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AIRFIX 


me 


FOR PLASTIC MODELLERS 


2s 6d 



IN 

THIS 

ISSUE 


Full guide to British tank markings, 1939-45 
Fieseler Storch and Beaufighter conversions 


51 years of -famous warplanes 


AiRFIX BRINGS THEM TO LIFE! With scores of great The vast range of Airfix construction kits covers 19 different 

fighting planes from World War I right up to today's super- series, including planes, ships, cars, historical figures and 

sonic jets— all constant scale (1/72nd) and all from Airfix! trackside series-each model just like the ^1 thing! 

J Prices from only 2/6d. to 19/6d. 



ARADO 


MITCHELL 


LIGHTNING 


THUNDERBOLT 


SWORDFISH 


MIRAGE 


LYSANDER 


SPITFIRE 


FIESLER 

STORCH 


CAMEL 



AIRLINERS. CARS. 
SHIPS, TANKS TOO! 

Start your collection NOW ! 



STOP PRESS 



Fill A. This kit of the swing-wino aircraft 
is over 1 ft. long complete with transfers. 
Wings and tailplane are actually variable. 
Price 7 6d. 


JUST LIKE THE REAL THING 

From toy shops, model and hobby 
shops and F. W. Woolworth 


AIRFIX MAGAZINE 2/6 MONTHLY 

ASK FOR THE AIRFIX KIT CATALOGUE 


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♦ 






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Model Kits • Trains • Slot Car Racing Die-cast Scale Models and Miniatures • Hobbies in general 




Model Kits • Trains • Slot Car Racing Die-cast Scale Models and Miniatures • Hobbies in general 


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Model Kits • Trains • Slot Car Racing • Die-cast Scale Models and Miniatures • Hobbies in general 

FOR ALL ENQUIRIES PLEASE SEND S.A.E. 


November. 1968 


89 


Model Kits Trains Slot Car Racing • Die-cast Scale Models and Miniatures Hobbies in general 




HISTOREX AGENTS 


CHASSEUR A CHEVAL 
DE LA GARDE 

Latest releases available 
. . . the Cuirassiers and 
personality figures of 
Gouvion St. Cyr and 
d’Hautpoul 


We offer you the means to reproduce perfect 
examples of Napoleonic miniatures. We think 
however that many modellers are not aware of 
the quality of our mouldings and so on receipt 
of P.O. or stamps for 1/6 we will send you a 
sample musket or sword. 

Figures are 1/30th scale and are historically 
accurate in every detail. A mounted figure is 
composed of approximately 50 separate parts 
and over 100 horse positions are available. 

Send s.a.e. for resume of products. The full 
catalogue will be sent with first order. 

HISTOREX AGENTS 

3 CASTLE STREET, DOVER, KENT 




BELLONA 

The world s largest range of 
Battle Scenery 
D1 1914-18 Trench System 
D2 Menin Road 
D3 The Redan 

D4 Twin 88 mm. Gun position 
D5 Fighter dispersal bay 

Send 6d. and S.A.E. for 
Catalogue. 


■ 


BELLONA 

Military Vehicle prints. A series 
of 16 prints with scale drawings, 
history and relevant details of at 
least four tanks per series. 

4/- each 


The Aircraft Kit of the Year — The Fabulous B-52 D 

Monogram 1/72 scale Cl 1 19s. 6d. post free 


NEW DECALS from 

FINLAND 

I.P.M.S. produced 

1/32 scale BF 109G 5/ per sheet 

(for Revell) 

1/72 scale M.I.G.21 2/6 per sheet 
(for Frog, Airfix) 

Convert your models with these 
unusual markings. 

NEW TAMIYA TANKS 

1/35 sc. HUNTING TIGER 59/11 
1/35 scale KING TIGER 59/11 
Both REMOTE CONTROL. 


The CAR kit of the year 
POSCHER ALFA ROMEO 
A masterpiece in miniature £35 
BACK IN STOCK — FROG AVRO SHACKLETON 


NEW 

REVELL 

1/32 scale ZERO 

1/72 scale B.17 LADY LUCK 1 

FROG 

B.A.C. LIGHTNING F.6 
CANADAIR SABRE Mk. 6 
HOC for WARGAMERS 
No. 21 Combat Uniforms 
No. 23 Military Equipment 
LINDBERG 
1/72 Do 335 
1/72 H S. 129 

Sorry all H E. 100 now sold. 

MONOGRAM 

1/72 GOSHAWK F11C 

1/72 HAWK P.6.E 

1/72 GRUMMAN F.4.B 


14/9 

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ERNEST BERWICK 

THE MODEL SPECIALISTS 

11A NEWLAND STREET, KETTERING, NORTHANTS, ENGLAND 


' CONTROL COLUMN" 

2/- plus 4d. post. 

POST U.K. 

Up to 10/-. 1/-; up to £1. 2/-; up to 
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18/11 


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90 


AIRFIX magazine 


Are you leaving 
school with 
no qualifications? 

So did Oliver Willmott. 

But he went to an Army Apprentices’ College 
and look how he’s progressed in just two years. 



Passed ‘O* Level Maths 


Sitting City & Guilds examination 


Passed Army Certificate of Lducation 

(Senior test) in 3 subjects 


Passed an Outward Bound Course 


Training as an electrician 

(will be qualified to Trades Union stanJarJs in only 1 more year 


Already promoted to Junior N.C.O. 


Gets 10 weeks holiday a year 


Could become a Sgt. Technician by 25 


Coached in many sports including rowing 


Saves £5.10. a week 


When Oliver left school, his 
prospects weren’t good. But he didn’t 
give up. He was determined to get a 
job with a future, and to go on with 
his education. 

So he applied for an Army 
Apprenticeship. 

With over 50 apprenticeships to 
choose from at 6 colleges, he decided 
to become an Electrician. Now, as 
well as getting first-class training, he 
is leading a really full life. 

His Electrician’s Course is an 
intensive and highly practical one. 
He will be qualified to Trades Union 
standards after three years. He is also 


getting further education up to 
G.C.E., City & Guilds and O.N.C. 
standards. And it’s all part of his 
training programme. And so is the 
two afternoons sport each week. 

Added to all this, Oliver gets 10 
weeks paid holiday, and plenty of 
free time for his own interests, like 
fishing, and 12-bore shooting, and 
he’s saving £5. 10s a week. 

You could have a life like Oliver. 
If you’re between 15 and 17, call 
at your local Army Careers inform- 
ation Office (the address is at your 
local Post Office). Or send off this 
coupon. 


I To: Army Careers MP6(A) 

I Lansdownc Hse., Berkeley Sq., 
London W1X6AA 
| Please send me full details of 
| Army Junior Entry Schemes 

j NAME 
| ADDRESS 

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| DATE OF BIRTH 

| ( You must be resident in the U.K.) 

.1667)2001 


November, 1968 


91 





24 TANK CONVERSIONS FROM EXISTING KITS 


Since 1964 Bellona Publications have been providing a unique 
service for the Military Enthusiast. This service is in the form of 
highly detailed scale drawings to the SAME scale as the AIRFIX 
MILITARY VEHICLE KITS. Equipped with these BELLONA PRINTS 
you can tackle a model conversion with the knowledge that you 
have the most advanced details, and drawn to the size you need 
so there is no messy measuring or calculating. 

All Series are kept In print. Each Series of BELLONA prints con- 
tains on average four sets of detailed scale drawings (4 mm. to 
one foot) drawn by experts, each set of drawings show a minimum 
of four views with sectional views when possible, plus photo- 
graphic illustration, a comprehensive history and technical details. 
For readers that follow the excellent series • Military Modelling 
(by Chris Ellis) in this magazine each month the Bellona Prints 
will give additional information and insight into the model they 
are working on. „ . . _ „ _ . 

To assist Military * Converters’ here is a list of Bellona Prints 
which cover subjects that can be easily converted from the Airfix 
Kits. 

AIRFIX KITS B ^ 

Bellona Military Vehicle Print Series Number 

A2V German Panther Tank 

Jagdpanther — Sd Kfz 173 8.8 cm. Tank Destroyer 
Pz. Kpfw Panther' Ausf G — 1945 Model 
A3V American Sherman Tank 

M 7 B 105 mm. HMC Priest’ 

M 4 Tank with 105 mm. Howitzer/Horizontal 
Volute Suspension 
17 pdr. Sherman VC Firefly' 

3" GMC M10 tank destroyer 
Medium Tank T.6 

M4A3E2 — Sherman Assault Tank ‘Jumbo' 

Canadian Cruiser RAM II (M4A5) 

M3 ’General Lee' Mk. I 


Series 8 
Series 16 

Series 3 

Series 5 
Series 7 
Series 9 
Series 11 
Series 13 
Series 14 
Series 15 


A6V 

German 75 mm. Assault Gun 




SturmKanone 7.5 cm. auf Pz. Kpfw III Ausf. D. 

Series 

6 

A7V 

Pz. Kpfw III Ausf. F (5 cm. KwK L/42) 

Russian Josef Stalin III 

Series 

7 


Klimenti Vorishilov 1 C (76.2 mm.) 

Series 


A8V 

Klimenti Vorishilov II (152 mm.) 

Germ in Tiger Tank 

Series 

4 

A11V 

Pz. Kpfw Tiger' Ausf. E (All versions) 

German Armoured Car (Sd Kfz 234) 

Series 

13 

A14V 

S. PzSpwg. (Sd Kfz 232) (FU) 8-rad. 

British Matador and 5.5 inch Gun 

Armoured Command Vehicle HP and LP (AEC) 

Series 

12 

A15V 

T6 x 6 Mk. 1 

British World War 1 Tank Mk. 1 

Series 

11 


Tank Mark 1 Signals Tank Mk. 1 

Series 

1 

A16V 

Tank Mark IV (Female) - 

Russian T34 Tank 

Series 

14 


T. 34/85 Tank 

Series 

4 


100 mm. Tank Destroyer SU 100 

Series 

2 

A202V 

85 mm. Tank Destroyer SU 85 

American Buffalo Amphibian and Jeep 

Jeep and M100 i ton trailer and amphibious jeep 

Series 

7 

A203V 

SEEP’ 

German 88 mm. Gun and Tractor 

Series 

6 


8.8 cm. FLAK 18 ton Sd Ah 201 trailer (earlier 
trailer than Airfix model) with 8t ZgKw Krauss 
Maffei semitrack tractor Series 9 

In addition to these conversions listed above there are of 
course many tanks and vehicles in the Bellona Print Series which 
can be scratch built’ with Airfix components as the basis. For 
instance in SERIES 2 Bellona Prints there is the Pz. Kpfw Tiger 
Ausf. B (Koeningstiger) which was the subject of an Airfix Maga- 
zine article in 1966. This model can be built combining parts 
from both the Tiger and Panther Kits. 

Price 4/- per copy, post 4d. Additional copies add Id. postage. 


BELLONA SHEET FOR MODEL MAKING. BELLONA WARPICS PHOTOS FOR REFERENCE. 
BELLONA Dioramas and Battlefields for displaying completed models. 

BELLONA A7, HAWTHORN HILL, BRACKNELL, BERKS. 


a F V TRANSFERS ui?« J 

[II 


H 1 ¥ 1 nfiliul LIIU SCALE 

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T.1 . ATriKa Korps raims. ou emuivms 
T.2. SS Panzer Division Signs. 60 signs. 
T.3. German Crosses for Military Vehicles. 

90 emblems. 

T.4. Alamein Sheet. 

T.5. German Tank numbers, outlined white. 
T.6. British Armoured Unit signs. 



AIRCRAFT TRANSFERS 

1 : 72 SCALE 

A.1 . Swastikas W.W.II. 80 on sheet. 

A 2. R.A.F. B' Type roundels. 20 on sheet 
A. 3. S.E.A.C. roundels. 36 roundels plus tail fin 
flashes. 

A. 4. R.A.F. Squadron Code Letters. 

0/4 4 per AT YOUR 

| | SHEET HOBBY SHOP 



TRADERS 

Stock and display Almarks, the British Transfers that 
every keen modeller and Wargamer demands. Trade 
terms available. Almarks are ready for display and 
safe customer handling. 


Now on sale at Lead- 
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you have difficulty in 
obtaining your Al- 
marks send direct to 
(Please add return , 
postage) i 


AlmarkS 


ALMARK PUBLISHING CO. 

104/106 Watling Avenue, Edgware, Middx., England 


New from Harbutt’s 



The new miniature car construction set for 
making up 10 vintage and veteran models. 
Contents include 10 assembly kits, instruction 
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thing fits into place perfectly without glue. 
Order now. Retail Price 10s 6d (U.K.) 

Distributed by 

HARBUTT’S PLASTICINE LTD. 

Bathampton • Bath • Somerset 


92 


AIRFIX magazine 




Then have fun driving a Mamod Steam Model. The traction engine 
ami the road roller c.\n actually be steered as they go. There are 

stationary engines, too. for powering Mamod miniature working machines 
and Meccano models. Precision engineered. Mamod models are safe as 
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STEAM MODELS mean a world of fun for you 


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(ENLARGED EDITION) Compiled by LESLIE HUNT 
Bound in boards — coloured dust jacket 

FACTS 


about this remarkable book 


9 Size 9J" deep x 7£" wide ® 162 pages • Weight 1 lb. 7 ozs. 

• Contains over 525 photographs • Over 20,000 words 

• Records the world-wide disposition of over 3,000 Veteran and 
Vintage Aircraft 

TOTALS LISTED 


AEROPLANES 
AIRSHIPS & BALLOONS 

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TOTAL ENTRIES 


3,102 representing 903 types 

4 representing 4 types 

47 representing 30 types 

1 representing 1 type 

101 representing 43 types 

95 representing 44 types 


3,350 — 1,025 types in 66 countries 


Order your copy now — price 30/-. Immediate delivery — post free. 


HARLEYFORD PUBLICATIONS LTD. 

LETCHWORTH • HERTFORDSHIRE • ENGLAND • DEP AF/LH 


November, 1968 


93 




■CUT THIS 
LEAVE IT ON 


Dear Dad, 

I’d love a Philips Electronic or 
Mechanical Engineer Kit for Christmas. 



Signed 


“I 


With Philips Mechanical Engineer Kit ME 1201 
I can build 25 exciting models different kinds 
of cars, cranes, elevators, dynamo, a fan, a bulldozer. 
Fascinating, gaily coloured working models. 



94 


AIRFIX magazine 


OUT AND 
DAD’S PILLOW! 


r 



The Electronic Engineer Kit EE 1003 
builds another 24 models, including 
radios, burglar alarms, amplifiers 
and signalling systems. 

Combine the Electronic 
and Mechanical Kits and 
even more fascinating 
models arc possible. 


PHILIPS 


“1 


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1 

To: Philips Electrical Limited, Century House, Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W.C.2. I 
Please send me a leaflet on Electronic and Mechanical Engineer Kits. ■ 

WRITE IN CAPITAL LETTERS PLEASE 1 


NAME 

ADDRESS 

A 1 


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Distributed in U.K. by Mettoy Play craft ( Sales) Ltd. 


PHJLIPSj 


November. 1968 


95 




FLIGHT MODELLERS . . . 

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The 18 beautiful contemporary colours, 
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Joy Plastic Enamel has good flow, 
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It gives glass-hard abrasion 
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Tins: 1/6; 2/3; 3/9; 6/6 

All colours are lead free 
and are safe to use on children s toys. etc. 



‘I0Y-PLANE’ BALSA CEMENT 




J0 ‘I0Y-PLANE’ POLYSTYRENE CEMENT 



New and 
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OTHER PRODUCTS MADE BY MODELLERS FOR MODELLERS 


‘JOY-PLANE’ CELLULOSE DOPES. 1/3; 2/-. 
•JOY-PLANE* CLEAR DOPES. 1/3 ; 2/- ; 2/9 ; 5/-. 
PLASTIC WOOD. 1/5. 

BANANA OIL. No. 1. Thick. 

No. 2. Thin. 1/3; 2/-. 

TISSUE PASTE. Tubes 1/3. 

These are the recommended retail selling prices 

96 



is the registered trade mark ot 


TURNBRID6ES LIMITED, LONDON. S.W.17 

manufacturers of quality products tor 

STICKING, STAINING. POLISHING, PAINTING 


AIRFIX magazine 


AIRFIX 

magazine 

FOR PLASTIC MODELLERS 


November 1968 


Cover Picture 

Two Spitfire Vs in typical Middle 
East camouflage, photographed 
in the Spring of 1943 during the 
Tunisian Campaign. Nearest is 
ER622, WR-D. Aircraft C in the 
background has its code letter 
in plain white with the rest either 
very faded or almost obliterated. 
These two machines were 
engaged in a typical Desert Air 
Force task - 'spotting’ for the 
guns of the Eighth Army; flying 
in pairs over the enemy lines they 
gave precise positions of enemy 
concentrations of tanks, troops, 
or transport, and directed the 
line of fire by constant commu- 
nication with the nearest gun 
battery. It is tempting to suggest 
that these Spitfires belonged to 
93 Squadron, but can any reader 
confirm this? 

Modellers should note that the 
Spitfire V illustrated would be an 
easy conversion subject from 
the Airfix Spitfire IX clip the 
wings, replace the exhaust 
manifolds, remove the outer 
cannon stubs, lengthen the air 
intake to make a Vokes filter, 
replace the port radiator with 
an oil cooler, and provide a 
3-blade propeller. 

(Imperial War Museum) 

Next publication date: 

November 22, 1968 


Editorial Offices : 

PSL Publications Ltd 
9 Ely Place 
London, EC1 
Tel: 01-405 2297 

Advertisement Offices: 

Stanbury + Treadway Ltd 
9 Ely Place 
London, EC1 
Tel: 01-405 1721 


Volume 10 No 3 


Editor Chris Ellis 


In the Air: Farnborough and Danish Air Force by Alan W. Hall 98 

News from Airfix: two new kits released 100 

Changing a Chaparral: slot-car feature by Doug Nye 102 

Basic Railway Modelling: narrow gauge baseboard by Norman Simmons 104 
Matador Crane Truck: lineside conversion by Michael Andress 106 

French Storch: MS-built variants converted by D. L. Whiting 108 

Armoured Division Markings: guide to British system by Peter Hodges 110 
Merlin Beaufighter: Mk II made by Alan W. Hall 113 

Fighting Colours: Part 12 by Michael J. F. Bowyer 117 

New Books: reviewed for modellers 121 

Roman Friends and Foes: figure conversions by Bob O’Brien 122 

T-34: Part 5 by John Milsom 124 

Military Modelling: Mark IV salvage tank by Chris Ellis 126 

Photopage: aircraft pictures from readers 127 

New Kits and Models: latest releases reviewed 129 

Letters to the Editor: your chance to win a free Airfix kit 131 


Circulation Department: 

Surridge Dawson & Company (Productions) Ltd 
Publishing Department, 136/142 New Kent Road, London, SE1 
Telephone: 01-703 5480 


AIRFIX magazine is published for the proprietors, Airfix Products Ltd. by PSL Publications 
Limited, on the fourth Friday of each month. Annual subscription rate 36s (USA $5.50) from 
Surridge Dawson & Company (Productions) Ltd. Second Class postage paid at New York Post 
Office, NY. 


0 All articles and illustrations published in AIRFIX magazine are 
strictly copyright, and may not be reproduced without written permis- 
sion from the Publishers. The Editor welcomes the submission of editorial 
material, wnich should be accompanied by return postage. Though every 
care is taken, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for safe 
keeping of editorial contributions. 



MEMBER OF THE AUDIT 
BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS 


November, 1968 


97 




I T may well be argued, in time to come, that this year’s 
* Famborough air show did not produce the highlights 
that have been seen on many previous years. Although there 
was not a great deal of new material to show since 1966 as 
far as aircraft went, the sensational Hoods at the beginning 
of the week and the tragic crash of the Brcguet Atlantic on 
the Friday kept the show well to the fore in national head- 
lines and the many hundreds of journalists from all over the 
world at full pressure. 

With more than half of Farnborough’s airfield covered 
with water to a depth of three feet from a break in the bank 
of the Basingstoke Canal which borders the south-east corner 
of the airfield, it looked, early on Monday morning, as if the 
flying display itself would be cancelled completely. Thanks 
to herculean efforts by a number of RAE employees and 50 
trainees from the nearby Royal Engineers barracks at Cove, 
the worst of the disaster, which could have ruined the show, 
was averted. 

Working all night in torrential rain with no mechanical 
aids, the workers kept back most of the flood water only to 
have the banks collapse again early in the morning when an 
oak tree was washed away and released many tons of water 
through a fresh gap. 

Preservation enthusiasts will probably want to make a 
note that in order to help stop the flood of water the 
Engineers manhandled an old Devon fuselage into the 
breach during the night. The aircraft was being used by the 
RAE Fire Section to practice fire fighting emergencies. When 
the breach was finally filled with tons of hard core and 
rubble the aircraft was completely covered. For the record, 
if aircraft enthusiasts 50 years from now try to dig the 
remains out of the canal bank, the Devon was XA879 and 
was formerly part of the Empire Test Pilots' School fleet 
when at Famborough. The aircraft went into service with 
the School in October, 1952, and was struck otT charge in 
March of this year. 

Flying was reduced to demonstrations by helicopters and 
light aircraft on the first day of the show but once the water 
had receded from the runway the show went on. 

Although my own impressions of this year’s Famborough 
were mainly wet ones, the manufacturers did a record trade. 
In spite of the weather and the crash, more than 172,000 
people attended on the three public days, which was only 
about 1,000 less than in 1966. Statistically the first week in 
September gives the best chance of good weather. The 



reason for moving the date was that it would clash with the 
Autumn holiday, but in my own opinion it would be worth 
keeping it the way it was in view of the problems encountered 
by an exhibition mainly under canvas. 

From the three hour flying programme on the public days 
the service participation, particularly that of the Royal Navy, 
stood out as being the best spectacle. As this was the last 
time that the senior service would be including a fixed wing 
demonstration in their show — their carriers should all be 
retired by the time the next Famborough takes place — they 
determined to make the most of the occasion. Combined 
aerobatics with Sea Vixens and Buccaneers plus some very 



fast runs by the Phantoms now at Yeovilton created sonic 
bangs on the first public day just to add to the noise of the 
jets and the action of the Wessex helicopters of No 845 Sqn 
with the Royal Marine Commandos. 

On the other end ot the scale it was interesting to see the 
gyrations of the single-scat Tipsy Nipper now being manu- 
factured by Slingsby. and the introduction of the Beagle 
Pups together with ‘big brother’ Bassett. 

Nine overseas countries took part in the show. One 
wonders if the Fellowship, jet-powered follower of the 
Friendship, will catch on like its predecessor, but it showed 
an admirable turn of speed and from the illustrations has a 
comfortable interior for either executive or feeder-line trans- 
port. The new Anglo-French helicopters were interesting 
compared to the Navy’s new giant, the Sea King, with its 



Heading: Latest photograph of the Red Arrows taken just 
before the Famborough flying display. The Arrows gave 
their last show for some time on Sutiday September 22 as 
the aircraft are due to go in for major servicing during the 
coming months. Above: The hottest ship on the British civil 
register. Lightning F6 G-A WON in the static display sup- 
ported by a large number of lethal looking ornaments. Left : 
The Phantom joins the Navy. Here one of the first aircraft 
with No 7 OOP Squadron at Yeovilton lands after its 
Demonstration at Famborough. 

AIRFIX magazine 




Top: The ill-fated Hrequet Atlantic photographed just prior 
to its crash behind the black sheds at Famborough. Above: 
Variations on a rheme. Danish markings on a Hunter F6. 

lour homing torpedoes. The Italian version of the ever- 
popular Iroquois, it is thought, would be worthy of study 
by those in charge of national defence budgets. It was a pity 
that both the Concorde and Jaguar were not ready for the 
show, however, as this would have undoubtedly made all 
the difference to the general interest. 

The crash of the Atlantic was a major disaster but being 
thankful for small mercies, it should be remembered that 
only one fatality occurred apart from the crew and although 
a number of RAE's transport vehicle fleet suffered and 
buildings were demolished, it could have been much worse. 
A few yards in either direction and the aircraft would have 
landed on a building crowded with office workers, the main 
MT fuel dump or the Famborough road traffic. A few 
minutes later and many of the employees at the Establish- 
ment would have been leaving work and usually crowd out 
of the exit where the aircraft fell. The reaction of the fire 
services, police and rescue workers was prompt and efficient. 
Unfortunately there was no chance for the crew whose air- 
craft burst into flame at the moment of impact. 

Although the enquiry into the accident has been convened, 
one cannot help wondering why the Atlantic’s pilot did not 
go straight on when he found himself running out of air- 
speed, and not go into a very steep bank from which even 
the most novice pilot will tell you an aircraft cannot hope 
to recover. 


Holiday in Denmark 

I N spite of protestations from one’s family, I am sure that 
1 many aviation enthusiasts like me cannot resist looking 
up one or two airfields and objects of aviation interest when 
on holiday. My own brood decided that Denmark would be 
the object of their attentions this year, an idea not entireh 
discouraged by father who had in the back of his mind a 
visit to the Danish Air Force and the possibility of seeing 
their remaining Catalinas at first hand. 

A contact on the Danish Air Staff provided the necessary 
permission and I was on my way to Vaerlose, an airfield 
close to Copenhagen which is used as the main transport 
aircraft base for the Danes and, due to its close proximit) 
to the capital, a centre for other interesting aircraft move- 
ments. 

Five Catalinas are still on operations with the Danish Air 
November, 1968 


Force and from their home base in Denmark take turns in 
arctic patrol duties in Greenland. All of the aircraft, with 
one exception, arc PBY-6As and according to Captain T. 
Jorgensen, their commander, are hard to replace. At the 
present time they are due to remain in service for at least 
another four to five years. No other amphibian or even 
helicopter can do the work of these ageing aircraft. The 
Danish Air Staff have looked at the Grumman Albatros and 
other equally useful amphibians but in each case they are 
too complicated, cannot carry the load required or have 
operational limitations which preclude their use in arctic 
waters. Current thinking is concentrated on the Canadair 
CL215, as this may be the answer to the problem. 

In service the aircraft arc used for ferrying troops on 
arctic patrol, carrying food, coal, fish, dog teams and other 
mixed cargo to isolated parts of Greenland which would 
otherwise be inaccessible by overland or sea routes. The 
Cats are maids of all work. They are always on standby for 
air-sea rescue operations and the crews become experts in 
navigation which can be difficult in northern regions close 
to the magnetic pole and without the comfort of the many 
electronic aids now in common use for navigating purposes. 

Elsewhere on Vaerlose I found Chipmunks, a KZ Larken, 
T-33s. Dakotas, Skymastcrs, S-61s and Allouettes, all in 
Danish colours. Overhead a Convairliner of SAS did touch- 
and-go approaches on a crew training programme. Later, 
two Flunters arrived and duly posed for my camera. 

The Danes are eagerly awaiting the arrival of their newly- 
ordered Drakens which will add considerably to the defen- 
sive capabilities of their Air Force. 

1 found that almost everyone to whom I spoke during my 
visit was very aware of the fact that the nearest Warsaw 
Pact country was only thirty miles away and that advanced 
warning of any attack would be brief. The effects of the 
last war and the lessons learned about Fifth Columnists are 
also very evident. The Danish Observer Corps, for example, 
still regards its prime role as aircraft reporting and all Danes 
in the Corps as well as their Territorial forces are armed 
and keep their weapons and ammunition at home. 

They arc also very security conscious. Although the 
Danish Air Force holds open days in the same way as our 
own, cameras are forbidden. 

Below: Danish Air Force Catalinas at Vaerlose. These air- 
craft, five of which are still on operations, commute with 
the icy wastes of Greenland and are used for cargo and air- 
sea rescue work. Bottom: A KZ Larken. 




NEWS FROM 


AIRFIX 


The worlds greatest value In construction kits 


0 Ferrari 250LM 
0 HMS Fearless 


I E MANS 24 Hour race fans who recall the epic race of 

J 1963 will recapture some of its thrills when they build 
the latest Airfix 1:32 scale model car kit — the 180 mph 
Ferrari 250LM Rerlinctta. 

The 250LMB, which owes its parentage to the Le Mans 
winner of 1963, has a light alloy body built by Pininfarina 
on the immensely strong Ferrari multi-tubular chassis frame 
and is powered by the 3.3 litre V12 engine developing more 
than 320 brake horsepower at 7,200 rpm. 

Airfix have faithfully reproduced every significant detail 
of this thoroughbred sports racing car from the three verti- 
cally-mounted control pedals and cranked gearshift to the 
wide brake drums, Borrani wheels and triple-cared knock-on 
hubs. 

The kit, which contains more than 50 parts, full assembly 
and painting instructions and cut-out racing numbers, costs 
3s 8d. 



The new Airfix 1:32 scale Ferrari 250LM. 


r PHE changing structure of the Royal Navy is graphically 
reflected in the latest addition to the Airfix range of 
fighting ships — the assault landing ship HMS Fearless in a 
50 ft: I inch scale (1:600). 

HMS Fearless — launched in December, 1963 — and her 
sister ship Intrepid are the largest British naval vessels to be 
designed and built since the second world war. They are 
equipped to transport and land Army units and to act as 
floating headquarters during amphibious operations. 

The Airfix kit of Fearless — which makes up into a model 
just over 10 inches long — also includes two helicopters, six 
landing craft (four LCAs and two LCMs), motor whaler and 
motor cutter, dinghies, and life rafts. 

100 



HMS Fearless in 1:600 scale is the latest Airfix warship kit. 



Fearless herself is magnificently detailed down to flood- 
lights, Sea Cat launchers and 40 mm guns. The stern ramp 
can be raised and lowered as can the forward and midships 
gangways. 

Full assembly and painting instructions, transfers and dis- 
play cradles are included. The kit costs 5s 2d. 


Soon after his flight in a RAF Dominie ( reported in our 
September. I06N, issue). AIRFIX magazine' s air historian . 
Michael J. F. Bowyer (left, above) presented one of the first 
Airfix / : 72 scale kits of the aircraft to Group Captain Alan 
Davies, CO of No 1 A NS. Stradishall. who operate the real 
aircraft. The actual aircraft depicted in the Kit stands 
behind them . 



