2 

61,1 

70,7 

68,1 

73,1 

77,4 

69,7 

60,7 

66,4 

73.6 


Limpopo 

54,7 

48,9 

57,9 

63,9 

66,9 

71,8 

72,9 

65,9 

62,5 

B7.4 


E. Cape 

50,6 

51 

58,3 

58,1 

61,6 

64,9 

65,4 

56,8 

59,3 

55.8 


National 

62,2 

60,6 

67,8 

70,2 

73,9 

78,2 

75,8 

70,7 

72,5 

75.1 



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In terms of the above national performance, the country has been masking steady growth with all provinces showing a positive 
achievement except for Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces that has shown some relative decline from 201. Mpumalanga province 
achieved better results than KwaZulu Natal, Limpopo and the Eastern Cape only. 


Table 66: District Performance for Mpumalanga Province: 2013- 2018 


year/ 

Districts 

Wrote 

2014 


Passed 

2014 

Pass % 

2014 

Wrote 

2015 

Passed 

2015 

Pass % 

2015 

Wrote 

2016 

Passed 

2016 

Pass % 

2016 

Wrote 

2017 

Pass 

2017 

Pass % 

2017 

Wrote 

2018 

Passed 

2018 

Pass % 

2018 

Bohlabela 

9753 


7491 

76.8 

11341 

8700 

76.71 

12488 

9041 

72,4 

11709 

8477 

72.4 




Ehlanzeni 

13792 


11324 

82.1 

16203 

13349 

82.39 

15859 

12607 

79,5 

133622 

10465 

76.8 




Gert 

Sibande 

10376 


8005 

77.1 

13555 

9844 

72.62 

11888 

9017 

75,8 

10736 

8211 

76.5 




Nkangala 

11160 


8795 

78.8 

13881 

11336 

81.67 

14048 

11167 

79,5 

12416 

9120 

73.5 

11384 

8963 

78,7 

Province 

45081 


35615 

79.0 

54980 

43229 

78.63 

54283 

41832 

77,1 

48483 

36273 

74.8 

44612 

35225 

79,0 


Data source: Department of Basic Education, Report on the National Senior Certificate Examination Results (2018). 

According to the 2017 examination results Nkangala obtained the third highest performance as compared to Gert Sibande 
and Ehlanzeni region, for 2017 Gert Sibande districts registered the highest performance rate in the Mpumalanga Province at 
76.5 % and Nkangala with 73.5% which is below the average provincial performance at 74.8%. in 2018 Nkangala obtained 
78,7 % which is an improvement on the 2017 results but is still below the provincial average. 

The overall performance of Nkangala region is attributed thereto by the performance of the schools located in constituent local 
municipalities as reflected in the Table 30 below: 


Table 67: Performance of schools per local municipalities under Nkangala District Municipality: 2013- 2018 


Municipality 

Entered 2014 

Wrote 2014 

Achieved 2014 

Pass % 2014 

Entered 2015 

Wrote 2015 

Achieved 2015 

Pass % 2015 

Entered 2016 

CO 

o 

CM 

a> 

o 

5 

Achieved 2016 

Pass % 2016 

Entered 2017 

Wrote 2017 

Achieved 2017 

Pass % 2017 

Entered 2018 

Wrote 2018 

Achieved 2018 

Pass % 2018 

Emalahleni 

2405 

2380 

1950 

81,9 

2629 

2595 

2195 

84,6 

3283 

2834 

2495 

88 

3583 

2775 

2244 

80.9 

3701 

2944 

2330 

79,1 

Emakhazeni 

310 

307 

263 

85,7 

524 

515 

448 

87 

514 

496 

419 

84,5 

462 

435 

355 

81.6 

507 

438 

360 

82.2 

Victor 

Khanye 

648 

631 

471 

74,6 

649 

630 

538 

85,4 

629 

569 

467 

82,1 

601 

531 

438 

82.5 

672 

530 

432 

81.5 

Steve 

Tshwete 

1911 

1881 

1611 

85,6 

2239 

2210 

1907 

86,3 

2411 

2313 

1874 

81 

2503 

2288 

1782 

77.9 

2216 

1953 

1647 

84,3 

Thembisile 

Hani 

3036 

3013 

2324 

77,1 

4293 

4243 

3299 

77,8 

4921 

3974 

3071 

77,3 

4262 

3284 

2218 

67.5 

3775 

2793 

2092 

74,9 

Dr. JS 
Moroka 

2977 

2948 

2176 

73,8 

3717 

3688 

2949 

80 

4345 

3863 

2841 

73,5 

4054 

3103 

2083 

67.1 

3854 

2726 

2102 

77,1 


Challenges Emanating 

To make a lasting impact on the Education status of the communities within its jurisdictional area, NDM in collaboration with 
key Stakeholders will need to during the medium - Longer Term of Council place more emphasis on the following issues: 


• Confront the emanating Skills shortage; 

• Dropouts (Contributing factors as indicated by department are social issues such as teenage pregnancies, drug 
abuse etc); 


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• Nkangala to engage FET colleges to check relevance on courses offered versus the market demand; 

• Lack of focus on disabled persons (Suggestion of teachers being trained on sign language); 

• Mitigate and minimize the impacts of disasters that occur in schools; 

• Shortage of teachers for Mathematics and Physical Science in high schools; 

• School libraries and laboratories remains a challenge in many schools, both in terms of physical buildings and books, 
chemicals, cubics and related resources, 

• Curriculum not responding to our societal and skills needs; 

• Problem on scholar transport compromise education in the areas that that are not covered by the boarding schools; 

• Lack of proper career guidance; 

• Youth who did not complete Grade 12 are left without option of completing in some parts of the region. 

Education Priorities (should also be in line with the outreach report of the district) 

• Create awareness about the role of MRTT in development of skills in the District as indicated in the State of the 

Province address; 

• Department will in the future budget for English medium school in Steve Tshwete area; 

• Ideally department intends to ensure that all schools will be able to cater for disabled learners; 

• Optimize the functionality of the current five special schools in Nkangala District; 

• To engage Nkangala FET colleges to address the skills gap especially in mining; 

• Engage the Department of Education on Scholar Transport; 

• Facilitate for the establishment of advisory and career guidance services in the region; 

• Capacitate educators on the importance of career guidance; 

• Mainstream and align the implementation of Career Expo in the region and also the inclusion of the district Science 
expo 

• Engage NYDA to support programs aimed at encouraging youth to complete grade 12; 

• Report on schools built and or renovated in the Nkangala region to Council 

Nkangala Education Capital Projects: New Construction 

• Areorand Primary School; 

• Marapyane Circuit Office; 

• New Dooringkop School; 

• New Klarinet Primary School (Mogalethwa); 


4.11 Issue 8: Welfare 

4.11.1Background and Problem Statement 

NDM Council confirmed this Developmental Issue and the challenges therein to be detrimental to the realisations of the Vision 
of the District. The need for the provision of facilities and services for the aged, disabled, and orphans, children living on the 
streets, the vulnerable groups, and pension-pay-points are generally adequate in the District. 

Schedule 4 Part A of the Constitution of the RSA affirms the commissioning and provisioning of the Welfare Services to 
be the responsibility of both National and Provincial Spheres of government. The NDM in an effort to bring about improved 
quality of life and sustainable development to all its citizens through Welfare Services is responsible for coordination and 
provision of support to the Mpumalanga Department of Health and Social Services and the National Department of Social 
Development in fulfilling their mandate. 

Issues of poverty, malnutrition, grants administration, gender, disability, child protection, pensioners, orphans and the 
homeless are some of the key areas of work located within Welfare Service. 

4.11.1.1 Protection of Children 

Over the past decade, there has been increasingly more attention paid to children, globally, regionally and nationally with the 
realisation that they are more vulnerable when confronted with poverty, live hoods securities, social ills and health pandemics. 
Within the District, a new phenomenon that has become evident particularly in Emalahleni municipality relating to Welfare is 
that of children living on the streets. This phenomenon is indicative of the breakdown in the family system. 

NDM hosted the children Council on the 27 June 2018. It was a practical credibility to the notion that children should not only 
be seen but also heard. It is a national response to the call by children for accountability by all stakeholders including 
government departments, civil society organisations, caregivers, teachers, private sector and all other people who have 
responsibilities for the protection and wellbeing of children to be held accountable. The summit gave all children, regardless 


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of their background, a space to discuss issues as peers, share ideas on issues of common interest, and make citizenship a 
reality. The resolutions taken on the council is as follows: 

• The protection of children’s rights in a safe environment as well as ensuring the schooling thereof 

• Identification and support to orphans, vulnerable children require special support. 

• More feeding scheme programs 

• All the stakeholders should play a role in making sure that there are of scholarships for underprivileged children still 
at school 

• Problem of abandoned children. 

• Children Council 

• Take a child at Work 

• Awareness Campaigns for children to stand against the rape of children 

• The municipalities to have environmental recycle plan (paper, bottles, tins, plastics, etc) 

• Mines to have awareness on pollution and the plan to reduce compact air pollution. 

• Girls and Boys Couching and mentoring programme; 

• Patriotism development 

• Children reading contest 

• Children and environment 

4.11.1.2 Protection of the Elderly 

Pay-points for pensioners and other social grants in the District are generally in a poor state and often not easily accessible. 
However, the District has already made progress in addressing this challenge through the development of Multi-Purpose 
Community Centres (MPCCs) as outlined in Priority Issue 5: Spatial Restructuring and Service Delivery. These centres 
continue to amongst others provide services to the elderly persons within close proximity. 

Based on the 2016 Stats SA Community Survey it indicates that there are 143,514 persons aged 60 years and above within 
Nkangala district. The table below shows the disaggregated data on the number of older person per municipality and the 
different age brackets. 


Table 68: Age Categories of Older Per sons in NDM 



Age categories of Older Persons 

Municipalities 

60-65 

66-70 

71-75 

76-80 

81-85 

86-90 

Victor Khanye Local Municipality 

2850 

1270 

863 

374 

139 

45 

Emalahleni Local Municipality 

11907 

5549 

3757 

1699 

968 

207 

Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

7868 

3714 

2664 

1416 

915 

457 

Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

1387 

902 

597 

328 

106 

54 

Thembisile Hani Local Municipality 

12143 

4857 

3466 

1310 

838 

651 

Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality 

10074 

5593 

4006 

2173 

1274 

874 

Subtotal 

46229 

21885 

15353 

7300 

4230 

2288 

Grand total 

143,514 


(Source: Community Survey 2016) 

Refers to the table above it clearly shows that rural municipalities such as Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka have a slightly 
higher proportion of older persons than the more urban municipalities. 


The Community Survey further indicates that more than half of older persons live in extended households. Sex variations 
show that the proportion of elderly women living in extended households is higher compared to that of their male counterparts. 
However, there is an upward trend in the prevalence of elderly single-member households from 16.3% in 2011 to 26.7% in 
2016. 

NDM in collaboration with Local Municipalities hosted the older person dialogue with the Executive Mayor during Older 
Person's Month (October) on annually basis 
Challenge eliminating from the dialogue: 

• Provision of sport equipment 

• To assist them with income generating programme 

• To support them in their local initiatives programmes to remain active and live healthier lives 

• Provide equipped health and fitness facilities for older person 

• Need support on deductions for micro loans and airtime that are affected on their social grants 


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Issues that were raised during the NDM Community Outreach 2018: 

• The elderly needed to be looked after by protecting their rights. They had different special problems which required 
the government's attention. 

• Pension centres should be prioritized and be fixed to cater for elderly people 

• Billing system for older persons (wrong reading of the meters) 

• Awareness campaign aimed at senior citizens 

• Golden Games for Senior Citizens; 

• Incorrect Identity documents should be fixed 

• the provincial government would attend to their problems 

■ Especial Human Settlement 

■ Home Affairs 

■ SASSA 

4.11.1.3 Access to Services 

In terms of access to social services grants, SASSA’s records as reflected in the table 31 below indicates that Thembisile Hani 
and Dr J S Moroka municipality have by far recorded the majority of beneficiaries 


Table 69: Access to Services 


NUMBER OF ACTIVE GRANTS PER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY PER GRANT TYPE 

Grant Type 

Emalahleni 

Emakhazeni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Dr J S 
Moroka 

Thembisile 

Victor 

Khanye 

Total 

Old Age 

15 967 

3 501 

10 508 

27 748 

25 070 

3 693 

86 487 

War Veteran 

5444554 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Disability 

5 944 

1 665 

2 701 

4391 

5 349 

1 111 

21 161 

Foster Child 

2 382 

511 

1 388 

1986 

2164 

418 

8 849 

Care 

Dependency 

932 

228 

437 

587 

851 

148 

3 183 

Child Support 

65 968 

12 352 

36 408 

77 480 

93 699 

16 940 

30 2849 

Grant in Aid 

650 

109 

160 

2 641 

1497 

110 

5 167 

Total 

91 843 

18 366 

52 602 

11 4834 

128 629 

22 420 

427 695 


(Source: SASSA 2018) 


Access to grants is an important indicator of the poverty levels but also that there is an increased access to Home Affairs 
Department which is the department responsible for the issuing of documentations without which grants cannot be accessed. 
The growing number of people accessing grants is indicative of the need to accelerate creation of employment so that 
community members only rely on grants as a temporary measure. 

In an effort to ensure improved access to government services the District established a forum, which deals with accessibility 
of Identity Documents (IDs). The forum meets bi-monthly with the objectives to: 

• Develop ID accessibility programmes; 

• Identify service backlogs in municipalities; 

• Define each party’s role (e.g. Processing application, Home Affairs; Mobilisation, Municipalities, Political Parties 
etc. Assist with school identification - Department of Education); 

• Monitor and evaluate the programme; 

• Mobilise resources for implementation of the programme. 

• The District established a Forum Chaired by the Municipal Manager dealing specifically with the accessibility of 
Identity Documents. 

4.11.1.4 Disability: 

The Statistics South Africa Community Survey of 2011 show that 297 521 people were beneficiaries of various government 
grants as per the breakdown in table 70. Overall 6.2% of the population in Nkangala (63 000) indicated some form of disability 
in 2016. 

Within Nkangala, the availability of stimulation centres to accommodate those living with disabilities are very few and this result 
in public ignorance to disabled and special persons. Often, such persons are open to abuse and stigma attached to those who 
are disabled especially amongst school going children. This requires that great awareness and empowering sessions should 


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continuously be arranged. Furthermore, the lack of special schools to cater for various disabilities necessitates that 
programmes on integration of people living with disability in mainstream schools could curb the lack of such facilities and deal 
away with the discrimination. 

Identified disability categories within the District is articulated as follows: 


Table 70: Identified disability categories in NDM 


Type of Disability 

Number of Patients attended 

Physical Disabilities 

30 912 

Visual Impairment 

35 327 

Hearing impairment/Deaf 

20 220 

Intellectual Disability 

Data to be obtained from DoE 

Communication Disability 

18 208 

Multiple Disabilities 

Data not available 

Total: 

104 667 


(Source: Department of Health August 2017) 


The statistical information received from Department of Health Nkangala District provide information of all different types of 
disabilities as described by the WHO. The numbers indicate patients that visited the clinics and the hospitals in Nkangala 
district. The figures are far less by half of the statistical analysis of the community survey by Stats SA. This shows that the 
community survey statistical results are relatively consistent. 

The district has launched the District Disability Forum after it hosted the Disability Assembly on Supply Chain Procedure 
Processes during Disability Month (November) 

Notwithstanding all the aforementioned successes achieved by the District, there are still challenges to be addressed during 
the Medium - Long Term of Council, viz: 

• People with disability continue to be marginalized in that programmes such as sporting tournaments’ are hardly 
created to embrace these groups; 

• Lack of basic facilities such as water, shelter, waiting areas and sanitation facilities at various social security pay- 
points; 

• The high dependency on Welfare grants within the District; 

• Where cam medical assessments be done to confirm disability 

• Late birth registration that are still prevalent in farm areas; 

• Economic Empowerment 

• Challenges of identifying persons with physical disability (Children and the elderly); 

• Mainstreaming of issues of gender and people with disability 

• Unemployment (workshop on job readiness); 

• Telecommunication workshop for people with disability; 

• Implement programmes aimed at integrating people with disabilities. 

• To advocate 2% on the Organogram for people with disability in respect with Local Municipalities 

• To increase public awareness and understanding of disability; 

• Department of education to intervene in schools for all sections of disability; 

• People with disability to participate on EPWP Programme; 

• Staff members to have lessons on Sign Language. 

• Entrepreneurship workshop/training for People with Disability 

• To ensure implementation of the 30 % of procurement for people with disability within the due restriction of NDM 

• Unit ensures that data base forms are available in all disability centres, to advance fair access to available business 
opportunity 

4.12 Issue 9: Culture, Sport and Recreation 
4.12.1 Background and Problem Statement 

During its 2017, Strategic Lekgotla the NDM Council confirmed this Developmental Issue and the challenges therein to be 
detrimental to the realisations of the Vision of the District. One major challenge in the District is the lack of sporting and 
recreation facilities that are to a large extent as a result of municipalities not allocation of 5% MIG Funding. 


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Furthermore, South African Local Government Association (SALGA) has some time back established what was then called 
SALGA Games, which were games of various sporting codes wherein all Municipalities within South Africa would affiliate 
and participate. The said games have been renamed as South African Municipal Sports and Recreation Association 
(SAMSRA). 


1) Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation 

Additionally, the following where the key challenges identified within the District as follows: 

• Shortage of libraries in the district; 

• Shortage of multi-sports complexes including indoor gyms and indoor sports facilities 

• Weak sports federations thereby resulting in lack of participation in National Sports competitions; 

• Lack of transformation of the landscape in the townships and some town in so far as the availability of recreational 
Facilities such as community parks and children playing facilities especially in Victor Khanye and Emakhazeni local 
Municipality; 

• Lack of support for the elderly (Gogos) in sport; 

• Non-involvement of traditional leaders in cultural activities; 

• Lack of support on cultural activities; 

• Shortage and unutilised taxi ranks; 

• Shortage of community parks and recreational facilities; 

• Unutilised Thusong Service Centres; 

• Lack of maintenance of the two King Cluster resulting in dilapidation; 

• Lack of clear policy on the support to be given to Amakhosi; 

• Non- exposure of the youth to the Visual Arts (film and video production) opportunities as well as performance 
arts; 

• Need to nurture and develop local music talent in the region. 

4.12.2 Regional Sports and Recreation Master Plan 

The Regional Sports and Recreation Master Plan noted as follows that: 

Guiding parameters of the functionality of the sub-unit: Sport and recreational 

■ The newly upgraded Solomon Mahlangu stadium in KwaMhlanga presents a hub around which other sports such 
as tennis, netball, basketball, boxing, gymnastics and wrestling can be developed. For this reason, it is strongly 
recommended that a multipurpose sporting facility be provided on the same grounds; 

■ The stadium in Dr JS Moroka Municipality presents similar potential. In this case, the hub is being developed with 
the construction of an impressive multipurpose hall adjacent to the stadium. All that remains to be done is to provide 
a main pavilion with change rooms for the players and to upgrade the adjacent swimming pool and tennis courts 
and to add at least two more combi courts; 

■ The Simon Ngondwe Sports Centre in Delmas should be extended as soon as possible as the residents of especially 
Botleng have very little access to any sport facilities; 

■ A new stadium should be considered in Kwaguqa with facilities on a regional level for soccer, athletics, tennis, 
netball, basketball, and volleyball; 

■ The Siyathuthuka stadium in Belfast should be upgraded to a major level stadium and facilities such as netball, 
basketball, volleyball and tennis extended with the addition of more combi courts. 

From the Nkangala Sports and Recreation Master Plan the following facilities have been identified as the most appropriate for 
soccer development in each of the municipal areas: 

■ Lynnville and Ackerville Stadiums in Emalahleni; 

■ Mhluzi, Kwazamokuhle and Nasaret Stadiums in Steve Tshwete; 

■ Simon Ngondwe Sports Centre in Delmas; 

■ Solomon Mahlangu Stadium in KwaMhlanga and Kwaggafontein C Stadium in Kwaggafontein; 

* Ga-Phaahla Stadium near Siyabuswa as well as Kammelrivier, Vaalbank and Nokaneng Stadiums in Dr 
JS Moroka; 

■ Siyathuthuka Stadium in Belfast as well as Sakhelwe, Emgwenya and Emthonjeni Stadiums in 
Emakhazeni. 

■ Resurfacing keis taaljaard Netball court 

■ Additional Netball courts and toilets Thembe Sinamela Stadium 


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Development of Sports and Recreation Master Plan 

Notwithstanding all the aforementioned successes achieved by the Council, there are still challenges to be addressed during 
the Medium - Long Term of Council, viz: 

• Tourism precinct like S S Skhosana and Zithabiseni Holiday Resort in Thembisile, Mkhombo Nature Reserves need 
urgent upgrading; 

• Shortage of playing fields, availability of other sporting codes and maintenance thereof; 

• Shortage of sport grounds; 

• Maintenance and upgrading of the existing sport grounds; 

• There is a need for resuscitation of Sport Councils; 

• Lack of recreation facilities and other sport codes in most areas including townships and rural areas. 

The undertaking of the NDM is to ensure that emphasis is placed on the provision of these facilities in the identified MPCCs 
and in the rural areas, especially codes such as rugby, hockey, cricket, etc throughout the District, hence the development of 
the NDM Sports and Recreation Master Plan is indispensable to the improvement of sports and recreation in the district 

4.12.3 Cultural Historic Heritage Sites 

Emanating from the district-wide assessment of cultural-historic facilities there is a wide range of cultural-historic facilities and 
services available within each of the municipal areas in the Nkangala. It is suggested that the Nkangala District Municipality 
facilitate the formalisation of a cultural-historic route in each of the municipal areas. The formalisation of these routes will make 
the facilities/sites more accessible to tourists. 

Although signage is noted as very poor in the region, NDM continues to point out to its strategic location against other 
destinations as a springboard to attract tourists. Each of these proposed cultural-historic routes should be properly branded 
and provided with standard signage in order to announce the theme and guide tourists to access the facilities easily. This 
initiative would require the proper formalisation and upgrading of each of the facilities along the routes. It could also be 
accompanied by a brochure highlighting the main features of each of the sites along the route. 

The NDM initiated and completed a study in 2006 n the formalisation of Historic and Heritage Sites with the objective of 
identifying all sites that have a historical and cultural significance. The study recommended that Council should prioritise, 
preserve and develop sites of importance. The study recommended a three (3) stage implementation plant 

• Short-term: 

Council resolved to prioritize five (5) sites in the region for further development. Thus far only Delmas Site has been developed 
and the Declaration documents are to be submitted to the Provincial Heritage Resource Agency. Council also resolved that 
an investigation into the possibility of establishing a Regional Freedom Park where the names of freedom fighters that could 
not be catered in the Upgrading of the Lynnville Cenotaph Project will be printed. 

Another initiative undertaken relates to the Report on the Draft Feasibility Study on the Establishment of the NDM Regional 
Freedom Park is completed and due to be served to Council. 

• Medium-term: 

This initiative is centred on applying proactive protective measures. The initial phase on this initiative should entail the 
implementation of basic conservation mechanisms such as erecting interpretative plaques, road signage, repairing fences and 
allow local communities and schools to act as custodians of the sites. This brings into the fore the significance of community 
participation in order to promote a sense of ownership within communities. 

• Long-term: 

The thrust of this strategy is based on informed prioritisation. This entails analysis of the existing data to prioritise further 
investigation, feasibility analysis, and assessment of tourism potential, identification of the host community and benefiting 
parties at specific prioritised sites and the development of business plans for prioritised sites. The list below indicates the 
number of classified cultural sites per Local Municipality: 

■ Steve Tshwete Local Municipality: 18 

Proposed Heritage sites 

1. House for people who had leprosy (Beyer’s Naude Street, next to Mhluzi) 

2. The Epstein House (SADC Street opposite the Department of Home Affairs) 

3. Old Magistrate court building (opposite the white church, next to Midmed Hospital) 


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4. Roman Catholic Church (Mhluzi, Riverside at Vusi Mnisi street) 

5. Old Correctional Services Building (at the vicinity of Correctional Services) 

6. King Dingizulu’s Grave (next to Uitkuik, Samora Machel Street) 

7. Old Dutch Reformed Church (Gogo Church, Mhluzi next Tshwenyane Combined School) 

8. Sefoloshe’s House in Mathayleni (the first house in Mhluzi) 

9. 3 Anglo Boer war Concentration Camp Cemeteries 

10. War Monument at 4SAI (monument situated at 4 th Infantry Battalion Camp) 

11. Anglo Boer War Memorial Church 

12. 2 x Anglo Boer War Forts 

13. Memorial Monuments for Anglo Boer War casualties (at Heroes graves in Beyers Naude Street) 

14. Voortrekker ox wagon tracks (1938 and 1958) 

15. Anglo Boer War Memorial Church 

16. English Bridge (at Beyers Naude Street) 

17. White Church (next to Wimpy and Magistrate Court) 

18. Old Middelburg Railway Station (situated next to Cowen Ntuli street) 

19. Tree Lane (at hospital road in Clubville) 

* Emakhazeni Local Municipality : 16 

■ Emalahleni Local Municipality : 10 

■ Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality : 6 

■ Victor Khanye Local Municipality : 5 

* Thembisile Local Municipality : 3 


In line with the above initiative (Formalization of Cultural and Historical Sites), a business plan for development of heritage 
sites in the District was developed. Initially this was done as part of the Mpumalanga Provincial Flagship programme, however, 
Nkangala has since taken the responsibility of funding and implementing the projects. The business plan focuses on the 
development of five selected heritage sites within the NDM. The business plan for development of heritage sites involved the 
development of the following heritage sites: 

■ Erection of Memorial Monument in honour of ordinary South Africans who perished in the struggle for democracy. This 
will involve developing a memorial plaque and monument in Delmas Town on the death site of Marco Mahlangu; 

* The archival restoration and restoration of historical buildings of Ikageleng School, Marapyane, in Dr. J.S. Moroka Local 
Municipality; 

■ Erection of a bronze memorial statue of an apartheid struggle hero/heroine posthumously (A struggle icon to be 
identified). The statue will be erected at Emalahleni Local Municipality at a place to be identified; 

■ Development of the Iron Age Archaeological Site in Emakhazeni Local Municipality; 

■ Development of the Delmas Magistrate Court Treason Trials 1985-1989. 

Amongst other significant findings, the Cultural Historical Sites Study highlighted the importance of Church Street in Lynnville 
as one of the street with a large conglomerate of churches within about 1.2 kilometre length in the region. The significance 
therefore was further elevated by the cenotaph precincts which has made it a potential hub for urban renewal. 

Development of the Delmas Magistrate Court Treason Trials 1985-1989 

In 2012, the District Municipality resolved to implement a memorial monument in Delmas in recognition of the Delmas Treason 
Trials 1985-1989. To that extent, research on the Delmas Treason Trials1985-1989, was conducted, the plan of the Delmas 
Treason Trials Commemoration Plague was developed, designed and erected within the premises of the Delmas Magistrate 
Court. This site is significant in the legal history of South Africa. The court was the scene of the longest court case after the 
Rivonia Trial in South African legal History (3 years) - the Delmas Treason Trial where 22 Black political leaders were charged 
when trial started in 1985 and the four (4) who were tried during the "Trial of Delmas Four” in 1989. The trial tested the 
apartheid legal machinery to the limit and marks a turning point in the history of the struggle for democracy. It is valued as a 
site of an important event in that it stands against injustice. 

Objectives of the project were: 

• To preserve the 1985 and 1989 political struggle trials in a form of memorial structure; 

• To declare the Delmas Magistrate Court as an historical heritage site following its role as a host to above political 


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trials; 


• To conduct research and preserve the archival record of the struggle trials in a form of legal materials and 
documents, including the auditory and pictorial records of the trial; 

• Parallel to the above carries out the necessary applications to declare the Delmas Magistrate Court as a National 
Heritage Site. 

The memorial plague inspired by Mandela's call from Robbin Island Prison, following the landmark 1976 Soweto Uprising 
“Unite, Mobilise, and Fight on! Between the Anvil of united mass action and the Hammer of the armed struggle, we shall crush 
apartheid”.The site was officially unveiled on 03 March 2012. The processes of declaring the area as a heritage site is 
underway by the Department of Arts and Culture 

Figure 38: The memorial plague inspired by Mandela’s from Robben Island Prison 



Phase 2: Regional Freedom Park 

Following the public participation process, the second phase of enlisting the names for inclusion on the cenotaph was 
completed and 137 names of fallen heroes and heroines of the struggle against apartheid were approved by council. The 
names had to satisfy the criterion of the Department of Culture Sports and Recreation in that: 

• Cause of death must have been in keeping with the fight for liberation; 

• Accidental death or death by natural causes were not considered; 

• The death should have occurred before 27 April 1994 (cut-off date). 

The approved names were subsequently engraved at Lynville Park which forms part of the Church street upgrading precinct, 
thus giving the Park a facelift with all the attributes for its strategic location as a major link between location and town but 
strategic and ideal to: 

■ Promote local economic development to relieve poverty and unemployment; 

■ Provide a safe and secure environment; 

■ Create a quality urban environment where people can live with dignity and pride; 

■ Develop efficient, integrated and user-friendly transport systems; 

■ Create job opportunities through the Extended Public Works Programme (EPWP). 


NDM has since prioritized the development of this route as a catalyst for infrastructure development, heritage preservation as 
well as urban renewal. As a result of the rigid criteria for inclusion of the names on the cenotaph, many people who were 
freedom fighters could not be included, thus the idea of the Regional Freedom Park was conceived and council resolved that 
it be investigated further. 

To-date the NDM has completed a feasibility study for the establishment of the Regional Freedom Park. 

• During the study all the six local municipalities also contested to host the Regional Freedom Park and the best possible 
site was identified at Dr JS Moroka at Vaaalbank Crossing next to the NDM Fire Station new building; 


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• The NDM Regional Freedom Park concept was developed with the view to emulate the National Freedom Park in 
Pretoria, to that extend a visit was undertaken to the national monument to under study. 

• The NDM continued and procured a service provider for the development of the concept designs that were completed in 
July 2016; 

• The NDM further appointed a service provider to undertake a Social Study with the view to investigate and facilitate 
community participation in partnership with all the local municipalities, communities, political parties, traditional, religious 
and other community leaders and relevant stakeholders; 

National Calendar Days 

The NDM in partnership with the MDCSR in fostering Social Cohesion and acknowledging cultural diversity and promoting 
unity by affirming, conserving and celebrating people’s way of life while striving for moral renewal of our society will continue 
to honour the events and celebrations of the following National Days: 

• 21 March Human Rights Day; 

• 27 April Freedom Day; 

• 24 September Heritage Day; 

• 16 December Day of Reconciliation; 

• 31 December Crossover Day in recognition of Moral Regeneration. 

Over and above these national events, the district will continue to work closely with Amakhosi and support the heritage and 
cultural work that is done in the region. In order to celebrate the various cultural diversity, a cultural festival aimed at stimulating 
growth and preservation of tradition and culture has become necessary. A policy on the support granted to Amakhosi will be 
developed to guide administration in the quest for heritage support and conservation. 

Performance, Cultural and Creative Art 

One of the eminent challenges confronting the District is that of positioning the region in terms of the short film production and 
performance and creative arts. Whilst this industry has potential to create a number of jobs but also complement the rich 
political struggle history, it remains untapped. It is therefore critical that the District works together with existing structures with 
the view to change the status quo. 

Department of Sports, Culture and Recreation Sporting Projects and Programmes 

The Department is involved in projects including the upgrading and renovating sports and recreation facilities, the promotion 
of Sports Letsema and the spirit of volunteerism, facilitation of capacity building programmes, promotion of indigenous games 
in communities, facilitation of Farm and Rural recreation and promotion of mass participation programmes 

4.12.1 Local Geographic Names Change 

Geographical name changes function is a national programme that is facilitated by the District Municipalities. It seeks to create 
a platform for public involvement in the renaming of public facilities. Notwithstanding this, the usage of new names remains a 
challenge hence a need to ensure that new names are promoted. The integration of the new names into municipal spatial 
planning, GIS, LED, surveying and deeds office remains a challenge. The signage on most National and Regional routes still 
reflects old names. 

Library Infrastructure: 

The construction of new libraries in 

• Zithabiseni; 

• Thubelihle; 

• Masobea; 

• Verena and 

• Mhluzi (Chromeville). 

Objectives 

Culture, Sports and Recreation Priority Projects and Programmes 

To make a lasting impact on the Sports, Arts and Culture status of the communities within its jurisdictional area, NDM in 
collaboration with key Stakeholders will need to during the medium - Longer Term of Council place more emphasis on the 
following issues: 


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• Optimize Talent search exercise within the District through Strategic Partnerships with relevant federations; 

• To strengthen and support the LGNC in order to fast track name changes process in the region; 

• Facilitate establishment of Sport Desks within all Municipalities; 

• Facilitate the construction of libraries especially in Dr JS Moroka, Thembisile Hani and Emakhazeni; 

• Establish facilities for training and performance arts; 

• Strengthen partnership among Municipalities, DCSR, Sports Councils and Sports Federations; 

• Facilitate the construction of multi-sports complex that will include facilities for cricket, rugby, hockey, tennis and 
baseball especially in Dr JS Moroka, Thembisile Hani, Emakhazeni and Victor Khanye; 

• Organize District Mayoral games and tournaments to enhance mass participation (including for people with 
disability) in various sporting codes; 

• Local Municipalities to prioritize the maintenance and good upkeep of sporting facilities; 

• Promoting, supporting and participating in the region events such as cultural, musical, sports, arts and recreation 
including SALGA Games (if and when held) and other national and provincial programmes; 

• Construction of community parks and child facilities in the various local municipalities; 

• Developing a guiding policy for the support and participation of the municipality on the programmes implemented by 
Amakhosi; 

• Support NDM Mayoral Games to be an annual event and align these with local municipal mayoral games; 

• LMs to engage with SASSA on elderly (Gogos) recreational programs and to include the elderly and people with 

disabilities; 

• Facilitate the establishment of the combo courts; 

• Conduct NDM Regional Freedom Park Social Study and other environmental studies; 

• Facilitate the provision of bulk services at the Vaalbank Crossing NDM Regional Freedom Park Site at Dr JS Moroka 
local Municipality. 

• Engage with the private sector, Department of Corporative Governance and Traditional Affairs, DCSR international 
and local NGO’s on the funding of traditional, cultural, heritage and activities including the NDM Regional Freedom 
Park development in the region; 

• Host a Cultural Festival in order to brand the NDM; 

• Develop community parks with recreational facilities especially in Victor Khanye and Emakhazeni; 

• Promote utilisation of Thusong centres; 

• Working together with relevant government department and private sector, promote the development of 
documenttaries based on local history and promotion of performance arts to promote youth participation; 

• Renovation of the two dilapidated King Clusters (House of Traditional Leader’s offices) at Thembisile Hani and Dr 
JS Moroka LM. 

• Registration and participation of Nkangala District Municipality in the SAMSRA Games 

• Awareness campaigns on Mix Migration 

• To support Community Sports Development 


4.12.2 NDM SOUTH AFRICAN MUNICIPAL SPORTS AND RECREATION ASSOCIATION (SAMSRA) 

4.12.2.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The National Sports and Recreation Act No 110 of 1998, provide for the promotion and development of Sport and recreation 
and the co-ordination of the relationships between the Sport commission, National and Recreation federations aimed at 
correcting imbalances in Sport and Recreation to promote equity and democracy in sport and recreation, to provide for dispute 
resolution mechanism in sport and recreation, to empower the Minister to make regulations, and to provide for matters 
connected therewith. To this Nkangala District Municipality through Council resolved as per Council Resolution DM296/ 
03/2017. 

The South African Municipal Sports and Recreation Association (SAMSRA) have since been formalised and an association 
to deal with sport matters within SALGA was established and named SAMSRA, which is composed of by both Councillors 
and Officials of Municipalities within South Africa and elects its Executive Committee every three (3) years. The object of 
SAMSRA is to afford municipal employees and Councillors structured and organised way in terms of which they participate 
in various sporting codes at certain marked time periods on a calendar year. 

Challenges 

Nkangala District Municipality has not been an affiliate and participating in SAMSRA Games and it is the intention of this report 
to seek Council approval for Nkangala District Municipality participation in the SAMSRA Games. 


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Further to the above it is required in accordance with the attached SAMSRA Constitution that each municipality should 
establish and launch a SAMSRA Local Committee which would represent the municipality in the meetings and committees of 
SAMSRA. 

The Constitution provides that the Local Executive Committee must have the following executive positions: 

• Chairperson; 

• Deputy Chairperson; 

• Secretary General; 

• Deputy Secretary General; 

• Treasurer General; and 

• Additional members. 

It is further recommended by the SAMSRA Constitution that Council be represented by at least two (2) Councillors who shall 
be members of the above mentioned Local Committee Ex Officio. 

Objectives 

Sport is the significant part of any Nation’s culture, leisure time health, economy and education. This directly involve benefit 
from a significantly enhanced quality of life, the physical activities engaged in, how they are integrated to community life, the 
value expressed through the and how they are celebrated, help define individuals, groups, communities and a Nation. The 
sum of this activities makes up a Nation’s physical culture play, fitness, and sport dance and so on. When integrated into 
broader framework of development goals, sports constitute an additional vehicle, mechanism or tool for advancing sustainable 
development in different sectors of the South African society. 

The following sporting codes are available at each SAMSRA Games and all municipal teams are encouraged to participate 
in: 

• Volleyball, Pool, Netball, Soccer, Tug of War, Marathon, Darts and Tennis; 

Priorities 

To encouraged Councilors and Employees to take part in all sporting activities, since it is part of Employee Health Wellness. 

4.12.3 MORAL GENERATION 

4.12.3.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The Moral Regeneration Movement (MRM) is a networking platform that facilitates and coordinates all processes and initiatives 
aimed at combating moral degeneration. As a civil society-driven initiative that is supported by the government, the MRM 
provides the opportunity to redouble our efforts as a full partnership of the people, and pay special attention to the issues of 
development, social cohesion, and nation building. The MRM also supports traditional and cultural programmes. 

• Current status district-wide 

Nkangala District Municipality was able to conduct six (6) Plenary meetings in preparation of launching Moral Regeneration 
Movement, the plenary meetings were conducted with the following Municipalities during the month of January 2018 Strictures, 
Steve Tshwete, eMakhazeni, eMalahleni, Dr JS Moroka, Thembisile Hani and Victor Khanye LM’s. NDM has managed to 
launched and Inducted MRM structures in all LM’s and NDM Structure. 

• challenges 

The lack of support became the major reason why these structures were not functional. In addition, the composition of the 
structures was not inclusive as they were mainly constituted by Pastors and Religious people. Furthermore, not all religions 
were included. The other civil society formations and structures were overlooked. The Structures also felt that they were 
not involved in the programmes, activities and events of the Municipalities. For instance, there were not involved in the year 
end of MRM event. 

Some reported infighting amongst members of the MRM Structures. The other factors that contributed to the demise of the 
structures include the following; 

• MRM programme is neglected by the Political Principals and Municipal Officials. 

• Lack of commitment by members 

• General lack of understanding of the Mandate of MRM, 

• Confusion between MRM the interfaith structures 

• Poor dissemination of information. 

• Change of Political leadership at Local Government level 


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Communication breakdown. 

No dedicated budget for the structure’s operations. 
Conflict between MRM structure and Municipal Officials. 


• Objective 

To facilitate a process of ensuring that Moral Regeneration is part of awareness campaigns the moist at schools and at 
community levels 

Aim to discuss the following, as per the principles from the charter of positive values: 

• Resect Human dignity and equality 

• Promote responsible freedom, the rule of law and democracy 

• Improve material well-being and economic justice 

• Enhance sound family and community values 

• Uphold honesty, integrity and loyalty 

• Ensure harmony in Culture, belief and conscience 

• Show respect and concern for all people 

• Starve for justice, fairness and peaceful co-existence 

• Protecting the environment 

• And spiritual transformation. 

• Uphold honesty, integrity and loyalty 

• Ensure harmony in Culture, belief and conscience 

• Show respect and concern for all people 

• Starve for justice, fairness and peaceful co-existence 

• Protecting the environment 

• And spiritual transformation. 

Such a programme should focus on crime prevention, drugs and alcohol abuse, vandalism, illegal connections, to 
municipal services and land uses that are inconsistent with the municipal by-laws. 

• Priorities 

Mission and vision of MRM must be achieved, through the establishment of the District structure, local structures be supported 
and follow moral ethics to develop communities and have good moral values. Moral Regeneration Movement structures are 
established and inducted to all LM’s including NDM Municipalities hence they need to be strengthen. 


4.12.4 COMMUNITY SPORTS DEVELOPMENT 
4.12.4.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, in its preamble, schedule 5 part A and part B, places the 
fundamental obligation on Government to facilitate sports and recreation. The White Paper on Sport and Recreation (1995) 
provided the policy framework upon which key legislation contained in the Sport and Recreation Act, Act No 110 of 1998 
was developed. The aim of sort and recreation in South Africa is to improve the quality of life of all South Africans. 
Government can achieve this by promoting participation in sport and recreation in the country and through the participation 
of South African sportsperson and teams in international sporting events. 

Challenges 

• Lack of support to Community Sports Development 

• lack of promotion of sports activities for the community 

• Insufficient sports facilities within the District. 

Objectives 

Community Sports Development is the promotion of sports activities for the community. Successful sports development 
depends largely on effective partnership and networking with a wide range of community groups, service providers, facility 
operators, national governing bodies, local authorities and voluntary groups.to develop and promote sport and leisure 
opportunities for local residents and workforce from foundation to excellence. Removing barriers to participation, promotion 
personal, and social community development. 


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Priorities 


To support Community Sports Development 

4.12.5 MIX MIGRATION 

4.12.5.1 Background and Problem Statement 

Migration across the world has become increasingly more complicated, (migration is here to stay). The traditional flow of 
people from one country to another, whether voluntary or forceful in search of safety or a better life is a cause for this 
movement. In 2010 there were an estimated 15.4 million refugees or people who fled their home countries because of war 
or persecution, based on a 2012 survey, an estimated 640 million adults would migrate to another country if they could. 

Challenges 

• Globalization of poverty (National Issue) 

• Lack of employment opportunities 

• Social and political conflict 

• Social and cultural practice 

• Gender discrimination 

• Lack of information 

Objectives 

• Awareness campaigns on human trafficking 

• Sensitizing participants on mixed migration concepts including Trafficking in Person (TiP) and smuggling 

• Guide participants on how to identify cases of trafficking and mechanism for accessing justice through the South 
African legislation and structures 

• To promote campaigns to raise awareness in in communities on human trafficking 

• To support first line officials in their effort to understand and manage mixed migration flows and assist vulnerable 
migrants 

• Refugees and asylum seekers through proper identification and referral 


Priorities 

• More awareness campaigns on human trafficking 

• Sensitizing participants on mixed migration concepts including Trafficking in Person (TiP) and smuggling 

4.12.6 CULTURAL JAZZ FESTIVAL 

4.12.6.1 Background and Problem Statement 

key background of promoting social cohesion, nation-building, tourism and economic development will be the major highlight 

in the arts and entertainment calendar of the country. 

Challenges 

• The Distract is face with triple challenges which is: Unemployment, Inequality and poverty 

Objectives 

• Job creation and economic upliftment remains some of the cornerstones of the staging of this festival. Through 
various services that will be rendered at the festival, ranging from festival infrastructure to cultural programmes 
activations, several job opportunities are created during the period of the festival. Efforts to ensure full participation 
of SMMEs (Hawkers and commercial photographers etc) generate visitors, to gauge the tourism, job creation as 
well as visitor’s expenditure patterns will continue to be undertaken in partnership with independent research 
institutions, an important tool in boosting the local economy in the District. 

Prioritise 


• District to annually host Jazz Cultural Festival in partnership with the Local Municipality’s and different Stakeholder’s. 

4.13 ISSUE 10: SAFETY AND SECURITY 

4.13.1 Background and Problem Statement 


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Combating crime forms one of the governmental strategic priorities within the medium term period. The two main 
thrusts focus on the improvement of the quality of life of poor and vulnerable communities as well as the improvement 
of the investment environment in general. 

During the IDP process some safety and security issues became evident and need attention. These include 
shortage of policing facilities throughout the District, improvement of community policing initiatives, lack of and 
inadequacy of resources, incorporating institutional capacity and arrangements. These are some of the factors that 
hamper the effectiveness of the policing services. 

