Skip to main content

Full text of "Genki I Integrated Elementary Japanese Course (with Bookmarks)"

See other formats


»B*|g 



AN INTEGRATED COURSE IN 
ELEMENTARY JAPANESE 




SECOND EDITION 




Eri Banno 
Yoko Ikeda 
Yutaka Ohno 
Chikako Shinagawa 
Kyoko Tokashiki 



^ H The JapanTimes 



#JB (D 9 -r * 0 \z it % MP3 B &<D 9 v £ JUSf P 7 t 7 T JLtf'JRIi $ ft r id £ T 0 
□ «TS4LT<f'?^o 

CD 7V-^-?iiS£?££tfA<DT\ £>±* < ££ u\> 

Note on the accompanying disk 

The disk that comes with this book contains digital audio files in MP3 format. 

The files can be played on computers or digital audio players, but not on CD players. 



Copyright ©2011 by Eri Banno, Yoko Ikeda, Yutaka Ohno, Chikako Shinagawa, and Kyoko Tokashiki. 

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, 
or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or 
otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. 

First edition: May 1999 
Second edition: March 2011 
8th printing: May 2012 



Illustrations: Noriko Udagawa and Reiko Maruyama 
English translations and copyreading: 4M Associates, Inc., and Umes Corp. 
Narrators: Miho Nagahori, Yumiko Muro, Tomoki Kusumi, Tsuyoshi Yokoyama, 
and Kit Pancoast Nagamura 
Recordings: TBS Service, Inc. 

Typesetting: guild 

Cover art and editorial design: Nakayama Design Office 

Gin-o Nakayama and Akihito Kaneko 
Printing: Tosho Printing Co., Ltd. 

Published by The Japan Times, Ltd. 

5-4, Shibaura 4-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0023, Japan 

Phone: 03-3453-2013 

Website: http://bookclub.japantimes.co.jp/ 

Genki-Online: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/ 

ISBN978-4-7890- 1440-3 



Printed in Japan 



3 



Jg|| 







tfx§j (Dmm-c-to 

it 11 fa T § £ L 

tz-hK z.<d^ mm^m-r^^bbta^tLtzo 

rttx§j (± 1999^, fwtctot 

iw**v'j git lt> tizftj&L, M 

mkUfBLKtfbMmzfofz&miZmfotzmz&MLtLtzo i)tt)t B 
*xu*m*¥wtz%¥£Ztt%.KimLtzmtxLtztf, b* 

Ltzo ^fafa#v\ fko 
%t\ 

& r& jl tLtzo ttz , tmwnfrb 10 

£<Dmmxii, r»j%§j \**<ott u, 

ffLv^^coiiJp, &fT£frV'£L 
fco &rffcfcfc»4 2^>jfcJi&£L£ Lfctf*. -C 4 <9 t $ fctlifcx.*-** 
< ItV'fto 

BfcflJiKOftj&li&fcoTtfa RfA,§J ^fftt<f:?otV'|,#<« 
OlfitfV'feLil'o tfc* r^§J OH/“Kv-^C4oO»S>f 

7X h*jffv>-c< /i^o/c^EilloOi 1 ^ 

LTrtftiJ: 0 (>, 

AXffiJi^OMF^HIJSM^ OliHfa'fcLf-fo 

dWfrLv* Rffa§J X\ v>o*d*L< B*f&«r^T?v>fc£lt*£fc 
IriotV'lto 

2011 gif-pl 






Preface 



This is a revised edition of the textbook GENKI: An Integrated Course in Elementary 
Japanese , which was published in 1999. Since it first came out, GENKI has become 
widely used by teachers and students of Japanese and has gone through numerous 
reprintings. Such wide acceptance led to the decision to publish this revised edition. 

In 1999, our aim was to develop a textbook that teachers would find convenient 
and helpful, and one that students could easily use. We thus wrote the book based 
on a survey of students needs and refined it through many test-teaching situations. 
Originally meant as a text for foreign students studying in Japan, GENKI gained 
popularity among those studying in other countries as well. As use increased, we 
began to hear from those who wanted “more information on culture” and “audio 
aids appended to the text.” It’s also been more than ten years since GENKI was 
originally published, and the passage of time has required revisions to vocabulary 
and expressions. 

While retaining the ease-of-use quality for teachers, we have added new content 
and revisions that reflect our experiences and the voices of those who have used the 
text. The task of revision took two years to complete. We believe that this effort has 
resulted in a book that instructors and students will find even easier to use and learn 
from. 

The opinions of the teachers and students who have used GENKI have been a major 
driving force in the preparation of this revised edition. We are truly grateful to those 
who have provided this input. The authors would also like to express their sincere 
appreciation to the following: Noriko Udagawa, our illustrator, whose work has 
become a GENKI trademark; the staff of The Japan Times; and particularly to Chiaki 
Sekido of the Publications Department of The Japan Times, who has worked tirelessly 
with us on this project since its inception. 

It is our hope that students of the language will find additional pleasure in learning 
Japanese by using this new edition of GENKI. 

The Authors 
January 2011 



[If A4S O 

t < l; 



6 



IS U I Preface 3 

^B(C "C/Introduction 12 

13/uU* 

Japanese Writing System 24 



SIS-SJSli 



fc'U fc jiRAi If a ^/u 

Greetings 34 

CultureNote 5)l^§Oi Greetings and Bowing 37 



nlw ^fcBU/^feTcS New Friends 38 

X IJ Y H? 

Question Sentences 
noun! CD noun 2 

CultureNote JUi/ul/A/CD &3:;L Japanese Names 45 

^Useful Expressions • <hU Time /Age 57 



si2 h Jb'Ufe© Shopping 58 

zn^tnfcn an 

CL CD / -?-© / $5© / <if© + noun 
cl CL “^CL <iftl 

Tuft® noun 
noun fc 
noun 

CultureNote {IJi/uCD Japanese Currency 68 



^Useful Expressions eTcJoUlT In the Classroom 



•83 







zr — Making a Date 84 

Verb Conjugation 

Verb Types and the “Present Tense” 

Particles 
Time Reference 
u*' 

Word Order 
Frequency Adverbs 
The Topic Particle 13: 

CultureNote Japanese Houses 101 

U li/, v>x. 



*4® — h The First Date 102 

x 

Describing Where Things Are 
Past Tense of TrlT 
Past Tense of Verbs 
fe 

-mm 

0V5 U Z)'/v 

1t<tZh u 

£l 

CultureNote Japanese National Holidays 114 

U IJ A/ Lo < bo 

^Useful Expressions B • iM • ^ Days/Weeks/Monlhs/Years 127 

O Uo 05 tb 



A Trip to Okinawa 128 

355 0 4 : Zz> 

Adjectives 

(&) /551U&) 

~ U 4: o / ~;T U <£ z> £>' 

