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MASTER 

NEGATIVE 
NO.94-82141-14 


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Author: 


National  broadcasting 
company,  inc. 

Title: 

35  hours  a  day! 


Place: 


[New  York] 


Date: 


[1 937] 


q^ -"82141 -14 


COLUMBIA  UNIVERSITY  LIBRARIES 
PRESERVATION  DIVISION 

BIBLIOGRAPHIC  MICROFORM  TARGET 


MASTER   NEGATIVE   « 


ORIGINAL  MATERIAL  AS  FILMED  -    ZXISTING  BIBLIOGRAPHIC  RECORD 


BUSINESS 

263.3 
N2133 


National  broadcasting  company,  inc. 

35  hours  a  day!  . . .  ^New  Yorkj  National  broad- 
casting company,  inc.,  cl937. 

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VERY  day  in  the  year,  each  of  two  great 
coast-to-coast    networks  — NBC    Blue    and 
NBC   Red  — fill   171^  hours  with  the  world's 
most   complete   schedule  of  all-star-studded 
entertainment,  up-to-the-minute   news,  and 
informative   educational    features,   a    total   of 
I  2,8  10  hours  during  1936  (5  1,000  programs). 
Nor  does  this  include  all  the  network  program 
production  time,  for  hours  and  programs  vary 
in  the  different  zones.  The  overall  minimum 
average  for  each  of  the  networks  is  17  j/^  hours. 
35  hours  a  day  devoted  to  giving  24,000,000 
radio  families  the  greatest  number  of  the  most 
popular  programs  — free  for  the  tuning. 

NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY 

zA  T^dio  (orporation  of  ^America  Service 


Copyright.  1937.  National  Broadcasting  Company.  Inc.  Lithographed  in  U.S.A. 


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Three  hundred  and  sixty-five  days  a  year,  your  radio  is  awake 
from  early  morning  into  the  small  hours.  At  finger-touch,  it 
brings  entertainment,  information,  inspiration.  This  book  tells 
a  little  of  what  lies  behind. 


^TpHE  National  Broadcasting  Company 
^  thinks  in  terms  of  a  "program-day," 
made  up  of  what  may  be  heard  hour  by 
hour  over  117  stations  on  two  NBC  net- 
works; a  total  of  more  than  fifty  thousand 
individual  programs  yearly.  These  pages 
suggest  the  scope  and  diversity  of  NBC 
broadcast  service  to  the  nation. 

•  •  • 

The  pattern  of  the  NBC  program-day  is 
woven  from  endless  aspects  of  all  the  things 
that  interest  people.  Events,  science,  educa- 
tion, religion,  art  are  reflected  in  the  daily 
program  array.  Music  in  its  every  expres- 
sion, discussion  of  topics  grave  or  gay, 
drama  that  brings  smiles  or  tears,  news  from 
around  the  corner  or  across  the  seas — to 
achieve  this  daily  broadcast  presentation, 
thousands  plan  for  the  millions  who  listen. 

«  •  • 

Nothing  can  be  left  to  chance.  Features  to 
fill  each  unit  of  air  time  must  be  thought- 


fully conceived  and  diligently  executed.  Pro- 
gram chiefs  and  their  lieutenants,  musical 
supervisors  and  directors,  production  man- 
agers, continuity  writers,  engineers  and 
technical  experts  who  order  the  amazing 
mechanism  of  the  ether  waves — these  and 
many  more  join  to  build  and  disseminate 
the  NBC  radio  contribution. 

•  •  • 

And  back  of  this  planning  and  performance 
operate  the  knowledge  and  experience  of  the 
Radio  Corporation  of  America — first  in 
radio  in  the  United  States;  radio  leader  the 
world  over.  For  besides  its  own  facilities, 
NBC  as  "A  Radio  Corporation  of  America 
Service"  has  at  its  command  the  research 
and  manufacturing  resources  and  the  globe- 
ranging  communications  of  RCA. 

•  «  • 

So  here  is  a  glimpse  across  the  NBC  pro- 
gram parade  of  thirty-five  hours  a  day — 
three  hundred  and  sixty-five  days  a  year! 


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Three  hundred  and  sixty-five  days  a  year,  your  radio  is  awake 
from  early  morning  into  the  small  hours.  At  finger-touch,  it 
brings  entertainment,  information,  inspiration.  This  book  tells 
a  little  of  what  lies  behind. 


nr^HE  National  Broadcasting  Company 
^  thinks  in  terms  ot  a  "program-day," 
made  up  ot  what  may  he  heard  hour  hy 
hour  over  117  stations  on  two  NBC  net- 
works; a  total  of  more  than  fifty  thousand 
individual  programs  yearly.  'I'hese  pages 
suggest  the  scope  and  diversity  of  NBC 
broadcast  service  to  the  nation. 

The  pattern  of  the  NBC  program-day  is 
woven  from  endless  aspects  of  all  the  things 
that  interest  people.  Events,  science,  educa- 
tion, religion,  art  are  reflected  in  the  daily 
program  array.  Music  in  its  every  expres- 
sion, discussion  of  topics  grave  or  gay, 
drama  that  brings  smiles  or  tears,  news  from 
around  the  corner  or  across  the  seas — to 
achieve  this  daily  broadcast  presentation, 
thousands  plan  for  the  millions  who  listen. 

Nothing  can  be  left  to  chance.  Features  to 
fill  each  unit  of  air  time  must  be  thought- 


fully conceived  and  tliligentl\-  executed.  IVo- 
gram  chiefs  and  their  lieutenants,  !nusical 
supervisors  ami  directors,  proiiuction  man- 
agers, continuity  writers,  engineers  and 
technical  experts  who  order  the  amazing 
mechanism  of  the  ether  waves  these  and 
many  more  join  to  build  and  disseminate 
the  NBC  radio  contribution. 

And  back  of  this  planning  and  performance 
operate  the  knowledge  and  experience  of  tlie 
Radio  Corporation  of  America  rirst  m 
radio  in  the  United  States;  radio  leader  the 
world  over.  For  besides  its  own  facilities, 
NBC  as  "A  Radio  Corporation  u{  America 
Service"  has  at  its  command  the  research 
and  manufacturing  resources  ami  the  globe- 
ranging  communications  of  RCA. 

So  here  is  a  glimpse  across  the  NBC  pro- 
gram parade  of  thirty-five  hours  a  day  - 
three  hundred  and  sixtv-five  da\  s  a  \  earl 


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WHEN  the  command  "Up  Ship!"  sent  the  Zeppelin 
"Hindenburg,"  world's  largest  airship,  soaring  skyward 
in  Germany  on  its  first  voyage  to  the  United  States,  NBC 
was  the  only  American  radio  organization  represented  on 
board.  Like  the  initial  flight  of  the  "China  Clipper"  and  the 
U.  S.  Army-National  Geographic  Society  Stratosphere 
Flight  (both  events  also  covered  exclusively  by  NBC),  this 
voyage  marked  another  milestone  in  aviation — the  inaugu- 
ration of  regular  airship  service  from  Germany  to  the  United 
States.  Ort/y  NBC  was  there! 


NBC's  Mobile  Unit  was  on  the  job  {above  and  left)  to  bring  first  greet- 
ings from  officers  and  passengers  to  American  listeners  as  the  "Hin- 
denburg" landed  at  Lakehurst,  N.  J.  {At  right)  Dr.  Hugo  Eckener, 
pioneer  in  Zeppelin  transportation  and  construction,  is  mobbed  for 
an  interview  by  reporters  at  Lakehurst. 


»? 


J 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


As  the  "Hindenburft"  roared  over  the  Atlantic, 
NBC  broadcast  regular  programs,  including  a 
piano  concert  from  mid-ocean,  under  direc- 
tion of  Max  Jordan,  NBC's  Continental  Euro- 
pean representative  (abave). 


Ill 


>' 


TT7HEN  the  command  "ITp  Ship!"  sent  the  Zeppelin 
▼  ▼  "Hindenhurg,"  world's  largest  airship,  soaring  skyward 
in  (iermany  on  its  first  voyage  to  the  United  States,  NBC 
was  the  only  American  radio  organization  represented  on 
board.  Like  the  initial  fiight  of  the  "China  Clipper"  and  the 
U.  S.  Army-National  (Geographic  Society  Stratosphere 
Flight  (both  events  also  covered  exclusively  by  NBC),  this 
voyage  marked  another  milestone  in  aviation — the  inaugu- 
ration of  regular  airship  service  from  (iermany  to  the  United 
States.  On/y  NBC  was  there! 


NBC's  Mobile  Unit  was  on  the  ioh  {above  and  left)  to  bring  first  greet- 
ings from  officers  and  passengers  to  American  listeners  as  the  "liin- 
denburg"  landed  at  I.akehurst,  N.  J.  {At  right)  Dr.  Hugo  Eckener, 
pioneer  in  Zeppelin  transportation  and  construction,  is  mobbed  for 
an  interview  by  reporters  at  Lakehurst. 


^^ 


"Ears"  at  the  Opera  for  millions  of  radio 
listeners — microphones  in  the  footlights  and 
high  up  in  the  proscenium  catch  every  note  of 
artist  and  orchestra  while  the  NBC  produc- 
tion man  follows  the  score  and  signals  the  en- 
gineer for  a  change  in  volume. 


From  the  famous  sound-proofed  Box  44  in  the 
Golden  Horseshoe  at  the  Metropolitan,  Marcia 
Davenport,  NBC's  opera  commentator,  and 
Milton  Cross,  NBC  announcer,  discuss  the 
music  and  action  of  each  broadcast  opera. 


EVERY  Saturday  afternoon  millions  of  listen- 
ers tune  their  radios  to  their  local  NBC  sta- 
tions for  three  full  hours  of  the  world's  finest  mu- 
sic. The  pinnacle  of  opera  performances  direct 
from  the  stage  of  New  York's  famed  Metropolitan 
Opera  House  comes  to  them  only  through  NBC. 
.  .  .  For  the  past  six  years  the  National  Broadcast- 
ing Company  alone  has  brought  its  listeners  this 
glittering  parade  of  the  world's  outstanding 
voices  in  masterful  music  brilliantly  presented. 

In  its  present  season,  the  Opera  is  sponsored  by 
the  Radio  Corporation  of  America.  In  addition, 
the  Metropolitan  Opera  Auditions  under  the 
direction  of  Edward  Johnson  are  presented  exclu- 
sively for  NBC  audiences  on  Sunday,  sponsored 
by  Sherwin-Williams  Company. 


NBC's  technical  broadcast  "maestros"  at  the 
Opera — production  men  and  engineer — bal- 
ance and  blend  the  music  volume  of  singer* 
and  orchestra  to  bring  perfect  reception  to 
NBC  Blue  Network  listeners. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


"Ears"  at  the  Opera  for  millions  of  radio 
listeners — microphones  in  the  footlights  and 
hifth  up  in  the  proscenium  catch  every  note  of 
artist  and  orchestra  while  the  \RC  produc- 
tion man  follows  the  score  and  signals  the  en- 
gineer for  a  change  in  volume. 


From  the  famous  sound-proofed  Box  44  in  the 
Golden  Horseshoe  at  the  Metropolitan,  Marcia 
Davenport,  NBC's  opera  commentator,  and 
Milton  Cross,  NBC  announcer,  discuss  the 
music  and  action  of  each  broadcast  opera. 


I  VERY  Saturday  afternoon  millions  of  listen- 
ers tune  their  radios  to  their  local  NBC  sta- 
tions for  three  full  hours  of  the  world's  finest  mu- 
sic. The  pinnacle  of  opera  performances  direct 
from  the  stage  (jf  Xew  "York's  famed  Metropolitan 
Opera  House  comes  to  them  only  through  NBC. 
.  .  .  Vor  the  jKist  six  years  the  National  Broadcast- 
ing Company  alone  has  brought  its  listeners  this 
glittering  parade  of  the  world's  outstanding 
voices  in  masterful  music  brilliantly  presented. 

In  its  present  season,  the  Opera  is  sponsored  by 
the  Radio  Corporation  of  America.  In  addition, 
the  Metrojiolitan  Opera  Auditions  under  the 
direction  of  Kdward  Johnson  are  presented  exclu- 
sively for  NBC  audiences  on  Sunday,  sponsored 
by  Sherwin-Williams  Company. 


NBC's  technical  broadcast  "maestros"  at  the 
Opera — production  men  and  engineer — bal- 
ance and  blend  the  music  volume  of  singers 
and  orchestra  to  bring  perfect  reception  to 
NBC  Blue  Network  listeners. 


'%  s 


Fred  Astaire  {Packard) 


om 


Ed  Wynn 

{Spud  Cigarettes) 


Charles  Butterworth  {Packard) 
Amos  'n'  Andy  {Pepsodent) 


Joe  Cook ' 
{Shell  Oil) 


N 


y 


{In  make-up) 


L 


"Bea"  Lillie  (Dr.  Lyort's) 


Bob  Bums  and  his 
"bazooka"  {Kraft) 


ACCORDING  to  our  mythical  "laugh- 
'  meter, "more  titters,  chuckles,  chortles, 
and  downright  "belly-laughs"  were  broad- 
cast over  NBC  Blue  and  Red  Networks 
during  1936  than  ever  before.  Old  favorites 
returned  with  new  gags  that  loosed  gales  of 
guffaws.  Newcomers  endeared  themselves  to 
audiences  with  new  slants  on  the  ridiculous. 
Comedy  singles,  duos,  and  full  stage  pro- 
ductions drew  talent — and  names — from 
every  corner  of  the  country  as  wise-cracks, 
gimmicks  and  nifties  were  quoted  and  re- 
quoted  wherever  men  gathered  and  women 
chatted.  Here  are  a  few  of  your  favorites. 
Can  you  fit  their  gags  to  their  faces? 

