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MARKETING COLLATERAL • 1990 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2017 with funding from 
Peter Cunningham 


https://archive.org/details/MktUS990US1990Collateral 



CONFERENCES 



OUTSOURCING 

OF 

INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS 


INPUT 

Join INPUT'S analysts and 
knowledgeable guests to 
discuss the potential 
revolution in the 1990s in the 
development and operation 
of computer/ 
communications systems. 


June 7 & 8, 1990 
Omni Shoreham Hotel 
Washington, D.C. 

Limited attendance— piease confirm 
eariy to avoid disappointment 



Outsourcing of Information Systems 

INPUT'S 12th Annual Executive Conference " 


Attend this conference on outsourcing in 
information systems to evaluate the 
opportunities and problems associated with 
the Various approaches. 

For 30 years the primary source of computer/ 
communications systems development and 
operations has been internal departments. 
Durliig this time, however, there has been an 
overgrowing computer software and services 
industry providing solutions to customer 
needs. This industry, the information services 
industry, is now a $180 billion per year market 
worldwide. 

The revolution in the 1990s is the shift from 
internal to external sources of software and 
solutions. This revolution is happening more 
rapidly than many expected. 

This conference is about 
that revolution. 


Questions to be addressed by INPUT analysts 
and panels of invited guests include: 



What is "outsourcing?" 

Why is it becoming so much a concern today? 

What are the different vehicles for 
outsourcing? , .n 

How will the various markets develop? 

What are the market forecasts through 1995? 

Who takes responsibility? 

What are the impacts on "competitive 
advantage?" 

What about security when using external 
vendors? 

What are the financial costs and benefits? 

What about impacts on information systems 
organizations and people? 

What is "change management?" 

What is the role of business consultants in 
outsourcing? 

Which vendors are offering what services? 

What have been customer experiences of 
^outsourcing? 

What are the relationships between system§^; 
integration and systems operations? 

What sources of skills will be used in the . ^ 
future? 

What opportunities exist for customers and " 
vendors? 

What will be the impact on information 
systems and services vendors? Who will win? 

These and many other questions, will be 
addressed during this critical conference.,.-You 
are invited to presubmit your questions. 


INPUT’S 

12th Annual Executive Conference 

OUTSOURCING OF 
INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

June 7 & 8, 1990 
Omni Shoreham Hotel 
Reston, Virginia, U.S.A. 


Fee Schedule 

The regular conference fee is $1395; $995 for additional attendees from the same company. 
Subscribers to INPUT'S Market Analysis Program may attend at the fee of $495 per person. 

Registration Form 

Yesl Please sign me up for the Annual Executive Conference, June 7 & 8, 1990 at the Omni 
Shoreham Hotel, Reston, VA, U.S.A. 

□ Check enclosed in the amount of $ 

□ Bill me in the amount of $ on Purchase Order # . Payment 

must be received before conference. 

□ Charge $ ^ to my American Express # . 

Exp. date Signature . 

Name: 

Title: 

Company: 

Address (include zip or country): 


Register today 
by calling 
any INPUT office 


Telephone: ( ) Signature: 

(Please duplicate this form for additional attendees and return the forms together) 


Conference space is limited! In the U.S., either mail this form to 
INPUT, 1280 Villa Street, Mountain View, CA, or call Christine Carter, Conference 
Coordinator, at (415) 961-3300. You can also FAX your registration to us at (415) 961-3966 

or contact any INPUT office listed below. 


New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 

Parsippany, NJ 07054 

(201) 299-6999 Fax (201) 263-8341 


Europe — ^Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWIY 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 Fax (01) 629-0179 


Tokyo — Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


Paris — 52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 
(33-1)42 77 42 77 
Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 


Cancellations must be in writing. 

You may cancel your reservation without a 25% cancellation fee until May 9, 1990. 