There is a need for improvement in community policing through a functional Community Policing Programme (CPP). 
Such a programme should focus on crime prevention, drugs and alcohol abuse, vandalism, illegal connections, to 
municipal services and land uses that are inconsistent with the municipal by-laws. 

During the IDP processes the communities of the NDM have highlighted the following challenges: 

■ High crime rate, particularly at night in dark areas 

■ Vandalism in common areas (i.e. schools, community halls, etc) 

■ Lack of support and capacitation of Community Policing 

■ Shortage and unavailability of police vehicles when needed 

■ Long response time 

■ Lack of trust between the police and the communities 

■ Need for satellite police stations 

■ Perpetrators of crime do not get convicted but are allowed to come back to society and perpetuate their 
criminal tendencies 


Objectives 

■ To develop and implement District Community safety strategy and municipal safety plans 

■ To ensure the establishment of Community Safety Forums in all local municipalities and the District in line 
the community safety forum policy. 

■ To participation in the implementation of National Crime Prevention Strategy. 

* To ensure effective implementation of the District Community safety strategy and municipal safety plans 

■ To ensure the establishment and continuous monitoring of Community Safety Forums in all local 
municipalities and the District in line the community safety forum policy. 

■ To facilitate the installation of high-mast lights in high crime areas. 

■ To develop strategies to fight crime in farm areas 

Strategies 

The Department of Community Safety, Security and Liaison (DCSSL) in an effort to implement the crime prevention 
strategy sought to increase community awareness combating gender violence in the Nkangala region. Related 
activities will be undertaken in all local municipalities. Tourism awareness campaigns were also conducted. 
Through the establishment of CSFs and CPFs in the region the overall relationship between the police and the 
community will improve therefore there is a need to urgently establish these structures. Additionally, crime 
awareness campaigns on drug abuse, violence and illegal weapons were conducted at some schools. Other related 
activities were also successfully undertaken by the Department. The District is committed in participating and 
assuming an active role in crime prevention activities within the region. Through the various governmental 
interventions and efforts an atmosphere in which an honest day’s work and up-right citizenship become the attractive 
lifestyle for communities shall be created and sustained. 

Through improved and integrated transport planning the issue of safe and efficient transport could be. Moreover, 
the instalment of sufficient street lighting and high mast lights for crime prevention will be ensured within the 
respective infrastructure programmes and service provisions. 


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Table 71: Safety and security Projects 2018/19 and 19/20 financial year 


Project 

Description 

Project 

Location 

Funding 

Source 

Budget 

18/19 

Budget 

19/20 

Responsibility 

Social Crime 

Prevention 

Programme 

Implementation of the 
approved district 
community safety 
strategy 

NDM 

NDM 

OPEX 

OPEX 

General Manager: 
Social Services 

Social Crime 

Prevention 

Programme 

Continuous monitoring 
of Community Safety 
Forums 

NDM and 
DCSSL 

NDM and 
DCSSL 

OPEX 

OPEX 

General Manager: 
Social Services 


Develop Crime 

Prevention 

Programmes 

NDM 

and DCSSL 

NDM 

and 

DCSSL 

OPEX 

OPEX 

General Manager: 
Social Services 

Moral 

Regenerations 

Develop moral 
Regenerations 
Programmes 

NDM 

NDM 

R340 000 

R350 000 

General Manager: 
Social Services 


4.14 Issue 11: Emergency Services 
4.14.1 Background and Problem Statement 

NDM Disaster Management Centre is established in compliance with Section 43 (1-2) of the Disaster Management Act no. 57 of 
2002 . 

The act states that: “Each District Municipality must establish in its administration a disaster management centre for its 
municipal area. 

(1) A district municipality- 

fa) Must establish its disaster management centre after consultation with the local municipalities within its area; 

(b) May operate such centre in partnership with those local municipalities”. 


The District Disaster Management Centre is currently located within the NDM Office building with its physical address as 
follows: NDM Disaster Management Centre, Nkangala District Municipality, 02 A Walter Sisulu Street. Middelburg, 1050, 
Emergency Contact number: 013 249 2800 

The Disaster Management Centre is composed of the Joint Operational Centre [JOC] and 24-hour communication centre. 
NDM has established a district Disaster Management Advisory forum which meets quarterly. 

Section 45. (1) of the Disaster Management Act states that “A municipal council must, subject to the applicable provisions of 
the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000). appoint a person as head of its municipal disaster 
management centre”. 

The head of the Municipal Disaster Management Centre is responsible for the exercise by the centre of its powers and the 
performance of its duties; and in accordance with the directions of the council, takes all decisions of the centre in the 
exercise of its powers and the performance of its duties. Except decisions taken by another person in consequence of a 
delegation by the head of the centre. 

The head of a municipal disaster management centre performs the functions of this office subject to section 44(3) of the 
Disaster management act. NDM council has appointed the Divisional Manager: Disaster Management as a head of its 
municipal disaster management centre. 

Objectives 

To provide for- 

• an integrated and co-ordinated disaster management policy that focuses 

• on preventing or reducing the risk of disasters, mitigating the severity of 

• disasters, emergency preparedness, rapid and effective response to 

• disasters and post-disaster recovery; 


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the establishment of national, provincial and municipal disaster management 
centres; 

disaster management volunteers; 


The legislative responsibilities of Municipal Disaster Management are: 

• To specialise in issues concerning disasters and disaster management in the 

• municipal area; 

• To promote an integrated and co-ordinated approach to disaster management 

• in the municipal area, with special emphasis on prevention and 
Mitigation, by¬ 
departments and other internal units within the administration of the municipality, and, in the case of a 
district municipality, also by departments and other internal units within the administration of the local 
municipalities in the area of the district municipality: 

all municipal entities operating in the municipal area; and 

other role-players involved in disaster management in the municipal area; 

• To act as a repository of, and conduit for, information concerning disasters, impending disasters and disaster 
management in the municipal area: 

• making recommendations regarding the funding of disaster management in the municipal area, and initiate and 
facilitate efforts to make such funding available; 

• To promote the recruitment, training and participation of volunteers in disaster management in the municipal area; 

• To promote disaster management capacity building, training and education, including in schools, in the municipal 
area. 

i) Disaster Management Plan: 

The Nkangala District Municipality (NDM), in terms of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act 57 of 2002), compiled a 
municipal Disaster Management Plan which was approved by Council. This document fulfils the legal requirement as set out 
in the Disaster Management Act and the National Disaster Management Framework and confirms the arrangements for 
managing disaster risk and for preparing for and responding to disasters within the Nkangala District Municipality. 

The key intended outcomes of the plan are the integration of Disaster Risk Management into the strategic and operational 
planning and project implementation of all line functions and role players within the Nkangala District Municipality, the creation 
and maintenance of resilient communities within the District, and an integrated, fast and efficient response to emergencies 
and disasters by all role-players. The overall objective of the Disaster Management Plan is to define and describe the essential 
elements and procedures for preventing and mitigating major incidents or disasters, but also to ensure rapid and effective 
response and aspect specific contingency planning in case of a major incident or disaster that will protect, prevent and reduce 
the risk exposure. 

Nkangala District is not immune to emergencies and disasters and occasionally suffers the impact of various human-induced 
and natural hazards that have the potential to kill, injure, destroy and disrupt. The District is committed to ensuring the safety 
of its inhabitants and the sustainability of its communities, economy and environment and therefore intends to effectively 
manage disaster risk within the District in close collaboration with all relevant stakeholders and especially the local 
municipalities within the District. The Plan identified hazards for each local municipality are summarized on the table below: 

The disaster priority hazards as identified in the District are reflected in the following Table. 


Table 72: Disaster Priority Harzards 



DR JS 
MOROKA 

EMALAHLENI 

EMAKHAZENI 

STEVE 

TSHWETE 

THEMBISILE 

HANI 

VICTOR 

KHANYE 

Air pollution 


X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Deforestation 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

Ground Water 
pollution 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Hazmat 

Spillage 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Illegal 

Dumping 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

River/ Flash 
flood 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


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Road Accident 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Severe 

Storms 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Strong winds 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Veld fires 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Water 

pollution 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Sinkholes 


X 


X 


X 

Cable theft 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Drought 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Stock theft 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


The above highlighted hazards points to the priority areas, risks and danger that the institutions should equip themselves in 
the eventuality that respond becomes necessary. From the above table, it can be confirmed that parts of the community of 
Nkangala continues to suffered damages especially those caused by hailstorm. 

Mining is one of the key economic drivers in the Nkangala region however due to the lack of rehabilitation of old mining sites 
the district is beginning to encounter serious challenges of some parts of the area being unsuitable for human habitation. 
Massive sinkholes and underground fires are evident at areas of Emalahleni Local Municipality and threaten public safety. 
The district has since established a Forum that is tasked to develop an integrated approach towards sinkhole management. 

The Nkangala District Municipality (NDM), Municipal Disaster Management Plan was developed and approved by Council.. 

ii) NDM Disaster Management Centre: 

Section 43 of the Disaster Management Act of 2002 states that “each District municipality must establish in its administration 
a disaster management centre for its municipal area in consultation with and operate such a centre in partnership with local 
municipalities”, the District completed the establishment of a Disaster Management Centre equipped with state of the art 
information technology systems to be in a position to carry out its mandate in line with section 44 of the Act. The Disaster 
Management Centre serves as a central communication and information management and dissemination hub within Nkangala 
district where calls are received and despatched throughout the district. Equally, the centre aims to promote effective and 
integrated call taking and despatching of emergences services on a 24-hour basis. 

District has appointed eight Control Room Operators to enable the control room to operatate on a 24 hours’ basis; which was 
effected in July 2014. NDM has appointed Timmut connect to manage the ICT system in the Disaster Management center. 

The district has identified land in Thembisile Hani Local Municipality for the building of a stand-alone Disaster Management 
Centre. A budget for the building construction will be set aside in the 2019/2020 financial year. 

Provision for disaster relief funding to repair damages caused by disasters has been made. Only incidents that were 
properly assessed and classified accordingly by the Disaster Management Centre will be funded. 

The functions of the Disaster Management Centre as captured in the approved Disaster Management Framework 
are as follows: 

The District Disaster Management Centre must: 

• Establish and maintain institutional arrangements that will enable the implementation of the Act. 

• Implement measures to develop progressive risk profiles to inform the IDP processes of municipalities for the 
purposes of disaster risk reduction and to determine the effectiveness of specific disaster risk reduction programmes 
and projects undertaken. 

• Facilitate the development, implementation and maintenance of disaster risk reduction strategies that will result in 
result in resilient areas, communities, households and individuals. 

• Monitor the integration of disaster risk reduction initiatives with development plans. 

• Develop and implement a comprehensive information management and communication system that is consistent with 
arrangements established by the NDMC and PDMCs. 

• Facilitate the development of response and recovery plans to ensure rapid and effective response to disasters that 
are occurring or are threatening to occur and to mitigate the effects of those disasters that could not have been 
prevented or predicted. 

• Submit copies of its disaster risk management plans to the NDMC, the PDMC, neighbouring disaster management 
centres. 

• Develop and implement mechanisms for creating public awareness to include a culture of risk avoidance 


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• Facilitate and promote disaster risk management education, training and research in the municipality. 

• Implement and maintain dynamic disaster risk management monitoring, evaluation and improvement programmes. 

• Make recommendations regarding funding of disaster risk management in the municipal area. 

PROJECTS AND PROGRAMMES 


In the period of 2018/19 NDM implemented the following projects and programmes: Table 74: Implemented projects 


Municipality 

Item Description 

Committed amount 

Available Amount 

NDM 

Construction of NDM Disaster 
Management Centre [detached from 
the main building] 

R0.00 

R1200’000.00 

NDM 

Repair and Maintenance of Disaster 
Management Centre Systems 
[Timmutconnect]- 3 year contract 

Rl'020'000.00 

Rl’020’000.00 

NDM 

Rental of two way radio 
communications 

Rl'174'000.00 

Rl’174’000.00 

NDM 

Emergency Open Days 

R850 000 

R900 000 

NDM 

Disaster Risk Reduction Awareness 
Campaign 

R326 668 

R326 668 

NDM 

Disaster Relief Materials 

R800 000 

R800 000 

NDM 

District Crime Prevention Summit 


R200 000 


Table 75: Priority Projects for 2019/2020 


Municipality 

Item Description 

Committed 

amount 

Available Amount 

NDM 

Acquisition and Construction of NDM Disaster 
Management Centre [detached from the main 
building] 


R10 000 000 

NDM 

Radio Communications rental 


R1 170 230 

NDM 

Disaster Management Staff uniform 


R500’000 

NDM 

Emergency Open Days 


R1000 000 

NDM 

Disaster Risk Reduction Awareness Campaign 


R360 000 

NDM 

Disaster Relief Materials 


R1000 000 

NDM 

Provision for Disaster Response and recovery 


R1000 000 


Achievements: 

• District Community Safety strategy approved by council 

• Disaster Management Centre is now operational on 24-hour basis; 

• Continuous support to local municipalities on supplying equipment for fire and rescue services; 

• Secured Drought relief funding for four local municipalities namely: Steve Tshwete, Emakhazeni, Thembisile and Dr 
JS Moroka. 


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Challenges emanating: 


• Disaster Management Centre attached to the main building, a stand-alone DMC is required 

• Lack of disaster management capacity in local municipalities 

• Shortage of fire fighting vehicles and equipment especially at Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

Priority Projects and Programmes 

To enable adequate response to all the Emergency incidents in the short to medium term, the District will focus on amongst 
others the following interventions: 

• Convene district Disaster Management advisory forums 

• Convene District Community Safety Forums 

• Construction of District Disaster Management Centre 

• Standardization and acquisition of disaster, fire and rescue equipment and vehicles throughout the NDM in terms of 
Local Government Structure Act 1998; 

• Building firefighting and rescue capacity at local municipalities; 

• Capacitating the Fire Protection Associations; 

• Diversify the procurement of relief materials; 

• Develop programs and policies to recruit and sustain volunteers; 

• Conducting of Disaster Risk reduction awareness campaigns; 

• Conducting Emergency Open day 

• Conduct NDM Disaster Management Summit/lndaba 

• Conducting of fire inspections will be done continuously to make that institutions comply; 

• Enter into mutual aid agreements with nearby municipalities for management of local incidents 


4.15 FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICES 

In accordance with the then MEC’s determination of 2003, Nkangala district is responsible for firefighting and rescue 
services in Thembisile Hani and Dr. J. S Moroka municipalities. The district therefore took over the function together with 
staff (72 firemen and 2 secretaries) that was attached to this function. The district has commenced the construction of a 
Fire Station in Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality on a land that was availed in Mbibane by the local authority. The District 
appointed seventy-four (74) fire and rescue personnel, including two (2) Chief Fire Officers, two (2) Divisional Officers, eight (8) 
Leading Fire Officers, sixteen (16) Senior Fire Fighters, twenty (20) Fire Fighters, twenty-six (26) Junior Fire Fighters and two 
(2) Fire Station Administrators manning both fire stations. 


The function is regulated by the Fire Brigade Services Act no. 99 of 1987 as amended, with the following objectives: 

• To provide for the establishment, maintenance, employment, co-ordination and standardization of fire brigade 
services; and for matters connected Therewith. 

The responsibility of the Fire and Rescue Services as per the act: 

• preventing the outbreak or spread of a fire; 

• fighting or extinguishing a fire; 

• the protection of life or property against a fire or other threatening 

• danger; 

• the rescue of life or property from a fire or other danger; 

• subject to the provisions of the Health Act, 1977 (Act No. 63 of 1977), 

• the rendering of an ambulance service as an integral part of the fire 

• brigade service; 

1. Fire Prevention and Response Strategy: 

Section 84 of the Municipal Structures Act, (Act 117 of 1998) as Amended spells out the responsibilities of District 
Municipalities as follows: 

• Firefighting services serving the area of the district municipality as a whole which includes: 

• planning, co-ordination and regulation of fire services; 

• specialized firefighting services such as mountains, veld and chemical fire services 

• co-ordination of the standardization of infrastructure, vehicles, equipment and procedures; 


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• Training of fire officers. Hence, the NDM is busy with the development of the Fire Prevention and Response 
Strategy. 

To that effect Council approved Fire Prevention and Response Strategy on the 30 June 2014. The Fire and Rescue Services 
By-Laws were approved and gazette in 12 June 2016 

The strategy focuses on the management of veld, mountain and other fires in the region and aims to minimize the impact of 
fires where occurrences cannot be prevented, to determine the various key role players and provide guidance on the provision 
of firefighting services and provide a standard regulation through by-laws for the prevention, management and controlling of 
fires in the region. 

Based on the quick response principle, the strategy highlights the need to construct additional 02 fire stations/satellite points 
in the region as well as procurement of purpose made equipment and vehicles to enable effective response. These gaps are 
important and were subsequently confirmed by the community during the outreach meetings especially in Dr JS Moroka. The 
Dr JS Moroka fire station was officially opened on the 15 of June 2017. 

2. Fire Protection Associations: 

The District has established Fire Protection Associations (FPA) in Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani and registered them 
accordingly. The FPA’s will be equipped and empowered to handle minor fires which often get out of control during fire break 
seasons whilst awaiting back-up from the respective Fire Stations. Due to the small scale farming that is practised at Dr JS 
Moroka and Thembisile Hani local municipalities, the need to capacitate FPA’s is eminent. The District will ensure the signing 
of SLA’s with neighbouring municipalities as a way of mobilising support for preparedness and response. 

Achievements: 

• Appointment of female Fire Fighter by the Nkangala District Municipality; 

• Appointment of Leading Fire Fighters as well as provision of training to the Fire Fighters; 

• Fire Prevention and Response Strategy is approved by Council; 

• Fire Services By-Laws completed and approved by Council. 

Challenges emanating: 

• Shortage of fire stations and/or satellite offices nearer to communities; 

• Shortage of fire fighting vehicles and equipment; 

• Response time of vehicles very slow 

Priority Projects and Programmes 

To enable adequate response to all the Emergency incidents in the short to medium term, the District will focus on amongst 
others the following interventions: 

• Procure office furniture and associated office and fire and rescue equipment; 

• Building firefighting and rescue capacity at local municipalities; 

• Establishment of a satellite fire station; 

• Capacitating the Fire Protection Associations; 

• Development of the Fire and Rescue Standard Operation Procedures; 

• Develop programs and policies to recruit and sustain volunteers; 

• Conducting of fire inspections will be done continuously to make that institutions comply; 

• Enter into mutual aid agreements with nearby municipalities for management of local incidents; 

• Conducting of fire awareness campaign will be done continuously. 

• Evacuation drill and fire extinguisher training 

• Holding fire protection association per quarter 

iii) Procurement of Fire Fighting Vehicles & Equipment’s: 

According to the notice gazette no 300 of 2003 the then MEC adjusted the Division of Powers and Functions between 
Nkangala and constituent local municipalities thereby assigning the former Fire Fighting services responsibility for Thembisile 
Hani and Dr. J. S Moroka municipalities. In line with this amendment the following initiatives have been implemented 

■ A Fire station in Thembisile Hani has since been constructed and is fully operational and services communities of 
THLM. 

Challenges have been encountered relating to difficulties for Dr. JS Moroka (Nokaneng, Pankop, Mametlhake, and Marapjane) 
to access the same level of service as THLM until the satellite fire station is completed and travelling time, visibility of 
personnel, knowledge and awareness about the service 

In the period of 2017/18 NDM provided the following equipment and material in support of local municipalities: 


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The following equipment and material was procured in 2016/2017 


Municipality 

Item Description 

Committed amount 

Available Amount 

NDM 

Staff Uniform 

R574’ 000.00 

R650’ 000.00 

NDM 

Skid Units 

R269’ 088.00 

R300’ 000.00 

TOTAL 

R2’743’088.00 

R3’000’000.00 


Priority Projects for 2017/2018 (Fire and Disaster) 


Municipality 

Item Description 

Committed amount 

Available Amount 

NDM 

Repairs and Maintenance of Emergency Services 
Vehicles and Equipment's: project no. 474/17 

Three year 

Three year contract 


NDM 

Staff uniform 

Three year contract 

R680 000 

NDM 

Skid units 


R900 000 

NDM Fire 

Three Complete sets of rescue tools 

Waiting for the 
delivery 

R2550 000 


Priority Projects for 2018/2019 


Municipality 

Item Description 

Committed amount 

Available Amount 

NDM 

Supply & deliver of the veld fire vehicles 

R2,699 

R2,699 

Dr JS Moroka fire 
station 

Supply and delivery of furniture and equipment 
of Dr JS Moroka Fire Station classrooms( forty 
(40) tables; forty 40) chairs), 2 sets of 20 seater 
boardroom furniture by 30 June 2019 

R858 

R 858 

Thembisile Hani 
fire station 

Supply & delivery of fuel for fire & rescue 
generators and skid units as and when required 
(Thirty Six [36] Months Contract) 

R60 000 

R60 000 

Thembisile Hani 
fire station 

Supply & deliver of fire & rescue materials 
(consumables) as and when required (Thirty Six 
[36] Months Contract 

R540 000 

R540 000 

total 


R4 157 

R4157 


Priority Projects for 2019/2020 


Municipality 

Item Description 

Committed amount 

Available Amount 

Dr JS Moroka fire 
station 

Establishment of the Nokaneng Satellite Fire 

Station with the Identified savings. That should 
cover implementation of the first phase for the 
renovating the old municipal buildings that were 
handed over to NDM 

R4,500, 000 

R4,500, 000 

Thembisile Hani 
fire station 

Implementation of the Fire reservists programme 
through completion of the benchmarking and the 
development of the NDM Fire and Emergency 
Reservist Policy 

OPEX 

OPEX 

Thembisile Hani 
fire station 

Establishment of Verena Fire Station which should 
entail Identification of land in the Verena high 

R10,000,000 

R10,000,000 


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Municipality 

Item Description 

Committed amount 

Available Amount 


accident zone, Develop Funding Proposal, Identify 
social Partners 



total 





4.16 ISSUE 21: TRANSVERSAL 

4.16.1 Background and Problem Statement 


The Constitution is the supreme law of the country, entrenching specific rights, responsibilities and an ethos that everyone 
must uphold. In the Bill of Rights, specific human rights are guaranteed and these rights and responsibilities guide the 
inherent rights and responsibilities of everyone, including children, women, the elderly, young people, People with Disability 
and People Living with HIV and AIDS. 

Transversal services unit is within the Social Services Department in Nkangala District Municipality (NDM). The unit is 
comprised with the following functions transversal issues (Children, HIV/AIDS, and Persons with Disability, Older Persons 
and Gender), HIV/AIDS and disability, gender and elderly 


Objectives of the Transversal Strategic planning process of NDM 

The Nkangala District Municipality through its Integrated Development Plan (IDP) seeks to: 

• Improve the quality of life for vulnerable groups 

• Tackle conditions facing the marginalised and vulnerable 

• Assess the implication of transversal issues on planned and proactive interventions in the municipality 

• Promote intergovernmental coordination through the transversal desks 

4.16.2 Gender Development: 

The South African Constitution is one of the most progressive in the world. It demonstrates a commitment to promoting equality 
for men and women, and entrenches women’s rights. This commitment is carried through in several Government Policies, but 
there are debates about extent of its implementation. Since 1994, Local Government has become a more important Sphere 
than before. It is bigger than it once was, and has a larger mandate than before. It has been described as the “hands and feet” 
of Government, and is expected to play a key role in developing its local areas. Like National Government, Local Government 
must carry through the commitment to women's empowerment and gender equity. Gender parity remains an intrinsic element 
of development in the Country and Nkangala alike. 

The objectives of this Gender Policy for Local Government are: 

• To facilitate and enable gender mainstreaming wherein gender-inclusive policy formulation, planning, budgeting, 
programming, monitoring and evaluation in local government can take place; 

• To outline the priority development areas for women's empowerment in local government; 

• To outline specific gender inclusive and sensitive indicators for monitoring and evaluation; 

• To develop institutional capacity and knowledge for gender mainstreaming through the reinvigoration of gender focal 
points; 

• To promote the development of municipal gender-responsive initiatives at local level and 

The District host men summit whereby the have identified some challenges that are faced by both six on daily basis are outline 
as follows: 

• Local Municipalities: Local municipalities do not have enough budget to implement their transversal programmes. 
The district find itself in a situation whereby part of its budget is allocated to support local municipalities. 

• They do not have enough human resources, in a sense that one official in a municipality deals with all transversal 
programmes. 

• Stakeholder mobilization: Nkangala District Municipality has a huge challenge on stakeholder mobilization. Sector 
departments do not properly attend the district municipality meetings, such social cluster meetings and other 
coordinated meetings. This has resulted to the district being unable to have a working relationship with sector 


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departments and unable to implement its coordination functions. Nkangala District Municipality need to strengthen 
their stakeholder relation to improve collaboration and interface with sector departments and civil society. 

4.16.2.1 Young women: 

The broad-based capacitating of women on issues relating to economic development and job creation, lack of skills, poverty 
high unemployment, high level of crime and violence. They are more likely to be unemployed than males as it indicates that 
from 2001 to 2011 unemployment female rates has drop from 56 % to 37.65. 

As per the depiction in the table 25 below, Women, particularly young ones are more likely to be unemployed than males as 
it indicates that from 2001 to 2011 Female unemployment rates has dropped from 56 % to 37.65%. To further reduce these 
unemployment rates, particularly in the female category of our population, the District and its constituent Local Municipalities 
will have to progressively ensure that all the development needs of Women, particularly in rural communities are prioritised as 
per the resolutions of Women Summits hereunder. 


Table 75: Employment and Unemployment Rate - Female 


Municipality 

Employment Rate % - Female (15-65) 

Unemployment Rate % - Female (15-65) 


ActuaL 

2001 

% 2001 

Actual 

2011 

% 

2011 

ACTUAL 

2001 

% 2001 

Actual 

2011 

% 

2011 

Mpumalanga 

Province 

234466 

45.9 

395303 

60.8 

275600 

54.0 

254709 

39.19 

Nkangala District 

70139 

44.0 

138167 

62.3 

89160 

56 

83436 

37.65 

Dr JS Moroka 

9905 

33.8 

16206 

50.2 

19433 

66.2 

16080 

49.81 

Thembisile 

14072 

41.7 

29315 

60.1 

19687 

58.3 

19457 

39.89 

Victor Khanye 

4288 

42.4 

7612 

62.0 

5819 

57.6 

4648 

37.91 

Emalahleni 

23333 

46.2 

48287 

63 

27109 

53.7 

28441 

37.07 

Emakhazeni 

4051 

56.8 

5188 

66 

3085 

43.2 

2687 

34.12 

Steve Tshwete 

14490 

50.8 

31558 

72.2 

14028 

49.2 

12124 

27.76 


Source: Statistics South Africa - Census 2011 


4.16.2.2 Women Empowerment 

Following the successful hosting 2017/18 NDM Women assembly, this affirms NDM position in seeking to elevate women’s 
issues to the fore. The primary focus of the assembly was to reflect on the assessment of challenges that have hindered 
progress and implementation of policies aimed at entrenching, women's Rights and Economic Empowerment in the District. 
The scope of assessment covered the resolution of the strategic NDM Women assembly held in 2018 August, by key women 
groupings in politics, business, civic, non-governmental organisations, government and issues specific women organisation 

Strangely, the challenge confronting women in different parts of the Region remain the same and can be summed 
up as follows: 

• The violence directed towards women and children remains a challenge 

• High teenage pregnancy, which represent challenge in bridging the skills gap between boy and girl children 

• Lack of diversification on economic streams followed by women resulting in limited opportunities 

• Sexual abuse 

• Improvement of quality of life and status of women in rural and urban communities 

• Women development and empowerment implementation plan 


Emanating from the 2018 NDM Women assembly, under the theme: “A woman of fortitude: Women united in moving 
South Africa forward”., the delegates took the following progressive resolutions. Table 76: Women empowerment issues 


Issues 

Resolved 

Responsible 

Department 

HIV/AIDS 
prevalence is 
high amongst 
young women 

-Widespread provision of condoms (male & female) 

-Prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) 

-To collaborate with all stakeholders in eradicating HIV & AIDS, 
expand HCT and commemorate World AIDS Day 

DOH 

NDM Special 

Programme Unit 


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Economic 

women 

empowerment 

-Access finance to support to small farmers 
-Women’s participation in the economy requires diversification. 
-Opportunities in other sectors such as construction remains untapped 
-Corporative Incentive Schemes (CIS) targets the youth and women- 
there must be a market for products 

-Adopt and strengthen the use of Cooperatives when acquiring goods 
and services 

-EPWP programme targeting women 
-To launch women Caucus in respect of Local Municipalities 
- Municipal Councils to ensure that the full Gender Desk are 
established in their Councils 

MEGA 

DEDET 

DTI 

NDM PED 

Community 

-Women Coordinating Sector forum on quarterly basis. 

NDM Social Service 

Participation 

Increased allocation of budget by Municipalities for the implementation 

NDM Special 


of various community based programmes targeting women including 

Programme Unit 


those in rural areas. 

Public Participation Unit 

Gender 

-Municipalities should mainstream gender within all the directorates 

NDM Departments 

Mainstreaming 

-Representation of women in management positions within the Local 

Local Municipalities 


Municipalities in good progress, though we still need to do more 

Private Sector 


-Career development 

Government Sector 

Gender Based 

-365 days GBV campaign (from 16 days’ activism) 

Local Municipalities 

Violence 

- Sub-programmes 

NDM Special 


■ Anti-rape campaign 

Programme Unit 


■ Human Trafficking campaign 

SAPS 


■ Domestic Violence 

■ Increase in substance abuse campaign especially in 
Emalahleni, Thembisile and Victor Khanye Local 

Municipalities. 

DCSSL 

Poverty 

-Cooperatives must be involved cleaning projects. 

NDM 

alleviation 

-Food security and rural development programmes 

DARDLA 


4.16.3 YOUTH DEVELOPMENT 

4.16.3.1 Introduction 

The development of an Integrated Youth Development Strategy for Nkangala District Municipality marked a crucial milestone 
in that whilst the challenges confronting youth development are obviously noticeable, the opportunities that lie ahead have 
equally been identified. 

The challenges of youth development are well encapsulated in the Integral Youth Development Strategy document which 
was adopted by Council. Although this Strategy represents the first official Integrated Youth Development Strategy of the 
District, youth development has enjoyed the attention within the Nkangala District and its constituent local municipalities 
over the past decade. 

The District has also established a Youth Development Office within the municipality. The importance of addressing the 
youth cohort in South Africa is exacerbated by the fact that the former apartheid regime did not afford the greatest part of 
South Africa’s youth population with the opportunity to develop to their full potential. The District, in line with the NYP 
recognises that immediate attention should be given to the following prioritized youth target groups mentioned below, e.g. 
youth in rural areas. 

4.16.3.2 Unemployed Youth: 

There is still a significant number of young people who are unemployed and therefore vulnerable to poverty. It is estimated 
that one third of all South Africa’s youth live in poverty and approximately half of these live in extreme poverty. Almost two 
thirds of youth in the age group of 15 - 24years live in households with expenditures of less than R1 200 per month, as do 
approximately 60% of youth aged 25 - 34 years. According to the census 2011 report, youth unemployment in the District has 
decreased to 38.91% as compared to the Census report in 2001. In terms of community survey, the employment statistics 
stays at See Tabled 78 below. 


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Table 77: Youth Employment Ra te within the District 


Municipality 


2001 

2001% 

Actual 2011 

%2011 


106851 

35.5 

471329 

60 

Nkangala District 

28814 

31.7 

167205 

61.0 

Victor Khanye 

1840 

31.6 

10849 

65 

Emalahleni 

10280 

35.7 

68700 

65 

Steve Tshwete 

6492 

39.5 

41640 

74 

Emakhazeni 

1878 

45.3 

6762 

66.3 

Thembisile 

5171 

270 

26412 

51.5 

Dr JS Moroka 

3153 

19.0 

112841 

39.3 


Source: Statsa-Census 2011 


4.16.3.3 School-Aged-Out- of School Youth 

These young women and men can be described as those who have dropped out of school prematurely and are unskilled to 
be absorbed by the job market. Hence mostly are unemployed since they do not have the necessary / required starting 
qualifications. They have no adult supervision, have poor levels of general welfare and well-being, and experience increase 
level of stress. They are also exposed to high-risk behaviour such as HIV infection, rape, alcohol and drug abuse, violence, 
and exploitation, and often run a risk of being in conflict with the law. 

4.16.3.4 Youth in Rural area 

Young women and men in rural areas face particular constraints with regard to both accessibility and availability of Services 
and facilities, and this result in fewer opportunities and less information and employment than in urban areas. 

4.16.3.5 Youth at Risk 

A high percentage of South African ‘s youth falls into this category, and includes youth living with HIV/AIDS, youth headed 
households, youth in conflict with the law, and youth abusing dependency -creating substances. As encapsulated in the 
Integral Youth Strategy as well as through the public participation process of the District, the following challenges 
confronting youth development have been elevated namely: 

• Young women are more likely to be unemployed than males; 

• The need for support and assistance to youth with disabilities particularly access to a variety of resources. At 
present, they are unable to compete with their peers due to inability to access such resources such as schooling 
facilities for people with special needs; 

• A significant number of young people who are unemployed therefore are vulnerable to poverty; 

• A high percentage of South Africa's youth falls into this category, and includes youth living with HIV/AIDS, youth 
headed households, youth in conflict with the law, and youth abusing dependency-creating substance. 

• The need to establish the bursary programme to adequately respond to the ever growing demand of youth with 
capacity and who are unable to further their studies to contribute to the economic development of our country. 

Nkangala District Municipality Integrated Youth Development Strategy seeks to address the following strategic areas in 
respect of the above-mentioned problems and challenges: 

• Youth capacity building; 

• Procurement opportunities for youth; 

• Skills development and education; 

• Health and welfare (HIV/AIDS and drug abuse); 

• Social cohesion; 

• Economic development; 

• Sports and recreation; 

• Rural development. 

4.16.3.6 Objectives and Key Priority Issues for Youth Development 

In addressing the challenges outlined in the National Youth Strategy and the Nkangala District Integrated Youth Strategy 
has developed the following programs in addressing social challenges in the region. 

1. Youth Job and Skills Development Summit/Job Fair 

■ To interrelate with recruitment strategy of all invited companies with the aim to make it friendly to the unemployed 
youth of our district municipality; 

■ To engage on the above mentioned sub-topic and arrive at youth solution for the challenge facing the youth as far 
as job and skills development is concerned; 


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■ To identify the skills shortage in the district versus the job demand; 

■ To create a steady and sustainable youth skills development programme by engaging the private sector centre in 
the district and avail their qualified personnel for skills transfer to the unskilled youth. 

* A Youth Entrepreneurship workshop is scheduled for the 2015/16 financial year and currently the youth 
entrepreneurial workshop held in the 2017/2018 financial year. 

* The Municipality is intending to hold yet another youth skill summit to establish the progress made in skilling the 
youth also to identify and align the available opportunity in the industry versus the skills the youth is possessing. 

2. Mayoral Bursary Fund 

Nkangala District municipality has identified as part of its social responsibility within its communities to establishment the 
District Mayoral Bursary with the aim to uplift the previously disadvantaged communities and provide financial support to the 
students who want to pursue the career in the opportunities identified as the scarce skills in the district. 

The objective of the bursary policy includes the follows: 

* To contribute to the achievement of the objectives of the skills development act. 

* To address the employment equity targets in the relevant regulations and legislations by including the previously 
disadvantages group in the relevant scarce skills. 

■ To fight poverty and enhancing development by giving the financial support to the needy students/learners to 
pursue the career in the rare skills within the district, etc. 

3. Education Indaba/Summit 

The municipality has is intending to hold the education indaba with the aim of aligning the opportunities and skills for the youth 
in the municipal area of jurisdiction. The education summit will work in aligning the opportunities in the industries around the 
district Municipality and the skills provided to the youth the education facilities. The above mentioned summit has the following 
objectives. 

■ To have a dialogue on the curriculum versus the skills demand in the District; 

■ To convene the Departments of Labour, Education and private sector to align subjects offered at schools with most 
needed/used skills in the private sector; 

■ To outline the role played by FET’s on skills development in the District since we are a District dominated by FET 
institutions. 

4. Skills Audit 

The municipality has in the previous financial year conducted the skills audit amongst the youth within Nkangala District area 
of jurisdiction. The skills audit was intended to achieve the following. 

■ A database of young unemployed graduates has been compiled, approved by Council and submitted to the 
industrial companies; 

■ To get a true reflection of the NDM Statistics of the young unemployed graduates. 

5. Career Expo 

The municipality is annually holding the career expo in the local municipality within Nkangala District with the aim to educate 
and create the awareness to the youth on available career opportunities to the industries across all professional fields. The 
municipality in the 2017/2018 financial years conducted the career expo’s Emalahleni, Victor Khanye, Emakhazeni, Dr JS 
Moroka and Thembisile Hani Local Municipalities. The expo has the following objectives 

* To expose learners to the different fields of study and institutions; 

* To research and analyse the most offered courses to compare it with the District’s demand; 

* To encourage learners to choose fields of study according to their potential and the needs of the District; 

■ To provide professional career guidance to the children in the disadvantaged communities. 

6. Mayoral Academic Awards 

The Nkangala district municipality in partnership with Department of Education hosted their sixth Mayoral academic awards 
ceremony. The Mayoral academic awards ceremony took place on 12 January 2017 at Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality 
(Maphanga Community hall). 

The Nkangala district municipality staged this august event of awarding learners who did exceptionally well in the 2017 
academic year in response to the national clarion call of prioritizing education. 

The Mayoral academic award ceremony was attended by delegation from the following sectors: department of education, 
other sector department the media house, religious and traditional leaders, Mayors from local municipalities, future leader’s 
foundation, Standard bank, Eskom, Glencore, official of NDM and local municipalities, NDM councillors, learners and parents. 
They have the following objectives. 

* To encourage learners to work hard at school knowing that their efforts are recognised and acknowledged by 
government and society at large; 

* To make education fashionable and stylish; 


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• To encourage a culture of learning and that will translate to increased pass rate in the District. 

• To develop an academic supporting program for both learners and teachers to make sure that learning and 
teaching is effective at classroom level to produce quality results for the district 

7. Young Entrepreneur Seminar 

• To create young entrepreneurs who will compete for business within the District's mainstream economy; 

• To enable young people to be skilful and knowledgeable in different areas of interests to do business; 

• To assist young business people to participate in the economy of the District. 

8. Teenage Pregnancy 

The campaign of teenage pregnancy is driven by a whole range of factors which have a negative if not dangerous impact 
on a life of an ordinary teenage, hence the initiative of collecting leaner pregnancy statistics on quarterly basis which 
informs the teenage pregnancy awareness or campaign if not dialogue to mitigate and educate teenagers about dangers of 
engaging into unprotected sexually activities at an early age. 

The shocking statistics revealed that at in Nkangala District Municipality area of jurisdiction, there are a total number of 1068 
teenage learners has been reported pregnant from January 2017 to December 2017. The statistics further reveals that a high 
volume of pregnant learners in the third quarter occurred between Grade 9(35), Grade 10(54) grade 11 (62) and grade 12 
(60). The age of pregnant learners varies between the age of 13 and 24 years. The department of education in the district 
receives different statistics as far as teenage pregnancy is concern, and the teenage pregnancy dialogue come one of the 
critical mitigation measures to the teenage pregnancy predicament to raise an awareness about dangers of been sexually 
active and engage in unprotected sex at an early age with the view to manage and control the rate of teenage pregnancy. 
Currently the district has obtained the decline of 13% in the first quarter of 2018 as compering to the quarter 1 of 2017. 

The Municipality has come up with the following initiatives in order to fight the above mentioned challenge of the teenage 
pregnancy in the schools 

• To run continuous awareness campaign, educate and inform teenagers about sexual education. 

• To hold debates at schools in an attempt to focus attention of young people in discouraging them to premature 
involvement in sexual activities that lead to unwanted pregnancy; 

• To target the learners in the lower grades who have not started with the involvement of the in the sexual activities with 
the theme” Ligotjwa Lisesemanzi” 

• To involve community through local structures to be aware of the existence such campaigns and to actively 
participate. 



9. Drugs and substance abuse 

The cost and consequences of alcoholism and drug dependence place an enormous burden on our society. As the nation's 
number one health problem, addiction strains the economy, the health care system, the criminal justice system, and threatens 
job security, public safety, marital and family life. 

The drugs and substance addiction is across all societal boundaries, affects however society has increasingly recognized 
the addiction as a disease, a disease that can be treated and cured through awareness and educational campaigned with 
the aim of empowering our communities with information related to drugs and substance abuse. Every ethnic groups, both 
genders, and people in every tax bracket. 

Emalahleni municipality is one of the South African cities with relatively high percentages of people with illegal drug trading 
and addictions. One of the main reasons for this high statistics is because of the two major national roads going through 


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Emalahleni, connecting Johannesburg (N12) and Pretoria (N4) on the way to Mozambique via Nelspruit. These routes have 
made an entry point for service users to access drugs and easier for drug lords to sell and distribute drugs to our youth of 
Emalahleni. Currently Thembisile and victor Khanye Local Municipalities has inclined in terms of number of youth involved in 
the drugs. This incline is informed by being closer to the neighbouring to Gauteng boarders together with the inter-provincial 
routes passing the above mentioned town and townships. 

The Municipality is continuously holding the drugs and substance abuse awareness campaigns in the areas identified as the 
drugs hot sports in the district area of jurisdiction. Currently the municipality has held the drugs and substance awareness 
campaign at Victor Khanye Local Municipality at Botleng and also Moloto at Thembisile Hani Local Municipality and Dr JS 
Moroka in vaalbank hall. The campaigns have the following objectives 

* Educating the community about of the services available to help those with the problem of substance abuse and 
drug users about possible cure and help to recover from substance usage. 

■ Provides with opportunities to reinforce our commitment in addressing and responding to the challenges of 
substance abuse 

■ Comprehend why trust is important and how decision about use of controlled and non-controlled substances 
impact on trust. 

■ Educated the community on how to avoid risks that exist in their environment as far as drugs abuse in concern. 

■ A dialogue on the solution to reduce the abuse of alcohol, drugs and substance was attended by many users, 
which so many of them (young users) indicating the willingness of quite drugs. 

10. Youth summit 

■ To create an enabling platform for young people to discuss matters that affects them and identify problem areas 
around them and come up with solutions. 

11. Integrated youth development strategy 

The Integrated Youth Development Strategy commences with a statement of intent which states that the first Integrated 
Youth Development Strategy of the Nkangala District, is to serve as a guiding tool with which to ensure that youth 
development occurs in a sustainable manner, as envisioned by the Youth Development Framework for Local Government 
(2008). 

Nkangala District municipality has also developed the integrated youth development strategies for Victor Khanye Local 
Municipality and Emakhazeni Local Municipality with the aim of supporting the youth development in the municipalities in 
their area of jurisdiction. The Strategy has the following objectives: 

■ The integrated youth development strategy assists and shapes the youth The integrated youth development strategy 
assists and shapes the youth development priorities and emanates from various consultative youth forums 

■ Development priorities and emanates from various consultative youth forums 

■ All local municipalities must have a youth development strategy that guides them in terms of advancing youth 
development issues and should be aligned with the district youth development strategy 

12. Mayoral cup/games 

The Nkangala District Municipality hosted its annual Mayoral sports tournament on the at the rotational basis in the six local 
municipalities within its area of jurisdiction. The Games aspires to promote sound inter-municipal relations and Social Cohesion 
within the District by using sports as a vehicle to forge sustainable partnerships and further strengthening existing relationships 
with sports federation, sports council and sports academy. The Games also helped in unearthing, identifying and nurturing 
hidden sporting talents within Nkangala District Area of Jurisdiction.The Mayoral sports tournament is aimed at creating an 
enabling environment for young people in the district to thrive and explore in founding their sports talent. The district mayoral 
games have the following objectives 

■ Enhancing cooperation between the different locals through the games 

■ Facilitating the development of sustainable sports infrastructure within municipalities 

■ Facilitate maximum utilization of the facilities within municipalities 

■ Promote local economic development through sports infrastructure in municipalities 

■ Identify hidden talent in the outlying areas of all local municipalities within the province 

■ Promote social cohesion within communities 

■ Develop sports management capacity at municipal and community level 

■ Promote partnerships with all relevant stakeholders 

■ Create access to different sporting codes for all communities especially within the previously disadvantaged 
communities and seek to redress the imbalances in respect to gender, physical challenged race etc. 