Lum  and  Abner  {Horlick's) 


i/     ^ 


{In  make-up) 


'    ^ 


Mr.  &  Mrs.  Goodman  Ace 
(Easy  Aces)(i4niicin; 

{Lejt)  Colonel  Stoopnagle  and  Budd 
{Minute  Tapioca) 

Honeyboy  and  Sassafras  {NBC) 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


lv'3 


Fred  Astaire  [Packard) 


1 


/rir 


1 

\ 

311      . 1 
C 

F.d  Wynn 

[Spud  Cigarettes) 


N«v 


Charles  Butterworth  (Packard) 
Amos  'n'  Andy    Pepsodent) 


Joe  Cook 
{Shell  Oil) 


m 


^\ 


Bea"  Lillie  (Dr.  Lyon's) 


Bob  Burns  and  his 
"bazooka"  (Kraft) 


C COR  DING  to  our  mythical  "laugh- 
i  1.  meter, "more  titters,  chuckles,  chortles, 
ami  downright  "belly-laughs"  were  broad- 
cast over  NBC  Blue  and  Red  Networks 
during  I9.>6  than  ever  before.  Old  favorites 
returned  with  new  gags  that  loosed  gales  of 
guffaws.  Newcomers  endeared  themselves  to 
audiences  with  new  slants  on  the  ridiculous. 
C^omedy  singles,  duos,  and  full  stage  pro- 
ductions drew  talent — and  names — from 
every  corner  ot  the  country  as  wise-cracks, 
gimmicks  ami  nifties  were  quoted  and  re- 
quoted  wherever  men  gathered  and  women 
chatted.  Here  are  a  few  of  your  favorites. 
Can   you  fit  their  gags   to   their  faces? 

Lum  and  Abner  (Hor lick's) 


{/      ^ 


y 


T*^y 


y 


{In  make-up) 


[In  make-up) 


1  O^/C  set  an  all-time  high  for  outstanding  NBC 
A  >^*JvJ  sport  broadcasts — 34%  greater  than  1935 — 
350  hours  of  broadcast  time  devoted  to  special  sports  and 
sports  topics.  Football,  baseball,  boxing,  racing,  golf,  ten- 
nis, track — amateur  and  professional — NBC  was  there! 
Two  of  the  most  discussed  sports  events  of  the  year — the 
Rose  Bowl  football  game  at  Pasadena  and  the  Louis- 
Schmeling  fight — were  NBC  exclusives! 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


^ffBSFirWf' 


llfn  'im    "— •      ■■■    — 


IT 


STANFORD  T-SOITIIKRN  MF.THODIST  0 
Paulman.  Stanford  quarterback,  scores  the 
winning  touchdown.  100,000  fans  from  far 
and  near  jammed  the  Rose  Bowl  (above) 
to  catch  this  thrilling  moment;  NBC  listen- 
ers "saw"  it  from  easy  chairs. 


I/A'^X.set  an  all-time  high  for  oursranding  \BC 
.X*^Jv/ sport  broadcasts  ,>4^  ,  greater  than  19^,5  — 
^^50  hours  of  broadcast  time  devoted  to  special  sports  and 
sports  topics.  Football,  baseball,  boxing,  racing,  golf,  ten- 
nis, track — amateur  antl  professional  NIK'  was  there! 
Two  of  the  most  discussei.1  sports  events  of  the  year  -the 
Rose  Bowl  football  game  at  Pasadena  and  the  Louis- 
Schmeling  hght — were  XHC  exclusi\es! 


Ihrou 


gh  NBC—exc/mive/y 


T 


OWN  meetin*  tonight!  Town  meetin'  tonight!" 
As  the  Town  Crier's  call  fades,  "America's  Town 
Meeting"  is  on  the  air.  Under  the  auspices  of  the 
League  for  Political  Education,  distinguished  authori- 
ties of  opposing  viewpoints  present  subjects  of  na- 
tional significance,  with  the  audience  participating — 
a  real  town  meeting,  voted  1936's  best  educational 
program  by  the  Women's  National  Radio  Committee. 


c 


Men  and  women  alike  present  their  view- 
points at  "America's  Town  Meeting" — and 
good-naturedly  answer  the  sometimes  vio- 
lent but  sincere  queries  of  the  more  deter- 
mined members  of  the  audience. 


i 


t 


"Fair  Harvard,  thy  sons  to  thy  Jubilee  throng — ^" 
Hundreds  of  alumni  and  their  guests  returned  to  Har- 
vard College  to  celebrate  the  300th  Anniversary  of  its 
founding — and  NBC  was  there  to  bring  the  color  and 
excitement,  and  the  addresses  of  distinguished  alumni 
and  guests,  to  Harvard  men  the  world  over.  The 
broadcasts  of  this  historical  event  brought  to  the  radio 
audience  one  of  1936's  most  memorable  programs. 


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(Above)  Academic  procession  marching  into 
Tercentenary  Theatre  during  exercises  Sep- 
tember 18,  1936.  (Right)  President  James  B. 
Conant  delivers  Tercentenary  oration  from 
rostrum.  (Below)  Fireworks  light  up  Charles 
River  during  Undergraduate  Celebration,  Sep- 
tember 17.  Harvard  School  of  Business  Admin- 
istration in  background. 


4.      ■".  -»  Ji        : 


In  1836  on  the  occasion  of  Harvard's  Bicentennial,  Josiah 
Quincy,  President,  sealed  this  package  and  inscribed  it,  "To 
be  opened  by  the  President  of  Harvard  College  in  the  year 
1936,  and  not  before."  Opening  the  package  was  one  of  the 
most  interesting  ceremonies  of  the  Tercentenary.  In  the  pres- 
ence of  Harvard  alumni  officers  and  college  officials.  Presi- 
dent Conant  revealed  its  contents,  a  collection  of  letters 
written  by  Harvard  alumni  in  1836. 


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INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


gh  NBC  —exclusively 


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^OWN  meetin*  tonight!  Town  meetin*  tonight!" 
As  the  Town  Crier's  call  fades,  "America's  Town 
Meeting"  is  on  the  air.  Under  the  auspices  of  the 
League  for  Political  Education,  distinguished  authori- 
ties of  opposing  viewpoints  present  subjects  of  na- 
tional significance,  with  the  audience  participating — 
a  real  town  meeting,  voted  1936's  best  educational 
program  by  the  Women's  National  Radio  Committee. 


7 


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.*:    .^if^  ^ 


"Fair  Harvard,  thy  sons  to  thy  Jubilee  throng—" 
Hundreds  of  alumni  and  their  guests  returned  to  Har- 
vard College  to  celebrate  the  jooth  Anniversary  of  its 
founding — -and  NBC  was  there  to  bring  the  color  and 
excitement,  and  the  addresses  of  distinguished  alumni 
and  guests,  to  Harvard  men  the  world  over.  The 
broadcasts  of  this  historical  event  brought  to  the  radio 
audience  one  of  1936's  most  memorable  programs. 


In  1836  on  the  occasion  of  Harvard's  Bicentennial,  Josiah 
Ouincy,  President,  sealed  this  package  and  inscribed  it.  "To 
be  opened  by  the  President  of  Harvard  Collej^e  in  the  year 
1936,  and  not  before."  Opening  the  package  was  one  of  the 
most  interesting  ceremonies  of  the  Tercentenary.  In  the  pres- 
ence of  Harvard  alumni  officers  and  college  officials.  Presi- 
dent Conant  revealed  its  contents,  a  collection  of  letter* 
written  by  Harvard  alumni  in  1836. 


r^:> 


-7^' 


(Above)  Academic  procession  marching  into 
Tercentenary  Theatre  during  exercises  Sep- 
tember 18,  1936.  (Right)  President  James  B. 
Conant  delivers  Tercentenary  oration  from 
rostrum.  (Below)  Fireworks  light  up  Charles 
River  during  Undergraduate  Celebration,  Sep- 
tember 17.  Harvard  School  of  Business  Admin- 
istration in  background. 


Men  and  women  alike  present  their  view- 
points at  "America's  Town  Meeting" — and 
good-naturedly  answer  the  sometimes  vio- 
lent but  sincere  queries  of  the  more  deter- 
mined members  of  the  audience. 


mi  1^1 


m 


1f-i 


TST'  ITS 


i^.A\.-^ /.\\V\V-.\L.\.v>    >  \\\V   >    >  \V  '>     >    >    .N    >    ■> 


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I 


Li^lV^  •  •  • 

abroad  and 


at  home 


-y,    ♦.^  .  t  ' 


-  .  f 


-     f 


•  :*v 


(L«/r)  Bruno  Walter,  noted  conductor  of 
several  concert  broadcasts  in  1936,  takes 
a  curtain  call  with  featured  members  of 
the  cast  of  "Don  Giovanni." 


In  NBC*8  Radio  City  Studios,  Dr.  Damrosch 
conducts  the  NBC  Symphony  Orchestra 
{above)  and  explains  the  compositions;  and  in 
more  than  70,000  radio-equipped  schools,  pu- 
pils listen  attentively  each  Friday  to  his  Music 
Appreciation  Hour,  an  important  part  of  their 
musical  education. 

At  a  luncheon  in  honor  of  his  75th  birthday 
given  by  David  SamoflF,  president  of  RCA,  Dr. 
Damrosch  was  at  his  happiest  when  these 
youngsters  gathered  about  him. 


THE  Music  Appreciation  Hour,  an 
exclusive  NBC  feature  conducted  by 
Dr.  Walter  Damrosch,  is  without  doubt 
the  most  widely  heard  musical  educa- 
tion program  for  school  children.  It  is  re- 
quired listening  for  some  7,000,000  stu- 
dents who  follow  the  weekly  "lessons" 
guided  by  notebooks  and  manuals  sup- 
plied to  the  schools  by  NBC's  Music 
Education  Department — and  heard  by 
half  again  as  many  adult  listeners. 

The  love  of  fine  music,  encouraged  by 
this  and  similarly  constructive  educa- 
tional periods,  is  increasing  the  audience 
for  such  important  programs  as  the  Salz- 
burg Music  Festival,  described  on  the 
preceding  page.  So  great  is  the  demand 
for  better  music  that  the  time  devoted  to 
classical  compositions  on  NBC  programs 
increased  over  45%  in  19^6.  .  .  .  Musical 
education  is  but  one  phase  of  NBC*s 
great  "editorial  section,"  the  sustaining 
programs  which  make  up  73.7%  of  all 

broadcasts  furnished 
by  NBC  "in  the  public 
interest." 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


USIC 


abroad  and 


Each  year,  when  thousands  of  music  lovers 
make  their  pilgrimage  to  Salzburg,  Austria, 
only  NBC  brings  its  Music  Festival  to  America. 

At  the  renowned  Festspielhaus  (right)  famous 
conductors  lead  Europe's  great  orchestras  in 
symphony  concerts;  noted  singers  appear  in 
the  world's  favorite  operas, — and  NBC  listen- 
ers sit  in  the  royal  box.  Wherever  great  music 
Is  to  be  heard,  NBC  is  there. 


I     is  t 


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«  •« 


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^    ^ 


Iff 


(Left)  Bruno  Walter,  noted  conductor  of 
several  concert  broadcasts  in  1936,  takes 
a  curtain  call  with  featured  members  of 
the  cast  of  "Don  Giovanni." 


In  NBC's  Radio  City  Studios,  Dr.  Damrosch 
conducts  the  NBC  Symphony  Orchestra 
(above)  and  explains  the  compositions;  and  in 
more  than  70,000  radio-equipped  schools,  pu- 
pils listen  attentively  each  Friday  to  his  Music 
Appreciation  Hour,  an  important  part  of  their 
musical  education. 

At  a  luncheon  in  honor  of  his  7.')th  birthday 
given  by  David  Sarnoff,  president  of  RCA,  Dr. 
Damrosch  was  at  his  happiest  when  these 
youngsters  gathered  about  him. 


'^f ^  H  K  Music  ApjM-ecianiin  H'lur,  an 
»  cxclusi\cNIK  tfarurcconviucred  bv 
Dr.  Walter  Damrosch,  is  uith-ur  vi-uin 
the  most  \viilcl>  hcarti  musical  educa- 
tion program  tor  school  chikiren.  It 
cjuired  listening  tor  some  ~,C'00,oc>c  >tu- 
dents  who  tollovv  the  \veekl\  "les>"n^'* 
guide(i  h\'  notebooks  and  manuals  sup- 
plied to  the  schools  In  NlK's  Mu>c 
Education  Department  and  heard  In 
halt  again  as  man\   adult  listener> 

The  love  ot  fine  music,  encuuragetl  In 
this  antl  similarK  consrructi\e  educa 
tional  periotls,  is  increasing  the  audience 
tor  such  important  pn>grams  as  the  Salz- 
burg Music  l^'estual,  describeii  on  the 
preceding  page.  So  great  is  the  demand 
for  better  music  that  the  time  de\  oted  to 
classical  comjtositions  on  NHL  program- 
increased  o\er4;'  ,  in  i<),;(k  .  .  .  Musical 
education  is  but  one  jiha^e  of  \  IK  s 
great  "editorial  section,"  the  >ustaining 
programs  which  make  up  ~^~^\'    ot  all 

broati casts   turnislieti 
d  ^  ^H      In  NBC  "in  the  public 

interest." 