ESTPUT's Executive 
Conference has been the 
prime forum for examining 
future trends in information 
services for the past 12 years. 
The combination of 
experienced computer 
industry professionals, 
objective research, and strong 
customer interaction has 
produced an environment for 
^ the presentation of new ideas 
9 and the identification of 
trends that have actually 
come to pass. 

In the last ten years, the 
growth of the microcomputer 
(pre-PC) in business (1980), 
the importance of 
connectivity and networks 
(1982), systems integration 
(1984), and systems 
operations (1988) have been 
among the keynote 
projections of this conference. 


Who should attend? 

"Outsourcing" is the 
conference to attend to 
determine the direction your 
company should take. To 
what extent should you 
participate in the markets as a 
buyer or seller; in some cases 
as both? The conference is 
for people with these 
questions. 

4 CIOs 

4 Planning Executives 

^ Business Executives with 
Information Systems 
Customers and Vendors 

4 Software and Services 
Executives 


Key Benefits of 
Attending: 

Discuss this critical issue with 
INPUT analysts, customers, 
and vendors involved in 
outsourcing. 

^ Learn about the trends 
and potential impacts on 
the industry of 
"outsourcing." 

^ Examine the competitive 
structure of the industry 
to determine the 
"players." 

4^ Obtain the necessary 
information to direct your 
company's position in this 
arena. 

4 Get ahead of the curve as 
the revolution rolls 
forward. 




THE program: THURSDAY, JUNE 7tH 


Information Systems Outsourcing — 

A Global Perspective: 

The switch from internal to external sources of 
information systems resources has been 
occurring for years. The information services 
industry provides customers with the external 
capabilities. How big is this business on a 
worldwide basis? What are the overall trends 

Systems Development 


These services are devoted to the 
development, installation, and maintenance of 
applications. 

Systems Integration — Acceptance: 

In the last six years, systems integration has 
become accepted by non-federal government 
organizations as a viable method of 
developing systems that work. The concept of 
a vendor taking responsibility for the 
development and installation of complex 
systems has proven appealing to customers 
faced with increasing demands and limited 
resources. 

In this session, INPUT will discuss with 
participants in the industry; customer 
requirements, success criteria for SI projects, 
partnering aspects that work or fail, and 
projections of the types of systems integration 
projects that will grow in the 1990s. Particular 
attention will be paid to network integration 
and image processing applications. 

Professional Services — Multiplicity of 
Choice: 

The prime alternative to in-house information 
systems staffing is to use professional services 
resources. The driving forces, including labor 
scarcity, employment considerations, and 
flexibility are examined in this session. 

Each major type of professional service is 
examined, as well as "project responsibility" 
and "resource" contracting alternatives. The 
concepts of "systems management," "change 
management," and contracted maintenance 
are introduced and discussed with 
proponents in the industry. 


in the U.S., Europe, and Japan? This session 
forms the framework for the conference 
answering basic questions as to "Why?" and 
"Why Now?" 

The session presents major types of 
outsourcing and how they relate; leading 
competitors in the industry are introduced. 


Outsourcing: 


Applications Software Products — 

Part of the Solution: 

These packages provide alternatives to 
custom-made software. As with other "off- 
the-shelf" items, they must be tailored to the 
customer's specifications. This session 
examines how this is accomplished. The 
overall factors influencing the growth of the 
market and the "make or buy" decisions are 
examined. 

The affects of trends to standard platforms are 
analyzed as are the impacts of increasing use 
of CASE technology. Repository and 
automated library functions are discussed by 
industry experts: they will change the concept 
of application development and 
implementation. 

The convergence of custom and package 
software is examined together with the 
implications for customers and providers. 

Interaction: 

The day will close with an intense question 
and answer period involving customers, 
vendors, and INPUT analysts. Attendees may 
pre-submit questions to be addressed during 
this session. 

The evening will include a reception for 
attendees to provide an opportunity for free 
discussion and the formation of dinner 
groups. 


THE program: FRIDAY, JUNE 8tH 

Systems Operations Outsourcing: 


These services are devoted to the operation of 
computer/ communications systems. 