■ Promote positive social economic and health values through the games 


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■ Games seek to promote tolerance and unity amongst communities irrespective of cultural or political 
background 

13. HIV/AIDS 

■ To get more young people involved in activities of the HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns; 

■ To work towards the achievement of an HIV/AIDS free generation by involving and educating young people about 
the epidemic; 

■ To continuously participate in the awareness campaigns to make sure that local communities of the District, 
Province and South African nation at large are informed. 

14. Poor Preforming Schools Support Programs 

Nkangala district Municipality has identified that the high unemployment rate is caused by couple of the issues as identified 
in the strategy which includes the Low skills base, lack of proper career choices in the industry. The main contribution factor 
is the low standards education systems in the rural areas. The district is intending to address this by establishing the schools 
support program with the following objectives: 

* To get more youth to obtain the quality basic education which will ensure that they get a fair opportunity to be in 
the labour market.; 

* To ensure there is no schools obtaining below 55% pass rate to reduce the number of the disgruntled youth 
without matric which will enable them to obtain necessary skills. 

■ To ensure unemployment graduates are given an opportunity to use their skills acquired at the institution of higher 
learning to assist youth in rural schools to obtain better quality education through volunteerism. 

4.17 Issue 12: Water and Sanitation 

4.17.1 Background and Problem Statement 

Development, operation and maintenance of infrastructure are critical to the process of economic growth and development 
therefore reducing poverty. Central to the poor infrastructure at some Municipalities in the NDM area is the lack of coordinated 
infrastructure planning strategies. In order to counter this trend and proactively plan and manage the new infrastructure, the 
NDM will have to coordinate the compilation and implementation of Infrastructure development plan for local Municipalities 
during the next five years. 

The delivery of basic Services is essential in improving the quality of life and sustainable development for communities. In 
order for a household to be considered having adequate access to sanitation, the household should have a proper sanitation, 
affordable, hygienic, and accessible. However, a decision of doing away with Ventilated Improved Pit latrines (VIPs) was been 
taken collectively with the Provincial government posing a strain of water supply. Unsustainable water supply continues to be 
a challenge because the Western Highveld scheme is being operated in isolation. Outcome 8 provides for sustainable human 
settlements and an improved quality of life sets out clear outputs on the provision of targets for local Municipalities as a primary 
responsibility of Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to contribute in achieving these national 
targets. However, this target was not achieved due to limited resources and growing number of households. Therefore, the 
Provincial government has taken an integrated approach on utilising the available resource towards the implementation of 
water and sanitation services. 


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The Figure (40) below indicate piped water inside dwelling in percentage: 


62 . 2 % 


54 . 9 % 


48 . 4 % 


41 . 9 % 


36 . 3 % 


2001 i 2011 


55 . 0 % 


40 . 6 % 


36 . 9 % 


28 . 4 % 


23 . 8 % 



VictorKhanye Emalahleni SteveTshwete Emakhazeni Thembisile DrJSMoroka Nkangala 


Source: SALGA-Local Government Brief , January 2015 


The figure (41) below indicate flush toilet connect to sewerage %: 


70 . 6 % 71 . 6 % 


81 . 9 % 

75.79 [ 74 . 4 % 


2001 ■ 2011 


63.2 



48 . 7 % 


43.8 


11 . 6 % 


13 . 3 % 


5 . 5 % 


6 . 8 % 




Victor Khanye Emalahleni Steve Tshwete Emakhazeni Thembisile DrJSMoroka Nkangala 


Source: SALGA-Locai Government Brief, January 2015 


National Projected Targets 
■ Water from 92% to 100% 

* Sanitation from 69% to 100% 

* Refuse removal from 64% to 75% 


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Electricity 


from 81% to 92% 


The infrastructure index ranges from the value of 0 to 1, where 0 indicates that all households in the region have no 
infrastructure of any kind whereas a value of 1 denotes that all households have an access to the minimum or basic level of 
service. 

Basic services there is still a need to strive towards 100% access to services by households especially water and sanitation 
in order to achieve the Provincial mandate of access to water by everyone in the Province. Blue Drop status of the District is 
poor with only two Municipalities with good status (SUM and DRJSMLM) and worst being EMKLM. Thorough analysis needs 
to be made on the Water Treatment Works (WTW) where there are still challenges on compliance with Blue Drop. Green drop 
status in the District is extremely poor with only STLM performing on average and all other 5 local municipalities performing 
badly. The possible challenge is the final effluent which is not compliant with the Water Services Act and might affect the 
ground water source and the downstream users of the stream or river. NDM needs to capacitate the LMs to improve the 
current condition. 

As part of a comprehensive strategy to deal with water and sanitation related challenges facing the Nkangala District, the 
following range of initiatives are currently prioritised. The priority area that should be focused on is building capacity in 
operation and maintenance area. Discussed below are the key strategic thrusts and initiatives emanating from the Water 
Master Plan that have been on consideration, which include: 

■ Collaboration; 

- Institutional Arrangements; 

- Cullinan and the Western Highveld Region Emergency Augmentation Scheme; 

- Rand Water Augmentation Scheme (Bloemendal pipeline); 

* Reclamation of Mine Water (Emalahleni & Steve Tshwete LMs); 

* Raw Water Supply to Industries (all LMs); 

* Recycling of Waste Water Effluent. 


4.17.2 Collaboration 

The identified challenges are resolved by having all the sector stakeholders working together in an aligned, efficient and 
productive manner. Key in this exercise would be the alignment of programmes and resources, integrated planning at all 
levels, linking to Project Consolidate, implementation of WMP and WSDPs, development of appropriate Community links as 
well as development and implementation of a monitoring and reporting system. The implementation of water and sanitation 
programmes must be in line with the developed WSDPs. 

4.17.3 Institutional Arrangements 

This section presents a summary of the main aspects of the institutional capacity of all the six LMs within the NDM. The need 
is to analyse the WSA functions, determine needs, design support and align NDM and other support institutions activities with 
ultimate goal of improved service delivery. 

All LMs under the jurisdiction of NDM are water Services authorities with a mandate of providing effective management of the 
water Services function and ensure that water Services are efficiently and effectively delivered. There is a reported varying level 
of institutional capacities in water Services management functions, associated organizational structure within the text portion of 
the WSDP, and in the interests of good planning. 

It is important to state that a study was conducted and it revealed that institutional capacity is the primary constraining factor. 
Delivering new infrastructure, operation, and maintenance of existing networks are key business complex activities that require 
competent skilled persons that are in short supply and Municipalities’ attempts to strive towards establishing institutional 
environment are met with little or no success in building internal capacities in specific water and sanitation service delivery 
projects. 

There is further a capacity problem as far as there is no dedicated unit in the Finance Departments who specifically manage 
consumer credit. The Municipalities do not have a dedicated legal section to undertake debt collection on behalf of council and 
legal proceedings against defaulting debtors are non-existent and this impact on Municipal financial viability as they are unable 
to implement cost recovery. 

The institutional reform in the Western Highveld requires special attention in the light of the continued challenges over many 
years related to poor service delivery and the historical problems associated with the fact that this area comprised the previous 
homeland of KwaNdebele. DWS has also been responsible for the O&M of the regional water scheme until it was handed 
over to the WSAs of Thembisile and Dr JS Moroka LMs. 


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4.17.4 Support activities include the following: 

■ The implementation of short term draw-down management arrangements with Rand Water and City of Tshwane 
to stabilise operations at the water treatment works in Bronkhorspruit LM and Dr JS Moroka LM; 

■ The efficiencies at the WTWs improved with operations close to optimum levels, while the water quality is monitored 
on a daily basis; 

■ Review Water Services Development Plans; 

* Replacement of asbestos pipes; 

* Upgrading of bulk service (Water and Sanitation) 

* Revenue enhancement 

* Augmentation on the existing infrastructure and supply 

■ The assessment of an optimal institutional mechanism to ensure sustainable service delivery. 

Significant amounts of capital Finance are also being provided to the WHR through MIG. For socio-economic reasons, it is 
likely that the Western Highveld area will continue to rely on grant funding to cover operational and capital expenditure. The 
independent feasibility study provided recommendations around necessary institutional arrangements that will put in place 
effective management of the Western FHighveld Scheme (WHS). The key objective is to ensure water is managed in the most 
effective and efficient way for the benefit of all the communities receiving water supply from the WHS. 

There are a number of different types of WSA, which could fulfil the WSP retail functions. Steve Tshwete and Emalahleni are 
typically associated with bulk water supply, but in some areas also provide retail Services, and private companies are appointed 
to support the service, for example meter reading, billing, etc. through service contracts. In this case, the WSA remains the 
WSP with the assistance of service contracts. 

There are no current audit reports available on the condition of water and sanitation infrastructure for each of the Municipalities. 
Municipalities in the region indicated challenges surrounding the implementation of policies, especially credit control policies 
and reasons cited is because no specific person or dedicated unit is responsible for this function. Not all Municipalities are 
implementing indigent policies and not all indigent registers are regularly updated. The effectiveness of a policy can only be 
measured against the results obtained from enforcing the policy. Crucial to the functionality of a Water Service Provider is the 
policies regulating water. 

4.17.5 Reclamation of Mine Water 

Emalahleni Water Reclamation Project (EWRP) is one of the initiatives, which are undertaken jointly with the Mining industry. 
The current capacity (Phase 1) of the EWRP is 25ML per day and it supplies ELM with 10ML per day. In order to meet demand 
supply must be increased to at least 20ML per day. 

The EWRP is designed such that its capacity can be increased to 75ML per day. It is currently constructed to treat 25ML per 
day purely for sustainability of the Mining operations, that is, the water being treated ensures that the water level is kept 
constant to allow Mining operations. Should higher amount of water be extracted, there will be a substantial draw down of the 
water level and the water reserve may be depleted. 

4.17.6 Raw Water Supply to Industries: 

Most of the Industries in ELM are supplied with potable water for their operation although they do not require potable water 
for this activity. Some of these Industries have already indicated their willingness to accept raw water from ELM as this will 
be both cost effective for the Industries and will alleviate the pressure on ELM with regard to the supply of potable water. 
Discussions are currently underway with other firms. If this is realised, approximately 220 000 litres of potable water will be 
recovered per day; which translates to the availability of water to supply approximately 1 050 households at the current supply 
norms. Individual LM’s must embark on this project in the future and improve the provision of Water supplies. 

4.17.7 Recycling of Waste Water Effluent: 

The waste water treatment works are currently discharging the resultant effluent into the natural watercourses. One of the 
proposals indicated in the Water Master Plan is the recycling of waste water effluent and reuse as raw water supply to industry. 
The District will further pursue recommendations of the Short Term Regional Intervention Project (STRIP), which highlights 
the following matters as requiring urgent attention 

* Active leakage management; 

* Pressure Management; 

* Meter reading; 

* Use of the telemetry systems to monitor water flow; 

■ Water quality management; 

■ Training/Skills development of process controllers. 

Several of the plants are currently utilised at maximum or more than the design capacities, while the effluent is reported to be 
either unknown or poor. 


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Some problems remain and the capacity of the plant is under pressure from increased flows. Major problems exist at the 
following WWTW: 

■ Emalahleni LM - Ferrobank, Riverview, Klipspruit and Kriel WWTWs. 

■ Thembisile LM - Tweefontein K WWTW. 

The most common immediate cause of effluent not meeting DWS standards is a breakdown of plant and / or length of time 
that it takes to have plant repaired, both of which are largely attributable to inadequate budgets or operator error or both. 

The situation depicts a lack of planning and budgeting for the upgrading and the O&M of these plants as shown in Table 41 
It is considered to constitute major health risks to downstream communities and negative sources of pollution to the natural 
environment. 

The O&M budget should be utilised in a cost effective way, as this practise is deemed to best promote the efficient use of and 
contributing to the best life-cycle cost effectiveness of their infrastructure. This WSA also reports that the condition of the 
infrastructure is considered satisfactory. 

The current level of operation and maintenance regarding water Services in all the LMs is not adequate and the assets are 
deteriorating. There is a general lack of planning, manifesting it through the absence of official documentation such as an 
Asset Management Plan (AMP) ora detailed WSDP in this regard. The schemes are also getting older and require increased 
maintenance and attention. The lack of planning has been exacerbated by the almost exclusive drive to meet the backlog- 
eradication targets by some WSAs. The addition of new infrastructure and consumers to the existing schemes and the 
redirection of budgets away from the O&M to the construction of new connections compound the problem. 

In the medium to long-term period, the District in collaboration with its Strategic Partners will need to place emphasis on the 
following matters: 

* Lack of water in informal settlements within NDM. 

* Inadequate bulk infrastructure to meet the Demands. 

* Dilapidated of existing bulk Infrastructure. 

* Unavailability of fully accredited Laboratory facilities. 

- Process controllers not registered with Department of Water and Sanitation. 

- Lack of operation and maintenance plan. 

* Lack of access to water and waterborne sanitation in farm areas. 

* Unaccounted water loss 

- Ageing of bulk infrastructure 

* Lack of maintenance budgets 

* Poor water quality 

* High water losses (UAW) 

* Improve revenue enhancement in LMs 

4.18 Issue 13: Electricity Supply 
4.18.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The Security of coal supply for some existing coal power stations is increasingly under threat. Coal miners are unwilling to 
sign new long-term contracts with Eskom, as they can get much more returns through exports to India and other Asian 
Countries. A balance has to be found between exports and local supply security with a fair deal between Government and 
Coal Mining Industry Leaders. 

A reliable electricity supply depends on a sufficient number of functioning power stations, and a reliable grid network to 
transport electricity to users. Municipalities distribute about half of South Africa’s electricity, with increasing local supply failures 
in some areas, a more pragmatic corrective approach will need to be implemented. With respect to the provision of electricity 
the following Table details the state of Electrical Infrastructure in the District. Table 78: Status of Electricity License 


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Local Municipality 

Provision of Electricity | 

Dr J S Moroka 

Eskom 

Thembisile Haiti 

Eskom 

Steve Tshwete 

Licenced 

Emalahleni 

Licensed 

Emakhazeni 

Partially Licensed 

Victor Kanye 

Partially Licensed 


Significant in Electricity have been achieved by Municipalities in the District to address the eradication of electricity backlogs 
as detailed in the following Table. 

Table 79: Status of High mast lights and transmission lines 


Local Municipality 

High mast Lights 

Transmission Lines 

Thembisile Hani 

20 

0 

Dr JS Moroka 

41 

0 

Emalahleni 

0 

0 

Emakhazeni 

0 

2 


The District has developed an Electricity Master Plan for Emalahleni Municipality that encompasses the need of the 
municipality and implementation of programmes and projects are prioritised in the IDP as directed by the local municipalities’. 
The Plan includes the provision to eensure that the electricity supply network expands to serve the entire ELM community, 
including rural communities and farm areas. In promoting environmental sustainability, the NDM has realized the need to 
explore other energy forms, which are renewable, beyond focusing on coal-generated electricity as the main supply of energy. 
In pursuit of this initiative, the Department in conjunction with the Municipal Support Unit in the District is evaluating alternative 
sources of energy e.g. solar power and engages with Eskom on an ongoing basis as a member of the Provincial Energy 
Forum. 

Key among high level Strategic interventions, the Kusile Power Station Project is valued at about R 118.5 billion and the 
Komati power station, which is to have a major revamp, are in the District area of jurisdiction. The Kusile Project is a new coal 
fired power station located to the West of the R545 between the N4 and N12 freeways near the existing Kendal power station. 
It comprises of six units rated at approximately 4 800 MW installed capacity. 

Nkangala District Municipality had a total number of 45 000 (11.61%) households with electricity for lighting only, a total of 
296 000 (76.34%) households had electricity for lighting and other purposes and a total number of 46 800 (12.06%) 
households did not use electricity. 

TABLE 80: HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE OF ELECTRICAL CONNECTION - VICTOR KHANYE, EMALAHLENI, STEVE 
TSHWETE, EMAKHAZENI, THEMBISILE HANI AND DR JS MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES, 2015 [NUMBER] 



Electricity for 
lighting only 

Electricity for 
lighting and other 
purposes 

Not using electricity 

Total 

Victor Khanye 

5,440 

14,100 

3,050 

22,600 

Emalahleni 

2,660 

104,000 

27,700 

134,000 

Steve Tshwete 

8,330 

62,600 

5,040 

75,900 

Emakhazeni 

2,320 

9,280 

2,470 

14,100 

Thembisile Hani 

17,400 

56,200 

6,360 

80,000 

Dr JS Moroka 

8,880 

49,900 

2,180 

61,000 

Total 

Nkangala 

45,038 

296,162 

46,774 

387,973 


Source: IHS Global Insight Regional eXplorer version 1029 


The region within Nkangala with the highest number of households with electricity for lighting and other purposes is Emalahleni 
local municipality with 104 000 or a share of 35.14% of the households with electricity for lighting and other purposes within 


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Nkangala District Municipality. The Region with the lowest number of households with electricity for lighting and other purposes 
is Emakhazeni local municipality with a total of 9 280 or a share of 3.13% of the total households with electricity for lighting 
and other purposes within Nkangala District Municipality. 

Figure 42: Electricity connection 


Electricity connection 

Nkangala, 2005-2015 

56,000 
54,000 
52,000 
50,000 
48,000 
46,000 
44,000 
42,000 

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 



^—•Number of households with no electrical connection 

Source: IHS Global Insight Regional explorer version 1029 

When looking at the number of households with no electrical connection over time, it can be seen that in 2005 the households 
without an electrical connection in Nkangala District Municipality was 51 400, this decreased annually at -0.95% per annum 
to 46 800 in 2015. 

The region within Nkangala with the highest number of households with electricity for lighting and other purposes is Emalahleni 
local municipality with 104 000 or a share of 35.14% of the households with electricity for lighting and other purposes within 
Nkangala District Municipality. The Region with the lowest number of households with electricity for lighting and other purposes 
is Emakhazeni local municipality with a total of 9 280 or a share of 3.13% of the total households with electricity for lighting 
and other purposes within Nkangala District Municipality. 

To respond adequately to the Electricity Supply issues NDM in collaboration with key stakeholders must place emphasis on 
the following matters and progress where applicable is detailed. 

• Partially licenced municipalities to provide electricity. 

• Municipalities exceeding its notified maximum demand. 

• None payment of bulk electricity 

• Ageing of bulk electricity Infrastructure 

• Inadequate bulk electricity infrastructure to meet the demand. 

• Lack of operation and maintenance plan. 

• Theft of solar panels from the borehole pump station. 

Generic issues common to the District: 


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Programmes implemented by Eskom and Department of Energy are not included in the respective Local municipalities 
I DPs resulting in duplication of services - Multi-year budgeting & implementation Projects from Eskom to be included 
in the IDPs 


Flowing from the 2018IDP Indaba held at Nkangala District Municipality, the plenary made the following recommendations: 

Table 81: Indaba recommendations on electricity __ 


Objective 

Strategies 

Recommendations/Resolution 

Improve access to 
electricity & 
community lightning 

• Municipalities to construct their own substations to be 
able to store energy and minimise the charges/penalties; 

and purchase electricity in bulk. 

• Revenue enhancement projects (Installation of electricity 

prepaid meters). 

• Alternative ways/method to secure solar panels. 

• Investigation of renewable energy 

• All street light in local municipalities to be energised with 

solar energy. 

Introduction of energy savings technology in municipal 

building. 

Engage with National Energy 
Regulation of South Africa 
(NERSA) on alternative energy 
sources and licencing of 
Municipalities to provide power 


Municipalities should develop recovery plans and enhance revenue collection for services rendered. 


4.19 Issue 14: Roads and Storm Water 
4.19.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The NDM does not have as a core function the responsibility of Municipal Roads in its jurisdiction and therefore does not have 
road assets or infrastructure, but will upgrade & develop roads infrastructure on request by LMs. However, support is provided 
to all Municipalities to ensure that road accessibility is improved as detailed in the following Table. 

Table 82: Storm water and roads status quo 


LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 

ROADS 

STORMWATER 

BRIDGES 

WALK-WAYS 

Dr JS Moroka 

2.7 km 

1.5km 

0 

0 

Victor Khanye Local 

Municipaity 

2 km Road 
Rehabilitation(RRM) 

0 

0 

0 

Steve Tshwete Local 

Municipality 

1.7km 

0 

0 

0 

Emalahleni Local Municipality 

0.2 km 

1.2 km 

65m 

21.5 km 

6.7 km Road 
Rehabilitation(RR) 

Emakhazeni Local Municipaity 

2.4 km 

0 

0 

0 

Thembisile Hani Local 

Municipaity 

11.099km 

8.499 km 

141m 

0 




4.19.2 Support by NDM and DPWR&T 

The National Department of Transport (DoT) has provided grant funding for the implementation of Road Asset Management 
Systems (RAMS) as set out in the framework for the Rural Road Asset Management Grant (RRAM), Division of Revenue Act 
(DORA). The purpose of RRAMS 

The strategic goal of the RRAM Grant is to ensure efficient and effective investment in rural roads through the development 
of Road Asset Management Systems (RAMS) and the collection of associated road and bridge inventory data, condition 
assessments and traffic information. Improved data on rural roads will guide infrastructure investment, improve accessibility 
to and mobility of rural communities. 


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The Nkangala District Municipality has been allocated the following budgets over the 3-year life-cycle of the RRAM Grant and 
it is anticipated that the project will be completed in the 2018/19 financial year. 

Table 83: PRAM Grant 


2016/17 

2017/18 

2018/19 

2 076 000.00 

2 180 000.00 

2 321 000.00 


The RRAMS will provide detailed actions to determine the characteristics of all roads which are classified as motorised, that 
is, from Class 1 to 5. This will entail physical inspections of these roads, their bridges and the quantification of their volumes 
of traffic. The current status of road access is detailed in the following Table. 

Table 84: Municipal Access roads 



Municipal & Access Road length (km) 

Local 

Municipality 

Paved 

Unpaved 

Concrete 

Block Paved 

Total 

Steve Tshwete 

763.34 

137.02 

0 

15.31 

915.670 

Emalahleni 

750.69 

469.15 

0 

33.38 

1253.225 

Victor Khanye 

176.1 

297.2 

0 

10.24 

483.549 

Thembisile Hani 

217.36 

1904.02 

0 

7.30 

2028.68 

Dr JS Moroka 

278.77 

2928.86 

0 

7.182 

3214.81 

Emakhazeni 

86.7 

99.09 

0 

33.66 

219.44 

Total Assessed 

2272.96 

5835.34 

0 

107.07 

8215.37 

TOTAL 

2272.96 

5835.34 

0 

107.07 

8215.37 

Percentage 

100% 

100% 

0% 

100% 

100.00% 


It is anticipated that the classification of certain roads may change during this investigation. These changes will be captured 
and verified through the province’s Road Infrastructure Strategic Framework for South Africa (RISFSA) classification system. 

The primary purpose of the project 

To assist the District Municipality to set up a rural roads asset management system and collect road and traffic data for the 
road network under its jurisdiction in line with the Road Infrastructure Strategic Framework for South Africa (RISFSA). The 
current extent of road network may increase as new roads are captured and the road network is further refined. 

Outcome Statement 

• Improve data on rural (all municipal) roads to guide infrastructure investment. 

• Reduce vehicle operating costs and extend the lifespan of rural (all municipal) roads. 

Outputs 

• Collection of selected road inventory data including condition assessment and traffic data. 

• Setting up pavement and bridge management systems compatible with National Standards. 

• Capacity building and training of S4 Civil Engineering Technician Graduates. (Refer to training) 

Condition of Grant; 

• Data must be collected and presented in the format prescribed by RISFSA. 

• Data collection should use labour intensive methods that comply with the Expanded Public Works Programme 
(EPWP) guidelines. 

• All data collected must be made available to the National Department of Transport (DoT), South African National 
Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) and the relevant provincial authorities. 

• Systems developed to record data must be compatible with the Department of Transport specifications. 

Challenges: 

• Certain areas with high crime spots makes it difficult to do assessments 

• Trying to obtain the Dataset and the Road Inventory. 

A Service provider has been appointed by the District Municipality for a period of three years for the duration of the RRAMS 
Grant. 


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The division of Roles and Responsibilities will be as follows: Table 85: Functions for PRAM Grant 


Assignment of responsibilities, functions and tasks 

Role player 

Responsibilities 

Municipal Authority 

■ spending of grant funds in accordance with the stipulations of the Division of Revenue 

Act (DORA) 

■ overall responsibility for RAMS Project during all its phases 

■ initiate project business plan 

■ appoint service providers 

■ control budgeting, accounting and internal auditing processes 

■ operate and maintain information management systems 

■ conclude learnership agreements 

■ relevant authorities to fund and implement projects emanating from the RAMS 

Provincial Authority 

■ coordinate project 

■ provide/host a centralised provincial Road Asset Management System 

■ interact with all role players and stakeholders 

■ coordinate graduate training and mentorship (Graduate Academy) 

■ interact with national authorities 

■ monitor planning and implementation processes 

■ explore innovative ideas 

Service Provider/ 

Project Manager 

■ implement and manage project 

■ formulate and manage communication plan 

■ interact with municipal authority as well as role players and stakeholders 

■ train and mentor graduates 

■ co-ordinate all reporting to municipal authority 

■ monitor progress and submit reports and cash flows 

Graduates 

■ commit to learnership and mentorship programme 

■ responsible for all equipment assigned to them during the project period 

■ carry out field assessments, desktop studies and project specific reports 

■ perform GIS work pertaining to the RAMS 


4.20 KPA 6: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS AND RATIONAL 

In March 2015, the Nkangala District Spatial Development Framework (NDSDF) was approved as part of the IDP in terms of 
section 34 of the Municipal System Act, No 32 of 2000. The spatial development analysis seeks to guide, overall spatial 
distribution of the existing and future desired land use and development within the District in order to give effect to the vision, 
goals and objectives of the District IDP. The focus of a Spatial Development Framework is on promote sustainable functional 
and integrated human settlements, maximize resource efficiency, and enhance regional identity and unique character of a 
place. The NDSDF provides both a short and long term development path of the District. It is of paramount important to note, 
that the NDSDF must guide national, provincial and municipal spheres, and private sector in taking any decision or exercising 
any discretion in relation to spatial planning and land use management system. 

The land use management system, is the system of regulating and managing land use through the confirming of land use 
rights by using zoning schemes, development parameters and land development procedures. 

4.20.1 REGIONAL OVERVIEW 

As shown on Figure 44 the NDM is bounded by the Limpopo Province to the north (Sekhukhune and Waterberg District 
Municipalities) and Gauteng Province to the west (the City of Tshwane and Sedibeng District Municipality). To the south lies 
the Gert Sibande District Municipality and to the east the Ehlanzeni District. The NDM is situated relatively close to the hub of 
economic activity of South Africa (i.e. Gauteng Province), and is traversed by three major national roads namely the N12, N4 
and Nil. The N4 forms part of the Maputo-Walvis Bay Sub Continental Development Corridor. The District is predominantly 
a rural area, comprising extensive farming, nature reserves and mining areas. There are approximately 165 towns and villages 
distributed throughout the area. These can be classified in three main categories, namely towns, rural villages (mainly 


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residential) in the Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka areas, and settlements associated with mining or electricity activities 
(collieries) in the southern parts of Emalahleni and Steve Tshwete municipalities. Witbank and Middelburg are the two main 
towns in the District, both in terms of location and function. Kwaggafontein, KwaMhlanga, Siyabuswa, Victor 
Khanye (Delmas) and eMakhazeni are secondary service centres serving as central places to the surrounding farming 
communities. The tourism potential associated with the eastern regions of the District has resulted in the regeneration and 
growth of Dullstroom and Emgwenya (Waterval- Boven) in the Emakhazeni Municipality. 

Figure 43: Regional Map 



NKANGALA DISTRICT 
MUNICIPALITY 

Spatial Structure 


Legend 


I iNkangala DM 
I I Local Municipality 
I | District Municipality 
I I Towns (C ensus 2011) 
—Traditional Areas 
® (Census 201 1) 
—Informal Settlements 
•(Census 2011) 
—National Roads 
“Main Roads 
Secondary Roads 
—Railways 

Ris ers and Dams 
• Towns 


The six Local Municipalities within the Nkangala District as depicted on Figure 42. The extent of the six local municipalities is 
noted below: 

Table 86: Area of Local Municipality 


MUNICIPALITY 

EXTENT (KM) 2 

% OF NDM 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

1416.49 

8.45% 

Emakhazeni LM 

4737.11 

28.26% 

Emalahleni LM 

2677.63 

15.98% 

Steve Tshwete LM 

3976.78 

23.73% 

Thembisile Hani LM 

2384.39 

14.23% 

Victor Khanye LM 

1567.8 

9.35% 

Nkangala DM 

16 760.2 

100% 


4.20.2 Issue 5: Spatial Restructuring and Service Provision 

• In regard to service provision according to the constitution, ‘everyone has the right to adequate Housing, healthcare, 
food and water, social security and to an environment that is not harmful to their health or well-being. Nkangala 
District municipality is at its level best taking reasonable legislative and other measures, within its available 
resources, to achieve the progressive realisation of each of these rights.’ The National Development Plan contains 
a similar endorsement of public investment in infrastructure:'Basic services enhance the quality of life of 


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citizens, and increase their social and economic opportunities by promoting health and safety, facilitating access 
(to work, to education, to recreation) and stimulating new productive activities’ 

• As Nkangala District in spatial restructuring we intend to pursue restructuring of the 6 local municipalities, its 
importance is about integration of economic, racial and social activities. Restructuring is thus intimately linked to 
interventions in the land market: either to protect lower income people from displacement or to bring lower income 
into areas of economic and other forms of opportunity from which they would otherwise be excluded. Nkangala 
District Municipality is working at its level best to be in line with the National Development Plan 2030. Currently the 
district is embarking on driving the development of Nkangala District Municipality vision 2040 and development 
strategy which intends to address the following: 

• To interrogate and validate the current Vision and Mission Statements of the Nkangala District; 

• To provide a strategic indicative on how this long term vision will be realised; 

• To identify and coordinate IDP project priorities that are aimed at achieving this Vision; 

• To provide a set of policies, principles and directives for implementation phases of the Vision and Development 
Strategy that are linked and aligned to the NDM IDP and budget processes; 

• To provide a clear and logical framework for private and public sector investment in the Nkangala District; 

• To promote sustainable development in terms of the natural and built environment; 

• To facilitate social, economic and environmental sustainability in the Nkangala District; 

• To provide a framework for dealing with key issues such as natural resource management, land reform and land 
use management; 

• To facilitate the development of aesthetic urban form and landscape; 

• In continuation of alleviating inequality, poverty and unemployment the Departments of Rural Development and 

Land Reform has taken an initiative of formulating the Rural Development Plan for the three district municipalities 
within the Mpumalanga province. The main key feature that the plan is to address are as follows: 

• Improving the living standards of the subsistence population. This involves mobilisation and allocation of resources 
so as to reach a sustainable balance overtime between the welfare and productive services available to the 
subsistence rural sector. 

• Mass participation which ensures that rural people take control of their environment and destiny. 

• Development of the appropriate skills and capacity of the communities involved. 

• Integrated/ comprehensive approach involving economic, social, institutional and physical development. 

• The presence of institutions at the local, regional and national levels to ensure the effective use of existing resources 
and to foster the mobilisation of additional financial and human resources. 


4.20.3 Background and Problem Statement 

The Nkangala District Municipality covers a vast area of approximately 188 118 hectares. The District is predominantly a rural 
area, comprising extensive farming, forestry, nature reserves and mining areas. There are approximately 165 towns and 
villages distributed throughout the area. These can be classified in three main categories, namely towns, rural villages (mainly 
residential) and settlements associated with mining or electricity activities (collieries). 


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The following map displays the NDM as a whole. 
Figure 44: NDN Regional Context 



NKANGALA 

DISTRICT 

MUNICIPALITY 


REGIONAL 

CONTEXT 

Provincial Boundary 
I I Nkangala District Municipality 
Towns and Settlements 
Nkangala Local Municipalities 

□ Dr J.S. Moroka 
I iThembisile 

□ Victor Khanye 
I I Emalahlem 

□ Steve Tshwete 
I I Emakhazeni 

— National Roads 

— Main Roads 
Secondary Roads 

• Main Towns 


4.20.4 Synthesis Critical Issues and Constraints 

The following is a Key Issues identified in the Nkangala District SDF are deemed to be relevant 

4.20.4.1 Fragmented Settlement Structure 

The Nkangala District has a dispersed spatial structure comprising 165 towns and villages. This could mainly be ascribed 
to the following: 

• The distribution of natural resources (e.g. coal) which determined the location of many settlements; and 

• The former homeland areas to the north which are under Traditional Authority and which were established under 
the Apartheid system. 

This distorted spatial structure makes the provision of community facilities costly and problematic. It results in the 
duplication of facilities and services, which is evident from the analysis of community facilities in the District. The threshold 
levels for the provision of community services are however low in rural areas, due to vast distances and low population 
densities characterising these areas. 

Engineering services are expensive to provide to small settlements in remote areas. The vast distances imply that 
communities have to make use of public transport to access community facilities, while the rural nature of the area also makes 
the provision of public transport costly and unsustainable. 

4.20.4.2 Poverty Footprint 

The spatial distribution of people reflects that there are three distinguishable groups of people affected by poverty, namely: 


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• Tribal Authority Areas: The main concentration of poor people is located in the north west of the Nkangala District, 
in the Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Municipalities. The conglomeration of settlements in these areas present 
communities displaced due to Apartheid planning. 

• These areas have limited local economies, due to the fact that expenditure until recently mainly occurred closer to 
employment centres which represents a significant leakage of income out of the area. 

• Informal Settlements: The second concentration of poor people is communities residing in informal settlements on 
the periphery of towns, specifically the informal settlements situated around Witbankand Middelburg. The population 
densities in these areas are very high, with poor access to basic infrastructure and community facilities. These areas 
also have no local economies and are reliant on the main centres for employment and business activities. 

• Farms and Mining Villages: The third category of poor people resides in the rural areas on small mining villages 
and on farms. The communities residing on farms are particularly vulnerable, as they do not have ownership of the 
land where they are staying and are affected by evictions and unfair labour practices. These communities have to 
travel long distances to the major centres in the Nkangala District to access community facilities and economic 
activities and are highly reliant on public transport, which is generally poor. 

4.20.4.3 Demographic Features 

• Population densities vary from very high in some of the urban areas, such as the settlements in Thembisile Hani 
and Dr JS Moroka in the north-west of the District as well as Witbank and Middelburg, to very low in some of the 
small settlements such as Dullstroom and the rural areas. 

• The population profile of the Nkangala District revealed that the majority of people living in the area are extremely 
poor and do not have access to mainstream economic activities. Approximately 86.1% of all households earn less 
than the Minimum Living Level of R4000 per month. 

• Thembisile Hani (37%) and Dr JS Moroka (46.6%) are characterised by excessively high unemployment levels. 

• The number of households in Nkangala is increasing while the average household size is decreasing. This has 
meant that, while there has been an increase in the number of households living in formal dwellings, the number 
living in informal housing remained constant - and the backlog of households needing basic sanitation and refuse 
removal services has increased. 

4.20.4.4 Accommodation 

• An estimated 41 502 households live in informal settlements excluding those living in backyards and overcrowded 
households (23 336 units) while about 8645 households live in informal structures in Traditional Areas. The total 
informal backlog hence stands at 73 490 units. 

• The poor management of the mushrooming of informal settlements and the non-enforcement of the by-laws by 
Municipalities exacerbates current informal settlement trends. 

• There is also a significant need for housing in farm areas for far workers. 


4.20.4.5 Land Reform 

There is substantial need for upgrading of tenure - especially in the tribal areas in order to provide tenure security to residents. 
Nkangala District Municipality is faced with backlogs of incomplete land tenure upgrading applications and opening of township 
registers in the Traditional Authority Areas.The spatial distribution of people reflects that there are three distinguishable groups 
of people affected by poverty, namely: 

• The main concentration of poor people is located in the north west of the Nkangala District, in the Dr. JS Moroka and 
Thembisile Municipalities. The conglomeration of settlements in these areas present communities displaced due to 
apartheid planning. The City of Tshwane is the main employment centre for communities residing in this area, 
necessitating daily commuting via public transport. These areas have limited local economies, due to the fact that 
expenditure until recently mainly occurred closer to employment centres. 

• The second concentration of poor people is communities residing in informal settlements on the periphery of towns, 
specifically the informal settlements situated west of Witbank and Middelburg as well as the settlement north of Victor 
Khanye. The population densities in these areas are very high, with poor access to basic infrastructure and community 


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facilities. These areas also have no local economies and are reliant on the main centres for employment and business 
activities. 

• The third category of poor people resides in the rural areas, particularly in the former black townships of small villages 
and on farms. The communities residing on farms are particularly vulnerable, as they do not have ownership of the land 
where they are staying and are affected by evictions and unfair labour practices. These communities have to travel long 
distances to the major centres in the Nkangala District to access community facilities and economic activities and are 
highly reliant on public transport, which is generally poor. 

• In Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani municipalities, most of the settlements are not formalised, not registered with the 
Surveyor General and there are no Title Deeds on individual properties. 

• Similarly, the speedy processing of land claims in terms of the Land Restitution Act in the Nkangala District remains a 
priority issue. According to the Land Claims Report, there are 721 land claims registered in the Nkangala District (NDM 
IDP 2013/14). These claims are located on 271 properties. The largest number of claims submitted are in the Steve 
Tshwete Municipality (270), followed by Emakhazeni (159), and then Thembisile (133). 

• The long process of finalizing land tenure projects on State Owned Land and the limited capacity within the relevant 
Department to approve such applications has also been identified as a major challenge. However, the District has 
conducted a Land Tenure Strategy in order to address the challenges pertaining to the long process of upgrading of 
land tenure. 

• Little support is provided to beneficiaries with regard to developing sustainable livelihoods by those involved in land 
reform processes. 

4.20.4.6 Movement Network 

• The N4 and Nil freeways create economic opportunities for the Nkangala District through trade opportunities 
associated with the Maputo and Richards Bay harbours as well as tourism opportunities associated with some of 
the main tourism centers in South Africa. The inherent potential to this initiative is however not optimally utilized at 
this stage. 

• The R540 (P81-1), which runs from the N4 freeway through Emakhazeni and Dullstroom, provides a link with the 
tourist attractions located in the Graskop, Lydenburg, Sabie, Pilgrim’s Rest and Hoedspruit areas (Tourism Triangle) 
which should be protected and further enhanced in future. 

• The road network in southern parts of the district is frequently damaged due to high volumes of coal haulage. 

• The City of Tshwane is the main employment centre for communities residing in the Thembisile Hani and Dr JS 
Moroka areas, necessitating daily commuting of approximately 35 000 people via the Moloto bus route. 

• The introduction of a rail system along this corridor is long awaited by the communities. 

4.20.4.7 Environment 

• Global climate change will impact upon Nkangala, specifically on agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forestry 
and human health. 

• Nearly 9% of the districts ecosystems are endangered, some critically so; 9% of land is already degraded, 35.8% of 
land has been transformed, primarily within the grassland biome; and 33% of the river types are critically 
endangered. This is mainly due to poor environmental management in mining areas which leads to excessive levels 
of water and air pollution. 

• There is a growing urgency to establish equitable and realistic trade-off that maximize the provincial benefits from 
the mining and energy sectors while mitigating any environmental impacts - especially with regards to agricultural 
production. 

4.20.4.8 Economic Development 

> Figure 26 illustrates the spatial distribution of applications for mining and prospecting licenses in the NDM area. From 
this the following needs to be noted: 

• The entire area between Delmas, GaNala/Kriel, Hendrina, Middelburg and Witbank is covered by mining license 
applications; 

• A second cluster starts developing in the area between Middelburg and eMakhazeni; 

• Applications to the north of eMakhazeni towards Dullstroom and Emgwenya are a major concern as these intrude into 
the tourism triangle of the NDM. 

• Also shown on Figure 44 is the footprint of existing mining activity in the District. It is clear that the spatial extent of 
mining activity is significantly less than the area covered by the license applications 


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Figure 45: Mining Activity 



Mining 

Activity 


L«gend 

I iNkaagalaDM 
□Local Municipality 
I I District Municipality 
Mining Applications 
Prospecting Applications 
^Mining Areas 
"■National Roads 
—Main Roads 
—Railways 
• Towns 


NKANGALA 

DISTRICT 

MUNICIPALITY 


• Natural resources make a significant and direct contribution to the District economy in the following 
sectors/industries, commonly referred to as a ‘resource based economy': 


• Mining and energy generation via coal deposits; 

• Agriculture, industry, domestic consumption: water reserves, also for distribution outside the District; 

• Agriculture, forestry: land capacity and geographical features, climate; 

• Tourism: conservation areas and ecosystems, natural features. 

• The relatively large economies of Steve Tshwete (Middelburg) and Emalahleni (Witbank) sustain the economy of 
the Nkangala District to a large extent. The economy of these centres is mainly based on the steel industry with high 
reliance on the manufacturing sector which makes the region vulnerable to economic cycles. 


• The south western region of the District is referred to as the Energy Mecca of South Africa, due to the large deposits 
of coal reserves and associated power stations. 


• The mining, petrochemicals and steel sectors are dominated by a few global-level companies, with relatively few job 
opportunities being created due to their capital intensive nature. 

• The NDM Industrial Development Strategy identified significant potential for manufacturing in the District in other 
centres like Victor Khanye, Emakhazeni, KwaMhlanga, Kwaggafontein and Siyabuswa but most of this potential is 
latent at this stage. 

• Agriculture is very important to the economy of the district. The southern regions of Nkangala are suitable to crop 
farming, specifically for fresh produce such as maize and vegetables. The northern regions are suitable for cattle 
farming and game farms. 


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• Agri-processing and export opportunities in view of the linkages to two harbours are not fully utilised while agricultural 
activity in Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka is at a very low (mainly subsistence) level. 

• The Nkangala District offers considerable tourism potential. The economy of the eastern areas of the District is 
already growing due to the increasing popularity of tourist destinations in the Emakhazeni Municipality. 

• The north western areas of the District also offer opportunities for tourism, through the consolidation of the various 
nature reserves and open spaces in Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani, but this potential is unexploited at this 
stage. 

• The agriculture and tourism sectors have the potential to employ large numbers of relatively unskilled workers. 
Hence, these sectors should be targeted in order to use indigenous resources to create jobs. These opportunities 
are, however, not recognized at present, possibly due to lack of skills, knowledge and buy-in by local municipalities. 

4.20.4.9 Engineering Services 

• The greatest challenge that the NDM faces is in terms of the availability of water resources, as well as the distribution 
and management of water services in the former homeland areas. 

• Extremely high water losses are experienced in the region, especially in the jurisdiction of Dr JS Moroka, Emalahleni 
and Thembisile Hani LMs due to inadequate operation and maintenance. 

• Thembisile and Dr JS Moroka have the lowest number of households that have access to piped water inside their 
dwelling/ institution (16.3% and 14.2% respectively) and the highest percentage of households with no access to 
piped water within their yard (72.1% and 55.7% respectively). Compared with the other local municipalities, Dr JS 
Moroka has the highest number of households with no access to piped water (22.1%). 

• The rural nature of Thembisile and Dr JS Moroka LMs is confirmed by their having the lowest number of households 
with access to a flush toilet connected to a sewerage system (6.9% and 13.3% respectively) and the highest number 
of households with access to a pit latrine without ventilation (65.3% and 56.8% respectively). 

• Thembisile Hani and Dr JS Moroka LM have very poor refuse removal services, with the majority of households in 
both local municipalities utilizing their own refuse dump (77.0% and 75.3% respectively). 


4.20.4.10 District Housing Demand 

Table 85 depicts the estimated human settlement demand in the Nkangala District, compared to the other two district 
municipalities in the Mpumalanga Province and according to the Mpumalanga Sustainable Human Settlement Master Plan. 

• From this it is evident that the estimated NDM housing backlog based on Census 2011 stands at approximately 73 
490 units, compared to 80 663 units in Gert Sibande District Municipality and 43 043 units in Ehlanzeni District. 

• According to historic IDP Housing Chapters for municipalities in Nkangala the backlog stands at approximately 77 
752 units. 

• The Nkangala Human Settlement Strategy compiled in 2012 estimated the backlog/demand at about 121 810 
units but this included tenure upgrading demand. 