Counting 

CultureNote Japanese Festivals 144 

II liA/ io 

.^Useful Expressions SMJEM5T! At the Post Office 145 

1 05 U7u$«K 



8 



■6" □K-FSMD-B A Day in Robert’s Life 146 

Te -form 

~r< recall 
~rt>lAlV£T 

Describing Two Activities 

CultureNote B^lDfitWrijIlSE ( 1 ) Japan’s Educational System (1) 154 

1 : i 5/v v»< -*v» B 

^Useful Expressions / ?&/?.?) Directions 165 

£ 33 u 



is 7 s * Family Picture 166 

*-< U*> U/u 

~ri^ 

ftdt uw 

Te -forms for Joining Sentences 
verb stem + lLfj< 

IA 

Counting People 

CultureNote Kinship Terms 184 

tJ> **< J: frtz 

^Useful Expressions Parts of the Body 185 

fi'S It iT\ iX\f\j 



#8* JK—^^rlL— Barbecue 186 

Short Forms 
Informal Speech 
~£HlA3:‘r / UTc 
~&IATKTc£IA 
verb ©WSrt 
£>' 

jqlt)' and lqp& 

&IC £IC 

CultureNote Foods in Japan 

II li^ *>© 



■207 



t>< u 



m<)m Kabuki 208 

Past Tense Short Forms 

Qualifying Nouns with Verbs and Adjectives 

^rc—r 

CultureNote Japenese Traditional Culture 226 

ti li/v VA, b n -KA, 

^Useful Expressions Colors 227 



mlO 1 * Winter Vacation Plans 228 

3 £ ru 

Comparison between Two Items 
Comparison among Three or More Items 
adjective/noun + CD 
-OfcD/c 
adjective + T&<t> 

£Z£) MC/cifClCfe 
Ir 

CultureNote Public Transportation in Japan 247 

U \if* Zn Op § ri'A, 

^Useful Expressions iRTr At the Station 248 



*llss After the Vacation 250 

VT 

~/clA 

-TcD-TcD?*) 

~c 

noun A noun B 

CultureNote fclE,fJ New Year’s 264 

^Useful Expressions In the Japanese Class- 

ir I5FA. 



•265 



10 



*12® -JM Feeling III 266 

-AZr'T 

~i55*'iM^-r 

~©Zr 

~IrU eft 5 

Culture Note B^£)ji\,l$: The Japanese Climate 286 

i: is a, £ 

.-^Useful Expressions filJSicL-lsIX Health and Illness 287 





cfc 6' ^/u 


min 


Fliragana 








290 


*2® 


fj'&fj'j- Katakana 








294 


te3§s 


£l/MCB0t*l/ttO Daily Life 








298 




-'£0£ft-tA^-h 


W 




n n b# 




*4® 


c^/u0UK£O^O Mary’s Weekend 




302 




B * A E AAA&AbI 


A 


T 


t ^ 




n5® 


D<£(IO Travel 








306 






A 


ft 


* & 





*6® ?A0!T$'^£L''Xhl7 V My Favorite Restaurant 






312 







h 7 r 


X 7 \J — cl hjCO'Ct^di- Mary’s Letter 












318 




# f- * & *t * C # ® « 


/fcr 


St 


* 


'if 


X 








Japanese Office Workers 

1C 15 Kj 6'U U*> UA, 










323 






O 




FB 


;x 


n 






mga 


X — cT/vCDBIS Sue’s Diary 

(Co * 














328 






tfc 




y > 


£ 


fa 






^ 10 w 


The Folktale Kasajizo 














334 






iL 


g 




« 


n 






W, ] X IS 


^TctD^IJjl Looking for Friends 

15 U*o 














340 








TfT 


?tf 






If % 





*12* "tj ^ Tanabata Festival 346 

TdZ I $Tc 



# X # Jf & ^ & tf> it ?'J £ # * fe 




Jb'/v 



cT < U^/u 1 Japanese-English 352 

c?f <C U^/u 2 English-Japanese 365 

Map of Japan 378 

££ Numbers 380 

£>' 1 T 

Conjugation Chart 382 



12 






I 2'l^£te5i/k 



te®tf>XB*m*¥JZA<Dfztb<7)m*WTto #f I #-#sn^tf>2fiT 
^23»‘C«iRH2f:RO^B*liE7Lt'to S5tt£*tt&A, 

SLiHLtv^A^ tto 

S<7)t\ ^f§/0 s &.2>@3£fr:^& •! t & mfH t Ltv'lto 
RUiRB*® tfASj ttlfr&ftttiLT, B^SSOEgaH (HK ■ ei* • Stir • #<) *ft 
ii'L, <ft'&-W*Bffiw||**Sf*-cv'< £ fcfciati Ltv»ito jEH ££$:#* £ trtn? 
§Tfc«M§3:&**j&'ofc»K 

k, wf#owt#<£>s^t*t‘^§ riEflt ^ j rssissj mm] *£<&>£> bti&xo 

twS*LT*») i-to 



n ttimcour 

4*111 <^®CBXfSt 5 {±, ^T^Sr^t'tcBfcrSrinAi Lfco 

1. Culture NoteCDiiSQ 

r£§& • i'ftflJ <Z)#S*fc TCulture NoteJ t 

V'dSS* »L<K»t, B«-ffc^ffiJ3ov>-coffl[ffi*tlffiLiL7to 

MP3ff^*C'r^X bfcffrtt* 1 1 >blz, 7-7 7 '7 7 
•Cttfflt-6 rHHHtSJ <7#^li7-7 7>7ic#tj\ iOffi^t<ULfc. r* 
xh r^&#§isj 4*0#ffe^jR»LiLfco 

3 . fg* u 

meu r ht^yj rnj 

BOBfcLT, 

4 . &£-m-sE&*®3in 

r£&J *ei±, #i»*ca7iifeaitc*iii±*»)i*&Ao ^<£>*-e\ 

7> JWWlcfc^DJpa • ajELTV'ii-o 

j^psi-«w*o®se^ r~<*o a r~*<A>^v^it 






tit A*} ©200^14, r~< fcV'^v'^t^&vv'C'tJ 

fc*ML£ Lfc„ 

£fc» SE*#§«w«*!»Hov'r>fe, fcofcSB 



in x+7. h©«j« 

r^xnttK r^is-i&iij r^&#§sij r#*j &t\ jus 

t s {±, 3k£W&:fci£&^O f . L&#*io> r^l-citj fffl<c:tj 

i:ov^fiLSto W#BII±JttTO«^?>aiJ®$tLTV^i-o 

•SIS 

L*e^*$fri*OT^e»jSo*cv'ii- 0 sex* jilt, ^w#t± r&vw-tj 

i) £ ^ tf> «£ 9 Co^oti' < A <£> X 1 &g|$ 

-cut. r^ISJ £«:» ^©»-e^*rtv^S 

tvcv^^a6, L 

«He>ttjiL<Ti*f ^t'EL 

J; -5 CLt < fi$v>o 

ifc, r^lSJ (MP3B^) TfBCiWIit. 3feS#fcHU 

tt*HJv'*£\ > ^-ya 0 SSL-On**®***^ 

Srt&J&f i"o 



r^MJ fctt, *-«>»<*> r^MJ t HSU t;tti-C<**rLv'W56*ifc»-c*») it. -*>* 
t\ r^tsj ^tti-c < tto %imt%2Bx*\mmm^mz 
«*u t -to ttz* %*K\*£m<D%.m*wmLtz r$ 

< V' A/J tf 5 'afe U £ -t* 0 

r^-fgj <n*<Dnm*z<vfe<DBx°i> < ^s#f±ftH^L-ro*x. 