We have many letters from readers requesting back 
copies of AIRFIX MAGAZINE containing conversion 
articles. Back copies of some issues are still avail- 
able for the benefit of readers who may have missed 
or mislaid earlier editions. For example, here are 
some of the practical articles which have appeared. 



1966: July — RF-4C Phantom conversion. 
September — Matador variants. 1967: July — 
Soviet missile tank. August— Early Churchills 
and Dauntless. 1968: March — Model 
timber yard. May — German Artillery, 1914 
and Wellington I. June — Auster conversion 
and ‘H’ class destroyers. July — FC-47 gun- 
ship. August — Me 109 and T-34 conversions. 

Would readers please note that all issues not 
listed above are now out of print and can no 
longer be supplied. 


Back copies cost 2s each (including postage) for 
each copy up to and including September. 1966. 
For all subsequent editions the cost is 2s 6d an 
issue, post paid. Please address all requests for 
back copies, together with your remittance, to our 
circulation department at SURRIDGE DAWSON & 
CO (PRODUCTIONS) LTD, PUBLISHING DEPT, 
136 NEW KENT ROAD, LONDON SE1. 


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November, 1968 


101 





A IRFIX’S ready-to-run 1:24 scale 
* * 1 cars have proved very popular 
among home slot-racing enthusiasts, 
and of this range the Chaparral 2C is 
one of the most attractive. But. 
possibly because its designers intended 
it to appeal to the younger ‘driver’, 
this 2C owes little apart from its . 
general body shape to the full-sized 
original. The actual Chaparral 2C was 
the first really successful design to 
stem from Texan oil-man Jim Hall’s 
works at Midland, Texas, and, fitted 
with a fully race-modified Chevrolet 
V8 engine and secret automatic trans- 
mission, the two cars built were raced 
widely at the end of 1965. Hall’s part- 
ner, Hap Sharp, won the important 
Riverside-Times GP in California that 
year against opposition which included 



Above: Useful detail view of Hap Sharp’s winning car at the Nassau Trophy 
race described in the text. This differs from Hall’s car, featured in the conver- 
sion by having intakes in the rear wings and a full-width roll-over bar. 


Changing the Chaparral 

DOUG NYE ADDS THE DETAIL TO THE AIRFIX MODEL 


Jackie Stewart, Jim Clark, Graham 
Hill and Dan Gurney, and then 
repeated the performance at Nassau 
in the Bahamas after Hall had crashed 
badly. This brought Chaparral’s US 
record that year to 17 wins and four 
second places out of 22 starts; some- 
thing to be really proud of! 

Now the Airfix 2C’s vacuum-formed 
body depicts the type which Hall 
crashed at Nassau, for Sharp’s win- 
ning car at Riverside and the Bahaman 
race had air intakes on either side of 
the cockpit let into the forward ends 
of the rear wings. To convert the body 
to a more realistic representation of 
Hall’s car is not difficult and, with 
even very basic experience in conver- 
sion work, should only occupy one or 
two evenings. 

First job is to carefully cut away 
unneeded parts of the body. 1 found 
this was best achieved by using a 
straight-edged X-Acto knife blade, 
and the parts which ought to be cut 
away include the whole of the tail 
spoiler assembly, the cockpit decking 
(with the driver attached), the air in- 
take under the nose and the outlet on 
top of the nose just in front of the 
windscreen, the blank ends of the air 
intakes just aft of the cockpit on the 
body sides, and finally the lower sur- 
faces of the nose spoilers. 

To start, remove the cockpit deck. 
This is attached to the back of the 
cockpit cut-out, and to the transparent 
extensions of the screen at the front 
and on both sides. Naturally, this is 

102 


not as per prototype — they didn't have 
double-glazing! Remove the chassis 
by unscrewing the four retaining 
screws and turn the body shell upside 
down. Then cut very carefully around 
what should be the upper rim of the 
screen. Take care when it comes to 
separating the deck from the rear edge 
of the cockpit, for the plastic is thin 
here and liable to tear. However, once 
cut-out all round, remove the com- 
plete deck, inside parts of the screen 
and driver. 

Cutting out the air outlet on top of 
the nose is simple enough, just cut the 
rearward edge of the outlet orifice 
away from outside the shell, and the 
forward edge from inside the shell. In 
this way the form of the plastic will 
guide the knife blade to where it ought 
to be. The inlet under the nose is slit 
very carefully for here, again, the 
plastic is thin, and then the lower sur- 
faces of the nose spoilers are cut 
away. The tail spoiler is removed by 
cutting along the forward edge where 
it joins the rest of the body, curving 
up over the rear wings and then 
slicing away along the tops of the fins 
on cither side. Cut down the tail 
leaving the fins intact, then remove the 
whole spoiler assembly by making a 
final cut across its base on the tail 
transom, leaving the part of the body 
with tail lights and outlet louvres in 
place. Final cutting-out job is to open 
up the air intakes on the body sides, 
and this can be done easily by gently 
inserting the point of the knife and 


just working it round the edges of the 
moulding. Make the edges of the cut- 
outs as straight and neat as possible — 
it all adds to the appearance of the 
finished body. 

Now to the job of making the shell 
more realistic, starting with the nose. 
The moulded lines around the point 
of the nose indicate where the tiny 
headlights of the original were 
mounted, and while it’s perfectly 
acceptable to leave these opaque, you 
could use cleaner on the inside of the 
shell to remove the red paint and then 
cement boxes on the interior with 
scrap anodised circular headlights in 
them. But, for this simple conversion. 

I contented myself with re-working 
the nose spoilers. As moulded these 
are rather small. Once the under 
surface of each spoiler has been 
removed, cut a piece of 1 mm plastic 
card to the shape shown and cement 
this in position beneath the remaining 
spoiler surface, also as shown. This 
modification will leave an unfilled gap 
in the lower side of the body, and this 
must be filled with a small sheet of 
the thinnest plastic card available 
(10 thou), cut oversize and glued home 
behind the offending gap. Should the 
patch protrude into the wheel-arch, 
trim off the excess. This patching will 
leave a slight depression in the shell, 
but this is obscured to normal viewing 
by the extended spoilers, and can 
easily be filled with body putty if 
required. 

Outlined on the inside curvatures 
AIRFIX magazine 



of the front wings are two almost 
rectangular areas. On the real car 
these were perforated louvres allow- 
ing air trapped under the wheel arches 
to escape. There are several ways of 
representing these panels in more 
detail on the Airfix shell, but punching 
small holes through the wing isn’t one 
of them, for the plastic isn’t strong 
enough to take it, and will shred 
away. 

The simplest method is to scratch a 
louvred pattern into the plastic in 
these areas. When it comes to painting 
the body, black Indian ink can be run 
into the patterning to detail it 
properly. 

Having removed the standard 
narrow cockpit deck, now cut a 
replacement full-width and full-length 
deck from 30 or 40 thou plastic card 
as shown. This, again, may be 
cemented into place. Sensibly used, 
cement does not remove the colouring 
from the body, although in this type 
of conversion the whole thing will 
have to be repainted on the outside 
anyway. The driver may now' be 
replaced, having been cut away from 
the original deck. I cut away the 
locating spigots under his arms and 
Aralditcd him in the correct position 
on the new deck. Unfortunately this 
figure is, in itself, not very realistic 
and could be replaced with one of the 
proprietary figures available. Other- 
wise, scrape away the wide moulded 
chinstrap, paint the helmet silver and 
line-in a thinner black strap. The 
goggles should be given more curva- 
ture on their lower edges and painted 
gloss black, then wipe some body 
putty over the face to obscure the 
features and paint this whole area 
matt white. Jim Hall was one of the 
first drivers to wear a fireproof face 
mask consistently, and this is what the 
white-painted putty will represent. 

Now to the most difficult part of 
the job; rebuilding the tail end of the 
shell. A rectangular piece of plastic 
card, as drawn, is cut and cemented to 
the forward edge of the cut-out in the 
modified shell and to the upper edge 
of the tail transom. Now the curva- 
ture of the wheel covers has to be 
reproduced, and I found a fairly 
simple way — saving moulding tech- 
niques — was as follows. 

The new body top panel passes 
underneath the cut-off end of these 
covers and the curve required for the 
new ends of the wings can be drawn 
in on this panel. I had some thin strips 
of plastic card left after the earlier 
operations, and cut these into suitable 
lengths (with the correct base curves) 

November. 1968 


to cement in place between the cut-off 
ends of the shell wings and the curve 
drawn on the body top panel. This 
will leave a slightly corrugated finish 
but, again, a layer of body putty and 
a coat of paint will give the wings, 
suitably sanded down, a realistic and 
fairly correct appearance. 

Small vertical plastic card plates 
must now be made up to form the 
inside surfaces of the vertical tail fins. 
Cement these to the shell at the top 
and rear edge, and to the new wheel 
covers at the bottom. Now, the com- 
plete spoiler assembly which was cut 
away in a sort of inverted Vee-shape 
must now be cut in two, retaining the 
front surface of the spoiler with its 
STP sticker. Separating this from the 
back of the assembly will leave a 
slight hook on the rearward edge. 
Spread some cement on the reverse, 
and slide the hook over the edge of a 
1 mm plastic card sheet. Wait for the 
cement to dry, then cut the plastic 
card away, using the original spoiler 
shape as a template. If you require an 
operating spoiler fit a stiff wire spindle 
between the laminations, if not just 
glue the new, strengthened spoiler into 
place with the curves at the lower 
front corners, fitting over the old cut 
outs on the wheel arches. 

For an operating spoiler, the wire 
spindle, once laminated into place, 
can be sprung into small holes drilled 
in the tail fins on either side. 

Experimentation with small piece> 


Modified body shell, before painting 

of ballast fixed to the leading and 
trailing edges of the wing should 
arrive at a point of balance at which 
the car’s acceleration will make the 
spoiler level, and deceleration will 
make it raise into the braking position. 
Stops on the side fins will prevent the 
spoiler flopping back over-centre. 

Now, the whole shell, with body- 
puttied parts sanded carefully to make 
them as smooth as possible, must be 
painted gloss white. This variant of the 
Chaparral didn’t have the primer- 
coloured lower body sides of the 
earlier versions, but retained the stan- 
dard USRRC race numbers of 65 for 
Sharp and 66 for Hall, both being in 
black script in a thin black circle 
painted directly on to the bodywork. 
The new cockpit deck is painted matt 
black, after the quadrant-shaped gaps 
left on either side of the cockpit back 
have been suitably filled with scrap 
card. A small Firestone sticker above 
the rear wheel arches on either side 
completes the modified, and by now 
much more realistic, shell. 

One last touch would be to replace 
the standard wheel inserts with some 
correct cast-spoke Chaparral inserts 
pinched from some other kit. Failing 
their availability, don’t bother, for you 
now have an Airfix ‘Shap’ to outdo all 
others for sheer appearance, if not 
necessarily performance! Now’s your 
chance to have a real go at those 
Concours classes . 


103 




BY NORMAN 
SIMMONS 


This month s work shown almost complete. The high level section is seen in 
position on the supports with the gradient at the rear where the locomotive is 
standing. Track is laid temporarily to check that everything fits according 

to the plan. 

The baseboard 

CONTINUING OUR NARROW GAUGE PROJECT 


I AST month I discussed two layout 

J plans for an 00-9 narrow gauge 
model railway system. One of the 
primary considerations in designing 
these layouts was that they should be 
small, compact and portable so that 
if required they could be easily carried 
about the house and operated in the 
living room in the company of the rest 
of the family. The smaller of the two. 
Plan B, measures only 3 ft X 2 ft. and 

1 decided this is the one that would 
suit me best. 

A necessary start to any model rail- 
way is the construction of the base- 
board. The generally accepted open 
framework construction using 2 inch 
x 1 inch timber with a ± inch thick 
softboard top is the type I advocate 
for an OO standard gauge layout 
where the baseboard is usually of such 
a size that it requires its own trestles 
or wall bracket supports. But for my 
much smaller 00-9 narrow gauge sys- 
tem I wanted something a little less 
bulky as I visualised operating it on 
the kitchen or even the dining room 
table. 

A board of some sort was the ob- 
vious solution, but what sort of 
board? The requirements were that it 
should not warp, bend or twist unduly, 
it should be thick enough and com- 
pact enough to take track pins, small 
nails or small screws and it should not 
be too heavy. One of my local ‘do-it- 
yourself shops operates a kind of 
supermarket of pre-cut materials of 
all thicknesses and sizes and after 
comparing materials such as hard- 
board, chipboard and plywood of 
various thfeknesses, i inch plywood 
seemed just about right in the 3 ft X 

2 ft size. Normally I would not dream 
of using such a hard material as ply- 
wood for a model railway using OO 
standard gauge equipment, mainly 

104 


because of the noise, but 00-9 narrow 
gauge trains arc so light and they 
travel so leisurely that this is not such 
a problem. 

It will be seen that Plan B is a dual 
level system with a high level terminus 
partly concealing the continuous oval 
and return loop which operate at the 
lower level. Another smaller piece of 
± inch ply, 3 ft X 1 ft 5 inch, was 
therefore selected for the high level 
sub-base. It must be admitted that 
3 ft X I ft 5 inch is rather an un- 
orthodox measurement to find ready 
cut in a shop but this day I must have 
been particularly lucky! Needless to 
say, the measurement is not terribly 
critical and anything about 3 ft X 



Above: Building the turntable in the 
manner described in this article, using 
a suitable tin lid as the ‘weir. Upper 
view shows the hole cut out, plus the 
components, all of which are seen in 
place in the lower view. Note track 
plan marked in pencil on the base- 
board. 


1 ft 6 inch, give or take an inch or 
two, would do. 

Next I needed some material to 
support the high level sub-base above 
the main baseboard. Two inches is 
about the minimum clearance required 
for the tallest piece of rolling stock in 
my present equipment and this is the 
Playcraft Dccauvillc 0-4-0 tank loco- 
motive. Two inches includes adequate 
allowance for the height of the track 
and all ether foreseeable factors so 
some 2 inch X } inch finished size 
strip wood was selected. A length 7 ft 
long was found to be sufficient. 
Finally, a 3 ft plank about 4 or 5 
inches wide (this is not critical) was 
selected to form a back piece. All this 
material which, apart from screws and 
glue, completes the shopping list, cost 
less than £1. 

It is essential to complete all the 
heavy carpentry work before laying 
any of the track and this part of the 
work should be carefully planned to 
ensure that nothing is overlooked. 

First, screw and glue the plank 
forming the back piece to the low level 
plywood — A at Fig 1. Now screw and 
glue the two side pieces B and C in 
place. Next, cut the high level sub- 
base to shape. Fig 2. The rectangular 
portion removed at E will become the 
base for the incline linking the high 
and low level. The side pieces B and 
C support the high level sub-base at 
the sides but to stop it sagging in the 
centre some additional supports arc 
required as shown at D on Fig 1. 
These have been carefully positioned 
to allow plenty of clearance for the 
low level tracks, taking into considera- 
tion the overhang of the rolling stock 
around the curves. D will also provide 
support for the scenic work which will 

AIRFIX magazine 



A 


7 


7 



All dimensions in inches 
except where stated 


Above: Scale drawings show the baseboard construction : 
all parts are keyed to references in text. 



Fig A 

Correct method : 
gentle slopes at top and bottom 


track at top of incline 


15 


eventually be built up on the fore- 
ground of the low level section. 

Next comes construction of the 
gradient. In describing how to do it, 
it is perhaps easier to show what not 
to do — Fig 3. If the changes in grade 
at the top and bottom of the gradient 
are made too abrupt this is likely to 
cause difficulty to long wheelbase roll- 
ing stock, especially when it is remem- 
bered that the line also curves sharply 
at these points. The changes in grade 
should be smoothed out as in Fig 4. It 
is particularly desirable that there 
should be a short stretch of level track 
at the top of the gradient as there will 
be the additional hazard of a break in 
the running rails at this point. The 
high level sub-base must be made 
readily detachable to allow ready 
access to the tracks below and the gap 
in the rails at the top of the gradient 
occur at a point where the high and 
low level tracks meet. 

A turntable is a feature of the ter- 
minal station track layout and thought 
must be given at this stage of con- 
structing the baseboard as to what sort 
of turntable is required. It is possible 


to build a flat disc type of turntable 
on top of the baseboard but all the 
narrow gauge turntables for loco- 
motives I have ever seen have been 
the well type. To model one of these 
will necessitate cutting a hole in the 
baseboard. In marking out the position 
of the turntable, draw out the position 
of the tracks leading up to it. In the 
case of Plan B there are only two and 
I took a line midway between the two 
tracks as the centre line of the turn- 
table. The nearer the turntable is to 
the edge of the baseboard the longer 
the station platform can be, which is 
desirable, but at the same time con- 
sideration must be given to possible 
fouling of the tracks below, cither by 
the base of the turntable or the centre 
pivot. The position of the turntable 
as marked at Fig 2 makes allowance 
for these factors. 

The diameter of the turntable will, 
of course, depend on the length of 
your longest locomotive. Most pro- 
prietary model 00-9 locomotives avail- 
able today are only 2-3 inches long so 
the turntable can be quite small, but 
it is well to allow for all possible 


future developments. What my 
chances arc I don't know, but I would 
very much like to make an 00-9 model 
of one of the Lynton and Barnstaple 
locomotives. The turntable on the 
Lynton and Barnstaple, which, by the 
way, is still seeing service at Romney 
on the Romney Hythe & Dymchurch 
Railway, is 30 feet long — just under 
5 inches in 4 mm scale. The L & B 
locomotives were approximately 23 
feet long over the buffer beams, so a 
turntable about 3J to 4 inches long 
would just about do for a model of 
one of these locomotives in 4 mm 
scale. My turntable is still under con- 
struction at the time of writing so I 
cannot give it a full description at this 
stage. I can, however, say that I am 
using the lid of a tin as the well for 
my turntable and after rummaging 
through all the likely sources at home, 
and a few unlikely ones as well, I 
found one of my wife's cleansing 
cream tins was just the right size — 
3J inches. Luckily the tin was nearly 
empty! The circular hole in the base- 
board was cut an exact fit for the lid 
so the lip around the edge stopped it 
falling right the way through the hole. 
I hope to say more about the turn- 
table in another article in this series. 
Finally, if you want to include an 
inspection pit in your locomotive shed 
it is a good idea to think about it now 
since it will be very much easier 
chiselling out a slot in the baseboard 
without the track or any other delicate 
features in place. The width of the pit 
can only be very narrow, something 
like 8 mm, so the track will have to 
be drawn in pretty accurately to get 
the exact position of the pit. 


Below : The main baseboard before the high level section was fitted, showing 
the supports and the gradient fixed in place. Compare with Fig I at head of 
this page to see how parts locate on the base. Refer also to Plan B on page 55 
in last month's issue when making this baseboard. 



L 


105 



vehicle. However, you could easily 
add a second hook, pulley, and wind- 
ing drum if you wish, using my photo 
of the full-sized lorry as a guide. 

Make up the two sides of the crane 
(remember the sides are not identical, 
but are mirror images) using the actual 
size plan in Fig 2 to work from. The 
girders are made from Microstrio 
11 mm wide by 1 mm thick and the 
re-inforcing plates arc cut from 10 
thou plastic card. 1 joined the two 
sides using spacers of Microstrip of 
the same size (11 mm wide by 1 mm 
thick) as used for the girders, and 
7+ mm long. These spacers arc posi- 


A Matador crane truck 


MICHAEL ANDRESS SUGGESTS A SIMPLE LINESIDE MODEL 


r PHE Airfix Matador kit, although 
intended especially for military 
modellers, is a very suitable basis for 
models of many different types of 
commercial lorries which will add 
interest to your model railway layout. 
Also, there arc quite a number of pro- 
totype ex-WD Matadors which have 
been converted for civilian purposes 
and which can be seen around the 
country, often in timber yards (Mata- 
dor Crane Truck, AIRFIX magazine, 
August, 1967) and at service stations. 
The Airfix Matador can be similarly 
converted to provide accurate models 
of these prototypes. 

My latest conversion is based on a 
breakdown vehicle which I photo- 
graphed recently at a garage on the 
Al. The crane mounted on this lorry 
appears to be a fairly standard type 
as I have seen identical cranes on 
other different breakdown vehicles. 

Now for the details of the con- 
struction. 

Chassis: The chassis and wheels are 
assembled exactly as in the kit instruc- 
tions; I prepainted most of the parts 
as this is usually much easier and 
neater than trying to paint the com- 
pleted model. 

Cab: The only alteration necessary 
is to the cab roof (Part 14). File off 
the projecting rim around the open- 
ing and the two ridges on the upper 
surface. Then cover the roof with a 
piece of thick drawing paper (if you 
use liquid cement, really solvent, this 
is simply done by holding a slightly 
oversize piece of paper in place on 


the roof and painting over it with the 
solvent which will soak through the 
paper and fix it in position), and trim 
neatly to exact size when the cement 
has set firm. Windows can be added if 
desired using transparent plastic sheet 
glued behind the window openings 
before assembling the cab. 

Body: The body floor (Part 17) 
must be shortened by cutting 9{ mm 
from the rear — this leaves the rear of 
the platform flush with the rear sur- 
face of the last cross member. The 
right-hand body side (Part 19) is cut 
down as shown in Fig 1 and the left- 
hand side (Part 18) is cut down to 
match (remembering that on both 
sides the cutting down is at the rear). 
The canopy sides (Parts 21 and 22) 
arc cut down at the rear so that they 
measure 35 mm and the canopy top 
(Part 25) is similarly shortened to 
35 mm. The front board (Part 16) and 
canopy front (Part 23) are used un- 
altered. These parts can all be painted 
and assembled now, following the kit 
instructions in so far as they arc 
applicable. Paint and add the equip- 
ment lockers (Parts 28, 29, and 30) at 
this stage and then cement the 
assembled cab and built up body to 
the chassis. 

Crane: I simplified my model 
slightly by only having a single hook 
instead of two as in the original 



tioned as shown by the shaded areas 
in Fig 2. Add two diagonal braces of 
1 mm wide thin plastic strip (about 
10 thou or less) 18 mm long to the top 
and two similar braces 19 mm long to 
the underside of the crane. 1 bought 
a packet of Slater's Plastikard Micro- 
strip some time ago and this contained 
a large selection of different widths 
and thicknesses. Using these is much 
neater and more convenient than try- 
ing to cut your own fine strips. As 
there are many different sizes in a 
packet, it is difficult for me to quote 
exact sizes for you. However, the sizes 
are not too critical provided the parts 
look about right on your model. 

I added a piece of 10 thou plastic 
card, 21 mm wide and 10 mm long, 
across the upper end of the crane and 
another piece of the same material, 
also 10 mm long but only 1 mm wide, 
set out at an angle from the lower 
part of the first piece. The model 
photos show- this and will make my 

Below : (/) Full-size drawing for sides 
as modified. ( 2 ) Full-size drawing for 
jib. (3) Hook — drawn five times actual 
size. 



106 


AIRFIX magazine 


description easier to follow. The gear 
wheel is an old watch gear 6 mm in 
diameter and the winding drum, to 
which it is fixed, was cut from the 
thicker of the smooth parts of one of 
the trunnions of the gun (Part 58). Cut 
this to length so that when it is fixed 
to the gear wheel the completed gear 
and drum will fit neatly between the 
sides of the crane. After painting the 
crane, and the drum and gear, the 
latter can be glued in place between 
the crane sides. I didn't have a small 
enough gear wheel to represent the 
smaller gear which meshes with the 
one on the winding drum, so I merely 
added an axle (of thin wood) in the 
appropriate position above the drum 
and the lack of the smaller gear is not 
at all noticeable. 

The two pulleys arc each a slice of 
two ridges and the intervening groove 
cut from the ridged part of a trun- 
nion (Part 58). The upper pulley is 
mounted between two rectangles, 
3 mm by 1 mm, of 10 thou plastic 
card. The pulley and mount are then 
painted black and glued in position 
as in the photos. For the lifting cable 
1 used two pieces of black thread 
(this is easier than trying to use one 
longer length) and the first of these 
I glued to the winding drum and to 
the pulley at this stage. Make sure 
that the thread is stretched tautly 
between the drum and pulley and 
when the cement has dried trim off the 
excess thread. The other pulley is 
mounted between two pieces of 10 
thou plastic card cut to the shape 
shown in Fig 3. The small hook is cut 
from scrap plastic card and fixed 
between the lower parts of the two 
side pieces. 

The crane assembly can now be 
fitted on to the platform, positioning 
it so that the girders at the base of the 
crane extend 61 mm beyond the rear 
edge of the platform. A strip of 1 mm 



Top: A front view of the completed 
model. Above: A view of the actual 
vehicle on which the conversion is 
based. 

wide 10 thou thick plastic card is 
cemented to the outer side of the end 
of each of these projecting girders, 
extending down to the end of each 
main chassis girder. The structure 
which is fitted below these main 
chassis girders is built up of 11 mm 
by 1 mm Microstrip for the girders, 
the uprights arc 8 mm long and the 
crosspiece, which fits between the up- 
rights, measures 1 1 mm: the triangular 
bracing pieces arc cut from 10 thou 
plastic card. When assembled the 
upper ends of the uprights can be 
glued to the outer sides of the ends 
of the main chassis girders. 

I built up the triangular towing bar 
from two exhausts (Part 46) left over 
from some of my earlier conversions, 
but you could just as easily use scrap 
plastic for the parts. The base is 
1 1 mm long and the two other sides 


each 12 mm. I cut a thin slice of the 
thicker smooth round part of a trun- 
nion (Part 58) and made a hole 
through the slice to form the ring at 
the end of the towing bar. 1 took the 
second length of black thread (about 
11 inches long) and threaded it 
through under the pulley of the hook 
and then cemented the hook through 
the ring of the towing bar. I followed 
this by glueing the base of the towing 
bar on to the top surface of the spring 
which lies between the rear end of the 
two main chassis girders, with the 
towing bar nearly vertical. The crane 
is completed by bringing the two 
thread ends up to the upper pulley 
and cementing the threads so that 
they are taut; the excess thread is 
trimmed off after the cement has set 
firm. 

The steps down from the door 
above the petrol tank are built up 
from 1 mm wide, thin Microstrip. The 
uprights are 10 mm long and the two 
rungs 51 mm. The steps are then glued 
to the undersurface of the floor and 
to the petrol tank where they touch 
it. Add headlights of thin slices of 
21 mm diameter dowel painted silver. 

The colour scheme is yellow and 
black with the rear edge of the plat- 
form and the rear surface of the rear 
cross member, the rear part of each 
back mudguard, and the rear parts of 
the structure which extends down 
from the rear ends of the main chassis 
girders painted white to make the 
vehicle more easily visible at night. 

The photo of the full-size vehicle 
shows some extra details that the 
super-detail fan can add: the second 
hook, warning light on the roof, tail 
lights, mirrors, a light on the crane, a 
name board for the canopy, the black 
and white striped plates on the rear 
mudguards (again for more visibility 
at night when stopped at the site of 
an accident), number plates and so on. 



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ADDRESS 


November, 1968 


107 


FRENCH STORCH 


D. L. Whiting converts the Airfix kit to 
MS 502 and MS 505 versions 

I^OR these conversions you will need two of the excellent Airtix 
I Fieseler Storch kits. The main modifications are confined 
10 the engines and installations, plus a few additional details not 
found in the kit. 

The MS502 is a 9-cylinder 230 hp Sa I m son-engined variant of 
the MS500, which was the standard Argus powered Storch built 
at the Morane factory. The MS505 is a re-engined 502, fitted 
with the American Jacobs 7-cylinder engine of 300 hp 

The first stage is to assemble the fuselage following the kit 
instructions, and when dry, cut the engine cowl off at the point 
indicated on the drawing, using a fine tooth razor saw. File all 
edges smooth and level, then cement a piece of J inch balsa sheet 
to the front and a smaller J inch sheet piece under the nose. The 
top of the nose cowling is built up with plastic body putty. When 
thoroughly dry, the new nose is carved and sanded to shape. 

On the 502 the engine is mounted directly to the new front, 
but on the 505. a disc of 1 mm thick plastic card or a metal 
washer is first cemented to the front of the fuselage (with Evo- 
slik if the latter is used) to form the firewall /engine mount. 

The engines arc the next job. Mine were modified from those 
in a Frog Miles Master kit which had been converted to Kestrel 
versions, but they could be built up from scratch, using stretched 
sprue and plastic card, with a Master engine as a guide if you 
have one. The 9-cylinder Salmson version is quite straightforward, 
and only requires the crankcase front cover building up with 
plastic putty. When the putty has been sanded smooth, the push- 
rods and rocker-covers can be fitted, two to each cylinder. These 
are made from short lengths of fuse wire bent to an inverted ‘L* 
shape. The rocker covers are merely short lengths of plastic tube 
taken from fine electrical wire. 

For the 505. things get just a little more complicated, mainly 
because it has only seven cylinders. 1 tackled this by cutting eight 
of the cylinders away from the crankcase with a modelling knife, 
leaving just one cylinder in the vertical position. Next cement six 
cylinders around the rest of the crankcase at 51.5° angles. When 
completely dry, push-rods and rocker covers arc fitted as before. 
Next, a circle of copper wire, the diameter of the crankcase, is 
bent to shape, and where the two ends meet, one piece is bent 
back at right angles, so that when filled this protrudes between 
No 1 and 2 cylinders, back towards the bulkhead. 

Before fitting the bulkhead and engine, bend a piece of plastic 
covered wire into a circle, slightly smaller in diameter than the 
bulkhead, and again with one end bent out at right angles. This 
is glued between the fuselage and bulkhead, with the angled end 
to the bottom left of the nose, to form the exhaust pipe. Fit the 
propeller shaft inside the engine, and cement the engine to the 
bulkhead. A small rectangle of 1 mm styrene sheet is fitted 
between the two lower cylinders to represent the oil cooler. This 
part seen from the side is angled forward towards the propeller 
at the top end. 