• Based on projections made in the Mpumalanga Spatial Development Framework it is expected that the 
incremental demand in the NDM area will be 47 625 subsidised units by 2030, and 172 868 bonded units by the 
same time. 

• The formal towns, informal settlement areas and traditional housing areas in Nkangala according to Census 2011 
GIS data. 

• From this it is evident that most incidences of informal settlement occur around Witbank town, Middelburg, and in 
Thembisile Hani Municipalities. 

• The map provides a more elaborate overview on the distribution of formal and informal housing throughout the 
Nkangala District (per municipality), as well as the projected demand per municipality (human settlement Table 
Insert 

4.20.5 Strategic development areas 

As part of the Mpumalanga Sustainable Human Settlement Master Plan an assessment was also made of all Strategic 
Development Areas which could accommodate future housing projects, according to the Spatial Development Frameworks 
of local municipalities. 

From this it is evident that approximately 22 119 hectares of land have been identified and demarcated on municipal Spatial 
Development Frameworks, and that these areas could collectively accommodate about 331 788 residential units at an 
average density of 15 units/ha. This is more than sufficient to accommodate the current demand (73 490) and projected 
demand (47 625 subsidised units and 172 868 bonded units). 


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Table 87 : Housing demands 


Area 

HOUSING DEMAND 

Projected Incremental Demand (2032) ( 

CENSUS 2011 

Informal 

% of 

Provincial 

Mpumalanga Housing 
Needs Register 

% of 

Provincial 

Subsidy Housing 

%of 

Provincial 

Bonded / 
Finance Linked 

% of 

Provincial 

Ehlanzeni District Municipality 


Bushbuckridge Local Municipality 

6103 

3.09% 

24618 

20.03% 

3100 

3.12% 

43870 

8.86% 

Mbombela Local Municipality 

15043 

7.63% 

19589 

15.94% 

16000 

16.09% 

87896 

17.76% 

Nkomazi Local Municipality 

8432 

4.28% 

5830 

4.74% 

2800 

2.82% 

37200 

7.51% 

Thaba Chweu Local Municipality 

9476 

4.81% 

3239 

2.64% 

1600 

1.61% 

9829 

1.99% 

Umjindi Local Municipality 

3989 

2.02% 

1871 

1.52% 

2000 

2.01% 

9905 

2.00% 

SUB TOTAL (Ehlanzeni) 

43043 

21.83% 

55147 

44.88% 

25500 

25.65% 

188700 

38.12% 

Gert Sibande District Municipality 


0 


0 





Chief Albert Luthuli Local Municipality 

11833 

6.00% 

12802 

10.42% 

1350 

1.36% 

16650 

3.36% 

Dipaleseng Local Municipality 

4296 

2.18% 

1734 

1.41% 

350 

0.35% 

3373 

0.68% 

Govan Mbeki Local Municipality 

26135 

13.25% 

9484 

7.72% 

14000 

14.08% 

48222 

9.74% 

Lekwa Local Municipality 

8794 

4.46% 

3730 

3.04% 

1900 

1.91% 

8100 

1.64% 

Mkhondo Local Municipality 

13769 

6.98% 

5350 

4.35% 

1200 

1.21% 

10338 

2.09% 

Msukaligwa Local Municipality 

11003 

5.58% 

3435 

2.80% 

7500 

7.54% 

39670 

8.01% 

Dr Pixley Ka Seme Local Municipality 

4833 

2.45% 

2454 

2.00% 

0 

0.00% 

7098 

1.43% 

SUB TOTAL (Gert Sibande) 

80663 

40.90% 

38989 

31.73% 

26300 

26.45% 

133451 

26.96% 

Nkangala District Municipality 


0 


0 


Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality 

6618 

3.36% 

6373 

5.19% 

1800 

1.81% 

20700 

4.18% 

Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

2895 

1.47% 

930 

0.76% 

1525 

1.53% 

9214 

1.86% 

Emalahleni Local Municipality 

33090 

16.78% 

4830 

3.93% 

23000 

23.13% 

64121 

12.95% 

Steve Tshwete Local Municipality 

13910 

7.05% 

5176 

4.21% 

17500 

17.60% 

40640 

8.21% 

Thembisile Hani Local Municipality 

12334 

6.25% 

10296 

8.38% 

2800 

2.82% 

32200 

6.50% 

Vicotr Khanye Local Municipality 

4643 

2.35% 

1135 

0.92% 

1000 

1.01% 

5993 

1.21% 

SUB TOTAL (Nkangala) 

73490 

37.27% 

28740 

23.39% 

47625 

47.90% 

172868 

34.92% 

Grand Total 

197196 

100.00% 

122876 

100.00% 

99425 

100.00% 

495019 

100.00%| 


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Table 88: HOUSING STOCK 


Local Municipality 

Total Formal 

Informal 

Total Informal 

Projected Increment Demand 2032 

Traditional 

Backyard 

Informal 

Projected Subsidy 

Projected Bonded 

DrJSMoroka 

55539 

691 

2574 

3359 

6618 

1800 

20700 

Emalahleni 

86780 

2721 

8763 

21618 

33090 

23000 

64121 

Emakhazeni 

10827 

736 

812 

1350 

2895 

1525 

9214 

Steve Tshwete 

51057 

1101 

6260 

6548 

13910 

17500 

40640 

Thembisile 

63296 

2875 

3807 

5654 

12334 

2800 

32200 

Victor Khanye 

15903 

521 

1150 

2973 

4643 

1000 

5993 

Nkangala 

283402 

8645 

23366 

41502 

73490 

47625 

172868 


Table 89: Informal Settlements 


MUNICIPALITY 

NUMBER OF INFORMAL 
SETTLEMENT 

NUMBER OF 
INFORMAL UNITS 

TOTAL EXPECTED 
DEVELOPMENT COST 

COMMENTS 

Steve Tshwete LM 

16 

6 075 

R 434 377 166.40 


Emalahleni LM 

74 

27 683 

R2 883 620 341.66 


Emakhazeni LM 

IS 

6 626 

R 110 688 207.60 


Thembisile Hani 

LM 

65 

24 102 

R1 551 144 520.26 

This includes settlements 
which are on state land. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

53 

64 842 

R4 685 146 826.93 

This includes settlements 
which are on state land. 

Victor Khanye LM 

11 

2 529 

R 203 202 342.80 



Extrapolated from the NDM Strategic Development Areas this need translated to specific household units is best represented 
in the Table 90 below: 



Emakhazeni LM 

1 107 

16 603 

Emalahleni LM 

7 029 

105 437 

Thembisile LM 

6 542 

98 137 

Victor Khanye LM 

2 833 

42 490 

Steve Tswete 

1 576 

23 639 


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4.20.6 Physical Planning functions 


The District is responsible on spatial planning functions for Dr J S Moroka, Emakhazeni, and Thembisile Hani Local Municipalities to 
manage the land use matters, building capacity on land uses policies and other related matters. The reviewal of the Physical Planning 
Strategy is completed with the recommendations as follows: Shared services centre, capacity building, education awareness and 
taking back the physical planning function to the local municipalities. However, the District are currently in the process of reverting 
back the planning functions to Thembisile Local Municipality, as now have been capacited. 

4.20.7 Land Use Management Systems (LUMS): 

Land Use Schemes is one of the components of the Land Use Management Systems, which were more commonly known as Town 
Planning Schemes, are statutory planning tools used to manage and promote development. All the local municipalities that are within 
the District are fully covered with the Land Use Management Schemes which are wall-to-wall land use scheme. The introduction of 
SPLUMA Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act which mandates the amendments of the current Land Use Schemes. 

District has completed the process to convert and translate Land Use Schemes into a Land Use Management System. This conversion 
and translation is largely driven by the Spatial Development framework, property assets management registered e.c.t (where 
appropriate) when they are adopted. 

4.20.8 Geographical Information Systems (GIS): 

The district has established a GIS with the intention of expanding it to local municipalities. Steve Tshwete and Dr JS Moroka are the 
only local municipalities in the District that have fully fledged GIS environments. The lack of Capacity in terms of the Human Resources 
and GIS resources are the reasons local municipalities face challenges. The District GIS Strategy has been developed to assist local 
municipality on the GIS issues. The District has embarked on the implementation of GIS through a three-year project that commenced 
in the 2016/ 2017 financial year (October 2016) and will conclude in the 2019/ 2020 financial year (October 2019). Through this 
project, a centralised, portal-based GIS will be established, whereby the software of all local municipalities within the district will be 
linked to the main GIS Server, which will be based at the district. This will enhance data integrity, improve communication between 
GIS practitioners across the district, ensure transparency of issues across the district, and ensure a comprehensively and efficiently 
maintained district spatial database. 

4.20.9 Spatial Development Framework: 

The 2010 stats, National Development Plan and other sector plans influenced the reviewal of the District Spatial Development 
Frameworks (SDF’s) and the five Local Municipalities for next five financial year periods. The following Table details the current 
progress in the review process. 

Objectives: 

• Facilitate formalisation of informal settlements; 

• Facilitate and monitor the Land Reform programme; 

• To establish a fully operational GIS and to support local municipalities; 

• To identify and designate land for Integrated Human Settlement; 

• Facilitate the integration of human settlement programme within the District; 

• To promote integrated spatial planning, land use management and land development in District. 

Strategies: 

• To identify and procurement of land for new township establishment and cemetery establishment in the District; 

• To subdivide and rezone strategic development area; 

• To facilitate the development of economical nodal point; 

• To ensure the formalisation of informal settlements; 

• To update the Land Use Schemes to be in line with the new promulgated act: Spatial Planning and Land Use Management 
Act and the Regulation thereof; 


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Facilitate the integration of human settlement programme within the District; 

Review and implementation of the NDM GIS Strategy by providing hardware/software resources, HR resources, and training 
for all local municipalities; 


4.21 Issue 15: Transportation 

4.21.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The Nkangala District Municipality does not own any rail infrastructure. The only commuter rail services operating in the NDM are 
being operated by Shosholoza Meyl, these services are long distance and travels from Johannesburg to Komatipoort traversing the 
Nkangala District stopping in Witbank. There are no regular short distance commuter services, which are generally operated by 
MetroRail or the PRASA, operating in the NDM. Moloto Rail corridor still remain the key public transport solution for the western region 
of the NDM as the majority of the commuters only relay on the bus services which is its service is towards Gauteng. 

Minibus taxi operation remain the dominant mode of choice for commuters in the NDM with limited aging formal public transport 
Facilities (Taxi Ranks). The NDM and Local Municipalities have budgetary constraints to adequately address the public transport 
facilities upgrades. 

The travel times for work trips range from one minute to 61 minutes and more the majority of people (41%) travel between 1 and 30 
minutes to get to work, this is closely followed by 29% travelling between 31 and 60 minutes to get to their place of employment. The 
NDM and Local Municipalities have budgetary constraints to adequately address the public transport facilities upgrades. 

4.21.2 Transport Goals 

The district transport goals include the following: 

• Support and promote economic and social development in urban and rural areas. 

• Improve mobility levels, service quality and with a wider modal choice, within budget limits for all communities but especially 

those that are dependent on public transport. 

• Reflect an integrated system in all respects, with an effective mix of various public transport modes, ensuring that each 
mode is utilized where it is economically and technically the most suitable and a healthy balance between private and 
public transport. 

• The system should be managed to ensure that each mode is utilized where it is economically and technically the most suitable 
and a healthy balance between private and public transport. 

• Create a regulated, safe, secure and reliable transport environment. 

• Ensure a sustainable and affordable system to both the transport users and authorities that is equitable in terms of financial 

support and level of service distributed on a geographic basis amongst all communities 

• Create accessibility and availability of services to the communities at large, with minimum walking distances to and from 
transfer facilities, termini and stops. 

• Develop high density corridors and public transport links between residential areas and the places of employment and other 
destinations. 

• The competitive environment within the transport industry should be healthy with fair competition among different modes and 
operators within modes. 

Challenges 

Several policies and strategies have identified the following challenges in the NDM. 

• The modal choice is limited to bus and taxi services, as there are no commuter rail services in this region 

• Public transport is a captive mode of transport for many commuters as, private vehicle ownership is generally low 

• Heavy vehicles traveling along routes that are not designed to accommodate heavy vehicles 

• Poorly maintained rail infrastructure 

• Budgetary constraints on the council fiscus for funding of provision of the public transport facilities. 


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4.21.3 Public Transport Services in NDM 


Figure 46: BUS PASSENGER DISSATISFACTION PERCENTAGE 


Bus Passenger Dissatisfaction Percentages 



■ Nkangala 


Figure 47: TAXI PASSENGER DISSATISFACTION PERCENTAGE 


Taxi Passenger Dissatisfaction Percentages 



■ Nkangala 


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4.21.3 Transit Orientated Development 

Transit Orientated Development (TOD) is defined as a unique mix of land uses located at a high density within a predetermined 
walking radius of a railway station (refer Figure 49). TODs are purposely designed to facilitate access to the railway stations and so 
increase the use of the public transportation systems. Thereby land use and transportation integration can be achieved. TOD 
programmes seek to create high quality living and working environments, to improve station access, to implement local land use 
plans, and to increase tax revenue. It also offers the possibility of enhanced utilisation volume, particularly off-peak and reverse-flow 
riders. 

The intention is to develop high density, mixed use areas around the proposed future railway stations along the Moloto Corridor and 
to incorporate Multi-Purpose Community Centres (Social Services), residential (including subsidised housing) development, as well 
as commercial, retail and even light industrial uses in these developments. The number of people residing within or in close proximity 
to these TODs will then create a “critical mass” to sustain the economic and social activities within the area, and will thus promote 
Local Economic Development (LED). 

Figure 47 below depicts the spatial concept of a Transit Orientated Development as developed during Phase 2 of the Moloto Corridor 
project. If successfully implemented, this concept will dramatically change the face of the towns and villages in the Thembisile and Dr 
JS Moroka areas, and enhance the long-term social and economic sustainability of these areas significantly, as it will lead to the 
following: 

b) Improved safety in terms of daily commuting; 

c) Shorter travelling times and thus better quality of life; 

d) Increased productivity due to shorter travelling times; 

e) Urban restructuring and urban renewal; 

f) Improved service delivery, both in terms of social and engineering services; 

g) Local economic development and job creation. 

Figure 48: Transit Orientated Development Concept 


TRANSIT ORIENTATED DEVELOPMENT CONCEPT 


LEGEND 



RESIDENTIAL 


WOH DENSITY 


■ 1 

f.l if 


1 

residential 

WOW DENSITY 

■i'V 

. 


9 1 


ii 

^AFFAIRS* 


( * 50OM BUFFER 

HI IU PHI i Mr I 

■ INFORMAL MARKET 
g RETAIL 
H BUSDEPOT 
m TAXI RANK 
I I PUBLC PARKING 


MOUSMGPfUCMCt 

B hioh density 

■ MEDUIM DENSITY 

■ RESIDENTIAL 

MMMi *>Al 
• >Vf HNW Ml 
. Ill 

POUCE STATION 


CLINIC 

HOMEAFFAffS 
COMMUNITY HALL 
POST OFFICE 
MUNICIPAL OFFICES 


CRECHE 

PfaMAftt SCHOOL 
SECONDARY 
8CHOOL 
COLLEGE 


UGWT INDUSTRIAL 
I PETROL STATION 
| MIXED USE 
| CARWASH 


X 


SPORTS FIELD 
OPEN 

OREENSPACE 

PEOE8TRIAN 

MOVEMENT 

PEDESTRAN 

BRK5GE 


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4.21 Issue 16: Land Reform and Land Administration 


4.21.1 Background and Problem Statement 

Land is an important and sensitive issue to all South Africans. It is a finite resource that binds all together in a common destiny. South 
Africa inherited arguably the worst racially skewed land distribution in the world. Whites who constitute about 10% of the total 
population owned nearly 90% of the land whilst blacks, who constitute nearly 90% of the population, owned about 10% of the land: 
whites owned most of commercial farms and agribusinesses whilst their black counterparts were predominantly confined to 
subsistence and small farms and micro agribusinesses, and lived largely by selling labour to commercial farms and agribusinesses. 
Therefore, in response of the above the government came with the Land reform programme constitutes. This has three aspects: 
redistribution; land restitution; and land tenure reform. 

• Redistribution aims to provide the disadvantaged and the poor with access to land for residential and productive purposes. 
Its scope includes the urban and rural poor, labour tenants, farm workers and new entrants to agriculture. 

• Land restitution covers cases of forced removals that took place after 1913. This is being dealt with by a Land Claims 
Court and Commission established under the Restitution of Land Rights Act 22 of 1994. 

• Land tenure reform is being addressed through a review of present land policy; administration and legislation to improve 
the tenure security of all South Africans and to accommodate diverse forms of land tenure, including types of communal 
tenure. 

According to the Land claims report, there are 721 land claims registered in the Nkangala District. These claims are located on 271 
properties. The largest number of claims submitted are in the Steve Tshwete Municipality (270), followed by Emakhazeni (159), and 
then Thembisile (133). 

NDM has compiled a Land Audit Report (LAR), which starts to point to development patterns, trends, and land reform issues within 
the region. The LAR depicts several issues relating to land in the District. Some of the aspects could have a negative contribution 
towards the growth of the region's economy and employment creation. In general, the land reform process needs to be fast-tracked. 
The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform should be engaged in terms of providing further detailed information on land 
reform issues within the region with the context of the Land Audit Report undertaken by the District. In additional, it will be pivotal that 
land identified by municipalities for development is assessed and processes be fast-tracked to facilitate development in the designated 
areas. 

The status of each of the various land claims in the district is also illustrated in Table 92. In some instances, claims have only been 
lodged and registered (Phase 1) while many of the claims are at present in the settlement phase, which is Phase 5 of the restitution 
process. 


Table 91: Outstanding Land Restitution Claims Submitted per Municipality 


Municipality 

Consolidated 

Allocated 

Unallocated 

Total Outstanding 

Emakhazeni LM 

43 

258 

06 

264 

Dr Js Moroka LM 

0 

04 

01 

05 

Thembisile Hani LM 

29 

159 

03 

162 

Total Outstanding 

72 

421 

10 

431 


Figure 48 illustrates the Land Ownership pertaining to land on which claims have been lodged reflected on the map represent 
registered and unregistered state owned land in the Nkangala District. A major concentration of state owned land is located in the 
Thembisile and Dr JS Moroka municipal areas with smaller concentrations located in the vicinity of Middelburg town in the Steve 
Tshwete municipality, and further to the east in the vicinity of Belfast and to the north of Dullstroom. As can be seen from Figure 49 
most of the land claims lodged in the Thembisile and Dr JS Maroka areas are on state owned land. 


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The land claimed in the northern parts of the district municipality in the Thembisile and Dr JS Maroka municipal areas are mainly 
associated with cattle and game farming, and secondary to that, some crop farming. It is also important to note that a large portion 
of the land claimed in the Thembisile and Dr JS Moroka areas form part of nature reserves 

Figure 49 reflects the predominant agricultural use/potential of the land on which the various land claims have been submitted. In 
broad terms, the areas around Emalahleni, Delmas and Steve Tshwete municipalities are all associated with intensive crop farming 
and supplementary cattle and game farming. 


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Figure 50: State Land and Land Claims 



farming, with limited crop farming. It is also important to note that the narrow strip of land to the north of Dr JS Moroka is suitable for 
primarily crop farming as it forms part of the rich soils of the Springbokvlakte area situated to the north thereof. These land claims 
thus pose opportunities for LED development in the District, which need to be further investigated. 

4.21.2 Upgrading of Land Tenure settlement 

Nkangala District Municipality is face with the backlog of incomplete land tenure upgrading applications and opening of township 
register. In Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani municipalities, most of the settlements are not formalised, not registered with surveyor 
general and there are no title deeds. The long process of finalising land tenure projects on the state land and the capacity within the 
relevant Department to approve such applications is being identified as the major challenge. However, the District has conducted a 
land tenure strategy in order to address the challenge pertaining with the long process of upgrading of land tenure. Three milestones 
have been proposed by the strategy: State Land Realise, Formalisation of settlement and Conveyancing. The major challenge which 
delay and stagnate the process of formalisation is the State land and traditional land. The District has already appointed the 
consultants to assist with the State Land release in Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani Municipalities. 


4.21.3 Land tenure reform 

The overarching long-term goal is to ensure that every household within NDM consists of absolute security of their residents and 
property. The tenure security approaches will be applicable and will rely on both administrative and legal mechanisms to provide 
protection against evictions. Once greater tenure security is in place for the residents, opportunities increase for access to the 
economy, infrastructure Services, social Services and micro-Finance 


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In terms of Table 92 below, 62% of the residents in the District have full ownership of their property, with Dr JS Moroka at 72% and 
Thembisile Hani at 70% being the Municipalities with the highest ownership therein. 


Table 92: Land Tenure Status in the District 


Municipality 

Owned 

Rented 

Occupied Rent-Free 

Total 


Actual 

% 

Actual 

% 

Actual 

% 

Actual 

% 

MP316: Dr JS Moroka 

38621 

72 

1124 

2 

13838 

26 

53583 

100 

MP314: Emakhazeni 

5019 

52 

1925 

20 

2779 

28 

9723 

100 

MP312: Emalahleni 

41044 

55 

16216 

22 

17657 

23 

74917 

100 

MP313: Steve Tshwete 

20833 

58 

10941 

30 

4455 

12 

36229 

100 

MP315: Thembisile Hani 

40485 

70 

1265 

2 

15798 

28 

57548 

100 

MP311: Victor Khanye 

6905 

51 

2197 

17 

4325 

32 

13428 

100 

DC31: Nkangala 

152908 

62 

33669 

14 

58851 

24 

245429 

100 


Steve Tshwete, Emalahleni and Emakhazeni Local Municipalities respectively comparatively have high rates of rental among 
communities in the District, this is partly because most of the people in these Municipalities, particularly Steve Tshwete and Emalahleni 
are in these Municipalities for either business or work related purposes, and permanently residing elsewhere. Hence, a need for more 
rental stock in these Municipalities. Therefore, the above issues need to be address accordingly in assisting the farm workers and 
communities to attain a better life. 

Notwithstanding all the aforementioned successes achieved by the Council in partnership with its Social Partners, there are still 
challenges to be addressed during this Term of Council, viz: 

■ Permanent and sustainable accommodation for evicted farm workers; 

■ Intensify establishment of rural agri-villages; 

* Need for upgrading of tenure - especially in tribal areas; 

■ Speedy processing of land claims in terms of the Land Restitution Act; 

* Little support is provided to beneficiaries with regard to developing sustainable livelihoods by those involved in land reform 
processes; 

■ The lack of cadastral information for the former homeland areas and the impact on the coordination of planning and land- 
use management in those areas; 

■ The process of finalising the lease agreements between farmers and government in case of state owned land is 
cumbersome to development; 

■ Intensify Rural development support programmes in all Rural Municipalities; 

■ District must facilitate the engagements between DM, LMs and the Department of Rural Development on the issues of 
Land Claims and other related matter. 

Therefore, the above issues need to be address accordingly in assisting the farm workers and communities for better life. 

4.22 Issue 17: Human Settlements 

4.22.1 Background and Problem Statement 

Human Settlement is not just about providing houses but, are geared towards creating integrated communities where people reside, 
work, access education and health Services and, participate in cultural and leisure activities. Hence it is correctly referred to as 
Integrated Sustainable Human Settlements. 

This NDM shall achieve by facilitating planning and building human settlements in an integrated, coordinated and holistic 
way. These must be places where people can play, stay, and pray. They should be green, landscaped communities, pleasant 
places, where people live, learn and have leisure. 


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The apartheid legacy of spatially and economically marginalizing the poor has meant that people live far from job opportunities and 
major Services, typically in “dormitory” type residential areas. These are some of the infrastructure scars that apartheid has inflicted 
on the country's physical and social landscapes. Whilst there is some work done, there are still people within the District who continue 
to survive without basic Services in the many informal settlements. Even those of our people who have jobs and a consistent salary, 
find it difficult to sustain a decent quality of life, as they fall outside of the subsidy bracket, but at the same time are unable to afford 
and access the mortgage products available from commercial banks. 

The government has made significant strides towards progressively fulfilling its constitutional obligation of ensuring that every South 
African has access to permanent housing that provides secure tenure, privacy, protection from the elements, and access to basic 
Services. The national housing programme is not just about building houses but also about transforming our cities and towns and 
building cohesive and non-racial communities. 

The current housing development approach with a focus on the provision of state subsidized houses will not be able to meet the 
current and future backlog demands and there are questions related to its financial sustainability. There is a need to diversify the 
current approach to include alternative development and delivery strategies, methodologies and products including upgrading of 
informal settlements, increasing rental stock, and promoting and improving access to housing opportunities in the gap market. 

In order to identify the informal settlements within respective local Municipality it is important to also investigate the existing formal 
settlements registered in the Deeds Office. According to the Deeds Office, Municipalities in NDM respectively have registered human 
settlements within their area of jurisdictions as depicted in Table 93 below. According to the depiction in the table, Dr JS Moroka, 
Emalahleni and Thembisile Hani Local Municipalities have the highest number of nformal dwelling in the District, and the perculiarity 
of these informal settlements vary as per Municipality. 

The fact that Emalahleni is more urbanised than Dr JS Moroka and Thembisile Hani is therefore indicative of the fact that the manner 
in which we should respond in formalization of informal settlements in the three Municipality warrants for differentiated approach. 


Table 93: Existing Registered Formal Settlements and Informal Dwellings within NDM 


Municipality 

No Registered Townships 

No of Registered Stands 

No of Informal Dwelling Units 

Dr JS Moroka 

31 

21413 

64 842 

Emakhazeni 

38 

21455 

1 541 

Emalahleni 

270 

256 371 

27 722 

Steve Tshwete 

73 

214 291 

6 075 

Thembisile Hani 

66 

73 857 

24101 

Victor Khanyi 

36 

26117 

2 529 

Nkangala DM 

514 

613 504 

126 810 


Source: Deeds Office Register ; Windeed , 2012 


In the Mpumalanga Province and Nkangala partly, the deliveries of sustainable human settlements are impacted by the following 
challenges: 

• The housing backlog in the province is standing roughly at 240 000 as per the 2007 Stats-SA survey; 

• 109 000 households live in informal settlements excluding those living in backyards and overcrowded households; 

• In addition, there are 68 741 households that are renting as per the Provincial survey report on the Housing Demand 
Database; 

• The poor management of the mushrooming of informal settlements and the non-enforcement of the by-laws by Municipalities 
which results in informal settlements; 

• Disintegrated planning or some Municipalities not having spatial frameworks contribute towards unsustainable housing 
developments; 

• Unavailability of land contributes negatively on the creation of integrated human settlements (as a result, low cost houses 
were built in areas where there is no basic infrastructure, economic activities and economic facilities such as health, safety, 
educational, transport and others essential Services); 


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• There is continuous inward migration from neighboring countries; 

• Budgetary constraints to deal with mushrooming of informal settlements and rental stock; 

• There has been lack of integrated planning by relevant stakeholders to enforce informal settlements by-laws by 
Municipalities; 

• There was no long-term planning for integrated human settlements and non-alignment of Spatial Development Framework 
and the Provincial Development Strategy; 

• There is a serious constraint in terms of technical and human resource skills at both Provincial and Municipal levels. 

• Erven sizes of the settlements are small 

As a result it has become imperative to facilitate and implement integrated planning and development across all sector departments, 
to promote sustainable communities and continues to promote inclusivity of appropriate stakeholders in promoting and enhancing 
service delivery. Presently this disjuncture still impacts negatively on service delivery and the disintegrated development, leading to 
unsustainable communities, resulting in the present of unsustainable and dysfunctional human settlements in the Province at present. 

The provision of housing is one of the key mechanisms through which the rate of service delivery can be fast-tracked. The NDM is 
cognisant that phrase ‘housing’ is much broader than a ‘house’. Housing encapsulates the physical structure, which is the house, as 
well as the Services that go with it, water and sanitation infrastructure, electricity, roads and storm water. Thus, accelerated provision 
and facilitation of access to housing can potentially alleviate the service delivery backlog that is still a dominant feature in some of our 
Municipalities. It must be taken into account that any housing programme has both a social and economic imperative. With that 
realisation, creation of sustainable human settlements will be achieved. 

Despite all the initiatives implemented during the past few years, the NDM still has a housing backlog, which needs to be addressed 
during the next decade. This would require funding to the order of R 3 615 million to address. The housing backlog continues to grow 
despite the delivery of 1, 831 million subsidised houses in the country between 1994 and March 2005. This is due to amongst other 
delays incompletion of the housing stock fora particular period due to poor workmanship and incapacity in some instances, which in 
turn precipitates the backlogs already at hand. 

Figure 50 below demonstrates the percentage of households with access to formal housing in Nkangala. Nkangala recorded a slight 
improvement from 72.1 % in 1996 to 74.7% in 2009, thus represents a percentage points increase of 2.6 %. Among the six Local 
Municipalities in Nkangala, Dr JS Moroka managed to register the highest percentage of households with formal housing (89.9 %) 
whilst the lowest percentage of 59.9 % was recorded in Emalahleni in 2009. 

Households without formal housing were recorded at 76 957 for Nkangala in 2009 and thus forms 37.8 % of the Provincial backlog 
total of 203 480. Emakhazeni recorded the lowest backlog in the District with 2 689 households without formal housing and Emalahleni 
had the highest backlog in 2009 at 40 657 households without formal housing. 


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Figure 51: Percentage of Households with access to formal Housing in Nkangala and its Local Municipalities, 1996 - 2009 



U /o 

Nkangala 

Victor 

Khanye 

Emalahleni 

Steve 

Tshwete 

Emakhazeni 

Thembisile 

Dr JS 
Moroka 

■ 1996 

72.1% 

66.5% 

76.4% 

78.9% 

64.7% 

59.8% 

77.5% 

■ 2001 

74.7% 

64.0% 

68.2% 

77.0% 

69.3% 

77.9% 

83.4% 

■ 2009 

74.7% 

71.5% 

59.9% 

74.7% 

83.5% 

84.2% 

89.9% 


Source: Global Insight - ReX, September 2010 

Apart from the funding constraints currently encountered, the communities have emphasized the need to address the following issues: 


• High level of housing backlog; 

• Slow pace of housing delivery (i.e. RDP housing); 

• Poor building quality by some contractors; 

• Long periods for construction and completion of RDP houses; 

• Lack of housing in farm areas for farm workers; 

• Illegal selling and renting out of RDP houses; 

• Inadequate budget allocations; 

• Need for prioritisation of informal settlement dwellers; 

• Need for prioritisation of the elderly and the disabled in the allocation of the RDP housing; 

• The challenges pertaining to title deeds, particularly in tribal areas; 

• Lack of support by private sector. E.g. banks & material suppliers; 

• Outstanding accreditation of capacitated Municipalities to implement housing programme; 

• Challenges relating to spatial integration of settlements; and 

• The requirement of R2 479 up-front payments for RDP houses. 

• The issues raised per Local Municipality during the February/March Outreach meetings are highlighted below: 

The issue of lack of low-income housing was highlighted as one the factors that lead to the increasing backlog. There are members 
of the Community who are currently employed but cannot afford to purchase a house in the free market. These communities requested 
that government should consider offering various housing options in order to accommodate different housing needs. One of these 
options would be the provision of low-income rental housing, particularly in areas that are experiencing economic growth (i.e. 
Emalahleni, Steve Tshwete and Emakhazeni Local Municipalities). 


Emanating from the Community outreach meetings, communities have identified the need for government intervention in supporting 
those who cannot afford their own housing and do not qualify for the RDP and other low income housing schemes. A large number 


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of these communities need to be assisted in securing bank loans and so forth. Resolving this situation will lead to a considerable 
reduction in the housing backlog and the incidence of selling RDP houses. 

To facilitate provision of Sustainable Human Settlements for all communities within the District in the medium - long term period, the 
following amongst other remains critical: 

■ Ensure that communities have security of tenure and access to basic Services in a safe and sustainable environment; 

■ Facilitate the formalisation and upgrading of informal settlements in the NDM area; 

■ Focus on the priority areas for capital expenditure as conceptualized within the reviewed Spatial Development Framework 
of the District; 

■ Promote provision of different housing options (low, medium high-income houses) through strategic town planning and land 
use management; 

■ Participate in the process of facilitating the completion of housing projects that have not been completed and those that 
were shabbily built; 

* Facilitate capacity development at Municipalities; 

■ Facilitate the process of obtaining Housing Accreditation for medium to high capacity Municipalities in the NDM; 

■ Develop and implement an Integrated Human Settlement Strategy (IHST) in partnership with Local Municipalities and 
stakeholders; 

■ Facilitate the acceleration of the delivery of housing as well as improving the quality of subsidized housing; 

■ Increase access to secure and decent housing for all by strengthening partnerships with financial institutions and the private 

sector and increasing their role; 

■ Facilitate the acceleration of the delivery of new rental housing, provide support for housing co-operatives and ensure that 
Provincial and local government allocate land for this purpose and building skills; 

* Encourage people to build their houses based on their own plans and choices and provide people with building 

■ Spearhead a programme for the allocation of building materials to rural communities for purposes of self-building and 

provide people with building skills; 

■ Conduct a land Audit; 

■ Purchase of Land by Municipality for Development; 

■ Implementation of Human Settlement Strategy and Informal Settlement Strategy; 

■ Purchase Land for Human Settlement; 

* Transfer of Public Works Properties to local Municipalities. 

The Energy Sector, which includes electricity generation, contributes to emissions resulting from oil and coal refining used to produce 
petroleum products, coal Mining and gas extraction, wood burning and the burning of coal and oil to produce heat for industrial and 
other purposes, is the single largest source of carbon dioxide (C02) and sulphur dioxide (S02) emissions in South Africa. This is 
mainly due to the reliance on coal and oil or its products for the country's energy purposes. 

Out of thirteen (13) coal-fired power stations including: Komati; Camden; Arnot; Grootvlei; Hendrina; Kriel; Matla; Duvha; Tutuka; 
Matimba; Lethabo; Kendal; and Majuba power stations, six (6) thereof (excluding Kusile Power Station) are in Nkangala District 
Municipality. 

4.22.2 Nkangala District Spatial Development Framework 


Figure 52 represents the spatial concept to the Nkangala Spatial Development Framework. Essentially, it is based on the following 
elements: 

> Enhancement of local, provincial and national corridors traversing the District, including the N4 (Maputo-Walvis Bay); N11 
(Botswana-N3-Durban); and the Moloto Corridor between Thembisile-Hani/Dr JS Moroka and City of Tshwane; 

> Strengthening of local linkages between the District and surrounding regions e.g. Gert Sibande (electricity and coal mining); 
Ehlanzeni (tourism, export); Sekhukhune (agricultural production and downstream beneficiation from Dilokong Corridor, 
Waterberg District (agriculture) and Gauteng, including City of Tshwane and Ekurhuleni (manufacturing, services and trade); 

> Consolidating human settlement (housing) and economic activity (industry and business) around the priority district nodal 
points; 

> Creating functional linkages between the Dinokeng tourism initiative in the City of Tshwane and the Mpumalanga 
Escarpment and Lowveld tourism precincts along the northern ridge series in the District; 

> Promoting and optimising the mining and electricity generation capacity of the southern coalfields precinct with a view to 
eventually restore the agricultural potential of the land once coal reserves are depleted; 


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> To utilise the nodal and corridor structure of the district to guide and direct infrastructure investment and service delivery in 
the District; 

> To optimise the agricultural potential of all land in the District and to convert subsistence farming to sustainable commercial 
farming through processes of Agrarian Transformation in the two CRDP priority areas in the NDM 



NKANGALA 

DISTRICT 

MUNICIPALITY 


Development 

Concept 


Figure 52: above graphically depicts the proposed Spatial Development Framework for the Nkangala District Municipality. 

This Plan comprises a multi-disciplinary range of development proposals, including proposals pertaining to the natural environment, 
conservation, social and economic infrastructure, engineering services, residential, business, and industrial development, as well as 
tourism development and agriculture/farming. Essentially, the plan is based on ten development principles which are briefly listed 
below: 

> Principle 1 : To achieve a sustainable equilibrium between urbanisation, biodiversity conservation, mining, industry, 
agriculture, forestry, and tourism related activities within the District, by way of effective environmental and land use 
management. 

> Principle 2: To establish a functional hierarchy of urban and rural activity nodes (service centres/ agri-villages) in the 
Nkangala District area; and to ensure equitable and equal access of all communities to social infrastructure and the 
promotion of local economic development by way of strategically located Thusong Centres (Multi Purpose Community 
Centres) (MPCCs) in these nodes. 

> Principle 3: To functionally link all nodal points (towns and settlements) in the District to one another, and to the 
surrounding regions, through the establishment and maintenance of a strategic transport network comprising internal and 
external linkages, and focusing on the establishment of Development Corridors. 

> Principle 4: To incorporate the existing natural environmental, cultural-historic and man-made resources within the 
Municipality in the development of Tourism Precincts, with specific focus on the Tourism Gateway in the north-eastern 
parts of the District (Emakhazeni); as well as the northern and north-western mountainous parts of the District. 


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> Principle 5: To promote a wide spectrum of extensive commercial farming activities throughout the District, and to 
establish local fresh produce markets at the main nodal points identified. 

> Principle 6: To optimally utilize the mining potential in the District without compromising the long term sustainability of the 
natural environment. 

> Principle 7: To concentrate industrial and agro-processing activities at the higher order nodes in the District where 
industrial infrastructure is available. 

> Principle 8: To enhance business activities (formal and informal) at each of the identified nodal points in the Nkangala 
District by incorporating these activities with the Thusong Centres and modal transfer facilities. 

> Principle 9: To consolidate the urban structure of the District around the nodal points by way of infill development and 
densification in identified Strategic Development Areas (SDAs) and Upgrading Priority Areas. 

> Principle 10: To ensure that all communities (urban and rural) have access to at least the minimum levels of service as 
enshrined in the Constitution. 

Figure 53: SDF 





•Varbe Hal 


Maopyar 


(wisterias 


NKANGALA 

DISTRICT 

MUNICIPALITY 


ilamasaoom 


Spatial 

Development 

Framework 


Primary Order Centre 
^ Secondary Order Centre 
% Ternary Order Centre 

• Rural Nodes 
m Minins 

Mining and Agriculture 
Small Scale Fannins and 
CRDP 

Ecological Corridors 
Extensive Agriculture 
Agri Tourism 
^ Forestry 
ifyi Tounsm Anchors 
mm Tourism Comdors 

Major Development Comdors 
^N4 Maputo Comdor 
—National Roads 
_ Mam Roads 
— Secondary Roads 
Railways 

-- Proposed Moloto Railway 

• Proposed Moloto Stations 

• Proposed Nkangala 

' International Anpon^K^ 
A Industrial Nodes 
■ Power Stations wflf 


Anaderfonti 




4.22.3 Strategic Development Areas 


As part of the Mpumalanga Sustainable Fluman Settlement Master Plan an assessment was also made of all Strategic Development 
Areas which could accommodate future housing projects, according to the Spatial Development Frameworks of local municipalities. 


The results for the Nkangala District are summarized on Figure 53. From this it is evident that approximately 22 119 hectares of land 
have been identified and demarcated on municipal Spatial Development Frameworks, and that these areas could collectively 


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accommodate about 331 788 residential units at an average density of 15 units/ha. This is more than sufficient to accommodate the 
current demand (73 490) and projected demand (47 625 subsidized units and 172 868 bonded units). 


Figure 54: SDA’s 


Nkangala District Municipality-SDAs 



Nkangala Strategic Development Areas 


Potential 
Yield at Ave 
15 units/Ha 


SDAs per Town 


Dr JS Moroka 


16 603 


Steve Tshwete 


Victor Khanye 


Total Nkangala 


Mpumalanga 


Gauteng 


MPUMALANGA 
PROVINCE 
HUMAN 
SETTLEMENT 
MASTER PLAN 


Nkangala District 
Municipality 


O Provincial 

□ Nkangab Diseoci 

Municipality 
Tcwrn&hip Boundary 

□ District MumapakTy 
I I Local Municipality 

Towns 

(Census 2011) 

■ informal Settlements 
(Census 2011) 

Wt Traditional Areas 
(Census 2011) 

■ Strategic Development 
Areas 

N'anonal Roads 

— Mam Roads 

— Railways 


4.22.4 Capital investment framework 

Figure 54 depicts the Capital Investment Framework and Implementation Priority Areas in terms of the Spatial Development 
Framework of the NDM. These priority areas must be differentiated in Incremental Service Upgrading Priority Areas and Strategic 
Development Areas as are expounded bellow: 

> As a priority, the majority of informal settlements in the District should be formalized and upgraded to ensure that 
communities have security of tenure and access to basic services in a safe and sustainable living environment 

> Continued tenure reform and establishment of security of tenure are essential to protect rural communities. 

> The Incremental Service Upgrading Priority Areas are: 

• The conglomerations of settlements in the Dr. JS Moroka Municipality, especially those in the Siyabuswa area in 
support of the development of a node in this area. 

• The conglomeration of settlements in the Thembisile Municipality, especially those in the KwaMhlanga area in 
support of the development of a node in this area; 

• The informal settlements situated west of eMalahleni; 

• The informal settlements situated west of Middelburg; 

• The informal settlements situated around Delmas town; and 

• The informal settlements around eMakhazeni, eNtokozweni, Dullstroom and Emgwenya. 


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> As shown in Figure 55 the following Strategic Development Areas were identified in the Nkangala District: 


• Middelburg Central Business District and industrial areas; 

• Emalahleni Central Business District and industrial areas as well as Ga-Nala (Kriel); 

• eMakhazeni town as the gateway to the major tourism centres in the Province; 
Figure 55: Investment Framework 



NKANGALA 

DISTRICT 

MUNICIPALITY 


Investment 

Framework 


Towns and Settlements 


.Mam Roads 

Roads 


Proposed Mototo Rail 

• Proposed Mbloto Rail Stations 

♦ Proposed Nkangala 

' International Airport 


Incremental Service 
■ Upgrading Priority Areas. 
Economic Infostructure 
Investment 


- Strategic Development Areas 
" and Housing 
Econormcmfiastmcture 
" Investment 


4.23 Issue 18: Environmental Management 
4.23.1 Background and Problem Statement 

Nkangala District Municipality has a high eco-tourism potential, which requires the protection, rehabilitation and enhancement of its 
attractive natural resources. The area has however extremely high mining potential that attracts mining activities (i.e. sporadic urban 
settlement patterns). In contrast, the mining potential on the other hand is detrimental to the valuable biophysical elements of the 
environment. 

The District Municipality moves from the premise that, although the primary objective is to achieve environmental sustainability, it is 
also important to ensure that other dimensions of sustainable development are addressed. These are outlined in the Figure 56 
outlining Sustainable Development Dimension below. 


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Figure 56: Outlining Sustainable Development Dimension 


Sustained Service Delivery 
Job Creation and Sustenance 
Sustained market absorption 



Nuisance 

In 2006, the NDM in partnership with the DALA compiled a State of Environment Report (SoER) for the District Municipality. The 
SoER reflects the state of the environment within the District and the report serves as a springboard in highlighting the environmental 
issues or the extent of the pollution (air, water, land) in the region and therefore aims to aid decision-making, information generation 
and awareness arising. In an effort to address the identified challenges, the NDM developed an Environmental Management Policy 
(EMP) in 2008, and subsequently completed an Integrated Environmental Management Plan (IEMP) in 2011 which was reviewed in 
2014/15. The status of air, water, waste, bio-diversity and land are some of the key elements in determining the state of the 
environment. 


The elements of topography, Vegetation, Fauna and Flora and pollution are briefly outlined below. 

Topography 

The overall topography of the Nkangala District can be described as an undulating landscape, with the occurrence of revealed rock 
outcrops along the Olifants and Wilge River and the mountainous areas in the northwest. The rocky outcrops stretch further in an east 
west direction along the northern boundary of the District (Dikwale/Dithaba mountain range), separating the Dr JS Moroka and 
Thembisile local municipalities from one another. 

A second significant topographical landform is the Bothasberg to the north of the Steve Tshwete LM. The Steenkamp Plateau 
comprises a large component of the eastern part of the NDM. From the plateau the landscape slopes downward tom the escarpment 
formed by the Drakensberg Mountains, towards the Lowveld and the Mozambique Coast. Finally, the northern part of Thembisile Hani 
local municipality comprises a mountainous area. 