Systems Operations — 

The Revolution of the 1990s? 

Systems Operations is potentially the most 
revolutionary market of the 1990s. It is an 
outgrowth of 'Tacilities management" — but 
customers do not buy management of a 
facility, they buy operation of a computer/ 
communications system in which they 
participate in the management. Recent events 
such as the entry of large computer 
manufacturers and professional services 
companies have stirred up this market. 

The financial methods employed, the reasons 
for systems operations as a viable alternative 
to in-house information systems, and the 
various forms of systems operations are all 
explored with participants in the industry. 
Computer ownership and location issues are 
addressed and INPUT research and forecasts 
presented. 

Relationships with systems integration and 
their services are examined. Vendor 
approaches to platform and application 
operations are discussed with the implications 
for customers. 

The impact on the rest of the industry of 
systems operations is considerable. Financing 
implications abound. These are examined in 
detail by INPUT and its guests. 

Processing Services — Variety and Growth of 
Outsourcing Alternatives: 

Many companies use some form of processing 
service from payroll through industry 
specialized services such as credit card 
processing. Disaster recovery is another 
service which is "enjoying" increasing use. 

These services are bought on an application- 
by-application basis as opposed to the 
"complete package" as with systems 
operations. Their use is steadily increasing. 
Through mergers and acquisitions, some of 
the vendors are becoming very large, with the 
ability to afford the development costs for the 
new generation of systems. 


INPUT will examine processing services 
positions in the outsourcing spectrum and 
projections for 1995. Customer needs for 
transaction processing and services will be 
discussed. 

Network Applications and Operations 
Services — The Battlegroxmd of the 1990s 

The final structured session of the conference 
examines customers' alternatives in the 
network area. 

As telecommunication networks become more 
complex and powerful, they will provide 
numerous opportunities for outsourcing. 
Various outsourcing alternatives in the 
development and operation of networks are 
examined including network integration and 
operations service. Sources of service are 
discussed. 

In particular, the impact of the telephone 
companies will be considerable on an 
international basis. Their rapid expansion is 
examined and the implications critiqued. 

Interaction: 


The conference will conclude with another 
intensive question and answer period with 
vendors, customers, and INPUT analysts. 



OUTSOURCING OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS 


Day One 


7:30 - 8:30 
8:30 - 9:30 


9:30 - 9:45 


Registration and Continental Breakfast 

Information Systems Outsourcing 

• Global Perspective 

• Internal and External Factors 

• Competitive advantages /Disadvantages 

Break 


Systems Development Outsourcing 


9 : 45 - 11:30 


Systems Integration 

• Industry Trends and Forecasts • Approaches 

• Responsibility Issues • Customer Requirements 

• Vendors and Capabilities 


11 : 30 - 1:00 


Lunch 


1 : 00 - 2:30 

2:30 - 2:45 


Professional Services 

• Industry Trends and Forecasts • Conversion 

• Labor and Skills Considerations • Systems Management 

Break 


2:45 - 4:15 


4:15 - 5:00 
5:30 - 7:30 


Applications Software Package Solutions 

• Industry Trends and Forecasts 

• Application Development Issues 

• Combinations with Professional Services 

• Partnering Among Vendors 

Questions and Answers 
Cocktail Reception 




Day Two 


7:00 - 8:00 


Continental Breakfast 


Systems Operations Outsourcing 


> 


8:00 - 10:00 


Systems Operations 

• Industry Trends and Forecasts 

• Financial Consideration 

• Method of Operation 


10 : 00 - 10:15 


Break 


10 : 15 - 11:30 


Processing Services 

• Industry Trends and Forecasts 

• Transaction Processing by: 

- Industry (eg.. Banking) 

- Function (eg.. Payroll) 


11 : 30 - 1:00 


Lunch 


1:00 - 2:30 


Network Operations 

• Industry Trends and Forecasts 

• Customer Requirement 

• Vendor Sources 


2:30 - 3:30 


Questions and Answers 



• Customer Requirements 

• Security 


• Application Sources 

• Vendor Trends 


• Public versus Private 
Networks 

• Network Management 
Services 


OUTSOURCING OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
June 7 & 8, 1990, Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C. 