Now to the propellers. Unfortunately, the kit propeller is noi 
the correct shape for cither of these models. Firstly, cut or file 
the small spinner away, then for the 502 a general slimming down 
in both outline and section is all that is required, but the 505 
propeller is rather more drastically altered. Remove the spinner, 
and then file the sides of the hub fiat, to a width of approx 
2.5 mm. Then, using a modelling knife, carefully scrape the edges 
of the blades down into a slim pointed shape. Now restore the 
pitch to the blades by again carefully scraping, following the pitch 
contours of the original moulding. Finish off with 0400 emery 
paper. The hub is now finished to a rounded section. A 1 mm 
length of 1 mm stretched sprue is cemented to the centre of the 
hub, and two thin discs (sliced from the same sprue) are cemented 
diametrically opposed (ie, top right bottom left of hub) to the 
hub, to represent the balance weights. 

108 



Abmc : A view of the completed MS 502 with Salmson engine, 
finished as in the drawing opposite. 

Back to the airframe now, where the assembly follows kit 
instructions, except that on the 505. part No 36 is not fitted to 
the tailplane. The resultant holes are filled with putty and sanded 
flush. When assembly is complete, the new wing struts arc made 
from heat-stretched sprue and fitted between the existing struts 
and the wing lower surface. Similarly make and fit the additional 
struts to the undercarriage. A short length of stretched sprue 
(5 mm long) is then cemented under the port wing where indi- 
cated. to represent the fuel gauge. A further piece of sprue 
represents the pipe from gauge to cabin. 

Cut a further four pieces of sprue 4 mm long and fit these to 
the undercarriage legs to form the steps. On the MS502, if the 
wheels arc fitted back to front, they will give the true disc appear- 
ance as in the full-size aircraft. On the MS505, fit as kit instruc- 
tions. Painting and finishing is straightforward on the 502, being 
dark green overall, matt, of course. The French markings came 
from the ABT MS500 sheet of decals. If you use the maker’s 
designation decal, cut the second ‘0* away, and when positioned 
on the rudder the figure ‘2’ can be drawn in, using Indian ink 
and a mapping pen. The wheel centres are grey. 

The 505 is more complicated and the paint scheme was not 
completed when the photos were taken. The basic colour is French 
Blue (high blue gloss with a little malt dark blue). Tips of wings, 
rudder and tailplane are vermilion red (gloss red with a little 
matt yellow), divided from the blue by a while line, outlined 
each side with black. The leading edge slats are vermilion. The 
while areas on the fuselage can be cut from Yeoman solid trans- 
fer sheet or masked off with coloured Sellotapc and the areas 
filled in with white paint (two parts white gloss, one part matt 
white). These semi-gloss colours look far more realistic than full 
gloss. The black outlines arc best done with Blick or Letterpress 
dry print transfer, as are the registration letters. Wheel centres 
are vermilion. Engines are matt black with grey crankcases, and 
the pushrods arc left polished metal on the 502, and gloss black 
on the 505. Exhaust pipe on the 505 is malt black. The 502 pro- 
peller is brown, whilst the 505 ’s is silver with yellow’ tips. 

You now have two out-of-ihe-rui Storches to stand alongside 
your Argus powered versions. 

Below : Two views of the MS 505 conversion, with registration 
still l<f he added ( from Blick) when phot(>graphed . Colttttr scheme 
given opposite. 



Cut here 


Serial on rudder, in line: 
NC 608 



Registration on 
white tail band : 
F-BDHA 
MS 505 


Salmson 9-cylinder 
230 HP engine 


Colours (or civilian MS 505 

S — 


is 


French white Vermilion 
Blue 


Morane Saulnier MS 502 and MS 505 


*|w 

1 : 72 scale 


November. 1968 


109 




Armoured 

division 

markings 

DESCRIBED BY PETER HODGES 


I N his article on Camouflage and Markings in the April, 
* 1966, edition of AIRFIX magazine, Chris Ellis dealt with 
some of the tactical signs which appeared on military 
vehicles in World War 2. The following notes deal with the 
composition of the Armoured Division, and with the various 
Arm of Service marks on the vehicles of the units which 
comprised it. 

As a preliminary, however, I have drawn some of the 
distinguishing flags which were in use during the earlier part 
of the war; and the following is an interesting extract from 
the 7th Armoured Brigade’s orders of 1941 : 

‘All armoured vehicles which have wireless masts will 
wear pennants in the position of the day. Tanks wear a 
red-and-white sign, but some newly arrived may not have 
had them painted on. Armoured cars have no colour sign, 
but they show they are friendly by holding a flag out on 
their right.’ 

The geometric shapes denoting *A\ *B\ *C’ and ‘HQ’ com- 
panies were in use at this time, but ‘HQ’ was then a diamond 
shape and ‘C’ a circle, later to be transposed when they were 
used as squadron marks. 

As the war progressed, the composition of the Armoured 
Division changed from an initial heavy preponderance of 
tanks, to a more balanced force of armour, infantry and 
artillery. 

As will be seen from Table 1, the Armoured Division on 
the 1940 establishment had two armoured brigades, each of 
three armoured regiments and a motor battalion, with only 
one infantry battalion in the support group of artillery, 
engineers and the usual services. In all, the Division had 
about 350 tanks, and its own armoured car regiment of 60 
armoured cars. 

Experience in the North African campaign showed that 
even though each Armoured Brigade had its own motor 
battalion, the Division as a whole needed more infantry 
support than could be provided by the solitary battalion in 
the Support Group. The second Armoured Brigade was 
replaced by an Infantry Brigade, which took over the vacant 
serial numbers. Infantry Brigade HQ being allocated number 
60 and the three Infantry Battalions numbers 61, 62 and 63. 
At the same time the Armoured Division’s Motorised Bat- 
talion — often carried in M3 half-tracks — was re-numbered 
54. There were now 172 tanks plus 14 A A tanks in the 
Division. 

In 1943, further changes were made. The armoured car 
regiment was withdrawn and placed under Corps command, 
but the Armoured Division was given an armoured recon- 
naissance regiment in lieu, and the total tank strength rose 

Continued on page 112 

110 



Above: Typical marking positions for British armoured 
vehicles ; this Churchill VII A PC. pictured post-war. displays 
the red! yellow RAC and the red School of Infantry flash. 


Standard ‘Arm of 
Service’ colours 


Additional Arm of Service’ 
marks allocated to Armoured 
Divisions until 1942 



Red 


Blue 



White 


Blue 


Blue 


Green 



H 


Black 


Yellow 


Red 



Tank Flags 


0 


R 


Brown 


Green 


Red 


N 


Green 


White 


Post-war Colour Changes 




Black background 
No 1 section — red 
No 2 section — yellow 
No 3 section — blue 
No 4 section — green 

Squadron Markings No 5 sec,i0 " ~ " hi,e 




o ° 



’A’ ‘B’ *C’ HQ’ 

( HQ and G' transposed until 1941) 

Key to marking drawings: (A) Formation HQ. (B) All 
Royal Artillery units, including HQ. (C) All Royal Engin- 
eers units, including HQ. (D) All Royal Signals units, 
including HQ. (E) Recce Regts (RAC). (F) Lorried in- 
fantry battalions. (G) All Royal Army Service Corps 
units, including HQ. (H) All Royal Army Ordnance Corps 
Units. (I) All Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engin- 
eers units — the black' is actually very dark blue. (J) 
Infantry battalions. (K) Senior armoured brigade 
vehicles. (L) Junior armoured brigade vehicles. (M) 
Support Group HQ. (N) Armoured car regiment. (O) Royal Army Ser- 
vice Corps. (P) All Royal Armoured Corps vehicles including trucks, 
but excluding RE and REME special purpose vehicles. (Q) Battalion 
commander s tank — battalion number superimposed in black. (R) 
Company commanders tank ( A— red. B— yellow. ’C’ — blue). (S) 
Rally’. (T) Come on'. (U) ’Out of action'. (V) Section commander s 
tank, colours as indicated. Squadron markings were usually painted 
on turret side and rear plates, sometimes with the troop number 
superimposed. Senior regiment or battalion, red: 2nd senior, yellow; 
junior regiment or battalion, blue. These could also be white. 

AIRFIX magazine 


TABLE i 

STANDARD NUMBERING FOR THE ARMOURED DIVISION 


(Two Armoured Brigades and one Support Group up to 1942) 

Number Colour of square 

(Superimposed) Unit (Arm of Service mark) 


40 

40 

40 

40 

Divisional HQ 

Divisional HQ Employment platoon 
Divisional HQ Intelligence Corps Sect. 
Divisional HQ Field Security 

Black 

Black 

Black 

Black 

50 

51 

52 

53 

78 

Senior Armoured Brigade HQ 

Armoured Regiments in precedence 

Motor Battalion 

Red 

Red 

Red 

60 

61 

62 

63 

79 

Junior Armoured Brigade HQ 

Armoured Regiments in precedence 
Armoured Regiments in precedence 
Armoured Regiments in precedence 
Motor Battalion 

Green 

Green 

Green 

Green 

Green 

75 

Support Group HQ 

Brown 

76 

77 

78 

RHA Regiment 

A T Regiment 

LAA Regiment 

Red Blue 

Red'Blue 

Red Blue 

74 

Infantry Battalion 

Red 

75 

Troop carrying coy RASC 

Red Green 

47 

Armoured Car Regiment 

Green White 

41 

Field Squadron, RE 

Cobalt blue 

42 

Field Squadron, RE 

Cobalt blue 

46 

Field Park Squadron, RE 

Cobalt blue 

48 

Armoured Divisional Signals 

White D.irk blue 

80 

RASC HQ 

Red Green 

81 

Armoured Brigade Coy RASC 

Red Green 

82 

Armoured Brigade Coy RASC 

Red Green 

83 

Support Group Coy RASC 

Red Green 

84 

Armoured Divisional Troops Coy RASC 

Red Green 


Note: The Arm of Service marks were normally worn on the off-side of the 
vehicle, with the Divisional sign on the near-side. Sometimes, however, the 
signs were transposed or combined together in one sign as in the 7th Armoured 
Division. The superimposed number was usually white. 


TABLE 3 

Brigades which served in the 79th Armoured Division 
Brigade Regiments Equipment Remarks 


1st Tank 

Ilth RTR 

42nd RTR 

49th RTR 

Originally CDL. 
but later converted 
to Buffaloes and 

Kangaroos 

1st Assault 
Brig, RE 

5th 

6th 

42nd 

Assault Regt, RE 

AVREs 


4th Armd 

Royal Scots Greys 
3/4th CLY 

44th RTR 

2nd KRRC 
(Motor Batt) 

Sherman DDs 

Independent brigade 
equipped with DDs 
for the Rhine crossing 

27th Armd 

13/ 18th Royal Hussars 
1st East Riding Yeo 
Staffordshire Regt 

Sherman DDs 

Normandy Landing 

30th Armd 

22nd Dragoons 

1st Lothian & 

Border Horse 

2nd CLY 

1 4 1 s t Regt, RAC 

Sherman Crabs 

Crocodiles 

Minesweeping and 
flame throwing 
brigade 

31st Tank 

7th RTR 

9th RTR 

144th RAC 

Crocodiles 

Withdrawn in 

August 1944 

33rd Armd. 

1st Northants Yeo 
144th RAC 

148th RAC 

1st East Riding Yeo 

Buffaloes 

144th transferred to 
31st Bde 

148th left in Aug 1944 
1st East Riding relieved 
148th 


1st Canadian APC 

Regt 

Kangaroos 

Equipped mainly with 
Rams and Priests 


1st Fife & Forfar Yeo 

Crocodiles 

From Oct 1944 


Ilth RTR 

Buffaloes 



TABLE 2 (Below) 


Unit 

7th Armd Div 

1 Ith Armd Div 

Guards Armd Div 

Principal equipment 

Remarks 

Armd Car Regt 

1 Ith Hussars 

The Inns of Court 
Regt 

2nd Household 

Cavalry Regt 

67 Armoured cars 

67 Scout cars 

Daimlers (basic car) 

AECs (heavy troops) 

Staghounds (HQ car) 

Daimler and Humber scout cars 
« M3 Half-tracks in squadron 
support troop 

Divisional HQ 




8 Cruisers 

Cromwells in 7th, 





2 AA Tanks 

Shermans in Guards and 






Ilth Armd 

Armd Recce Regt 

8th King’s Royal 

2nd Northants 

2nd Armd Recce Batt. 

40 Cruisers 

Cromwells 


Irish Hussars 

Yeomanry 

Welsh Guards 

6 CS Tanks 






30 Light Tanks 

Challengers 





5 AA Tanks 

Honeys. Crusader AA. 





8 Scout cars 

Centaur AA 

Armd Brigade HQ 

22nd Armd Brigade 

29th Armd Brig 

5th (Guards) Armd 

7 Cruisers 





Brig 

8 OP Tanks 

As Divn HQ above 





2 AA Tanks 


Armd Regt 

4th CLY 

23rd Hussars 

2nd (Armd) Batt, 

55 Cruisers 

Cromwells and Fireflies in 7th, 




Grenadier Guards 

6 CS Tanks 

Shermans and Fireflies in Guards 

Armd Regt 

1st RTR 

2nd Fife & Forfar 

1st (Armd) Batt. 

1 1 Light Tanks 

and 1 Ith Armd Divns: 



Yeomanry 

Coldstream Guards 

6 AA Tanks 

Comets were issued to 





8 Scout cars 

1 Ith Armd after the 

Armd Regt 

5th RTR 

3rd RTR 

2nd (Armd) Batt. 

(in each regt) 

Rhine crossing. 




Irish Guards 


Most AA Tanks withdrawn 






soon after D-Day 

Motor Battalion 

1st Bn. The 

8th Bn, The 

1st (Motor) Bn. 

80 Carriers and Half-tracks Universal carriers 


Rifle Brigade 

Rifle Brigade 

Grenadier Guards 


M3 Half-tracks 

Infantry Brigade 

1 3 1st Infantry Brigade 

159th Infantry Brigade 32nd Guards Brigade 



Regiment 

1 /5th Queen’s 

3rd Bn, 

5th Bn, 

2" and 3" mortars 




Monmouths 

Coldstream Guards 

6 pounder AT guns 


Regiment 

1 6th Queen's 

4th Bn, 

3rd Bn. 





KSLI 

Irish Guards 



Regiment 

1 /7th Queen's 

1st Bn. 

1st Bn, 





Herefords 

Welsh Guards 



Independent 

No 3 Support Group, 

2nd Independent 

3rd Independent 

Vickers M/Gs and 


Machine-gun 

Royal Northumberland 

M G Co. 

M G Co. 

4.2" mortars 


Co 

Fusiliers 

Royal Northumberland Royal Northumberland 





Fusiliers 

Fusiliers 



Royal Artillery 

3rd RHA 

1 5 1st Field 

153rd Field 

24 (towed) 25 pdrs 




Regiment. RA 

Regiment. RA 




5th RHA 

13th RHA 

53rd Field 

24 Sextons 





Regiment. RA 


18 Bofors were SP 


15th LAA 

58th LAA 

94th LAA 

54 Bolors 

24 17 pdrs 


Regiment. RA 

Regiment. RA 

Regiment, RA 


were SP 


65th A T 

75th A T 

21st A T 

48 17 pdr 

(Achilles or Archer) 


Regiment, RA 

Regiment. RA 

Regiment. RA 

A T guns. 



Note: In addition, each Division had its own supporting Services, ie. RE, Signals, RASC. RAMC. RAOC. REME. RCMP. 


November, 1968 


111 


7th Armd Div vehicles, 

Berlin July 1945 

Note : Desert Rat' formation sign 
is red on white background in each case 



Challenger of 8th Hussars 

45 in white on blue/green square 



Typical Cromwell markings 




2nd Armd Recce Bn. Welsh Guards 
White 45 on blue/green square 
Yellow 26 on black disc with 
yellow surround (bridge plate) 
White A in black square is 
squadron mark 

Guards Armd Div *Eye' emblem 


Priest and Sexton markings 

Priest of 11th HAC, RA. 1942-43 



Sexton of 147th Field Regt. RA 


D 


® U© 

C±) 


RA emblem 


Cromwell OP of 3rd RHA 
Battery letter R beneath 
cannon emblem, both red 
on white. 74 on red/blue 
square 



Quad tractor of 3rd RHA 
Colours as Cromwell, but signs 
on boards at sides of bonnet 


HQ. 11th Armoured Divn 
White 40 on black square 
White A 

Black bull on yellow background 


C Qi# ^ 


8th Hussars 

Compare with Challenger of same unit* 


Fox mask emblem of 8tn Armd Brigade 
Sexton of 6th Armd Division 


RA emblem 



Mailed fist emblem of 6th Armd Div 


Coil®]? 


Sexton of 11th 
Armoured Division 


5th RHA. OP vehicle 
Red Z on white square 

White 76 on red/blue RA square Bull emblem 
7th Armd Div formation sign formation sign 



RA emblem 


Divisional markings — continued 


to 244 plus 34 AA tanks. The recce regiment’s number was 
45 on the standard blue/green arm of service square. 

The Division was further enlarged in 1944 by the addition 
of extra tanks and also by an independent machine-gun com- 
pany. It now had 310 tanks, plus 8 OP tanks and 25 A A 
tanks on the strength. In practice it was also allocated an 
armoured car regiment by Corps on a more or less perma- 
nent basis, and this effectively released the armoured recon- 
naissance regiment to make it the fourth regiment of the 
Armoured Brigade. 

Table 2 shows three of the Armoured Divisions of the 
21st Army Group in NW Europe, 1944-45. Notice that the 
basic tank of the 11th and Guards Armoured Division was 
the Sherman; that the 7th had Cromwells; and that all 
Divisions had Sherman Fireflies to stiffen up their fire-power. 
The Firefly was the fourth tank in a standard troop of four- 
tanks, the other three being either Shermans or Cromwells. 

Apart from the armour of the other Allied armies, which 
will not be dealt with here (except to say that the Polish 
Armoured Division was equipped with Cromwells), there 
were two other major groups. 

The first, the 79th Armoured Division, comprised the 
Brigades of special purpose AFVs shown in Table 3. This 
was the largest Armoured Division in existence and because 
of its special duties, did not conform to the usual composi- 
tion. Prior to the assault on the Rhine the 79th comprised 
five Brigades — a total of 17 regiments — with lour times as 
many tracked and armoured fighting vehicles as a normal 



Left : A Sherman in 
1944 displaying typical 
markings: 79th Armd 
Div formation sign 
red/white/red RAC 
flash; 40' indicating a 
divisional HQ vehicle 


O 


Above : Typical mark- Black 28 on yellow disc 
ing combinations for (bridge classification) 
the 1942-45 period on 

British armoured 
vehicles. 

armoured division. 

The second group comprised the Independent Armoured 
Brigades and Tank Brigades which were equipped with 
Churchills for infantry support, although in some cases Sher- 
mans were also used in the infantry support role, for which 
they were not entirely suited. One of the Churchill-equipped 
brigades was the 6th (Guards) Tank Brigade, who wore their 
own Brigade Formation sign, of a golden sword set in the 
centre of a diagonal band of blue-red-blue on a white shield. 

The typical vehicle markings are taken from various 
sources, and mostly deal with the NW European campaign. 
From Table 2, it will be seen that a second field regiment 
RA was added to the Armoured Division, and this usually 
had the number 74 on the Arm of Service sign — denoting a 
regiment of towed 25 pounders, the number 76 being 
reserved for the Sexton-equipped unit (or Priests prior to the 
introduction of Sextons). 


APPLICATION OF MARKINGS 

Summarising the above, we get the following principal mark- 
ings applicable to British army vehicles in World War 2. 

Formation sign: The emblem, which could be partly heraldic, 
partly symbolic, or just ‘concocted’, which normally denoted 
the higher formation which directly commanded the unit oper- 
ating the vehicle. In the case of most ‘fighting’ vehicles, there- 
fore, this was the divisional emblem. Famous examples are the 
mailed fist of 6th Armoured Division, the ‘Desert Rat’ of 7th 
Armoured Division, the ‘Eye’ of the Guards Armoured Division, 
the black cat (Dick Whittington’s by legend) of 56th (London) 

Continued on page IK > 

AIRFIX magazine 


Beaufighter 
with Merlins 

Alan W. Hall makes a Mk II version 
from the Airfix kit 



R2270, the first production Beaufighter II with B type 
roundels and no codes. Note the air scoop above the cockpit 
canopy, the partly overpainted panel in the transparency, 
and the extensive weathering leaving hare metal showing 
through the overall black finish. There is also a yellow gas- 
detector patch just ahead of the tail. This aircraft has the 
dihedral tailplane (Imperial War Museum photo). 


S a further example of how left over pieces from one 
conversion can easily make up into another, I have 
chosen for my subject this month the Merlin powered version 
of the Bristol Beaufighter. 

Readers will have seen how, starting with the Halifax II 
conversion, I have been able to use the spare engines to make 
a Lancaster II and now, to take things to their logical con- 
clusion, am using two of the four discarded Merlin engines 
from the basic Lancaster kit to power a Beaufighter. 

I hope that I have been able to show the beginner that he 
need not spend a considerable amount of money in order to 
enlarge his collection and that given patience and some 
research he can produce excellent replicas without going to 
the expense of buying several kits to cannibalise into one. 
Those who have experience in these matters will agree that 
every item not needed in one kit will eventually come in 
handy for another. So if you do strike off on your own the 
golden rule is never to throw things away! 

The last two conversions have been relatively simple ones. 
The Beaufighter II follows this trend as the basic needs for 
change in this conversion are in the engines and tail unit. 
There’s also some heat treatment of sprue needed, but as 
this is one of the first things the ab initio conversion enthusi- 
ast learns, I have not worried about the inclusion of this 
type of work. 

Beaufighter I Is were used in quantity in the RAF during 
the early part of World War 2 when there was some doubt 
about the supply of Hercules engines being maintained. A 
total of 450 aircraft powered by Merlin XX engines were 
constructed at Bristol’s Filton works and the first production 
aircraft entered service with Nos 604 and 600 Squadrons in 
April, 1941. Other units using the Beaufighter II operation- 
ally were 25, 125, 255, 307, 406, 456 and 488 Squadrons. 

I found the most compact reference for this conversion in 
the Profile Publication No 137 on the Beaufighter. Photo- 
graphs, details and three side views are given in colour and 
in the case of the aircraft belonging to No 54 OTU, Richard 
Gardner has given a plan view showing the position of the 
camouflage. Other information can be gleaned from William 
Green’s Fighters of the Second World War. His ‘Famous 
Fighters’ series also deals with the subject fully. 

STAGE 1 The two fuselage halves and the wing halves 
are joined in accordance with kit instructions. These are laid on 
one side to dry and in the case of the latter this should be for 
at least 12 hours because joints are apt to part if the full drying 
out period is not observed. 

STAGE 2 The original engine nacelles on the Beaufighter 
wing are now removed as they arc too wide when compared with 
the Merlin replacements. Not all of the nacelle was cut away, 
however. I measured the width of the Merlin against the width 
of the Hercules and where the two coincided, about J inch from 

November, 1968 


the rear, made a cut at right angles so that I was provided with 
an effective key on which to fix the balsa wood block used to 
replace the original plastic. The cutting operation which followed 
the line of the edge of the nacelle where it met the wing was done 
w'ith a fret saw. ( Picture below ) 



STAGE 3 During the cleaning up operation, which 
involved the use of a file and sandpaper to smooth off the cuts 
made by the fret saw, I also removed the oil coolers on the 
leading edge of the wings. Sufficient plastic in the leading edge 
allows this to be done without making a hole in the wing, but 
if you do happen to make a slight indentation, reinforce the area 
with body putty, leave it to dry and then reshape the wing section 
later when waiting for another stage to dry out. 


STAGE 4 A balsa wood plug which runs from the leading 
edge to the right angle cut at the rear of the nacelle is then 
inserted. I purposely made this too deep as I wanted enough 



wood on which to work. The Lancaster nacelle is stuck on to 
the front of this, making sure that it lines up on the depth and 

Scale drawings on next page 
Instructions continued on page 116 

113 




Note that individual aircraft differed in small details; check pictures 
carefully when modelling a particular machine 

All colours matt 


PAINTING AND CAMOUFLAGE 

Most operational night fighters were matt black overall but 
the well-known aircraft from No 54 OTU. T3224. was my 
choice for a colour scheme. It should be noted that this air- 
craft did not display the nose radar aerials. M. J. F. Bowyer’s 
article on the Beaufightcr II in the March, 1963, issue of 
AIRFIX magazine has a photograph of a completed model 
in this scheme in addition to the drawings this month. There 
are also a number of alternate codes and serials given in the 
same article. Beginners should note that the Sea Grey Medium 
should be applied first and the green after this has dried. The 
colour came from the Humbrol Authentic Colour set No 1. 
RAF (European) reference HB.l and HB.6. Transfers were 
basically from the kit. A matt surface was achieved by rub- 
bing the gloss away with an ink rubber before the transfers 
were placed in water. Yeoman red transfers were used for 
the codes *ST-H’ and the serials were made up from Lctrasct. 
The March, 1 963, AIRFIX magazine is long out of print and 
cannot be supplied. 


Beaufighter II — continued 


Aerials on R2402 
night fighter 


Drawings by R. E. Gardner 


Ocean Grey 


Black 


Completed model of ST-H drawn below. Roundels are used 
straight from the kit, as is the tail flash. 


Dark Green 


Beaufighter IIF night fighter, R2402 : YD*G of 255 Sqn., 1942 


Plan view of T3224 


Note exhaust details 


Beaufighter IIF, T3224, of 54 OTU, 1944 


Note retractable tail wheel 


Note aerial on belly, starboard 


Nose of R2402 with 
bow and arrow A.I. aerial 


Front elevaiion. T3224 


Three bladed propeller 
omitted for clarity 


114 


AIRFIX magazine 


November, 1968 


115 








Beaufighter II — continued 


width when compared with the front view drawing on the next 
page. 

STAGE 5 When dry, the nacelles can be carved to their 
correct shape. It will be noted that as the width of the Merlin and 
Hercules vary (with the nacelle shape for the Merlin narrower), 
it will necessitate part of the balsa block being cut to follow the 
top of the wing section before the hump of the nacelle is reached. 
This can only be done by cutting down and sideways with a very 
sharp knife and finishing off with a file and sandpaper. This 
operation is possibly the most difficult of the whole conversion 
as you must get the division between the nacelle and the wing at 
a sharp angle and care must be taken to avoid cutting too deep. 
On the underside the nacelle is shaped so that the correct depth 
is obtained against the full depth of the Merlin engine and to do 
this I shaped the nacelle in the first instance ignoring provision 
for wheel wells. Once this was roughly completed I measured the 
height from the ground in scale size using the undercarriage legs 
and wheels from the kit. The resultant measurement gave me a 
point where I should cut the nacelle, remembering when I did so 
that sufficient thickness of wood had to be found to allow the 
undercarriage legs to be let into the surface. Finally, slots were 
cut into the sides of each nacelle to allow a fixing point for the 
undercarriage doors 

STAGE 6 The whole of the wooden part of the nacelle is 
now coated with talcum powder and clear dope mixture and 
allowed to dry. Time and patience arc needed to sand the nacelles 
down so that the joint line cannot be seen and it may be neces- 
sary, as in my case, to give the area a second coat of the filler 
before finally achieving a perfect match. 

STAGE 7 Before the undercarriage doors are added the 
forward bump on those in the kit must be removed with a knife 
and sandpaper. The bump on the rear of the doors is left. When 
complete, the doors are stuck in position and the undercarriage 
legs added. Drill small holes to take the locating stubs on the legs 
and push them into position, adding a little cement to do so. 
The rear struts arc also added at this stage and again small holes 
arc drilled in the wood surface as the struts have locating stubs 



Above: Close view of the Merlin nacelles grafted on to the 
remains of the Hercules nacelles. Note how the extremely 
careful finishing conceals any visible join between the plastic 
and the balsa. 

on them. In my case I did not put the wheels in position at this 
point as I preferred to pre-paint these and add them after the 
rest of the model has been painted. There is fess chance of the 
wheels being touched with paint from another part of the model 
if you do this. 


STAGE 8 On some Beaufighter I Is the lailplane had 
dihedral as in the kit, but on my model I chose to have the early 
horizontal tailplanc. To achieve this the locating stub was cut off. 
a 90° flat filed on the fuselage side and the two parts joined with 
cement. I also cut the locating stub from the wings as the joint 
was not perfect when this was put together in a dry run. After 
the stub was removed and the wing joined to the fuselage, it was 
found that the cleaning up process used to hide the joint line 
was easier. 


STAGE 9 Final details were then added. The canopies 
were put in place (these were pre-painted as 1 found it easier to 
do this separate from the model). Radar aerials for the nose and 
wing extremities were made by heat treating sprue. When stretched 
to the required thickness and before setting. I bent the material 
over the corner of my vice to get the right-angle required and 
then cut the piece to length. A further piece was added at the 
right-angle and the whole let into the nose by firstly drilling a 
small hole. A standard beam approach aerial was needed under 
the fuselage. The plan will show the length of this and again it 
was made from heat treated sprue. The upright parts were cut 
from small pieces of plastic card. Propellers, tailwhecl and aerial 
were stuck in position to complete the model. 


British Armoured Division markings — from page 1 12 


Division, the stylised ‘HD’ of 51st (Highland) Division, and the 
two crossed keys of 2nd Infantry Division. Vehicles of ‘inde- 
pendent’ brigades — ie, those not attached to divisions — carried 
their brigade formation sign. Well-known examples are the fox 
mask of 8th (Independent) Armoured Brigade and the sword on 
a shield of 6th Guards Brigade. Vehicles belonging to ‘Army’ 
or ‘Corps' troops carried the army or corps formation sign, a 
good example being General Montgomery’s Humber staff car 
which wore the 8th Army emblem in the Western Desert and 21 
Army Group emblem in NW Europe. Finally vehicles of units 
administered by ‘Commands’ or ‘Districts’ carried the com- 
mand or district emblem. An example was the ‘flaming torch’ 

emblem of Aldershot District. 