Vegetation 

The field types occurring within Nkangala can be divided into three categories, namely Bushveld (Tropical Bush and Savannah types), 
pure grassveld types (Turf Highveld), and false grassveld types (Bankenveld). 


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Approximately 40% of the Nkangala District is covered with Bankenveld, which is categorised as the only false grassveld type in the 
area. Bankenveld covers the largest part of the Delmas, Emalahleni and Steve Tshwete municipal area, with intrusions of Veld or Turf 
Highveld in the south. In the north west of Nkangala, Mixed Busheveld and Sourish Mixed Bushveld are the dominant veld types, with 
Springbok Flats Turf Thornveld occurring exclusively in the north of Dr JS Moroka municipal area. In the Emakhazeni LM the 
Bankenveld and North eastern Sandy Highveld types are predominant. 

Fauna and Flora 

Emakhazeni local municipality has more “important areas” than any of the other municipalities. It also has the most “irreplaceable 
“sites at 4.8%. The most critical areas within the Emakhazeni LM are namely: 

• The high altitude grasslands and wetlands of the Steenkampsberg Mountains between Verlon Valei Nature Reserve and Belfast 
(flora, mammals, birds); 

• The Mistbelt grasslands of the mountains between eNtokozweni and the southern boundary of the LM (flora, mammals, birds); 

• The headwaters of the Elands and Crocodile Rivers (fishes); and 

• The Montane grasslands south west of Stoffberg 

After Emakhazeni LM, the next most important local municipalities for threatened species are Steve Tshwete and Thembisile LM's. 
The most critical areas within the LM are: 

• The Loskop Dam Nature Reserve (mammal, birds, reptiles); and 

• The Grasslands between Middelburg and Loskop Dam Nature Reserve (flora) 

With regards to threatened fish species, it is of critical importance that the integrity of especially the upper catchments and headwaters 
of the Crocodile and Elands Rivers are restored and maintained. 

4.23.2 Pollution 

Section 36 of the National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act (NEMAQA), 39 of 2004 came into effect on the 1 st of April 
2010 in respect of Atmospheric Emission Licensing (AEL) function. The section charges Metropolitan and District Municipalities with 
the atmospheric emission licensing system for the listed activities (Section 22). 

A synopsis of the pollution in respect of air, water and land medium is hereby described below: 

a) AIR: The following are amongst others the air quality management issues that were raised by the SoER and the subsequent 
policies and: 

■ Management of greenhouse gases emanating mainly from fossil fuels and power generation stations (relating to 
Environmental Management); 

■ Veld fires (related to Environmental Management) and refuse and tyre burning (also related to waste); 

■ Management of vehicle emissions that account mainly for Nitrogen Oxides(NOx); 

■ Management of informal industries such as car spraying in residential areas; 

■ Domestic fuel burning that accounts for a major part of the air pollution in less formal settlements; 

■ There is no ambient air quality monitoring happening at Victor Khanye, Thembisile Hani, Dr. JS Moroka and Emakhazeni 
local municipalities, since none of the ambient air quality monitoring stations are allocated within the boundaries of these 
municipalities. 

4.23.2.1 Atmospheric Emission Licensing Function Project 

Section 36 (1) of the Environmental Management Act: Air Quality Act 39 of 2004 provides that “Metropolitan and District Municipalities 
(hereby referred to as Atmospheric Emissions Licensing Authorities {AELA}) are charged with implementing the atmospheric emission 
licensing system and must therefore perform the functions of licensing authority” as set out in Chapter 5 of this Act. An Atmospheric 
Emission License is a tool used by government for ‘direct regulation’ (i.e. a type of regulation carried out by setting legal requirements 
or by issuing licenses, followed by inspection and enforcement). 

Furthermore, the NDM falls within the Highveld Priority, an area declared an Air Pollution Hotspot” hosting eight (8) out of thirteen 
(13) ESKOM Coal Fired Power Generation Stations in the Mpumalanga Province {i.e Komati, Arnot, Hendrina, Kriel, Matla, Duvha, 


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Kendal and Kusile}. 


To that end Nkangala District Municipality has conducted and approved a Section 78 Investigation and the development of a Strategic 
Plan for the provision of the Atmospheric Emission Licensing function (new function). Through Council resolution DM86/05/2012, 
Council decided as follows: 

• THAT the NDM Draft: Atmospheric Emission Licensing (AEL) Report & Implementation Plan be noted and approved. 

• THAT the internal mechanism option of Atmospheric Emission Licensing service delivery be adopted. 

• THAT the Acting Municipal Manager be authorized to deal with all matters incidental to the Atmospheric Emission Licensing 
(AEL) Section 78 Assessment Report & Implementation Plan. 

The NDM Atmospheric Emission Licencing (AEL) Investigation Plan is mainly based on the Highveld Priority Area (HPA): Air Quality 
Management Plan (AQMP) of which three (3) of the local municipalities within the NDM are part of the Air Pollution Hotspots (Namely 
- Emalahleni, Steve Tshwete and Victor Khanye Local Municipalities). 

The HPA: Air Quality Management Plan as promulgated through Government Notice 270 of 2011 seeks to achieve and maintain 
compliance with the ambient air quality standards across the HPA, using Constitutional principle of progressive realisation of air quality 
improvements by both government and private sector. 

In order to achieve the planned AQMP goals, seven (7) strategic goals are designed to achieve different aspects of identified problems 
as follows: 

Goal 1: By 2015, organisational capacity in government is optimised to efficiently and effectively maintain, monitor and enforce 
compliance with ambient air quality standards; 

Goal 2: By 2020, industrial emissions are equitably reduced to achieve compliance with ambient air quality standards and dust fallout 
limit values; 

Goal 3: By 2020, air quality in low-income settlements is in full compliance with ambient air quality standards 
Goal 4: By 2020, all vehicles comply with the requirements of the National Vehicle Emission Strategy 
Goal 5: By 2020, a measurable increase in awareness and knowledge of air quality exist 
Goal 6: By 2020, biomass burning and agricultural emissions will be 30% less that the current 
Goal 7: By 2020, emissions from waste management are 40% less that the current 

In the implementation Plan, each of the seven goals is subdivided into logical and related objectives, then activities are allocated to 
the respective objectives and the time-frames and responsibilities are allocated accordingly. 

The following according to the above-mentioned goals have been achieved: 

• Organisational Capacity Building; 

• An Air Quality Officer for the NDM (Assistant Manager, Pollution Control) as per the legal requirement has been appointed 
and also designated Grade 2 Environmental Management Inspector (EMI), 

• Two (2) officials were appointed, (Atmospheric Emission Licensing Officer, and Environmental compliance and enforcement 
officer, respectively; 

• One (1) official deployed by DEA as Assistant Director local government support. 

• Furthermore, the AEL Calculator is being developed by the Department of Environmental Affairs for all the Atmospheric 
Emission Licensing Authorities; 

• Continuous training and workshops in various AQM skills including Environmental Management Inspector (EMI) Course, Dust 
Regulations, Stack Monitoring and Compliance Monitoring Inspection, SAAELIP and NAES Training. 

As of 1 July 2013, Nkangala District Municipality assumed responsibility of performing the Atmospheric Emission Licencing Function. 
Furthermore, the National Departments together with the provincial departments of Environmental Affairs and the District 
municipalities have completed the development of the Highveld Priority Area (HPA) Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP). Nkangala 

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District Municipality has developed its own District Air Quality Management Plan and the air quality by-laws. The NDM is currently in 
a process of developing the Air quality by-law implementation fine list. 

To-date the following AEL's have been issued as illustrated in the following Table 94. 


Project 

Name 

Project 

description 

Status of the project 

Local 

Municipality 

Locality 

Kusile 

Power 

Station 

Power 

Generation 

Renewal AEL Issued 

Victor Khanye 

Local Municipality 

Farm Hartbeesfontein 537 
- Portion 4, Remainder 
Portion 1, Portion 7 and 

Farm Klipfontein Portion 3, 
Portion 26 and Portion 58 

Elkem Ferro 
Veld 

Calcining 

Renewal AEL Issued 

Emalahleni 

Local Municipality 

Farm Driefontein 297 JS 9 

Infrabuild 

Cement 

Cement 

manufacturing 

AEL with outstanding 
information from the 
Applicant 

Steve tshwete 

Local Municipality 

Industrial site on 

Middelburg Ferrocrome 
grounds and Columbus 
stainless steel 

Eagle Creek 

Animal 

Processing 

Section 22A AEL 

Issued 

Victor khanye 

Local Municipality 

Portion 207 Hek-Poort 
Delmas 

Much 

Asphalt 

Plant 

Asphalt Plant 
Production 

AEL Issued 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

70 Newton Road 

Ferrobank xl Witbank 

Vanchem 

SAJV&FEV 

Ferro-alloy 

production 

AEL Renewal Issued 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

SAJV: Portions 4 & 33 of 
the farm Elandsfontein 309 
JS (Fev and SAJV) FeV: 
Portion 92 of the farm 
Nooitgedach 

Engen 

Petroleum 

Limited 

Petroleum 

Storage 

AEL Renewal Issued 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

Situated at 18 Moses 

Kotane Street 

Vanchem 

Vanadium 

Products 

Outstanding 

Information from the 
facility the AEL is on 
the Draft Stage 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

Moses Kotane Street 

Columbus 

Stainless 

Steel 

Briqueting 

Plant 

Outstanding 

Information from the 
facility the AEL is on 
the Draft Stage 

Steve Tshwete 
Local Municipality 

Hendrina Road Middelburg 

Afgri 

/Southern 

proteins 

Animal 

Processing 

Section 22A 

Application issued 

Victor khanye 

Local Municipality 

Remaining extent of 
portion 33 of the farm 
weltevreden 227 IR 

ACWA 

Power 

Power 

Generation 

AEL Transfer Issued 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

Anglocoal Mining 

Operations 

Emalahleni 

Crematoria 

Crematoria 

AEL Issued 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

Portion 66 of Witbank 

Farm 307/JS,Emalahleni 

Middelbur 

Fero 

Cromme 

Ferrochrome 

Production 

AEL Variation Issued 

Steve Tshwete 
Local Municipality 

Portion 280 of portion 155 
Middelburg town and 
townlands No287 JSSteve 
Tshwete Local Municipality 

Minerals 2 
Metals 

Ferrochrome 

Production 

AEL Issued 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

No 1 Ferrobank, 

Emalahleni 


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4.23.2 Compliance Monitoring 

Purpose of the Compliance and Enforcement Strategic Inspections is aimed at checking compliance against environmental legislation 
by various competent authorities at national, provincial and local government officials in terms of their various environmental 
mandates. 

The objectives include: 

• To raise level of compliance through administrative enforcement actions; 

• Assist and build capacity on how the permits and licences are developed and improve on drafting and testing the efficacy of 
legislation; 

• Building internal capacity to conduct inspections; 

• To conduct monitoring, compliance and enforcement actions in terms of NEMA, AQA and other appropriate environmental 
legislation. 

4.23.3 Development of NDM Air Quality Management Plan and By-Laws 

The aim of the NDM on the matter is to develop Air Quality Management Plan and Air Quality Management (AQM) by-laws which will 
help the NDM and local municipalities, industry and other stakeholders to take necessary steps in order to minimize the emissions 
which are considered to be dangerous to human health and for the state of the environment. 

Objectives 

District Air Quality Management Plan and the By-Laws seek: 

■ To give effect, to Chapter 3 of NEMA to the extent that the Chapter is applicable to it; 

■ To compile a status quo air quality report, situation assessment, gap analysis and needs assessment for NDM; 

■ To give effect to the Approved NDM Section 78 Atmospheric Emission Licensing Investigation and Implementation Plan; 

■ To update the District Air Quality emission inventory from the NDM Section 78 Atmospheric Emission; 

■ To develop an AQMP for the NDM covering all the six local municipalities in the district and to give effect to its AQMP 
implementation: For three of the municipalities such AQMP-related information can be adapted and/or adopted from the 
Highveld Priority Area AQMP. For the remaining three municipalities outside the priority area, new information needs to be 
collected and should be in line with the Provincial AQMP that is currently under development; 

■ To identify and reduce the negative impacts of poor air quality on human health and the environment in the District; 

■ To give effect to Section 13 of the Local Government; Municipal Systems Act 2000 and the NDM Standing Resolution in 
respect to the Municipal By-law development and adoption processes; 

* To address the effects of emissions from the industrial sources use of fossil fuels in residential applications and other 
sources especially those identified in the (HPA) Air Quality Management Plan; 

■ To address the effects of emissions fron from any point or non-point sources (including mining) of air pollution other than 
those contemplated above; 

■ To evaluate current capacity and provide capacity development plan for the district; 

■ To provide a framework for a comprehensive air quality management training programme and communication strategy for 
the NDM; 

* To implement South Africa’s obligations in respect of international agreements; 

■ To give effect to best practices in air quality management. 

The following challenges and proposed intervention measures were identified as outlined in the following Table 


Challenges 

Recommendations 

Inadequate capacity on compliance 
monitoring inspection and enforcement 
of AEL issued and controlled emitter. 

Appoint more AQM and compliance monitoring officials to conduct 
compliance monitoring and enforcement inspection to industries 

Purchasing of Mobile Air quality monitoring stations 


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Inadequate capacity on NDM legal 
capacity pertaining to environmental 
management issues 

NDM legal unit and pollution to undergo continuous training on 
environmental legislations e.g. Environmental Management Inspectorate 
(EMI) training. 

Insufficient working tools and protective 
clothing (PPE) for employees 

To purchase investigative cameras and protective Clothing (PEE) 

Lack of implementation of the Climate 
change strategy 

NDM to Budget and implement the strategy 

AQMP valid for 5 years, due for reviewal 

2020/ 2021 Financial year NDM to budget for review of the Air Quality 
Management Plan (AQMP). 

Enforcement of the NDM air quality By¬ 
laws 

Review the existing air quality by-laws and the implementation plan in 
accordance with the recommendations by the magistrate courts/council. 

Lack of cooperation between AQM 
authorities and the environmental 
regulated community Organisations 

Improve cooperation between the AQM Authorities and the environmental 
regulated community organisations. 


4.23.4 Water 

There is a need for increased level of surface and ground water resource monitoring in the District on a regular basis. The monitoring 
programme in local municipalities urgently needs to be revised to cover the whole year to provide a better indication of the overall 
trend. Water quality concerns in the Olifants catchments are biological / microbial and chemical/mineralogical. Biological/microbial are 
caused by sewage treatment plant return flow volumes in the Loskop Dam catchment causing of eutrophication in the upper reaches 
of the Loskop Dam and the Klein Olifants River. Chemical/mineralogical 

water quality concerns high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and sulphates, low pH, and at times high concentrations 
of iron, manganese and aluminium as a result of mining activities (McCarthy & Pretorius, and NDM WMP, 2008). 

Hence, in response to the above need to monitor the quality of both water and sewage treatment works discharges to the main 
watercourse. The NDM has appointed a professional water analyser laboratory for quality water monitoring to service all the local 
municipality to deal with amongst others: 

• The presence and origin of heavy metals (such as aluminium, vanadium, copper, lead and zinc) in water samples is of 
concern and should be investigated; 

• The presence of faecal coliform bacteria in some water samples is of concern and sanitation management systems 
must be re-evaluated. 

There is also a growing need to manage the ever-increasing Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) challenge in the region, both as part of the 
legalised mining rehabilitation programme and as an effort to deal with the old decant mines that their previous owner cannot be 
traced in collaboration with the Department Minerals and Energy. 

4.24 Issue 22: Climate and climate change 

According to the IPCC report, Climate change is a change in the state of the climate that can be identified (e.g., by using statistical 
tests) by changes in the mean and/or the variability of its properties and that persists for an extended period, typically decades or 
longer. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) defines climate change as ‘a change of climate 
which is attributed directly or indirectly to human activity that alters the composition of the global atmosphere and which is in addition 
to natural climate variability observed over comparable time periods'. It is imperative for one to note that both definitions concur with 
each other, however the second further clarifies the causes of climate change. It there necessary for one to understand climate change 
not only as a change in the state of the climate but rather understand the causes, process and the time scale. 


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This rise in the average temperature is due mainly, to the increased concentration of gases known as greenhouse gases (GHG) in 
the atmosphere that are emitted by human activities. These gases intensify a natural phenomenon called the “greenhouse effect” by 
forming an insulating layer in the atmosphere that reduces the amount of the sun's heat that radiates back into space and therefore 
has the effect of making the earth warmer. Climate Change has become a measurable reality and along with other developing 
countries, South Africa is especially vulnerable to its impacts. Evidence of rapid climate change, including more frequent and intense 
weather systems and greater climate variability, has already been observed includes: 

• Increases in the average global temperature with the past decade being the hottest on record; 

• Rises in the average global sea level; 

• Changes in average rainfall patterns, with some regions experiencing higher rainfall (e.g. Northern Europe) and other areas 
experiencing drying (e.g. Southern Africa); 

• Increased frequency of heavy rainfall and extreme weather events over most land areas, and 

• More intense and longer droughts, particularly in the tropics and sub-tropics. 

To this extent, the government of South Africa is responding through its National Climate Change Response Policy and is aiming at 
an effective climate change response and a long term, just transition to climate-resilient and lower carbon economy and society. The 
country’s response to climate change has two broad objectives as follows: 

• Effectively manage inevitable climate change impacts through interventions that build and sustain South Africa’s social, 
economic and environmental resilience and emergency response capacity; 

• Make a fair contribution to the global effort to stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations in the atmosphere at a level 
that avoids dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system within a timeframe that enables economic, social 
and environmental development to proceed in a sustainable manner. 

The overall strategic approach for South Africa’s climate change response is needs driven and customised, developmental, 
transformational, dynamic and evidence based, empowering and participatory, balanced and cost effective and integrated and aligned. 
In addition, and support to this, the District developed a Climate Change Mitigation and Response Strategy that sought to: 

• ensure that Nkangala District makes a fair contribution to the country’s effort to achieve the stabilization of greenhouse gas 
concentrations in the atmosphere at the level that prevents dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate change; 

• To ensure effective adaptation, mitigation and response strategies are put in place to manage unavoidable and potential 
damaging climate change impacts both as a provider of certain municipal services (according to municipal powers & functions) 
including Occupational Health & Safety requirements and the broader coordinating role; 

• Develop interventions that should build and sustain the country’s socio-economic and environmental resilience and emergency 
response capacity; 

• To quantify and forecast the effects of climate change per identified sector; 

• To give effect to the Republic's obligations in terms of international agreements on climate change; 

• To engage key stakeholders and affected parties so as to confirm and solicit practical and implementable intervention tactics; 

• To develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that seeks to improve the vulnerability of the socio-economic infrastructure 
against unavoidable impacts of climate change. 

• To suggest strategies that will enhance a more environmentally-friendly, energy-producing technologies in the region; 

• To ensure that the adaptation and response strategies developed are yielding significant short and long-term social and economic 
benefits (Green Economy); 

• To provide information on climate-change financial resources and technology transfers nationally and internationally (e.g World 
Bank Climate Investment Funds). 

Furthermore, to: 

• Promote the primary government objectives, which include job creation, the provision of basic services and infrastructure 
development, the alleviation of poverty and the provision of housing; 

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• These priorities are also generally compatible with the principles of sustainable development as encapsulated in United 
Nations’ Agenda 21; 

• To mainstream climate change responses into all local government planning regimes; 

• Engender the use of incentives and disincentives, including through regulation and the use of economic and fiscal measures 
to promote behaviour change that would support the transition to a low carbon society and the promotion of green economy. 

4.24.1 Environmental Education and Awareness 

Section 24 of the Republic of South Africa constitution states that everyone has the right to an environment that is not harmful to their 
health or wellbeing It is against this background that NDM embarks on environmental awareness campaigns to build capacity of 
community members and raise community awareness and promote community action on environmental issues. The issues identified 
during the campaigns are in line with the NDM’s State of the Environment Report, the Environmental Management Plan & Policy, the 
NDM Integrated Waste Management Plan, the NDM Climate Change, Mitigation and Response Strategy and the Municipal Health 
Services Section 78 Assessment Report and the Implementation Plan. The Awareness Campaigns are held in all the six (6) local 
municipalities in order to raise the awareness to different stakeholders so as to promote sustainability of the environment and the 
people’s health. 

The protection of environment is a pressing issue. Every person, organisation and institution has an obligation and duty to protect it. 
Environmental protection encompasses not only pollution but also sustainable development and conservation of natural resources 
and the ecosystem. Our nation’s future relies on a well-educated public to be wise stewards of the very environment that sustains us, 
our communities, and future generations. It is environmental education which can best help us as individuals make the complex, 
conceptual connections between economic prosperity, benefits to society, environmental health, and our own wellbeing. Ultimately, 
the collective wisdom of our citizens, gained through education, will be the most compelling and most successful strategy for 
environmental management. The current annual target for the environmental education and awareness is seventeen according to the 
SDBIP. 

The awareness campaigns are therefore aimed at the following: 

• Creating a general awareness among people as far as the environmental issues are concerned; 

• Motivating people towards conservation of resources, protection of environment and sound management of waste in accordance 
with the waste Hierarchy priorities. 

• Promoting understanding and cooperation among public to help in facing various ecological issues; and 

• Conserving indigenous knowledge, traditions and culture that favour environment protection, 

• Cooperation with communities in promoting awareness in Environmental Health Issues that has a bearing in the public health 
such as education and awareness in: 

o Food poisoning and food hygiene control; 
o Pesticide Control 

o Prevention and Control of Communicable Diseases 
o Waste Management and Pollution Control 

4.25 Issue 19: Waste Management 

4.25.1 Background and Problem Statement 

Waste management has not, historically, been regarded as priority environmental concern in South Africa (DEAT, 2000).There has 
been a lack of a co-ordinated approach towards integrated waste management (IWM), with waste management activities having been 
primarily reactive (DEAT, 2000). In addition, most “municipalities operate waste management facilities in contravention of the DWA 
Minimum Standards and the National Environmental Management: Waste Act 2008 with regard to the permitting of waste 
management sites (i.e. landfill sites, transfer stations, etc.). The majority of municipalities’ permitted waste disposal facilities do not 
comply with the Minimum Requirements for Waste Disposal by Landfill (Department of Water Affairs & Forestry)." (DPLG.2005). This 
has led to a number of associated environmental and human health issues within the Region. 


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The NDM’s Integrated Waste Management Plan details a number of challenges with regards to waste collection and disposal in the 
region. Based on an estimated population growth rate of 1.25%, 141 366 tonnes per year of general waste are generated. As expected, 
the highest quantities of waste are generated within the urban local municipalities of Steve Tshwete and Emalahleni, typical towns 
characterized by a higher socio-economic population generating higher tonnages of waste, with rich mining and industrial activity. 

Approximately 16 municipal and private industrial landfill sites are known within the Nkangala District Municipality. These landfills vary 
in status from small, illegal dumps to permitted and compliant sanitary landfills. From available information, it would appear that 
sufficient landfill airspace (lifespan) exists within the more urbanised municipalities. 

However, the level of compliance of Nkangala District Municipality landfills with the DWAF’s Minimum Requirements is an issue of 
concern. It is evident that waste management in the Nkangala District Municipality is recognized as an important environmental issue, 
which requires pro-active approaches for increased service delivery and environmental sustainable development. 

From Table 95, it is clear that 45.1% of the households in Nkangala District Municipality have access to acceptable refuse removal 
service levels. Steve Tshwete local municipality (MP313) has the highest percentage of households having access to refuse removal 
services (84.8%). Dr J.S Moroka local municipality (MP316) has the lowest percentage of households having access to refuse removal 
services (10.8%). The municipality also has the largest refuse removal backlog (89.1%), contributing 30.2% of the District backlog 
and 9.2% of the provincial backlog. The municipality with the smallest refuse removal backlog is Steve Tshwete local municipality 
(MP313), with a refuse removal backlog of (15.1%) and contributes 4.5% to the District backlog and 1.3% to the provincial backlog. 
The Nkangala District Municipality contributes 30.4% to the provincial refuse removal backlog. The Nkangala District has a relatively 
high refuse removal backlog. 

Some of the disposal facilities are not yet authorised and the Municipalities should prepare applications for a license in terms of 
Section 45 of the National Environmental Management Waste Act, Act 59 of 2008. Some of the facilities are reaching capacity in 
terms of air space and need to be closed and rehabilitated. In these cases, new disposal facilities should be identified and established. 
A summary of the existing disposal facilities in the District and their legal status are indicated in Table 93 below, based on the NDM 
IWMP2011. 

It should be noted that DARDLEA has indicated that it will implement a centralized landfill site project in the district per phases in the 
forthcoming 2015/16 finacial year. 


Table 95: Existing Disposal Facilities 


Status of Landfill Permitting/Licensing In Nkangala M 
Local Municipality: Victor Khanye 

unicipality 

Permit Status: Permitted/Licensed 

Name of disposal facility 


Delmas Botleng 

Permitted for continued operation on 8 Feb 1996 

Delmas Witklip 

Permitted for closure by DWAF on 1 Feb 1996 

Proposed Delmas transfer station 

In process of being permitted/licensed 

Local Municipality: Emakhazeni 

Permit Status 

Belfast 

Permitted on 11 March 2009 

Dullstroom 

Permitted and operational 

Waterval Boven 

Permitted 

Machadodorp 

Authorised for closure 

Mmametlhake 

Awaiting approval 

Local Municipality: Thembisile Hani 

Permit Status 

Kwagga Plaza 

Authorised, Directions 28 Feb 2003 

Local Municipality: Dr JS Moroka 

Permit Status 

Libangeni 

Authorised through Directions by DWAF 

Local Municipality: Steve Tshwete 

Permit Status 

Komati transfer station 

RoD issued by DEDET, not yet licensed 

Rietkuil transfer station 

RoD issued by DEDET, not yet licensed 

Pullenshope transfer station 

RoD issued by DEDET, not yet licensed 


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Status of Landfill Permitting/Licensing In Nkangala Municipality 

Doornkop transfer station (proposed) 

Planning stage, permit application submitted 

Bankfontein transfer station (proposed) 

Planning stage, permit application submitted 

Middelburg landfill site 

Permitted on 16 July 2002 by DWAF 

Local Municipality: Emalahleni 

Permit Status 

Emalahleni Leeuwpoort landfill 

Permitted on 22 September 1994 by DWAF 

Phola Ogies landfill 

Not permitted/licensed, application was submitted for 
closure 


For that reason, Nkangala District Municipality developed a District Wide Integrated Waste Management Plan. When an initial 
assessment was done it was discovered that Victor Khanye, Thembisile Hani and Emakhazeni local municipalities also needed the 
Integrated Waste Management Plans. Hence the IWMPs for these local municipalities were simultaneously developed. 

All the Municipalities, in various extent, have insufficient equipment to deliver an effective service, and are currently facing challenges 
as some of the current waste collection vehicles are old and in bad condition. These equipments need to be repaired or replaced in 
the near future and an active capitalisation programme is being actively pursued by both the District and Local Municipalities. 

Establishment of Waste Disposal Sites within the NDM 

As part of an effort to assist in improving the status of waste disposal facilities in the region the NDM has begun the process of the 
establishment of a landfill site (hereby referred to as Western Eastern Landfill Site) at Thembisile Hani Local Municipality. To date the 
feasibility studies that include sites are being completed. Hence, once the site identified is cleared of any land claim and is available 
and affordable, then other studies including the EIA will be proceeded with. 

4.25.2 Integrated Waste Management Plan 

For that reason, Nkangala District Municipality developed a District Wide Integrated Waste Management Plan (2009) which was 
reviewed on 2018/19 FY for an amount of R504 500. The NDM IWMP incorporated all the LM’s waste management challenges and 
identified the gaps and address the LM’s objectives and goals from short term to long term. 

4.25.3 Waste Management Equipment 

All the six Municipalities, in various extent, have insufficient equipment to deliver an effective service, and are currently facing 
challenges as some of the current waste collection vehicles are old and in bad condition. These equipments need to be repaired or 
replaced in the near future and an active capitalisation programme is being actively pursued by both the District and Local 
Municipalities. 

In order to address the refuse removal backlog, NDM has procured waste collection equipment as part of the capital projects in the 
financial year 2018/19 to assist the two local municipalities: 


Waste Management Equipment Procured 


Waste Management Equipment 

Beneficiary 

Period 

Budget 

Supply, delivery and Registration of Two(2) 19 M 3 
Refuse Compactor Truck 

Emakhazeni and Victor 
Khanye Local Municipality 

Feb 2019 

R4 280 000.00 

Supply, delivery and Registration of Two(2) 12 M 3 
Refuse Compactor Truck 

Emkahzeni local 
municipality 

Dec 2016 

R3,294 144.00 


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Procurement of waste collection equipment/s is per the request of the Local Municipalities in capital projects or on availability of NDM 
o wn Budget. NDM for the coming financial years will assist local municipality as follows: __ 


Waste Management Equipment 

Beneficiary 

Period 

Budget 

Supply, delivery and Registration of Two(2) 19 M 3 
Refuse Compactor Truck 

As per request 

2019/20 

R5 600.00 

Other waste related equipment (containers, 
tractors and trailers) 

As per request 

2019/20 

R3 000.00 


4.25.4 Establishment of Waste Disposal Sites within the NDM 

Thembisile Hani Local Municipality is in the process of upgrading the landfill site in Kwaggafontein approved by Department of 
Environmental Affairs (DEA) December 2016. Currently the municipality has completed the designs and in the process of upgrading 
for the landfill site awaiting funding from MIG by 2018/19 FY to complete the landfill site. 

4.25.5 Waste Recycling Initiatives 

Generally, throughout the region there are informal and ad-hoc waste recycling initiatives, which are operated but not necessarily co¬ 
ordinated by the municipalities, hence there is very less information on waste re-use and recycling and therefore reclaimable waste 
figures are not known. Steve Tshwete Local Municipality has a formal contract in place with two recycling companies to reclaim and 
remove recyclable material from the landfill. There is therefore a need to investigate and support the establishment of recycling 
initiatives including partnerships. 

4.25.6 Nkangala District Municipality Workplace Waste Recycling Project 

As part of the implementation of some of the NDM Climate Change Mitigation and Response Strategy the NDM has developed and 
implement an internal waste recycling project and identify interventions (e.g. electronic recycling, paper shredding, efficient lighting.) 
aimed at reduced carbon footprint for NDM municipal building. To that end Nkangala District Municipality Workplace Waste Recycling 
Project was approved. The project will focus on waste generated at the workplace such as paper, plastic and tins and will be 
implemented in partnership with cooperatives dealing with recycling. It is envisaged that through the recycling project, consciousness 
and promotion of sustainable development will be attained. In order for the NDM to reduce the carbon footprint, a pilot waste recycling 
project has been initiated within the building in order to recover and reduce the amount of waste ending up in the waste disposal site. 
Waste recycling will be the first phase of the NDM Carbon Footprint Reduction Strategy implementation and the other parts of the 
strategy such as the strategy such as energy usage will gradually be phased in, hence the main focus currently is waste generation 
within the building. 

Waste as an important contributor to carbon emissions. Reducing waste can lead to big emission reduction and lower land fill 
requirements (which is very high on capital investment for government), with consequent reduction in air and land pollution. Waste 
not only discharges C02 and methane into the atmosphere, it can also pollute the air, groundwater and soil. 

4.25.7 Expanded Public Works Programme on Environment and Culture 

The Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) on Environment and Culture sector involves creating work opportunities in public 
environmental programmes e.g. (Working for Water and Land Based sustainable programmes) including the waste management on 
programmes such as Waste for Food. The Sector Champion in Mpumalanga is the Department of Public Works in collaboration with 
the Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism. Flence the NDM needs to investigate the possibility of the 
establishment of an Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) on waste management. 

4.25.8 Environmental Protection and Infrastructure Programme (EPIP) 

The NDM Integrated Development Plan (IDP) and the Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) provides for the 
investigation of the use of cooperatives in Environmental and Waste management programme and other Expanded Public Works 
Programme (EPWP) initiatives. In order to achieve the above purpose, the NDM is participating in Department of Environmental 
Affairs (DEA) EPIP. The purpose of the programme is to keep the NDM Council up to date about DEA Environmental Protection & 
Infrastructure Programme and that includes the projects where the NDM and/or its constituent local municipalities is directly 
involved. 

Since the 1999/2000 financial year, the Department of Environmental Affairs has been Implementing programmes aimed at conserving 
natural assets and protecting the environment. Over time this programme has evolved and has also grown from a budget of R28 


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million in the 1999/2000 financial year to more than R750 million in 2012/2013. In this period the programme has seen introduction of 
new methods of doing things and has also changed names from Poverty Relief Programme to Social Responsibility Programme and 
it is now called the Environmental Protection and Infrastructure Programme (EPIP) funded by DEA. 

The programme’s mandate is to manage the identification, planning and implementation of programmes that mirror and support the 
mandate of the department whilst at the same time creating the well needed job opportunities. The sub-programmes are as follows: 

• Working for Land; 

• Working for the Coast; 

• Working on Waste; 

• Youth and Waste; 

• People & Parks; 

• Wildlife Economy; 

• Greening and Open Space Management. 

Emanating Challenges 

• Lack of access to refuse removal services, that translate into refuse removal backlogs in terms of refuse storage and collection 
receptacles; 

• Lack of formal and well-coordinated recycling programmes and projects which are co-ordinated by the municipalities or other 
government agencies; 

• Old and insufficient waste removal equipment 

• LMs need to establish Waste Management Committee; 

To make a lasting impact on the Waste Management of the communities within its jurisdictional area, NDM in collaboration with key 
Stakeholders will need to during the medium - Longer Term of Council place more emphasis on the following issues. 

Priority Projects 

• Raise funds internally (through capital projects allocation) and externally (big business) to procure waste management, 
refuse removal trucks and other equipment in order to tackle refuse removal backlogs in the region; 

• Development and implementation of an internal waste recycling project (Identify interventions (e.g. electronic recycling, 
paper shredding, efficient lighting.) aimed at reduced carbon footprint for NDM municipal building; 

• Investigate the possibility of the establishment of an Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) on waste management 
in partnership with appropriate stakeholders; 

• Support local municipalities in waste management initiatives such as equipments, fencing of landfill sites and development 
of strategic documents 

• Implementation of the Environmental Protection and Infrastructure Programme (EPIP) in collaboration with DEA. 


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CHAPTER FIVE 


5.1 NDM’S DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES, OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES, KPI PER KPA AND PROJECTS. 

According to Section 53 of the Constitution a municipality must structure and manage its administration and budgeting and planning 
processes to give priority to the basic needs of the community, and to promote the social and economic development of the community, 
and participate in national and provincial development programmes. 

The above implies that local government must comply with the national strategic plan that defines the framework for detailed planning 
and action across all spheres of government. Strategic priority areas recognised by national and provincial government will therefore 
guide the strategic priority areas identified by municipalities to build a developmental government that is efficient, effective and 
responsive; to strengthen accountability and to strive for accountable and clean government; to accelerating service delivery and 
supporting the vulnerable; and to foster partnerships, social cohesion and community mobilisation. 

The focus of the Nkangala District Municipality is on shaping the future of the municipality to, as the vision statement reflects accelerate 

“Improved quality of life for all”. 

In this journey the municipality is intent on aligning its goals and strategies to that of the National Development Plan - Vision 2030 
(NDP) as well as other relevant National and Provincial strategies. The NDP prioritises, that closely link to Nkangala, focus on: 

• an economy that will create more jobs; 

• improving infrastructure; 

• transition to a low-carbon economy; 

• an inclusive and integrated rural economy; 

• reversing the spatial effects of apartheid; 

• improving the quality of education; 

• training and innovation; 

• quality health care for all; 

• social protection; 

• building safer communities; 

• reforming the public service, and 

• fighting corruption and transforming society and uniting the country 

It is the National Government’s priority area, to ensure a better life for all by providing basic services to all communities, which amongst 
others includes creating sustainable jobs, poverty alleviation and relevant skills transfer through successful implementation of 
government programmes and lastly, by encouraging the transformation of community participation and involvement. 

It has been shown that where there has been State intervention in the economy through direct public investment in infrastructure, 
there has been economic growth and more job creation. Therefore, the Nkangala District Municipality seeks to position itself to relate 
directly to amongst other initiatives the National Development Plan, National Outcomes, in particular the outputs from Outcome Nine, 
and the Provincial Employment Growth and Development Plan (PEGDP) and the Vision 2030 Mpumalanga. 

Therefore, this Chapter sets out the main strategic goals, desired impacts, outcomes, measurements and targets to be achieved, 
aligned to the strategies to be implemented in order to achieve the vision of the municipality. Strategic Goals were developed at a 
Strategic Lekgotla held over three (3) days between the 4th and 6th February and the following Development Objectives; refer 
following table, were adopted during an IDP Indaba held on the 05-06 April 2018. 


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Developmental Objectives 

Strategic Goals 

Integrated Sustainable Human Settlements and improved 
quality of household life 

Integrated Regionalised Planning 

Efficient, competitive and responsive economic infrastructure 
network 

Sustainable Infrastructure and Service Provisioning 

Decent employment through inclusive economic growth 

Inclusive Economic Growth 

Inculcate and improve financial sustainability and management 

Sound Financial Management 

Responsive, accountable, effective, efficient and sound 
Governance System 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Skilled and capable workforce supportive of inclusive growth 

Competent, Innovative and Accountable Team 

Vibrant, equitable and sustainable rural communities and food 
security 

Healthy Social Environment 

Protection and enhancement of environmental assets and 
natural resources 

Healthy Social Environment 


The following table depicts the expected outcome to be achieved by the successful implementation of the Nkangala District 
municipalities adopted Strategic goals. 


Strategic Goal 

Outcome 

Healthy Social Environment 

Improved quality of life, effective and efficient service delivery 

Inclusive Economic Growth with Sustainable 
Development 

Diversified and sustainable regional economy by 2030 

Sound Financial Management 

Financial sustainability 

Sustainable Infrastructure and Service Provisioning 

Deliver various infrastructure projects for sustainable economic 
growth and service provision to communities 

Integrated Regionalised Planning 

Integrated economic space and sustainable human settlements 
by 2030 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Clean Audit results and satisfied and participative communities 

Competent, Innovative and Accountable Team 

High performing and effective employees 


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The District Municipality must ensure that it aligns its strategic goals with the National and Provincial goals and priorities. The table 
underneath reflects the Nkangala strategic goals’ alignment to Local Government Key Performance Areas. 


CoGTA Key Performance Areas 

Nkangala Strategic Goals 

KPA 1: Institutional Development and Transformation 

Competent, Innovative and Accountable Team 

KPA 2: Good Governance and Public Participation 

Sound Electronic Governance 

KPA 3: Local Economic Development 

Inclusive Economic Growth with Sustainable Development 

KPA 4: Financial Viability and Financial Management 

Sound Financial Management 

KPA 5: Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 

Healthy Social Environment 

Sustainable Infrastructure and Service Provisioning 

KPA 6: Spatial Rationale 

Integrated Regionalised Planning 


The Strategic Goals and CoGTA Key Performance Areas have been aligned to specific Priority Issues which were again endorsed at 
the recent Strategic Lekgotla and IDP Indaba as still being relevant to the current status quo. The confirmation of the current 
developmental strategies will serve to galvanise management in a concerted effort to implement the strategic intent as outlined in this 
document for the current and forward years of the five year (5) cycle. The Balanced Scorecard approach must enable the municipality 
to measure financial management, client value proposition, institutional processes (efficiencies and effectivity) and the skills and 
competency levels of its people. It should contribute to the disbanding of the institutional silos; identifying the integrative programme 
for service delivery and that the budget should support the initiatives as stipulated through the processes. 


The following table depict the Priority Issues and their respective alignment to each Strategic Goals and CoGTA Key Performance 
Area. 


COGTA Key Performance Areas 

Nkangala Strategic Goals 

Priority Issues 

KPA 1: Institutional Development 
and Transformation 

Competent, Innovative and Accountable 
Team 

Powers, Duties and Functions 

Organizational Restructuring and 
Transformation 

KPA 2: Good Governance and 

Public Participation 

Sound Electronic Governance 

Communication, Liaison and Alignment 

KPA 3: Local Economic 

Development 

Inclusive Economic Growth with 

Sustainable Development 

Economic development and job creation 

KPA 4: Financial Viability and 
Financial Management 

Sound Financial Management 

Financial Management 

KPA 5: Basic Service Delivery and 
Infrastructure 

Healthy Social Environment 

Health 

Education 

Welfare 

Sports and Recreation, Arts and Culture 

Safety and Security 

Emergency Services 

Transversal/Special Programmes 

Environmental Management 


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COGTA Key Performance Areas 

Nkangala Strategic Goals 

Priority Issues 



Waste Management 

Climate 

Sustainable Infrastructure and Service 
Provisioning 

Water and Sanitation 

Electricity Supply 

Roads and Storm Water 

Transportation 

KPA 6: Spatial Rationale 

Integrated Regionalised Planning 

Spatial Restructuring and Space Provision 

Land Reform 

Housing and Land Administration 


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5.2 STRATEGIC SCORECARD 


To measure the progress in achieving the abovementioned Strategic Goals and Outcomes, the following strategic scorecard was developed represented by the accountable department. 