* i 9 KLfcJi'? j&*v>V'*CL i 9o 



14 



b, o #SSlw{±*4=*#|ELT*>) it 

io#^{±j£x- 5 ie'Si±* 5 1^ 0 

icOr^T. ht:'(±I#(7)T^-tr> h (ffiOitSfSO £tLTV>itA, 0 Btf£?>7^-t> 
M±ilM*M*fiAig (ittftraoH*^) tUStU'tiA SHg*-fb^#B©aitS*^J:4*'fb 
&H$gt'to Xtfrb, p.m<D7?-k> H;f±&i 

•xa 

ifestMtt, aiaL-cv^Afe« 1 anai» , e§*«t^^ Rw<B¥a$&'L'jWiLfc 0 i 

&<*> riu -e^^iffbnrv^iigiit^r rt£j ©tt>t?s£WLf*o it 0 mm\t 

rt&j <dm%x> £R®H#i£a 6 

x&t) ito 



•mm 

r^wj tt 

ri*£*i& 0 i»S*®#££*LTv>< xt\z£^x, tea*< B*f& 5 &*W®*e§S<fc?£BEJ* 
LT&O i to 

gjwepa* 

ov^xv^to fwttg-g-eg nt&Et^nr 

fit to 

ifc, TMSJ WfcRfctt riEtf>o£$SJ #'i)f)lto 
-frfciRB* f^MJ *JBmLXV\\<D£m*ftZ>BW%t\ 



•Culture Note 

#Ri- TCulture NoteJ R V' -9 n 7 A £!&ij\ B & Elio V'TtftEg Lt 

v'ito rat^igy *££*&£«• 

*y b? 1 * 8 UR£*Lfc»K #&& BtAtfSLA 0 Lt> 
ito 

•Useful Expressions 

CT 7 T'-'T^h. A [Useful Expressions J 3 rl£&t 

-c* 19 i to :ii:iijl Iftw r CAA- E LJ 0 «t 9 £*■<*>»<*> Mty 7 

iHo§i<7> riR-ej Kaffir £Kf£t*i&^m£iEa6i la d £ ft &«£»<>, •*<*> 

f£ < V'AJ tcR-lir-Ci) (9 ito 



^Wcouvc ►►►15 



vit* b*®©*^*^ twot, n 

£lSrct>S>tf*fc, «3i *&?! 

•Cil^Sr^SLtl-o #3S*JaiH©#Sil±, WTWJ; d 



•»« 

H*fcfcxSfcttfca5&**<&©*e, ®0^Lf-5fitV'<J;^:U<^$V'o jl^tiJ^ 
TWi^ C^otv^to 



©3t?©ffiUg^ 



©H? ®*¥©II3W5 ®C©*¥«£A//gi|iB 





► ll/C 


^((5/v) book 0 Japan 




>tE 


B A/^*) Japanese language 






Ay (^ ^ i) t £ A/) Mr./Ms. Yamamoto 


V 


(book; basis) 


( 5 ) — © t ^ © 



©^©Stt j 

®mwm 



©»« 



®K 75 iztitzM^<Dmfrijx\ ►(* r#i%^j> ^t^)^<D^mm(D^^mxLtzi>(Dv 
&&Zt% 7 j<L£i-o t> (i ri)l|fi<&J> i)H$i^(Di*tto ^-fjcc^*. ^ Plfjc^ t. . i£ 
M<D^-X:itt>titz^, g-fflg.itir&tij'&fffo t) t i~o (fc£x{i\ \¥\ tv^jH^fi [iff] 
bWtfrt~$~j)\ [&$tl fcv^ig.f^ifj'eii [#?} bMfrti’o) ^©£ 9 
i) b. ©nlS^H-fSHfic* fix V' i © o 
*J5, ?l^©i£tcti#< ©®(*2f$:#o“CV'a &©&& 0 i 

®fc®-e ©4 , ^AoTv^ii^^^^.|g(i, ^©is-e^x-^^i t ©-©i-o — ©“s ii 

^©^)©(i##i: LT^Plffck©'© ^x& < Tfcj&'tV'£-£A , 0 

7-^^'^«tl®©iti:Iiy- b ;***») it<DX\ 



MS 

l>J%# IJ tc{±,«^©*na,KjS«trt^ov»T©WK, -€-L-C# <*«*** Oii*o 

?m^©Mw fi , £ #«? l -c -c § * p^np * b & nmmt & rm^m^ b %m % w %> r$ 

M%b\ $£$''2&MW£®i:Tm^Kl*ftT©< ^£0412: LT©£ 1- 0 SEflTOUi, M 



16 



ZfiiXhz r^fS-i&SJ X^A ,tzjc&*? 
WRto9mi!l t t6[$kb2tiXisi), fii^fLT^Sto Ii©ii 

lz\Z, lf< MS i LTCDfuSc b vf 7 

ntx^nj U(±, Ii«trt#i:ov>t(7)S^ •€-L-C*<«S***0 t-To fifi¥*£ 

»i, #«* »fg, xyfe>f, $t^i*^IPOH^:fl*JRD±»fCV'4'to ^<r>% 

z-ctz^/vtmm^icm, 9&<o%\mim&t2ixx&i). asrii^rtt^ «$*»,&£* 
^'ift-rv^SI-o frffi^^^iT'oaiSJiK^m^tvCv^to iS©ftti:ii, i'fX 
b fc?y ^)0 s 4l^$ttTv^t'o 

&&\ 4-0®3fetr)K-eJ4^ f It'fniti, Lfc» 

gJoov'Tv^^oii, (MP3 j&30 -CPB< 

Ck%* 

SU& • mnm*ti*tuDm-M\z. r$< WU *^ffiLtLtz 0 -o(±fn^$<v^-c\ # 

|fc r )#f§^- 1 ^ Useful Expressions Ltz ([Culture 

NoteJ ^I§«^±^•*S•ti:^)o ^Wm^X^titz^rift^^L 

TV'i'to < V'A/-C(4» #»©m»i*8RB«T^7r^y bM^S®$4ifV'i*t 0 4* 

0W0fctr)R*C»4, #»PU3 [rw] [u] [irr.] <»&&*%& LX, t’<D'f)l'-7Kmt2>W}mfrfofr 

2> X-olZLi L7to 

Lfco 



IV itietWfcicour 

ilWSBli, £*Wfc#ffliK«fcf£ 

J: n * =fc. oti. 

O^&^iBKLT&O fto 

19 Sto 

fe/fu Bsi^ r*v»$oj ina, ^ 2 mti. ^s#«nffl *e«Lg 

■ * ?*i-mZtL, n-v^£#|BL£ Ltz 0 :on-7? 
#IBt±& < £ J: n l^UWC < tzZ^\ t> 

4 wint #*#■**«# 2 si-c* ^tuw^sttto 

*J3, rif*#§MJ -Ctt, jK^Sr*3 8U5H»t^SLTV'§i1-3&*, ^S<O3£if^0itS J: 
9> BES^?I^U(±^>9^*/5 s igoT£)l9 £-tfA, 0 



*«icoivu 17 



t IbAsttf tiX^tlTo $^#${±¥#§3:^ 

tztiLs mm 

tceri®J $ 0 Zi ti~o £ o T l±* ##tr 

ioT^'i *9 f) £ -to i oT- oCoi^S^* 



W : »### 

$ 

5 

b 




9JSH# 






n"v ?#: 




0 

b 



-V 

Vs. 