CONFERENCE REGISTRATION 

Conference fees: 

■ First attendee from a company $1395 

■ All additional attendees $995 

Subscribers to INPUT'S Market Analysis 
Program may attend at the fee of $495 per 
person. 

PAYMENT AND CANCELLATION POLICY 
You may cancel your reservation without a 
25% cancellation fee until May 9. 

Cancellations must be in writing. INPUT will 
consider purchase order numbers or company 
checks as proper reservations. We also accept 
American Express. INPUT reserves the right 
to make changes to this conference without 
notice. 


ACCOMMODATIONS 

Washington's famous Landmark Hotel, the 
Omni Shoreham, beautifully restored to the 
grand style of days gone by and uniquely 
located on 11 tranquil acres in Rock Creek 
Park in the heart of Washington, D.C., just one 
block from Woodley Park Metro Station, 
minutes from the Smithsonian Institute, 
museums, the Capitol, and walking distance 
from the National Zoo. 

Hotel reservations may be made by calling the 
Omni Shoreham at (202) 234-0700. Be sure to 
ask for the INPUT Conference special rate. 
Available rooms may be taken quickly, so 
please contact the hotel promptly. 


REGISTER TODAY! In the U.S. call 415-961-3300 
or mail or fax the registration form today! FAX: 415-961-3966. 
Internationaily, contact INPUT at the numbers below. 


INPUT Offices 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


INPUT 


JJJJ 2/90 







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Service Agreement 


INPUT'S 1991 

U,S. Information Services Market Analysis Program 


Yes! Subscription to INPUT'S U.S. Information Services Market 

Please enter my Analysis Program: 
order as described: 

□ $29,500 if payment received by December 15, 1990. 

□ $31,000 if payment received after December 15, 1990. 

TERM OF SUBSCRIPTION — ^The initial term of this subscription will be for twelve (12) 

consecutive months beginning . The subscription will automatically renew for 

each succeeding year unless INPUT receives written notice sixty (60) days prior to the start of each 
renewal period. The fees for INPUT services defined in this Agreement and it's attachments will 
be invoiced each year at INPUT fees then in effect, due and payable on or before the start of the 
program subscription period. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT — Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ ^ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

Travel expenses for on-site presentations are additional and will be billed separately. 

California clients; Please add applicable sales tax on 25% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT — ^The information provided shall be used only by the employees 
of and within the current corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other 
organization or person including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided 
\mder this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, 
INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content 
of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
Tel. (415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


Signature 


Dale 


MAMAP 11/90 


INPUT 








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A NEW REPORT FROM INPUT 


Optimize software product strategy by 
targeting growth market opportunities... 


Call, Mall or Fax Your Order Today 


Order Form 


INPUT'S Research Studies 


Yes! U,S, Software Products Market, 1989-1994 report at 

Please enter my fee of $3,000 

order as described: 

SAVE $150 if check included with order 


TERMS OF PAYMENT 

Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

□ Charge $ to my American Express # . 

Exp. date Signature . 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current corporate 
structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person including 
parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises 
its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this Agreement and believes the 
information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss 
or expense that may result from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. 
INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content of the program in response to changing 
client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
(415) 961-3300 
Telex 171407 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


Signature 


Date 


MAPP 1/90RB 

INPUT 




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9 


INPUT 


When You Have to 
Know the Specifics 
on the Federal 
Telecommunications 
$ Market. . . 


^ How big is the market and how fast 
will it grow? 

4^ Which are the key buying agencies? 

4- What are users looking for? 

4- Which agencies are awarding 
contracts now? 

4- What is the competition like, and 
how can you beat it? 


3 


You Have to Have INPUT’S New 
Federal Telecommunications Report! 