Widespread introduction of formation signs did not take place 
until 1940 in Britain (and in the BEF in France) and 1941-42 in 
the Western Desert and elsewhere, though formation signs were 
widely used in the first world war. Since World War 2 incident- 
ally formation signs have been continued in the British Army, 
and insofar as any standardisation goes, they arc normally 
painted on the left, front and rear (ie, nearside) of the vehicle. 
During the inter-war period, formation signs were discontinued 
(with few exceptions) and individual units were identified by an 
abbreviation (eg, *1 CHES’: 1st Cheshires) in 4 inch white 

letters usually on the sides of the vehicle, often inside a white 

circle. Individual unit identification in post-war years is stan- 
dardised by a similar abbreviation (eg, ‘S of I’: School of 
Infantry) in black letters on a white strip painted above the ‘Arm 

116 


of Service’ sign. Sometimes extra identification is provided (and 
was pre-war) less officially, by unit badges on doors, etc. 

The ‘Arm of Service’ sign with the number superimposed is 
most usually painted on the right, front and rear (ie, off-side) of 
the vehicle. Sometimes the number is omitted. 

Almost without exception, all British service vehicles from 1939 
to the present have carried a weight classification (or bridge plate) 
consisting of a yellow disc with a number depicting weight in 
tons superimposed. This is mainly to assist in routeing. etc, for 
convoy work to ensure that vehicles are kept to bridges and pon- 
toon ferries appropriate to their weight. Frequently, however, 
vehicles are seen with the number omitted. 

At the rear, low down, most British armoured vehicles carry a 
convoy panel of three black and four white vertical stripes painted 
centrally to give a ‘station keeping’ guide to following vehicles. 
Below : A Centurion A VRE with markings displayed in the most 
usual order from right (off) side to left: bridge plate. Royal 
Engineers' ' Arm of Service * marking, serial, and ‘ MOD - 
administered’ formation sign, a lion and crown. 




Part 12: Fighters in the Far East War 

r PHE campaign in the Far East presents one of the saddest 
L stories in Britain’s history. Everywhere it was a case of 
too little too late, or a wrong conception of the needs for 
defence — and its message for today is all too obvious. Incon- 
ceivably it seems that Singapore was entirely without any 
tighter protection until May, 1941. and that in India a few 
Blenheims and a host of biplanes were all that were avail- 
able. The reverses in Europe in 1940 prohibited reinforce- 
ments going to the East, a region of almost no action. 
Overseas re-deployment was instead to the Middle East, 
preventing planned Hurricane deliveries further east. For 
defence the RAF looked towards North American supply. 

Japanese strength and standard of equipment was 
obviously underestimated. Four Allied squadrons had been 
equipped with the outdated, under-armed Brewster Buffalo, 
which had to face a carrier force equipped with the lcgcndars 
Zero fighter. 

When the battle broke on December 7, 1941. the RAF 
had in Malaysia five fighter squadrons. These, it was argued, 
could be reinforced by others from the USA and the 
Netherlands East Indies. Britain’s force had been planned to 
rise from 88 obsolete or obsolescent aeroplanes to 336 
modern machines for which a string of new bases was being 
prepared. Radar and observer links were required and addi- 
tional bases in Burma and Cey lon. The 40 Buffaloes, and 12 
Blenheim IFs of No 27 Sqn, could hardly provide effective 
defence. 

By late November, 1941, relations with the Japanese had 
deteriorated so that attack seemed likely against Siam and 
perhaps Malaya — and remotely against Singapore. In con- 
sequence squadrons moved to war stations to support a 
possible British advance into Siam. RAAF Hudsons and 
three Catalinas of No 205 Sqn meanwhile were to watch for 
‘enemy’ shipping. Too late they came across Japanese trans- 
ports off Malaya. At this time No 21 Sqn RAAF, and No 27 
Sqn were deployed for Operation Matador against Siam, 
leaving Nos 243, 453 and 488 to defend Singapore. 

At first light on December 8, 1941, enemy troops began 
to land on the beach of North Malaya and Blenheims were 
ordered to shoot them up at once. Operations by the fighters 
began at 03.00 hrs. Two Buffaloes strafed enemy barges near 
Kota Bahru and at 04.00 Singapore had its first raid by 



A line-up of Spitfire VHIs in 1944 trim. 


November, 1968 



Top: A line-up of Buffaloes in green / brown / Sky finish. 
Above: One of the few air-to-air photographs of Buffaloes 
in the Far Fast. The censor has been busy, but it is still 
possible to read the squadron letters as ‘WP’. Unit not 
known (Imperial War Museum). 

carrier-based aircraft. Attacks soon began on airfields with 
the object of putting them out of use but not of destroying 
them. In a matter of hours Nos 21 and 27 Sqns had only 
four aircraft each and withdrew to Butterworth. Their efforts 
had been ineffectual. 

Short endurance prevented the Buffaloes from being of 
much help to our bombers. For 453 Sqn an even more de- 
moralising situation awaited. Their task was to patrol over 
HMS Repulse and HMS Prince of Wales ; they arrived to find 
both mighty warships had been sunk, and had only their des- 
troyer escort to look after. Such was the enemy success that 
Nos 21 and 27 Sqns had again to retreat south to Ipoh over 
difficult forested territory. Meanwhile, Buffaloes of No 3 
PRU flew useful reconnaissance sorties off the coast. A few 
days later, 453 Sqn moved forward to Ipoh. losing five of 
its number to crashes en route, and only six Buffaloes 
reached the field. Japanese raids soon reduced a revived 
21 Sqn and 453 Sqn to a strength of four aircraft each. On 
December 23 all were withdrawn to Singapore. 21 and 453 
Sqns had been very handicapped by lack of attack warning 
and poor facilities in general, although their presence was 
at least a morale booster for the troops. 

State of the fighters on December 24 was as follows: 21 
and 453 Sqns re-organising at Sembawang, 243 Sqn had 
14 Buffaloes at Kallang where 488 Sqn also had 14 and a 
Dutch squadron had nine, with 27 Sqn also there sorting 
itself out. Desperate messages had gone to Britain for re- 
inforcements which by January 8 should have included 51 
crated Hurricanes diverted from the Middle East with 24 
pilots. These were to operate from Kallang. and they arrived 
amid great excitement on January 13 for it was considered 
these could provide effective defence. 

Meanwhile the Buffaloes soldiered on, facing the continued 
heavy Jap attacks. Twelve of them escorted Blenheims 
attacking barges in the River Linggi on January 15. Next 
day 15 Buffaloes shot up road movements between Tampin 
and Gemas. Four shot up troop barges on the Muar River, 
attacks repeated by half-dozen others escorting Vildebcestes 

Continued on next page 
117 



Fighting Colours — continued 


there on January 17. The attacks were repeated on the 18th 
when 14 aircraft operated. PRU Buffaloes were watching the 
repair of airfields and the build-up of Japanese squadrons 
upon them. No 27 Squadron's Blenheim fighters unsuccess- 
fully atempted to halt raids on Singapore where the Hurri- 
canes were being hastily assembled on dispersed sites. They 
entered combat on January 20, flown by pilots of No 17 Sqn 
and some from 135 and 136. With ground crews they were 
formed into 232 Sqn at Kallang. 

From HMS Indomitable another 48 Hurricanes were soon 
to be flown off and 39 more in crates were on the way. 
Buffaloes were continuing their straffing operations and 
patrolling around Muar, intercepting bombers when practi- 
cable. Roads and the beachhead were also strafed. Some of 
the Hurricanes were at Scletar by the 25th, their intended 
airfields having been overrun. Then came the landings at 
Endau. Fifteen Buffaloes and eight Hurricanes escorted 
bombers to the spot, and a second wave of Vildebeests had 
four Buffaloes as escort. The slow biplanes proved a head- 
ache for the escorters who, nevertheless, claimed 12 Zeros. 

Next came a period of heavy raids on the Singapore air- 
fields. Nos 21 RAAF and 453 Squadrons were being mainly 
used for army support, leaving 232, 243 and 488 Sqns to 
defend the island. On their first day of operations, inciden- 
tally, the Hurricanes claimed eight unescorted bombers 
without loss ... if only there had been more Hurricanes. 
Usually the bombers were escorted, and against these forma- 
tions the Hurricanes were flying three to five sorties daily. 
When fighting the Zeros, however, the Hurricanes were at a 
disadvantage. Their desert filters deprived them of about 
30 mph although at over 20,000 ft they were superior in 
speed and climb but could be outmanoeuvred. Seventeen 
had been lost by the 28th and only 21 Hurricanes were 
available for fighting. No 27 Squadron had been withdrawn 
to the Netherlands East Indies and when the army fell back 
to Singapore Island only Kallang could be used, for all the 
other fields were on its north side. By the end of January, 
only eight Hurricanes of 232 Sqn and six Buffaloes of 453 
were left on the island, the reinforcement Hurricanes being 
taken direct to Sumatra. After flying about 100 sorties the 
PR Buffaloes were finally knocked out on February 7. 

On Sumatra No 258 Sqn was established with 15 Hurri- 
canes. It had come from the Middle East in Indomitable on 
January 26 and flew some sorties from Singapore. During 
the first ten days of February the Hurricanes were almost 
continuously airborne. When Singapore fell on February 9 
it was claimed that fighters had destroyed 183 enemy air- 
craft. A total of 30 later credited to the Buffaloes seems 
reasonable. Hurricanes claimed 100 destroyed for the loss 
of 45 to themselves. 

A mixture of Hurricane Is and MBs had so far reached 
the East. To improve the MB's performance its outer four 
guns were removed. Thirty-nine more Hurricanes arrived on 
February 12. Two days later a massive airborne assault was 
launched on Palembang when the Hurricanes were airborne 
and out of W/T range. Soon the task was the escort of 
Blenheim bombers to prevent the Japanese from capturing 
the island, but on 15th withdrawal was forced and Sumatra 
was captured. 

Finally came the attempt to hold Java. Fighters were now 
located at Tjililitan where 232 Sqn and the newly-arrived 
elements of No 605 Sqn were established with 25 Hurricanes. 
No 605's 1 1 As went into action on February 23 and they 
fought until Java was overrun. 




1 !>••• 1 YEUOW lllllli MEDIUM SEA GREY \/A/\ LIGHT BLUE 


Drawings by A. M. Alderson 



Above, top to bottom: Hurricane Mk IIC of No 60 Sqn, 
LD345, complete with white wins* identity bands and other 
white trim. The squadron codes were 15 inches high and fin 
band 18 inches deep. An interesting feature of this and all 
the Spitfires illustrated here is that the fuselage and wing 
roundels had an outside diameter of 15 inches; the inner 
pale blue ring was of 6 inches diameter; this also applies to 
the Hurricane. The Brewster Buffalo AN 180 has the earlier 
colours similar to those of home-based fighters. Its camou- 
flage pattern appears to have been non-standard for a single- 
engined fighter, but this applied to other Buffaloes. Note 
that the Sky band and spinner differs much in shade from 
the duck egg shade ( blue or green?) of the under surfaces. 
A trio of Spitfires, the top wearing late war colours with 
white trim and wing and tail fin and tailplane bands. JG534 
at the top shows a non-standard camouflage pattern. 
MT567 : H M-B has the usual pattern and is in 1944 finish. 
RNI93, a Mk XIV , shows the post-war scheme, and is of 
interest in that it has a small whin fin serial. 

The aircraft and their colours 

All the fighters engaged in the period December, 1941, to 
February, 1942, were similarly painted. They had dark green 
and dark earth upper surfaces with Sky (duck egg green 
shade) under surfaces except perhaps some Hurricanes with 


118 


AIRFIX magazine 


lighter shades of Sky. Code letters (when carried) were 
medium grey placed with the unit letters forward on the port 
and usually aft on the starboard side of the fuselage. Serials 
were black, spinners and rear fuselage bands Sky. Roundel 
types were as for home based fighters. 

Relatively little has, not surprisingly, survived concerning 
the aircraft engaged in the campaign, but there follows a 
listing of some aircraft used: 

No 21 Sqn Royal Australian Air Force: Buffaloes used 
included AN 170, AN 171, AN 174. Unit probably coded GA 
(and if so GA-B:AN180 may be added to the list). 

No 243 Sqn, examples used being W8147. W8179, W8199, 
W8238. 

No 453 Sqn possibly coded FU: formed October. 1941. 
Examples W8I60, AN 184, AN211. 

No 488 Sqn formed October 1941. Examples used included 
NF-U : W8 198, NF-0:W8I38 and AN187, '189, W8135, 
'8171, '8186, ’8191, '8195, '8200. 

No 27 Sqn: no details known. Used Blenheim IF. 

No 232 Sqn coded EF, No 242 Sqn briefly existing before 
becoming part of 242 Sqn probably coded LE, and No 258 
Sqn coded ZT. 

Burma and India 

Japan's onslaught on Burma began around Christmas, 
1941. Two terrible raids on Rangoon killed over 7.000 of 
its inhabitants. To defend Burma seven airfields had been 
built, reinforced by six landing grounds. For the fighters 
there was a serious disadvantage since mountains to the cast 
prevented early warning. Defence lay entirely in the hands 
of the 16 Buffaloes of No 67 Sqn which included W8135, 
'8138, '8168, '8191, '8195, *8198. along with American P-40> 
guarding the Burma Road to China. Object of the Japanese 
attacks was its entry point, Rangoon, and the aim was to 
cut supplies to China. During those frightful raids the 
fighters fought well and claimed 36 of the enemy, an amazing 
achievement considering there was only one radar station, 
virtually no early warning and the most primitive communi- 
cations system. Thirty Hurricanes were hastily brought in 
during January, and No 67 Squadron re-equipped for 
exhaustive fighting next month defending Rangoon. But the 
Japanese could not be held anywhere in the East and soon 
struck into Burma. Rangoon fell and all that remained of 
the fighter force — three Buffaloes and 20 Hurricanes — was 
forced to withdraw to India under terrible conditions. Here 
the defensive force was re-organised and included Nos 17 
and 67 Squadrons using Hurricanes based for a time on the 
forward base on Akyab which was heavily raided on March 
27. After this only 13 Hurricanes remained. By April the 
fighters were committed to the defence of Calcutta. 

Indomitable ferried more reinforcements in the form of 
Hurricane Is and Ms of Nos 30 and 261 Squadrons for the 
defence also of Ceylon from Ratmalana. Trincomalee and 
Colombo. These bases gave fighter cover to the Royal Navy. 
A tremendous fight was waged over the island on April 5, 
when 18 enemy aircraft were claimed for the loss of 18 of 
the 36 Hurricanes (Mks I and IIB) of Nos 30 and 258 Squad- 
rons. The Navy took a hammering and 261 Sqn fought 


Below: Spitfire VIII, AF-Z : JG534, in 1945 markings. 




Top: The inscription on the bomb dates the photograph here 
as circa December, 1944. White bands and codes are well 
shown . . . but which squadron is ‘ GQ 7 (Imperial War 
Museum photo). Centre: Another Thunderbolt / in SEAC 
trim coded AD-R, unit not known (Photo by D. Reeves). 
Above: KL859 of No 60 Sqn in natural finish with black 
identity bands and bars, also black codes T:MU. Standard 
size roundels. 

another fierce battle around Trincomalee on April 9 but the 
island was clearly going to hold out. 

Radar units had now been set up in India so that when 
the Japanese began raids on April 6, the Hurricanes had 
early warning. Soon the situation calmed as the Japanese 
reached the border of India and paused for breath. For 
many months the fighters stood by to repulse another great 
attack but the summer came and went with nothing major 
materialising. By June. 1942, Hurricanes equipped Nos 17. 
30, 67, 79, 135, 146, 258 and 261 Sqns, in India and Ceylon. 

A few Japanese bombers had made a night raid on 
Calcutta in January, 1942, and caused panic amongst its 
inhabitants. At once a few Beaufightcrs arrived to halt the 
night raids, going into action on January 15/16. Four nights 
later, with sore losses to heal, the enemy raids halted. 
Against the A. I. equipped machines the enemy was powerless 
to achieve anything. 

Throughout 1942 the Middle East war, swinging to and 
fro over the desert sands, dictated to a large extent the 
strength of the forces in India. Supplies intended for the 
Far East often went no further than North Africa where 
Rommel's prowess had shaken the British. All that could 
still be spared for India were Hurricane I Is. a type largely 
withdrawn from offensive operations over NW Europe. The 
supply of Spitfires was still insufficient to allow any to go to 
India except for PR duties. Eventually the defensive strength 
there was set at six Hurricane squadrons; 1943 saw the 
deployment of Beaufightcr Vis for nightfighter duties. 

The fighter squadrons came much into their own when 
Wavell launched his First Arakan Campaign, the aim then 

Continued on next page 

119 




Fighting Colours — continued 

being to capture Akyab. Hurricanes distinguished themselves 
in close support work, but the strength of enemy land forces 
nullified the army's efforts. Meanwhile, other fighters sup- 
ported the Wingate enterprise when the C’hindits first cam- 
paigned, an exciting aspect of operations, halted when the 
June monsoon came. Hurricanes had given useful escort to 
the supplying Dakotas. 

Hurricane deliveries were now sufficiently large to permit 
them to replace such aircraft as Blenheims, and they were 
ideally suited to the tough conditions of operation, using 
guns and bombs. Nos 1 1, 34. 42, 60 and 1 13 Squadrons were 
equipped with them. Early in October, the first Spitfire V( s 
arrived for Nos 136, 607 and 615 Squadrons. At last the 
Mohawks of No 5 Sqn (eight had been India’s sole defence 
force at one time) could be replaced after they had put up 
some stiff fighting. Another Buffalo squadron. No 143 (eg, 
AN 124, W8246), received Hurricanes, too. 

Greatest of the needs in this theatre of operations was for 
transport aircraft and these were now arriving in the form 
of Dakotas. The fighter types sent there were essentially 
schemed for operations in the defence of Britain. They 
lacked range and needed to be tropicalised and also to be 
backed by early warning stations, etc. One of the great 
success stories was that of the Beaufighter which immediately 
proved successful and soon became known to the Japanese 
as ‘Whispering Death' on account of its quiet approach. 

The arrival of the Spitfire was, perhaps, the most successful 
event of all for it took such a heavy toll of enemy fighters 
and bombers bold enough to venture near or over India. 
Then the Japanese brought along strong fighter cover at high 
altitudes — only to find that in January. 1944. the Spitfire VIII 
had arrived. It had a top speed of over 4(X) mph and could 
fight at up to 40.0(X) feet. British air superiority was now 
unquestionably gained, and by what was possibly the most 
refined Spitfire of all. 

Our strength was well apparent in the Second Arakan 
Campaign when Hurricanes Mk MB, 1 1C, I ID of No 20 Sqn 
and the Spitfires fought so well. The Japanese provided a 
strong distraction in the Imphal and Kohima regions in 
March and April. 1944, and in only 16 days 2,200 sorties 
were flown by Hurricanes of four squadrons in the ground 
attack role against the 31st Division at Kohima. Around 
Imphal the Hurricanes of Nos 11, 28, 34, 42. 113 Squadrons 
fought a bitter battle. Then came the support for the Second 
Chindit Campaign and massive support for the second thrust 
into Burma which, despite the monsoon, led to the capture 
of Rangoon. And still it was the Hurricanes that were bash- 
ing away at the enemy whilst Spitfire V 1 1 Is maintained air 
supremacy. Battles to clear Burma continued far into 1945. 

By then the picture of equipment had changed. The 
Republic Thunderbolt was at hand, for in 1944 seven squad- 
rons equipped with the type. Nos 79, 123, 134. 135, 146, 258 
and 261. and others were to follow. Nos 67. 136. 273 and 
607 all had Spitfires by mid- 1944 and 60 Sqn was flying 
Hurricane I Vs. Three, Nos 17, 20 and 28, were to soldier on 
another year with a mixture of Hurricane IICs and lVs. 
Thunderbolts proved useful in the role the Hurricanes had 
adopted and Spitfires, too, sailed in as fighter-bombers as 
the war reached its concluding months. There was no need 
to invade Malaya; the arrival of the nuclear age halted the 
fighting in time. And still Nos 17. 20 and 28 Squadrons had 
Hurricanes. 

When production permitted, the Spitfire XIV made its 
debut in the East and in the spring of 1945 the FRX1V 
reconnaissance fighter with a rear fuselage oblique camera. 

120 


Immediate post-war trim on Spitfire XIVs of No 132 Sqn. 
FF-B : RN 133. the squadron commander s aircraft, is nearest, 
carrying liis pennant marking. RN 190 : FF-J is in the fat- 
distance. As with many SFAC roundels the fuselage marking 
on RN/33 shows that it is the European type suitably 
doctored (Imperial War Museum). 

Markings of the aircraft 

Once the Buffaloes and early Hurricanes had ceased to 
be, a change in colouring was soon apparent. Well into 1945 
there were Spitfires. Thunderbolts and Hurricanes in SEAC 
with dark green and dark earth upper surfaces with deep 
blue under surfaces. Some are recorded as having under 
surfaces a dark shade of grey. too. Another change con- 
cerned code letters which in 1943 were replaced by a smaller 
size, often 18 inches high but sometimes only a foot high. 
In the middle of that year ( officially on June 24) a blue and 
white roundel was adopted which frequently appeared as 
roundel blue and a pale shade of blue 16 inches in diameter 
and with a six inch white centre disc. Two fin stripes, blue 
and white, each eight inches wide, were applied two feet high 
on the single-engined fighters, ( ode letters were positioned 
as usual on home-based fighters. Sky fuselage bands were 
sometimes applied and spinners were sometimes white, 
although on some fighters both were white. For a while the 
fuselage band was then painted, and often never applied. 
By 1945 some spinners were dark sea grey, the rear fuselage 
bands had gone and white wing and tail bands came into 
vogue. Thunderbolts had 28-inch wide bands around the 
inner wing section, 18-inch wide bands around the tailplane 
and across the fin and a stripe around the cowling leading 
edge of 17 inches wide. Similar markings were applied to the 
Hurricanes and Spitfires, from about mid-March, 1945, but 
officially at any rate they did not include a white nose. 

Thunderbolts were being supplied in natural finish during 
the final months of the war. In place of white noses and 
wing and tail stripes these had black trimmings and code 
letters. They featured a black or olive anti-dazzle panel. An 
interesting feature often seen was the application of the 
serial in small characters to the fin as well as to the fuselage. 
1945 roundels and flashes invariably featured the pale blue 
colour in place of white. 

It would be impossible here to list all the fighters that 
were sent to South East Asia Command. Most of the Spitfire 
VI I Is were shipped there, and almost all of the Thunder- 
bolts. Mk I aircraft with the old ‘razor back’ carried the 
serials FL73I-850 and HB962-HDI81. Mk lls with teardrop 
canopies were HDI82-30I. KJ 128-367. KU68-347. KL838- 
887. 


The squadrons 

Listed here are the relevant fighter squadrons which 
operated in the Far East and their respective equipment: 


Sqn 

Unit 

letters 

Type 


Serial 

Notes 

5 

? 

Mohawk IV 


? 

12 41 to 6.43 



Hurricane lie 


HW801 

6.43 to 1944 


OQ ? 

Thunderbolt I/ll 

? 

1944-45 

11 

? 

Hurricane lie 


B-LB796 

1943 



Spitfire VIII 


? 

1944 



Spitfire XIV 


? 

1945 

17 

YB 

Hurricane 1 1C 


BN540 \ 

in use 1943 



Hurricane IVC 


HV798 / 

20 

? 

Hurricane IIB 


BN 699 1 

in use 1943 



Hurricane 1 ID 


HW676 / 

28 


Hurricane IIB 


BH134 


30 

RS 

Hurricane 1. II 


? 




Thunderbolt 1. 

II 

HD286 G 


34 

AD ? 

Hurricane 1 1 A . 

B 

? 




Thunderbolt 1. 

II 

KL 200 


42 

AW 

Hurricane lie 


KZ244 C 

m use 12.43 



Thunderbolt II 


KJ316Y 

in use late 44 


Continued an page 130 
AIRFIX magazine 



REVIEWED FOR MODELLERS 


Modern soldiers 

WORLD UNIFORMS IN COLOUR. Volume I. Europe. Pub- 
lished by Patrick Stephens Ltd. 9 Ely Place. London Ed. 
Price 30s. 

I \ESPITE the large number of books published on military 
* - uniforms, relatively few deal with those which arc currently 
worn by the armies, police forces, and other units of the world. 
This book fills the bill very well, since it covers just about all the 
dress uniforms we can think of and a lot more we had not heard 
of. It has colour plates on every page— more than 70 — and plenty 
of illustrations of badges and emblems, plus brief but interesting 
details of all the regiments, uniforms, and units involved. The 
original was published in Italy, but this is. of course, an English 
edition. Coverage is excellent, the colour drawings are accurate 
and photographic rather than impressionistic and. all in all, the 
uniform enthusiast gets good value with plenty of figure conver- 
sion ideas suggesting themselves to the modeller. All European 
nations are included plus the crack units — even the Kremlin 
Guard— though combat dress is net featured. Coverage of British 
units is particularly good, even though one or two of the regi- 
ments featured have just been, or are about to be. disbanded in 
the latest clumsy defence reductions. 

Aircraft trio 

SE 5A. by Charles L. Bourget ; JAPANESE CODE NAMES: 
JAPANESE AIRCRAFT INSIGNIA. CAMOUFLAGE. AND 
MARKINGS, both by Richard M. Bueschel. All available 
from Motor Books A Accessories. 33 St Martins Court. London 
W C2. Price 17s each, plus Is 6d postage. 

I^IRST of these three books gives the usual monograph treat- 
t ment to the famous SE 5A fighter, with brief history, lots of 
pictures— some very rare— and some good scale drawings and 
interior shots. It’s quite well produced, though its rather high 
price (for only 24 pages) will unfortunately put it out of the 
reach of many who would buy it if it was only half as much. 

The same remark applies to the other two publications which 
are uniform in style. They each have lots of rare pictures and the 
book on code names is particularly useful since it identifies each 
Japanese World War 2 aircraft by its full Japanese designation 
and its Allied code designation. There arc interesting pictures of. 
for instance, the Tabby, or Nakajima L2D Type O. which was a 
licence-built DC-3, and the Thalia, which was a licence-built 
Lockheed 14, both suggesting ideas for model finishes. 

The colour scheme book includes colour illustrations on the 
inside covers plu,s a summary of the development of Japanese 
camouflage. Once again, it's a useful little volume with plenty 
of rare pictures, including a fine shot of a captured Havoc under 
test. 

Spanning the years 

CONQUERORS OF THE AIR. bv C. Deman, I ami II. Emde. 
An Edita book published in UK by Patrick Stephens Ltd. 9 
Ely Place, London ECI. Price £9 10s. 
r I THIS is a big book, both in size (200 pages) and in scope, 
since it sets out to cover the evolution of aircraft from 1 903- 
45. It docs this by taking 14 famous episodes or epochs along 
the way, from Santos-Dumont’s Demoiselle and its contem- 
poraries, through two world wars, the pioneering years of the 
twenties and ’thirties, and ends with the coming of the jets. The 
approach is essentially ‘popular* and. indeed, even in a book this 
size it would be difficult to take everything in in anything but a 
‘fast gallop’ through the years. The ‘milestones’ are well recorded 

November, 1968 


in a very readable way, and the text is well supported with 
scores of lavishly produced drawings in colour mostly, but with 
others in black and white. Most of the drawings arc in ‘Profile" 
style, the early and inter-war types being very well done. Indeed, 
they fill quite a gap since there is still surprisingly little in print 
of use to modellers for these particular periods of aviation history. 
The drawings of the types like the Wright Flyer and Antoinette 
are most exquisite, as arc later historic aircraft like the 
’Arc-en-Ciel’ and Ford Trimotor. The World War 2 (and to a 
lesser extent World War I) periods are less happily covered, 
however. The authors (who are American) are obviously none too 
well up on RAE and Luftwaffe camouflage and markings and 
make some sad errors of colour on such types as the Spitfire. 
Lancaster, and Me 262, to mention just a few. MAP Dark Green, 
for example, changes in shade from bright green to slate grey 
from drawing to drawing, serials get omitted, as do fin flashes, 
and *C* Type roundels appear with while or yellow outers— 
obviously misinterpreted from half-tone prints. The book is most 
luxuriously produced, however, as reflected in its price, and useful 
for the early types it covers well. Not many readers will be able 
to afford it, but Conquerors of the Air is worth looking for in 
your local library. 

First war aircraft 

FIGHTERS 1914-19: BOMBERS 1914-19, by Kennelli Man- 
son. Published by Blandford Press. 167 High Holborn, London 
W Cl. Price 18s each ( two volumes). 
r I THESE are two excellent books which have obviously been 
* produced with the modeller in mind. Their content is good 
but the small size precludes the inclusion of full three-view 
drawings. In each case the colour illustrations arc done in plan 
view showing the upper surfaces on the right-hand side of the 
silhouette and the under surfaces on the left. The model maker 
is left guessing, therefore, as to what happens on the other side. 
There are no front views. 

The choice of colour scheme for the 66 bombers and 80 
fighters is first rate. There are many that have not been seen 
before and this alone will want to make the enthusiast purchase 
the book. Where possible squadrons have been identified and 
this too is of value. Each drawing has its own descriptive matter 
at the back of the book containing a short history and service 
record of the aircraft. 

The two volumes are the fifth and sixth of the series being pro- 
duced by Blandford and the standard of reproduction of draw- 
ings has improved a great deal since the first volume was avail- 
able. At a price of 18s these books arc cheap enough for almost 
any pocket 

New from Aero 

THE LUFTWAFFE IN WORLD WAR 2. by Uwe Feist ami 
Rene Francillon. 

THE SLVBIRD GROUP, by Kenn C. Rust and William N. Hess. 
TIN GOOSE — THE FABULOUS FORD TRIMOTOR. />» 
Douglas J. Ingel Is. 

Price 36s 6d each book, including postage. 