•* 

b 





18 



Introduction 



I Aim and purpose 

GENKI: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese is a textbook for beginners in the study 
of the Japanese language. Students can complete the elementary-level study of Japanese in 
the 23 lessons of this text, which is divided into two volumes. The book is designed mainly 
for use in university courses, but is also effective for high school students and adults who are 
beginning to learn Japanese either at school or on their own. Hopefully, students will have at 
least a basic knowledge of English, because grammar explanations are given in English. 

GENKI: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese is a comprehensive approach to 
developing the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), which 
aims to cultivate overall Japanese-language ability. Emphasis has been placed on balancing 
accuracy, fluency, and complexity so that students using the material will not end up speak- 
ing accurately yet in a stilted manner, or fluently but employing only simple grammatical 
structures. 



Q Revised edition 

The revised edition features changes in four major areas. 

1 . Addition of Culture Notes 

Each lesson now contains a “Culture Note,” which is designed to enhance students’ knowl- 
edge of Japan through information on Japanese culture and daily life. 

2. Audio material bundled with text and workbook 

Audio aids, which had previously been sold separately, have now been added to the textbook 
and workbook in MP3 format. The addition of audio material for the workbook’s “Listen- 
ing Comprehension” exercises is especially convenient. We have also recorded the readings 
from the Reading and Writing section of the book. 

3. Vocabulary and expressions 

We rigorously reviewed the vocabulary and expressions to replace words, such as “cassette 



Introduction ►►► 19 



tape” and “LL” that are no longer in common use, with words and phrases that students will 
encounter more frequently. 

4. Grammar, practice and readings 

While no changes were made to the grammatical topics introduced in each lesson, we sup- 
plemented the text and/or made the necessary corrections to make the material even easier 
to understand. 

In the revised edition, we have replaced the negative forms of adjective and noun phrases 
-ku arimasen/-ja arimasen and -nakucha ikemasen , meaning “must,” with the -ku nai desu/ 
-ja nai desu and -nakereba ikemasen/ -naky a ikemasen forms, which are more commonly used 
in everyday life. 

We also increased communicative practice material — mainly dialogues — so that students 
would be given sufficient opportunity to practice the grammar that they learn. Moreover, we 
have updated the readings in the Reading and Writing section to make them more relevant 
to the Japan of today. 



QI Structure of the textbook 

This textbook basically consists of three sections: Conversation and Grammar, Reading and 
Writing, and the Appendix. A detailed explanation of each part follows. 

A ► Conversation and Grammar 

The Conversation and Grammar section aims at improving students’ speaking and listening 
abilities by having them learn basic grammar and by increasing their vocabulary. The Con- 
versation and Grammar section of each lesson is organized as follows: 

# Dialogue 

The dialogues revolve around the lives of foreign students living in Japan and their friends 
and families, presenting various scenes that students are likely to face in their daily lives. By 
practicing natural expressions and aizuchi (responses that make conversations go smoothly), 
students are able to understand how sentences are connected and how some phrases are 
shortened in daily conversation. Because the Dialogue section of each lesson covers a lot 
of new grammar and vocabulary, students may feel it is too difficult to understand at first. 
Don’t be overly concerned, however, because the grammar and vocabulary will gradually 
take root with practice. 

Students can listen to dialogues on the accompanying audio aids (in MP3 format). 
Students are encouraged to practice regularly by listening to the audio and carefully noting 
pronunciation and intonation. 



20 



# Vocabulary 

The Vocabulary section presents all the new words encountered in both the Dialogue and 
Practice sections of each lesson. Words that appear in the Dialogue are marked with an as- 
terisk ( * ). Words are listed according to their function in Lessons 1 and 2, and by parts of 
speech in Lesson 3 and all subsequent lessons. In addition, all words presented in the text 
are also found in the Index at the end of each volume. 

Words found in the Vocabulary section of each lesson appear frequently in subsequent 
lessons, thus encouraging students to learn little by little each day. The new words, along 
with their English translations, also appear in the audio material, which enables students to 
absorb through listening. Starting with Lesson 3, the Vocabulary section also gives the kanji 
rendering, but students are not required to memorize the kanji orthography. 

This textbook does not indicate a word’s accents. The accent of a Japanese word varies 
considerably, depending on region, the speaker’s age (including the generation gap between 
speakers), the word’s inflections, and its connection with other words in the sentence. 
Therefore, there is no need to be overly concerned about accent, but try to imitate as closely 
as possible the intonation heard on the accompanying audio aids. 

# Grammar 

Easy-to-understand grammar explanations are provided so that even those studying on their 
own can easily follow. Students at school should read the explanations before each class. 

All grammar items covered in the lesson’s Practice section are explained in the Grammar 
section. Grammar and vocabulary that require explanation but are not practiced are sum- 
marized in the Expression Notes section at the end of each Grammar section. 

# Practice 

For each grammar point covered, Practice sections provide drills that advance in stages from 
basic practice to application. The intent is to enable students to gain a grasp of Japanese 
naturally by completing the drills in the order presented. 

Basic exercises that call for a single predetermined answer are marked with a Q and re- 
corded with their answers on the audio aids, thus allowing students to practice and learn on 
their own. 

The last part of the Practice section contains Review Exercises that help summarize what 
has been learned. For example, some exercises combine various topics covered in the lesson, 
while others require students to create dialogues by applying what was learned in the Dia- 
logue section. 

# Culture Note 

We have integrated a Culture Note section into each lesson, where we explain aspects of the 
culture and everyday life of Japan. These notes cover a wide variety of topics, ranging from 



Introduction ►►► 21 



matters closely linked to language, such as kinship terms, to information deeply ingrained 
in daily life, such as the Japanese climate. Our hope is that these comments will serve as a 
springboard for students to deepen their understanding of Japanese culture even further by 
taking steps of their own, such as by gathering information from the Internet or by discuss- 
ing the topics with their Japanese friends. 

# Useful Expressions 

When necessary, we include sections on Useful Expressions at the end of the lessons in or- 
der to present supplementary vocabulary and phrases. These sections list expressions that 
are related to the lesson’s topic (as in “Time and Age” in Lesson 1) or to particular situations 
(as in “At the Station” in Lesson 10). The vocabulary introduced in Useful Expressions is 
also listed in the index of each volume. 

B ► Reading and Writing 

The Reading and Writing section aims to foster comprehension and writing ability throug 
the study of Japanese characters and through practice in both reading and writing. After 
learning hiragana in Lesson 1 and katakana in Lesson 2, students begin studying kanji in 
Lesson 3. Each lesson after Lesson 3 is organized as follows: 



# Kanji list 

The list contains the new kanji introduced in each lesson. Students are exposed to about 
new characters in each lesson. Since it is probably not feasible to learn all of these at once, 
we encourage students to tackle a few each day. We have formatted each kanji list as follows. 



(1) serial number 



(2) kanji 


(3) reading 


(5) compounds that include the kanji 




► li/C 


book H ^-(ICliA/) Japan 




£ 


g Japanese language 






Mr./Ms. Yamamoto 


T 


(book; basis) 


(5) — -f t ^ ^ 



(4) meaning 



(7) stroke order 



(6) stroke count 



The ► mark appearing next to readings in item (3) indicates the on-yomi, or the reading of 
the character that was imported from China. The t> mark indicates the kun-yomi, or the 
native Japanese reading. The sound of on-yomi and kun-yomi may change when the kanji 
is used in certain words. For example, the ordinary pronunciation of $ is gaku, but this 
becomes gak when the kanji is used in the word ( gakkoo ). Such derivative readings are 

also included in the readings section. 