INPUT has just published a new report on the federal 
telecommunications market that gives you the specific 
market intelligence you need to understand overall 
trends, identify lucrative contract opportunities, and 
avoid competitive pitfalls. 

And if you act before January 31 , 1 991 , 
you’ll pay $1 75 less than the regular list price 
for the report — a savings of 1 0 percent! 


Federal Telecommunications Market, 
1990-1995 

Market Analysis and Forecast 

• Federal Market Forces through 1995 

• Vendor Market Share and Competition 

• Technological Impacts 

• Policy and Regulatory Prospects 

Agency Requirements 

• Key Players in Regulations, Standards, and 
Policy 

• Agency Plans and Perspectives 

• Technology Trends 

Implications of FTS 2000 

• Status of Cutover 

• Sen/ice Scope Issues 

• Agency Understanding and Acceptance 

• Vendor Perceptions and Prospects 

Competitive Trends 

• The Marketplace 

• Federal Telecommunications Vendors 

• Vendor Federal Telecommunications Market 
Plans and Concerns 

• Recommendations 

Telecommunications Opportunities 

• Present and Future Programs 

• Recent Telecommunications Awards 

• Telecommunications Opportunities by Agency 


The report, entitled Federal Telecommunications Market, 
1990-1995, offers detailed insights into where the 
opportunities are today in this kaleidoscopic market. 
What can you do to benefit from FTS 2000? Which 
agencies are buying? What market forces are working 
against you, and what can you do about them? The 
report answers all of these questions, and many more 
on every aspect of selling these complex products and 
services to the government. 

Understanding Market Trends 

The report first gives telecommunications vendors 
detail^ forecasts for growth through 1995 for the 
market as a whole and for four major market 
segments: Leased Telecommunications, Professional 
Services, Telecommunications Hardware, and 
Network Services. 

With this as a cornerstone, the report then builds a 
complete foundation for your marketing plans to help 
you educate agencies about your products and 
services, and to help you understand the many forces 
driving or inhibiting market growth: L 

• What kind of impact will FTS 2000 have on you 
now that it is being implemented? 

• How do the standardization of GOSIP and the 
increasing interconnect abilities of federal systems 
affect the long-term prospects for growth? 

• How will agencies' desires for E-mail and EDI affect 
prospects for real growth? 

• Does the present budgetary climate affect those 
prospects? 

• How can you minimize the impacts of lengthy 
acquisition processes? 

• How large is the market today, and how will it 
change over the next five years? 

• Which segments will grow fastest? Slowest? 

• What proportion of the market is made up of leased 
telecommunications services, professional services, 
network services, and hardware? 

• Who are the major competitors in this arena, and 
what are they doing right? 

The report also offers an entire chapter devoted to the 
impacts of FTS 2000 on agency procurement plans, 
standards adoption, and market opportunities. ( | 


INPUT* 


1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560, Vienna, VA 22182 Tel. (703) 847-6870 

Fax (703) 847-6872 


Dear Colleague: 

If you are going to exploit the federal telecommunications market opportunity to the 
fullest, you are going to need a lot more than just the right product or service at the 
right price. 

You're going to need information. 

What are agencies looking for from vendors these days? How can you benefit from the 
implementation of FTS 2000? What are your competitors doing? Who's buying now, 
and what are they paying? 

INPUT has just released a report designed from the ground up to give you the answers 
to these questions and hundreds more like them. Entitled Federal Telecommunications 
Market, 1990-1995, the report gives you something that's hard to get: competitive 
intelligence based on strong, fost-hand data and analysis of all relevant documentary 
sources — public and not so public. 

Why settle for less? This is the kind of competitive edge you need to sell 
telecommunications products and services to the government in times like these. 

Get the facts. Then get tactical and strategic analysis based on years of experience in 
this market. Get a copy of INPUT'S report. Federal Telecommunications Market, 1990-1995, 
today. 


Regards, 



John Frank 

President, INPUT, INC. 





1 









ORDER FORM 


I have to know what's going on in the federal telecommunications market. I need 
INPUT'S report. Federal Telecommunications Market, 1990-1995. 