FOCKE-WULF 190A, by Eberhard Weber and Usve Feist. Price 
24s lOd, including postage. All published by Aero Publishers 
Inc, and available ( outside USA ) from W. E. Hersant Ltd. 
228 Archway Road. Highgate. London N6. 
r I TOP of this list comes the first of a new series called ‘Aero 
Pictorials’. Luftwaffe in World War 2 contains over 100 
pages entirely devoted to pictures, most of them very rare and 
hitherto unpublished. They are not just pictures of aircraft cither 
— most show what went on behind the scenes on the ground, so if 
you want to get some of that essential ‘atmosphere* for airfield 
models like aircraft being armed, serviced, or fuelled, you’ll find 
plenty to satisfy you here. In addition just about every picture 
includes some most helpful details for modellers of Luftwaffe 
aircraft— both internal and external. A most useful volume this. 

By contrast, the second book is a highly detailed operational 
history of 353rd Fighter Group, the famous ‘Slybird’ Group of 
8th Air Force in World War 2. About two-thirds of this volume 
is text, data, mission details, and so on — all very readable — and 
the rest is made up of scale drawings, colour schemes, and some 

Continued on page 130 

121 


ROMAN FRIENDS/ 
AND FOES 


BY BOB O BRIEN 




I^OR this article we deal with a 
* certain people — one which has 
been long in the lands of the Eastern 
Mediterranean, and once burst out 
and established an Empire which 
stretched from Spain to Eastern 
borders of the old Persian Empire. 
These were the Arabs, who in the 
period with which our models are 
concerned were anything but united, 
but were a number of small kingdoms 
and tribal groups troubled by feuds 
and differences which in some cases 
remain in being today. 

The Arabian desert, with its thinly 
scattered tribes and Arab kingdoms, 
f ringed the area of the Fertile Crescent 
which stretches along the coast of the 
Eastern Mediterranean, swings round 
to the East through Syria and then 
continues on its way down the lines 
of the Tigris and Euphrates. In this 
area many of the oldest civilisations 
grew up, flowered, and then went 
under to a fresher order, or in some 
cases, to the raiders from the moun- 
tains to the East and North, or to 
those from the deserts and steppes of 
Asia and Arabia. Any invader from 
the East wishing to move to the sea 
would have the Arabs on his left flank 
all the way, and in the same way any- 
one wishing to strike eastwards would 
have them on his right. When the big 
Empires were strong, their policy was 
to buy off the most troublesome, now 
and again try to punish the more 
enterprising, and in many cases enlist 
the desert warriors in their own 
armies, as light cavalry, scouts and 
light infantry and bowmen, so that 
one could find Arabs on both sides in 
an encounter between Romans and 
Persians. 

We will now deal with the conver- 
sion of the types in the Airfix Arab 
set to these light auxiliary troops of 
the Ancient period. 

Arab Infantry 

One thing that has changed little 
over the years is the costume worn by 
the desert dweller, so that the figures 
in the set need little or no alteration 
to dress. The conversion of the run- 

122 


Part 2: Arab Auxiliaries 

ning figure will result in two types, a 
spearman and a swordsman, and as 
the procedure is similar for both, they 
will be dealt with together. 

The rifle must be cut away, and the 
bandolier shaved down so as to ‘lose* 
the cartridges. A small hole is then 
drilled in the right hand to take cither 
a sword or a spear. The ‘sword’ is 
made from a medium thickness pin, 
with the head and the extreme point 
cut off to leave about 12/13 mm. It is 
then filed as flat as possible for all 
except the end 3 mm which will be 
pushed through the hole in the hand. 
The complete sword is curved slightly, 
pushed into place in the hand, 
adjusted to a suitable position (see 
diagrams), and secured by a touch of 
Araldite or similar glue. A scabbard 
of flat plastic strip is then glued on to 
the figure on the left-hand side. This 
scabbard should be curved slightly to 
match the sword. The figure drawn 
has a small circular shield added, but 
this is my own particular fancy, and 
the shield can be of a different shape, 
or left out altogether. 

The spearman has a spear of wire 
a little under 1 mm thick, and 
35/36 mm in length. The spear is 
pushed through the hole in the hand 
and then into a hole in the base, and 
the whole figure will have to be bent 
a little backwards on the base, as the 
original position shows the figures 
leaning well forward, and left in this 
position the spear is liable to un- 
balance the model. As a secondary 
weapon this man would carry a sword 
and this should be represented by a 
scabbard made as for the other figure, 
and glued at waist level. Again, the 
shield is optional. 

These figures would generally be 
painted in light colours, at least as far 
as the main garment is concerned, with 
the headdress of a different colour. 
The figures shown arc coloured, for 
the swordsman : pale yellow with 
orange head covering and a blue head- 
band and all belts and scabbard in 
tan. The shield can be painted to 


choice, for instance dark green with a 
device in red. The spearman is a rather 
duller looking character, with his 
main garment of matt khaki mixed 
with cream, and a dark red head 
covering. When painting faces for 
these figures, darken up the normal 
flesh colours with a touch of earth 
and red to get the right effect. 

Camel Archer 

The Airfix camel riders as they are 
supplied in the set can be used with 
only the following alterations: 

(1) Cut away rifle, if carried. 

(2) Make up a quiver from plastic, 
8 mm long X 2 mm wide and 
tapered slightly, then glued as 
shown. 

(3) Cut off the left arm close to the 
shoulder and replace with the 
left arm of a Robin Hood 
archer — use a portion of a pin 
to attach the arm securely, as 
shown in the sketch. 

Painting this figure can be to choice 
— my riders have an orange robe with 
a maroon headband, while the camel 
saddle and trappings are matt blue, 
yellow and green, with maroon trim. 
Belts are tan. as is the quiver, but for 
those who fancy a bit more colour, 
pieces of equipment such as these can 
be decorated with a different colour 
and/or bronze representing designs 
that would often be applied to the 
material. Belts painted in tan. 

Before leaving this figure, I should 
mention that the Robin Hood bow 
should be trimmed down to 13/14 mm 
from tip to tip, to represent the much 
shorter bow used by cavalry. 

Light Lancer 

This is the Airfix horseman in the 
Arab set as supplied but with the 
addition of a lance, shield and a scab- 
bard for the sword to be used as 
secondary armament. The lance is of 
1 mm wire 40/42 mm long, and is 
positioned in a hole drilled through 
the figure from just inside of the elbow 
to come out as nearly as possible to 
the right hand. The shield is of the 
‘hour glass’ type, 8 mm X 4 mm, and 
shaped as shown in the sketch, with 
a centre boss of the head of a pin 
pushed through a hole in the shield 
and into the figure. The scabbard 
should be about 9 mm long, and 
slightly curved as shown, glued to the 
left-hand side as though suspended 
from the waist. 

Colouring, again, on this figure, is 
very much left to choice — light colours 
as a rule, but with a varying degree of 
ornamentation depending on the im- 

AIRFIX magazine 



portance and means of the wearer. 

Generally 

This does not by any means exhaust 
the types that can be converted from 
the Arab set — further conversions will 
appear later, and as far as armies of 
the more important Arab kingdoms 
were concerned, there might also be 
some cavalry with part armour, and 
even mercenaries from other places 
and of different races. 

For anyone who has never tried 
converting OO/HO size Airfix figures 
before, the simple types I've just des- 
cribed are an ideal introduction to the 



Above: Models converted as described 
here. From Left: Arab with spear. 
Arab with sword and shield, light 
lancer, camel archer, camel lancer. The 
latter was described in Part I of this 
series last February. 



art. With these auxiliaries — who can 
fight either with or against the Airfix 
Romans — you are not restricted to 
specific ‘uniform’ colours and you can 
vary them and their equipment (eg, 
shields) as you wish. Also, because 
they are simple, quite a large ‘army’ 
of Arab warriors can be turned out 
quickly. 

Keep unused parts — the ‘disarmed’ 
Robin Hood bowmen, for example 
as they may come in useful for other 
figure conversions, and do all cutting 
with a sharp blade in your craft knife. 
Finally, a reminder to scrub all Airfix 
OO/HO figures in soapy water before 
you begin work on them: this will 
making painting very much easier and 
the paint will adhere more satis- 
factorily. 


Above: Conversion sketches. (/) Making the swordsman, V is suitably bent pin. 
(2) Spear man. (3) Making the camel archer. *</’ is length of pin. (4) The light 
lancer. Note the shape of the shield, though this could be any other desired 
shape. Part I of this series appeared in our February, 1968, issue. 




13-17? Y 11 coiM be a Air Cadet 


this leaflet 

To Wing 
Ci. K. A. 

Headqua 
<956 WV1>. 

Royal Air Force. 
Brampton. Hunts. 

Plea\e semi me your lea 


NAME 

ADDRESS 


DATE OF BIRTH 


Travel and meet people. 1 300cadets v isit 
the R A F. abroad each year. Cadets 
may also visit 18 foreign countries 
tinder the international air cadet 
exchange scheme. 

Make new friends by the dozen! 

The Air Training Corps is a voluntary 
youth movement whose programme is 
specially arranged so as not to interfere 
with school activities. There are Squad- 
rons all over the country - more than 
850 in all 


Prepare for your career. If you decide 
to join the R A F., it is an advantage 
to have been in the A.T.C. If you want 
a civilian career, most employers re- 
cognise the practical value of Air Cadet 
training. 

Learn about engines, radio, radar, 
parachutes, dinghies, aircraft recogni- 
tion— dozens of other things. 

Visit RJI.F. Stations on annual camp 
Sport, from climbing to canoeing, from 
football to fencing you name it 

teifl 


Join the Air Training Corps and you vc 

J ot a hobby that’s really worth having. 
Icrc arc a few of the things you can do. 


Cet your wings as a glider pilot. The 
ATC has 160 gliders, in 27 different 
gliding schools. 

Learn about flying. ^ ou could even get 
a flying Scholarship of 30 hours flying 
training (including 10 hours solo) with 
a Civil Flying School. 

Learn to shoot .22 as well as .303. 
There is a Cadets’ Bisley every year. 


November. 1968 


123 




Part 5: Special purpose variants 

UO far as is known, there have been three distinct versions 
* - of the T-34 in the bridge laying role, all produced since 
the end of World War 2. The first was an early Russian type 
with a rigid ARK type bridge, the second a Russian model 
with a rigid type bridge launched by pivoting about a roller 
at the front (designated T-34/ MTU), and a more recent 
type, employed by the Czechs, which retains the turret as a 
housing for the bridge-actuating motor. This latter type had 
a folding scissors bridge. The first Russian model mentioned 
above consisted of a rigid bridge structure which was 
attached to the tank in such a way as to be able to adopt 
any required attitude. The bridge could not be removed from 
the tank and the idea was to drive the vehicle into the trench 
to be spanned, and to adjust the bridge until it coincided 
with the two peripheries of the trench, which were not 
necessarily in the same plane. The second Russian version 
had a bridge of about 39.5 ft in length, which could span 
some 37.5 ft, and carry loads up to 40 tons. The bridge was 
of lattice steel construction and was launched forwards by 
a single boom. The Czech scissors type had a bridge some 
65 ft long when fully extended, was hydraulically operated, 
and could carry up to 35 tons load. 

T-34s were also fitted with various mine-clearing equip- 
ments, as follows: 

Mine rollers: There were basically two types; one single 
axle with A shaped beaters attached to the rims of the discs; 
the other type had a split axle. T-34/85 tanks so equipped 
were designated T-34/PT-3. 

Snakes: The snake is a term generally applied to explosive 
line charges cither pushed or projected across minefields and 
concrete obstacles. Types of both classification arc known 
to have been fitted to the T-34/85 tank, although the 
Russians do not seem to favour this method in comparison 
with the mine-roller device. 

Tankdozers: Most models of the T-34 were fitted with 
either manually or hydraulically operated dozer blades for 
general engineer work in clearing mines, snow, earth, etc. In 
such cases the turret and main armament are always 
retained. These tanks are designated T-34/STU. 

Under the conditions of a large tank offensive against a 
heavily defended position established behind a minefield, 
the Russians might well drive a battalion or two of con- 
ventional gun tanks across a minefield. Although this sounds 
to be a brutal method of achieving an aim, it will possibly 
produce less casualties than conventional methods, and most 
certainly saves a great deal of time. 

With the standardisation of the T-34 and KV programmes, 
flame-thrower installations were designed for both tanks: 
the T-34 was originally tried out with a type designated 
ATO-41. Further flame-thrower development was influenced 
by the policy of the US and British armies, the former pre- 
ferring the replacement of the main armament by the flame- 
gun, and the latter insisting upon the retention of the main 

124 



Top to bottom: A T-34 185-1 of the East German Army 
shown on a pontoon ferry during Warsaw Pact exercises a 
couple of years ago. Note the single mushroom ventilator 
forward of the cupola hy means of which the I can he dis- 
tinguished from the II version. A T-34/85-II showing the 
twin mushroom vents behind the cupola. Airfix kit is a model 
of this type. Note the extra fuel tanks on the hull rear. A 
T-34 185-11 with muzzle brake , shown in winter finish. This 
official Soviet picture is evidently a propaganda shot or a 
scene from a film since it includes wrecked German equip- 
ment in the background — out of period with the vehicle. 

armament at all cost; of the two, the Russians preferred the 
British method, although they were against the employment 
of towed fuel trailers. 

In 1943, under the Allied Aid Agreement, a number of 
British flame-throwing tanks (Churchill Crocodiles) were 
shipped to Russia from the PWD (Petroleum Warfare 
Department, at Langhurst) for training purposes. As the 
result of the experience gained from the PWD installation 
in the Churchill tank, the T-34 system was completely 
redesigned, and the flame-thrower redesignated ATO-42. 
Tanks so equipped became known as OT-34s (Ogniemetnyi 
Tank 34), and were first employed against the Germans in 
1944. The OT-34 carried 44 gallons of fuel in the ATO-42 
model (as against 22 in the ATO-41 model) and the flame- 
gun was operated by compressed air; it could achieve a 
range of 82-98 yards with unthickcned fuel, or up to 120 
yards with thickened fuel, under ideal conditions. The flame- 
gun was mounted in an armoured casting on the right-hand 
side of the glacis plate, displacing the ball-mounted MG, 
with 5 degrees of traverse each side of centre. Operation was 
by electric pump and started by firing a 20 mm cartridge. 
Ignition was by sparking plug actuating a petrol jet. Six 

AIRFIX magazine 


shots could be fired, each of two seconds duration, and the 
whole unit was self-contained within the tank. A few experi- 
mental models are believed to have been fitted with dual 
flame-guns mounted on the glacis plate — one on each side 
of the driver. 

In its final stages of use by the Soviet Army, the T-34 was 
provided with facilities for deep wading. This equipment 
necessitated sealing the hull and turret components and pro- 
vision of a breathing tube for the engine and crew compart- 
ments. The T-34 was supplied in large numbers to Soviet 
satellites and other countries in the Russian sphere of 
influence. Many still remain in Soviet Army service either in 
reserve or second line use or as the basis of special purpose 
types. 

Self-Propelled Limited Traverse Versions of the T-34 

r PHERE have been three basic limited traverse versions 
based on the T-34 hull and chassis accepted for quantity 
production. Little is known about experimental mountings 
on this chassis. The three models consist of (a) an 85 mm 
anti-tank gun mounting, (b) a 100 mm anti-tank gun mount- 
ing, and (c) a 122 mm howitzer mounting. 

Vehicles of this type are designated ‘SU’ (Samochodnaja 
Ustanovka), or self-propelled gun. and arc classified accord- 
ing to gun calibre: thus the 85 mm mounting, for example, 
becomes the SU-85. 

The SU-85: This was one of the initial assault guns pro- 
duced during the war in quantity production. It was the 
contemporary of the SU-76 (based on the T-70 light tank 
chassis) and the SU-152 (KV chassis). The 85 mm gun was 
an adaptation of the 85 mm AA gun M-1939. 

The SU-85 was a self-propelled mounting with the 85 mm 
gun in a fixed superstructure on a T-34 tank chassis. The 
vehicle was first observed in 1943 and replaced the SU-76 
which proved inadequate in an anti-tank role. When the 
vehicle was phased out in 1944 it was modified for use by 
Soviet satellite countries by replacing the original 85 mm 
AA gun M-1939 with the newer 85 mm gun (D5-S85A). 
There was no visible difference between the two guns, 

Below: A T-34/85-II shown ‘ snorting with the breathing 
tube fixed in the turret roof, which incorporated a special 
attachment aperture. Bottom: The T-34/85 PT-3 mine clear- 
ing tank. This roller equipment could also be used with 
the T-34/76. 



Top to bottom: A platoon of T34/85-lls of the Hungarian 
Army seen fuelling in the field from a portable pipeline. 
Note the Soviet-style tank suits and the extra fuel tanks on 
the hull rear. The earliest type of T-34 bridgelayer had a 
rigid bridge which could be pivoted to any angle. The 
vehicle was driven into a ditch and left, as in the British 
ARK. The second type of T-34 bridge was launched forward 
over the roller just visible at the front of the vehicle shown. 

although the M-1944 had a greater range and greater armour 
penetration ability. Late in 1944, when the T-34 went over 
to the 85 mm gun, the SU-85 was replaced by the SU-100. 

The SU-100: The SU-100 is a further development of the 
SU-85. The 100 mm gun, which is the same as that mounted 
on the much later T-54 tank, has a greatly improved per- 
formance over that of the 85 mm gun. In addition to the 
distinctive long gun, the SU-100 is distinguished by the 
differently shaped mantlet and circular cupola which is 
attached to the right-hand side of the superstructure. The 
vehicle first appeared in 1944 and remained the standard 
support gun for mechanised and armoured divisions until 
their reorganisation in 1957, when it was replaced by the 
JSU-122 (A-I9S) assault gun carriage on the Joseph Stalin 
tank chassis. This resulted from the production of the T-54 
tank with a 100 mm gun. Obsolete vehicles were conse- 
quently supplied to Bulgaria, Communist China, Czecho- 
slovakia, Egypt, East Germany, Poland. Rumania and the 
United Arab Republic (together with T-34/85 tanks). The 
superstructure is very similar to that of the SU-85, and the 
hull, running gear and automotive components arc identical 
to the T-34/85. The armament consists of the 100 mm field / 
anti-tank gun Model 1944 (D-10S). As with the SU-85, no 
secondary armament is carried. 

SU-122: The SU-122 consisted of the Model 1938 122 mm 
field artillery howitzer mounted on the chassis of the T-34 
tank. It entered service in late 1941 and was replaced by the 
SU-85 in autumn, 1943. The vehicle was designed to provide 
artillery fire support to tank divisions and had little effect 
against armoured vehicles. The general construction and 
layout of the vehicle was similar to the other two variants. 

125 





November, 1968 


Military Modelling 



SALVAGE TANK 

I AST month’s LAD half-track conversion suggests a panicu- 
4 larly attractive conversion of similar configuration for the 
World War 1 period. This is the so-called ‘Salvage Tank’, the 
very first of the ARVs. which was developed and used by the 
Tank Corps Central Workshops at Erin, Northern France. 

Only a small number of vehicles were so adapted, mostly for 
use in the tank parks and other rear areas. They were all based 
on either old Mark IV Supply Tanks or ‘war weary’ Mark IVs 
of cither the Male or Female variety. This immediately suggests 
some variations for the modeller. The basic vehicle can be com- 
pleted as a Mark IV Male, a Mark IV Female, a Mark IV Supply 
Tank with large sponsons. or a Mark IV with no sponsons at all. 
This latter was quite common, since the sponsons were simply 
unshipped and the vehicle ran without them. If you choose this 
alternative, you don’t have to worry about building the sponsons 
up from plastic card but you then need to put in interior details, 
including a dummy Daimler engine. 

To obviate the need even for doing this, I chose the last alter- 
native of all which entails sliding doors on runners which the 
Central Workshops put over the sponson apertures of a few of 
these Salvage Tanks. However, this is getting a little way ahead, 
and the first task is to convert the basic tank hull from the Airfix 
World War 1 tank into a Mark IV. This was fully described in 
the April, 1968. issue, but for those who may have missed this. 
I'll summarise the work briefly. 

Assemble the basic hull without any details, then build up a 
rear fuel tank with a 10 mm X 17 mm rectangle of plastic card 
for the base, a 7 mm X 17 mm rectangle for the rear, and a 
8 mm x 17 mm rectangle for the top. This is cemented against 
the hull rear, with the lower edge of the fuel tank level with the 
hull bottom. A 9$ mm x 1 1 mm rectangle is cemented above the 
fuel tank and against the hull rear with the top edge 2 mm below 
the top of the hull. A stowage tray is built up on the rear sloping 
panel of the hull top, the full width of the hull, using 3 mm deep 
strips of plastic card cut to fit and cemented in place. 

The exhaust manifold is cemented as supplied, but before affix- 
ing it, add an extra strip of 1 mm deep plastic card across the 
hull top between the second and third exhaust apertures. You 
then need an exhaust pipe which leads back from the manifold 
along the hull top. through the stowage tray, and curving down 
to terminate just aft of the tray. Make this in sections so that 



Making a T-34/76B. early production type with short gun. Key: 
( A) File down mantlet and use two small strips of plastic card to 
give ridged top; shorten gun. ( B ) Cement strips over top and 
front of driver's vision blocks to give single block. ( R ) Carefully 
file dust guard to give rounded instead of angled edge. ( M ) Cut 
armoured flange from around hull machine gun before cementing 
it in place. (L) Unditching beam from maJchstick; omit rear 
stowage boxes and fuel tanks. 

126 



Views of the Mark IV Salvage Tank, as completed and under 
construction. Note fuel tank at rear and extended exhaust pipe. 
you do not actually need to drill through the stowage tray — just 
cement sections in place to match up each side. You can use 
heat-stretched sprue for this exhaust pipe, but I had some old 
1:72 scale rocket stems left over from an aircraft conversion, 
and they are just right for the job. 

Now move on to the sliding doors, which are dummy on my 
model, being just cemented in place. I made mine partly open on 
one side. Four doors are required, each 15 mm X 19 mm 
rectangles of card or plastic card. They were either sheet steel or 
wooden vertical planking on the real thing. If you choose the 
latter, score them at 3 mm intervals. Steel runners were fitted 
above and below the openings, and I depicted these with 2 mm 
deep strips of card, 32 mm long, cemented so that the rear edge 
is 1 mm forward of the panel line behind the openings. 

All that remains is the jib, a full-size plan of which is given. 
1 made this up entirely from Slater’s Microstrip (available from 
large model railway shops) which is sliced plastic card. Use the 
plan and build up the two long arms, with a Churchill road 
wheel (or equivalent sized scrap disc) as the sheave, cemented solid 
with the arms. Then build up the cross-bracing from the thinnest 
slices of Microstrip. The completed jib should be painted before 
attachment (as should the tank) and it is then cemented inside 
the front horns, immediately above the track tensioning bolts at 
45 degrees. Two guy ropes are then required, taken from the top 
of the jib to the rear corners of the driver’s cupola. Use thin 
cotton or ‘invisible’ thread for these. 

A Weston purchase was normally used with these Salvage 
Tanks, and my sketch shows how this can be made. I used two 
discarded Churchill road wheels for the blocks and fine chain 
(available from model ship or model railway shops) for the pur- 
chase. Use UHU or Sellobond to cement the blocks to the chain. 
I made up hooks at each end from scrap heat-stretched sprue. 
I arranged it to hook over the sheave at the top of the jib so 
that it could be detached and carried in the stowage tray. 

This completes the basic model, but you could add tools and 
plenty of oddments (including a hawser) in the stowage tray. 
One or two vehicles had a hand winch bolted on the hull roof 
just aft of the commander’s hatch with its whip led forward over 
the head of the jib. This was unusual, but would make for an 
imposing model. 

The second model this month is a very simple adaptation of 
the Airfix T-34 to a very early production T-34/76B with the 
short calibre gun and modified mantlet. Main details are given 
with the picture and in the drawings, but note that all handrails 
should also be removed (as on last month’s ATO-41 though I 
did not have space to mention it then). Use a fine file for this. 


Key to drawings: (/) Plan of Salvage Tank jib. (2) Weston pur- 
chase. (2) Shorten gun for early T-34I76B model and file down 
mantlet. (4) Cross-section of mantlet. Top ridges from plastic card. 



I 


3 



Key (1) Ron Skidmore sent this fine view of a Hampden of 455 Sqn photographed in 1942 when operating from Leuchars with Coastal 
Command. It retains standard Bomber Command finish with light grey codes. (2) A formation of Liberator 6s of a training unit over India. 
All have ‘SNAKE’ painted ahead of their serials. Nearest is Y:EW117. All are in USAAF olive drab/grey it seems, very faded and worn. 
(3) Aircraft N of the same unit with part of the fuselage side evidently repainted in darker green (or fresher olive drab), also used to 

obliterate a marking above the tail flash. Pictures by Pierre Schmit. 


photo 


More rare pictures from readers with 
captions by Michael J. F. Bowyer. 
A free Airfix kit is awarded for every 
picture published, but please note 
that there is usually a delay of some 
months before publication due to 
the limited space at our disposal. 


2 




Key: (4) R. Pearl took this picture of R-QX:AM522. a Hudson of 224 
Sqn in 1940-41. (5) From Ron Skidmore comes a similar view of a 
Hudson I 2S-S flying over Tentsmuir on May 15. 1940. Note how the 
codes partly overlap the roundel. Serial unknown; can anyone identify 
the squadron? (6) J8634. a Siskin IMA of No 1 Sqn. RAF. pictured 
in 1927. Submitted by Ron Skidmore. (7) Belgian reader R. Vanhaeze- 
brouck sent this delightful view of ground crew heaving a Ju 52 along 
the runway. It’s an excellent detail view but we ve no other informa- 
tion. Can anyone identify the unit 7 




5 



Key: (8) N9717 and another Fairey Dart, pictured at Leuchars in 
1925. We've no details of the squadron. (9) N9499 5. a Fairey HID 
once again almost certainly at Leuchars in the 1925 period. Both 
pictures from Ron Skidmore. 



8 


127 






WHM-mns 


PLASTIC KIT SPECIALISTS— ASSOCIATE MEMBEIl I.P.M.S. 


AURORA 



MONOGRAM 



FUJIMI 



HAWK 



Curtiss P-6E 

1/48 

13/6 

P-51D Mustang 

1/32 

30/9 

F-8D Crusader 

1/70 

13/6 

Spitfire Mk 22 

1/72 

4/11 

SBC-3 Helldiver (bip) 

1/48 

13/6 

P-38J Lightning 

1/48 

30/9 

Bell Huey Cobra 

1/48 

15/6 

W. Lysander 

1/48 

15/3 

Breguet 14 

1/48 

13/6 

Mosquito ll/IV/VI 

1/48 

30/9 

W. Wasp 

1/48 

13/6 

G. Bearcat 

1/48 

15/3 

Albatross C-3 

1/48 

13/6 

P-51B Mustang 

1/48 

15/3 




AOSIMA 



Pfalz D-3 

1/48 

13/6 

Focke-Wulf FW 190 

1/48 

15/3 

TAMIYA 



B Buffalo 

1/72 

5/- 

Fokker D-VIII 

1/48 

13/6 

Hurricane 1 I/I V 

1/48 

15/3 

J7W1 Shinden 

1/72 

4/11 

C6N1 Sauin (Myrt) 

1/72 

5/- 

S. Camel 

1/48 

13/6 

ME Bf-109E 

1/48 

15/3 

A6M3 Hamp Mod. 32 

1/72 

4/11 

Ki-100 

1/72 

5/- 

Albatross D-3 

1/48 

13/6 

S. Spitfire IX 

1/48 

15/3 

Ki-84 Hayate (Frank) 

1/72 

4/11 

A7M Reppu (Sam) 

1/72 

5/- 

F. Eindekker 

1/48 

13/6 

N.A.T.-28D 

1/48 

15/3 

Ki-44 Shoki (Tojo) 

1/72 

4/11 

M6A1 Seiran 

1/72 

5/- 

Spad XIII 

1/48 

13/6 

G. Wildcat 

1/48 

15/3 

J2M3 Raiden (Jack) 

1/72 

4/11 

Shiun (Norm) 

1/72 

5/- 

Nieuport II 

1/48 

13/6 

JU-87G Stuka 

1/48 

23/3 

Ki-61 Hien (Tony) 

1/50 

12/11 

A6M2 Zero 

1/72 

5/- 

Fokker DR-1 

1/48 

13/6 

P-47D Thunderbolt 

1/48 

23/3 

Ki-43 Oscar 

1/50 

12/11 

Zuiun (Paul) 

1/78 

5/- 

D.H. Tiger Moth 

1/48 

13/6 

0S2U-3 Kingfisher 

1/48 

23/3 

J2M3 Raiden (Jack) 

1/50 

12/11 

FROG 



Halberstadt CL-2 

1/48 

13/6 

M E. Bf-IIOE 

1/72 

15/3 

NIK2-J George 

1/50 

12/11 

W. Lysander 

1/72 

4/- 

Avro CF-100 

1/70 

13/6 

G. F7F-3 Tigercat 

1/72 

15/3 

Ki-100 

1/50 

12/11 

B. Shark 

1/72 

4/- 

Hiller X-18 

1/70 

13/6 

P-51B Mustang 

1/72 

10/11 

Ki-44 Shoki (Tojo) 

1/50 

12/11 

JU-87G Stuka 

1/72 

4/- 

LS 



G. F8F Bearcat 

1/72 

10/11 

A6M7 Zero 

1/50 

12/11 

F-86F Sabre 

1/72 

4/- 

A6M2-N Rule 

1/75 

4/11 

AIRFIX 



C6N1 Sauin (Myrt) 

1/50 

21/- 

F. Barracuda 

1/72 

4/- 

D4Y2 Susie (Judy) 

1/75 

4/11 

A-1H Skyraider 

1/72 

3/8 

F1M2 Pete 

1/50 

21/- 

B. Beaufort II 

1/72 

4/- 

Oscar Mk 1 

1/75 

4/11 

Henschel H.S.129 

1/72 

3/8 

NICHIMO 



Mosquito IV/VI 

1/72 

5/8 

G3M1 Nell 

1/72 

24/6 

H.S.125 

1/72 

5/2 

S. Spitfire VB 

1/70 

4/11 

F-104G Starfighter 

1/72 

5/8 

G3M3 Nell 

1/72 

24/6 

HASEGAWA 



A5M4 Claude 

1/72 

4/11 

BAC Lightning 6 

1/72 

6/9 

Ki-109 Fighter 

1/72 

24/11 

G8N1 Renzan (Rita) 

1/72 

49/11 

A6M5 Zero 

1/35 

23/9 

Phantom F4K/M 

1/72 

6/9 

Zero Mk 21 

1/75 

4/11 

T-38A Talon 

1/72 

4/11 

NIK2-J George 

1/35 

23/9 

A. Shackleton MR 3 

1/72 

18/11 


MONOGRAM FIGHTERS OF 
THE THIRTIES 

Curtiss P-6E, 1/72 scale. 10/11. 