22 



Although some kanji have many readings, we include principally those readings that are 
appropriate for an elementary level course. 

Readings and words that are shaded should be memorized. The others are for reference, 
so students don't need to memorize them. The Reading and Writing section of the work- 
book includes practice sheets for the kanji learned in each lesson. Students should practice 
writing the kanji repeatedly, following the stroke order shown on the kanji list in the text- 
book. 

# Practice 

GENKI I consists of kanji practice, readings for comprehension, questions about the content 
of the readings, and writing practice. Kanji practice is aimed at getting students accustomed 
to kanji through practice in various forms, such as reconstructing kanji from their compo- 
nent parts or making new words by combining kanji. Readings for comprehension are gen- 
erally short and deal with subjects familiar to the students. They assume knowledge of the 
vocabulary and grammar that the student has learned in the Conversation and Grammar 
section. New words that appear in the readings are listed. At the end of each Practice sec- 
tion, we suggest topics for students to write on. 

GENKI II contains readings for comprehension, questions about the content of the read- 
ings, and writing practice. The readings introduce Japanese as it is used in a variety of areas, 
ranging from letters and fables to essays and advertisements. They assume knowledge of 
the vocabulary and grammar that the student has encountered in the lesson so far, and with 
each lesson the readings become longer and more difficult. New words in the readings are 
listed in the order in which they appear. At the end of each Practice section, we suggest top- 
ics for students to write on. 

We provide recordings of these readings in both Volumes I and II of the revised edition. 
These are denoted by a Q mark. Students can listen to them through the accompanying 
audio aids (in MP3 format). 

C ►Appendix 

The Appendix of Volumes I and II contains an Index. The Japanese-English Index, in hira- 
gana order, lists words and expressions from the Vocabulary and Useful Expression sections 
of each lesson (the index does not contain the vocabulary used in Culture Notes). The num- 
ber next to a word indicates the lesson in which the word was introduced. In the English- 
Japanese Index, English equivalents to Japanese words are arranged in alphabetical order. In 
both indexes of this revised edition, verbs are indicated with [ru] [u\ [irr.], to show which 
verb group they belong to. 

Also included in the Appendix are a map of Japan with the names of all the prefectures, a 
table of changes in the sounds of numbers and counters, and a table of verb conjugations. 



Introduction ►►►23 



IV Orthography and font 

The basic text is written in kanji and hiragana. In the case of kanji, we follow the official Joyo 
Kanji list. However, hiragana is used instead when the Joyo Kanji equivalent is deemed un- 
necessary for beginning students of Japanese. 

The pronunciation of every kanji in the Conversation and Grammar section is indicated 
in hiragana so that this section can be studied alone. To lessen the burden on the students 
and allow them to study on their own, however, the “Greetings” unit and Lessons 1 and 2 
are written in hiragana and katakana , alongside which the same statement is presented in 
romanization. The romanizations are purely for supplemental purposes and students should 
avoid relying on them too much. Students study hiragana and katakana in Lessons 1 and 2, 
respectively, of the Reading and Writing section. 

Students begin studying kanji in Lesson 3 of the Reading and Writing section. To encour- 
age students to maintain a firm grasp of the kanji they have learned, the Reading and Writ- 
ing section does not provide hiragana readings for kanji that have already been introduced. 

The Japanese in the basic text is set mainly in the Textbook font, which resembles hand- 
writing and serves as a good model for students. Students will encounter a variety of fonts 
used for Japanese materials, however, and should be aware that the shape of some characters 
differs considerably, depending on the font used. Note especially that in certain fonts two 
separate strokes may merge into a single stroke because they mimic the characters produced 
by a writing brush. 



Example: Textbook font 


Mincho font 


Gothic font 


Handwriting 


A 


$ 


£ 


A' 


$ 


§ 




A 


u 




D 


'j 


b 


b 


5 


b 


z 


< 


<Z 




K 9 


* 







24 



Japanese Writing System 



There are three kinds of characters in Japanese: hiragana, katakana, and kanji . 1 All three 
characters can be seen in a single sentence. 

t~ U hi £ JL i ~f 0 I watch television. 

katakana kanji hiragana 

Hiragana and katakana, like the alphabet, represent sounds. As you can see in the above ex- 
ample, hiragana has a roundish shape and is used for conjugation endings, function words, 
and native Japanese words not covered by kanji. Katakana, which has rather straight lines, is 
normally used for writing loanwords and foreign names. For example, the Japanese word for 
“television” is written in katakana as f kb ( terebi ). Kanji, or Chinese characters, represent 
not just sounds but also meanings. Mostly, kanji are used for nouns and the stems of verbs 
and adjectives. 



(T)H i r a g a n a 

1 . Basic Hiragana Syllables 

There are forty-six basic hiragana syllables, which are listed below. Once you memorize this 
chart, you will have the skill to transcribe all of the Japanese sounds. 



h 




1 


X 




a 


i 


u 


e 


0 




* 


< 


It 




ka 


ki 


ku 


ke 


ko 


* 

s— . 


L 


i- 




* 


sa 


*shi 


su 


se 


so 


tz 


% 


o 


r 


E 


ta 


*chi 


*tsu 


te 


to 




\z 


& 


n 


<D 


na 


ni 


nu 


ne 


no 


li 


U 


O' 




11 


ha 


hi 


fu 


he 


ho 



i 



There is another writing system called romaji (Roman letters) which is used for station names, signs, and so on. 




Japanese Writing System ►►►25 




L 

n 











* The syllables L , £>, and are 
romanized as shi , chi , tsu , and/w, re- 
spectively, to closely resemble English 
pronunciation. 

* * £ is also pronounced as “wo.” 



The romanization is given for general pronunciation reference. 



2. Hiragana with Diacritical Marks 

You can transcribe 23 additional sounds by adding diacritic marks. With a pair of short 
diagonal strokes ( " ), the unvoiced consonants k, s, t, and h become voiced consonants g , z, 
d, and b, respectively. The consonant h changes to p with the addition of a small circle ( ° ). 



7^' 




<" 


If 




8 a 


gi 


g u 


g e 


go 


V 


t 


-r 




? 


za 


ji 


zu 


ze 


zo 


tz 


% 


*o 


T 




da 


ji 


zu 


de 


do 


If 


If 


> '' 
O' 


•< 


If 


ba 


bi 


bu 


be 


bo 



If 




\ O 

O' 


K 


If 


pa 


Pi 


pu 


pe 


po 



* £> (ji) and o ( zu ) are pronounced the 
same as U (ji) and "f - (zu), respec- 
tively, and have limited use. 



3. Transcribing Contracted Sounds 

Small and J; follow after letters in the second column (z- vowel hiragana , except t ') 

and are used to transcribe contracted sounds. The contracted sound represents a single syl- 
lable. 



26 



* * 

kya 


* rp 

kyu 


Z X 

kyo 


Lv 

sha 


L Yp 

shu 


L Jt 

sho 


cha 


t) yp 

chu 


% X 

cho 


1- * 

nya 


IC rp 

nyu 


IC Jt 

nyo 


U? 

hya 


th tp 

hyu 


ux 

hyo 


A 

mya 


Yp 

myu 


^ ct 

myo 


U * 

rya 


l ) YP 

ryu 


‘ ) X 

ryo 





H'yp 


* X 


m 


gy» 


gy° 


IT* 


C Yp 


i: J: 


ja 


ju 


jo 



U K* 

bya 


byu 


tfx 

byo 


V* 

pya 


U°YP 

pyu 


U° X 

pyo 



4. Transcribing Double Consonants 

There is another small letter, which is used when transcribing double consonants such as 
tt and pp. 