KPA 1: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSFORMATION 


KPA1: Institutional Development and Transformation 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st 

Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd 

Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Competent, 
Innovative and 
Accountable 
Team 

Organisational 
restructuring and 
transformation 

M_01 

Number of formal 
performance reviews 
conducted with Section 56 
employees by 31 May 2020 

1,8 

Opex 

2 

N/A 

1 (annual 
assessment) 

1 

(mid¬ 

year) 

N/A 

2 

Attendance 
register and 
reports 

Powers, Duties 
and Functions 

M_02 

Number of new/reviewed 
policies approved by Council 
by 30 June 2020 (IA-04; RM 
-03; PMS-01; 

LS -01; TS - 01; 18- FS; 
PED-01; SS -02; CS-12) 

1,4 

Opex 

39 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

43 

43 

Approved 

Policies Report 
and council 
resolutions 


KPA 1: Institutional Development and Transformation 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Competent, 
Innovative and 
Accountable 

Team 

Good 

governance and 
communication 

M_03 

Percentage of KPIs and 
projects attaining 
organisational targets by 30 
June 2020 (Total 

Organisation) 

1,8 

Opex 

96% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly 

Institutional 

Performance 

Report 

M_04 

Percentage on number of 
litigation matter reduced by 

30 June 2020 


Opex 

New 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

15% 

15% 

Litigation register 
and report 


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M_05 

Average number of days 
elapsed from date of 
authorisation of disciplinary 
processes by the MM to the 
completion date (90 days) 


Opex 

New 

90 

days 

90 days 

90 days 

90 days 

90 days 

Appointment letter, 
charge sheet and 
disciplinary 
outcome report 

M_06 

Number of quarterly 
Institutional Performance 
Reports submitted to 

Council per quarter 

1.8 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

4 Quarterly 
institutional 
Performance 

Reports and council 
resolution 


KPA 1: Institutional Development and Transformation 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 




Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 


Competent, 
Innovative and 
Accountable 

Team 

Organisational 

Restructuring 

and 

Transformation 

M_07 

Percentage of Recruitment 
processes on approved vacant 
positions finalized within 3 
months of position being 
advertised 

1,2 

Opex 

100% 

95% 

95% 

95% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly 
Vacancy Rate 
Report 



M_08 

Percentage of employees from 
previously disadvantaged 
groups appointed in the three 
highest levels of management 
(level 0 to 3) as per the 
approved EE plan (GKPI) by 30 
June 2020 

1,3 

Opex 

45% 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

70% 

70% 

EE Annual 
Report 



M_09 

Percentage of allocated budget 
spent implementing the 
Workplace Skills Plan (GKPI) 
by 30 June 2020 

1,5 

Opex 

87% 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

90% 

90% 

Training 
report (include 
budget 
spending 
report. The 
budget is 2 
Million) 


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KPA1: Institutional Development and Transformation 


Strategic 

Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Competent, 

Innovative 

and 

Accountable 

Team 

Organisational 

Restructuring 

and 

Transformation 

M_11 

Annual Youth 

Summit convened 
by 30th June 2020 

1,6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Annual Youth 
Summit report, 
agenda and 
attendance 
registers 

M_12 

Percentage of 
findings on health 
and safety incident 
implemented by 30 
June 2020 



New 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

100% 

100% 

OHS report 


KPA2: GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 


Strategic Goal 

Priority 

Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 

Sound 

Electronic 

Governance 

Good 

Governance 

M_13 

Number of Quarterly 
MPAC Reports 
submitted to council per 
quarter 

2,1 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

4 Quarterly Reports 
submitted to council 
resolutions 

M_14 

Obtain clean audit 
opinion in respect of the 
2018/19 Audit Report by 

30 November 2019 

2,4 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

AG's Audit Report 

M_15 

Action Plan on issues 
raised by the Auditor 
General compiled and 
tabled to Council by 
December 2019 

2,5 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

Action Plan and 
Council resolution 

M_16 

Percentage of AG 
Management Letter 
findings resolved by 30 
June 2020 (Total 
organization) 

2,5 

Opex 

100% 

N/A 

N/A 

50% 

100% 

100% 

Action Plan 
progress report 


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M_17 

Final IDP tabled for 

2,6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Approved IDP 




approved to Council by 









document & Council 




the 31st May 2020 









resolution 


KPA 2: Good Governance and Public Participation 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 




1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


Sound 

Electronic 

Governance 

Good 

governance and 
communication 

M_18 

Submission of Final audited 
Annual Report to Council by 
31st December 2019 

2.4 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

Final audited 

Annual Report 
and council 
resolution 



M_19 

Submission of Oversight 
Report by MPAC to Council 
by 28 February 2020 

2.5 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

1 

Oversight Report 
and council 
resolution 



M_20 

Final 2020/2021 SDBIP 
approved by Executive 

Mayor within 28 days after 
approval of Budget 

2.6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Approved and 
signed SDBIP 



M_21 

Adjusted SDBIP approved 
by 28 March 2020 

2.4 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

1 

Approved 

Adjusted SDBIP 
and Council 
Resolution 


KPA 2: Good Governance and Public Participation 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Sound 

Electronic 

Governance 

Good 

governance and 
communication 

M_22 

Percentage of action plans 
implemented to address 
Strategic Risks Identified per 
quarter (organisation) 

2,3 

Opex 

99% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly 

Strategic Risk 
report 


211 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 


















































Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 





1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 




M_23 

Percentage of action plans 
implemented to address 
Operational Risks Identified 
per quarter (Total 
Organisation) 

2,3 

Opex 

98% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly 
Operational Risk 
report 



M_24 

Percentage of action plans 
implemented to address 

Fraud and corruption Risks 
Identified per quarter (Total 
Organisation) 

2,3 

Opex 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly Fraud 
and corruption 

Risk report 



M_25 

Developed and approved 
2020/2021 Risk based audit 
plan by 30 June 2020 

2,2 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Approved Risk 
based audit plan 


KPA 2: Good Governance and Public Participation 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 




1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


Sound 

Electronic 

Governance 

Good 

governance and 
communication 

M_26 

Percentage of internal audit 
recommendation 
implemented per quarter 
(Total organization) 

2,2 

Opex 

New 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly IA report 



M_27 

Developed and approved 
2020/2021 Strategic Risk 
Register by 30 June 2020 

2,3 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Approved Strategic 
Risk Register 



M_28 

Number of quarterly Audit 
Committee reports 
submitted to Council per 
quarter 

2,2 

Opex 

4 

1 

0 

2 

1 

4 

Quarterly Audit 
Committee reports 
and council 

Resolution 


212 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 




































Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 




1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 




M_29 

Number of Council meeting 
held by 30 June 2020 

2,1 

Opex 

14 

2 

2 

3 

3 

10 

Attendance register 
and minutes 



M_30 

Number of quarterly ICT 
steering committee meetings 
held per quarter 

2,4 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Minutes and 
Attendance 

Register 


KPA 2: Good Governance and Public Participation 


Strategic 

Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st 

Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Sound 

Electronic 

Governance 

Good 

governance 

and 

communicatio 

n 

M_31 

Number of quarterly District 

Municipal Manager's Forum 
meetings held per quarter 

2,6 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Minutes and 
Attendance 

Register 

M_32 

Number of quarterly District Mayoral 
Forum meetings held per quarter 

2,6 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Minutes and 
Attendance 

Register 

M_33 

2020/2021 IDP review Framework 
Plan approved by 30th June 2020 

2,6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Reviewed 
Framework Plan 
and Council 
resolution 

M_34 

Strategic Lekgotla report tabled to 
Council by 31 January 2020 

2,6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

1 

Strategic Lekgotla 
report and Council 
resolution 

M_35 

Percentage of 2018/2019 strategic 
lekgotla resolutions implemented 
by 30 December 2019 

2,6 

Opex 

NEW 

N/A 

100% 

N/A 

N/A 

100% 

Strategic Lekgotla 
report 

M_36 

Percentage on implementation of 
Council resolutions resolved (Total 
organization) 

2,1 

Opex 

4 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly report on 
implementation of 
Council resolutions 


213 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 






































KPA 2: Good Governance and Public Participation 


Strategic 

Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Sound 

Electronic 

Governance 

Good 

governance 

and 

communication 

M_37 

Number of Local 

Labour Forum (LLF) 
meetings held 30 June 
2020 

2,1 

Opex 

9 

3 

2 

2 

3 

10 

Agenda, Minutes and 
attendance register 

Communicatio 
n, Liaison and 
alignment 

M_38 

Number of Public 
Participation meetings 
held (bi-annual) 

2,6 

Opex 

12 

5 

N/A 

5 

N/A 

10 

Copy of Public 
participation reports 
and attendance 
registers 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


KPA 3: Local Economic Development 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Inclusive 

Economic 

Growth with 
Sustainable 
Development 

Transport 

M_39 

Number of Quarterly 

LED Forum Meeting 
held per quarter 

3,3 

Opex 

New 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Minutes of LED 
Forums and 
attendance 
register 

M_40 

Number of Quarterly 
Transport Forums 
meeting held (per 
quarter) 

3,3 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Minutes of 
Transport 

Forums and 

attendance 

register 

M_41 

Hosting of the District 
Tourism summit Event 
by 31 January 2020 

3,2 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

1 

Attendance 
register and 
report 


214 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 





































KPA 3: Local Economic Development 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 





Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 


Inclusive 

Economic 

Growth with 
Sustainable 
Development 

Economic 
Development 
and Job 

Creation 

M_42 

Number of EPWPFull 
Time Equivalent 
(FTE's) job 

opportunities provided 
(GKPI)by 30 June 

2020 

3,4 

Opex 

192,01 

FTE 

50 

50 

50 

50 

200 FTE 

Employment 
Contracts, 
PROGRESS 
reports and 
monthly attendance 
registers 



M_43 

Number of EPWP Work 
Opportunities job 
created (GKPI) by 30 
June 2020 

3,4 

Opex 

361 WO 

130 

130 

150 

200 

610 WO 

Employment 
Contracts, 
PROGRESS 
reports and 
monthly attendance 
registers 


KPA 3: Local Economic Development 


Strategic 

Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Inclusive 
Economic 
Growth with 
Sustainable 
Development 

Economic 
development 
and job 
creation 

M_44 

Number of reports 
submitted to Council by 30 
June 2019 {with respect to 
the financial / non-financial 
support provided to 

SMME's, Coop's and 
emerging contractors} 

3,4 

Opex 

2 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

1 

2 

Reports and 

Council 

resolutions 

M_45 

Number of SMME's and 
cooperatives supported 
with tools and equipment 
by 30 June 2020 

3,4 

Opex 

New 

N/A 

N/A 

15 

15 

30 

Award letters, 
delivery notes 
and proof of 
received 


215 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 


































Strategic 

Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

M_46 

Number of companies 
owned by people with 
disabilities benefited from 
NDM procurement process 
by 30 June 2020 


Opex 

New 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

10 

10 

Appointment 

letters 


KPA 3: Local Economic Development 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

KPI 

IDP 

Budget 

Baseline 

2019/2020 

POE 



IDs 


Link 

R 000's 

2017/18 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


Inclusive 

Economic 

Growth with 
Sustainable 
Development 

Promotion of 

economic 

development 

M_47 

Number of progress 
report on the 
implementation of 
mining and big industries 
resolutions submitted to 
council by 30 June 2020 

3,4 

Opex 

New 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

2 

Report and 

council 

resolution 



M_48 

Number of progress 
reports on Trade and 
Investment projects for 
the district submitted to 
council by 30 June 2020 

3,4 

Opex 

new 

N/A 

1 

1 

1 

3 

Report and 

council 

resolution 



M_49 

Number of progress 
reports on the 
establishment of the 
Nkangala Economic 
Development Agency 
(NEDA) Submitted 

3,4 

Opex 

New 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Reports and 

council 

resolution 


216 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 


































KPA 4: MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 


KPA 4: Municipal Financial Viability and Management 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 




1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


Sound Financial 
Management 

Financial 

Viability 

M_50 

Percentage of procurement 
plan implemented per 
quarter 

4,2 

Opex 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Quarterly 
Procurement plan 



M_51 

Number of quarterly reports 
on the Implementation of the 
Procurement Plan submitted 
to National Treasury per 
quarter 

4,2 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Quarterly Reports 
Monitoring & 
Implementation of 
Plan and proof of 
submission 



M_52 

Submission for approval of 
MTREF Budget by the 31st 
May 2020 

4,3 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Approved MTREF 
Budget and council 
resolution 



M_53 

Annual Financial Statements 
(AFS) submitted on or 
before the 31st August 2019 
to Auditor General 

4,4 

Opex 

1 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

Annual Financial 
Statements (AFS) 
and 

acknowledgement 
of Auditor 

General's office 


KPA 4: Municipal Financial Viability and Management 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Financial 

Viability 

M_54 

Number of quarterly 
section 52(d) MFMA 
reports submitted to 
Executive Mayor 
within legislative 
timeframes per 
quarter 

4,5 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Quarterly section 

52(d) MFMA report 
and 

acknowledgement 
of Executive 

Mayor's office 


217 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 





































Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 





Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 




M_55 

Current Ratio 
expressed as current 
assets/current 
liabilities by 30 June 
2020(GKPI) 

4,2 

Opex 

13.14 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

2 

2 

As Per AFS 



M_56 

Number of section 71 
MFMA reports 
submitted to 

Executive Mayor 
within legislative 
timeframes per 
month 

4,6 

Opex 

12 

3 

3 

3 

3 

12 

Section 71 MFMA 
reports and 
acknowledgement 
of Executive 

Mayor's office 



M_57 

Section 72 (midyear) 
MFMA report 
submitted to 

Executive Mayor 
within legislative 
timeframes by 25 
January 2020 

4,6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

1 

Section 72 
(midyear) MFMA 
report and 
acknowledgement 
of Executive 

Mayor's office 


KPA 4: Financial Viability and Finance Management 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 





1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


Sound Financial 
Management 

Financial 

Viability 

M_58 

Percentage of transfer and 
subsidies budget actually 
spent on projects by 30 

June 2020 

4,7 

Opex 

New 

20% 

45% 

50% 

90% 

90% 

Expenditure 
progress report 



M_59 

Percentage of Capital 

Budget actually spent on 
Capital projects (NDM 
project) by June 2020 

4,7 

Opex 

97% 

15% 

25% 

50% 

90% 

90% 

Expenditure 
progress report 



M_60 

Percentage spend on 

Rural assets management 
grant by 30 June 2020 

4,3 

FMG 

100% 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

100% 

100% 

Expenditure 
progress report 


218 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 




































Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 





1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 




M_61 

Percentage spend on 
Financial Management 

Grant (FMG) by 30 June 
2020 

4,3 

FMG 

100% 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

100% 

100% 

Expenditure 
progress report 


KPA 4: Financial Viability and Finance Management 


Strategic Goal 

Priority 

Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Sound 

Financial 

Management 

Financial 

Viability 

M_62 

Number of quarterly 

SCM reports submitted 
to the Executive Mayor 
per quarter 

4,1 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Quarterly SCM 
report and 
acknowledgement 
of Executive 

Mayor's office 


BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE 


Strategic 

Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 




POE 



Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 


Healthy 

Social 

Environment 

Emergency 

Service 

M_63 

Number of Disaster 

Risk reduction 
awareness campaigns 
conducted with local 
municipalities per 
quarter 

5,7 

Opex 

9 

2 

2 

2 

3 

9 

Quarterly Disaster Risk 
reduction reports (proving 
Number of DRR awareness 
campaigns conducted) and 
attendance register 


Health 

M_64 

Number of quarterly 

DAC meetings held 
per quarter 

5,10 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Attendance register, minutes 
and signed Agenda 


Health 

M_65 

Number of HIV/AID's 
educational 
awareness campaigns 
implemented to 
capacitate and build 

5,9 

Opex 

18 

5 

5 

5 

5 

20 

Quarterly reports (proving 
Number of HIV/AID's 
awareness campaigns 
conducted)and attendance 
register 


219 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















































Strategic 

Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 



Qtrl 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 





communities per 
quarter 











KPA 5 - Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 




1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


Healthy Social 
Environment 

Health & 

Environmental 

Management 

M_66 

Number of water 
samples taken per 
quarter from the local 
municipalities, analysed 
as per the SANS 241 
standard (per quarter) 

5,8 

Opex 

7399 

850 

850 

850 

850 

3400 

Quarterly water 
samples reports and 
Spread sheets 



M_67 

Number of food 
handling and 
preparation facility 
inspections conducted 
in terms of the 

Foodstuffs, Cosmetics, 
Disinfectant Act (FCDA) 
per quarter 

5,8 

Opex 

4321 

1100 

1000 

1150 

1150 

4400 

Quarterly water 
samples reports and 
Spread sheets 



M_68 

Number of municipal 
Health Services and 
Environmental 
Management 
awareness campaigns 
implemented by 30 

June 2020 

5,8 

Opex 

30 

7 

8 

8 

7 

30 

Attendance register 
and reports 


220 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 


































KPA 5 - Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st 

Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th 

Qtr 

Annual 

Healthy Social 
Environment 

Public Safety 

M_69 

Number of Moral 

Regeneration Movement 

Event hosted by 31 

December 2019 

5,6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

Attendance 
registers and 

MRM report 

Health & 

Environmental 

Management 

M_70 

Number of compliance audits 
conducted with respect to 

Sec 21 listed activities as per 
the NEMAQA by 30 June 

2020 

5,6 

Opex 

25 

6 

7 

6 

6 

25 

Quarterly reports 
(proving Number 
of Compliance 
Audits 
conducted), 
Individual 
inspection reports 
& Attendance 
Registers 


KPA 5 - Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 


Strategic Goal 

Priority 

Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 



1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


Healthy Social 
Environment 

Welfare 

M_71 

Number of companies owned 
by women benefited from 

NDM 2019/2020 procurement 
process by 30 June 2020 


Opex 

New 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

50 

50 

Appointment letters 



M_72 

Number of companies owned 
by youth benefited from NDM 
2019/2020 procurement 
process by 30 June 2020 


Opex 

New 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

40 

40 

Appointment letters 


Health 

M_73 

Number of awareness 
campaigns on teenage 
pregnancy undertaken in the 
District by 30 June 2020 

5.1 

Opex 

6 

2 

2 

2 

2 

8 

Attendance register 
and reports (proving 
number of 

awareness 
campaigns on 
teenage pregnancy 
undertaken) 


221 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



































Strategic Goal 

Priority 

Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 



1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 




M_74 

Number of campaigns on 
drug / substance abuse 
held in partnership with 
SANCA by March 2020 

5.1 

Opex 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Attendance register 
and reports (proving 
number of 
campaigns on drug 
/ substance abuse 
held) 


KPA 5 - Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget R 
000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st 

Qtr 

2nd 

Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th 

Qtr 

Annual 

Healthy Social 
Environment 

Education 

M_75 

Number of Education 

Career Expos held by 30 

June 2020 

1,6 

Opex 

4 

N/A 

N/A 

2 

2 

4 

Attendance register and 
reports (proving of 
number of Education 
Career Expos held) 

M_76 

Number of existing qualifying 
learners provided with 
financial support (Funded by 
NDM) by 28 February 2020 

1,6 

Opex 

28 

N/A 

N/A 

30 

N/A 

30 

Applications forms for 
qualified learners, 
Appointment letters and 
Progress report 

M_77 

Number of new qualifying 
learners provided with 
financial support (Funded by 
NDM) by 28 February 2020 

1,6 

Opex 

17 

N/A 

N/A 

10 

N/A 

10 

Applications forms for 
qualified learners, 
Appointment letters and 
Progress report 

M_78 

Mayoral Academic Awards 
held by 30 January 2020 

1,6 

Opex 

1 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

N/A 

1 

Attendance register and 
report 


222 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



































KPA 5 - Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure and 
Service 

Provisioning 

Water and 
Sanitation 

M_79 

Number of SANITATION 
projects (as submitted by the 
LM's) implemented in terms of 
their individual quarterly 
schedules by 30 June 2020 

5,1 

Opex 

7 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

5 

5 

Institutional 

Annual 

Report with 

Council 

resolution 

M_80 

Number of WATER projects 
(as submitted by the LM's) 
implemented in terms of their 
individual quarterly schedules 
by 30 June 2020 

5,2 

Opex 

13 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

7 

7 

Institutional 

Annual 

Report with 

Council 

resolution 


KPA 5 - Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI 

KPI 

IDP 

Budget R 

Baseline 

2019/2020 

POE 

IDs 

Link 

000's 

2017/18 

Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Facilities 

M_81 

Number of SOCIAL AND 
RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 
projects (as submitted by the LM's) 
implemented in terms of their 
individual quarterly schedules by 

30 June 2020 

5,3 

Opex 

3 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Institutional 
Annual Report 
with Council 
resolution 


Roads and 

Storm water 

M_82 

Number of ROADS AND 
STORMWATER Projects (as 
submitted by the LM's) 
implemented in terms of their 
individual quarterly schedules by 

30 June 2020 

5,4 

Opex 

8 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

19 

19 

Institutional 
Annual Report 
with Council 
resolution 


223 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 


































KPA 5 - Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget R 
000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 




POE 





Qtr 1 

Qtr 2 

Qtr 3 

Qtr 4 

Annual 


Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Municipal 
Properties and 
Infrastructure 

M_83 

Number of MUNICIPAL 
Facilities (NDM) projects 
implemented in terms of 
their individual quarterly 
schedules by 30 June 2020 

5,5 

Opex 

2 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

2 

2 

Institutional 
Annual Report 
with Council 
resolution 


Electricity 

M_84 

Number of ELECTRICITY 
projects (as submitted by 
the LM's) implemented in 
terms of their individual 
quarterly schedules by 30 
June 2020 

5,2 

Opex 

New 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

1 

1 

Quarterly 
progress report 
and council 
Resolution 


Project 

Management 

M_85 

Number of progress reports 
on the percentage of 
households with access to 
basic levels (Water, 
Sanitation, Electricity and 
roads) submitted to Council 
by 30 June 2020 

5,2 

Opex 

0 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

1 

2 

progress report 
and council 
Resolution 


KPA 6: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT 


KPA 6: Spatial Development 


Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 

Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Spatial 
restructuring 
and service 
provision 

M_86 

Percentage of compliant 
applications considered by 
municipal tribunal/ land use 
committee with respect land 
use application within 120 
days 

6,5 

Opex 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Register of application 
compliant and minutes 
of municipal tribunal/ 
land use 


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Strategic Goal 

Priority Issue 

KPI IDs 

KPI 

IDP 

Link 

Budget 

R 000's 

Baseline 

2017/18 

2019/2020 

POE 

1st Qtr 

2nd Qtr 

3rd Qtr 

4th Qtr 

Annual 


M_87 

Percentage of applications 
received and responded with 
respect to town planning 
within 21 days 

6,5 

Opex 

New 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Register of application 
received and minutes 
of municipal tribunal/ 
land use 


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CHAPTER SIX: 


District Approved Sectoral Plans that are guiding the Municipality 


6.1 Key Sector Plans 

Beyond the core components of an IDP, as legislated by the Systems Act, the NDM recognised the need to develop further strategies, 
policies and plans, which seek to deal with specific issues that will facilitate a progressive realisation of the desired developmental 
trajectory of the District. Close examination of all these strategies and plans will show a greater degree of alignment all the guidelines 
and development directives outlined in the government policy frameworks above. Sustainable development is one of the issues that 
have received consideration. This is viewed as critical as sustainable development seeks to balance social, economic and ecological 
requirements in a long-term perspective. 

Nkangala District Municipality developed a number of Sectoral Strategic and Operational Plans together with policies as joint ventures 
with all Local Municipalities within the District, which are outlined below under the strategic themes linked to the NDM KPAs: 

Sectoral Strategic and Operational Plans 


Sector Plan 

Jurisdictional Issue in the IDP 

Status 

Financial 

year 

Council 

Resolution 

KPA1: Municipal Transformation and Institutional Development 



Organizational Performance 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 

2019/20 


Management Framework 

Transformation 




Human Resource Development 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Draft 


To be approved 

Strategy 

Transformation 



by council in 





june 2019 

Performance Management 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 

System Policy and Procedure 

Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Acting Allowance Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Employment Equity Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Grievance Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Sexual Harassment Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Disability Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Task Job Evaluation 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Disciplinary Code 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Overtime Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Cellphone Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Bereavement Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Retirement Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Smoking Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 

2019 

DM- 


Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Acting Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 

Adopted 


DM- 

226 IPage Nkangal; 

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P 





Transformation 



ND353/05/2019 

Internship Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 
Transformation 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

ICT Governance Charter 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 
Transformation 

Adopted 

2018 


ICT Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 
Transformation 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

ICT Security Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 
Transformation 

Adopted 

2018 


Contract Management Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 
Transformation 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Alcohol and Drug Policy 

Issue 2: Organizational Restructuring and 
Transformation 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 



Fraud and Corruption Plan and 
Strategy 

Issue 4: Good Governance and 
Communication 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Fraud and Corruption Policy 

Issue 4: Good Governance and 
Communication 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

External Bursary Policy 


TO BE APPROVED 
BY COUNCIL IN 
JUNE 

2018 


Batho Pele Policy 

Issue 4: Good Governance and 
Communication 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Public Participation policy. 

Issue 4: Good Governance and 
Communication 

TO BE APPROVED 
BY COUNCIL IN 

2014/15 


NDM Communications Strategy 

Issue 4: Good Governance and 
Communication 

Under review 

2017/18 

DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

KPA 3: Local Economic Develo 

pment 



Local Economic Development 
Strategy 

Issue 20: Economic Development and Job 
Creation 

Adopted 

2017/18 


Investment attraction and 
promotion strategy 

Issue 20: Economic Development and Job 
Creation 

Adopted 

2017/18 


Tourism Development & 
Branding Strategy 

Issue 20: Economic Development and Job 
Creation 

Adopted 

2017/18 


KPA 4: Municipal Financial Viability and Management 



Supply Chain Management 
Policy. 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Asset Management Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Credit Control and Debt 

Collection Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Rental of Council Facilities 
Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Black Listing Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Borrowing Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Donation Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Budget Virement Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Travel and Subsistence Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Petty Cash Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Funding and Reserve Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Insurance Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 


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Investment of Surplus Cash 
Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Cash Management and 
Creditors Payment Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Budget Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

SIPDM Model SCM Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Catering Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Foreign Exchange Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Tariff Policy 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Provision for Doubtful Debt 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Unauthorized Irregular and 
Fruitless and Wasteful 

Expenditure 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

Unsolicited Bid 

Issue 3: Financial Viability 

Adopted 


DM- 

ND353/05/2019 

KPA 5: Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development 



Regional Sport & Recreation 
Master Plan 

Issue 9: Culture, Sports and Recreation 

To be developed 



Water master plan study 
scheme and capacity in 
Emakhazeni LM. 

Issue 12:water and sanitation 

Adopted 

2016/17 


Environmental management 
policy 

Issue 18: Environment Management 

Adopted 

2016/17 


Environmental Management 
Plan 

Issue 18: Environment Management 

Adopted 

2016/17 


Air quality management plan 
and by-laws 

Issue 18: Waste Management 

Adopted 

2016/17 


Disaster Management Plan 

Issue 11: Emergency Services 

Adopted 

2016/17 







Integrated Waste Management 
Plan 

Issue 18: Waste Management 



To be approved 
by council in 
June 

Disaster Management 

Framework 

Issue 11: Emergency Services 

Adopted 

2016/17 


KPA 6: Spatial Rationale and Development 


Spatial Development 

Framework 

Issue 5: Spatial Restructuring and Service 
Delivery 

Adopted 

2015/16 


Integrated Transport Plan 

Issue 15: Transportation 

Adopted 

2016/17 



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CHAPTER SEVEN: 


7.1 FINANCIAL PLAN 

7.1.1 Background and Problem Statement 

The application of sound financial management principles for the compilation of the District’s financial plan is essential and critical to 
ensure that the District remains financially viable and that municipal services are provided sustainably, economically and equitably to 
all communities. 

The District’s business and service delivery priorities were reviewed as part of this year’s planning and budget process. Where 
appropriate, funds were transferred from low- to high-priority programmes so as to maintain sound financial stewardship. A critical 
review was also undertaken of expenditures on non-core and ‘nice to have’ items. Key areas where savings were realized were on 
operational administrative expenditure. 

A number of Local Municipalities within the District have experienced cash flow challenges since 2014/15 financial year. Municipal 
financial sustainability and viability is about the ability to generate sufficient revenue to meet operating expenses, debt commitments 
and where applicable, to allow growth while maintaining service levels. The financial analysis reports for the District and its six local 
municipalities have highlighted various financial management challenges that effects the financial viability of the municipalities. 

The following key strategies constitute a summary of the key strategies that have been identified for achieving the objectives of the 
district wide financial viability: 

7.1.2 Short-term Strategies 

• Development of a credible and cash-backed Budget. 

• Effective cash-flow management, forecasting and monitoring. 

• Effective management of operating and capital expenditure. 

• Effective maintenance of Municipal Standard Chart of Accounts (mSCOA) for the local municipalities. 

• Effective implementation of credit control and debt collection measures. 

7.1.3 Medium-term Strategies 

Implementation of a Revenue Enhancement Strategy, which includes the following: 

• Enhancement of the current revenue base take into account the socio-economic factors of its surroundings and promote 
initiatives aimed at sustainable revenue growth. 

• Current revenue streams must be properly managed. Strategies must be introduced to reduce electricity and water losses 
to the absolute minimum. 

• Existing fees, tariffs and charges must be reviewed annually in order to ensure that the revenue attributable to fees and 
charges are maximised and that the bases for determining fees and charges are cost reflective and/or market related. 

7.2 Operating Revenue Framework 

Nkangala District Municipality to continue improving the quality of services provided to its citizens and local municipalities it 
needs to generate the required revenue. In these tough economic times strong revenue management is fundamental to the 
financial sustainability of every municipality. The reality is that we are faced with development backlogs and poverty. The 
expenditure required to address these challenges will inevitably always exceed available funding; hence difficult choices have to be 
made in relation to balancing expenditures against realistically anticipated revenues. 

The municipality’s revenue strategy is built around the following key components: 

• National Treasury’s guidelines and macroeconomic policy; 

• Growth in the District and continued economic development; 

• Efficient revenue management. 

7.2.1 Operating Expenditure Framework 

The District’s expenditure framework for the MTREF is informed by the following: 

• Balanced budget constraint (operating expenditure should not exceed operating revenue) unless there are existing 
uncommitted cash-backed reserves to fund any deficit; 

• Funding of the budget over the medium-term as informed by Section 18 and 19 of the MFMA; 


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• The contribution to local municipalities is aligned to the asset, I DP and backlog eradication plan; 

• Operational gains and efficiencies will be directed to funding the contribution to local municipalities and other core 
services; and 

• Project lists submitted by local municipalities. 

7.2.2 Operating Transfers and Grant Receipts 


Description 

2015/16 

2016/17 

2017/18 

Current Year 2018/19 

2019/20 Medium Term Revenue & 
Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 
Forecast 

Budget 

Year 

2019/20 

Budget 
Year +1 
2020/21 

Budget 
Year +2 
2021/22 

RSC Levy 

Replacement Grant 
and Equitable Share 

326 223 

333 667 

339 056 

343 962 

343 962 

343 962 

356 274 

367 176 

378 869 

Finance Management 
Grant 

1 250 

1 250 

1 250 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

Municipal Systems 
Improvement 

930 

- 

- 






- 

Expanded Public 

Works Program 

2 280 

2 318 

4182 

3 626 

3 626 

3 626 

2131 



Provincial Treasury 

Data cleansing 

3 000 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Donations 

- 

- 

- 


1 500 

1 500 




Total Grant Revenue 
(excluding capital 
transfers and 
contributions) 

333 683 

337 235 

344 488 

348 588 

350 088 

350 088 

359 405 

368 176 

379 869 


7.23 Main operational expenditure categories for the 2019/20 financial year 

The following graphical presentation gives a breakdown of the main expenditure categories for the 2019/20 financial year. 


Main Expenditure categories 2019/20 


Other expenditure, 55,762,304,12% 


Transfers and grants, 155,420,836,34% 



Employee related costs, 152,389,223, 
33% 


Contracted services, 58,115,761,13% 


Remuneration of counci llors, 
15,108,111,3% 


Depreciation & assetimpairment, 
16,138,991,3% 


Finance charges, 173,789,0% 
Other materials,8,022,009,2% 


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7.2.4 Summary of Annual Budget 


The following table summarizes the Annual Budget for the district 


DC31 Nkangala - Table A1 Budget Summary 


Description 

2015/16 

2016/17 

2017/18 


Current Year 2018/19 


2019/20 Medium Term Revenue & Expenditure 
Framework 

Rthousands 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budqet 

Full Year 

Forecast 

Pre-audit 

outcome 

Budget Year 
2019/20 

Budget Year 
+1 2020/21 

Budget Year 
+22021/22 

Financial Performance 











Property rates 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Service charges 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Investment revenue 

38,235 

43,921 

41,793 

22,459 

30,591 

30,591 

11,655 

25,450 

23,460 

21,470 

T ransfers recognised - operational 

338,036 

337,235 

344,488 

348,588 

348,588 

348,588 

261,901 

359,405 

368,176 

379,869 

Other own revenue 

3,483 

4,572 

2,932 

2,346 

4,172 

4,172 

3,484 

2,125 

2,161 

2,197 

Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers and 
contributions) 

379,755 

385,728 

389,213 

373,393 

383,351 

383,351 

277,039 

386,980 

393,797 

403,536 




Employee costs 

90,060 

108,540 

123,428 

144,287 

143,364 

143,364 

88,996 

152,389 

156,961 

160,100 

Remuneration of counciors 

12,882 

12,587 

13,520 

13,498 

14,730 

14,730 

9,384 

15,108 

16,015 

16,975 

Depredation & asset mparment 

9,566 

9,609 

10,573 

9,380 

15,526 

15,526 

10,405 

16,139 

14,948 

12,925 

Finance charges 

1,519 

1,127 

780 

968 

635 

635 

360 

174 

21 

- 

Materials and tx* purchases 

- 

- 

148 

- 

7,387 

7,387 

- 

8,022 

9,119 

9,741 

Transfers and grants 

177,349 

162,301 

176,411 

167,509 

166,623 

166,623 

62,382 

155,421 

135,659 

97,060 

Cither expendtu re 

65,471 

69,831 

77,130 

109,581 

104,040 

104,040 

46,758 

113,878 

115,824 

123,423 

Total Expenditure 

356,846 

363,996 

401,989 

445,224 

452,305 

452,305 

218,286 

461,131 

448,547 

420,224 

Surplus/(Deficit) 

22,909 

21,732 

(12,777) 

(71,831) 

(68,954) 

(68,954) 

58,753 

(74,151) 

(54,750) 

(16,688) 

Transfers and subsidies - capital (monetary alocatfons) (N< 

2,010 

2,076 

2,175 

2,180 

2,180 

2,180 

- 

2,310 

2,442 

2,577 

Contributions recognised • capital 8 contributed assets 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1,500 

1,500 

- 

- 

- 

- 


24,919 

23,808 

(10,602) 

(69,651) 

(65,274) 

(65,274) 

58,753 

(71,841) 

(52,308) 

(14,111) 

Surplus/(Deficit) after capital transfers & contributions 











Share of surplus/ (dels) of associate 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 

24,919 

23,808 

(10,602) 

(69,651) 

(65,274) 

(65,274) 

58,753 

(71,841) 

(52,308) 

(14,111) 

CaDital exDenditure & funds sources 

Capital expenditure 

29,181 

34,803 

21,621 

33,248 

30,746 

30,746 

8,159 

36,600 

30,688 

24,590 

Transfers recognised - capital 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Borrowing 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Intemaly generated funds 

29,181 

34,803 

21,621 

33,248 

30,746 

30,746 

8,159 

36,600 

30,688 

24,590 

Total sources of capital funds 

29,181 

34,803 

21,621 

33,248 

30,746 

30,746 

8,159 

36,600 

30,688 

24,590 

Financial Dosition 

Total current assets 

559,368 

573,318 

525,276 

515,507 

516,526 

516,526 

575,748 

443,841 

371,998 

338,968 

Total non current asses 

176,863 

206,402 

221,496 

248,865 

252,223 

252,223 

219,208 

261,575 

280,709 

297,807 

Total current iabBes 

40,872 

58,213 

39,980 

53,202 

53,202 

53,202 

28,303 

62,430 

56,872 

50,648 

Total non current iabioes 

23,698 

24,813 

23,405 

25,853 

25,853 

25,853 

23,405 

25,532 

30,688 

35,092 

Community weaBi/Equiy 

671,662 

696,694 

683,386 

685,318 

689,695 

689,695 

743,248 

617,454 

565,147 

551,035 

Cash flows 











Net cash from (used) operating 

66,361 

34,617 

900 

35,106 

(13,745) 

(13,745) 

83,274 

4,216 

(37,103) 

(1,993) 

Net cash from (used) Investing 

(33,329) 

(38,505) 

(25,959) 

(37,368) 

(34,866) 

(34,866) 

(8,159) 

(41,651) 

(36,090) 

(30,532) 

Net cash from (used) feiandng 

(3,085) 

(3,353) 

(1,909) 

(3,085) 

(3,085) 

(3,085) 

(2,148) 

(2,480) 

(820) 

(750) 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year end 

465,142 

457,901 

430,933 

372,359 

379,237 

379,237 

481,413 

339,322 

265,309 

232,034 

Cash backina/surolus reconciliation 

Cash and investments avalaWe 

506,005 

502,748 

480,152 

421,325 

428,204 

428,204 

530,632 

393,340 

324,729 

297,396 

Apptcaaon of cash and investments 

11,312 

(14,139) 

20,824 

41,772 

41,772 

41,772 

19,002 

50,325 

47,488 

39,433 

Balance - surplus (shortfall) 

494,692 

516,887 

459,328 

379,553 

386,432 

386,432 

511,631 

343,015 

277,240 

257,963 

Asset manaaement 

Asset register summary (W'DV) 

136,001 

161,065 

164,388 

199,899 

203,256 

203,256 

203,256 

207,558 

223,298 

234,963 

Depreaaaon 

9,566 

9,609 

10,573 

9,380 

15,526 

15,526 

15,526 

16,139 

14,948 

12,925 

Renewal and Upgrading of Existing Assets 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Repairs and Maintenance 

6,721 

4,844 

13,106 

21,560 

23,762 

23,762 

23,762 

23,771 

21,783 

21,848 


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CHAPTER EIGHT: 


8.1 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 


8.1.1 Background and Introduction 

The Municipal Systems Act and the Municipal Finance Management Act require that the PMS be reviewed annually in order 
to align itself with the reviewed Integrated Development Plan (IDP). In consequence of the reviewed organisational 
performance management system it then becomes necessary to also amend the scorecards of the Municipal Manager and 
Section 57 Managers in line with the cascading effect of performance management from the organisational to the departmental 
and eventually to employee levels. 

8.1.2 Objectives of Performance Management 

The objectives of institutionalizing performance management are beyond the legislative compliance requirements. The general 
objectives of managing performance are to: 

• facilitate increased accountability; 

• facilitate learning and improvement; 

• provide early warning signals; and 

• facilitate decision-making processes 

The objectives are also for the performance management system to serve as a primary mechanism to monitor and improve 
the implementation of the District IDP. Performance management is viewed as a tool that improves the overall performance 
of the municipality. 

8.2 Performance monitoring flow chart is illustrated as follows: 

8.2.1 NDM tools aims at operationalizing Performance management plan 

• PMS Framework Plan 

• SDBIP 

• Reporting template 

• Quarterly performance report 

• Mid-year performance report 
Annual Performance report 

• Electronic performance system 

• Performance agreements 

8.3 The Performance Management Framework Plan 

Nkangala District have developed and Performance management framework plan which was adopted by council 2017/18 
financial year is being reviewed on annual basis 

8.5 Performance Reporting and review 

Departmental reporting performance it is done in two ways which first one is the informal assessment done during 
November and formal Assessment which are being done during March of every financial 


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CHAPTER NINE: PROJECTS 


9.1 NDM CAPITAL PROJECTS PER DEPARTMENT 

The following tables reflect the Capital Projects by department, specific to the Nkangala District Municipality for the 2019/2020 financial year 

MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

ssue 

IUDF 

Project 

.ocation 

Service Delivery 
outcome 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sound electronic 
governance 

ssue 4: Good 
Governance and 
communication 

Governance 

Installation of MPLS 

DR. JS 
Vloroka LM 

Increased 
communication 
and operational 
efficiency of the 
Nkangala District 
Municipality 

% installation completed 

6 000 000 

5 000 000 

- 

Equitable 

Share 

Establishment of District 
Wide DRRS 

NDM 

% completion of the 
Establishment of District 
Wide DRRS 

5 000 000 

5 000 000 

5 000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Implementation of ERP 
Systems 

NDM 

% implementation 

7 000 000 

3 000 000 

3 000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

ssue 4: Good 
Governance and 
communication 

Governance 

Development and 
implementation of 
DRP/BCP 

NDM 

% implementation of 
DRP/BCP 

5 000 000 

2 000 000 

2 000 000 

Equitable 

Share 


LEGAL SERVICES 


Strategic Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Service Delivery 
outcome 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 

Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure and 
Service Provisioning 

Issue 1: Powers 
duties and functions 

Governance 

By-Laws: Local 
Municipalities 


Satisfied and 

participative 

communities 

Number of By 
Laws gazetted 

454 500 

600 000 

650 000 

Equitable Share 

Integrated Public 
Transport Network: 
Gazetting of Transport 

By Laws 

NDM 

316 500 

503 909 

- 

Equitable Share 


233 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 





































SOCIAL SERVICES 


Strategic 

objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Service 

Delivery 

outcome 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Healthy social 
environment 

Issue: 7 Education 

Inclusion and 

access 

Mayoral Bursary 

Fund 

NDM 

Educated, 
informed 
and healthy 
community 

Number of 

bursaries 

awarded 

2,800 000 

3,000 000 

3,200 000 

Equitable Share 

Issue: 7 Education 

Inclusion and 

access 

Youth Development 
Summit 

NDM 

Number of YDS 
held 

220 000 

242 000 

242 000 

Equitable Share 

Issue: 7 Education 

Inclusion and 

access 

Youth Entrepreneur 
Workshop 

NDM 

Number of youth 
entrepreneur 
workshops held 

240 000 

264 000 

350 000 

Equitable Share 

Issue: 7 Education 

Inclusion and 

access 

Integrated youth 
development strategy 

Victor 

Khanye 

Number of Youth 
development 
strategy 
developed 


335 000 


Equitable Share 


FINANCIAL VIABILITY 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 


AFS Assistance and NDM Increased 

Review 2019/20 to efficiency of 

2022/23 Finance 

operations 

600 000 

625 000 

658 750 

Equitable 

Share 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 

Governance 

SCM/Debtors Emalahleni Increased Payment and 1 

verification system LM,STLM, efficiency of report on debtor 

VKLM, Finance and SCM 

EMAKLM, operations verification 

THLM, System (100%) 

DRJSMLM 

AND NDM 

2 966 000 

3 115 000 

2 983 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 

Governance 

Credit Rating 

NDM 

Increased 
efficiency of 
Finance 
operations 

100% spending 
On the project 

161 000 

163 976 

172 830 

Equitable 

Share 


234 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 












































Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 




Actuarial valuations 

NDM 

Increased 
efficiency of 
Finance 
operations 

Number of 
Actuarial 
valuations 
conducted 

30 000 

46 200 

48 695 

Equitable 

Share 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 

Governance 

Assistance to Local 
Municipalities: Co- 
Sourced Internal 

Audit Support 

Dr JS Moroka 

Number of local 
municipalities 
assisted with: 

Co- Sourced 
Internal Audit 
Support 

624 281 

640 000 

640 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 

Governance 

Emakhazeni 

430 000 

430 281 

640 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 

Governance 

Thembisile 

Hani 

430 281 

430 281 

640 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 

Governance 

Victor Khanye 

816 562 

811 562 

880 600 

Equitable 

Share 

Sound Financial 
Management 

Issue 3: Financial 
Viability 

Governance 

Emalahleni 

770 000 

750 000 

780 000 

Equitable 

Share 


SPATIAL RATIONALE 

Projects for priority Issue 5: Spatial Restructuring and Service Provision (DPU) 


Strategic 

Objective 



Project 

Location 


Key 

Budget (R) 

Source of 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 



Outcome 

performance 

Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Funding 

Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Issue 5: Spatial 
Planning and land 
Use management 

Spatial 

integration 

Spatial Planning: Land 
surveying Dr JS Moroka 

Dr JS Moroka 

LM 


% completion 


500 000 

520 000 

Equitable 

Share 


Spatial Planning: State 
Land release for 

Dr JS Moroka 

LM 

Sustainable 

Hectares of land 
released for 

527 500 

" 


Equitable 

Share 




Integrated Human 
Settlement In Dr JS 
Moroka 


Human 

Settlements and 
improved quality 

Integrated 

Human 

Settlement 





Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Issue 5: Spatial 
Planning and land 
Use management 

Spatial 

integration 

Spatial Planning: 
Township 

Establishment for 
Integrated human 
Settlement in Dr JS 
Moroka 

Dr JS Moroka 

LM 

of Life 

Number of 
townships 
established 


1 669 537 

1 500 000 

Equitable 

Share 


235 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















































Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

performance 

Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 




Spatial Planning: 
Extension of existing 
cemeteries Belfast 
Siyathuthuka 

Emgwenya 

Emakhazeni LM 


% completion of 
extension 

1 000 000 

1 200 000 


Equitable 

Share 

Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Issue 5: Spatial 
Planning and land 
Use management 

Spatial 

integration 

Spatial Planning: Land 
Surveying Emakhazeni 

Emakhazeni LM 

% completion 


445 210 


Equitable 

Share 

Spatial Planning: 

Opening of Township 
Register at 

Emakhazeni LM 

Emakhazeni LM 

Number of 
township 
registers 
opened 

685 750 



Equitable 

Share 

Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Issue 5: Spatial 
Planning and land 
Use management 

Spatial 

integration 

Spatial Planning: 

Opening of Township 
Register at Victor 

Khanye LM 

Victor Khanye 

LM 

Number of 
township 
registers 
opened 

650 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Spatial Planning: Land 
Surveying Thembisile 

Hani LM 

Thembisile Hani 

% completion 



520 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Issue 5: Spatial 
Planning and land 
Use management 

Spatial 

integration 

Spatial Planning: Land 
Surveying Victor 

Khanye LM 

Victor Khanye 

LM 

% completion 

422 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Spatial Planning: State 
Land release Integrated 
Human Settlement 
Thembisile Hani 

Thembisile Hani 

Hectares of land 
released for 
Integrated 

Human 

Settlement 

527 500 

556 514 

600 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Issue 5: Spatial 
Planning and land 
Use management 

Spatial 

integration 

Spatial Planning: 
Township 

Establishment for 
Integrated Human 
settlement Thembisile 
Hani 

Thembisile Hani 

Sustainable 

Human 

Settlements and 
improved quality 
of Life 

Number of 
townships 
established 

1 582 500 

1 669 537 

1 500 000 

Equitable 

Share 


236 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 

































Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

performance 

Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 




Feasibility Study for 
Integrated Human 
Settlement Thembisile 
Hani 

Thembisile Hani 


Number of 

feasibility 

studies for 

human 

settlements 

conducted 

633 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Feasibility Study for 
Integrated Human 
Settlement Dr. JS 

Moroka 

Dr. JS Moroka 

633 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Integrated 

Regionalised 

Planning 

Issue 5: Spatial 
Planning and land 
Use management 

Spatial 

integration 

Feasibility Study for 
Integrated Human 
Settlement 

Victor Khanye 

LM 

Sustainable 

Human 

Settlements and 
improved quality 
of Life 

633 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Geographical 

Information System 
(GIS) Project and 

Support: Procurement 

Gis Cadastral Data 

NDM 

Gis Cadastral 

Data procured 

700 000 


500 000 

Equitable 

Share 


BASIC SERVICES AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

Projects for priority Issue 8: Health (Social Services): Basic Services Delivery and infrastructure 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project Location Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget R 000's 