With decals for 17th Pursuit Sqn. 

Curtiss F11c2, 1/72 scale. 10/11. 
With decals for U.S.S. Saratoga, 
1933. 

Boeing F4B-4, 1/72 scale. 10/11. 
(Illustrated.) 

Boeing B-52D Stratofortress, 1/72 sc. 
With decals for S.A.C. or Vietnam 
finish, a truly superb model with 
many special features. £11.19.6 


BOEING F4B-4 1/72 

With decals for Fighting Squadron 2. 
U.S.S. Lexington in 1930 s. 

See A. Profile No. 27 



Ships 

AURORA 


AURORA 

U.S.S. Benion 

1/600 

13/6 

U.S.S. Bainbridge 

1/600 

13/6 

U.S.S. St. Paul 

1/600 

13/6 

H.M.S. King George V 

1/600 

18/6 

Admiral Graf Spee 

1/600 

13/6 

Type 1X-C U-Boat 

1/110 

13/6 

IMAI (motorised) 

I M S. Chokai 

1/550 

19/11 

I M S. Mogami 

1/550 

19/11 

I M S. Myoko 

1/550 

19/11 

I M S. Atagi 

1/550 

19/11 


In addition to full ranges of kits, of 
which we can only list a few. we also 
have stocks of useful reference books 
for the modeller, some of which are 
l.sted below. 

Aircam Aviation Series. 21/- each. 

Could be termed photographic albums 
for the types, including 8 pages of 
colour side views. 

1. P-51D in USAAF/USAF service. 

2. P-47 in US. RAF and other Air Arms. 

3. P-51B/C and Mustang l-IV in all its 
many guises and insignia (due mid- 
November). 

Men and Machines Series. 30/- each. 

Colour 5 views, specifications, develop- 
ment and oparational histories, in hard 
covers. 

RAF Bombers of WWII, Vol 1, covers: 
Lancaster 1 and 2. Battle. Mosquito. 
Boston, Liberator. Manchester. 

Luftwaffe Bombers of WWII, Vol 1, fea- 
tures: Dornier 17, Heinkel 111. JU-88. 
FW Condor. 


AFV kits by Airfix. Midori. Tamiya. 
Fujimi. Nitto. Niahon. etc. 

Bellona Prints. Handbooks. Battle- 
fields and plastic card. 

Aircraft and Armour Profiles. 

Decals by ABT. Stoppel. De-Frey. 
Authenticals. 

Always try us firs.t for all your plastic 
modelling needs. 


A6M5 Zero by Revell. 1/32 scale. 14/9 


BY RETURN POSTAL SERVICE 


Postage and Packing 

Refer to amount in brackets if 1st class 
mail delivery required. 

Up to 10/-. 1/- (1/6). 

10/- to 22/-. 2/- (2/6). 

22/- to £5. 5/- (6/-). 

Over £5, no charge. 


ALMARKS DECALS 
OO/HO Armour Range. 

2/11 each 

T1 . Afrika Korps Palm Tree emblems. 
T2. SS Panzer Divisional Signs. 

T3. German military vehicle crosses. 
T4. British 8th Army. Alamein sheet. 
T5. German Tank numbers. 

T6. British Armoured Unit sheet. 

1/72 Scale Aircraft. 2/11 each 

A1. Luftwaffe Swastikas, fighters and 
mediums. 

A2. R.A.F. ‘ B Type Roundels. 

A3. S.E.A.C. Roundels and Flashes. 
A4. R.A.F. Fighters. Sq. Coding. 1939- 
40. Blue/Grey. 

(UK postage: up to 3 sheets. 6d.; 

4 sheets and over, 9d.) 


346 Kingston Rd Portsmouth 

Tel * 1'ortsmoulh 61469 


128 


AIRFIX magazine 


KITS AIMD MODELS 


LOCOMOTIVE PRINTS 

B EATTIES have sent us samples of a 
collection of locomotive pen and ink 
sketches by G. A. Copping. They measure 
14J in X 9£ in and are printed on 
smooth white paper. There arc 105 prints 
in the complete collection and the first 
12 available include the GWR Great 
Bear. LNER A4 Quicksilver, SR ‘Schools’ 
Class, LMS Royal Scot. GWR ‘King- 
Class, LNER Cock O' the North and an 
LMS 8F 2-8-0. The Flying Scotsman will 
be the next to be released. All the loco- 
motives are pictured at rest. 

The drawings arc well executed, techni- 
cally very accurate and contain a weallh 
of detail. They would make admirable 
subjects for framing. Price 5s each post- 
age extra from Beatties. 5 The Broadway, 
London N14. N.S. 

NEW TRANSFERS 

r pWO more releases have come to hand 
J- from the US firm of Exact-a-cal and 
these are to the same high standard of 
presentation as the set for the Airfix 
SM 79 which we reviewed a few' months 
back. Set No 2 in the Exact-a-cal range 
is devoted to the Ficseler Storch and pre- 
sents a sheet of markings enabling the 
Airfix 1 : 72 scale model to be finished as 
cither of two Spanish Nationalist aircraft 
of the Spanish Civil War’s famous 
Condor Legion, an Italian machine in 
North Africa in 1942, or a German 
ambulance aircraft in Italy in 1941. The 
sheet comes in a transparent envelope 
with a page of tone drawings of each 
subject, camouflage details, and paint 
chips giving the exact shades which the 
modeller needs to match for an accurate 
finish. In most cases these colours are 
readily available in the Humbrol, Airfix, 
or Modelcolor paint ranges. Set No 3 
gives all necessary markings for two 
different Condor Legion Me 109Es in 
both 1 :48 and 1 : 72 scale, being intended 
for the Monografii and Revell kits of this 
aircraft respectively. Included in this set 
arc the walkways for the wings and the 
black panels which were painted on the 
lower fuselage sides of these machines. 
Once again scale tone drawings, notes, 
and colour chips arc given. The black and 
white parts are printed separately for 
application one over the other, thus 
obviating registration problems. 

Price of each set is SI. 50, which is not 
quite so expensive as it sounds when you 
appreciate that four models can be 
finished from each sheet. Not everyone 
models to 1:48 scale, but even so the 
1:48 scale Spanish Me 109 markings 
could come in useful for larger 1 : 72 
scale types. These Exact-a-cal sets arc 

November, 1968 


available by post from Exact Scale 
Hobbies. 97 James Street, Bloomfield. 
NJ 07003, USA. Postage extra. C.O.E. 

NEW FROM BUCK 

B LICK, who produce the sheets of 
dry print transfers for modellers, 
have now produced a new large sheet for 
model makers which matches the size and 
price (2s 3d each sheet) of the standard 
Blick lettering sheets. Gold, white, black, 
orange, yellow, red, and blue colours are 
available and each sheet includes two 
styles of lettering and numbers in 1/16 
inch and £ inch depths, with lining stripes 
in widths of 1/64, 1/32, and 5/64 inch. 
More than 6 feet of lining stripes are 
included altogether on each sheet when 
the individual lengths are totalled up. 
This sheet, reference number BOE 59, is 
ideal for just about all model subjects 
since the lettering styles arc suitable for 
most needs in the way of serials, names, 
and so on. The lining is just right for 
aircraft cheat lines and locomotive lining, 
funnel bands on ships, and so on. Well 
worth having, this. Under reference num- 
ber BOE 60, Blick have another sheet for 
modellers in the same range of colours. 
This one has much larger numbers only, 
wider lining stripes, plus plain discs in 
various diameters. This sheet will mainly 
appeal to car and slot-race model fans, 
since the numbers are ideal for the scales 
involved. The smaller discs, however, 
would also make excellent camera ports 
and the like for 1:72 scale aircraft 
models. Again, this sheet is well worth a 
glance. Price is 2s 3d. Your local station- 
ers or model shop should hold stocks — 
if not. ask them to get some of these 
useful and modestly priced sheets. C.O.E. 

VINTAGE CARS 

\V T E have remarked before that the 
** modeller in the popular OO/HO 
and 1 : 72 scales is not well served with 
vintage transport models to match. A 
range of models which we recall from 
years ago has now re-appeared from 
Traction Engine Enterprises Ltd and 
should be useful raw- material for anyone 
needing vintage miniatures. We say this 
because, quite frankly, these arc crude by 
the standards of anyone used to Lesney 
and Corgi die-cast models. The range of 
four cars we’ve had for review lacks such 
refinements as headlights and steering 
wheels and the castings arc crude, but 
acceptable. Two of the models, which are 



nondescript, but resemble a Hupmobilc 
and early Chevrolet quite well, arc to OO 
scale, and the other two. which look like 
a Sunbeam tourer of 1920 vintage and a 
Commer/ Napier type wagonette of about 
1910 would be more acceptable in TT 
(1 : 100) scale we think. As we said, they 
need working on to add detail, but suit- 
ably doctored and repainted they will be 
useful to railway modellers or even mili- 
tary modellers requiring World War I 
period transport. Price is 2s 6d each, and 
they can be had from Traction Engine 
Enterprises Ltd. 4 Station Road, London 
E4. C.O.E 

FLOQUIL RELEASES 

I^ROM Victors Ltd, 75 Chapel Market. 
* London Nl, we’ve had copies of two 
useful little publications put out by 
Floquil, the big US paint makers. First 
of these is called Painting Miniatures and 
is priced at 8s. It goes into just about all 
aspects of the subject in great detail and 
in a most interesting way. with special 
reference, of course, to Floquil paints. 
Most Floquil paints are made for model 
railways and the book tends to emphasise 
this aspect, but not unduly so. 

The second book is called Painting 
Plastic Miniatures and costs 22s 6d, but 
comes complete with some useful sheets 
of colour standards for various nations. 
Some of the material in this second book 
is the same as in the first, but there is 
extra material telling how Floquil should 
be applied to plastics — it needs to be 
treated with caution, see our Floquil 
review of July, 1967 — and interesting 
items on weathering and mottling. Both 
books are well worth reading. C.O.E. 

NEW ALMARKS 

L ATEST issues of transfers from 
Almarks will fulfil many needs, since 
they include both British and German 
armoured unit markings and pale grey 
fighter squadron codes for the RAF of 
the 1939-40 periods. This useful new RAF 
squadron codes sheet contains 100 letters 
in two styles — rounded and squared off — 
and all arc j inch deep, just right for 
Spitfires. Hurricanes, Dcfiants, and the 
like. This new set costs 2s lid and once 
again is just what aircraft modellers have 
needed for ages. Finally, we’ll remind 
those readers who ask us for a source of 
swastika transfers that they are also 
admirably catered for now by sheet A1 
in the Almarks range which has an 
abundance of them in all styles for 1 :72 
scale, again at only 2s lid the sheet. 
The military sheets are T4, Alamein 
Continued on next page 

129 



New Kits — continued 


units, a selection of formation signs 
Including 8th Army, 7th Armd Div, 5 1st 
Highland Div. and LRDG : T5, 

Armoured Divisions, including RAC 
flashes, bridge plates, squadron markings, 
and 1st and 6th Armd Div formation 
signs : T6 German tank numbers in red 
and black, with small numbers for turret 
rears. These arc all to GO /HO size and 
just what military modellers need at 
2s lid a sheet, from most model shops. 

More inexpensive transfers in the Hales 
range have come to us from Jones Bros 
Ltd, 56 Turnham Green Terrace, Lon- 
don W4. These are (1) a small sheet of 
German crosses and swastikas, plus other 
assorted items like mission tallies, chev- 
rons, Werke Nos (one pair only), and a 
pair of ‘skull and crossbones’ : (2) a small 
sheet of British C type and post-war style 
roundels, plus a pair of serials, a pair of 
prototype ‘P’ emblems, tail flashes, and a 
length of red /yellow small checks: (3) a 
US sheet with post-war style slars-and- 
bars, buzz numbers, *P’ emblems, and 
‘Army’ and ‘Navy’ legends, plus tail 
flashes of the pre-1940 period : (4) a small 
sheet of Polish and Soviet emblems plus 
an ‘Aeroflot’ emblem and *CCCP’ letter- 
ing. These are all rather old-fashioned in 


style with shiny finish and— in the case 
of the RAF sheet — rather bright colours, 
but they would all be very useful parti- 
cularly as most of the markings are about 
I : 72 ‘bomber’ size, still not widely avail- 
able elsewhere. The ‘P’ emblems and the 
markings on the US sheet arc most 
handy, while if you fancy a Soviet C-47, 
the stars on the Russian sheet should be 
just about right. These are worth having 
at only 6d a sheet. Send an SAE with 
your order. Also available from Jones 
Bros arc the old Yeoman \ inch letters in 
red, blue, yellow, black, or white, at 4d 
a sheet. C.O.E. 

RUB ’N BUFF 

TUST how to get a ‘natural metal’ 
finish for plastic aircraft models has 
led to solutions ranging from painting 
with the silver in Humbrol’s Railway 
Enamels range (very good, in fact) to 
applying baking foil or Metalskin. 
Another American product we’ve just 
been trying is Rub ’n Buff, now being 
imported by Aviacolour. 466 Eastern 
Avenue, Ilford, Essex, at Us 6d per tube. 
For your money you get a tube rather 
like a tube of toothpaste and the silvering 
material is in liquid form. It is applied 
with the tip of a cloth over any surface 
(wood or plastic) you wish to coat, 
spread thoroughly, and left to dry. After 


this it can be polished up (or ’buffed’ as 
they say) with a clean cloth to give a sur- 
face very like natural metal in appear- 
ance. It is most effective and well worth 
trying if you can afford it. We recommend 
practising on a piece of scrap plastic first, 
however, to get the application technique 
mastered. It is essential to have a per- 
fectly clean grease-free surface before you 
try applying the Rub ’n Buff, and it is 
most essential to have eliminated any un- 
wanted join lines completely before 
application : otherwise they will show 
only too clearly through the newly 
silvered surface. Aviacolour can supply 
Rub ’n Buff by post, and they are also 
UK stockists for the very large ‘Official’ 
range of paints which includes some 
useful shades not available elsewhere. 
Aviacolour can send a free list of these 
to anyone who sends a SAE. C.O.E. 


LATEST DIECAST MODELS 

Finally, a ‘must’ from Lcsney for old- 
timer car fans in the shape of a new and 
beautiful replica of a 1912 Rolls-Royce 
to 1:48 scale in the ‘Yesteryear’ range. 
In silver-grey and maroon with plated 
parts it needs only a few details (like the 
folded canopy) picked out with paint to 
put it in the showcase class. Snap it up 
for its modest price of 5s. C.O.E. 


New Books — from page 121 


Fighting Colours — from page 120 


Sqn 


Unit 

letters 


Type 


Serial 


Notes 


60 

MU 

Hurricane II 

LE354 M 

Mk. IIC listed 



Thunderbolt 

KL859 T 

in use 7.45 

67 

RD 

Buffalo 

W8280 U 



Hurricane II 

BN871 




Spitfire VIII 

JG 183 S 


79 

NV 

Hurricane 1 IC 

BN569 




Thunderbolt 1. II 

? 


113 

? 

Hurricane II 

? 




Thunderbolt 1, II 

HD173N 


123 

XE 

Hurricane II 

BP114 

in use 6.43 



Thunderbolt 1 

HD106 

in use 12.44 



Thunderbolt II 

KJ241 

in use 3.45 

131 

NX 

Spitfire VIII 

? 




Thunderbolt II 

? 


134 

? 

Hurricane IIA/B/C 

BN957 




Spitfire V/VIII 

JK118 

in use 7.43 

135 

WK 

Hurricane 1. II. IV 

? 



Thunderbolt 1 

HB975 L 


136 

HM 

Hurricane II 

? 



Spitfire VIII 

MT507 B 




Spitfire XIV 

RN193 A 


146 

GO 

? Buffalo 

AN124 




Hurricane I/ll 

BN927 




Thunderbolt 1. II 

K 1330 

FL793 Mk. 1 

155 

DG 

Mohawk IV 

BS798 B 

in use 1943 



Hurricane II 

HW420 

in use 11.43 



Spitfire VIII 

? 


258 

ZT 

Hurricane IIA/B/C 

? 




Thunderbolt I/ll 

HD185 


261 

FJ 

Hurricane II 

AP935 A 

in use to late 
44 



Thunderbolt II 

KL849 G 

in use '44 to 
8.45 

273 

? 

Fulmar 

X8773 

few used 



Hurricane I/ll 

? 




Spitfire VIII 

9 

in use 1944 

607 

AF 

Hurricane 

? 




Spitfire VIII 

JF781 F 

in use 1944 

615 

KW 

Hurricane II 

HV828 

Mk IIC 



Spitfire V/VIII 

JL108 

Mk. V given 



Thunderbolt I/ll 

? 

As 

can 

be seen there are more gaps existent 

in the tabu- 

lation 

of 

the Far East squadrons for less 

material has 


survived from this area. Readers’ confirmed additions would 


be welcomed. 

Michael J. F. Bowyer 

130 


splendid pictures which include such rarities as a Tiger Moth, 
Oxford, and B-17, all used as ‘hacks' by the Group at various 
times. The other types portrayed arc. of course, the Group's main 
steeds. P-47s and P-5 Is. 

Tin Goose is a fine account of the Ford Trimolor with 
numerous rare pictures and detailed text which brings the story 
right up to the current Bushmastcr derivative of this immortal 
aircraft. Required reading for anyone going in for conversions 
or modifications of the Airfix Trimolor kit, it includes plenty of 
detail views and markings. The last book in this group gives the 
usual ‘Aero’ scries treatment of the Fw 190A, complete with 
some colour drawings. Plenty of detail pictures, but not such a 
‘good buy’ as the rest in our view. 

Interesting Branch 

THE TANAT VALLEY . ITS RAILWAYS AND INDUSTRIAL 
ARCHAEOLOGY, by Wilfrid J. Wren. Published by David 
de Charles ( Publishers ) Ltd. South Devon House. Railway 
Station. Newton Abbot. Devon. Price 42s. 
r PHE River Tanat rises in Wales in the Berwyn Mountains 
A and flows east through Montgomeryshire into Shropshire 
and the Severn basin The first part of this book describes in 
detail the preparation, construction and working of the Tanat 
Valley Light Railway (opened 1904, absorbed into the GWR in 
1923 and closed in 1960). The second part deals with the indus- 
trial archaeology of the valley and describes the lead, slate, phos- 
phate and granite workings which for centuries had been the main 
industries. Several suggested tours of the more interesting re- 
mains are included. 

The author has been extremely thorough in his research, cover- 
ing every conceivable aspect of the subject and the presentation 
is first class. Numerous sketch maps, diagrams, tables and an 
excellent selection of photographs illustrate the text. Some of 
the photographs go back to GWR days and beyond, and others 
illustrate railway, mine and quarry remains still visible today. 
By being so thorough the book will have a very wide appeal. 
Model railway enthusiasts particularly will find much useful 
material in the track plans and descriptions of the trains. 

AIRFIX magazine 


8888$$ 


»! 




Letters to the Editor 




Squadron identified 

'T'HE photo on the front cover of the 
-L July issue was terrific! Let’s have 
more like it. Regarding the Beaufightcr 
VIFs in the same issue, these are possibly 
from 19 Sqn SAAF who used this mark- 
ing style on their aircraft. Colours were 
dark green and dark sea grey with Sky 
undersides, white identification letters, 
and C Type roundels on the wings. The 
squadron later used the Beaufightcr X. 

I). Becker, Pori Elizabeth, South Africa. 

'Benledi’ 

I READ with interest the review of the 
I new Benledi kit. You said that 
research was necessary to get the right 
shade of grey for the hull, and for 
making the other ships in the class. 

The hull colour is a very light shade of 
grey and can be mixed perfectly by mix- 
ing Airfix dark grey with matt white in 
the proportion 4:3. This makes a remark- 
able likeness to the actual shade. To make 
Benledi into either of her sister ships, 
Benirgris or Benalbannach the main 
change is to omit the topmast from the 
after polemast. 

Ian Cochrane, Redcar, Yorks. 

Fuselage bracing 

AVING recently received the May 
issue of the magazine, I studied the 
article on Wellington conversions and 
prepared a method for introducing the 
side windows. Pieces of stiff wire are used 
for bracing. 

The wire is bent to the internal fuselage 
contours and several pieces arc used on 
both the upper and lower fuselage. These i 
arc cemented to the interior with any all- 
purpose adhesive (I used Araldile) and 
the ends of the wire are made level with 
the upper and lower edges of the win- 
dows. The wire eliminates the springy 
nature of the fuselage. With the interior 
detailed and painted, the wires are not 
obtrusive. The effect is more rewarding 
and authentic than using block transfer 
sheet. 

Robin Green, Melbourne, Australia. 

Slave carrier 

HAVE never seen a reference in 
1 AIRFIX magazine to the ‘Slave 
Carrier’ which was an ordinary Universal 
carrier adapted to carry batteries to 
charge the batteries of tanks. These were 
definitely used to charge Churchills and 
were a part of HQ squadron. Externally 
the only differences between these carriers 
and the one from the kit are the different 
front mudguards, a pattern for which is 
shown in tne September, 1964, edition of 
AIRFIX magazine. 

A canvas tilt is also retired, made 
from tissue and wire. This is in two 
parts, one over the hull top and one for 
the driver’s compartment. A temp'ate for 
the wire frame was shown in the Decem- 
ber, 1964, edition for the Carrier 
Ambulance. The flans on the rear of the 
tilt and the cover for the driver can be 
represented by tissue rolled up in a 23 mm 
length. 

November. 1968 


Letters to ih* Editor selected for publica- 
tion antitla the senders to each receive 
a free Airfix plastic construction kit of 
their choice. We are always pleased to 
receive your comments and pictures, 
which will be considered for publication. 
Submitted material and pictures can only 
be returned if accompanied by a stamped 
addressed envelope, and the Editor can- 
not accept responsibility for safe keeping 
of any such contributions, neither does 
he necessarily agree with comments 
expressed by correspondents in the 
letters columns. Please note that any 
letters anticipating a reply MUST be 
accompanied by a SAE or stamp. 


A small addition that can be made to 
any carrier is a small mirror | inch from 
the hull side for the driver, mounted on 
a piece of stretched sprue or wire 5 mm 
long. The mirror can be made from a 
rec. angle of Perspex I mm x 3 mm, 
painted on the back first silver then dark 
green. Headlights can also be positioned 
against the huil front above each mud- 
guard instead of the position shown in 
the kit. 

Clive Darke, Fishponds, Bristol. 

Simulated tracks 

BELIEVE many readers may be 
A_ interested in my method of depicting 
tank tracks on a modelling baseboard. 
Any glue mav be used, and is spread in 
two parallel lines, the width of the track, 
at a depth of about 1 mm. It is now left 
until it becomes tacky but not hard. The 
track is then p!accd on the glue, which 
is allowed to harden. The track is then 
peeled off, leaving a very realistic track 
impression. If the tracks are carefully 
placed in line, a long tank track stretch- 
ing across the baseboard is really effec- 
tive. The track impression is then painted 
a dark earth colour. 

Wheeled vehie’e tracks are equally well 
depicted by nutting a length of wire 
through the wheel and running it through 
the tacky glue. Obviously you have to use 
tank tracks of the desired type before 
putting them on the Airfix model. 

M. Walton, Carshaton Beeches, Surrey. 

Narrow Gauge Club 

W E read with interest the recent 
articles in the magazine on the 
subect of Narrow Gauge modelling. 
Other readers might be interested in a 
society now formed for enthusiasts in 
this branch of the railway world. The 
Lewisham and District Narrow Gauge 
Society, as we are called, would be 
pleased to hear from fellow Narrow 
Gaugers interested in us, to whom there 
will be an invitation to our first meeting 
in the near future. 

Those interested please write direct to 
the Hon Secretary: 

I). A. Brewer, 4 Prior Street, 
Greenwich, London SFIO. 

‘Puff’ points 

A N article in your July, 1968, issue on 
‘Puff the Magic Dragon’ contains a 
slight error which I would like to com- 


\ ment on. In this article the gunship ver- 
sions of the C-47 are referred to as both 
AC-47 and FC-47. Only the AC-47 
designation is proper. Whi e an extremely 
minor point, I feel the usual regard of 
your magazine for historical accuracy 
demands my comment. 

In addi.ion to my connection with 
CAHA, 1 am a USAF Reserve Officer 
with duty at Wright-Patterson AFB, and 
(in my civilian occupation) an Aerospace 
Research Engineer. Thus, I often have 
access to (unclassified) official material 
normally not in the public domain. This 
includes owning a copy of AFR 66-11, the 
1962 Air Force Regulation that estab- 
lished the DOD-widc present standard 
designation system. This Regulation 
would countenance the des gnation AC-47 
but forbid FC-47. In add non, the Regu- 
lation requires that a book be issued 
semi-annually listing all aircraft in the 
current inventory by their correct 
designation. 

I have copies of three such semi-annual 
books, and have spot checked others 
covering the period 1966 to present 
| — my July, 1968, issue arriving yesterday. 

According to these, the USAF has never 
official.y recognised the FC-47 designa- 
tion. In the early days of ‘Puff’ operation, 
some local correspondence referred to the 
planes incorrectly by the FC-47 designa- 
tion and some individual crew members 
may slill do so — but officially ‘thar warn’t 
none’. The fact that the Suoer-Puff pro- 
gramme us : ng C-119 and C-130 aircraft 
uses the AC designation lends support to 
my assertion. Of course, they could 
i change this any time, but up to July. 
1968. th *v had not done so. 

H. L. Elman, G’astonhury, Conn, USA. 

Robert C. Jones writes: While Larry 
Elman is strictly correct in what he savs 
in his letter, nonetheless a lot of US 
aviation magazines and many ‘Puff’ crew- 
men all refer to this aircraft as the FC-47. 
popular usage if not official usage. 

Rhodesian Harvards 

I T' OR one who was a pupil pilot at 
No 22 SFTS. Thornhill Air Station. 
Gwelo. Southern Rhodcs : a. in 1945, your 
cover illustration to the September issue 
brought back many pleasant memories, 
and I shall be pleased if you will permit 
me to offer some comment on the caption 
thereto. 

The formation is of aircraft of No 20 
SFTS, Cranbomc Air Sta ion, Salisbury, 
Rhodesia, all of who*c 80 or so Harvards 
carried individual identification numbers 
(not squadron numbers) in red. and in 
the American stvle shown. The illustra- 
tion does not show the display on the 
uoper surface of the mainplanes where 
this identification number was repeated 
in the same colour and stvle. but using 
the full chord, and the full w : dth of the 
ye’low strioe (or the equivalent on all- 
yellow aircraft). The wing numbers were 
applied so as to be read in a similar 
manner to the under-wing serials, ic. star- 
board— read from the rear, port— read 
from forward. 

Continued on next page 

131 


Letters — continued 


To distinguish between the two single- 
engined schools, the Harvards of No 22 
SFTS carried black identification num- 
bers : these were of British style with 
rounded corners, were only some 75 of 
the size of No 20’s numbers, and were 
displayed forward on the fuselage so that 
the rearmost figure of a pair was 
immediately abreast of the forward pilot’s 
position. The number was not repeated on 
the mainplanes of this school’s aircraft, 
and examples of individual aircraft were 
Harvard II — all yellow — AJ628:63 and 
Harvard IIA - natural finish /yellow - 
KX246 :69. 

Harvards on the strength of the 
Rhodesian Air Training Group’s Central 
Flying School carried the school crest in 
the position occupied by the numbers on 
No 22 SFTS. 

Every aircraft which I saw in Rhodesia 
from February. 1945, until the training 
group was disbanded carried Type C 
roundels (including the mainplane upper 
surface position) and fin flashes, and not 
the Type A variety as illustrated, so, as 
Professor Joad would have said, it all 
depends on what you mean by ‘just at the 
end of the war’! 

Apropos the article on the P-38 
Lightning conversion in the same issue, 
and more especially to the reference to 
the RAF examples having been handed 
over to the US 8th Air Force, it may be 
of some interest to report the personal 
observation of an airworthy Lightning in 
PR blue, and sporting RAF PR roundels, 
parked alongside a similarly finished 
Airspeed Oxford in a hangar at RAF 
Coningsby, in December, 1944. which 
station was. at that time, the home of 
Nos 83 and 97 Squadrons, No 5 Group, 
Bomber Command. I was given to under- 
stand that the Lightning was used by the 
Squadron COs to observe and direct the 
daylight formation flying practices of 
their squadrons. Perhaps another reader 
can provide the serial of this particular 
aircraft? 

G. M. O’Connell, Hull, Yorks. 

M. J. F. Bowyer writes: The P-38 note 
is interesting. No 192 Sqn operated 
several from Foulsham late in the war — 
perhaps is was one of those. 

The Harvard picture was taken . I think, 
in 1943.— EDITOR. 

Track treatment 

r N your articles on conversions of 
AFVs you have suggested using a 
strip of plastic card between tracks and | 
covers to achieve sag on tracked vehicles, j 
May I suggest another method. Using 
thin acetate sheet obtained from an 
orchid box (enough for dozens of models) 
or similar, cut a strip slightly less than 
the width of the track, and about \ inch 
longer than the centres of the front and 
rear sprockets. A \ inch from one end, 
bend the strip at right angles, then at 
about i inch centres bend at alternate 
right angles until the strip is like this: 

Now trim to length and insert between 
track and cover. A little experimenting 
with the actual amount of bending 
required for a particular model is but a 
few minutes’ work. The strip is almost 
invisible on completion. 