I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send 
this form by mail. I understand that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 



SECTION ONE: Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S report, 

MY ORDER Federal Telecommunications Market, 1990-1995 at the fee of 

$1,750 each. 


SECTION TWO: □ Enclosed is my check for $ to cover the cost of my order. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

(CHOOSE ONE) □ Charge $ to my American Express card: 

Card # 

Exp. date 

Name as it appears on my card 

A Signature 

^ □ Please invoice my company for $ on purchase order 

number . 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041-1194 
Tel. (415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organizaiian 

signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


Signaure Dale 

(SEE TERMS OTHER SIDE) FrTE4 1 2/90 



INPUT 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or 
person — including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations — without written consent of 
INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under 
this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, 
INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. 


INPUT 


INPUT 


Federal Professional Services 
Telecommunications Market 
Percent by Submode, 1990-1995 


(Percent) 






Systems 

Civilian 

18 

'^////\^ 

8 

Development 





Defense 


7 


Civilian 

27 

15 

Systems 


v7777777/z// 34 

Integration 





Defense 

33 

14 





Systems 

Civilian 

TTTTT^TTAz'i 

14 

Operations 


^§3g3888888888888888888^ 35 



Defense 

41 

15 





Design/ 

Civilian 

>99999W 1 t) 

2^10 

3 

Consulting 





Defense 

Vz 


3 





Education/ 

Civilian 

56888888! 1 5 

2:^11 

4 

Training 

Defense ^ 

5 

1 1 1 1 

4 


1990 


□ 1995 


10 20 30 40 50 

Percent 


• Which agencies are the key 
telecommunications users, and what 
are their buying plans for the next 
five years? 

• What will their leasing expenditures 
be for GFY1990 and 1991? 

• What are their preferred methods for 
acquiring new or enhanced 
telecommunications? 

• What are the specific trends in 
spending for voice, leased circuits, 
VANs, hardware, and software? 

• What are the 51 most recent 
telecommunications contract 
awards? Who won them? What is 
their dollar value? 

The report also discusses other 
opportunities compiled from INPUT'S 
exhaustive research into the A-1 1 
submissions to OMB, the OMB/GSA/ 
NIST Five-Year Plan, and 
documentation not generally available 
to the public, such as the Five-Year 
Defense Plan. 


IN ADDITION TO PINPOINTING federal user requriements and contract 
opportunities, the report offers detailed analyses of market segments by 
submode, giving vendors a crystal-clear picture of where the market 
opportunities are. 


Highlighting Opportunities 

In addition to detailed analyses of the forces that 
shape the telecommunications markets, the report 
devotes chapters to addressing questions of user 
requirements and actual telecommunications contract 
opportunities that have immediate and significant 
impacts on your day-to-day business: 

• What are the major trends in the requirements of 
federal users? 


INPUT'S research team, with decades of 
experience in federal telecommuni- 
cations, has interviewed the major 
players, read the regulations, and 
combed the RFPs. And now they are 
putting the results of their labor at your fingertips in a 
single, concentrated volume of sharply focused 
research into this dynamic market 

INPUT'S Federal Telecommunications Market, 1990-1995 
gives you the market intelligence you need to compete 
successfully. Use the enclosed form to order your 
copy today. 





Which vendor characteristics are becoming more 
important to users? Less important? 


Call, fax, or mail your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



INPUT 


About INPUT 

INPUT provides planning information, analysis, and recommendations to managers 
and executives in the information processing industries. Through market research, 
technology forecasting, and competitive analysis, INPUT supports client ^ 

management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, proprietary research/consulting, 
merger/acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to users and 
vendors of information systems and services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, communications, and systems/ 
software maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have more than 20 years' experience in 
their areas of specialization. Most have held senior management positions in 
operations, marketing, or planning. This expertise enables INPUT to supply 
practical solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, INPUT has become a leading 
international research and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 of the 
world's largest and most technically advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 


North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

Atrium at Glenpointe 
400 Frank W. Burr Blvd. 