Examples: tz katta (won) cf. ti'tz kata (shoulder) 

sakka (writer) 

(1 0 11° happa (leaf) 

*5 o L zasshi (magazine) 

Note double consonant ns as in sannen (three years) are written with L + a hiragana with 
an initial n sound (tc, 1C, <&, fa, and <7)). 

Examples: * ^ fa L sannen (three years) 

*>L+£\' armai (guide) 

5. Other Issues Relating to Transcription and Pronunciation 
A. Long Vowels 

When the same vowel is placed one right after the other, the pronunciation of the vowel 
becomes about twice as long as the single vowel. Be sure to hold the sound long enough, 
because the length of the vowel can change one word to another. 



Japanese Writing System ►►►27 



aa 


L 


obaasan 


(grandmother) 


cf. io (1 *5 obasan (aunt) 


ii 


In U t U 


ojiisan 


(grandfather) 


cf. L "5 L ojisan (uncle) 


uu 


■f 1 C 


suuji 


(number) 




ee 


The long ee sound is usually transcribed by adding an t ' to an e-vowel hiragana. 




There are a few words, however, in which 1L 


is used instead of v \ 






eega 


(movie) 






$ L 


oneesan 


(big sister) 





oo The long oo sound is in most cases transcribed by adding an 1 to an o-vowel 

hiragana. There are, however, words in which the long vowel is transcribed with 
an io, for historical reasons. 

(Ib 'Jo hooritsu (law) 

Y. In too (ten) 

B. Pronunciation of K> 

L “n” is treated like a full syllable, in terms of length. Its pronunciation varies, however, 
depending on the sound that follows it. Japanese speakers are normally not aware of the 
different sound values of L. Therefore, you do not need to worry too much about its pronun- 
ciation. 2 

C. Vowels to Be Dropped 

The vowels i and u are sometimes dropped when placed between voiceless consonants (k, s, t, 
p, and h ), or at the end of an utterance preceded by voiceless consonants. 

Example: $ T"i~ s(u)kides(u) (I like it.) 

D. Accent in the Japanese Language 

Japanese has pitch accent: all syllables are pronounced basically either in high or low pitch. 
Unlike English stress accent in which stressed syllables tend to be pronounced longer and 
louder, in Japanese each syllable is pronounced approximately in equal length and stress. 
The pitch patterns in Japanese vary greatly, depending on the region of the country. 



2 One variety of the L pronunciation merits discussing here. When it is followed by a vowel or at the end of an 
utterance, L indicates that the preceding vowel is long and nasalized. (Nasalized vowels are shown here with a 
tilde above vowel letters. You hear nasalized vowels in French words such as “bon,” or the English interjection 
“uh-uh,” as in “no.”) 

ex. ft (Cio reai (romance) If /C ho (book) 

Followed by n, t, d, s, and z sounds, L is pronounced as “n.” ex. f? U 1 j.' onna (woman) 

Followed by m, p, and b sounds, L is pronounced as “m.” ex. "5 Ulf sampo (stroll) 

Followed by k and g sounds, L is pronounced as “ng” as in “song.” ex. i U’i* matjga (comics) 



28 



Examples: & •$ 


a 

sa 

ma e 


(morning) 


tt'i i 


na 


(name) 




ka 

ta i 


(high) 



(i)K a t a k a n a 



T 




7 


JL 


* 


a 


i 


u 


e 


0 


tj 


Y 


7 


Y 


0 


ka 


ki 


ku 


ke 


ko 


Y 


V 


X 


-fe 


7 


sa 


*shi 


su 


se 


SO 


7 


Y 


V 


7~ 


h 


ta 


*chi 


*tsu 


te 


to 


i~ 


. — 


X 




/ 


na 


ni 


nu 


ne 


no 


/ \ 


t 


7 




* 


ha 


hi 


fu 


he 


ho 


-7 




A 


/ 


Y 


ma 


mi 


mu 


me 


mo 


Y 




ZL 




3 


ya 




yu 




yo 


■7 


'J 


)l 


V 


a 


ra 


ri 


ru 


re 


ro 


7 








7 


wa 








0 



y 

n 











if 


Y 


7" 


Y 


3" 


g a 


gi 


g u 


ge 


go 


Y 


> '' 

V 


X 


Y 


V" 


za 


P 


zu 


ze 


zo 



* The syllables -f-, '7 , and ~7 are 

romanized as shi , chi, tsu, and /«, re- 
spectively, to closely resemble English 
pronunciation. 



Japanese Writing System ►►► 29 



7 






— V* 

7“ 


F 


da 


P 


zu 


de 


do 


/ \ 


t: 


X 




X 


ba 


bi 


bu 


be 


bo 





t° 


X 


o 

"S. 


* 


pa 


P* 


pu 


pe 


po 



* ^ (ji) and "/ ( zu ) are pronounced the 
same as V (ji) and X ( zu ), respec- 
tively, and have limited use. 





X 3. 


X 3 


^ '' 

ja 


X rz. 

ju 


j° 



kya 


*=L 

kyu 


3 

kyo 


sha 


> 3. 

shu 


> 3 

sho 


cha 


XL 

chu 


X 3 

cho 


— + 

nya 


— XL 

nyu 


— 3 

nyo 


t -V 

hya 


t 3. 

hyu 


t 3 

hyo 


- dr 

mya 


^ XL 

myu 


i 3 

myo 


rya 


') a. 

ryu 


') 3 

ryo 



bya 


tf 3- 

byu 


if 3 

byo 


pya 


t°3. 

pyu 


k° 3 

pyo 



The pronunciation of katakana and its combinations are the same as those of hiragana , ex- 
cept for the following points. 

(1) The long vowels are written with — . 



Examples: 7 — 


kaa 


(car) 




keeki 


(cake) 


X * — 


sukii 


(ski) 




booru 


(ball) 


x — y 


suutsu 


(suit) 









When you write vertically, the — mark needs to be written vertically also. 

* 



Example: 






30 



(2) Additional combinations with small vowel letters are used to transcribe foreign sounds 
which originally did not exist in Japanese. 



Examples: ^7 ^ 


/nc7 7 4 — y 


harowiin 


(Halloween) 


7 X 


' S 'f ^X'f 


haiwee 


(highway) 




$ ^7 )\ / *> * — 7 — 


mineraruwootaa 


(mineral water) 


i/ x 


'> x 7 


shefu 


(chef) 


Z/ x 


i/ X — A X 


jeemusu 


(James) 


& X 


■f" x y 9 


chekku 


(check) 


7 T 


7 r y 'y 3 y 


fasshon 


(fashion) 


7 A 


7 4 ') 'ey 


firipin 


(Philippine) 


7 x 


t)7 x 


kafe 


(cafe) 


7 t 


7 * — 7 


fooku 


(fork) 


f* >r 


'*— 7-4 — 


paatii 


(party) 




-r 4 X — — 7 7 K 


Dizuniirando 


(Disneyland) 


X n. 