F. Blount, Luton, Reds. 

132 


Making canopies 

V AM intrigued by the lengths resorted 
1 to by your contributors in their modi- 
fication of plastic kits. Cockpit covers are 
a particular problem and I ve even seen 
letters advocating multiple kit purchase 
simply to obtain extra cockpit covers. 

As a veteran of the pre-plastic kit days, 
I faced this problem many times — pei- 
haps readers would be interested in an 
unusual solution? 

The method can be used for the most 
complex transparencies and involves sheet 
gelatine (obtainable at most butchers’ 
shops!). A male mould is required but it 
can actually be built on the model 
Candle-wax is ideal, if the mould is made 
of wood, the wood should be waxed. The 
sheet gelatine is soaked in water until i) 
becomes pliable and is then stretched over 
the mould, being held by elastic bands 
and or clothes pegs until dry. When dry. 
the gelatine should be given .» coat oi 
clear varnish, and when this has dried i‘ 
may be trimmed with a razor blade and 
simply lifted away from the mould. The 
resulting transparencies are beautifully 
clear and thin but they are slightly brittle. 
This method has been used successfully 
to produce the ‘glazing’ for a Hampden, 
a Halifax and a He 1 1 1 (built ‘from 
scratch*, not from kits). 

Sqn I.dr I). B. Thomas, I’pwood, Hunts. 

Copydex 

M R PARTON, writing in the Septem- 
ber. 1968. edition, mentions a use 
for Copydex externally on models. It can 
also be used internally in ship models to 
glue the hull together and at the same 
time, if spread around the hull, can make 
it watertight. One can paint over it, but 
it makes an extremely matt finish. 

It also can be used to glue the various 
puts of Airfix soldiers together in 
conversions. 

Simon (’mine, London SW3. 

Colour schemes 

R EADING part 10 of ‘Fighting 
Colours’ caused me to look out 
some old wartime notes, and I find that, 
in September, 1943, in the Lossiemouth 
area, I saw several rocket-armed Bcnu- 
fiehtcr Xs with white under-surfaces and 
sides. One, which had no code letters, was 
serial LZ792. Others which I saw at the 
same time, with grey /green top and sides, 
were a definite blue underneath. 

A Beaufightcr II which I saw at Forres 
in that month, with grey /green top and 
sides, bore the red letters LX- A. 

Going further back, a Blenheim IV 
fighter which I saw in February, 1942, 
had Sky under-surfaces (the real ‘green’ 
shade) and ‘off-white’ code letters J-XA 
on the port side. 

My notes also show that in August. 
1942, several Spitfire Vs were to be seen 
in the east of Scotland, sporting tropical 
filters and desert colours! 

Alex Tough, Newport-on-Tay, Fife. 

M. J. F. Bowyer writes: 

An interesting letter, for it confirms 
that some Coastal Command strike air- 
craft other than Hampdens and a few 
Beau forts of the 1943 vintage had white 
undersurfaces and fuselage sides. Never- 
theless. these must he considered excep- 
tions to the usual. Confirmation of the 
deep blue finish is interesting, too. There 
would seem the possibility that this colour 
was applied for a brief period as toning 


better with the light during operations off 
Norway. 

The LX coded Beaufighter II came 
from No 54 OTLJ which trained night- 
fighter pilots on Beauforts. Beaufighters 
and Mosquitoes. The letters ST and YX 
were carried by other squadrons within 
the OTU. — EDITOR . 

Lubrication 

IVTHY apologise for increasing the 
s ▼ price of your magazine, even at 3s 
it would be a bargain. In the September 
issue, P. E. Lawson complains that oil 
cats away the paint and cement. The way 
to overcome this is to substitute Vaseline 
for oil on stiff joints. 

Trevor Hartley, Sunderland, Co Durham. 

M Y own model Beam Engine has 
- worked well for over a year now 
(often demonstrated to visitors). Due to 
the friction between two plastic surfaces 
some lubrication must be used. Vaseline 
is satisfactory but a light multi-purpose 
‘3-in-l* oil has been my own lubricant. I 
have noticed no damage to the plastic 
and the oil streaks and dust film that 
adhere to it. adds (in my opinion) 
greatly to the realism. 

John Thompson, Wisbech, C'ambs. 


Moving parts 

I N the September issue, Mr Lawson 
" gave a warning about the use of oil 
for lubricating moving parts on Airfix 
models. To prevent such sticking, the 
moving parts should be trea.cd before 
assembly as follows. 

Firstly, all the joints should be cleaned 
of flash. They should then be washed in 
a mild detergent solution to remove any 
grease and dirt. When this has been 
rinsed off. the moving parts should be 
treated with anti-stat fluid (*/Mihy- 
droxycthane). This is available from 
photographic dealers, either as a fluid or 
in the form of a cloth impregnated with 
the fluid. The use of this helps to prevent 
the build-up of charge on the plastic, 
which attracts dust and other small 
particles to the surface of the plastic. 
Finally, all parts are ‘plated’ with graphite 
by rubbing them with a softish graphite 
pencil. This requires some patience, as it 
takes time to achieve satisfactorily. 

Some care should be taken with paint- 
ing, and it is probably best to paint areas 
near moving parts before assembly. 

Incidentally, you wrongly captioned the 
drawing of Blenheim IVF V5736 on page 
473 of your August issue. QY was the 
code of 235 Sqn, not 254. 

Malcolm Oliver, Ruislip, Middx. 



Reader J . N . McFarland sent us this view 
of A uster Mk 9(M) with Lycoming engine 
and other modifications described in our 
September 'hi the Air feature. Owned by 
Major Somerton-Rayner, it is registered 
G-AVHT and retains service markings 
and camouflage. 

AIRFIX magazine 


WIKING 

1:90 SCALE PLASTIC ROAD VEHICLES 


In 

JEEP 

2/7 

29m 

VW SERVICE TRUCK 

2/7 

3g 

VW-GHIA-COUPE 

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4f 

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31 

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32 

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241 

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29 

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NEW 1968 WIKING ILLUSTRATED PRICE LIST OF 150 MODELS: 4d. STAMP 


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MAIL ORDER ONLY POSTAGE EXTRA 

7 KINGS DRIVE . LITTLEOVER . DERBY . DE3 6EW 


DE-FREY DECALS 

INVASION STRIPES R.A.F. SKY CODES 

Sheet 2 comprises — 

1 36 in. of D-DAY/KOREAN WAR invasion stripes (1/72 and 
1/48). Accurate, matt finish, decals depicting the Allied 
invasion identification stripes. 

2 16 Royal Navy (Fleet Air Arm) markings in black and 
white (1/72). 

3 Solid matt black panel. 

4 Solid matt white panel. 

This is a very large special value sheet, measuring 11 x 8 in. 
PRICE 4/6 plus 6d. p.p. (U.S.A. and Canada 1 dollar). 

Sheet 1 comprises R.A.F. style code letters and rear fuselage 
bands in official specification Sky type *S* for light bombers 
such as the Blenheim and Mosquito and for Battle of Britain 
fighters. 

PRICE 2/9 plus 6d. p.p. (U.S.A. and Canada 60 cents). 
DE-FREY DECALS 

2 Lyndhurst Gardens, Finchley, London, N.3, England 

IPMS MEMBER TRADE ENQUIRIES INVITED 



INVASION D-DAY 


OR THESE FABULOUS FRIZES 


Haupt & Feist. June 6, 1944 through German eyes. 

52 pp. Over 100 photos. 22s. post paid. 

WEAPONS OF THE GERMAN INFANTRY 

Harms & Feist. Pistols — Rifles — Machine Guns. etc., of W.W.II. 
56 pp. 87 photos. Wrs. 21s. 9d. post paid. 

WORLD UNIFORMS IN COLOUR 

Vol. 1. The European Nations. 

200 illus. in colour. 12] in. x 10 in. 34s. 6d. post paid. 

W. E. HERSANT LTD. 

228 ARCHWAY ROAD, LONDON, N.6 
We can supply all books reviewed in this journal. 


ENTRY FORM 
IN THE NEW 
RIKO' CATALOGUE 
ON SALE NOW 
FROM YOUR MODEL 
SHOP OR IN CASE 
OF DIFFICULTY 
WRITE TO: 


HONDA MOTOR CYCLE 
RACING CYCLE 
TAPE RECORDER 
12 TRANSISTOR RADIOS 
4 MICROSCOPES 
100 LARGE CAR KITS 
100 LARGE TANK KITS 


RICHARD KOHNSTAM LIMITED 

13- 15a HIGH ST.. HEMEL HEMPSTEAD, HERTS 


November, 1968 


133 


BEHIND THE SCENES WITH THE R.A.F.-1 

The VC10 that never was 



© 0 ® 
®0^vs* U 


1. Airspeed indicator 

2. Horizon director indicator 

3. Altimeter 

4. Machmeter 

5. Course deviation indicator 

6. Vertical speed indicator 

7. Turn and slip indicator 

8. ADF indicator 

9. RPM indicators 

10. Slat position indicators 

11. Flap position indicators 

12. Undercarriage selector lever 

13. Aileron trim indicator 

14. Tacan indicator 

15. Wheel-brake pressure gauges 

16. Auto-pilot trim indicators 

17. Tall trim levers 

18. Speed-brake lever 

19. Throttles 

20. Flap'slat levers 

21. Pilot's intercom, control panels 

22. Auto-throttles control panel 

23. Auto-pilot control panel 




Even at 13. you could make a start in 
the Air Truininu Corps. You'd yet lots 
of fun and thrills, and it would he a 
great help in joining the R.A.F. later. 


From 15' to 17.1, you could join as an 
apprentice. These boys are on a 2-year 
electronics course. And they get plenty 
of sport and adventure too! 



From I7i onwards, you could come in 
as a trade trainee, or with 5 acceptable 
O-Lcvels, you could start training as 
an officer. 


This is the cabin of a VCio 
that will never leave the 
ground. But it will fly any- 
where. It will land at any 
airport. It can crash into 
the sea at 200 mph —and 
then take oft* again ! 

It is the R.A.F.’s new 
VCio flight simulator — the 
most advanced in Britain. 
Packed with intricate hy- 
draulic, electrical and elec- 
tronic engineering. Outside, 
it is simply the first 15 feet 
of the nose of a VCio. In- 
side, you can’t tell it from 
the real thing. It is used to 
train air-crew to fly the 
VCio’s of Air Support 
Command. ^ 

It will reproduce every 
manoeuvre and every haz- 
ard a VCio is likely to 
encounter. Turbulence, 
pitching, rolling, fog — al- 
most anything can be 
arranged ! It answers every 


movement of the control 
column— or you can switch 
to automatic pilot. As you 
throttle back to land, you 
lower a non-existent under- 
carriage with a soft thud, 
and then you hear the 
sound of the wind rushing 
through it. As you touch 
down, you get the authentic 
jolt of a real plane, and the 
rumble of the wheels on the 
tarmac. And it gives aircrew 
experience in emergencies 
that would be impossible 
any other way. After all, 
who’d bring a real VCio 
down into the sea just for 
experience ? 

The small picture shows 
an essential part of the 
simulator. A relief model of 
the Brize Norton area, 
where the simulator is, 
with the airfield complete 
with landing lights in the 
centre. A colour TV camera 


moves and tilts on a travel- 
ling rig which follows the 
controls in the simulator 
cabin. The crew can take 
off* from Brize Norton, fly 
to any part of the world anti 
land there without even 
leaving the ground; all 
made possible by new 
simulator techniques. 

The R.A.F. has all kinds 
of revolutionary new equip- 
ment. And more is con- 
stantly coming . . . new air- 
craft, computers, radar sys- 
tems, electronic test gear, 
fire fighting equipment, 
even new filing systems. To 
operate it and service it all 
needs dozens of different 
skills. And in them, the 
R.A.F. provides a first- 
class, full-time training. If 
you’re interested in aircraft 
and technology, the R.A.F. 
might be the life for you 
one day. Think about it. 


I 

I Royal Air Force 1 

| Send this coupon for your free copy of the | 

I colour leaflet “The R.A.F.— it’s Supersonic”. - 
It tells you more about the R.A.F. and it I 
opens up into a super wall chart for your bed- ■ 
| room too ! 

I Name ■ 


I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 


Address 



134 


AIRFIX magazine 



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Twin tubes 6/-. 


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Med. tube 9d. Large 1/3. 
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TO THE 

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COLOUR RANGE 

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COMBAT UNIFORMS 

Kit No. 22 

CEREMONIAL UNIFORMS 

Kit No. 23 

MILITARY EQUIPMENT 

These authentic military colours 
are the result of careful 
research to establish shades 
identical to the originals. 

(Kits contain 6 Tinlets and full instructions) 
Ask for these products by name at your model shop. 



UMBROL 


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aircraft... A.F.V.s... 
boats. ..cars... pistols 


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motorised 

Brit. Abbot Tank 1/35 31/- 
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U.S. M48 Patton T. 1/50 18/6 

Jppanese M-61 1/44 18/6 

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Westland Wasp Hel. 1/50 13/6 
Huey Cobra Hel. 1/50 15/6 
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Skyraider 1/70 15/6 

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Fighter 1/50 21/- 

Northrop F5B ditto 21/- 

Crusader 1/70 13/6 

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1/72 15/11 each 

Phantom Thunderchief 
Sabre Skyraider 


AURORA AIRCRAFT 1/72 3/11 

Piper Apache 
Cessna 

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1/48 scale 
French Nieuport II 
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B26 Martin Marauder 


Aurora Tank Kits 1/4 scale 

Swedish S 13/6 

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Full Range Almark Decals 
2/11 each 


Aurora Aircraft 13/6 each 

Thunderchief F105 

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Post and Packing 

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ORPINGTON 
MODEL CAR CENTRE 

49 HIGH STREET, ORPIHGTON 

Tel: Orpington 30503 


November, 1968 


135 









UNDER THE "HARBOROUGH" AND "HARLEYFORD" IMPRINTS, JUST ON 
400,000 OF OUR AVIATION HISTORICAL BOOKS HAVE SO FAR BEEN SOLD 
WORLD-WIDE — A RECORD NOWHERE APPROACHED BY ANY OTHER 
PUBLISHER — AND ONE WHICH IS STEADILY INCREASING. 


AIRCRAFT MARKINGS OF THE WORLD 1912-1967 

Compiled and written by BRUCE ROBERTSON 

“ — a mine of information.” Aeroplane. 

“ — crammed with information for the modeller.” Aeromodeller. 

” — high standard of accuracy." R.A.F. Quarterly. 

“ — covers a vast amount of ground.” Airfix Magazine. 

“Harleyford makes the claim that it publishes the world s best aviation historical 
books; this new title does nothing to dispute that claim, it merely strengthens it. 
An extremely handsome book in appearance, there is a wealth of material within 
its 232 pages to substantiate their claim many times over.” 

Cross and Cockade (Leading American Historical Aviation journal). 


Aircraft Markings of the World 1912-1967 has a com- 
pletely new approach in presenting aircraft markings, 
world wide. It in no way duplicates the information 
in the author’s earlier book Aircraft Camouflage and 
Markings 1907-1954, but is, in fact, a companion 
book. In general outline, the contents consist of a 
review of the markings and insignia of 165 countries, 
with a chronology giving a date-by-date history of 
international marking changes from 1912 to 1967, 
both military and civil. A two-page map provides at 
a glance the letter combination and origin of civil 
registrations of the world, no less than 163. Colour 
pages, 24 in number, present a panorama of national 
markings, 35 civil airline emblems and 24 liveries, 
with 1939-1945 War and later period international 
markings illustrated by photographs and profile 
paintings. (National Markings over 400.) 


Several hundred photographs are presented, includ 
ing a large number never before published. Some are 
large, others are “close-ups” of insignia and mark- 
ings. Also included are reproductions of 1939-1945 
War invasion stripes, manufacturers motifs, and 
chemical warfare, Red Cross, detail, armament, 
advertising and rank markings, etc. In addition, pages 
of line drawings of markings and insignia of the 
1912-1967 period, similar BUT IN ADDITION TO, those 
in the Camouflage book. 

Aircraft Markings of the World 1912-1967 contains 
232 pages, over 100.000 words, all on high quality art 
paper. The book size is 8£ in. by 11$ in., and weight 
nearly 2\ lb. All colour plates made and the book 
printed and bound in England to our usual very high 
standard, with gilt blocked cloth on heavyweight 
millboard. Dust jacket in full colour. 


FOR A COPY OF THIS MAGNIFICENT BOOK. 
AUTOGRAPHED BY THE AUTHOR AND PRODUC- 
TION TEAM. PLEASE REMIT DIRECT TO THE 
PUBLISHERS FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY FROM 
STOCK. 


JUST PUBLISHED! OUR LATEST BROCHURE 
OF ALL 14 TITLES NOW AVAILABLE. SENT 
POST-FREE. DEPT. AF/B. 


HARLEYFORD PUBLICATIONS LIMITED 

LETCHWORTH, HERTFORDSHIRE, ENGLAND, DEPT. GD/1 


70 /- 

POSTAGE, PACKING 
AND INSURANCE 
INCLUDED 


136 


AIRFIX magazine 


STOP PRESS ' STOP PRESS • STOP PRESS ■ STOP PRESS 


RACE TRACK NEWS FROM AIRFIX MRRC 




f- NEW 4SECTI0N BANKED TRACK 


NEW BANKED CIRCUIT 
MR 300 SET £12.19.10 

WITH TWO NEW GP CARS 

A new MotorAce set from Airfix— the Interna- 
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set are two new 1/32nd scale cars— the Honda 
and Eagle Weslake. Over 31 ft. of double track lay- 
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High Speed Honda and Eagle Weslake at 27/9d. 

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CLUBMAN SPECIALS 



Covering 1/32nd 
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cars with varying types of motor. 
Models include— Porsche. Ferrari, 
Felday Ford, Honda, Weslake, 
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CONTROLLERS 


Hand controllers for 
AIRFIX/M.R.R.C. covering 
range of 7}, 10 and 15 ohms 


AIRFIX MAGAZINE 



A magazine concerned 
solely with plastic model- 
ling. News, photography 
and articles. Only two 
shillings monthly. 



BODY 

SHELLS 


The 

Honda, Weslake 
and Felday Ford have 
now been added to the existing 
range of Airfix moulded body shells. 



THE COMPLETE RANGE OF 
MOTOR RACING ACCESSORIES 

See the complete range at your local stockist. 

AIRFIX PRODUCTS LIMITED • HALDANE PLACE • GARRATT LANE • S.W.18 



November, 1968 


137 



WARGAMES, NOW EXPLAINED BY A SERIES OF MONTHLY 
ARTICLES IN MINIATURE WARFARE. 

Each month articles appear on how to play wargames, collect soldiers and 
design terrain. 

Olher articles contain valuable information on the tactics and fighting abilities 
of the Roman, Napoleonic, American Civil War and modern armies. 

Together with numerous military photographs, advertisements of all model 
soldier and equipment manufacturers and listings of all known wargame clubs. 

Obtainable from your local hobby shop, who will also probably have details of 
other warramers in your area. 

Or di.ect irom the publishers by sending a 3/- P.O. and a 12" x 9" s.a.e. 

(4d. postage). 

MINIATURE WARFARE (DEPT. AM5) 

61 Benares Road, London, S.E.18 



Fabulous finishes from FLOQUIL . 
specialists in miniature’ paints for 25 
years. Over 70 intermixable colours that 
dry in 2-5 minutes to a flat, absolutely 
permanent finish. Only 1/10,000 of an 
inch thick, yet is fully opaque . . . 
FLOQUIL can never obscure the minu- 
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a perfect finish. 

MM series 4/3 jai 
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RR series 6/3 jar. 
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Colour 

AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL MODEL SHOP 
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WAYS INCLUDING NINE NEW BRITISH 
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★TRADE ENQUIRIES WELCOME ★ 


VICTORS 


75 CHAPEL MARKET, ISLINGTON, N.1 

(01-837 6959) 


BOOKS on WAR GAMES. UNIFORMS, WEAPONS, etc. 

Satisfaction guaranteed (or full refund). Prices include postage. 

PC = Soft p’per covers; HC = Hard covers; pp = Pages. 
CARMAN — British Military Uniforms from Contemporary Pictures 
168 pp.. 109 plates (u in colour). HC. 39s 6d 

CHAMB. & ELLIS— The Sherman 87 photos. 80 pp.. PC. 30s 9d 
ELLIS — ‘How to go Plastic Modelling'. Many photos. HC. 25s 6d 
FEATHERSTONE — 'War Games'. 150 pp.. 16 plates, HC. 22s 6d 
FUNCKEN — Les Costumes et les Armes des Soldats de tous les 
Temp3'. French text, profuse col. illus. of uniforms and weapons, 
etc. Vol. 1 : Pharaohs to the time of Louis XV. Vol. 2 : Frederic II 
to modern times. HC. Single volumes each 44s 6d 

Or the Set of two volumes 88s 6d 
KANNIK & CARMAN— Military Uniforms of The World in Colour'. 
278 pp.. 512 col illus. of uniforms from 15th Century to modern 
times. HC 31s 6d 

OGORKIEWICZ — 'Design and Development of Fighting Vehicles'. 

208 pp . 174 plates of A.F.V.s, etc. HC. 53s Od 

HAUPT & FEIST— Invasion D-Day'. 52 pp.. 96 photos. PC 22s Od 

SMITH — British Army Vehicles and Equpment'. 240 pp.. illus. of 

A.F.V.s. artillery, small arms and miss. les. HC. 31s 6d 

SEND YOUR OFDER. with pvvment. to 

KEN TROTMAN, 18 MANWELL ROAD. SWANAGE, DORSET 


HINTON HUNT FIGURES 

Member of the Gu.ld of Model Soldier Manufacturers 

20 mm WAR GAME RANGE 

large range of high quality metal 20 mm War Game figures. 
BULK PRI CES for orders of 100 and over. 

Painting Instructions" available giving full 
details of the colouring of the uniform. 

54 mm COLLECTOR RANGE 

obtainable hand piinted or unpsinted. Skilled craftsmen 
animate each figure by hand. 

MODEL SOLDIER SHOP, HINTON HUNT FIGURES. 9 and 10 
the CAMDEN PASSAGE BOUTIQUE. Antioue Market. Islington. 
London — 5 minutes from Angel Tube Station 

NEW CATALOGUE 

Send 2/6d. for catalogue of 20 mm figures or 54 mm figures. 
Price for both catalogues 4/6d. only. 


HINTON HUNT FIGURES 
Rowsley, River Road, Taplow, Bucks., England 


THE MODEL SHOP, MAIDSTOHE 

Unique Wild West wagon series. Superb wooden scale model 
construction kits. 15" to 17" when made up. 

Buckboard Wagon 19s 6d Covered Wagon 24s Od 

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Conestoga Wagon 24s Od Ranch Wagon 19s 6d 

Soar into the future with a Hovercraft . . . 

Ready to run 29s lid. Kit form 23s lid. 

IMAI Space Receiver — easy to assemble — 59s 6d 

Two superbly detailed kits by Pocher of Italy. 

1/8 Scale 1907 Fiat £22 12s 6d. 

1931 Alfa Romeo £35 (£5 deposit secures). 

Plastic kits by Airfix. Monogram, Frog. Revell. Pyro. Tamiya. 
Imai. Otaki. Bandai and Protar. 

SPECIAL OFFER— Aurora U.N.C.L.E.’ kits 

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138 


AIRFIX magazine 


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Closing date for next issue — November 1 


FOR SALE 

Military and Civil Aircraft Photographs. 

Lists 3d. SAE please. T. A. Brown, 45 
Clifton Road. Southall, Middx. [237S) 
Stop Press! Just received from Poland: 
Ruch’s 1/72 scale PZL P-23 A (Karas) 
fighter 7s post free! M. Hodde, Tusscn- 
meer 250, Amsterdam. (See below.) 
Down with the Prices! Aircraft kits at 
reduced postfree prices. Hasegawa’s Rita- 
bomber 45s ; BAC Electric Lightning 
FMK 6, Phantom F4J and F4K : LTVA- 
7 Corsair 11s each: L.S. Bombers: 
Peggy, etc, now 20s each. All 1/72 scale. 
Hawk 1/48 scale German V-l and Kami- 
kaze ‘BAKA’ two kits in one box 16s; 
1/72 scale Spitfire Mk 22, Me 109G, etc, 
16s each: Thunderstreak. Supermarine 
Swift, Skyray F14D-1, etc, 8s each. M. 
Hodde. Tussenmcei 250, Amsterdam. 
(Sec below.) 

Miniature Scale Aircraft: Marusan 1/100 
scale: Ju 87b, Me 109E, Yak 9, Tojo. 
George, P-38, P-47. P-51, Hellcat, Spit- 
fire 5B, Corsair, Thunderstreak, Sabre, 
Oscar, Zero 52, X.15, 3s each; E.E. 
Lightning 4s 6d. Postage 1-3 kits 2s; 4-6 
kits 3s 6d. Otaki 1/150 Jap turbo-prop 
liner: 1/130 Neptune PzV7 ; 1/72 Mu.2 : 
8s each. I MO or bank notes to M. 
Hodde, Tussenmeer 250, Amsterdam. 

1 242S J 

Wargames from America by Avalon Hill 
Co & Gamescicnce Corn. Afrika Korps ; 
Battle of Britain ; Battle of the Bulge : 
Blitzkreig: Confrontation; D-Day; 

Guadalcanal: Jutland: 1914; Stalingrad; 
Tactics 2 : Strategy & Tactics Magazine. 
Brochures 6d. McLcllan. 12 South Road. 
Wick. Caithness. Scotland. (241S) 

Mirror finished, self-adhesive plastic tiles 
that can be cut with scissors. Has in- 
numerable uses for the modeller, ie, 
model display, scenic modelling, mirrors, 
etc. For free sample and details send 
SAE to ‘Gailomc’, 199 Cowbridgc Road 
East, Cardiff, Glam. |244S) 


Air Pictorial, Flying Review, Aero 
Modeller, Aeroplane Spotter, I.P.M.S., 
Airfix Magazines, 1/72 plans. Aircraft in 
Miniature, Aeroplanes and Aero-engines, 
Buccaneer. Lockheed F-104, Rockets and 
missiles. Hawker Siddeley PI 127. All 
The World’s Fighting Fleets. Offers, 
Winfield. 79 Babbacombe Road. Tor- 
quay. (245SJ 

Selection out of ‘1800 Airplane Photo- 
graphs’. Civil, warplane and rockets. 
Format postcard, price lid each (post 
free), payment by money-order. Cata- 
logue price 2 reply coupons (post paid). 
‘Reinha*, Hoogkarspelstraat 33, Den 
Haag, Holland. Clearing 508691. |246S1 

Unique collection of 170 different 1/72 
scale plastic aircraft kits in original 
boxes. £40 the lot. Telephone Chester 
20339. (248S) 

Ten Historex mounted models immacu- 
lately finished, 50/- each. Roco Minitank 
vehicles, cost 77/-. for 40/-. SAE list. UK 
only. Cook, 15 Lochrin Terrace, Edin- 
burgh 3. |247S] 

100' -1" Fine scale ship models in metal, 
many types, many periods, 1/- stamp 
brings lists from Mr Holton, 15 Lyming- 
ton Gardens, Stoneleigh, Surrey. f249SJ 
Collection 80 f 1/72 aircraft, mostly 
WW II. Many conversions, colour 
schemes. Offers over £10. Watt, 25 Rut- 
land Park, Sheffield. [250S] 

Aeroplane Spotters and aircraft recogni- 
tion journals. Send SAE, state require- 
ments and offers to: R. Firth, 22 
Slaylcigh Avenue, Sheffield S10 3RB. 

| 258SJ 

200 Model Aircraft. Pring, 13 Westleigh 
Road, Taunton, Somerset. |259S] 

35 Airfix Magazines, Bcllona drawings, 
15 Profiles, 70 AFVs, spares. Surgey. 19 
Farnham Avenue, Hassocks, Sussex. 

I260SJ 

WANTED 

Revell ‘Caravelle’ kit H 184 unmade. 
State price. Kirkland. 2 Kerrington 
Crescent, Barnhill, Dundee. |252W| 


Model Cars: pre-1955, any sort or size. 
Dinky. Britains, tinplate, etc. Also books 
on flying and motoring. Dr Gibson, The 
Green, Anstey, Leicester. |239W] 

Frog Venom/Vampire Kit — preferably 
unbuilt but will take completed one in 
good condition. Write Cothliff. 2 Dudley 
Grove, Liverpool L23 OSJ. |251W] 
Warships, Merchant Ships. 1:1250 
models or kits. Basset-Lowke, Eagle, 
Pyro, etc. State price, condition. Box No 
253W. |253W) 

20inm Metal W argames figures. Swoppets 
knights. Mansfield, 15 Wick Avenue, 
Wheathampstead, Herts. [254WJ 

Military A/C Photos, to be published in 
new modellers mag. List and prices to; 
C. Sourgnes, 26 Av. Kennedy, 59 Lille, 
France. I255W] 

Airfix Magazines, August, October 1967, 
February 1968. Pay 5/- each. D. Booth. 
2 Tutbury Avenue, Canlcy, Coventry. 

(256WJ 

Airfix Magazine, April 1965. Pay 5/-. 22 


MISCELLANEOUS 

Search Service for overseas collectors. 
Plastic model kits. Books, back issue 
magazines. Lists with postal reply 
coupons. Box No 240M. (240M] 

Maltese Wargamers and military minia- 
ture enthusiasts interested in forming 
group, contact Patrick Micallef, 1/4 
Norfolk Street, Malta G.C. |243M] 


PERSONAL 

Have you a model railway? If so, you 

must read Railway Modeller monthly 
2/6d. Each issue packed with Show-you- 
how articles and descriptions of other 
people’s layouts to help and encourage 
you to get the most from your own line. 
From Model Shops and Newsagents 
everywhere. Send 6d for specimen copy 
to Pcco Publications, Seaton, Devon. 

|238P] 


THE FANTASTIC HOBBYSHOP — Sydney, Australia 
34 Angel Arcade, Ash Street. Sydney 2000 

has the most Fantastic Range of Plastic Kits in Australia. 800 square 
feet of display area devoted to your hobby. Every brand ever brought 
into Australia is here. Personal calls or mail orders, you’ll get service 
second to none. It really is Fantastic. U.K. SUPPLIERS. If you can 
get it to us fast, in Hobbies or Toys, send us details and catalogues 
today. SECOND HAND. We urgently need good Locos and Rolling 
Stock regardless of scale. We buy discontinued plastic kits (unmade). 
Send us details today, for the best price tomorrow. 