-^1^ 


mm\^ 


1 


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/  .Jt'-\ 


■n 


(Left)  "Vic  and  Sade,"  comedy  serial  of  home  life,  is 
a  popular  NBC  daytime  proj^ram.  Rush,  Sade  and 
Victor  Gook  are  portrayed  by  Billy  Idelsou,  Bernar- 
dine  Flynn  and  Art  Van  Harvey.  (Below)  Two  of  the 
cast  of  NBC  Radio  Guild  portray  a  dramatic  situa- 
tion. The  Guild  presents  Shakespeare's  plays,  classic 
dramas,  and  specially  prepared  radio  dramatizations 
of  historical  events. 


f 


TT" 


'"^^^Si 


rat 


Presentation  of  awards  for  the  best  play  and 
best  motion  picture  of  the  year  are  exclusive 
NBC  features.  In  1936  Robert  Sherwood,  repre- 
senting the  New  York  newspaper  movie  critics, 
awarded  "The  Informer"  with  Victor  McLaglen 
the  gold  medal  which  was  accepted  by  Mrs.  M. 
H.  Aylesworth  for  RKO-Radio  Pictures.  In  the 
same  year,  the  New  York  Drama  Critics  Circle 
awarded  Maxwell  Anderson  (right)  its  gold 
plaque  for  "Winterset"  starring  Burgess  Mere- 
dith and  Margo  who  later  appeared  in  the 
RKO-Radio  picturization  of  the  play. 


^m^ 


(Above)  Ethel  Barrymore,  "first  lady  of  the 
American  stage,"  brings  her  program, 
"The  Famous  Actors'  Guild,"  before  NBC 
Blue  Network  microphones  weekly  in  re- 
vivals of  plays  in  which  she  starred  on  the 
stage.  (Right)  Irene  Rich,  appearing  in  the 
dramatic  serial  "Lady  Counselor,"  was 
one  of  the  first  screen  stars  to  be  presented 
regularly  on  NBC  networks.  Cornelia  Otis 
Skinner's  delightful  character  sketches  are 
now  a  regular  NBC  feature. 


i\ll  the  world's 


a  stage . . 


No  group  of  Americans  ever  "held  the  mir- 
ror up  to  nature"  with  greater  success 
than  America's  topliners  who  nightly  play  to 
audiences  of  many  millions  over  NBC  Net- 
works. Famous  hits  of  Broadway  have  brought 
laughter  and  tears  from  Lake  O'  the  Woods  to 
Cajin'  Land  as  Shakespeare's  immortal  lines 


have  thrilled  new  millions  on  land  and  sea. 
Thirty-five  per  cent  of  all  sponsored  programs 
during  1936  used  either  drama  or  comedy 
drama  as  a  central  theme,  proving  once  again 
the  power  of  the  spoken  word.  A  few  of  the 
high  dramatic  moments  of  the  past  year  are 
recalled  on  these  pages. 


»  ^«..^,xf 


V 


"We,  the  People"  brings  persons  from  all  walks  of  life 
before  the  microphone  to  recreate  dramatic  moments  in 
their  lives.  Voted  1936's  outstanding  new  program  idea  by 
Hearst  newspapers'  radio  editors,  "We,  the  People"  is 
produced  by  Phillips  Lord  (circle).  (Left)  Edgar  A.  Guest  in 
"Welcome  Valley."  (Extreme  left)  Warden  Lewis  E.  Lawes 
in  "20,000  Years  in  Sing  Sing." 

-^ 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


'^^^^..^ 


HH 

hP 

Hv  ^1 

(;4boie)  Ethel  Barrymore,  "first  lady  of  the 
American  stage,"  brings  her  program, 
"The  Famous  Actors'  Guild,"  before  NBC 
Blue  Network  microphones  weekly  in  re- 
vivals of  plays  in  which  she  starred  on  the 
stage.  [Riiht)  Irene  Rich,  appearing  in  the 
dramatic  serial  "Lady  Counselor,"  was 
one  of  the  first  screen  stars  to  be  presented 
regularly  on  NBC  networks.  Cornelia  Otis 
Skinner's  delightful  character  sketches  are 
now  a  regular  NBC  feature. 


the  world's 


w 


n 


I 


r 


(Le/n  "Vic  and  Sade,"  comedy  serial  of  home  life,  is 
a  popular  NBC  daytime  program.  Rush,  Sado  and 
Victor  Cook  are  portrayed  by  Billy  Idelson.  Bernar- 
dine  Flynn  and  Art  Van  ilarvt-y.  lieloui  Two  of  the 
cast  of  NBC  Radio  Guild  portray  a  dramatic  situa- 
tion. The  Guild  presents  .Shakespeare's  plays,  classic 
dramas,  and  specially  prepared  radio  dramatizations 
of  historical  events. 


1 


Helen  Hayes  is  one  of 
NBC's  featured  dra- 
matic stars  in  her 
"Bambi"  series. 


«t 


^  ^\ 


^ 


Presentation  of  awards  for  the  best  play  and 
best  motion  picture  of  the  year  are  exclusive 
NBC  features.  In  1936  Robert  Sherwood,  repre- 
senting the  New  York  newspaper  movie  critics, 
awarded  "The  Informer"  with  Victor  McLaglen 
the  gold  medal  which  was  accepted  by  Mrs.  M. 
II.  Aylesworth  for  RKO-Radio  Pictures.  In  the 
same  year,  the  New  York  Drama  Critics  Circle 
awarded  Maxwell  Anderson  ri<j.ht  its  gold 
plaque  for  "Winterset"  starring  Burgess  Mere- 
dith and  Margo  who  later  appeared  in  the 
RkO-Radio  picturization  of  the  play. 


fi 


"V 


f 


tO  group  of  Americans  ever  "held  the  mir- 
ror up  to  nature"  with  greater  success 
than  America's  topHners  who  nightly  phiy  to 
audiences  of  many  millions  over  NBC  Net- 
works. Famous  hits  ot  Broadway  have  brought 
laughter  and  tears  trom  Lake  ()'  the  Woods  to 
Cajin'  Lantl  as  Shakespeare's  immortal  lines 


t 


lir 


have  thrilled  new  millions  on  land  and  sea. 
Thirty-five  per  cent  of  all  sponsored  programs 
during  1936  used  either  drama  or  comedy 
drama  as  a  central  theme,  proving  once  again 
the  power  of  the  spoken  woni.  A  few  of  the 
high  dramatic  moments  of  the  past  year  are 
recalled  on  these  pages. 


^.<^ 


"We.  the  People"  brings  persons  from  all  walks  of  life 
before  the  microphone  to  recreate  dramatic  moments  in 
their  lives.  Voted  I9.?6's  outstanding  new  program  idea  hy 
Hearst  newspapers'  radio  editors,  "We.  the  Peoplt"  in 
produced  by  Phillips  Lord  cinli').  (Left  Kdfiar  A.  (iuest  in 
"Welcome  Valley."  [Extreme  left  ^  Warden  lewis  K.  I  awes 
in  "20,000  Years  in  Sing  Sing." 




^        f 


i 


//ool'//p  of  Broadcast 


V 


i 


^C.   I'(iif///)crf 


I 


M.  J.inli 


I     I 


/ 


M.  Robert  Jardillier, 
French  Minister  of  Com- 
munications (right),  ac- 
companied by  Fred  Bate, 
NBC  British  representa- 
tive, speaks  from  Ameri- 
can  Air   Liner  NC- 16030. 


^1 


M5C  MAS'l'KR 
COMROL 
ROOM       .^ 


From  his  office  high  up  in 
the  RCA  Building  in  Radio 
City,  David  Sarnoff,  presi- 
dent of  the  Radio  Corpora- 
tion of  America,  opened 
the  international  4-way 
radio  conversation. 


R(K  KV 


roatlfig    ti»   MUl  from 


o  % 


"iiitr 


rter  at 
..  I.,  »ent 
>e. 


I : '  I K  I    \  i  \  k  c  ( I M 


From  the  NC-16005,  M. 
Maurice  Rambert,  Presi- 
dent of  the  International 
Broadcasting  Union 
(right),  accompanied  by 
Mai  Jordan,  NBC  Euro- 
pean representative, 
greets  the  conference. 


KCA         *' 

il^jranmal 

v«    iec«i?ef ,  I 
..  I.,  fooMfi^of 


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C  A  &  NBC 


Aboard  his  yacht,  the 
"Elettra,"  off  Genoa,  Italy 
— via  Italo  Radio, Rome — 
Senatore  Marconi  joined 
in,  while  America  and 
Europe  eavesdropped. 


A  PERFECT  example  of  coordination  of  radio  facilities  was 
/l^  this  unique  feature  of  NBC's  Tenth  Anniversary  week— 
a  4-cornered  conversation  across  the  world— from  air-to-land- 
to-sea.  Two  visiting  European  radio  executives,  M.  Robert 
Jardillier,  French  Minister  of  Communications,  and  M.  Maurice 
Rambert,  President  of  the  International  Broadcasting  I'nion, 
en  route  in  two  planes  from  Buffalo  to  Washington,  exchanged 
greetings  with  David  Sarnoff  in  the  RCA  Building  and  with 
Senatore  Guglielmo  Marconi,  on  his  yacht  "Elettra"  near  Genoa. 

"This  is  an  amazing  conversation,"  said  Marconi,  the  father  of 
modern  radio.  And  so  it  was.  The  entire  program  was  broadcast 
in  the  United  States  over  8o  NBC  Red  Network  Stations, 
relayed  by  NBC  and  RCA  Communications  shortwave  trans- 
mitters to  Europe  where  it  was  rebroadcast  in  Germany,  Den- 
mark, Austria,  France,  Switzerland  and  Czecho-Slovakia. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Event!  A-w3iY  broadcast 


yTook-np  of  Broadcast 


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-IKikrW.Wi;   KK(  LI\  KK 
AlOC  R(  A   BLII,l>lNt; 


NHC  MASTER 

CONTROL 

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k(  A<  ■   ^hortu.iM- 


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IrCAC   Sh..rl«,.ve[ 
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/  oic-  <>j  A  I.  Rambkrt 


I'liici-  'It  W.  |ardii.i.if.r 


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I'oicr  oj  St.NATDRt  Marconi 

Semitore  ^JSCarcoui 

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Via  RCA  &  NBC 


A  PFRFKCT  example  of  coordination  of"  radio  faL-ilirics  vsas 
^^  this  unique  feature  of"  XHC's  Tenth  Anniversarv  week  - 
a  4-cornered  conversation  across  the  world  -from  air-to-land- 
to-sea.  Two  visiting  Kuropean  radio  executives,  M.  Robert 
Jardillier,  French  Minister  of  Communications,  and  M.  Maurice 
Ramhert,  President  of  the  International  Bnuidcastinir  lni..n, 
en  route  in  two  planes  from  Buffalo  to  Washington,  exchanged 
greetings  with  David  Sarnoff  in  the  RCA  Building  and  with 
Senatore  Guglielmo  Marconi,  on  his  yacht  "Elettra"  nearCienoa. 

"This  is  an  amazing  conversation,"  said  Marconi,  the  father  of 
modern  radio.  And  so  it  was.  The  entire  program  was  broadcast 
in  the  United  States  over  8o  \BC  Red  Network  Stations, 
relayed  by  NBC  and  RCA  Communications  shortwaxe  trans- 
mitters to  Europe  where  it  was  rebroadcast  in  (iermany,  Den- 
mark, Austria,  France,  Switzerland  and  Czecho-Slovakia. 


Aboard  a  chartered  tug,  NBC  officials  and 
announcers  accompanied  liner  through 
the  Narrows,  broadcast  account  of  her 
arrival  over  nationwide  NBC  network. 


WHEN  the  great  liner,  R.M.S.  Queen 
Mary,  sailed  on  her  trial  run,  NBC 
brought  the  first  broadcast  from  the  mighty 
ship  to  American  listeners.  On  her  maiden 
voyage  to  New  York,  the  Queen  Mary  was 
wired  for  sound  from  stem  to  stern  as  NBC 
broadcast  frequent  programs  throughout  the 
run,  and  upon  her  arrival  in  New  York  har- 
bor. Less  than  one  hour  after  docking,  the 
Queen  Mary's  commander,  the  late  Sir  Edgar 
T.  Britten  (below  with  Roger  Eckersley,  Brit- 
ish Broadcasting  Corporation  official)  broad- 
cast from  the  National  Broadcasting  Com- 
pany's Radio  City  studios  an  account  of  his 
ship's  first  crossing. 


{Left)  John  B.  Kennedy,  NBC  commen- 
tator, and  George  Hicks,  NBC  announcer, 
introduced  the  world's  greatest  ship  to 
all  America  as  she  steamed  into  New 
York  harbor  at  the  end  of  her  voyage. 


(Above)  When  the  Queen  Mary  came  up 
the  harbor  accompanied  by  a  great  fleet 
of  welcoming  craft,  NBC  carried  the 
scene  and  sounds  into  the  homes  of  mil- 
lions of  listeners. 


Margo,  Mexican  star  of  "Winter- 
set,"  is  interviewed  by  Francisco 
J.  Ariza,  editor  of  Cine-Mundia!, 
movie  magazine  circulating  in 
Central  &  South  America. 

Making  its  first  direct  radio 
pick-up  from  Nanking,  China, 
on  December  17,  1936,  NBC 
broadcast  the  speech  of  Dr. 
H.  H.  Kung,  Finance  Minister. 
He  spoke  on  the  kidnaping  of 
Chiang  Kai-Shek,  then  front 
page  news. 