Source of Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Healthy social 
environment 

Issue 6: Health 

Inclusion and 

access 

Aids Day: HOT 
and VMMC 
campaign 

Dr JS Moroka 

Improved 
quality of 
life, effective 
and efficient 
service 
delivery 

Number of 

awareness 
campaings held 

117977 

120 000 

120 000 

Equitable Share 

Thembisile 

Hani 

117977 

120 000 

120 000 

Equitable Share 

Steve Tshwete 

117977 

120 000 

120 000 

Equitable Share 

Emakhazeni 

117 977 

120 000 

120 000 

Equitable Share 

Victor Khanye 

117 977 

120 000 

120 000 

Equitable Share 

Emalahleni 

117977 

120 000 

120 000 

Equitable Share 

Issue 6: Health 

Assistance to 

Local 

Municipalities: 

Dr JS Moroka 

Improved 
quality of 
life, effective 
and efficient 


333 333 

200 000 

" 

Equitable Share 

Healthy social 

Issue 6: Health 

Inclusion and 

access 

Thembisile 

Hani 

333 333 

200 000 


Equitable Share 


237 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 






















































Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project Location Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget R 000's 

Source of Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 




Blue and Green 
Drop 

Steve Tshwete 

service 

delivery 


- 

200 000 

- 

Equitable Share 

Emakhazeni 

- 

200 000 

- 

Equitable Share 

Victor Khanye 

333 333 

200 000 

- 

Equitable Share 

Emalahleni 

333 333 

200 000 

" 

Equitable Share 


Basic services: social services, priority issue: Health 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Key 

Budget R 000's 

Source of Funding 

Kroject Location uutcome 

Kerrormance 

Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

FHealthy social 
environment 

Issue 6: Health 

Inclusion and 

access 

., , Thembisile 

Upgrading of 

Thembisile hani park 

home and installation 

of carports 

Improved 

Service 

Delivery 

% completion of 
Upgrading of 
park home and 
installation of 
carports 

350 000 



Equitable Share 

Installation of 
carports for MHS 

Staff 

Emalahleni 

% completion of 
carports for MHS 
Staff 

350 000 

350 000 

850 000 

Equitable Share 

Park homes 

installation/upgrading/ 

carports 

Steve Tshwete 
and DR JS 
Moroka 

% completion of 
Project 

400 000 + 

300 000 

400 000 

600 000 

Equitable Share 


Basic services: social services, priority issue: Transversal 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project Location Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget R 000's 

Source of 

Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Healthy social 
Environment 

Issue 21: 

Transversal 

Inclusion and 

access 

Inter- 

Governmental 
Relations (IGR) 
Programme: 

Moral 

Regeneration 

NDM 

Improved 
quality of life, 
effective and 
efficient service 
delivery 

Number of 

Moral 

Regeneration 

programmes 

conducted 

90 000 

95 000 

100 000 

Equitable Share 


238 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 
























































Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project Location Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget R 000's 

Source of 

Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 


Issue 21: 

Transversal 

Inclusion and 

access 

Inter- 

Governmental 
Relations (IGR) 
Programme: 

Moral 

Regeneration 

Dr JS Moroka 


Number of IGR: 
Moral 

regeneration 
campaigns held 

75 000 

80 000 

85 000 


Issue 21: 

Transversal 

Inclusion and 

access 

Thembisile 

Hani 

75 000 

80 000 

85 000 

Steve Tshwete 

75 000 

80 000 

85 000 

Emakhazeni 

75 000 

80 000 

85 000 

Victor Khanye 

75 000 

80 000 

85 000 

Emalahleni 

75 000 

80 000 

85 000 


Projects for priority Issue 11: Emergency Services and Disaster Management (Social Services): Basic Services Delivery and infrastructure 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project Location Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget(R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Healthy social 
Environment 

Healthy 

Environment 

Issue 10: 
safety and 
security 

Inclusion 
and access 

Establishment of 
the stand-alone 
District Disaster 
Management 

Centre 

NDM 

A district Disaster 
Management Centre 
site identified and the 
Feasibility Study (with 
a view of obtaining 
state land release) 
conducted 

% completion of 
disaster centre 

2 000 000 

9 000 000 

9 000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Garage and office 
extension civic 
centre 

NDM 

Increased operational 
efficiency of NDM 

% completion of 

garage 

extension 

7 600 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Supply, Delivery 
and Registration of 
Flazmat response 
vehicles for Steve 
Tshwete LM 

Steve Tshwete 

LM 

Healthy Environment 
and safe communities 

Number of 

Flazmart 

response 

vehicles 

purchased 

1 800 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Issue 10: 
safety and 
security 

Inclusion 
and access 

Disaster 

Management: 
Emergency Open 
day needs 

Dr JS Moroka 

Number of 

Disaster open 
days held per 
municipality 

- 

- 

550 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Steve Tshwete 

Thembisile Hani 

Victor Khanye 

- 

500 000 

- 


500 000 


400 000 

- 

- 


239 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 






















































Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project Location Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget(R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 





Emalahleni 

Healthy Environment 
and safe communities 

- 

- 

- 

550 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Issue 10: 
safety and 
security 

Inclusion 
and access 

Disaster 

Management: 

awareness 

campaign 

Dr JS Moroka 

Number of 

awareness 
campaigns held 
per municipality 

100 000 

120 000 

132 000 

Emakhazeni 

60 000 

80 000 

88 000 

Steve Tshwete 

60 000 

80 000 

88 000 

Thembisile Hani 

100 000 

120 000 

132 000 

Victor Khanye 

60 000 

80 000 

88 000 

Emalahleni 

60 000 

80 000 

88 000 


(Social Services) and issue 19 waste management 


Strategic 

Developmental 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

Objective 

Issue 


Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 


Issue 19: Waste 
Management 

Inclusion and 
Access 

Purchasing of a 
refuse removal 
truck 

Emakhazeni 

Improved Service 
Delivery 

None 


2,800 000 


Equitable 

Share 


Projects for priority Issue: Fire and rescue (Social Services): Basic Services Delivery and infrastructure 


Strategic 



Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key Performance 

Budget R 000's 

Source of 

Objective 

Developmental Issue 

IUDF 

Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Funding 


Issue 10: Safety and 
Security 

Inclusion and 

access 

Supply, delivery and 
Registration of One (1) 
Veld Fire Vehicles and 
ten (10) skid units 

NDM 

Improved 

Service 

Delivery 

Number of Veld 

Fire Vehicles and 
skid units 
supplied and 
delivered 

1,200 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 


Governance 

Additional 

Infrastructure 

Nokaneng Fire Station 
Phase 1 

NDM 

An efficient, 

effective and 

development 

oriented 

public 

service 

% construction 
completed 

2,500 000 

3,500 000 


Equitable 

Share 


240 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 

























































Environmental Management 


Strategic objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Healthy 

Environment 

Issue 18: 

Environmental 

Management 

Inclusion and 

access 

Environmental 

Health: Education & 
Awareness 

Campaigns 

Dr JS Moroka 

Improved 
quality of 
life, 

effective 
and efficient 
service 
delivery 

Number of 
Campaigns Held 

45 000 

60 000 

70 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Thembisile 

Hani 

45 000 

60 000 

70 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Steve 

Tshwete 

45 000 

60 000 

70 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Emakhazeni 

45 000 

60 000 

70 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Victor Khanye 

45 000 

60 000 

70 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Emalahleni 

45 000 

60 000 

70 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Healthy 

Environment 

Issue 18: 

Environmental 

Management 

Growth 

NEDA development 
and establishment 

NDM 

Quarterly report 
on 

implementation 

527 500 

606 512 

2,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Healthy 

Environment 

Integrated Green 
Economy 

Management 

800 000 



Equitable 

Share 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Projects for priority Issue 20: Economic Development and Job Creation (Local Economic Development) 


Strategic Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Inclusive 

Economic Growth 
with Sustainable 
Development 

Inclusive 

Economic Growth 

Issue 20: Economic 
Development and 

Job creation 

Growth 

Support to SMMEs 
Cooperatives & 

Informal Traders 

NDM 

Improved 
economic 
development of 
the district 

Number of SMMEs 
Cooperatives & 
Informal Traders 
supported 

2 110 000 

2 226 050 

2 000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

EPWP Creative Arts 
and Culture 

Number of EPWP 
Creative Arts and 
Culture jobs created 

1 780 620 



EPWP 

Grant 


241 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 


















































Strategic Objective 

with Sustainable 
Development 


Developmental 

Issue 


IUDF 


Project 

Location 

EPWP Rural 
Development & 
Agriculture 

NDM 

Job Creation EPWP 
Security 

District-Wide 

EPWP incentive 

Grant Project 

Thembisile 

Hani 

Support of Regional 
LTOs & Tourism 
Organisation (RTO 

District-Wide 

Non-Financial 

Support to SMMEs, 
Cooperatives and 
Informal Traders 
supported with tools 
and equipment 

District-Wide 


Dr. JS Moroka 
LM 


Emakhazeni 

LM 

Containerised 

Steve 

Tshwete LM 

Business Flub 

Emalahleni 

LM 


Victor Khanye 
LM 


Thembisile 

Hani LM 


242 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


Outcome 


Key Performance 

Budget (R) 

Source of 

Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Funding 

Number of EPWP 
Rural Development 
& Agriculture jobs 
created 

1 783 500 




Number of Jobs 
Created through 

EPWP Security 

2 400 000 

2 500 000 



Number of Projects 
Implemented 

1,100 000 

- 

- 


Number of Regional 
LTOs & Tourism 
Organisation (RTO 
supported 

316 500 

353 913 

371 608 


Number of SMMEs, 
Cooperatives and 
Informal Traders 
supported 

1 010 000 

2,226 051 

1,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

- 

" 

" 

2,000 000 



- 

- 

2,000 000 


- 

" 

" 

2,000 000 


- 

- 

" 

2,000 000 


- 

- 

- 

2,000 000 



" 

- 

2,000 000 



019/20 IDP 




































priority Issue 12: Water (Technical Services): Basic Services Delivery and infrastructure 


Projects for 


Strategic Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Budget R 000's 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure and 
Service 

Provisioning 

Issue 12: 

Water and 
Sanitation 

Inclusion and 

access 

Moripe Gardens & 
Madubaduba Water 
Supply 

Dr J S Moroka 

LM 

Increased 
access to 
clean and 
healthy 
water 

% completion of 
Moripe Gardens & 
Madubaduba Water 
Supply 

3,500 000 

7,000 000 

7,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Water Tankers for Dr 

JS Moroka 

Dr J S Moroka 

LM 

Number of water 
tankers purchased 

7,000 000 

- 

- 

Equitable 

Share 

Water installation 
Empumelelweni 

Emakhazeni LM 

% completion of 
Empumelelweni 
water reticulation 

3,021 489 



Equitable 

Share 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure and 
Service 

Provisioning 

Issue 12: 

Water and 
Sanitation 

Inclusion and 

access 

Water Reticulation 
Hlalanikahle ext 3 

Emalahleni LM 

Increased 
access to 
clean and 
healthy 
water 

% water 

Reticulation 

completed 

2,500 000 

4,250 000 

2,250 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Refurbishment of 
Boreholes & elevated 
steel tank 

Victor Khanye 

LM 

% refurbishment 
completed 

5,000 000 

5,000 000 

5,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Water reticulation at 
Siyathuthuka 

Emakhazeni 

LM 

% water 

Reticulation 

completed 

500 000 



Equitable 

Share 


Projects for priority Issue 12: Sanitation (Technical Services): Basic Services Delivery and infrastructure 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 12: 

Water and 

Sanitation 

Inclusion and 

access 

Installation of Sanitation 
Reticulation (Outfall 
Sewer) at 

Empumelelweni 

Emthonyeni 

Emakhazeni LM 

Increased 
access to 
healthy 
sanitation 

% of installation 
completed 

6,500 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Sewer Line Hlalanikahle 
Ext 3 

Emalahleni LM 

% of construction 
completed 

2,500 000 

4,250 000 

2,250 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Upgrading Klarinet x2 
x3 and Pine Ridge 

Sewer 

Emalahleni LM 

% of construction 
completed 

7,701 389 

2,000 000 


Equitable 

Share 


243 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 









































Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Budget (R) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 12: 

Water and 

Sanitation 

Inclusion and 

access 

VIP Toilets and Septic 
Tank Suction 

Dr JS Moroka 

LM 

Increased 
access to 
healthy 
sanitation 

% of construction 
completed 

1,500 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Construction of low- 
flush toilets in rural 

areas 

Steve Tshwete 

LM 


% of construction 
completed 

333 333 



Equitable 

Share 

Sewer Reticulation at 
siyathuthuka 

Emakhazeni LM 


% of reticulation 
completed 

500 000 

" 

" 

Equitable 

Share 


Projects for priority Issue 


14: Roads and Storm water (Technical Services) 


Strategic Goal 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget (R)) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 14: 

Roads and 
storm water 

Inclusion and 

access 

Kabenziwa Storm 
water Control 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

Increased 
accessibility to all 
destinations in the 
District through 
efficient and 
reliable road 
network 

% Construction 
completed 

3,500 000 

4,500 000 

" 

Equitable 

Share 

Storm water 

Matshiding ward 12 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

% Construction 
completed 

4, 000 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Ga-Morwe to 
Mthambothini Vehicle 
Bridge 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

% Construction 
completed of 
bridge 

4,000 000 

6,000 000 

1,500 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Mabuyeni Stormwater Dr JS Moroka LM 
Drainage Systems 

Ward 6 

% Construction 
completed 

3,000 000 

4,500 000 

1,500 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 14: 

Roads and 
storm water 

Inclusion and 

access 

Procurement of 

Grader 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

Increased 
accessibility to all 
destinations in the 
District through 
efficient and 
reliable road 
network 

Number of 
Graders 

Procured 

4,000 000 

4,500 000 


Equitable 

Share 

Procurement of 

Grader 

Enalahlenini LM 

Number of 
Graders 

Procured 


5,000 000 




244 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 















































Strategic Goal 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Budget (R)) 

Source of 
Funding 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 




Feasibility Study 

Road Machadodorp & 
Waterval Boven 

Emakhazeni LM 


Number of 
feasibility 
studies 
conducted 
(100%) 

1,500 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Tokologo (Ezinyokeni) 
Road 

Steve Tshwete 

LM 

Km of road 
completed 

6,000 000 

6,000 000 

6,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Somaphepha Road 

Steve Tshwete 

Km of road 
completed 

4,000 000 

10,900 000 

2,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 14: 

Roads and 
storm water 

Inclusion and 

access 

Storm water Phumula 

Thembisile FHani 

Increased 
accessibility to all 
destinations in the 
District through 
efficient and 
reliable road 
network 

Km of storm 

water 

completed 

4,000 000 

4,000 000 

5,500 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Issue 14: 

Roads and 
storm water 

Inclusion and 

access 

Completion of Bus 
Route Tweefontein 

Thembisile Hani 

LM 

Increased 
accessibility to all 
destinations in the 
District through 
efficient and 
reliable road 
network 

% of bus route 
completed 

7,000 000 

" 

" 

Equitable 

Share 

Paving of Greenside 
Road Khalanyoni 

Thembisile Hani 

LM 

Km of road 

Paved 

6,000 000 

7,000 000 

" 

Equitable 

Share 

Construction of Road 
at Kakarela 

Dr. JS Moroka LM 

Km of road 
constructed 

" 

" 

2 000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 14: 

Roads and 
storm water 

Inclusion and 

access 

Supply and Delivery 
of low Bed Truck 

Emakhazeni LM 

Number of low 
bed truck 
purchased and 
delivered 

3,000 000 



Equitable 

Share 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 14: 

Roads and 
storm water 

Inclusion and 

access 

Supply and Delivery 
of Bull Dozer 

Emakhazeni LM 

Number of Bull 
Dozer supplied 
and delivered 

1,233 333 



Equitable 

Share 


245 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 






























Projects for Priority Issue 14: Roads and Storm Water (Technical Services) 


STRATEGIC 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Key 

Budget (R) 

Source of 

Funding 

Outcome 

Performance 

Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 14: 

Roads and storm 
water 

Inclusion 
and access 

Mandela Luthuli 

Bridge Road 

Thembisile 

Hani LM 

Increased 
accessibility to 
all 

destinations in 
the District 
through efficient 
and reliable road 
network 

KM of road 
completed 

1,000 000 

1,000 000 

1,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Roads and storm 
water Ward 12 

Thembisile 

Hani LM 

1,000 000 

5,000 000 

3,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Issue 14: 

Roads and storm 
water 

Inclusion 
and access 

Storm water Ward 4 

Thembisile 

Hani LM 

3,000 000 

3,000 000 


Equitable 

Share 


Projects for Priority Issue 14: Roads and Storm Water (Technical Services) 


Strategic 

Objective 

Developmental 

Issue 





Key 

Budget (R) 

Source of 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Performance 

Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Funding 




Kwaggafontein-D Bus 
and Taxi Route 
(Phase 3) 

Thembisile 

Hani LM 



5,000 000 



Equitable 

Share 




Thembalethu Bus 

Route 

Thembisile 

Hani LM 



1,412 340 

2,500 000 

8,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 




Madamini Bus Route 

Thembisile 

Hani LM 

Increased 

km of road 
completed 

1,000 000 


5,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 

Sustainable 
Infrastructure 
and Service 
Provisioning 

Issue 14: 

Roads and 
storm water 

Inclusion and 

access 

Bus Route from 
Mogononong to 
siyabuswa magistrate 
court 

Dr JS Moroka 

LM 

accessibility to all 
destinations in the 
District through 
efficient and reliable 


5,000 000 

1,500 000 

Equitable 

Share 



Construction of 

Roads in Victor 

Khanye 

Victor Khanye 

LM 

road network 


4,526 960 

4,526 960 

4,000 000 

Equitable 

Share 




Rural road asset 
Management: Road 
Master Plan 

NDM 


Number of Road 
Assert 

Management 

Systems 

Completed 

2,310 000 

2,442 000 

2,577 000 

RAMS 


246 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 










































Projects for Infrastructure: Technical Services 


Strategic objective 

Developmenta 

IUDF 

Project 

Location 

Outcome 

Key Performance 

Budget (R) 



Source of Funding 

1 Issue 

Indicator 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 


Sustainable 
Infrastructure and 
Service 

Provisioning 

Issue 13: 
Electricity 

Inclusion and 

access 

High Mast Lights Dr 

JS Moroka 

Dr JS 

Moroka LM 

Increased 
access to 
electricity 
and lighting 

Number of high 
mast lights 
completed 

3,000 000 



Equitable Share 


Projects by Sector Departments 


Department of Sports, Culture and Recreation 


Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

1 NEW LIBRARY UNDER CONSTRUCTION DUE FOR COMPLETION IN 2019/20 

1. Emalahleni 

Thubelihle 

Learners, educators and the 
community 

100% completion 

R10 000 

R16 500 

1 NEW LIBRARY UNDER CONSTRUCTION DUE FOR COMPLETION IN 2020/21 

2. Steve Tshwete 

Newtown 

Learners, educators and the 
community 

10% completion 

R1 500 

R16 500 


Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

2 NEW LIBRARIES AT PLENARY STAGE FOR CONSTRUCTION IN 2020/21 

3. Dr JS Moroka 

Mmamethlake 

Learners, educators and the 
community 

Planning phase completed 

R500 

R16 500 


247 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 















































4. Emalahleni 

Emalahleni 

Learners, educators and the 
community 

Planning phase completed 

R500 

R16 500 

1 EXISTING LIBRARY UPGRADED 

5. Emalahleni 

Emalahleni main 

Learners, educators and the 
community 

80% completion 

R4 000 

R4 000 


Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

3 MUNICIPAL LIBRARIES MAINTAINED 

6. Victor Khanye 

Sundra 

Learners, educators and the community 

100% maintenance completion 

R800 

R800 

7. Emalahleni 

Ogies 

Learners, educators and the community 

100% maintenance completion 

R800 

R800 

8. Emalahleni 

Lynnville 

Learners, educators and the community 

100% maintenance completion 

R800 

R800 

1 MULTI -YEAR PROJECT 

9. Emakhazeni 

High Altitude 

Training Center 

Athletes, Coaches, technical officials, 
administrators, managers and 
communities 

TA approvals on the PPP 
framework stages of the High 
Altitude acquired to solicit 
private investor 

R27 692 

R5 100 000 


248 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 





































Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

40 LIBRARIES SUPPORTED WITH RESOURCES INCLUDING INTERNET AND WIFI 

38 Public and 2 Regional 
Libraries 

libraries supported with 
resources, marketing and 
internet and WIFI 

Learners, educators and 
community 

38 Public and 2 Regional 
Libraries 

Provincial Budget 

Provincial Budget 

PROVISION OF SPORT EQUIPMENT/ATTIRE AND OUTDOOR GYM 

Municipal Hubs and Clubs 

Provision of Sport 
equipment/Attire and outdoor 
gym 

All communities 

6 Hubs and 20 Clubs and 

1 outdoor gym 

Provincial Budget 

Provincial Budget 

2 CUMMNUTY SPORT STRUCTURES SUPPORTED 

Steve Tshwete 

Loskop Marathon 

All communities 

Athletes 

R500 

R500 

(Tour Mpumalanga Cycling 
Project) 

Cycling project that will tour 
Mpumalanga Stage 1 - Loskop 
Dam to Badplaas 

All communities 

Mpumalanga cyclist and 
communities 

R500 

R500 


Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

2 ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE SUPPORTED 


Erholweni 

All communities 

Support to Artists 

R100 

R100 

Komjekejeke 

All communities 

Support to Artists 

R200 

R100 

1 COMMUNITY DIALOGUE 


249 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 













































Nkangala Region 

Social cohesion and national 

All communities 

1 Community 

R150 

R450 


building conversations 
conducted at regional level 


Dialogue 


Provincial Budget 


Department of Community Safety, Security and Liaison 



A. EMALAHLENI LOCAL 
MUNICIPALITY 

Hlalanikanhle village 

> 

Gender Based Violence 

May 2019 

R8000.00 for catering 

Phola village 

> 

Gender Based Violence 

August 2019 

R8000.00 for catering 

Coronation Village 

> 

Gender Based Violence 

February 2020 

R8000.00 for catering 

Witbank Dam 

> 

Tourism Awareness campaign 

September 2019 

None 

Dunbar village 

> 

Monitor liquor trader 

September 2019 

None 

Empumelelweni Village 

> 

Sports against crime 

November 2019 

R30000.00 

Ogies Village 

> 

Human trafficking Awareness 

Campaign 

October 2019 

R8000.00 

Kromdraaai Village 

> 

Human trafficking Awareness 

Campaign 

January 2020 

R8000.00 

Hlalanikahle Village 

> 

Community Outreach 

August 2019 

R300000.00 



Victim Friendly facility Project 

April 2019-March 2020 



250 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 















Vosman, Phola, Kriel Ogies and 

> 

Monitor and Support victim friendly 

Witbank Police Stations 


facility projects 



Rural safety Project 


> 

Establishment of Rural Safety 

Witbank 


Committee 


> 

Paralegal workshop 

Emalahleni Farms 

> 

Monitor intervention Mechanism 

Emalahleni Farms 

> 

Vulnerable Group Project 

Purchase uniform for vulnerable 

Emalahleni Farms 


children 



School Safety Project 


> 

Anti-crime Awareness Campaign in 
identified schools 

Emalahleni 

> 

Assess Community Safety Forum at 
Emalahleni 

Witbank 

> 

Assess Community Police Forum 

Witbank, Vosman, Phola, Kriel and 


Structure at Emalahleni 

Ogies police stations 

> 

Deploy and Monitor Tourism Safety 

Emalahleni 


Monitor (16) 

B. STEVE TSHWETE LOCAL 



MUNICIPALITY 



Kwamapimpana village 

> 

Gender Based Violence Campaign 



Contact Crime Project 

Mhluzi 

> 

Assaults GBFI Awareness Campaign 
Victim Friendly Facilities 


None 


May 2019 

September 2019 
September 2019- March 2020 

May 2019 

April 2019- March 2020 

October 2019 

June 2019 and August 2019 
April 2019 


October 2019 

November 2019 


None 

R25000.00 

None 

R30000.00 

None 

None 

None 

Not Applicable 


R8000.00 

R8000.00 

None 


2 0 I D P 










Mhluzi, Middleburg, Hendrina and 


Victim Friendly Facility Project 

April 2019- March 2020 


Blankpan police stations 

> 

Monitor and Support victim friendly 
facility projects 





Rural Safety Project 


None 

Middleburg 

> 

Establishment / Revival of Rural 

Safety, 

May 2019 

R20000.00 

Steve Tshwede Farms 

> 

Paralegal Workshop 

October 2019 




Vulnerable Group Project 


R30000.00 


> 

Purchase uniforms for vulnerable 
children 

April-May 2019 




School Safety Project 

April 2019-March 2020 

None 


> 

Anti-crime Awareness Campaign in 
identified schools 




> 

Assess Community Safety Forum 

November 2019 

None 

Middleburg 

> 

Assess Community Police Forum 

April 2019 

None 

Mhluzi Police Station 

> 

Assess Community Police Forum 

February 2020 

None 

Hendrina Police Station 

> 

Assess Community Police Forum 

March 2020 

None 

Middleburg Police Station 

> 

Deploy any Monitor Tourism Safety 
Monitor (12) 

April 2019 

Not Applicable 

C. Thembisile Hani Local 





Municipality 





Mandela Village 

> 

Gender Based Violence Campaign 

July 2019 

R8000.00 


> 

Gender Based Violence Campaign 



Sheldon Village 

> 

Monitor Compliance of Liquor Traders 

March 2020 

R8000.00 


252 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 










Sun City Village 

> 

Sports Against Crime 

June 2019 

None 

Luthuli Village 

> 

Anti - Stock Theft Awareness 

Campaign 

December 2019 

R30000.00 

Wolwenkop Village 

> 

Contact Crime Project 

Anti-Rape Awareness Campaign 

November 2019 

None 

Moloto Village 

> 

Victim Friendly Facilities Project 

Monitor and support victim friendly 
facilities at the identified police stations 

September 2019 

R8000.00 

Kwaggafontein, Tweefontein, 
KwaMhlanga and Verena Police 
Stations 

> 

Vulnerable Group Project 

Support vulnerable groups at the 
identified centers within municipalities 

April 2019-March 2020 

None 

Thembisile Hani Municipality 

> 

School Safety Projects 

Anti- Crime Awareness Campaign in 
all the identified schools 

April 2019- March 2020 

R30000.00 



Prison tour by learners from Mandlethu 
and Mbalenhle secondary schools 

April 2019-March 2020 

None 


> 

> 

Assess Community Safety Forum at 
Thembisile Hani Local Municipality 

Assess Community Police Forum 

June 2019 

R30000.00 


> 

Assess Community Police Forum 



Thembisile Hani Municipality 

> 

Assess Community Police Forum 

July 2019 

None 


253 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 









Verena and Kwaggafontein Police 
Stations 

KwaMhlanga Police Station 


Tweefontein Police Station 


KwaMhlanga Police Station 

D. DR JS Moroka Local 
Municipality 

Siyabuswa 


Marapyane 


Siyabuswa, Vaalbank and 
Mmamethlake Police Stations 


Siyabuswa 


Siyabuswa Police Station 
Mamohlake Police Station 


> Deploy and Monitor Tourism Safety 
Monitors (16) 


> Monitor Compliance on Liquor Traders 

> Anti-Stock theft awareness Campaign 

Victim Friendly Facilities Project 

> Monitor and support victim friendly 
facilities 

Vulnerable Groups Project 

> Monitor and support Vulnerable 
Groups at the identified centers 

School Safety Project 

Anti-crime Awareness campaigns at 
the identified schools 

> Assess Community Safety Forum for 
Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality 

> Assess Community Police Forum 

> Assess Community Police Forum 

> Deploy and Monitor Tourism safety 
Monitors (36) 


254 IP a g e 


Siyabuswa and Vaalbank Police 
Stations 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2 0 19/ 


May 2019 
July 2019 


None 


July 2019 

None 

November 2019 

None 

April 2019 

Not Applicable 

November 2019 

None 

July 2019 

None 

April 2019- March 2020 

None 

April 2019- March 2020 

R30000.00 

April 2019- March 2020 

None 

August 2019 

None 

August 2019 

None 

January 2020 

None 

April 2019 

Not Applicable 










E. VICTOR KHANYE LOCAL 


Victim Friendly Facility Project 

April 2019- March 2020 

None 

MUNICIPALITY 

> 

Monitor and support Victim Friendly 
Facility Project 



Delmas and Sundra 

> 

Rural Safety Project 

Establishment and Revival of Rural 
Safety, Committee 

May 2019 

None 

Victor Khanye Farms 

> 

Paralegal workshop at farms 

August 2019 

R15000.00 



Vulnerable Groups Project 




> 

Monitor and support vulnerable groups 
at identified schools 

April 2019- March 2020 

R30000.00 



School Safety Project 




> 

Anti- crime awareness Campaign at 
identified schools 

April 2019- March 2020 

None 


> 

Prison tour by learners from from 
Mafamax and Botleng Secondary 
schools 

August 2019 

R25000.00 

Delmas 

> 

Assess Community Safety Forum for 
Victor Khanye Local Municipalicy 

June 2019 

None 

Sundra Police Station 

> 

Assess Community Police forum 

September 2019 

None 

F. EMAKHAZENI LOCAL 





MUNICIPALITY 

> 

Tourism Safety Awareness Campaign 

June 2019 

None 

Dullstroom 

> 

Tourism Safety Awareness Campaign 

December 2019 

None 


> 

Sports Against Crime 

August 2019 

R25000.00 

Zasm Tunnel 





Machadodorp 


Victim Friendly Facility Project 

April 2019- March 2020 

None 


255 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 











> 

Monitor and support victim friendly 



Machadodorp, Belfast, Dullstroom, 


facility 



Waterval Boven and Laersdrift 



May 2019 

None 

Police Stations 

> 

Rural Safety Project 

Revival of Rural Committees 

September 201 

R20000.00 

Emakhazeni Farms 

> 

Paralagal Workshop 

April 2019- March 2020 

R30000.00 



Vulnerable Group Project 



Belfast 

> 

Monitors and support vulnerable group 
in all identified centers 

April 2019- March 2020 

None 

Emakhazeni 

> 

School safety 

Anti- crime awareness campaigns in all 

September 2019 

None 

Belfast 


the identified schools 


None 

Dullstrum, Belfast, Machadosdorp, 

> 

Assess Community Safety Forum for 

December 2019 


Laersdrift and Watervaal Boven 
Police Stations 


Emakhazeni Local Municipality 

April 2019 

Not Applicable 

Watervaal Boven and Dullstrum Police 

> 

Assess Community police forum 



Stations 

> 

Deploy and Monitor Tourism Safety 
Monitors (28) 




Department of Education projects 


256 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 









Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 




Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Baseline 


Framework/Budget 







2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Aerorand Primary 
School 

Construction of a Grade R Centre, 24 
Classrooms, administration block, 
library, computer centre, 40 toilets, 
fence, electricity, water, school hall, 
kitchen, 3 sports grounds and car park. 

Steve Tshwete LM 
(Middelburg) 

Contractor 

appointed 

New School 
Completed 

48,177,886 

3,207,939 

48,177,886 

New Klarinet Primary 
School (Mogalitwa) 
(Phase 2) 

Construct 28 Classrooms, Administration 
block, laboratory, library, computer centre, 
School Hall, 40 Toilets, Fence, Electricity, 
Water, Kitchen, ramps + rails, 3 Sports 
Grounds and Car Park. 

Emalahleni LM 
(Klarinet) 

Contractor 

appointed 

New School 
Completed 

7,450,000 



Marapyane Circuit 
Office 

Construction of new circuit offices 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Marapyane) 

Contractor 

appointed 

New Offices 
Completed 

7,042,247 

653,795 

- 

New Doornkop School 
(Phase 1) 

Phase 1: Provision of toilets, water, 
electricity, Fencing and guard house 

Steve Tshwete LM 
(Doornkop) 

Contractor 

appointed 

New School 
Completed 

5,174,000 

4,004,000 

- 

Extension 

24/Rockdale Primary 
School (Middelburg) 

Phase 1,2018-19: Planning design and 
provision of bulk services (fencing, water, 
sanitation and electrical installation) 

Phase 2, 2019/20: Construction of 28 
Classrooms, 2 X Grade R Centre, 
administration block, library, computer 
centre, ramps & rails, kitchen, 3 sports 
grounds and carpark. 

Steve Tshwete LM 
(Ext 24) 

Planning and 

Design 

New School 
Completed 

600,000 

24,480,000 

24,480,000 

Emakhazeni 

Combined Boarding 
School 

Phase 1: Maintenance of the boarding 

Emakhazeni LM 
(Machadodorp) 

Construction & 

Final Account 

Maintanance 

Completed 

132,273 

- 


Steve Tshwete 
Boarding School 

Phase 1: Maintenance of the boarding 

Steve Tshwete LM 
(Somaphepha) 

Construction & 

Final Account 

Maintanance 

Completed 

150,000 

- 

- 


257 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Masuku Primary 

School 

Maintenance of classrooms and 
replacement of asbestos roof to 1 
classroom block. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Siyabuswa) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

2,500,000 


“ 

Pine Ridge Combined 
School 

Maintenance of electrical works and repair 
of roof sheeting to 1 classrooms and 
replace asbestos roof to 2 block of 
classrooms 

Emalahleni LM 
(Pine ridge) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

2,072,000 



Sibongimpumelelo 
Primary School 

Refurbishment and renovation of 16 
classrooms. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Thembalethu) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

362,598 


- 

Sifundise Primary 
School 

Overall maintenance for the school 

Emalahleni LM 
(Matla Coal) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

4,293,000 

“ 

" 

Somtshongweni 
Primary School 

Maintenance of classrooms and 
replacement of asbestos roof to 1 
classroom block. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontein B) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

338,425 



Phase 1: 

Refurbishment of 
existing 30 

classrooms, Phase 2: 
Administration block, 

6 laboratories, Library, 
fence, kitchen 

Phase 1: Refurbishment of existing 30 
classrooms, Phase 2: Administration block, 
6 laboratories, Library, fence , kitchen 

Steve Tshwete LM 
(Mhluzi) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

606,346 



Thandulwazi Primary 
School 

Renovation and refurbishment of 12 
classrooms 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontein C) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 338,425 

Completed 




258 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 


2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Vukuzame Secondary 
School 

Renovation of existing 16 classrooms, 
computer centre and laboratory. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein C) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

386,772 

- 

- 

Sibongamandla 
Secondary School 

Renovations of 24 classrooms, 
administration block library, laboratory, 
computer centre, 56 toilets. 

Emalahleni LM 
(Thubelihle) 

Planning, Design 
and Construction 
in 2019/20 

Maintanance 

Completed 

825,919 



Belfast Academy 
Combined School 

Overall maintenance for the school 

Emakhazeni LM 
(Belfast) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Maintanance 

Completed 

6,014,360 

- 

- 

Rietkol Primary 

School 

Refurbishment of the existing waterborne 
toilets and upgrade of water supply 

Victor Khanye LM 
(Rietkol) 

Construction 

Maintanance 

Completed 

831,100 

43,742 

- 

Cibiliza Secondary 
School 

Phase 2: Demolish and reconstruct of 
unsafe structures of two blocks of 8 
classrooms and admin block, repair the lib 
burn down. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontei A) 

Construction & 

Final Account in 
2019/20 

Upgrades & 
Additions 

13,710,582 



Mmagobane 

Combined School 

Phase 1: Demolition of 07 Unsafe 
Classrooms and construction of 07 new 
Classrooms, Renovations of 07 Classrooms 
and Construction of 02 Grade R Centre. 

Emalahleni LM 
(Thushanang) 

Construction 

Maintanance 

Completed 

3,477,180 



Amandla Primary 
School 

Construction of 9 Enviroloo Loo WC toilets. 
Demolition of 8 Pit toilets. Refurbish jojo 
tank stands 

Emalahleni LM 
(Albion) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,465,957 



Babutheni Secondary 
School 

Construction of enviro-loo toilet 11 seats, 5 
urinals, 9 wash hand basin. Demolition of 

12 pit toilets. Installation of borehole and 2 x 
5 0001 water storage tank & stands. 
Installation of new borehole. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Allemansdrift B) 

Construction & 

Final Account in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,811,923 




259 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 




Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Baseline 


Framework/Budget 







2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Batlagae Primary 
School 

30 waterborne toilets, 13 urinals, 28 wash 
hand basins, refurbishment of 18 enviro loo 
toilets, add septic tank, 2 x 10 000L water 
tank and 2 drinking fountains. 

Steve Tshwete LM 
(Doornkop) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

541,755 



Bingweni Secondary 
School 

Construction of 16 new enviroloo toilets and 
5 urinals, demolish 16 existing pit toilets 
and equipping of borehole 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Leeufontein) 

Construction & 

Final Account in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,663,586 

“ 

- 

Buhlebesizwe 
Secondary School 

Demolish 8 existing pit toilets, Refurbish 7 
existing waterborne toilets . Construct 9 
enviro-loo toilet seats with 4 urinals, 8 wash 
basins. Equipping of borehole and 
Installation of 4x (50001) water tanks. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Buhlebesizwe) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,968,644 



Dikgabo Primary 
School 

Construction of 10 enviro loo toilets, 5 
urinals and 9 x wash hand basins, 2 x 
drinking fountains and demolition of existing 
pit toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Lefiso) 

Construction & 

Final Account in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

237,757 



Dipere Primary 

School 

Construction of 20 Enviroloo loo toilets. 
Demolition of 18 Mud toilets. Drinking 
fountain x 1. construction of French drain.1 
x Jojo tank. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Mmametlhake) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,482,763 



Ditholo Combined 
School 

Construction of 12 enviro-loo toilet seats, 5 
urinals, 9 wash hand basins, demolish 
existing pit toilets, equipping of borehole 
and installation 3 x (50001) water tank. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Noaneng) 

Construction & 

Final Account in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,033,338 



Edwaleni Intermediate 
School 

Construction of 12 enviro-loo toilet seats, 5 
urinals, 14 wash hand basins. Demolish 15 
existing pit toilets Refurbish existing 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein H) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,881,360 




260 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 


waterborne toilets. Installation of borehole 
and 4 x(5000l) water tank 







Ekuphakameni 

Primary School 

Construction of 17 enviro-loo toilet seats, 3 
urinals, 14 wash hand basins. Demolition of 
pit toilets. Equipping of borehole and 
installation of 4 x (50001) water tank. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
Vaalbank) 

Construction & 

Final Account in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,212,731 



Emfundweni Primary 
School 

Construction of enviro-loo toilet 24 seats, 6 
urinals, 16 wash hand basin. Demolition of 
existing 14 pit toilets. Supply and 
installation of 1 x 5 0001 water storage tank 
& stand. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Vaalbank ) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,933,162 



Emthonjeni Primary Construction x 24 Enviroloo loo units. 
School Demolition of 6 x existing pit toilets and 

refurbish 1 existing waterborne toilet block. 
Installation of borehole and 4 X 50001 water 
tank. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontein A) 

Construction & 

Final Account in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

3,438,818 



Gijamphezeni Primary Construction x 20 Enviroloo loo units. 
School Demolition of 8 x Mud toilets. Equiping of 

borehole. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Kameelrivier A ) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,305,479 



Gijimani Primary Construction of 15 new Enviroloo toilets,(5 

School urinals, 11 hand basins)demolish existing 

pit toilets and equipping of borehole 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein J) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,305,479 


" 

Hluzingqondo Primary 
School 

Demolish 8 existing pit toilets, Construct 13 
enviro-loo toilet seats with 5 urinals, 12 
wash basins. Equipping of borehole and 
Installation of 4x (50001) water tanks. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontein A) 

Construction in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,524,420 




261 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Houtenbek Primary 
School 

Demolition of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 21 new toilets 

Steve Tshwete LM 
(Houtenbek) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,462,369 

" 

" 

Kabenziwa Primary 
School 

Construction of 18 waterborne toilets, 8 
urinals, 13 wash hand basins, 1 x 10 000L 
water tank and 2 drinking fountains. 
Demolition of 14 existing toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(SiyabuswaA ) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

337,062 



Khayalethu Primary 
School 

Demolish 8 existing pit toilets, Construct 13 
enviro-loo toilet seats with 5 urinals, 12 
wash basins. Equipping of borehole and 
Installation of 2x (50001) water tanks. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Boekenhouthoek) 

Construction in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,524,420 



Khayelitjha Primary 
School 

Construct 26 enviro loo toilets, 6 urinals, 16 
wash hand basins and refurbish 4 
waterborne toilets. Demolition of 34 existing 
pit toilets. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Sun City AA) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

353,273 



Khuphukani Primary 
School 

Construction of 15 enviro-loo toilet seats, 5 
urinals, 11 wash hand basin, demolish 
existing pit toilets, 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein B2) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,426,632 


" 

Kome Primary School 

Construction of additional 10 enviro-loo 
toilet seats. Refurbish 10 waterborne toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Lefiswane) 

Construction in 
2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,689,106 

■ 

- 

Lelengaye Primary 
School 

Demolish 8 existing pit toilets, Refurbish 4 
existing waterborne toilets. Construct 11 
enviro-loo toilet seats with 4 urinals, 8 wash 
basins. Equipping of borehole and 
Installation of 4x (50001) water tanks. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Sun City AA) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

353,273 




262 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 


2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Madikole Primary 
School 

Construction of a disabled toilet seat and 1 
wash hand basin. Refurbish 13 waterborne 
toilets. Demolish existing pit toilets. 
Equipping of borehole and 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Mmametlhake) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

752,826 


- 

Malebo Secondary 
School 

Construction of addition 9 enviro-loo toilet 
seats, 2 urinals, 7 wash hand basins. 
Refurbish 6 waterborne and demolish 
existing pit toilets. Equipping of borehole 
and installation of 2 x (50001) water tank. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Makometsane) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,604,113 



Maloka Primary 

School 

Construction of 17 enviro-loo toilet seats, 2 
urinals, 11 wash hand basins. Demolish 
existing pit toilets. Equipping of borehole 
and installation 3 x (50001) water tank. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Masobye) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

955,800 


- 

Manyazela Primary 
School 

Construction of 15 Enviroloo. Demolition of 
13 pit toilets. Refurbish existing jojo tank 
stand and provision of 1 jojo tank. 
Construction two drinking fountains 2 x 
drinking fountain 

Victor KhanyeLM 
(Waaikraal) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,134,108 



Mapondo Primary Construction of 21 enviro loo toilet seats, 8 

School urinals, 18 wash hand basins. Refurbish 4 

Waterborne Demolition of 18 pit toilets. 
Installation of borehole, installation of 2 
xIOKL and 1 x 5KL water tanks 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein E) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,838,401 


- 

Maqhawe Primary Construction of 9 waterborne toilets, 2 
School urinals, 07 wash hand basins, 1 x 5 000L 

water tank and 1 drinking fountains. 
Demolition of 12 existing toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Siyabuswa A) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

177,520 




263 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 


2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Masobye Primary 
School 

Construction of 15 enviro-loo toilet seats, 5 
urinals, 11 wash hand basins. Demolition of 
10 existing pit toilets. Upgrading of existing 
borehole and provide 1 x 10 000L elevated 
tanks and 1 x steel stand for existing 10 
000L tank. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Masobye) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,067,073 


- 

Masuku Primary 

School 

Construction of 15 waterborne toilets, 5 
urinals, 11 wash hand basins, 1 x 5 000L 
water tank and 1 drinking fountains. 
Demolition of 12 existing toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Siyabuswa C) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

277,001 



Matimba Primary 
School 

Construction of 24 enviro loo toilet seats, 6 
urinals,21 wash hand basins. Demolition of 
16 pit toilets. Installation of a borehole and 
2x 10KL water tanks 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Moloto) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

3,088,937 


- 

Mayisha Secondary 
School 

Refurbish existing 20 waterborne toilets, 
and demolish lOpit toilets. Upgrade existing 
borehole and fence around existing 
elevated tank stands 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Waterval) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

631,635 



Mgwezani Combined Construction of 20 enviro-loo toilet seats 8 
School urinals, 18 wash hand basins. Refurbish the 

existing 5 waterborne toilets. Demolition of 
14 pit toilets. Refurbish the existing 
borehole. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontein C) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,843,753 


- 

Mkhanyo Primary Construction 18 enviro-loo toilet seats, 8 

School urinals, 21 wash hand basins. Demolish 13 

pit latrines and Refurbish 8 existing 
waterborne toilets. Demolish existing 20 pit 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Zakheni) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

631,635 




264 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 


toilets. Refurbish the existing borehole. 
Installation of 3 x 10KL with 5m high stand 







Mohlatseng Primary Construction of enviro-loo toilets 20 seats, 5 
School urinals, 15 wash hand basin. Demolition of 

existing 18 pit toilets, supply and installation 
of 2 x 5 0001 and water storage tank & 
stand and installation of borehole. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Senotlelol) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,041,127 


- 

Molebye Primary 
School 

Construction of: 8 Enviro loo including two 
urinals and a palisade fence, Two new 
drinking fountains including water tank and 
stand. The existing 7 waterborne toilets 
need to be refurbished. 