AIRCRAFT PHOTOGRAPHS 

QUR EXTENSIVE RANGE covers over 10.000 titles of C’vll and 
Warpiane photographs (S| x 3} in.) including both Wars. If you will 
please state the section in which you are interested and send 1/3 we will 
send the appropriate list. 

REAL PHOTOGRAPHS LTD. (Dept. A.M.), Southport. England. 


EVERYTHING FOR PLASTIC MODELLERS 

NEW TAMIYA M36 TANK 31/- 
NEW ALMARK TRANSFERS 2/11 sheet 
NEW DE-FREY DECALS 4/6 sheet 
ALL TAMIYA, RIKO, MONOGRAM. AIRFIX. 
REVELL. AURORA Kits Stocked 
NEW and Exclusive German W.W.I Transfers 1/6 sheet 
Please add postage to all orders. 

CATALOGUES: Airfix 2/3, Tamiya 3/6. Revell 2/6. Aurora 2/-. 
Riko 3/-. All post free. 

JONES BROS. OF CHISWICK 
56 Turnham Green Terrace, Chiswick, W.4 

Tel. 01-994 0858 Eat. 1911 


November. 1968 


139 



BOOKS FOR WAR MODELLERS 

New BENDER publication! Orders, Decorations. Medals and Badges 
of the Third Reich, 232 pp . 350 photos and 4 col. pages of 
ribbons 93 * 

Taschenbuch der Panzer. 1969 edn. of the standard (German-text) 
ref book. 652 art-paper pp.. 348 photos. 498 dwgs. £7 11s 6d 
17th Century Rigging (Anderson) 9 photos. 282 figs.. 1 plan 27s Od 
World Uniforms in Colour. Vol. 1 — European (Current Styles). 96 
pp 12" x 10"). Text by D'Ami 200 col. illus by various artists. 
Laminated board binding. As reviewed in this issue. 34s 6d 

Armour in Profile vol. of 24 issues. Many col. and other ill 79s 6d 
Tank Data (Aberdeen Proving Ground). W.W.2 types only 77s Od 
Military Uniforms of World in Col. 512 ill 1506-date. Kannik. 31s 6d 
Ger. Military Uniforms & Insignia 1933/45. Dwgs. & photos 71s Od 
PAPERBACKS: L'Aviation Frangaise 1914/40: Escadrilles. insignes. 
Coming in eight parts each of 24 French-text pp. plus 24 hand- 
coloured plates. By Cmdt. E. Moreau-BOrillon. Send for details. 
Picture Hist of the Waffen SS. 1940/45. 75 pp.. 150 photos 70s Od 
Colors of the SS and 3rd Reich 56 large pp.. 22 in colour. 87s Od 
Hndbk. on Ger Army Identification 1943. 81 pp.. many dwgs 35s Od 
Many others Call or write. Early closing Wednesday. POST PAID. 
Graham K. Scott, 2 The Broadway, Friern Barnet Rd., London, N.11 


DON’T MISS this outstanding work, the first 
volume of which was published in April to 
commemorate the Golden Jubilee of the 
R.A.F. 

PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE RAF 

(Vol. 2. 1939-45) 

J. W. R. Taylor and P. J. R. Moyes 35/- 

A complete history of the R.A.F. in World War II, 
which, having been written after the official history, 
draws on material which was not available at that 
time. 9 in. x 6 in. 208 pages including over 140 
pages of pictures. 


AS REVIEWED 
N E WW IN THIS ISSUE 

OO’ SCALE DIE CAST 

VETERAN VEHICLES 

Finished in one colour spray finish ready 
for detailing. 

PRICE 2s. 6d., postage 6d. (per model). 

Send 3/- for sample or S.A.E. for detailed list of 
twelve models available. 

To Sole Distributors : 

Traction Engine Enterprises 

Leisure Time’, 4 Station Road, Chingford, London, E.4 

TRADE ENQUIRIES WELCOMED 


Also for October publication 

HANDBOOK OF THE VICKERS 
VISCOUNT p st John Turner 25/- 

This new book gives fullest possible information 
about the Viscount. Photographs depict it through all 
its stages of development, and in the liveries of 
virtually every operator who used it. 9 in. x 6 in. 
176 pages, 72 pages of pictures. 


IAN ALLAN 


Shepperton, Middlesex 


AVIACOLOUR 

MODEL SUPPLIES SPECIALISTS 


RUB ’N BUFF 11/6 t p u e b r e 

Superb ‘aluminium’ finish in a tube. Easy to apply 
and easy to use . . . recommended for plastic and 
wood models. 

OFFICIAL" PAINTS f/O »*. 

Comprehensive range of official’ colours. Send * 
for our free list of German World War II, U.S. Air 
Force. U.S. Navy, Japanese and U.S. Vietnam col- 
ours. Flat black, yellow, blue, and red. Brown leather 
and black leather also available as well as ‘clear 
finish and thinners (2/6 bottle). 

•Send 4d. stamped envelope for your copy. 


A.B.T. DECALS, ALMARKS. and 
BLICK DRY PRINT. 


Full ranges of all Airfix. Scalextric, Triang (Rovex), Frog. 
UPC. Playcraft and Wren (N gauge trackside accessories) held 
in stock and always available. 

PYRO. AURORA. REVELL. HAWK. TAMIYA. BELLONA BATTLE- 
FIELDS AND MINITANKS ALL IN STOCK 


Why not come and pay us a visit? Open 9.00 a.m. to 6.00 
p.m. (7.00 p.m. on Friday) and closed on Thursday after- 
noon. If you can't come and see us then write or telephone. 
We will do our utmost to help you. Mail Order charges 
2/- In the £1. (Minimum 2/-.) 

466 EASTERN AVENUE. ILFORD, ESSEX 

Telephone 01-554 9142 


jURFIX&MRRC 


FOR THE SPECIALIST 

Airfix : M.R.R.C. provide a wide range of 
accessories from 1/32nd and 1/24th scale 
cars to engines, tyres and steering units. 

Latest additions to this ever growing range are: 

Flexible copper braid & in. wide for maximum effect 
on pick up Cat. No. 826. 1 yd. per packet. Price 3/-. 
Connecting wire made specially for M.R.R.C. con- 
taining 65 strands of fine copper wire, P.V.C. coated 
Cat No 827. Price 1/3d. per yd 


Please send 6d for catalogue and name of nearest stockist to. 

29 Ashley Road. Boscombe, Bournemouth. Hampshire. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 


140 


AIRFIX magazine 



OPEN Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m 

Late Night Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Saturday 9 a.m. to I p.m. 

INTERNATIONAL MAIL ORDER POSTAGE RATES 

Inland Overseas 

Under 10/- 2/- Surface 20 per cent 

Under £1 2/6 Airmail 45 per cent 

Over £1 3/6 (Min. charge 13/-) percent 

C.O.D 4/6 extra of total order value. 

The above rates are a general indication only 
Any underpayment will be debited 


THE FULL RANGE 

OF 

HELLER 


AIRCRAFT 


1/72 Fighters 


091 Bloch 152 

6/11 

092 Dewoitine 520 

6,11 

093 Morane Saulnier 


MS 406 

6/11 

094 Curtiss H-75 A3 

6 11 

095 Les Mureaux 1 17. R2 

8 9 

096 Caudron C-714 

8/9 

1/72 Bombers 


390 Amiot 143 

21/6 

391 Liore et Olivier 45 

216 

392 Brequet 693 

21 6 

393 Bloch 174 

21 6 

394 Potez 631 

216 

396 Potez 63-1 1 

21/6 

397 Leo 451 

21 6 

545 Bloch 210 

34/ 1 1 

1 50 Fighter Jets 


105 Trident 

17/6 

120 Fiat G.9I . R3 

17/6 

511 Mirage IIIR 

26 II 

1/50 Bombers 


305 Vautour IIB 

21/6 

330 Vautour HIM 

21 6 

500 Etendard IV 

26 1 1 

1/50 Fighter Bombers 


505 Brequet Alize 

26/11 

830 Mirage IV 

43 6 

510 Mirage MIC 

26/ 1 1 

1/40 Fighter Jets 


310 Fouga Magister 

21/6 

1/50 Helicopter 


200 Alouette III 

17/6 

325 Frelon 

21/6 

1/125 Civil Aircraft 


700 Boeing 707 

34/11 

705 Douglas OC8 

34/11 

1/100 Civil Aircraft 


300 Caravelle 

21/6 

855 Concorde 

43/6 

715 Brequet Atlantic 

34 II 

320 1/75 Super-Broussard 

21/6 

720 1/50 Mystere 20 

34 1 1 

710 1/85 Noratlas 

34/11 

Historic Aircraft 


335 1/75 Arc-cn-Ciel 

21/6 

100 1/40 Spad VII 

21/6 


AUTO KITS - The All Metal 1/24 Scale Kits- AUTO KITS 


VINTAGE SERIES 

005 1927 Bugatti 35B 72 6 

006 1934 1.5 E.R. A. 72/6 

008 1932 Alfa P.3 G.P. 72 6 
010 1929 M.G. ‘M’Type 65 11 
013 1929 Mercedes SSKL 82 II 
015 1927 Delage 1.5 G.P. 72 6 

I.M.C. 

I 25 Fully Detailed Kits 
AT LAST 

MECOM LOLA T.70 
is now available 

No. 108. Full Ford engine, sus- 
pension. interior detail. Working 
steering. Opening doors and rear 
deck. Everything expected from 
an I.M.C. Kit 33 9 

103 Cougar II 33/9 

104 Ford G.T. 40 33 9 

105 Ford ’48 Conv. 33 9 

106 Lotus Indy 38 24 6 

107 Dodge ’Little Red 

Wagon’ 33/9 

109 Mustang II 33/9 

I I I STP Indy Lotus 24 6 

M3 Ford G.T. ’J’ Car 33 9 

I 14 Volkswagen ’Beetle’ 33 9 
1 15 ’48 Ford Coupe (’46 or 
'47 versions possible). 

I 16 Chaparral 2E fully 
detailed Chevy engine 
and suspension, remov- 
able rear deck, opening 
doors, steering, working 
aerofoil. 33/9 

1/72 I.M.C. Aircraft 
401 Lear jet. Fully detailed 
interior, removable instruments 
and engine. Operating ailerons 
and rubber, in white with chrome 


1933 M.G 



K.3. MAGNETTE 

With genuine wire spoke wheels 72 6 


BIG SCALE KITS 
18 Monogram Cars 

PC98 Jaguar ’E’ Type 174/6 
PC 1 26 Corvette Stingray 174/6 
1/96 Revell Historical Ships 

391 Kearsage 149/6 

394 Cutty Sark 149 6 

399 Pedro Nunes 149 6 

386 Constitution 175/4 

390 Thermopylae 175/4 

392 Alabama 175 4 

395 Cutty Sark (with sails) 175,4 
398 Constitution 

(with sails) 216/7 


parts. 

NEW 1/32 KITS 

181 Ford Galaxie 

182 Plymouth Fury 

183 Pontiac G.P. 

184 Chevrolet Impala 


33/9 

17/6 

17/6 

17/6 

17/6 


PLEASE NOTE 


WE WILL BE OPEN ALL 
DAY SATURDAY 

(9 a.m. - 6 p.m.) 
on 

NOVEMBER 30th 
DECEMBER 7th 
DECEMBER 14th 
DECEMBER 21st 


Sprint Series with working 
interior and exterior lighting 

525 1/48 Alouette III 26/11 

835 I /SO Brequet Alize 43/6 

840 I / 100 Caravelle 43 6 

850 I /I25 Boeing 707 43/6 

SHIPS 

I 200 Civil Liner 

1010 Avenir 86/11 

1/430 Aircraft Carriers 

1000 Clemenceau 86/11 

1005 Foch 86/11 

1/400 Destroyers 

540 Surcouf 26/11 

541 Maille-Breze 26/11 

543 Dupetit-Thouars 26/11 

I 400 Ships 

860 Colbert Cruiser 43/6 

870 Jeanne D’Arc 

Helicopter Carrier 43/6 

Historic Ships 

865 I /90 Santa Maria 43/6 

905 Phenix 86/11 

CARS 

730 1/20 Renault RI6 fully 

detailed engine 34/11 

735 1/24 Alpine A2I0 G.T. 

Fully detailed 
everything 34/ II 

740 |/24 Matra FI I. 

Engine, suspension 

detail 34/11 

Also full range of cadet, series 
aircraft and galleons, at 4/11 
Send 2/- for illus. Heller 
catalogue. 


POCHER KITS from ITALY 
Large Scale Cannon Kits 

01 24 lb. Casemate (ready built 129/6) 

02 Louis XIV 22 barrelled (ready built 139/6) 

03 English 1800 Field Gun (ready built 175/-) 

04 75 mm Field Gun (ready built 1 19/6) 

05 Chinese Cannon (ready built 175/-) 

06 16th Cent. Coulevrine (ready built 197/6) 

07 German Cannon (ready built 197/6) 


REVELL KITS 

PLANES 

H.20I Flying Fortress B-17 
H.202 Avro Lancaster 
(Oambuster) 

H.203 Liberator B-24 
H.204 Focke-Wulf Condor 
H.205 PB4Y-I 
H.206 Lockheed YF-I2A 
H.207 Lancaster Mk. I 
H.208 Swing Wing Fill 
H.282 Spitfire Mk. I 
H.283 Curtiss P-40E 
H.284 Mcsserschmitt I09F 
H.26I Skyraider 1/40 
H.262 Boeing SST 
H.290 Spad XIII 1/28 


SHIPS 

H.324 Golden Hind 
H.326 Bounty 
H.327 Mayflower 
H.328 Beagle 
H.329 Constitution 
H.336 Santa Maria 17/6 

H.363 Victory 17/6 

H.397 Tugboat Motorized 17/6 
H.32I U.S.S. Franklin D. 

Roosevelt 23/8 

H.339 U.S.S. Forrestal 23/8 

H.344 Flying Cloud 23/8 

H.347 Eagle 23 8 

H.370 Oriskany 23/8 

H.433 Patrick Henry 45,4 

OTHER KITS 

H.I280 Jaguar E-type 17/6 

H.I267 VW Station Wagon 19/6 

u ~ •- . 30/10 


30/10 
30; 10 


34/- 


61- 

46 - 

46/- 

46/- 

PYRO — Actual scale Firearms 

195 Kentucky Rifle 46 6 

197 Western Saddle Gun 33 6 

228 Blunderbus 18 - 

200 Western 44 14/3 

208 Civil War Navy ’36 14/3 

231 Peacemaker 45 14/3 

Antique Pistols — All 14/3 

201 Buccaneer 

202 Privateer 

THE 1931 ALFA ROMEO 2300 MONZA £35 203 Yorktown 

Amazing detail. Working brakes, geared steering, moving pistons, 204 Bunkcrhill 
crankshaft and suspension. 1452 parts in many materials. No gluing — 224 Derringer A Pepperbox 



H. 1266 Miss Deal 
H.I268 Thames Panel 
Truck 

H. 1269 51 Ford Anglia 
H.I233 Honda Super 
Sports 

H.I234 Honda Racing Bike 34/- 

H.I235 Honda Scrambler 34/- 

MONOGRAM KITS 
Clastic Models 1/24 scale 
81 1934 Duesenbcrg 46/- 

87 1937 Mercedes 540K 46 /- 

109 Rolls Royce 
130 1937 Cord 
133 1927 Bugatti 35B 
174 1941 Lincoln 
Continental 


Builds as^ori^inal with nut^and bolts. 


MOST DETAILED KIT IN THE WORLD 
and 

1907 130 H.P. FIAT F.2. G.P. 


225 French Wheellock 

226 Italian Miquelet 

227 Moorish Miquelet 
229 Duelling Pistols (2) 


MODERN SERIES 

001 1962 BRM F.l 59,6 

002 1963 Lotus 25 F. I 52/11 

003 1961 Ferrari F.l 59 6 

004 1963 BRM F.l 59/6 

007 Lotus Super 7 65/11 

009 Porsche 904 GTS 89 I I 

011 1965 Lotus 38 Indy 65 11 

012 1965 Lotus 33 F.l 59 6 


1928 4j LITRE LE MANS 
BENTLEY 

1/24 Wills Finecast all metal kit 
with full engine, suspension, 
steering, interior and underside 
detail. £6 14 8 

1/43 RIO MODELS 
Italian masterpieces in 
miniature 


13/4 

1 

Itala 1906 

37/11 


3 

Fiat 501 S 1919 

37/ 1 1 

13/4 

5 

Alfa 1932 P3 

37/11 

13/4 

6 

Fiat Mod. O 1912 

37/11 

13 4 

8 

Isotta Fraschini 1924 

45/- 

13/4 

10 

Bianchi Laundaulet 1909 45 - 

13/4 

13 

Fiat ’Balilla’ 1932 

37/ II 

1 3 4 

14 

Fiat Tipo 2. 1910 

45/- 

13/4 

16 

Chalmers Detroit 

14 9 


1909 U.S. A. 

45/- 

14 9 

17 

Mercedes 1909 

45/- 

14 9 

19 

Alfa 1750 1932 

45/- 

19 6 

23 

Fiat 60 cv 1905 

42/11 

23 8 

24 

Fiat 1905 (open) 

42/11 

28 9 

25 

Fiat Phaeton 1906 

42/11 

28 9 

26 

Fiat 12 h.p. 1902 

37/11 

28,9 

27 

Fiat 24 h.p. 1905 

45/- 


28 

Bianchi I90S 

45/- 

17/6 

29 

1902 Merc Simplex 

45/- 

17/6 

31 

1901 Fiat 8 c.v. 

37/11 

17/6 

32 

1903 Fiat 16 c.v. 

37/11 

17/6 

33 

1908 Mercedes 

42/11 

17/6 

34 

1907 Renault X 

42/11 


1/43 DUGU 
More Italian Masterpieces 


I 191 I Fiat 4 
4 1907 Fiat F.2 G.P. 

6 1907 Itala Palombella 

7 1912 Itala 25/35 HP 
II 1899 F, at 3.5 HP 

14 1924 Fiat 509 

16 1909 Itala 35/45 HP 

17 1934 Fiat Balilla 
Coppa d'oro 

18 1936 Cord Phaeton 

19 1931 Duesenberg 


42/6 
42/6 
49 I I 
42 6 
39/ 1 1 
42/6 
49/11 

49/11 
49 I I 
49; 1 1 


Full engine, suspension, geared steering. Brass, steel, iron, copper, leather, 230 Dutch Fhntlock 
rubber, aluminium and plastic parts £22 15 0. 231 Peacemaker 45 


POLITOYS (ITALY) 

All models in this range have 
opening doors, bonnets and 
boots; with engine detail and 
springing. 

1/43 Die-Cast Models 

525 Ferrari 'Le Mans’ 31/- 

526 Fiat IIOOBerlina 15 6 

530 Alfa 2600 Zagato 23/6 

531 Alfa Giulia T. I 21/- 

532 Alfa 1750 Alfetta 31/- 

533 OSI 125 Coupe 21/- 

534 Lola GT 21/- 

536 Ferrari 'Dino' 23/6 

537 Alfa 2600 Pantera’ 23/6 
539 Lamborghini 350 GT 23/6 

SOLIDO (FRANCE) 

143 Military Vehicles 

200 M.20 Combat Car 18/11 

201 ‘Unic* Missile-Launcher 35/1 1 

202 U.S. M. 47 Patton Tank 42/11 

202 Renault 4/4 18/11 

204 I05F Anti Aircraft Gun 32/- 

205 I05C Field Gun 32/- 

206 10- Howitzer Cannon 32/- 

207 U.S.S.R. PT76 Tank 

208 U.S.S.R. SUI0O Tank 

209 French AMX30 Tank 
212/13 Merc. Jeep and 

Trailer 

214 Berliet Auroch 

Amphibious Troop 
Carrier 35/11 


42/- 

42/- 

42/11 

23/11 


AUTO MODELS LTD • 70 FINSBURY PAVEMENT • LONDON EC2 • 01-606 5S06 


Printed by Blackfriars Press Ltd., Smith Dorrien Road. Leicester. England 




1 


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MODEL MAIL ORDER HOUSE 

Suppliers to the British and Overseas Governments 


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A.F.V. >c PER sheet 

T.l. AfrJIca Korps Palms 
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T,3, German Crosses lor Military Vehicles 
T.4. Atamein Sheet 
T.5, German Tank Numbers 
T.S. British Armoured Unit Signs 

POSTAGE RATES 
UK up to 3 sheets 6d. 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 
WRITE FOR FULL 
TRADE TERMS 
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Aircraft 

AX W.W.tl Swastikas 
Ae2. RAF Type Roundels 
A, 3. SEAC Roundels for fighters and 
medium aircraft 

A A. RAF Squadron Code Letters 


LATEST BOOKS TO ARRIVE 
Weapons of the German Infantry 
during World War II by Herve and 
Feist 22 6 

Very authentic^ 56 pages over 00 
photos, covering all German small 
arms 

Invasion D Day June 6, 1944. A 

pictorial account of the first 24 
hours of the luecessfijJ Allied 
attempt io regaiif the continent of 
Europe as seen and viewed by the 
German side. Leading military per- 
sonalities ol both sides, aircraft, 
armoured vehicles and other 
interesting items for the Historian 
and modeller, 106 selected photos. 

12/6 


A I RCA M AVIATION SERIES 

A new pictorial survey of Famous 

Aircraft — 21/^ each. 

No. t* North American P.5I D 
Mustang in USAAF-USAF 
service. 

No, 2 + Republic P-47 Thunderbolt 
in USAAF-RAF Foreign ser- 
vice, 

For .ipprox. Nov. 9. 

No + 3* North American Mustang in 
RAF, RAAF. SAAF, RNZAF, 
RCAF and Foreign service. 

ITALIAN CIVIL AND MILI- 
TARY AIRCRAFT I9JD-I945 

i Thompson) 

The author presents the first book 


CALER BOOKS 

MARSEILLE STAR OF AFRICA 
by Hein* Joachim Nowarra. 

4th in the fascinating Caler Ulus- 
trilled series. Extensive research by 
the author now permits unfolding of 
the complete Marseille story which 
rjinks amongst the most heroic epics 
of the World War II era. Marseille 
who was undoubtedly one o the 
greatest tacticians in the history of 
aerial warfare, achieved a score ol 
I SB victories. 

Profusely illustrated including full 
colour scale drawings and colour 
aerial photographs 17 6 


GERMAN MILITARY 
UNIFORMS 1933-45 

Covering all German Military Ser- 
vices plus Labour, Police, Youth. 
Fully Illustrated with photos and 
drawings. 225 pages. The Collector's 
bible on the subject. 66 - 

MEN AND MACHINES 
RAF Bombers of W r W.ir r Vql, ! 10,- 
Luftwaffe Bombers of W, W. U , VoL I 
BLANDFORD 10> 

PUBLICATIONS 
Helicopters and other Rotor Craft 

IS- 

Miikary Uniforms of the World, in 
colour by P, Kannkk 30/- 

Pocket Encyclopedia of World 
Aircraft, in colour 16/-* 

16/-; Fighters* Civil Airliners, 
Private Aircraft or Fightcr& 1914—18. 
18/-: Bombers 1914-1910. 

Each of the above has approximately 
40 pages of colour. 


to be published in this country that 
contains information about all of the 
Italian aircraft of the period immedi- 
ately before and during W„W, M* 
Containing a complete discu&iom, 
t > f all service and experimental types 
of aircraft, plus data about obsolete 
aircraft and unfinished projects, 
this book includes history, descrip- 
tion, use, special features, camou- 
flage. insignia, engine data, arma- 
ment* specs, and performance of 
these aircraft. Comparisons are 
made with major Allied and Axis 
types and a brief description of 
kalian industrial organization is 
given. 3-views. 550 photos, side view 
fine drawings, 76/6 

AERO SERIES: An outstanding 
series of books on famous aircraft by 
Uwe Feist. Mr, Feist is assisted on 
this project by many renowned 
authoritative authors. 


AERO SERIES 

Vol. I Mts«rtch(nilt ME 109 
Vol. 2 N.iUirm.L Ki-84 (Frank) 

Voi. 2 The Curtin P-40 

Vol. 4 The Heinkel He 162 

Vol, 5 Boeing. P-12 F4b Fighter 

Vol, 6 Republic P-47 

Vol. 7 Kamikitc 

Vol, S Junker* }U 67 Stuka 

Vol, 9 Dornicr DO-335 "PFEIL" 

Vol. 10 Supcrmarifle Spitfire 

Vol. 1 1 Cori.ifr Chuoce Vought F4U 

Vol. 12 Heinkel 1 00. 112 

Vol 13 Heinkel HE 177 “Gref" 

Vol. 14 Messertchmitt Me 262 
Vol. IS MustAAg North American 
P5J 

Vol. 16 Messertchmitt BM 10 
Vol. 17 Me»er*chmitt Me 163 

231- each 


NEW AIRCRAFT 
MONOGRAM I ;72 

Inter War Series 
HB4 Boeing 
P6E Hawk 
Goshawk FI IC-2 
and 

Mustang P 51 B 
Bearcat F0F 
Curtis* P 36A 
Tigercat F7F3 
McHerichm.tt BI 1 1 0E ■ I 
A I -E Sky raider 
NEW AIR FIX I 72 
Henchel 129 
Sky raider 
Dominie 

NEW FROG I 72 

Stika 

Mosquito 

BAC Lightning F6 

F ,66 Sabre 

Western Lysander 


J O' I I 

10 1 1 

10/ 1 1 

10/11 
10/ 1 1 
10/ 1 1 
15/9 
15/9 
I5J9 


HAWK I 71 4/6 each 

Spitfire Mk 22; Meuer*chmitt Bf 
I09G: Zero A6N5. 

AEVELL 1/72 

Bth A« r Force B 1 7F Lad y Lock 1 3/4 

REVELL I >72 

3/- each: Spad XIII; Sop with 
Camel. Albasroi Dili; Nteuport 


AIRCRAFT 


1 7c; Fokker DVIl; 5E-5A; D.H II; 
Morane Saulnier; FoHtff “ 1« 
decker; Fokker DR-I; Nieor 
F-<pwith triplane. Spitfire 
t asscrschniii ME-109; Rep*- . v* 
Thunderbo/t ^*470; Focke Wulf 
190; Hawker Hurricane; Mitsu- 
bishi Zero; Mustang P-5ID; Hawker 


Tempest; Kawasaki Hicn; Curtis* 
P-401 Kittyhawk; Mesicrjchmitt 
ME-262; Corsair F4 U-l ; Polikarpov 
1-16; Brewster Buffalo F2A; Naka- 
jima Ki-84-La Hayate; Grumman 
F4F-4 Wildcat; Bell Airacobra P39; 
Hayabuaa Ki-43 (Oscar); PZL P-t 1C; 
Fiat Cft 42; Boeing Kaydcc PT-13; 
Boeing P-26A; Maechi M.C.200; 
Curtiss Hawk 75A. 

9 6 each; McDonnell Phantom 1 1; 
B-26 Marauder; Heinkel 219; 
Junker* SB; A-7A Corsair; A-20C 
Havoc. 

13/4 each: Flying Fortress B-17; 
Avro Lancaster (Dam bus ter): Liber- 
ator 8-24; Focke- Wulf Condor; 
PB4Y-I; Lockheed YF-QA; Lan- 
caster Mk I; Swing Wing Fill, 
RAAF FI I tC. 

14 9 ea.'i. Spitfire Mk I; Curtiss 
P-40E; t ie*ierichn..ct I09F; Bell 
UH-tD Fluey; Bell Huey Cobra. 


TAMIYA A.F.V.’s 

GERMAN HEAVY TANK KING TIGER 

45 - or with remote control equipment $9 I I. 


I 21 Scale, fully motorised. 

M4 Sherman Tank 73 - 

PxKwl German Tank 73 — 

75 mm Assault Gun 73 — 

155 mm M2 Gun (no motor) 34 - 

t 21 with remote control, 

Big Shot 105/- 

M4 Sherman (05/- 

PaKw3 German Tank 105/- 

77 mm Assault Gun 105/- 

I 25 Scale with remote control 
German Panther 126- 

Jagd Panther Rommel 126 - 

J 25 Scale motorised 

German Panther 99/11] 

Jagd Panther Rommel 99/1 1] 

Chieftain, British Tank 99 ll| 

1 15 Scale motorised 
Ti05 JSI I I Stalin Tank 45/- 

T5S Russian Tank 31/- 

M4 1 Walker Bulldog Tank 25 6 

T34 Russian Tank 25 6 

British Chieftain Tank 25 6 

French Twin Flack Tank AMX DCA 30 25 6 
Rommel Tank 31 - 

French Archery Tank AMX 105 25 6 

Napoleon Tank AMX 30 31/- 

M48 Patton Tank 45/- 

Scorpion Armoured Car 16 6 

Spider (Coventry) Armoured Car 16 6 

Salad in Armoured Car IS. 6 

MB Armoured Car 18 6 

SU 100 Assault Gun 25 6 

M4 Sherman Tank 31/- 

M36 Type B2 Destroyer Tank 31/- 


GERMAN HEAVY TANK 
HUNTINGTIGER 

45/ - or with remote control equipment 59 II 


NIC H I MO I 35 Tanks, fully motorised 

French Army AMX 13 27 111 

French Army AMX VTP 27 ll| 

British Army Centurion Mk 10 37 1 1 

British Army Abbot 27 ll| 

British Army Chieftain 37 | 

U.S. Army 105 mm M 109 Self propelled 

howitzer 27. Ill 


BMW MODELS, 327-329 HAYDQNS ROAD, WIMBLEDON, LONDON, S.W.19 01-510 7333/4