World  Traveler 


WHEREVER  things  happen,  NBC  micro- 
phones are  on  the  job!  To  travel  half-way 
round  the  world  to  bring  to  America  news  of 
some  history-making  event  is  not  uncommon. 
Guided  by  NBC  microphones,  the  American 
listener,  at  his  own  fireside,  travels  the  world. 

And  now,  through  its  improved  shortwave  facili- 
ties, NBC  brings  North  America  and  South 
America  within  mutual  voice-range.  In  the  fall 
of  1936  NBC  began  regular  program  service  to 
Latin  America,  competing  with  European  radio 
organizations  which  previously  dominated  the 
field.  Six  programs  a  week  are  now  broadcast, 
with  increased  service  already  being  planned. 
Increased  coverage  of  the  Peace  Conference  in 
Buenos  Aires  was  part  of  this  new  activity. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Aboard  a  chartered  tug,  NBC  officials  and 
announcers  accompanied  liner  through 
the  Narrows,  broadcast  account  of  her 
arrival  over  nationwide  NBC  network. 


\ I  THEN  the  great  liner,  R.M.S.  Queen 
f  Mary,  sailed  on  her  trial  run,  NBC 
brought  the  first  broadcast  from  the  mighty 
ship  to  American  listeners.  On  her  maiden 
voyage  to  New  York,  the  Queen  Mary  was 
wired  for  sound  from  stem  to  stern  as  NBC 
broadcast  frequent  programs  throughout  the 
run,  and  upon  her  arrival  in  New  York  har- 
bor. Less  than  one  hour  after  docking,  the 
Queen  Mary's  commander,  the  late  Sir  Edgar 
T.  Britten  (below  with  Roger  Eckersley,  Brit- 
ish Broadcasting  Ct)rporation  official)  broad- 
cast trom  the  National  Broadcasting  Com- 
pany's Radio  City  studios  an  account  of  his 
ship's  first  crossing. 


(Left)  John  B.  Kennedy,  NBC  commen- 
tator, and  Ceorge  i licks,  NBC  announcer, 
introduced  the  world's  greatest  ship  to 
all  .\morit.a  as  shi-  sti-amed  into  New 
York  harbor  at  the  end  of  her  voyage. 


(Above)  When  the  Oueen  Mary  came  up 
the  harbor  accompanied  by  a  great  fleet 
of  welcoming  craft,  NBC  carried  the 
scene  and  sounds  into  the  homes  of  mil- 
lions of  listeners. 


Margo,  Mexican  star  of  "Winter- 
set,"  is  interviewed  by  Francisco 
J.  Ariza,  editor  oiCine-Mundial. 
movie  magazine  circulating  in 
Central  &  South  America. 

Making  its  first  direct  radio 
pick-up  from  Nanking,  China, 
on  December  17,  1936.  NBC 
broadcast  the  speech  of  Dr. 
H.  H.  Kung,  Finance  Minister. 
He  spoke  on  the  kidnaping  of 
Chiang  Kai-Shek,  then  front 
page  news. 


. .  .World  T 


WHEREVER  things  happen,  NBC  micro- 
phones are  on  the  job!  To  travel  half-way 
round  the  world  to  bring  to  America  news  of 
some  history-making  event  is  not  uncommon. 
Guided  by  NBC  microphones,  the  American 
listener,  at  his  own  fireside,  travels  the  world. 

And  now,  through  its  improved  shortwave  facili- 
ties, NBC  brings  North  America  and  South 
America  within  mutual  voice-range.  In  the  fall 
of  I9j6  NBC  began  regular  program  service  to 
Latin  America,  competing  with  European  radio 
organizations  which  previously  dominated  the 
field.  Six  programs  a  week  are  now  broadcast, 
with  increased  service  already  being  planned. 
Increased  coverage  of  the  Peace  Conference  in 
Buenos  Aires  was  part  of  this  new  activity. 


\\ 


Dr.  Ralph  W.  Sockman  who  con- 
ducts the  "Radio  Pulpit,"  NBC's 
pioneer  religious  program. 

(Below)  Rt.  Rev.  Mons.  Fulton  J. 
Sheen,  professor  of  philosophy. 
Catholic  University  of  America, 
Is  heard  on  the  Catholic  Hour. 


H/ducation 


RADIO'S  service  in  keeping  them  abreast  of  current 
affairs  has  seemed  to  many  listeners  its  most  help- 
ful educational  feature.  Actually,  NBC  has  brought  a 
new  dramatic  treatment  to  all  educational  subjects- 
art,  literature,  history  and  music,  to  mention  a  few. 

Each  week,  NBC  presents  46 
regularly  scheduled  educational 
programs — as  well  as  countless 
other  educational  subjects.  In 
fact,  educational  programs  ac- 
count for  25%  of 
NBC's  full  schedule. 


Dr.  W.  W.  Bauer,  director  of  the 
Bureau  of  Health  and  Public  In- 
struction of  the  American  Med- 
ical Association,  speaks  on  the 
"Your  Health"  program  con- 
ducted under  the  auspices  of 
that  professional  organization. 


eligion 


INSPIRATION  and  information  have 
been  combined  to  bring  to  NBC  audi- 
ences an  outstanding  group  of  religious 
programs.  One  of  the  first  regularly  sched- 
uled features  to  be  broadcast  by  NBC 
was  the  "Radio  Pulpit,"  founded  by  the 
late  Dr.  S.  Parkes  Cadman  and  now  con- 
ducted each  Sunday  by  Dr.  Ralph  W. 
Sockman.  During  1936,  almost  five  hours 
a  week  were  devoted  to  religion,  including 
talks  by  leading  clergymen  of  representa- 
tive faiths,  religious  music,  the  celebra- 
tion of  religious  festivals,  and  church 
services  of  various  denominations. 


(Above)  During  the  University  of  Chicago 
Round  Table  vSessions,  world  and  national 
problems  are  discussed  by  faculty  members 
of  that  University.  Above  are  T.  V.  Smith, 
professor  of  philosophy;  Arthur  H.  Comp- 
ton,  professor  of  physics;  and  Anton  J.  Carl- 
son, head  of  the  department  of  physiology. 


Dr.  Harry  Emerson  Fosdick  di- 
rects "National  Vespers,"  now  in 
its  sixth  year  on  NBC. 


Paul  Wing,  spelling  master,  gives 
a  difficult  word,  to  the  consterna- 
tion of  an  entrant  in  the  NBC 
National  Spelling  Bee. 


(Above)  On  NBC's  Tenth  Anni- 
versary, Dr.  John  W.  Langdale, 
chairman  of  the  Federation's 
Radio  Committee,  presented  a 
testimonial  from  the  Federation 
of  Churches  of  Christ  in  America 
to  Lenox  R.  Lohr,  president  of 
NBC,  to  commemorate  its  Net- 
works' contribution    to   religion. 

(Left)  Rabbi  Jonah  B.  Wise  di- 
rects the  "Message  of  Israel" 
program,  now  in  its  third  year. 


The  daily  audience  of  "Morning 
Devotions"  is  numbered  in  mil- 
lions. Many  faiths  are  represented 
among  the  different  clergymen 
who  speak.  Lowell  Patton,  organ- 
ist and  composer  (above),  and  a 
mixed  quartet  supply  the  musical 
background. 

(Left)  His  Eminence  Patrick  Car- 
dinal Hayes  paid  his  first  visit  to 
the  NBC  Radio  City  studios  in 
1936.  He  broadcast  greetings  from 
America  to  the  Vatican  on  the  oc- 
casion of  Pope  Pius  XI's  birthday. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


In  thousands  of  homes, 
amateur  musicians  and 
students  find  helpful 
instruction  in  their  fa- 
vorite avocation  when 
the  NBC  Home  Sym- 
phony directed  by  Er- 
nest I. a  Prade  {below) 
goes  on  the  air.  In  their 
own  homes,  they  be- 
come part  of  a  nation- 
wide symphony  orches- 
tra as  they  join  in  the 
broadcast  music. 


RA  DIO'S  service  in  keeping  them  ahreasr  of  current 
affairs  has  seemed  to  many  listeners  its  most  help- 
ful educational  feature.  Actually,  XHC  has  brought  a 
new  ilratnatic  treatment  to  all  educational  subjects  — 
art,  literature,  history  antl  music,  to  mention  a  few. 

Kach  week,  XRC  presents  4^) 
regularly  scheduled  educational 
programs  -as  well  as  countless 
other  educational  subjects.  In 
fact,  educational  programs  ac- 
count tor  i\^",  of 
NHC's  full  schedule. 


{Ahove)  During  the  University  of  Chicago 
Round  Table  sessions,  world  and  national 
problems  are  discussed  by  faculty  members 
of  that  I  niversity.  Above  are  T.  V.  Smith, 
professor  of  philosophy;  Arthur  II.  (^omp- 
ton,  professor  of  physics;  and  Anton  J.  Carl- 
sun,  head  of  the  department  of  physiologiy- 


(Above)  Vida  vSutton  who  con- 
ducts the  "Magic  of  Speech" 
program  for  voice  improvement, 
is  chairman  of  the  Radio  (Coun- 
cil of  Teachers  of  English. 


Dr.  W.  W.  Bauer,  director  of  the 
Bureau  of  Health  and  Public  In- 
struction of  the  American  Med- 
ical Association,  speaks  on  the 
"Your  Health"  program  con- 
ducted under  the  auspices  of 
that  professional  organization. 


Paul  Wing,  spelling  master,  gives 
a  difficult  word,  to  the  consterna- 
tion of  an  entrant  in  the  NBC 
National  Spelling  Bee. 


Dr.  Ralph  W.  Sockman  who  con- 
ducts the  "Radio  Pulpit,"  NBC's 
pioneer  religious  program. 

i Below)  Rt.  Rev.  Mons.  Fulton  J. 
Sheen,  professor  of  philosophy. 
Catholic  University  of  America, 
Is  heard  on  the  Catholic  Hour. 


eligion 


INSPIRATION  and  informaticm  have 
J-  been  condiined  to  bring  to  XRC  audi- 
ences an  outstanding  group  of  religious 
programs.  One  of  the  first  regularly  sched- 
uled features  to  lie  broadcast  by  XHC 
was  the  "Radio  Pulpit,"  founded  by  the 
late  Dr.  S.  Parkes  Cacbiian  and  now  con- 
ducted each  Sunday  by  Dr.  Ralph  \V. 
Sockman.  During  19./),  almost  five  hours 
a  week  were  devoted  to  religion,  including 
talks  by  leading  clergymen  of  representa- 
tive faiths,  religious  music,  the  celebra- 
tion of  religious  festivals,  and  church 
services  of  various  denominations. 


Dr.  Harry  Emerson  Fosdick  di- 
rects "National  Vespers,"  now  in 
its  sixth  year  on  NBC. 


[Above  On  NBCs  Tenth  Anni- 
versarj.  Dr.  John  U .  I  angdale. 
chairman  of  the  Federal  ion's 
Radio  (iommittee.  presented  .i 
testimonial  from  the  Federation 
of  Churclies  of  Christ  in  Anierii.i 
to  I.enox  R.  I  ohr,  president  .if 
NBC.  to  commemorate  its  Net- 
works"  contribution    to    religion. 

iLeft\  Rabbi  Jonah  B.  \N  ise  di- 
rects the  "Message  tif  Israel" 
program,  now  in  its  third  \ear. 


The  daily  audience  of  "Morning 
Devotions"  is  numbered  in  mil- 
lions. Many  faiths  are  represented 
among  the  different  clergvmen 
wlio  speak.  Lowell  Pat  ton.  organ- 
ist and  composer  iih<nc  .  ,iiul  .i 
mixed  quartet  supply  the  musical 
background. 

Left  His  Eminence  Patrifk  Car- 
dinal Hayes  paid  his  tirsi  visit  to 
tlie  NBC  Radio  C;it>  studios  in 
l'>.<«».  He  broadcast  greetinjjs  from 
.Vnierica  to  the  \  at  lean  on  ilie  m  - 
casionof  Pope  Pius  Ms  birtlul.i\. 


?w_     ^-A*^rtJ 


mi  ■  —  TTT^afs'i'TiFa 


Most  unusua' 


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PI 

CK..UP 

TIME  ON   AIR 

ENDS 

NBC  Studio*.  New  York 

4  min. 

3:19:M 

2-way  Police  Car  Talk,  Cleveland 

3  min.  30  sec. 

3:33:30 

U.  S.  Navy  Submarine,  oil  New  York 

4  min. 

3:3«:30 

Pikes  Peak,  Colorado 

3  min.  30  sec. 

3:30:00 

"Comet",    Boston-Providence   Stream- 
liner, and  i5«i  "Flying  Hamburger", 
Berlin-Hamburg    run — talk   between 

moving  trains  and  across  Atlantic 

4  min. 

3:34:0* 

k 

Coal  Mine,  Pittsburgh 

3  min. 

3:37:00 

PICK-UP 


TIME  ON  AIR      ENDS 


7 
8 

10 
II 
13 
13 


NBC  Mobile  I'nit.  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York 

Sii-Day  Bike  Race,  Chicago 

Aboard  U.  S.  Army  Tank*,  outside  Wash 
ington,  D.  C. 

U.  S.  Coast  Guard  Cutter,  oil  New  London 

Mid-Town  Tunnel,  New  York 

Atop  Golden  Gate  Bridge,  San  Francisco 

U.  S.  Navy  Planes  over  San  Diego— Talk  be 
tween  plane  and  earth 


3  min. 

3:40:00 

3  min. 

3:43:00 

4  min. 

3:47:00 

n 

3  min. 

3:50:00 

3  min. 