■r xl X >y h 


dyuetto 


(duet) 


1 The sound “v” is sometimes written with r >". For example, the word 
times written as t : — X X or 7 4 — i~ X . 


“Venus” is some- 



(m)K a n j i 

Kanji are Chinese characters which were introduced to Japan more than 1,500 years ago 
when the Japanese language did not have a writing system. Hiragana and katakana evolved 
later in Japan based on the simplified Chinese characters. 

Kanji represents both meanings and sounds. Most kanji possess multiple readings, which 
are divided into two types: on-yomi (Chinese readings) and kun-yomi (Japanese readings). 
On-yomi is derived from the pronunciations used in China. Some kanji have more than one 
on-yomi due to temporal and regional variances in the Chinese pronunciation. Kun-yomi are 
Japanese readings. When people started to use kanji to write native Japanese words, Japanese 
readings ( kun-yomi ) were added to kanji. 

By the time of high school graduation, Japanese are expected to know 2,136 kanji (called 
Joyo kanji), which are designated by the Ministry of Education as commonly used kanji. A 
total of 1,006 kanji are taught at the elementary school level, and most of the remainder are 
taught in junior high school. 

There are roughly four types of kanji based on their formation. 



Japanese Writing System ►►►SI 



(1) Pictograms 

Some kanji are made from pictures: 






(tree) 



|s| 



B 



(day; sun) 



(2) Simple ideograms 

Some kanji are made of dots and lines to represent numbers or abstract concepts. 
— -*• (three) . * -*• P (up) 



(3) Compound ideograms 

Some kanji are made from the combination of two or more kanji. 
Q (day; sun) + (moon) — ► (bright) 



A (person) + A (tree) - A (to rest) 



(4) Phonetic-ideographic characters 

Some kanji are made up of a meaning element and a sound element. 



Meaning element 
y (water) + 

Q (day; sun) + 



Sound element 
sei (blue) 



yjf sei (blue) 




On-yomi 
sei (clean) 




sei (clear sky) 




fr'U to iS\hj IS 5 / Vu 

Conversation and Grammar Section 



3 d 0 ^© Greetings 34 

» 1 » aBfcSUUtfcfcfS New Friends 38 

Shopping 58 

m 3 X — h©ft^] 5 ^ Making a Date 84 

*><*< 

$ 4 R ffl&Z(DT— h The First Date 102 

A Trip to Okinawa 128 

33£»fcD«>:!:5 

31 6 □ A — Sc^f/u© — B A Day in Robert’s Life 146 

UV5 Id'S 

m 7 IS ^S^©^K Family Picture 166 

6' ?< Uv> LA, 

A' — — Barbecue 186 

* 9 ® fr'/ 3 \ 3 : Kabuki 208 

mlOtS $f'fc<fr© : P/E’ Winter Vacation Plans 228 

^llii fod}(D&<tl After the Vacation 250 

*>T 

if§12tS ^ S Feeling III 

If *5 £ 



266 



34 ► ► ► IzsceS * 3£>2 a!§ 



Ml KOO-G 

Greetings 


















&l± X 1 o 


Ohayoo. 


Good morning. 




Ohayoo gozaimasu. 


Good morning, (polite) 


^ Aj 1 1~> li o 


Konnichiwa. 


Good afternoon. 


3 XJf/Clio 


Konbanwa. 


Good evening. 


^ X 1 f X b o 


Sayoonara. 


Good-bye. 


v') 0 


Oyasumi(nasai). 


Good night. 


& ') !)*£ 1 0 


Arigatoo. 


Thank you. 


#> ‘J 


Arigatoo gozaimasu. 


Thank you. (polite) 


"t" <& i -tt /C 0 


Sumimasen. 


Excuse me.; I’m sorry. 




lie. 


No.; Not at all. 


''oTJ i ”t” o 


Ittekimasu. 


I’ll go and come back. 


''oTbo L '(’I'o 


Itterasshai. 


Please go and come back. 


/c^'io 


Tadaima. 


f m home. 


IJ (t'^')o 


Okaeri(nasai). 


Welcome home. 


^/;/:'$ito 


Itadakimasu. 


Thank you for the meal, 
(before eating) 


3"^^ * i (T L 7c) 0 


Gochisoosama(deshita). 


Thank you for the meal, 
(after eating) 


l± Ui6i L To 


Hajimemashite. 


How do you do? 


X6 l < fc^'oLJto 


Yoroshiku onegaishimasu. 


Nice to meet you. 




36 >•>•>• £15 



Expression Notes 1 



D tj'ilZ) ► Ohayoo is used between friends and family members, 
while ohayoo gozaimasu is used between less intimate acquaintances, similarly 
with arigatoo and arigatoo gozaimasu. The rule of thumb is: if you are on the 
first-name basis with someone, go for the shorter versions. If you would address 
someone as Mr. or Ms., use the longer versions. 

Ohayoo is the greeting used before noon, but some people use it in casual 
settings in the afternoon or even at night when they see their classmates or co- 
workers for the first time that day. 

There are several good-bye expressions in Japanese, the choice 
among which depends on the degree of separation. Sayoonara indicates that the 
speaker does not expect to see the person spoken to before she “turns a page in 
her life”; not until a new day arrives, or until fate brings the two together again. 

It sounds dramatic and ritualistic, and its daily use is largely restricted to school 
children taking leave of their teachers. 

itzo Jaa, mata. 

(between friends, expecting to see each other again fairly soon) 

Lotfiv* L S to Shitsureeshimasu. 

(taking leave from a professor’s office, for example) 

Sumimasen means (1) “Excuse me,” to get another person’s atten- 
tion, (2) “I’m sorry,” to apologize for the trouble you have caused, or (3) “Thank 
you,” to show appreciation for what someone has done for you. 

IMA*. ► lie is primarily “No,” a negative reply to a question. In the dialogue, it is 
used to express the English phrase “Don’t mention it,” or “You’re welcome,” with 
which you point out that one is not required to feel obliged for what you have 
done for them. 

I Ittekimasu and 
itterasshai is a common exchange used at home when a family member leaves. 

The person who leaves says ittekimasu , which literally means “I will go and come 
back.” And the family members respond with itterasshai , which means “Please go 
and come back.” 

Tadaima and okaeri are used when a person comes home. The person who ar- 
rives home says tadaima (I am home right now) to the family members, and they 
respond with okaerinasai (Welcome home). 





r 



0*5 



iiy-h i\ 



&Uc!r:3»>37 




Tl/uUtfO Practice 



Act out the following situations with your classmates. 

1. You meet your host family for the first time. Greet them. 

2. It is one o’clock in the afternoon. You see your neighbor Mr. Yamada. 

3. You come to class in the morning. Greet your teacher. Greet your friends. 

4. On a crowded train, you stepped on someone’s foot. 

5. You dropped your book. Someone picked it up for you. 

6. It is eight o’clock at night. You happen to meet your teacher at the convenience store. 

7. You are watching TV with your host family. It is time to go to sleep. 

8. You are leaving home. 

9. You have come back home. 

10. You are going to start eating. 

1 1 . You have finished eating. 



C ulture(Jj30 

Greetings and Bowing 

Aisatsu to ojigi 



Japanese people greet each other by bowing, which has many 
other functions, such as expressing respect, gratitude, or apologies. 
There are different ways of bowing, ranging from a small nod of the 
head to a 45-degree bend at the waist. Generally, the longer and 
the deeper you bow, the more formal and respectful it appears to 
others. 