Allow for plinth around JOJO stands and 
Slab around ablution facilities. The existing 
borehole needs to be upgraded and allow 
for water connection. Demolition of all 
existing pit toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Nokanengl) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,404,587 



Moniwa Primary 

School 

Construct 9 enviro-loo toilet seats 5 urinals, 

11 wash hand basins. Refurbish 6 
waterborne toilets. Demolish the existing 19 
pit toilets. Refurbish existing borehole and 
install 1 x 10KL water tank with 5m high 
stand. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Boekenhouthoek) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,362,905 


- 

Motswedi Primary 
School 

Construction of: 3 Enviro loo new drinking 
fountains including a septic tank and stand. 
The existing 17 waterborne toilets need to 
be refurbished. Demolition of all existing pit 
toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Leseleselengl) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

821,695 




265 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Mpoko Maloka Construction of 11 Enviro loo and 5 urinals 

Primary School including a palisade fence, 2 drinking 

fountains including water tank and stand. 
The existing borehole needs to be upgraded 
and allow for water connection. Demolition 
of all existing pit toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Masobyel) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,593,000 


- 

Mpumelelo Secondary 
School 

Demolish 12 existing pit toilets, Refurbish 4 
existing waterborne toilets. Construct 18 
enviro-loo toilet seats with 4 urinals, 8 wash 
basins. Equipping of borehole and 
Installation of 2x (50001) water tanks. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Bundu) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,044,324 



Musi Primary School Construct 9 enviro-loo toilet seats 8 urinals, 
21 wash hand basins. Refurbish 14 
waterborne toilets. Refurbish existing 20 
toilets. Demolish 9 pit latrines. Install 10KL 
water tank with 5m high stand 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(KwaMhlanga B) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,593,000 


- 

Ndabezitha Primary Construction of 8 Enviro loo including two 
School urinals and a palisade fence, 2 new drinking 

fountains including water tank and stand. 
Refurbish existing borehole and allow for 
water connection. Demolition of all existing 
pit toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Nkosini) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,274,400 



Musi Primary School Construct 9 enviro-loo toilet seats 8 urinals, 
21 wash hand basins. Refurbish 14 
waterborne toilets. Refurbish existing 20 
toilets. Demolish 9 pit latrines. Install 10KL 
water tank with 5m high stand 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(KwaMhlanga B) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,593,000 


- 


266 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 



Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Baseline 


Framework/Budget 






2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 

Ndabezitha Primary 
School 

Construction of 8 Enviro loo including two 
urinals and a palisade fence, 2 new drinking 
fountains including water tank and stand. 
Refurbish existing borehole and allow for 
water connection. Demolition of all existing 
pit toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Nkosini) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,274,400 

Ndedema Primary 
School 

Construction of 11 Enviro loo's and 5 
urinals. 4 new drinking fountains including 
stand for water tanks, upgrade existing 
borehole. Demolition of pit toilets. 

Refurbish existing 9 waterborne toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Waterval) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,768,902 

Nkosabo Primary 
School 

Construction of 19 Enviro-loo, 5 urinals and 
demolition of 14 pit toilets 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Allemansdrift C) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,647,873 

Nobuhle Primary 
School 

Construction of 15 Enviro loo units. 

Refurbish existing jojo tank stand and 
provision of 1 jojo tank. Construction two 
drinking fountains 2 x drinking fountain 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontein D) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,221,829 

Nteseng Primary 
School 

Construction of 13 Enviro-loo Toilets and 4 
urinals , demolish 5 pit toilets and borehole 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Nokanengl) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,305,477 

Patric Mankolane 
Primary School 

Construction 20 Enviro loo toilets. 

Demolition of 12 Mud toilets. Equiping of 
borehole. Drinking fountain x 1. construction 
of French drain. Refurbish 2 x existing jojo 
tanks stands 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Marapyane) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,480,866 


267 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Phake Primary School Construction of 25 x Enviroloo Units. 

Demolition of 12 Pit toilets. Electrical works. 
Drinking fountain x 2. Construction of 

French drain. 2 x 5000L Jojo tank 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Phake) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,968,199 



Phambili Secondary Construct 16 enviro-loo toilet seats 5 

School urinals, 12 wash hand basins. Demolish 

existing 20 pit toilets. Install 10KL water tank 
with 5m high stand. Install 3 x 10KL water 
tanks with 5m high stands 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein E) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,529,280 


- 

Phumzile Secondary Construction 20 Environ loo toilets. 

School Demolition of 12 Mud toilets. Equiping of 

borehole. Drinking fountain x 1. construction 
of French drain. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Mandlethu) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,543,206 



Prince SJ Primary Construction x 20 Environ loo toilets. 

School Demolition of 12 x Mud toilets. Drinking 

fountain x 1. Construction of French drain. 
Refurbish existing jojo tank stand, 1 x Jojo 
tank stand, 1 x drinking fountain 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Mgononweni) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,579,476 



Radijoko Primary 
School 

Construction of 09 Environ Loo WC toilets 
.Demolition of 8 Pit toilets. Electrical works. 
Refurbish 1 x Jojo tank dtand.1 x 5000L 

Jojo tank. Construction of V-Drain 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Radijoko) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,417,804 


- 

Ramabale Primary Construction x 20 Enviro loo toilets 

School .Demolition of 8 x Mud toilets. Drinking 

fountain x 1. Construction of French drain. 
Refurbish existing jojo tank stand. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

Lefiso) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,525,380 




268 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 



Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Baseline 


Framework/Budget 






2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 

Ramabifi Primary 
School 

Construction of 11 Enviro-loo Toilet seats 
and 3 Urinals, demolish 8 pit toilets and 
borehole 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Seabe) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,670,928 

Ramanchaane 

Primary School 

Construction 20 Environ loo toilets, 5 
urinals. Demolition of 20 toilets. Drinking 
fountain x 1. construction of French drain. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Seabe) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,456,538 

Ramantsho Primary 
School 

Construction of 11 Enviro-loo Toilet seats 
and 3 Urinals, demolish 8 pit toilets and 
borehole 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Ramantsho) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,688,653 

Refitlhile Primary 
School 

Construction 20 Environ loo toilets. 
Demolition of 14 x Mud toilets. Equiping of 
borehole. Drinking fountain x 1. 

Construction of French drain. Refurbish 
existing jojo tank stand. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Phake) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,521,648 

Rethabile Primary 
School 

Demolish 13 Pit Toilets, Construct 20 
enviro-loo toilet seats 5 urinals, 15 wash 
hand basins, Provide lx 5000L tanks, 
Borehole Provisions, Install water Fountain 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Kameelrivier A) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,597,228 

Sakhe Primary School Construction of enviro-loo toilet 15 seats, 5 
urinals, 10 wash hand basin. Demolition of 
existing 10 pit toilets. Installation of new 
borehole and 2 x 5 0001 water storage tank 
& stands 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Kameelrivier B ) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,145,005 

Sakhile Primary 

School 

Construction of 20 Enviro-loo Toilets, 
demolish 10 pit toilets and 1 x 5000 L Tank 
and providing of borehole. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Buhlebesizwe) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,372,010 


269 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 



Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Baseline 


Framework/Budget 






2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 

Semonate Combined 
School 

Construction of enviro-loo toilet 11 seats, 5 
urinals, 9 wash hand basin. Demolition of 
existing 17 pit toilets. Installation of new 
borehole and 2 x 5 0001 water storage tank 
& stand 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Sehoko) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,811,923 

Sibongimpumelelo 
Primary School 

Demolish 21 Pit toilets, Construction of 32 
Enviro-loo( 25 Seats, 7 Urinals, Install lx 5 
000L water tank with stand & fencing 
barrier, Water Reticulation .Install borehole/ 
Upgrading and Equipping of Borehole 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Thembalethu) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

3,533,618 

Siboniwe Primary 
School 

Demolish 26 Pit toilets, Construction of 33 
Enviro-loo( 25 Seats, Including 08 Urinals, 
Install 2x 5 000L water tank with stand & 
fencing barrier, Water Reticulation. Install 
borehole 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Phola) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

3,486,374 

Silamba Secondary 
School 

Demolish 8 Pit toilets, Construction of 27 
Enviro-loo(21 seats, 6 Urinals, Install 2x 5 
000L water tank with stand & fencing 
barrier, Water Reticulation, Equiping and 
Upgrading of Borehole 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Sun City) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,602,705 

Sizisizwe Primary 
School 

Demolish 6 Pit toilets, Construction of 25 
Enviro-loo 20 Seats, 05 Urinals, Install lx 5 
000L water tank with stand & fencing 
barrier, Water Reticulation Install borehole 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Allemansdrift C) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,507,394 

Sobantu Secondary 
School 

Phase 1: Construction of 8 waterborne 
toilets and renovation of 13 existing toilets 
and demolition of pit toilets 

Phase 2: Renovation of 16 classrooms. 
Future Phase: Completion of 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(GaPhaahla) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

638,567 


270 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 


Administration block , construction of 

Kitchen , Computer Centre , Car Park , 3 
Sports Grounds 







Somarobogo Primary Demolish 10 Pit toilets, Construction of 23 
School Enviro-loo( 19 Seats, Including 04 Urinals, 

Install lx 5 000L water tank with stand & 
fencing barrier, Water Reticulation. Install 
borehole/ Upgrading and Equipping of 
Borehole 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein E) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,675,841 


- 

Sothembani Primary Demolish 10 Pit toilets, Construction of 23 
School Enviro-loo( 18 Seats, 05 Urinals, 

Renovations to existing waterborne toilets 
Install lx 5 000L water tank with stand & 
fencing barrier, Water Reticulation, 
Upgrading and Equipping of Borehole 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Matshiding) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,435,452 



Sovetjheza Secondary Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 

School construction of 11 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Matshiding) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,335,046 

- 

- 

Thembalihle Primary 
School 

Construction of 20 new Enviro loo toilets, 
demolish 21 existing pit toilets and 1 x5000 
L Tank and upgrading equipping of 
borehole. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Alllmansdrift C ) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,432,525 


- 

Thokozani Primary 
School 

Construction of 15 enviro-loo toilet seats 5 
urinals, 11 wash hand basins. Demolition of 
10 pit toilets. Refurbish the existing 
borehole. Provide 1 x 10 000L tank 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein F) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,330,223 



Thushanang Primary 
School 

Construct 14 waterborne toilet seats 6 
urinals, 12 wash hand basins .Refurbish 15 
waterborne toilets. Demolish the existing 17 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Machipe) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,335,046 

" 

" 


271 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 

2019/20 

2020/21 2021/22 

dilapidated mobile toilets. Supply 2x10 
000L elevated tanks 







Thulani Primary 

School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 25 new ablution units 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Mandela) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

3,098,331 


- 

Ukuphumulakwesizwe 
Primary School 

Construction of enviro-loo toilets 20 seats, 6 
urinals, 15 wash hand basin. Demolition of 
existing 16 pit toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Alllmansdrift C ) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,578,365 



Velangezwi Primary 
School 

Construction of enviro-loo toilets 15 seats, 5 
urinals, 10 wash hand basin. Demolition of 
existing 24 pit toilets. Refurbish and service 
an existing borehole, supply and installation 
of 2 x 5 0001 water storage tanks & stands. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Siyabuswa) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,145,005 



Vukuzame Secondary Construction of 12 new Enviro loo toilets, 5 
School Urinals demolish 12 existing pit toilets and 

equipping of borehole, and electricity 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein C) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,851,394 

- 

- 

Vukuzenzele 
Secondary School 

Construct 8 enviroloo toilet seats; 5 urinals, 
7 wash hand basins. Refurbish 8 
waterborne Toilets, demolish 6 pit toilets 
and upgrade septic tank, borehole,equiping 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein G) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,697,776 



Sidlasoke Secondary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 14 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Pieterskraal) 

Planned & designed in 
2013/14 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,510,400 

1,233,920 


Thabana Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 14 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Thabana) 

Construction & Final 
Account 

Completion of 
ablutions 

174,960 

174,960 

- 


272 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


2019/20 

2020/21 2021/22 

Magaduzela Primary 
School 

Rehabilitation of existing toilets and 
demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 10 new ablution units 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Kwaggafontein A) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,274,400 

1,041,120 

" 

Makhosana Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 20 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Matshiding) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

796,500 

796,500 

- 

Mhlutshwa Primary 
School 

Demolish pit toilets and construction of 
additional 14 enviroloo toilets. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Verena) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,816,020 

95,580 

- 

Mocha Primary School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 08 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Pankop) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

955,800 

780,840 

- 

Njomane Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 25 new ablution units 
inclusive of Grade R toilets 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Mattysensloop) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,372,000 

1,080,400 


Phanagela Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 14 new ablution units 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein G) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,433,700 

1,171,260 

- 

Phuthumani Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 15 new ablution units 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Thembalethju ) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

174,960 

1,736,640 

- 

Sehoko Primary Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 

School construction of 10 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Sehoko) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,115,100 

910,980 

- 

Sibongile Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construct 12 toilets. 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Dihekeng) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,274,400 

1,041,120 

- 

Siphumule Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 16 new ablution units and a 
borehole 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Sun City) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

955,800 

780,840 



273 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


2019/20 

2020/21 2021/22 

Sizamile Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 25 new ablution units 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Phola) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,230,200 

1,821,960 

- 

Somlingo Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing 12 pit toilets and 
construct 37 toilets. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Verena) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

955,800 

780,840 

- 

Tonteldoos Secondary 
School 

Demolish pit toilets and construction of new 
ablution facilities. 

EmakhazeniLM 

(Tonteldoos) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,513,350 

79,650 

- 

Ukukhanya Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 16 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Allemansdrift C) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

204,120 

2,026,080 

- 

Verena Primary 

School 

Demolish pit toilets and construction of 
additional 15 waterborne toilets. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Verena) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,513,350 

79,650 

- 

Vukile Primary School 

Construction of enviro-loo toilet 15 seats, 5 
urinals, 10 wash hand basin. Demolition of 
existing 18 pit toilets. Installation of new 
borehole and 2 x 5 0001 water storage tank 
& stand 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Leeufontein) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,145,005 

536,251 

- 

Zamani Primary 

School 

Demolishing of existing 08 pit toilets and 
construct 13 toilets. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Tweefontein F) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,270,025 

119,475 

- 

Zamintuthuko Primary Demolishing of existing 14 pit toilets and 
School construct 13 toilets. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
Buhlebesizwe) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,513,350 

79,650 

- 

Zimiseleni Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 10 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Leeufontein) 

Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,967,355 

103,545 

- 

Besilindile Primary 
School 

Construction of additional 19 toilets 

Emalahleni LM 
(KwaGuqa Ext 11) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

285,000 

1,615,000 

- 


274 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Municipality and 

Ward/s 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


2019/20 

2020/21 2021/22 

Jeremia Mdaka 

Primary School 

Construction of additional 20 toilets 

Emalahleni LM 
(KwaGuqa) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

300,000 

1,700,000 

- 

Zamintuthuko Primary Demolishing of existing 14 pit toilets and 
School construct 13 toilets. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
Buhlebesizwe) 

Planning, Design and 
Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,513,350 

79,650 

_ 

Zimiseleni Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 10 new ablution units 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Leeufontein) 

Planning, Design and 
Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

1,967,355 

103,545 

_ 

Zithuthukiseni Primary 
School 

Demolishing of existing pit toilets and 
construction of 12 new ablution units 

Thembisile Hani LM 
Buhlebesizwe) 

Planning, Design and 
Construction in 

2019/20 

Completion of 
ablutions 

2,421,360 

127,440 

_ 

Moloto Primary School 

Construction of additional 29 toilets 

Thembisile Hani LM 
Moloto) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

435,000 

2,465,000 

- 

Mphalali Secondary 
School 

Demolition of 5 existing pit toilets and 
Construction of 10 additional toilets as 
required. 

Thembisile Hani LM 
(Vrisghgevacth) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

" 

1,187,500 

" 

Nelson Ngubeni 
Primary School 

Construction of additional 20 toilets inclusive 
of 8 Grade R toilets 

Emalahleni LM 
(KwaGuqa) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

300,000 

1,700,000 

- 

Nkosiphile Primary 
School 

Construction of additional 17 toilets inclusive 
of 2 Grade R toilets 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Matshiding) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

255,000 

1,445,000 

- 

Phaphamani 

Secondary School 

Construction of additional 22 toilets 

Victor Khanye LM 
(Ext 3) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

330,000 

1,870,000 

- 

Ramokgeletsane 
Primary School 

Construction of additional 19 toilets inclusive 
of 8 Grade R toilets 

Dr JS Moroka LM 
(Ramokgeletsane) 

Planning, design and 
construction 

Completion of 
ablutions 

285,000 

1,615,000 

- 


275 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















Project Name 

Project Description 

Project Location 

Project Status or 
Baseline 

Annual Target 

Medium term Expenditure 

Framework/Budget 


Municipality and 

Ward/s 

2019/20 

2020/21 2021/22 

Sizweni Senior Phase 

Construction of additional 15 toilets 

Thembisile Hani LM 

Planning, design and 

Completion of 

225,000 

1,275,000 

School 


(Thokoza) 

construction 

ablutions 



Ubuhlebethu 

Construction of additional 16 toilets and 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

Planning, design and 

Completion of 

248,100 

1,405,900 

Secondary School 

demolish 12 plain pit toilets 

(Siyabuswa) 

construction 

ablutions 




Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport 


Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 

Allocation (Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 
R’000 

VICTOR 

KHANYE LM 

Rehabilitation: Coal Haul Road P36/1 (R50) from km 62.6 to km 71.7 between Delmas and 
the N12 (9.1 km) 

Delmas 

70% Complete 

82 125 

171 990 

Rehabilitation: Coal Haul Road P36/2 from Delmas to Gauteng boundary (towards Devon 
& Balfour) (13 km) 

Delmas 

100% Complete 

38 935 

122 310 

Rehabilitation: Sinkhole on Coal Haul road P29/1 (R555) ± 6 km from Delmas (2 km ) 

Delmas 

100% Complete 

6 584 

48 256 

Rehabilitation: Coal Haul road P29/1 (R555) from km 50 at D2669 to km 62.55 at D2821 
(near D686 & Kendal) (12.55 km) including Rehabilitation of Sinkhole on P29/1 

Delmas 

55% Complete 

84 639 

132,941 

THEMBISILE LM 

Rehabilitation road P95/1 between Verena and Gauteng Boundary Phase 2 (13.5km) 

Verena 

80% Complete 

82 840 

215 280 

Design: Upgrade D935 from Limpopo boundary past Katjibane to D2740 Nokaneng (9km) 

Katjibane - Nokaneng 

Detailed design 

4 400 

4 400 

DR JS MOROKA 

Upgrade: Rural Access Road D2091 from Marapyane to Limpopo Border (towards 

Settlers) (4.7 km) 

Marapyane 

15% Complete 

32 262 

54,051 


276 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 















































Rehabilitation Coal Haul road P141/1 12.8 D455 South of Clewer to 22.42 km at D1651 

North of Kriel 9.6 km 

Clewer 

60% Complete 

105 726 

184 513 

STEVE TSHWETE LM 

Rehabilitation of Coal haul road P182/1 (R542)from km 26.25 to R38 between van 

Dyksdrift and Hendrina Phase 3 (12.1 km) 

van Dyksdrift - 
Hendrina 

Site 

establishment 

0 

251 180 

Rehabilitation: Coal Haul road P141/1 from km 12.8 (D455) South of Clewer to km 22.42 
at D1651 (North of Kriel) (9.6 km) 

Clewer 

60% Complete 

105 726 

184 513 

Rehabilitation of Coal Haul road P49/1 (Nil) from Montagu street, Middelburg to N4 (4.3 
km) 

Middelburg 

100% Complete 

30 736 

96,553 

Rehabilitation of D2274 from Nil at km 18.7 to D1398 at km 31.7 North of Hendrina (13.0 
km 

Hendrina 

30% Complete 

33 521 

210,600 


Department of Health 


Project/ Programme 

Name / Description 

Project 
Beneficiary / 
Ward/ 

Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 

Allocation 

(Annual) 

R’000 

Total Project Cost 
R’000 

Mammetlhake Hospital 

Phase 1 

Dr JS Moroka 

Alterations and additions to existing Hospital. 

Practical completion achieved. 

8,936 

384,771 

Mammetlhake Hospital 

Phase 2 

Dr JS Moroka 

Alterations and additions to existing Hospital. 

Currently on tender adjudication stage. 

92,636 

211,700 (Estimate) 

Pankop Clinic 

Dr JS Moroka 

Construction of new Clinic and accommodation units including associated external 
works. Construction stage approx. 34% complete. 

27,634 

51,209 

Newtown Clinic 

Steve Tshwete 

Construction of a new Ablution Block and Septic Tank. 

Construction stage, approximately 15% complete. 

584 

584 

Witbank Hospital 

Emalahleni 

Repairs and Refurbishment of EMS station. 

Construction stage with fixing of the roof leaks. 

5,068 

5,068 

Witbank Hospital 

Emalahleni 

(Construction of new Laundry building and Renovation of Mental ward). 

Early planning stage with Laundry and mental as priority. 

14,065 

Early planning 

Middelburg Regional 

Hospital 

Steve Tshwete 

Construction of a new district hospital. 

Construction 15% complete. 

331,783 

1,046,500 


277 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 





























Project/ Programme 

Name / Description 

Project 
Beneficiary / 
Ward/ 

Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 

Allocation 

(Annual) 

R’000 

Total Project Cost 
R’000 

KwaMhlamaga Hospital 

Thembisile Hani 

Master planning, Relocation of Phychiatic (mental) ward, Mertenity ward and sub- 
sioil water investigation, early planning state with master plan being presented 

12 219 



Department of Community Safety, Security and Liason 


Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

Municipality: Emalahleni 

Civilian Oversight: Monitoring & Evaluation 

Monitoring of Police Stations on policy 
compliance 

Witbank 

06 Police Stations monitored on policy 
compliance 

Operational 

Operational 

Kriel 

Vosman 

Ogies 

Verena 

Phola 

Civilian Oversight: Monitoring & Evaluation 

Audits on the implementation of Domestic 
Violence Act (DVA) 

Witbank 

06 Police Stations audited on the 
implementation of Domestic Violence 

Act (DVA) 

Operational 

Operational 

Kriel 

Vosman 

Ogies 

Verena 

Phola 

EDUCATIONAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS 

(03) Gender based violence campaign 

Hlalanikahle , Phola & Coronation 

08 Educational awareness campaigns 
conducted 

R25 000 

R25 000 

(01) Tourism safety campaign 

Witbank 

(01) Liquor traders workshop 

Dunbar 

(01) Sports against crime 

Empumelelweni 


278 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 














































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

(02) Human trafficking campaigns 

Ogies & Kromdraai 




(01) Community Outreach programme 

Klarinet 

(01) Community Outreach programme 
conducted 

R500 000 

R500 000 

Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Safety 

Forum 

Emalahleni 

01 Community Safety Forum assessed 
& supported 

Operational 

Operational 

Assess & support Community Policing 
Forums 

Witbank 

05 Community Policing Forums & 
assessed supported 

R20 000 

R20 000 

Phola 

Ogies 

Vosman 

Kriel 

COMMUNITY POLICE RELATIONS 

Recruit Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) 

Witbank (14) 

14 Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) 
recruited 

R408 576 

R2,432.22 Stipend per TSM 
fora period of 12 months 

R408 576 

TRANSPORT REGULATION 

Safety engineering 

eMalahleni LM 

05 Transport Regulation programmes 
implemented 

Operational 

Operational 

Traffic Law enforcement 

Road safety Education 

Traffic administration and licensing 

Overload control 


Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

Municipality: Steve Tshwete 


Hendrina 


Operational 

Operational 


279 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 















































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

Monitoring of Police Stations on policy 
compliance 

Blinkpan 

04 Police Stations monitored on policy 
compliance 



Mhluzi 

Middelburg 

Audits on the implementation of Domestic 
Violence Act (DVA) 

Hendrina 

04 Police Stations audited on the 
implementation of Domestic Violence Act 
(DVA) 

Operational 

Operational 

Blinkpan 

Mhluzi 

Middelburg 

EDUCATIONAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS 

(01) Gender based violence campaign 

Mapimpana 

01 Educational awareness campaign 
conducted 

R4 000 

R4 000 

Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Safety Forum 

Steve Tshwete 

01 Community Policing Forum 
assessed & supported 

Operational 

Operational 

Steve Tshwete: Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Policing Forums 

Middleburg 

04 Community Policing Forums & 
assessed supported 

R7 000 

R7 000 

Blinkpan 

Hendrina 

Mhluzi 

COMMUNITY POLICE RELATIONS 

Recruit Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) 

Middleburg (13) 

13 Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) 
recruited 

R379 392 

R2,432.22 Stipend per TSM 
fora period of 12 months 

R379 392 

TRANSPORT REGULATION 

Safety engineering 

Steve Tshwete LM 

05 Transport Regulation programmes 
implemented 

Operational 

Operational 

Traffic Law enforcement 

Road safety Education 


280 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 

















































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

Traffic administration and licensing 





Overload control 


Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

NKANGALA REGION 

Municipality: Thembisile Hani 

Monitoring of Police Stations on policy 
compliance 

Tweefontein 

04 Police Stations monitored 
on policy compliance 

Operational 

Operational 

Kwaggafontein 

Vaalbank 

Kwamhlanga 

Audits on the implementation of Domestic 
Violence Act (DVA) 

Tweefontein 

04 Police Stations audited on 
the implementation of 

Domestic Violence Act (DVA) 

Operational 

Operational 

Kwaggafontein 

Vaalbank 

Kwamhlanga 

EDUCATIONAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS 

(01) Liquor traders workshop 

Sun City 

05 Educational awareness 

R20 000 

R20 000 

(02) Gender based violence campaign 

Mandela& Sheldon 

campaigns conducted 

(01) Anti-Stock theft campaign 

Wolvenkop 


(01) Sport against crime 

Luthuli 


Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Safety Forum 

Thembisile Hani Municiaplity 

01 Community Safety Forum 
assessed & supported 

Operational 

Operational 

Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Safety Forum 

Thembisile Hani Municiaplity 

01 Community Safety Forum 
assessed & supported 

Operational 

Operational 


281 IP a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 



















































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

Assess & support Community Policing Forums 

KwaMhlanga 

04 Community Policing 

Forums assessed & 
supported 

R5 000 

R5 000 

Vaalbank 

Tweefontein 

Kwaggafontein 

COMMUNITY POLICE RELATIONS 

Recruit Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) 

Kwamhlanga (18) 

18 Tourism Safety Monitors 
(TSMs) recruited 

R525 312 

R2, 432.22 Stipend 
per TSM for a period 
of 12 months 

R525 312 

TRANSPORT REGULATION 

Safety engineering 

Thembisile Hani 

LM 

05 Transport Regulation 
programmes implemented 

Operational 

Operational 

Traffic Law enforcement 

Road safety Education 

Traffic administration and licensing 

Overload control 


Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

Municipality: Victor Khanye 

CIVILIAN OVERSIGHT: MONITORING & EVALUATION 

Monitoring of Police Stations on policy 
compliance 

Sundra 

02 Police Stations monitored on policy 
compliance 

Operational 

Operational 

Delmas 

Audits on the implementation of 

Domestic Violence Act (DVA) 

Sundra 

02 Police Stations audited on the 
implementation of Domestic Violence Act (DVA) 

Operational 

Operational 

Delmas 


282 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 












































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

EDUCATIONAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS 

(01) sports against crime 

Delmas 

01 Educational awareness campaign 
conducted 

R10 00 

R10 000 

Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Safety 

Forum 

Victor Khanye 

01 Community Safety Forum assessed & 
supported 

Operational 

Operational 

Assess & support Community Policing 
Forums 

Sundra 

02 Community Police Forums assessed & 
supported 

R4 000 

R4 000 

Delmas 



Municipality: Victor Khanye 

TRANSPORT REGULATION 

Safety engineering 

Victor Khanye LM 

Operational 

Operational 

Operational 

Traffic Law enforcement 





Road safety Education 





Traffic administration and licensing & 





• Overload control 





CIVILIAN OVERSIGHT: MONITORING & EVALUATION 

Monitoring of Police Stations on policy 
compliance 

Mmametlhake 

02 Police Stations monitored on policy 
compliance 

Operational 

Operational 


Siyabuswa 




Audits on the implementation of 

Domestic Violence Act (DVA 

Mmametlhake 

02 Police Stations audited on the 
implementation of Domestic Violence Act (DVA) 

Operational 

Operational 

Siyabuswa 



Municipality: Dr JS Moroka 


283 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 










































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

EDUCATIONAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS 

(01) Anti Stock theft workshop 

Marapyane 

02 Educational awareness campaigns 
conducted 

R6 000 

R6 000 

(01) Liquor traders workshop 

Siyabuswa 

Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Safety 

Forum 

Dr JS Moroka 

01 Community Safety Forum assessed & 
supported 

Operational 

Operational 

Assess & support Community Policing 
Forums 

Siyabuswa 

Mmamethlake 

02 Community Police Forums assessed & 
supported 

R4 000 

R4 000 

Municipality: Dr JS Moroka 

COMMUNITY POLICE RELATIONS 

Recruit Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) 

Siyabuswa (17) 

Vaalbank (13) 

30 Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) recruited 

R875 520 

R2,432.22 Stipend per 
TSM fora period of 12 
months 

R 875 520 

TRANSPORT REGULATION 

• Safety engineering 

• Traffic Law enforcement 

• Road safety Education 

• Traffic administration 
and licensing 

• Overload control 

Dr JS Moroka LM 

05 Transport Regulation programmes 
implemented 

Operational 

Operational 

Municipality: Emakhazeni 

CIVILIAN OVERSIGHT: MONITORING & EVALUATION 


284 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 










































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 

Monitoring of Police Stations on policy 
compliance 

Belfast 

04 Police Stations monitored on policy 
compliance 

Operational 

Operational 

Machadodorp 

Watervalboven 

Dullstroom 

Audits on the implementation of 

Domestic Violence Act (DVA) 

Belfast 

04 Police Stations audited on the 
implementation of Domestic Violence Act (DVA) 

Operational 

Operational 

Machadodorp 

Watervalboven 

Dullstroom 

Municipality: Emakhazeni 

EDUCATIONAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS 

(01) Tourism safety campaign 

Dullstroom 

03 Educational awareness campaigns 
conducted 

R7 000 

R7 000 

(01) sports against crime 

Machadodorp 

(01) Tourism safety campaign 

Zasm Tunnel 

Community Police Relations 

Assess & support Community Safety 

Forum 

Emakhazeni 

01 Community Safety Forum assessed 

Operational 

Operational 

Assess & support Community Policing 
Forums 

Machadodorp 

03 Community Police Forum assessed 

R15 000 

R15 000 

Dullstroom 

WatervalBoven 

Municipality: Emakhazeni 

COMMUNITY POLICE RELATIONS 

Recruit Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) 

Dullstroom (11) 

21 Tourism Safety Monitors (TSMs) recruited 

R612 864 

R612 864 

Watervalboven (10) 


285 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 









































Project/Programme Name 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/ Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 
Allocation (Annual) 
R’000 

Total project cost R’000 




R2,432.22 Stipend per 
TSM fora period of 12 
months 


TRANSPORT REGULATION 

• Safety engineering 

• Traffic Law enforcement 

• Road safety Education 

• Traffic administration 
and licensing 

• Overload control 

Emakhazeni LM 

05 Transport Regulation programmes 
implemented 

Operational 

Operational 


Department of Culture Sports and Recreation 


Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 

Allocation (Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

NEW LIBRARIES UNDER CONSTRUCTION DUE FOR COMPLETION IN 2020/21 

Steve Tshwete 

Newtown 

Learners, educators and the community 

10% completion 

R1 500 

R16 500 

NEW LIBRARIES AT PLENARY STAGE FOR CONSTRUCTION IN 2020/21 

Dr JS Moroka 

Mmamethlake 

Learners, educators and the community 

Planning phase 
completed 

R500 

R16 500 

Emalahleni 

Emalahleni 

Learners, educators and the community 

Planning phase 
completed 

R500 

R16 500 

EXISTING LIBRARIES UPGRADED 

Emalahleni 

Emalahleni main 

Learners, educators and the community 

80% completion 

R4 000 

R34 095 

MUNICIPAL LIBRARIES MAINTAINED 


286 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 
















































Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget 

Allocation (Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

Victor Khanye 

Sundra 

Learners, educators and the community 

100% maintenance 
completion 

R800 

R800 

Emalahleni 

Ogies 

Learners, educators and the community 

100% maintenance 
completion 

R800 

R800 

17. Emalahleni 

Lynnville 

Learners, educators and the community 

100% maintenance 
completion 

R800 

R800 

MULTI -YEAR PROJECTS 

20. Emakhazeni 

High Altitude 

Training Center 

Athletes, Coaches, technical officials, 
administrators, managers and 
communities 

TA approvals on the PPP 
framework stages of the 
High Altitude acquired to 
solicit private investor 

R27 692 

R5 100 000 


Departmentof Energy 


Municipality 

Project/Programme 

Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

Emalahleni 

Electrification of Phola OBM 

Ward 31&28 

357 

R 5 796 822,00 

R 5 796 822,00 

Emalahleni 

Empumelelweni Extensions 

Ward 3,23&29 

486 

R 7 873 200,00 

R 7 873 200,00 

Emalahleni 

Electrification of Siyanqoba 

Ward 12&15 

700 

R 11 340 000,00 

R 11 340 000,00 

Emalahleni 

SiyanqobaBulk substation Phase 3 

Ward 12 

8 km line 

Control room structure 

R10 000 000,00 

R66,000,000 

Emalahleni 

Total 


1543 

R35,000,000.00 


Steve Tshwete 

Kwazamokuhle 11 kV Switching 

Station 

Ward 2 

Switching Station 

R8,000,000.00 

R9,000,000 

Steve Tshwete 

Total 


0 

R8,000,000.00 



287 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 
































Emakhazeni 

132/11kV,20MVA,Belfast Substation 
New intake Phase 2 

Ward 8 

132kv switchyard 

RIO,000,000.00 

R60,000,000 

Emakhazeni 

Total 


0 

R10,000,000.00 


Dr J S Moroka 


Wardl 

211 

R3,500,000.00 

R3,500,000 

Dr J S Moroka 

Total 


211 

R3,500,000.00 



Department of Rural Development and Land Reform 


Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

DIRECETORATE: REID 

Number of new Agricultural enterprises supported in the 44 priority districts aligned to Agri-parks 

Marapyane vegetable - Supply and delivery of vegetable production inputs 

Dr J S Moroka 

4 

R1 500 000 

Sybrandskraal beef production - supply and delivery of beef livestock 

Thembisile Hani 


R2 500 000 

Kranspoort Beef production - Supply and delivery of Beef production 

Steve Tshwete 


R2 500 000 

Livestock improvement for farmers supported with AVMP infrastructure in JS Moroka 

Dr J S Moroka 


R2 500 000 

Number of existing Agricultural enterprises supported in the 44 priority districts 

Sybranskraal FPSU Mechanization, Grain Production & 10 Vegetables Projects 

Thembisile Hani 

3 

R2 650 000 

Kameelrivier FPSU Mechanization ,07 Grain Projects & 08 Vegetables Projects 

Dr Js Moroka 


R2 000 000 

Nkangala Art and Craft 

Thembisile Hani & Dr J S Moroka 

3 

R 2 000 000 

Number of existing non- agricultural enterprises supported in the 44 priority district 

Dr Js Moroka Art and Graft-Thenjiwe Bead Work Primary Cooperative 

Dr J S Moroka 

2 

R100 000 

Thembisile Hani Arts & Craft-Batizi Primary Cooperative 

Thembisile Hani 


R100 000 


288 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 














































Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 

Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

DIRECTORATE: STRATEGIC LAND ACQUISITION 

Number of hectares acquired through ALHA 

Ptn 8 ( Remaining extent) of the farm Klippoort 277 JS 

Nkangala 

3 831 

R 3,575,000.00 

Ptn 13 of the farm Suikerboschkop 278 JS 

Emakhazeni 


R 4,000,000.00 

Ptn 14 of the farm Rietfontein 365 JT 

Nkangala 


R 650,000.00 

Ptn 10 of the farm Schoonwater 374 JT 

Nkangala 


R 4,000,000.00 

Ptn 7 (Remaining extent) of the farm Rietvlei 375 JT 

Emakhazeni 


R 3,500,000.00 

Portion 0 (Remaining Extent) of the farm De Roodekop 350 JS 

Nkangala 


R6 000 000.00 

Portion 27 of the farm Waaikraal 385 JT 

Emakhazeni 


N/A 

Portion 27 (A Portion of Portion 9) of the farm Woestallen 477 JS 

Nkangala 


R100 000.00 

Portion 18 of the farm Olifantsfontein 196 IR 

Nkangala 


R50 000 000.00 

Portion 3 of the farm Onverwacht 99 JT 

Nkangala 


R5 600 000.00 

Portion of the farm Winnaarspoort 350 JT 

Nkangala 


R4 300 000.00 

. Portion 1 (Remaining extent) Portion 3,10,11,12 & 17 of the farm Kliprivier 341 JS 

Nkangala 

3831 

R100,291,400 

Portion 0 (Remaining Extent) & Portion 11 of the farm Katboschfontein 22 IR 

Nkangala 


R 82,000,000 

Portion 10,11 & 23 of the farm Kaalbooi 368 JT 

Nkangala 


R9 165 000 

Portion 1 of the farm of the farm Hooggenoeg 205 JS, Portion 2 

Nkangala 


R49 045 929 

Portion 2 and Portion 10 of the farm Steynsplaats 360 JT and Portion 3,5,13 of the farm 
Hartebeestespruit 361 JT 

Emakhazeni 


R23 005 000 


289 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 












































Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Portion 1 and Portion 16 (Remaining Extent) of the farm Langkloof 356 JT 

Nkangala 


R 9,100,000 

Portion 0 of the farm Bospoort 1208 JS, Portion 2 (Remaining Extent) of the farm Klipfontein 
385 JS & Portion 0 of the farm By Rietvally 384 JS 

Nkangala 

3831 

30 000 000.00 

Number of hectares acquired through partnerships with Private sector/financial institutions 

Portion 18 of the farm Olifantsfontein 196 IR 

Nkangala 

700 

R50 000 000.00 

Number of pilot farms acquired and allocated to support ALDRI initiative 

Ptn 13 of the farm Suikerboschkop 278 JS 

Nkangala 

3 

4,000,000 

Ptn 7 (Remaining extent) of the farm Rietvlei 375 JT 

Nkangala 


3,500,000 

Ptn 8 (Remaining extent) of the farm Klippoort 277 JS 

Nkangala 


3,575,000 

STRATEGIC LAND ACQUISITION 

Number of farm development support through ALHA 

Kleinwater/Moniwa 

Nkangala 

16 

44 762 141 

Waaikraal/Thokoza 

Nkangala 



Schoonoord 

Nkangala 



Klippoort 

Nkangala 



Welgeluk 

Nkangala 



Leeukloof 

Nkangala 



Lakenvallei 

Nkangala 



Klipspruit 

Nkangala 




290 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 






































Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Doornrug 

Nkangala 



Elandspruit 

Nkangala 

Number of farm development support through Households (HH) 


Number of restitution farms supported through post settlement support 

Doornkop CPA 

Nkangala 

8 

R 84 441 707 

Borehole CPA 

Nkangala 

Somphalali CPA 

Nkangala 

Shonanyawo CPA 

Nkangala 

Number of Households supported through ALHA 



Hartebeestspruit farm dwellers 

Nkangala 

60 

2 000 000 

Number of Households supported through HH 

1 hh/bakgatla ba mmakau coop mp 

Nkangala 

367 

R 1 400 000 

1 hh/lahlamohlako cooperative mp 

Nkangala 

R 1 226 275 

1 hh/pankop cooperative mp 

Nkangala 

R 2 147 275 

Lr/hlanganisi inqfondo pty mp 

Nkangala 

R 3 422 457 

Lr/qedindlala emasimini coop mp 

Nkangala 

R 1 150 692 

Lr/triple b cooperative mp 

Nkangala 

R 808 012 

Lr/zamelani ukusebenza coop mp 

Nkangala 

R 922 457 


291 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 






































Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 





Phake thabeng agric coop 

Nkangala 


R 2 000 000 

Thembisile cooperative 

Nkangala 


R 3 000 000 

Number of Recapitalisation and Development commitments finalised 

Khethile cooperative 

Nkangala 

5 

R 1 200 000 

Thembisile Commonage 

Nkangala 


R 2 000 000 

Rietvallei 

Nkangala 


R 3 703 050 

Number of One Household One-hectare commitment finalised 

Lahlamohlako 

Nkangala 

8 

R 21 011 592 

Mocha 

Nkangala 



Bakgatla Ba Mmaka 

Nkangala 



Pankop 

Nkangala 



Qedindlala 

Nkangala 



Tripple B 

Nkangala 



Zamelani Ukusebenza 

Nkangala 



Hlanganisi ngcondo 

Nkangala 



DIRECTORATE: TENURE SYSTEMS IMPLEMENTATION 

Number of hectares allocated to farmer’s dwellers/labour tenant 


292 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 




































Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary/ 
Ward/Location 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Portion 0 (Remaining Extent) of the farm De Roodekop 350 JS 

Nkangala 

1000 

R6 000 000 

Portion 27 (A Portion of Portion 9) of the farm Woestallen 477 JS 

Nkangala 

R100 000 

Portion of the farm Winnaarspoort 350 JT 

Nkangala 

R4 300 000 

Portion 29, 34, 35, 36 (remaining extend) & 40 of the farm Paarderplaats 380 JT 

Nkangala 

R2 900 000 

Portion 17 (a portion of portion 6)of the farm Zwartkoppies 316 JT 

Nkangala 

R1 000 000 

Portion 4 of the farm Kareekraal 135 JT 

Nkangala 

R3 612 000 

ortion 3 of the farm Elanshoek 100 JT 

Nkangala 


R2 300 000 

Portion 6(RE) and Portion 7 of farm Waaikraal 385 JT 

Nkangala 


R9 840 000 


Department of Wter and Sanitation 


Project/Programme Name/Description 

Project Beneficiary 

2019/20 Target 

2019/20 Budget Allocation 
(Annual) R’000 

Total project cost 

R’000 

Loskop Bulk Water Supply Project 

Bulk water abstraction from Loskop dam, construction of 20MI/d 
treatment module, 50km bulk pipeline, and storage reservoir. 

Thembisile Hani 

Local Municipality 

Project Planning: Implementation 
Readiness Study 

100 000 

700 000 

WSIG -emalahleni 

Emalahleni Local 
Municipality 

Phase 1 and 2 of Wtbank WTW 
project under construction 

35 000 

35 000 

Rust de Winter Bulk Water Supply Project: 

Abstraction from Rust De Winter Dam, 10 Megalitres per day Water 
Treatment Works (WTW) 

Dr JS Moroka Local 
Municipality 

Planning: Implementation 

Readiness Study 

10 000 



293 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP 




























Delmas Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Upgrade Delmas sewer treatment plant from 5 megalitres to 12 
megalitres per day. 

Victor Khanye Local 
Municipality 

Implementation is subject to Victor 
Khanye LM providing confirmation 
of counter funding. The 

Municipality expected to provide 
R63m as economic contribution to 
the project. 

30 000 

126 000 


Mhluzi 


20 600 

20 600 

WSIG- Steve Tshwete 

Kwazamathole 


1 300 

1 300 


Kwazamathole x6 


8 100 

8 100 


294 I P a g e 


Nkangala District Municipality 


2019/20 IDP