3:53:00 

3  min. 

3:5«:00 

k. 

3  min. 

Sign  Off 
3:59.40 

»:«# 


ON  November  8,  1936,  from  3:15  to 4:00  PM,  over 
78  NBC  Blue  Network  stations,  listeners  heard 
the  most  unusual  broadcast  of  the  year,  a  feature  of 
NBC's  Tenth  Anniversary  Week.  Represented  among 
the  thirteen  pick-ups  was  every  conceivable  commu- 
nication point — mountaintop,  subterranean  tunnel, 
planes  in  the  sky,  boats  on  the  sea  and  underseas. 
Back  and  forth  across  the  country  and  across  the 
Atlantic  the  program  see-sawed.  In  three-quarters  of 
an  hour,  the  listener  traveled  by  ear  over  20,000  miles. 

Just  forty-five  minutes  of  entertainment  for  radio 
listeners — yet  weeks  of  preparation  were  necessary  to 
make  this  such  a  splendid  example  of  complete  co- 
ordination of  facilities  at  widely  separated  points. 
For  a  three-minute  broadcast,  two  experienced  moun- 
tain climbers  started  out  28  hours  ahead  of  time  and 
)lodded  through  four  feet  of  snow  to  erect  a  trans- 
itter  atop  Pike's  Peak.  The  complicated  two-way 
co^ersation  between  speeding  streamline  trains,  one 
in  ?^v  England  and  the  other  in  Germany,  required 
16  racMp  links  and  wire-line  circuits  plus  the  world- 
wide faXlities  of  RCA  Communications. 

Here  wasVdeed  a  remarkable  demonstration  of  the 
amazing  te(\nical  progress  radio  has  made  during  the 
ten  years  sii^e  the  organization  of  the  National 
Broadcasting  (jbmpany. 


HI  Rl  1\ 


RCA  *'Radio  Central." 
Rocky  Point,  L.  I.,  trans- 
mitted via  short-wave, 
conversation  from  the 
"Comet"  to  the  "Flyinft 
Hamburger" ;  also  used  for 
contacting  the  NBC  an- 
nouncer aboard  the  Coaot 
Guard  Cutter. 


Switchboard  at  RCA  Com- 
munications  Receiving 
Station,  Riverhead,  L.  I., 
where  signal  was  received 
from  Coast  Guard  Cutter 
and  from  the  "Flying 
Hamburger"  via  Reichs 
Post,  Berlin,  for  relay  to 
the  NBC  Blue  Network. 


\\  ,^  n-  -i  ■  k/  ivj 


E 


.  <s* 


I*    n*   r«i    T>   «o    r»   ra    ... 

Ca  «      r     3D    JV    NS 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Most  unusual  broadcast 


in  1936 


« 


ON  November  8,  1936,  from  ,:;:i ;  to  4:00  PM,  over 
78  NBC  Blue  Network  stations,  listeners  heard 
the  most  unusual  broadcast  of  the  year,  a  feature  of 
NBC's  Tenth  Anniversary  Week.  Represented  among 
the  thirteen  pick-ups  was  every  conceivable  ommu- 
nication  point — mountaintop,  subterranean  tunnel, 
planes  in  the  sky,  boats  on  the  sea  and  undcrseas. 
Back  and  forth  across  the  country  and  across  the 
Atlantic  the  program  see-sawed.  In  three-quarters  of 
an  hour,  the  listener  traveled  by  (f^r  over  20,300  miles. 

Just  forty-five  minutes  of  entertainment   for  ratlio 
listeners — yet  weeks  of  preparation  were  necessarv  to 
make  this  such  a  splendid  example  of  complete  ct»- 
ordination  of  facilities  at   widely  separated    points. 
For  a  three-minute  bnjadcast,  two  experienced  moun- 
tain climbers  started  out  28  hours  ahead  of  rime  and 
iodded  through  four  feet  of  snow  to  erect  a  rrans- 
tter  atop  Pike's  Peak.  The  complicated  two-way 
>versati(m  between  speeding  streamline  trains,  one 
'"  ^\^  England  and  the  other  in  (iermany,  required 
16  racko  links  and  wire-line  circuits  plus  the  world- 
wide facilities  of  RCA  Communications. 

Here  wasVdeed  a  remarkable  demonstration  of  the 
amazing  tecViical  progress  ratlio  has  made  during  the 
ten  years  si\e  the  organization  of  the  National 
Bi 


roadcasting  Oumpany. 


CK-UP 

TIME  ON  AIR 

ENDS 

NBC  Studios.  New  York 

4  mln. 

3:19:00 

2-way  Police  Car  Talk,  Cleveland 

.*  min.  30  sec. 

3:22:30 

U.  S.  Navy  Submarine,  off  New  York 

4  min. 

3:26:30 

Pike's  Peak,  Colorado 

i  min.  30  sec. 

3:30:00 

"Comet".    Boston- Providence   Stream- 
liner, and  (5a  1  "Plying  Hamhurfier". 
Berlin-Hamburfi    run^talk   between 
movinii  trains  and  across  Atlantic 

4  min. 

3:34:00 

Coal  Mine,  PittNburgh 

3  min. 

3:37:00 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 


k  - 1  p 

TIME  ON  AIR 

ENDS 

NBC  Mobile  I  nit.  Fifth  Ave..  New   York 

3  min. 

3:40  :«• 

Six- Day  Bike  Race.  Chicago 

3  min. 

3:43:00 

Aboard  U.  S.  Army  Tanks,  outside  Wash- 
iniiton,  [>.  C. 

4  min. 

3:47:00 

V.  S.  Coast  Guard  Cutter,  off  New  London 

3  min. 

3:50:00 

Mid-Town  Tunnel,  New  York 

3  min. 

3:53:00 

Atop  Golden  Gate  Bridge.  .San  Francisco 

3  min. 

3:. 56:00 

L  .  S.  Navy  Planes  over  San  Uiefto— Talk  be- 
tween plane  and  earth 

3  mln. 

Sign  Off 
3:59:40 

a 


RCA  "Radio  Central," 
Rocky  Point,  L.  I.,  trans- 
mitted via  short-wave, 
conversation  from  the 
"Comet"  to  the  "Flying 
Hamburger" ;  also  used  for 
contacting  the  NBC  an- 
nouncer aboard  the  Coast 
Guard  Cutter. 


Switchboard  at  RCA  Com- 
munications  Receiving 
Station,  Riverhead,  L.  I., 
where  signal  was  received 
from  Coast  Guard  Cutter 
and  from  the  "Flying 
Hamburger"  via  Reichs 
Post,  Berlin,  for  relay  to 
the  NBC  Blue  Network. 


Ihin 


gs  happen . .  NBC  is  there 


Crowds  kept  vigil  outside  Buckingham  Pal- 
ace to  learn  of  King  George  V's  condition. 
When  death  came,  NBC  was  first  on  the  air 
with  the  tragic  news.  More  than  twenty 
NBC  programs  described  for  American 
listeners  the  pomp  and  ceremony  of  the 
funeral  cortege  (right)  and  the  last  rites  as 
the  King  was  laid  to  rest  in  St.  George's 
Chapel,  Windsor  Castle  {below). 


J 


Wi  k1 


E  regret  to  announce  that  he  whom  we  loved 
ng  has  passed  away."  These  tragic  words 
from  Britain  ushered  in  a  series  of  events  that  made 
British  Empire  history.  The  death  of  King  George  V 
and  his  state  funeral — the  accession  of  Edward  VIII 
— and  at  the  end  of  the  year,  Edward's  abdication — 
of  all  these  NBC  brought  its  listeners  up-to-the-minute 
news  in  a  series  of  special  broadcasts  as  well  as  during 
regular  news  periods. 


(Top)  According  to  ancient  custom,  Edward 
VIII  is  proclaimed  King  from  the  balcony  of 
Friary  Court,  St.  James'  Palace.  (Left)  Later 
the  Proclamation  is  again  read  from  the  steps 
of  the  Royal  Exchange  by  King's  Heralds  in 
traditional  dress. 

"At  long  last"  .  .  .  began  the  Duke  of  Windsor 
in  addressing  the  greatest  radio  audience  just 
after  his  abdication  as  Edward  VIII.  His  words 
reached  the  American  nation  over  both  NBC 
Blue  and  Red  Networks. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


hings 


NBC  is 


Crowds  kept  vijjil  outside  Buckingham  Pal- 
ace to  learn  of  King  (ieorge  V's  condition. 
When  death  came,  \B(^  was  first  on  the  air 
with  the  tragic  news.  More  than  twenty 
NBC  programs  described  for  American 
listeners  the  pomp  and  ceremony  of  the 
funeral  cortege  [right i  and  the  last  rites  as 
the  King  was  laid  to  rest  in  St.  George's 
Chapel,  Windsor  Castle  (below). 


I¥  7  E  regret  to  announce  that  he  whom  we  loved 
▼  T  as  King  has  passed  away."  These  tragic  words 
from  Britain  ushered  in  a  series  of  events  that  made 
British  Kmpire  history.  The  death  of  King  George  V 
and  his  state  funeral — the  accession  of  Edward  \TII 
— and  at  the  end  of  the  year,  Edward's  abdication — 
of  all  these  NBC  brought  its  listeners  up-to-the-minute 
news  in  a  series  of  special  broadcasts  as  well  as  during 
regular  news  periods. 


[Topi  According  to  ancient  custom,  Edward 
VllI  is  proclaimed  King  from  the  balcony  of 
Friary  Court,  St.  James'  Palace.  iLf/f/  Later 
the  Proclamation  is  again  read  from  the  steps 
of  the  Royal  Exchange  by  King's  Heralds  in 
traditional  dress. 

"At  long  last"  .  .  .  began  the  Duke  of  Windsor 
in  addressing  tiie  greatest  radio  audietice  just 
after  his  abdication  as  Edward  V'lll.  His  words 
reached  the  .\merican  nation  over  both  NBC 
Blue  and  Red  Networks. 


Shell-fire  and  the  rattle  of  machine  guns 
punctuated  on-the-spot  descriptions  of 
scenes  such  as  these  direct  from  Spanish 
loyalist  and  rebel  fronts. 
(Below)  Emperor  Haile  Selassie  addresses 
NBC  listeners  direct  from  Addis  Ababa. 


The  new  Italy  becomes  the  new  Roman  Em- 
pire with  the  conquest  of  Ethiopia.  (Above) 
Ethiopian  infantrymen  fleeing  Italian  air 
raid.  (Right)  Italian  snipers  on  northern 
Ethiopian  front. 


A  GAINST  a  background  of  bursting  shells — or  in 
^  ^  the  wake  of  a  triumphal  procession  of  a  President 
bearing  a  message  of  Peace— NBC  microphones  are 
equally  at  home. 

In  1936,  590  hours  of  NBC  broadcast  time  were  devoted 
to  special  news  events  and  current  news  topics — enough 
material  to  keep  a  station  operating  on  a  full  broadcast 
day's  schedule  continuously  for  more  than  a  month,  yet 


eace 


The  President  of  the  United  States  opens 
the  Inter-American  Conference  for  the 
Maintenance  of  Peace,  in  Buenos  Aires. 
While  his  words  reached  the  American  radio 
audience  via  RCA  and  NBC  as  he  spoke,  the 
special  telephone  system  (switch  boxes  on 
desks)  brought  his  speech  to  delegates  in 
their  own  languages. 


only  3%  of  the  total  hours  of  programs  produced  for 
NBC  listeners  during  the  year. 

History's  pages  are  being  written — and   NBC   takes 
them  from  Time's  teletype  before  the  ink  is  dry. 


!£?V 


*:n 


1^  ( 


I 


*« 


(Above)  Tumultous  crowd  of  500,000  wel- 
comes the  President  to  Buenos  Aires.  [Left) 
On  his  way  to  Buenos  Aires,  the  President 
disembarked  at  Rio  de  Janeiro  and  there 
addressed  the  Brazilian  Congress. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


t  GAINST  a   background  of  bursting  shells— or   in 
*    the  wake  of  a  triumphal  procession  of"  a  President 
hearing  a   message  of  IVace  -NBC   microphones   are 
equally  at  home. 

In  I9j6,  590  hours  of  NBC  broadcast  time  were  devoted 
to  special  news  c\  enrs  and  current  news  topics  -enough 
material  to  keep  a  station  operating  on  a  full  broadcast 
da)'s  schedule  continuously  for  more  than  a  month,  yet 


The  now  Italy  becomes  the  new  Roman  Km- 
pire  with  the  ronquest  of  Kthiupia.  Above) 
Ethiopian  infantrymen  fleeing  Italian  air 
raid,  i  Right'  Italian  snipers  on  northern 
Ethiopian  front. 


Cclv^C 


The  President  of  the  United  States  opens  ' 
the  Inter-American  Conference  for  the 
Maintenance  of  Peace,  in  Buenos  Aires. 
While  his  words  reached  the  American  radio 
audience  via  RCA  and  NBC  as  he  spoke,  the 
special  telephone  system  (switch  boxes  on 
desks)  brought  his  speech  to  delegates  in 
their  own  languages. 


only  3%  of  the  total  hours  of  programs  produced  for 
NBC  listeners  during  the  year. 

History's   pages   are   being   written — and   NBC   takes 
them  from  Time's  teletype  before  the  ink  is  dry. 


y\iir 


^;:^v' 


(Above)  Tumultous  crowd  of  .<iOO,000  wel- 
comes the  President  to  Buenos  Aires,  l^ft) 
On  his  way  to  Buenos  \ires,  the  President 
disembarked  at  Rio  de  Janeiro  and  there 
addressed  the  Brazilian  Congress. 