Many Japanese tend to feel uncomfortable with physical contact, although handshaking is 
becoming quite common in business situations, especially those involving foreigners. 




When meeting someone in a business situation for the first time, 
it is customary to exchange meeshi (business cards) with a small 
bow. Etiquette guides list a vast number of rules and pointers, but 
just remember that the important thing is to clearly show your 
respect when exchanging meeshi. 



38 • SCSI! 

















\ 


SsJ_B 

/£l\ tb 


L 


E 


S 


S 


0 


N 


1 



New Friends 



fc'Uto D 



Q 



o g u e 

Mary, an international student who just arrived in Japan, talks to a Japanese student. 

© L|i K01-01/02 



» * i) i> 

1 yru- 

Mearii 

2 tz 1+ L : 

Takeshi 

tb $> b 

3 /T'J- 

Mearii 

4 tz It L : 

Takeshi 



■fAiHfAo v'£ 

Sumimasen. Ima nanji desu ka. 

t d> *7 b U liX,Ti" 0 

Juuniji han desu. 

Arigatoo gozaimasu. 

lie. 





HI 111 >■>■>• 39 




KOI -03/04 



1 tz 111 : 
Takeshi 

) 6 * i) V' 

2 / T >J - : 

Mearii 

3 Tclt L : 
Takeshi 

* u i' 

4 y r >J - : 

Mearii 



£(7), r)> -9^< J>'o 

Ano, ryuugakusee desu ka. 

U, f'iv4/c'V'^<<7) 7j<< 

Ee, Arizona daigaku no gakusee desu. 

•?- 1 -Ur/L 3 ti ^'/CT'-f ©o 

Soo desu ka. Senkoo wa nan desu ka. 

uii/Cr'T-fo /C -tt v 'tto 

Nihongo desu. Ima ninensee desu. 



© 

Mary: Excuse me. What time is it now? 

Takeshi: Its half past twelve. 

Mary: Thank you. 

Takeshi: You’re welcome. 

® 

Takeshi: Um ... are you an international student? 
Mary: Yes, I am a student at the University of Arizona. 
Takeshi: I see. What is your major? 

Mary: Japanese. I am a sophomore now. 



40>>>£i£'3££St 



Tc hu cZr 

Vocabulary 



K01-05 



h<r> 


ano 




ima 


X. V ' w 


eego 


L X. 


ee 


< -t+v ' 


gakusee 




. . .go 


z l Z i 


kookoo 


z z 


gogo 


r'-tfx 


gozen 




. . . sai 


~ $ L 


. . . san 


~c 


. . . ji 


~ c ^ 


. . . jin 


-tir/C 3 ^ 


senkoo 


H± V ' 


sensee 


* 9 T-f 


soo desu 


9 Ti* 


soo desu ka 


< 


daigaku 


X Lb 


denwa 




tomodachi 


Li L 


namae 


LL/LL 


nan/nani 


izliL 


Nihon 




. . . nensee 


liv ' 


hai 




han 


liXZ'9 


bangoo 


‘j H> 9 -ttv ' 


ryuugakusee 


btz l 


watashi 



um . . . 
now 

English (language) 
yes 

student 

. . . language ex. I C ( I L 3' 

( nihongo ) Japanese language 
high school 

P.M. 

A.M. 

. . . years old 
Mr./Ms. . . . 
o’clock 

ex. v ' % U ( ichiji ) one o’clock 
. . . people ex. I - ( I L U L 
(nihonjin) Japanese people 
major 

teacher; Professor . . . 

That’s right. 

I see.; Is that so? 

college; university 

telephone 

friend 

name 

what 

Japan 

. . . year student ex. v ' £> faX -t f v ' 
( ichinensee ) first-year student 
yes 

half ex. IZ C (i/C (niji han) half 

past two 

number 

international student 
I 



* Words that appear in the dialogue 



ADDITIONAL VOCABULARY 



K01-06 



Countries 

r / 'j fi 

& tb ij i)' 

T ¥') x 

V' S* ij t 

*-X h -7 'J T 

« b -r t e> i) * 

tf'/CZ < 
x x.—T'y 

■f 9 k. x. "C A, 

^i:'< 



Amerika 

Igirisu 

Oosutoraria 

Kankoku 

Suweeden 

Chuugoku 



U.S.A. 

Britain 

Australia 

Korea 

Sweden 

China 



Majors 





kagaku 


science 


TS'TIt/C* rj» -7 

i> u h 


ajia kenkyuu 


Asian studies 


l+v ' 


keezai 


economics 


3 < * 'tJ'/CI+v ' 


kokusaikankee 


international relations 


3 y £ 

Z. k> Xf *P *? tz $> 


konpyuutaa 


computer 


L/C£v>^< 


jinruigaku 


anthropology 




seeji 


politics 


fcf v T X 

rtf l* 4^ -4- 


bijinesu 


business 


Cr U 9 

.S/U«< 


bungaku 


literature 


L 


rekishi 


history 


ccupation 


s 




L 3"L 


shigoto 


job; work; occupation 


\ ' L K 1 


isha 


doctor 




kaishain 


office worker 


3 *5 3 


kookoosee 


high school student 


L n> .)> 


shufu 


housewife 


/c'v 'J* < v, 'X,-th ' 


daigakuinsee 


graduate student 


7c' V < -|+\. ' 


daigakusee 


college student 


^3"l 


bengoshi 


lawyer 


a m i 1 y 

*5^'* -25 


okaasan 


mother 


& L 9 ^ 


otoosan 


father 


fc fc X. is L 


oneesan 


older sister 


1- ^ ' ■J X/ 


oniisan 


older brother 


V ' 1 9 £ 


imooto 


younger sister 


fcL 9 £ 


otooto 


younger brother 



42 •£:>£■ 




Grammar 

M x&YTrr 



“It is 12:30.” “I am a student.” “My major is the Japanese language.” These sentences will all 
be translated into Japanese using an appropriate noun and the word desu. 



o Itis... 



U 2 I- U ll/CT'-fo (It) is half past twelve. 

Juuniji han desu. 

() < ( -if t ' o (I) am a student. 

Gakusee desu. 

I C ( I L Z' T"~t o (My major) is the Japanese language. 

Nihongo desu. 

Note that none of these sentences has a “subject,” like the “it,” “I,” and “my major,” found in 
their English counterparts. Sentences without subjects are very common in Japanese; Japa- 
nese speakers actually tend to omit subjects whenever they think it is clear to the listener 
what or who they are referring to. 

What are we to do, then, when it is not clear what is being talked about? To make explicit 
what we are talking about, we can say: 

( i 1 2 ( i /C Z o is the Japanese language. 

wa nihongo desu. 

Where stands for the thing that is talked about, or the “topic,” which is later in the 

sentence identified as nihongo. For example, 

-tf /C Z 9 (i iZtl/CZ' T"i~ 0 (My) major is the Japanese language. 

Senkoo wa nihongo desu. 

Similarly, one can use the pattern X wa Y desu to identify a person or a thing X as item Y. 



X IS Y Trlfo X is Y. As for X, it is Y. 

btz b l± X - • 4-AT-fo 

Watashi wa Suu Kimu desu. 



I am Sue Kim.