"Under  the  batnn  of . 


Don  Voorhees 


Meredith  Willson 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Don  Voorhees 


The  Showboat  Singers  re- 
hearse for  their  Thursday 
night  Maxwell  House  broad- 
cast, Al  Goodman  directing. 


HOWEVER  great  the  popularity 
of  individual  artists  or  programs, 
music  is  the  perennial  favorite  in 
radio  entertainment.  And  to  gratify 
the  catholic  musical  tastes  of  listeners, 
NBC  programs  have  consistently  pre- 
sented the  finest  in  every  type  of 
composition — played  by  the  country's 
best  known  orchestras  under  the  batons 
of  the  world's  leading  conductors,  and 
sung  by  vocalists  whose  voices  have 
won  universal  acclaim.  From  symphony 
to  swing,  NBC  produced  more  than 
12,000  hours  of  network 
musical  programs  in    1936. 


swing 


MiTodilh  \\  illsun 


In  planes  circling  over  flooded  Ohio  and  Missis- 
sippi valleys,  NBC  microphone  crews  reported 
conditions  to  relief  agencies  and  network 
listeners. 


(Above)  In  flood-stricken  Cincinnati,  U.  S.  Coast  Guards- 
men helped  WLW,  local  NBC  associated  station,  bring 
true  picture  of  conditions  to  listeners. 

(Upper  right)  NBC  flood  reporters  at  their  Evansville, 
Indiana,  headquarters. 

(Lower  right)  Hal  Totten,  NBC  announcer,  describes 
Cairo's  fight  against  flood  from  vantage  point  atop  river- 
front warehouse. 


The  1937  flood  waters  missed  Hartford,  Con- 
necticut— but  in  1936  they  struck  with  full 
force  in  this  and  other  New  England  cities. 
NBC  was  there! 


LESS  than  a  year  after  its  complete 
'  coverage  of  the  1936  floods,  the  Na- 
tional Broadcasting  Company  rushed 
microphone  crews  to  cover  all  points 
when  the  Ohio  started  on  its  1937  ram- 
page. The  ^rsi  flood  broadcast  was 
made  by  NBC  from  Kennett,  Missouri, 
the  only  one  that  day,  January  20,  and 
the  first  of  many  NBC  broadcasts  dur- 
ing the  week  that  followed. 

In  that  first  week,  NBC  Networks  car- 
ried more  than  one  hundred  broadcasts 
from  twenty-one  cities  in  eleven  states, 
covering  more  than  1,800  miles  of 
flooded  areas  along  the  Ohio  and  Mis- 
sissippi Rivers. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


riood  News 


rrby  NBC 


Iff 


In  planes  circling  over  flooded  Ohio  and  Missis- 
sippi valleys,  NBC  microphone  crews  reported 
conditions  to  relief  agencies  and  network 
listeners. 


I 


The  1937  flood  waters  missed  Hartford,  Con- 
necticut— but  in  1936  they  struck  with  full 
force  in  this  and  other  New  England  cities. 
NBC  was  there! 


I  ESS  than  a  year  after  its  complete 
^  coverage  of  the  1936  floods,  the  Na- 
tional Broadcasting  Company  rushed 
microphone  crews  to  cover  all  points 
when  the  Ohio  started  on  its  1937  ram- 
page. The  first  flood  broadcast  was 
made  by  NBC  from  Kennett,  Missouri, 
the  only  one  that  day,  January  20,  and 
the  first  of  many  NBC  broadcasts  dur- 
ing the  week  that  followed. 

In  that  first  week,  NBC  Networks  car- 
ried more  than  one  hundred  broadcasts 
from  twenty-one  cities  in  eleven  states, 
covering  more  than  1,800  miles  of 
flooded  areas  along  the  Ohio  and  Mis- 
sissippi Rivers. 


NBC's  Cleveland  mobile  unit— Tom  Manning, 
announcer  —  cruised  Portsmouth's  flooded 
streets,  relaying  on-the-spot  information  to 
relief  headquarters  and  the  radio  audience. 


In  1936  at  Lewiston,  Pa.  (right ),  five  members  of 
NBC  unit  covering  Pennsylvania  floods  were 
marooned  for  two  days  and  nights,  on  an  en- 
forced diet  of  ice  cream  and  soda  crackers. 
Food  was  their  first  thought  when  they  re- 
turned to  NBC  headquarters  [below). 


Jesse  Jones, 
RFC  Chairman 


Graham  McNamee 


Rep.  Bertrand 
H.  Snell 


Dorothy  Thompson 


Leading  personalities  at  both  major  party 
Conventions  addressed  NBC  listeners.  Doro- 
thy Thompson  and  Walter  Lippman,  noted 
political  analysts,  were  at  Cleveland  and 
Philadelphia  for  NBC  exclusively,  in  addi- 
tion to  regular  NBC  staff  commentators. 


A  Roosevelt  stampede  at  Philadelphia 

(Below)  At  Republican  Convention,  75  NBC  mi- 
crophones covered  every  point  in  huge  Cleve- 
land Auditorium. 


Walter  Lippman 


(Above)  John  B.  Kennedy,  NBC 
commentator,  interviews  Earl 
Johnson,  UP  news  manager,  and 
BarryFarris,  INSeditor-in-chief, 
at  Philadelphia. 

(Left)  Each  State  delegation  had 
its  own  microphone;  as  each  del- 
egate talked,  engineer  brought 
him  in  on  this  monitor  panel. 


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Election  night  In  Times  Square.  Millions  more 

r' 

heard  results  over  NBC  Networks. 
(Right)  Hot  off  the  wire,  election 

Wi^-^tJiL 

ilN 

c  ^ 

reports  are 

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edited  for  broadcasting. 

j 

A 

L^l 

Election 


Cut-in  announcements  gave  flash  reports  of 
election  results  as  they  were  tabulated  from 
wire  reports.  Special  election  night  programs 
went  on  the  air  at  frequent  intervals. 


'  "fe; 


1  Q^/v — Presidential  Year!  Nominating  con- 
-*-  >^*-^vJ  ventions,  addresses  by  party  candi- 
dates, debates  on  issues,  election  returns,  election 
night  celebrations  across  the  country — NBC  car- 
ried them  all.  Over  41  hours  were  allotted  to  broad- 
casts from  national  conventions  of  the  major 
parties  alone.  All  parties  and  all  candidates  were 
accorded  equal  opportunity  to  present  their  ap- 
peals. .  .  .  Finally,  in  the  most  elaborate  presiden- 
tial election  coverage  ever  attempted  by  radio, 
NBC  kept  listeners  abreast  of  results  in  48  states. 

Commenting  on  the  service  of  radio  in  a  letter  read 
at  NBC's  Tenth  Anniversary  Banquet  in  New  York 
on  November  15,  President  Roosevelt  said:  "Radio 
broadcasting  is  an  essential  service  to  the  American 
home  in  the  moulding  of  public  opinion." 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Jesse  Jones, 
RFC  Chairman 


Graham  McXamee 
with 
Rep.  Bertrand 
H.  Snell 


Dorothy  Thompson 


Leading  personalities  at  both  major  party 
Conventions  addressed  NB(]  listeners.  Doro- 
thy Thompson  and  Walter  Lippman,  noted 
political  analysts,  were  at  Cleveland  and 
Philadelphia  for  NBC  exclusively,  in  addi- 
tion to  regular  NBC  staff  commentators. 


A  Roosevelt  stampede  at  Philadelphia 

[Below <  At  Republican  Convention,  75  NBC  mi- 
crophones covered  every  point  in  huge  Cleve- 
land Auditorium. 


Walter  Lippman 


! 
i    ' 

1              :! 

[ 

ii 

J              ^ 

-k4 

1      ,; 

i' 

'Nri'^l 

1 

{Above)  John  B.  Kennedy,  NBC 
commentator,  interviews  Earl 
Johnson,  UP  news  manager,  and 
BarryFarris.  INSeditor-in-chief, 
at  Philadelphia. 

{Left)  Each  State  delegation  had 
its  own  microphone;  as  each  del- 
egate talked,  engineer  brought 
him  in  on  this  monitor  panel. 


Election  night  in  Times  Square.  Millions  more 
heard  results  over  NBC  Networks. 

(Right)  Hot  off  the  wire,  election  reports  are 
edited  for  broadcasting. 


Election 


Cut-in  announcements  gave  flash  reports  of 
election  results  as  they  were  tabulated  from 
wire  reports.  Special  election  night  programs 
went  on  the  air  at  frequent  intervals. 


ialk^if#r 


>  ♦  ,**. 


.<k 


»     «■'  I 


"*- 


■>- 


1  (Y^/v — Presidential  Year!  Xnniinaring  con- 
1  y%Jyi  ventions,  addresses  l>y  part\  candi- 
dates, debates  on  issues,  election  returns,  election 
night  celebrations  across  the  country  -\BC  car- 
ried them  all.  Over  41  hours  were  allotted  to  broiui- 
casts  from  national  conventions  of  the  nia)t>r 
parties  alone.  All  parties  and  all  caniiidates  were 
accorded  equal  opportunity  to  present  their  ap- 
peals. .  .  .  Finally,  in  the  most  elaborate  presiden- 
tial election  coverage  ever  attempted  by  radio, 
NBC  kept  listeners  abreast  of  results  in  4S  states. 

Commenting  on  the  service  of  radio  in  a  letter  read 
at  NBC's  Tenth  Anniversary  Banquet  in  New  ^'ork 
on  November  15,  President  Roosevelt  said:  "Radio 
broadcasting  is  an  essential  service  to  the  .American 
home  in  the  moulding  of  public  opinion. " 


A  NATIONAL  crisis — a  disaster — a  great  man 
dies.  Click-click-click — a  flash  bulletin — STOP 
PRESS!  A  light  blinks  on  the  network  control 
board.  The  engineer  throws  a  switch — and  an  NBC 
announcer  is  on  the  air  directly  from  the  NBC  news 
room,  breaking  the  news  to  listeners,  seconds  after 
the  first  report.  ...  A  few  hours  later,  NBC  com- 
mentators paint  the  picture  behind  the  news. 
NBC  has  again  given  complete  news  coverage. 


arm  and  Home 


AS  interested  as  city  dwellers  in  the  entertainment  features 
^  ^of  radio,  rural  listeners  have  an  even  greater  appreciation 
of  informative  programs  adapted  to  their  special  needs. 
Such  a  program  is  the  National  Farm  &  Home  Hour,  a  daily 
NBC  feature  presented  in  cooperation  with  the  U.  S.  De- 
partment of  Agriculture.  The  best  known  agricultural  radio 
program  on  the  air,  it  is  a  well-balanced  combination  of 
national  farm  news,  educational  talks  and  musical  features. 
To  listen  to  it  many  farm  homes  extend  the  dinner  hour.  As 
one  agricultural  leader  put  it,  "They  consider  the  Farm  & 
Home  Hour  worth  more  than  the  hour  spent  in  the  field." 


i. 


i«^-.' 


{Above)  The  "planning  board"  talks  over 
program  details;  Left  to  right,  Lloyd  Harris, 
production  chief;  William  E.  Drips,  NBC 
director  of  agriculture;  Walter  Blaufuss,  or- 
chestra conductor;  and  Everett  Mitchell, 
Chicago  chief  announcer.  I  Left)  More  than 
150,000  people  attended  the  National  Com 
Husking  Contest  in  Licking  County,  Ohio, 
in  November,  1936.  An  exclusive  NBC  broad- 
cast on  one  Farm  &  Home  Hour. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


NATIONAL  crisis — a  disaster — a  great  man 
dies.  Click-click-click — a  flash  bulletin — STOP 
PRF.SS!  A  light  blinks  on  the  network  control 
board.  The  engineer  throws  a  switch — and  an  NBC 
announcer  is  on  the  air  directly  from  the  NBC  news 
room,  breaking  the  news  to  listeners,  seconds  after 
the  first  report.  ...  A  few  hours  later,  NBC  com- 
mentators paint  the  picture  behind  the  news. 
NBC  has  again  given  complete  news  coverage. 


■bii  If    H^  \i, 


t>    «!t- 


Boys  and  girls  of  four  winning  sectional  4- II 
clubs  in  the  4-H  Social  Progress  contest  pose 
with  David  SarnofT,  president  of  RCA.  which 
sponsors  this  contest.  Many  Farm  &  Home 
Hours  are  devoted  to  4-H  club  activities. 


and  Home 


AS  interested  as  city  dwellers  in  the  entertainment  features 
^  A.of  radio, rural  listeners  have  an  even  greater  appreciation 
of  informative  programs  adapted  to  their  special  needs. 
Such  a  program  is  the  ^National  Farm  &  Home  Hour,  a  daily 
NBC  feature  presented  in  cooperation  with  the  U.  S.  De- 
partment of  Agriculture.  The  best  known  agricultural  radio 
program  on  the  air,  it  is  a  well-balanced  combination  of 
national  farm  news,  educational  talks  and  musical  features. 
To  listen  to  it  many  farm  homes  extend  the  dinner  hour.  As 
one  agricultural  leader  put  it,  "They  consider  the  Farm  & 
Home  Hour  worth  more  than  the  hour  spent  in  the  field." 


(Above)  The  ''planning  board"  talks  over 
program  details;  Left  to  ri^ht,  Lloyd  Harris, 
production  chief;  William  E.  Drips,  NBC: 
director  of  agriculture;  Walter  Blaufuss.  or- 
chestra conductor;  and  Everett  Mitchell. 
Chicago  chief  announcer.  iLeft'  More  than 
150,000  people  attended  the  National  Corn 
Husking  Contest  in  Licking  County.  Ohio, 
in  November,  1936.  An  exclusive  NBC  broad- 
cast on  one  Farm  &  Home  Hour. 


Glenn  Morris,  Olympics  decathlon  winner, 
clears  the  high  hurdles.  {Below)  Parade  open- 
ing the  Winter  Olympics  at  Garmisch  Parten- 
kirschen.  {Upper  right)  Jesse  Owens,  leading 
point  scorer  at  Olympics,  receives  first  award 
for  the  broad  jump.  Japanese  and  German  en- 
trants placed  second  and  third,  respectively. 


^P^fl 


Ceremonies  at  the  opening  of  the  1936  Olympic 
Games  in  Berlin  included  lighting  the  Olympic 
Flame  {upper  left)  and  the  parade  of  the  ath- 
letes with  massed  flags  of  all  nations  partici- 
pating {above).  Bill  Slater,  sports  announcer, 
covered  the  Olympics  for  NBC  {left). 


TTTHILE  new  records  were  being  made  in  the 
V  1  world  ofsports,  NBC  was  making  new  records 
for  complete  coverage  of  sporting  events.  NBC 
sports  broadcasts  set  an  all-time  high  in  I9^^6,  ris- 
ing 33'^%  over  1935.  Highlight  was  NBC's  cover- 
age of  the  Olympics.  After  covering  all  the  major 
track  and  field  elimination  meets,  American  listen- 
ers were  kept  posted  on  events  from  the  time  the 
first  American  contingent  sailed.  More  than  75 
international  broadcasts — a  new  high  for  a  single 
series  of  international  radio  programs — ^kept  this 
country  informed  of  every  Olympics  result. 


here  Champions  meet . . .  there's 


*1 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Glenn  Morris,  Olympics  decathlon  winner, 
clears  the  high  hurdles.  (Below)  Parade  open- 
ing the  Winter  Olympics  at  Garmisch  Parten- 
kirschen.  (Upper  ri^ht)  Jesse  Owens,  leading 
point  scorer  at  Olympics,  receives  first  award 
for  the  broad  jump.  Japanese  and  German  en- 
trants placed  second  and  third,  respectively. 


« 


IT  "  HILF.  new  records  were  being  niaJe  m  rhe 
▼  »  world  ofsports,  NBC  was  niakinii;  ncv\  rec«  )rds 
for  complete  coverage  of  sporting  exenrs.  NIK" 
sports  l>roadcasrs  set  an  all-rime  high  in  i()_;(\  ns- 
ing  3^^6' (  over  19,^5.  Highlight  was  NBC's  cover- 
age ot  the  Olympics.  After  covering  all  the  major 
track  and  field  elimination  meets,  American  listen- 
ers were  kept  posted  on  events  from  the  time  the 
first  American  contingent  saileii.  More  than  ~< 
international  broadcasts  a  new  high  for  a  sinule 
series  ot  international  radio  programs  -kept  this 
country  informed  of  every  Olvinpics  result. 


Champions  meet . . .  there's^^ 


i.  ..|^l<l<tllU  tiKWIMM  Itlllltltllt    t>  . 


^asp- 


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> 


From  the  umpire's  "Batter  up!"  of  the  first 
I  game  till  the  last  pop  bottle  was  drained, 
NBC  brought  a  complete  play-by-play  de- 
scription of  the  19.^6  World's  Sciies  between 
New  York's  two  major  league  leaders,  the 
Giants  and  the  Yankees.  Sponsored  by 
Ford  Motor  Company, 


1 

i 


(Circle)  Television  transmitting  antenna 
atop  Empire  State  Building,  highest  point 
in  New  York  City. 

{Right)  In  the  NBC  television  studio  at 
Radio  City,  "Iconoscope"  cameras  pick  up 
the  images  while  a  microphone  overhead 
catches  the  sound.  At  left  is  the  close-up 
camera  while  the  camera  at  right,  for  full- 
length  pictures,  is  mounted  on  a  dolly 
to  facilitate  moving  operator  and  camera 
together. 


lelevision 


Newsreels  and  other  short  movie  subjects 
also  make  excellent  television  program  ma- 
terial. Sound  film  is  run  through  these  pro- 
jectors. Pictures  are  projected  onto  the 
"Iconoscope"  of  the  cameras  in  the  next 
room  for  transmission. 


(Left)  The  33- tube  television  receiver 
designed  by  RCA  brings  this  group 
"talking  pictures  by  air."  The  televi- 
sion image  appears  on  the  "Kinescope" 
mounted  vertically  in  the  cabinet  and 
is  reflected  in  the  chromium  steel  mir- 
ror mounted  inside  the  cabinet  cover, 
shown  here  in  tilted  position  for  view- 
ing. (Below)  Betty  Goodwin,  first  NBC 
television  announcer,  as  she  would  ap- 
pear by  television  in  your  home.  (Actual 
photograph  of  a  received  picture. ) 


y 


(Above)  Video  (picture)  and  audio  (sound)  transmit- 
ters at  the  Empire  State  Building.  From  this  point, 
both  visual  and  sound  signals  are  sent  out  after  having 
been  received  from  the  Radio  City  studios  by  radio 
relay  or  coaxial  cable.  (Left)  Inside  one  of  the  trans- 
mitter cabinets,  showing  the  huge  water-cooled  trans- 
mitting tubes. 


JUNE  29,  1936,  marked  the  beginning  in  this  country  of 
organized  television  experiments  between  a  regular  trans- 
mitting station  and  a  number  of  experimental  receivers  in 
homes.  These  field  tests,  conducted  by  NBC,  brought  tele- 
vision out  of  the  RCA  laboratory  into  the  sphere  of  practical 
use.  While  television  is  still  not  ready  for  regular  service, 
NBC's  part  has  been  to  consider  all  the  requirements  of  a 
schedule,  i.e.,  to  experiment  with  operating  and  program  tech- 
nique and  production,  the  development  of  which  must  precede 
organized  television  service. 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


(Left^  The  .i.i-tube  television  reciiver 
designed  by  R(L\  brinUs  this  iirmip 
"talkin{>  pictures  by  air.  '  I  he  ivKvi- 
sioii  imafte  appears  on  the  '■  Kinescope" 
mounted  vertieally  in  iht-  cabinet  and 
is  reflected  in  the  chromium  st«.-f|  mir- 
ror mounted  inside  the  cabinet  comt. 
shown  here  in  tilted  position  for  \if»- 
ing.  Below  Betty  (ioodwjn.  hrst  NBC 
television  announcer,  as  she  wmild  ap- 
pear by  televisit)n  in  your  honu'.  Vctu.il 
photoftraph  of  a  recei\ed  picture. 


Circle i  Television  transmitting  antenna 
atop  Empire  State  Building,  highest  point 
in  New  York  City. 

[Right  In  the  NBC  television  studio  at 
Radio  City,  "Iconoscope"  cameras  pick  up 
the  images  v^hile  a  microphone  overhead 
catches  the  sound.  .\t  left  is  the  close-up 
camera  while  the  camera  at  right,  for  full- 
length  pictures,  is  mounted  on  a  dolly 
to  facilitate  moving  operator  and  camera 


together. 


:  lelevision 


Newsreels  and  other  short  movie  subjects 
also  make  excellent  television  program  ma- 
terial. Sound  film  is  run  through  these  pro- 
jectors. Pictures  are  projected  onto  the 
"Iconoscope"  of  the  cameras  in  the  next 
room  for  transmission. 


Abnte  Video  'picture)  and  audio  (sound)  transmit- 
ters at  the  Empire  State  Building.  From  this  point, 
both  visual  and  sound  signals  are  sent  out  after  having 
been  received  from  the  Radio  City  studios  by  radio 
relay  or  coaxial  cable.  (Left)  inside  one  of  the  trans- 
mitter cabinets,  showing  the  huge  water-cooled  trans- 
mitting tubes. 


JUNE  29,  I9j6,  marked  the  beginning  in  this  countrv  n( 
organized  television  experiments  l^etween  a  regular  tran.s- 
mitting  station  and  a  number  of  experimental  receivers  in 
homes.  These  field  tests,  comlucted  by  NBC,  l)rought  tele- 
vision out  of  the  RCA  laboratory  into  the  spjiere  of"  practical 
use.  While  television  is  still  not  read>'  for  regular  service, 
NBC's  part  has  been  to  consider  all  the  requirements  of"  a 
schedule,  i.e.,  to  experiment  with  operating  and  program  tcch- 
nic]ue  and  production,  the  development  of  which  must  precede 
organized  television  service. 


\ 


"Let's  Talk  It  Over,"  a  wom- 
an's forum  of  the  air,  featur- 
ing Anne  Hard,  NBC  news 
commentator,  and  guest 
speakers,  with  Alma  Kitchell 
as  mistress-of-ceremonies, 
has  won  unusual  feminine 
applause. 


<rN 


f  1  o  the  Ladies ! 


FROM  the  time  when  "the  cat,  the  fire  and  the  wife  must 
never  go  out"  to  woman's  present  emancipation  seems 
generations;  so,  to  confine  women's  interest  to  programs 
dedicated  strictly  "To  the  Ladies!"  is  archaic.  How  Ameri- 
can women  rank  NBC  broadcasts  is  shown  by  recent  awards 
of  the  Women's  National  Radio  Committee  representing 
20,000,000  clubwomen.  Three  out  of  Jour  first  places  and  nine 
out  oj  fourteen  runner-up  mentions 
went  to  programs  on  NBC  Networks. 


Allen  Prescott,  the  "Wife- 
Saver,"  lightens  home-mak- 
ing with  light-hearted  but 
pointed  household  hints. 


{heft)  The  ever  popular  "Breakfast 
Oub"  gets  the  nation  off  to  work  to  a 
smiling,  happy  start,  after  the  members 
of  the  strategy  board  have  their  coffee. 

(Right)  The  Mystery  Chef's  delicious, 
practical  recipes  have  made  many  a 
mouth  water  in  anticipation. 

(Below)  Cheerio— still  incognito— and  his 
delightful  programs  of  music  and  phi- 
losophy hold  audiences  year  after  year. 


7 


-■  -r-'i 


(Right)  Madge  Tucker,  NBC's  talented  impres- 
sario  of  childhood,  rehearses  one  of  her  gay 
programs  with  several  of  her  enthusiastic  play- 
ers. (Below)  No  wonder  these  kids  have  fun 
broadcasting  about  a  real  barn. 


hildren's 
Hour 


COMES  a  pause  in  the  day's  occupation,  that  is  known 
as  the  Children's  Hour."  Strictly  speaking,  there  are 
few  NBC  radio  hours  that  are  not  Children's  Hours,  for  the 
youth  of  America  has  banded  itself  together  into  legions  of 
self-appointed  program  specialists.  It's  always  "Junior"  or 
"Smart  Sister"  who  can  tell  you  "who's-on-what-station- 
when."  They  listen  to — and  participate  in — the  programs 
illustrated  here  and  other  NBC  children's  programs. 


i^ 


/ 


ij-^^ 


'O 


(Left)  Judges  of  NBC's  Children's  Program 
Contest  scanned  hundreds  of  entries  and 
awarded  top  honors  to  six  fine  scripts  which 
NBC  will  produce  in  1937.  (Right)  Childhood's 
Sweetheart!  Lovely  Ireene  Wicker,  the  "Sing- 
ing Lady,"  has  captivated  the  hearts  of  younger 
boys  and  girls  for  the  past  five  years. 


n/ 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Y 


"Let's  Talk  It  Over,"  a  wom- 
an's forum  of  the  air,  featur- 
ing Anne  Hard,  NBC  news 
commentator,  and  guest 
speakers,  with  Alma  Kitchell 
as  mistress-of-ceremonies, 
has  won  unusual  feminine 
applause. 


y< 


M 


itSr 


im 


n^ 


o  the  Ladies! 


1^  ROM  the  time  when  "the  cat,  the  fire  and  the  wife  must 
never  go  out"  to  woman's  present  emancipation  seems 
generations;  so,  to  confine  women's  interest  to  programs 
dedicated  strictly  "To  the  Ladies!"  is  archaic.  How  Ameri- 
can women  rank  NBC  broadcasts  is  shown  by  recent  awards 
of  the  Women's  National  Radio  Committee  representing 
2o,ooo,cx)o  clubwomen.  T/iree  out  of /our  first  places  and  fijfie 
out  of  Jourteen  runner-up  mentions 
went  to  programs  on  NBC  Networks. 


^V 


Allen  Prescott,  the  "Wife- 
Saver,"  lightens  home-mak- 
ing with  light-hearted  but 
pointed  household  hints. 


{Left)  The  ever  popular  "Breakfast 
Club"  gets  the  nation  off  to  work  to  a 
smiling,  happy  start,  after  the  members 
of  the  strategy  board  have  their  coffee. 

(Right)  The  Mystery  Chef's  delicious, 
practical  recipes  have  made  many  a 
mouth  water  in  anticipation. 

( Below }  Cheerio— still  incognito — and  his 
delightful  programs  of  music  and  phi- 
losophy hold  audiences  year  after  year. 


<=»^/ 


y 


^.<J 


•  / 


(Right)  Madge  Tucker,  NBC's  talented  impres- 
sario  of  childhood,  rehearses  one  of  her  gay 
programs  with  several  of  her  enthusiastic  play- 
ers. (Below)  No  wonder  these  kids  have  fun 
broadcasting  about  a  real  barn. 


C^  OMES  a  pause  in  the  (.lay's  occupation,  that  is  known 
~~J  as  the  Children's  Hour."  Strictly  speaking,  there  are 
few  NBC  radio  hours  that  are  not  Children's  Hours,  for  the 
youth  of  America  has  banded  itself  together  into  legions  of 
selt-appointed  program  specialists.  It's  always  "junior"  or 
"Smart  Sister"  who  can  tell  you  "who's-on-what-station- 
when."  They  listen  to  -and  participate  in  the  programs 
illustrated  here  antl  other  NBC  children's  programs. 


Vi 


(Left)  Judges  of  NBC's  Children's  Program 
Contest  scanned  hundreds  of  entries  and 
awarded  top  honors  to  six  fine  scripts  which 
NBC  will  produce  in  1937.  (Right)  Childhood's 
Sweetheart!  Lovely  Ireene  Wicker,  the  "Sing- 
ing Lady,"  has  captivated  the  hearts  of  younger 
boys  and  girls  for  the  past  five  years. 


'/. 


^    i  V 


y    :k.v 


'^r" 


''^  1 


/■j 


NBC's  Chief  Engineer,  O.  B.  Hanson,  demon- 
strates the  first  model  of  the  micro-wave 
transmitter,  the  midget  radio  station.  Con- 
cealed in  a  top-hat,  the  transmitter  has  its 
power  supply  in  batteries  worn  in  a  belt.  A 
later  model  (left)  built  in  a  box  with  a  handle, 
was  widely  used  during  NBC  broadcasts  from 
1936  political  conventions. 


Hat 


AGAIN  leading  the  way  in  im- 
-  proving  broadcasting  technique, 
NBC  engineers  added  to  their  long 
list  of  achievements  the  development 
of  the  new  micro-wave  transmitter. 
This  self-contained  broadcasting  unit 
permits  radio  pick-ups  to  be  made 
from  locations  where  power  lines  are 
not  available.  It  does  away  with  trail- 
ing wires  and  allows  the  announcer 
to  stroll  about  at  will.  When  it  is 
used,  the  programs  are  picked  up  by 
more  powerful  equipment  and  re- 
layed to  the  networks.  The  entire 
equipment  weighs  but  seven  pounds. 


NBC's  self-contained  broadcast- 
ing unit  was  first  used  during 
the  Easter  parade  on  April  12, 
1936.  NBC  announcer,  George 
Hicks,  became  a  walking  radio 
station  as  he  described  Easter 
finery  with  the  help  of  Lucius 
Beebe,  newspaper  columnist  and 
man-about-town  ileft)  and  Miss 
Gloria  Braggiotti,  socialite  and 
fashion  writer  {right). 


Jack 


Benoy 


an*,  p. 


n»iiy 


Listener's  Choice 

"rir^  HE  greatest  number  of  the  most  popu- 
X    lar  programs"  is  more  than  just  a 
catch-phrase.  For  years,  the  leaders  in  popu- 
larity polls  have  been  predominantly  NBC 
artists  and  programs.   Newspapers,   radio 
magazines,  trade  papers,  and  special  radio 
committees   representing   millions 
of  listeners  have  all  joined  in  this 
acclaim.    In   news,   drama,   com- 
edy, variety,  music,  education  — 
NBC   programs   and    artists    are 
truly  first  choice  of  the  greatest 
number  of  listeners.    Shown  here 
are  some  of  the  NBC  artists  who 
beckon  the  ears  of  the  nation — 
who  have  become  the  greatest 
sales   force  in   the  world   because 
they    are    invited   guests   in   mil- 
lions of  homes— listener's  choice. 


Lulu  Belle,  1936  Radio  Queen 
National  Bam  Dance 


\Ai* 


^TbO**- 


.4  1^'** 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


6/ 


''«Cr, 


°9bt 


/I,  (i.AIX  leading  the  way  in  im- 
proving hroudcasting  technique, 
NBC  engineers  added  to  their  long 
hst  of  achievements  the  development 
(A  the  new  micro-wave  transmitter. 
'I'his  self-contained  hroatlcasting  unit 
permits  radio  pick-ups  to  he  made 
trom  locations  where  power  lines  are 
not  available.  It  iloes  away  with  trail- 
ing wires  and  allows  the  announcer 
to  stroll  ahout  at  will.  When  it  is 
usetl,  the  programs  are  picked  up  hy 
more  powerful  equipment  and  re- 
hnetl  to  the  networks.  The  entire 
equii>nient  weighs  hut  seven  pounds. 


NBC's  self-contained  broadcast- 
ing unit  was  first  used  during 
tfie  Kaster  parade  on  April  12, 
1936.  NBC  announcer,  George 
Hicks,  became  a  walking  radio 
station  as  he  described  Easter 
finery  with  the  help  of  Lucius 
Beebe,  newspaper  columnist  and 
man-about-town  ileft)  and  Miss 
Gloria  Braggiotti,  socialite  and 
fashion  writer  {right). 


jack  Benny 


"**»'»  F^ 


ntiiy 


Listener's  Choice 

1"^  HE  greatest  number  of  the  most  popu- 
lar programs"   is   more   than  just   a 
catch-phrase.  For  years,  the  leaders  in  popu- 
larity polls  have  been  predominantly  XBC 
artists   and   programs.    Newspapers,    radio 
magazines,  trade  papers,  and  special  radio 
committees    representing   millions 
of  listeners  have  all  joined  in  this 
acclaim.    In    news,    drama,    com- 
edy, variety,  music,  education  — 
NBC    programs   and    artists    are 
truly  first  choice  of  the  greatest 
number  of  listeners.    Shown  here 
are  some  of  the  NBC  artists  who 
beckon   the  ears  of  the  nation  — 
who  have   become   the  greatest 
sales   force   in   the  world   because 
they    are    invited    guests   in    mil- 
lions of  homes— listener's  choice. 


Lulu  Belle,  1936  Radio  Queen 
National  Barn  Dance 


TiTsi"''"'  ^^ 


s\\«** 


''"'*^e  Co 


ehind  the 


(Above)  Playing  to  empty  seats  for  probably 
the  first  time  in  his  successful  career,  Noel 
Coward  discusses  the  script  with  one  of  the 
directors  while  other  artists  await  their  re- 
hearsal cues. 

{Right)  In  the  control  room,  a  production  man 
times  the  script  and  cuts  "business"  to  split 
seconds  while  the  engineer  watches  the  dials 
for  sound  control. 


6i 


Mike 


'>n 


E 


VERY  minute  on  the  air  requires  sixty  minutes 
preparation"  is  a  formula  not  literally  true  of  every 
program,  but  the  most  experienced  radio  directors  know 
that  "the  harder  the  planning,  the  easier  the  listening," 
and  consequently  exercise  the  greatest  care  over  every 
detail.  Playing  to  an  audience  of  millions  requires  the 
highest  proficiency.  Nothing  is  left  to  chance  ...  or  in- 
spiration. Everything  must  move  with  clocklike  precision 
and  yet  none  of  the  tactics  of  a  "drill  sergeant"  must 
show,  for  "the  greatest  art  disguises  the  means  of  art." 
Here  are  a  few  "ofF-stage"  glimpses  of  the  variety  program 
directed  by  Rudy  Vallee. 


{Right)  It  looks  like  a  family  reunion  when 
Ed  Wynn  is  "guesting"  on  the  Vallee  show. 
Graham  McNamee  chuckles  as  Ed  cracks  a 
"nifty"  and  Rudy  follows  the  script. 

{Below)  Musical  scores  are  "subject  to  change 
without  notice,"  so  the  musician  marks  a  cor- 
rection on  the  spot. 


\ 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


Abote  Playing  to  empty  seats  for  probably 
the  first  time  in  his  successful  career,  Noel 
Coward  discusses  the  script  with  one  of  the 
directors  while  other  artists  await  their  re- 
hearsal cues. 

Right)  In  the  control  room,  a  production  man 
times  the  script  and  cuts  "business"  to  split 
seconds  while  the  engineer  watches  the  dials 
for  sound  control. 


S'  111 


1 


VERY  minute  on  the  air  requires  sixty  minutes 
J  preparation"  is  a  formula  not  literally  true  of  every 
program,  but  the  most  experienced  radio  directors  know 
that  "the  harder  the  planning,  the  easier  the  listening," 
and  consequently  exercise  the  greatest  care  over  every 
detail.  Playing  to  an  audience  of  millions  requires  the 
highest  proficiency.  Nothing  is  left  to  chance  ...  or  in- 
spiration. Everything  must  move  with  clocklike  precision 
and  yet  none  of  the  tactics  of  a  "drill  sergeant"  must 
show,  for  "the  greatest  art  disguises  the  means  of  art." 
Here  are  a  few  "ofF-stage"  glimpses  of  the  variety  program 
directed  by  Rudy  V'allee. 


(Right)  It  looks  like  a  family  reunion  when 
Ed  VVynn  is  "guesting"  on  the  Vallee  show. 
Graham  McNamee  chuckles  as  Ed  cracks  a 
"nifty"  and  Rudy  follows  the  script. 

(Below)  Musical  scores  are  "subject  to  change 
without  notice,"  so  the  musician  marks  a  cor- 
rection on  the  spot. 


^> 


{Above\  Rudy  directs  the 
orchestra  in  rehearsal  as  a 
production  man  phones  the 
control  room  to  check  on  the 
transmission. 

(Left^  "Is  this  mike  open?" 
signals  the  production  man 
to  the  engineer  in  the  con- 
trol room  oH-stage. 


t    •  I    i    t 


TTn 


^ 

y 


5,500,000  letters  t JT  us 


vv 


7 HAT  does  America  think  about 


I'  { 


NBC  Mail  Room,  more  com- 
plete  than   many   postofiices. 


radio?  What  do  listeners  think 
about  NBC  programs?  Our  "best 
friends  and  severest  critics"  from 
coast  to  coast  and  across  the  seas 
take  their  pens  in  hand  and  tell  us. 

In  1936,  five  and  a  half  million  letters 
— 2,000,000  more  than  in  1935 — 
brought  comments,  questions  about  •«"«  *>ag8  of  mail  each  day 
artists,  requests  for  selections,  re- 
sponse to  offers,  and  many  queries 
about  subjects  bearing  little  relation 
to  radio.  Millions  of  other  letters 
went  direct  to  sponsors  of  NBC  com- 
mercial programs. 

Nowhere  will  you  find  more  sub- 
stantial evidence  that  radio  has  be- 
come firmly  established  as  the  friend, 
counselor  and  teacher  to  America's 
millions. 


This  "rowing  machine"  aids 
in  sorting  mail  sent  to  indi- 
vidual artists  and  programs. 


For  each  letter,  a  record  card  is 
punched,  giving  facts  about  its 
source  for  statistical  use. 


/ 


Each  piece  of  audience  mail  is 
carefully  checked  and  classi- 
fied before  routing. 


I 


This  device  sorts  and  counts 
record  cards  for  tabulating 
data  on  NBC  circulation. 


and  a  half  million  more  call  personally 


IN  1936,  560,000  persons — 80%  of  them  from 
other  cities — visited  the  Radio  City  head- 
quarters of  NBC,  making  it  New  York  City's 
most  popular  point  of  interest  among  paying 
sightseers.  They  had  heard  NBC  programs; 
they  came  to  see  "what  makes  the  wheels  go 
round."  After  the  studio  tour,  these  "neigh- 
bors" from  every  state  had  a  greater  appre- 
ciation of  the  meaning  of  those  words  familiar 
to  more  than  24,000,000  radio  families:  ''This — 
is  the  National  Broadcasting  Company!" 


INTENTIONAL  SECOND  EXPOSURE 


5,500,000  letters  t(?V  US 


HAT  does  America  think  about 
radio?  What  do  listeners  think 
about  \BC  programs?  Our  "best 
friends  and  severest  critics"  from 
coast  to  coast  and  across  the  seas 
take  their  pens  in  hand  and  tell  us. 

In  I9j6,  five  and  a  half  million  letters 
— 2,000,000  more  than  in  19.^5 — 
brought  comments,  questions  about 
artists,  requests  for  selections,  re- 
sponse to  offers,  and  many  queries 
about  subjects  bearing  little  relation 
to  radio.  Millions  of  other  letters 
went  direct  to  sponsors  of  NBC  com- 
mercial programs. 

Xowhere  will  you  find  more  sub- 
stantial evidence  that  radio  has  be- 
come firmly  established  as  the  friend, 
counselor  and  teacher  to  America's 
millions. 


NBC  Mail  Room,  more  com- 
plete than  many  postoffices, 
sorts  bags  of  mail  each  day. 


This  "rowing  machine"  aids 
in  sorting  mail  sent  to  indi- 
vidual artists  and  proiirams. 


Each  piece  of  audience  mail  is 
carefully  checked  and  classi- 
fied before  routing. 


This  device  sorts  and  counts 
record  cards  for  tabulating 
data  on  NBC  circulation. 


half  million  mor.      ,///  persorh^/fv 


I  N  1 9j6,  560,000  persons — 8o%of  them  from 
other  cities  -visited  the  Radio  City  head- 
quarters of  NBC,  making  it  New  York  City's 
most  popular  point  of  interest  among  paying 
sightseers.  They  had  heard  NBC  programs; 
they  came  to  see  "what  makes  the  wheels  go 
round."  After  the  studio  tour,  these  "neigh- 
bors" from  every  state  had  a  greater  appre- 
ciation of  the  meaning  of  those  words  familiar 
to  more  than  24,000,000  radio  families:  "77;/j — 
is  the  National  Broadcasting  Company!" 


V  • 


Date  Due 


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