Teaneck, NJ 07666 

Tel. (201) 801-0050 Fax (201) 801-0441 

Washington, D.C, 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England f 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 V 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 
Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 
Fax (33-1)42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 3864-0531 Fax (03) 3864-4114 



MAREC 12/90 



INPUT 




Trends in Processing Services— 
Western Europe, 1990-1995 



THE 1990s WILL BRING A MAJOR 
RESTRUCTURING OF THE 
TRANSACTION PROCESSING 
MARKET. 


Use INPUT'S report to 


• Evaluate the effect of restructuring in the 
market. 

• Learn important country differences — 
essential if you are intending to set up a 
pan-European infrastructure. 

• Discover the technological issues driving 
and inhibiting the market. 

• Discover how end-user pressures are 
changing the market — essential for 
meeting clients' requirements. 

j « Find out how to adapt your service to 
I remain competitive in the 1990s . 


Despite a decline 
in growth rate in 
the processing 
services sector 
over recent years, 
there are still 
opportunities 
worth over 
$7.8 billion. 


(C 


Processing Services—A Sector 
Facing Change 


The processing services market will undergo a 
major restructuring in the 1990s, and it is vital 
for European vendors to know what effect this 
will have on them, so that they can plan ahead. 

INPUT'S report Trends in Processing Services — 
Western Europe, 1990-1995 describes the current 
market climate and highlights market 
differences in 13 European countries. These 
changes will affect all country markets, but will 
be particularly significant in Scandinavian 
countries where processing accounts for a 
relatively large market share. The market will 
also be affected by the impact of these changes 
on the captive revenues of the closed 
user-group processing centres in Germany and 
Scandinavia. 

The availability of more software on faster and 
cheaper hardware platforms has led to a decline 
in the growth rate in the processing services 
sector of the European software and service 
market. However, INPITT believes that there are 
still significant opportunities available for 
vendors. 

The report provides valuable guidance in a 
market — because of a marked decline in 
growth — where it is particularly important to 
be informed about opportunities. 

INPUT'S report provides the following: 

• Vendor rankings according to 1989 
revenues, by country 

• Percentage of market share for each 
vendor 

• Forecasts for growth — 1990-1995 — for 
Western Europe as a whole and by country 

This data is invaluable for assessing the country 
markets that provide the best opportunities and 


Evolution of Competitive Edge 



for tracking competitors. The report also 
describes factors influencing each country 
market. 

Service Concept 

The processing services market is becoming 
more competitive, as vendor companies are not 
only competing with each other, but also with 
IS departments of user organisations. There 
have been significant changes in the processing 
environment from the batch processing and 
timesharing services of ten years ago. It is now 
crucial for vendors to diversify into other areas. 
INPUT'S report discusses some specific 
applications and recommends strategies for 
extending capability into new applications — for(^ 
example, how payroll processing can be 
developed into a human resources system. 


INPUT 



Trends 

INPUT'S report discusses the technological 
issues affecting the market, such as: 

• Cost/ performance ratio of equipment 

• The effect of workstations and UNIX 


• The effect of higher-level languages and 
their potential to enable users to solve 
systems problems in-house. 


The above issues could be viewed as threats to 
the processing services market. INPUT'S report 
describes how to turn these potential threats 
into opportunities. 

User Base 



The user base for processing services is 
changing as a result of European 
deregulation — merger and acquisition activity 
is creating larger companies seeking larger 
markets and greater efficiency. Vendors are 
having to adapt in the same way as the client 
base. 


Find out: 


• How deregulation in Europe is affecting 
the user base and forcing vendors to adapt 
accordingly 


• Whether outsourcing is a reality, or 
whether the reverse is true — a return to 
in-house processing 


• Which issues vendors view as particular 
challenges 


• The essential elements of successful 
transaction processing 


I 


REPORT CONTENTS 


Market Forecast 


• Market Size and Forces 

• Regional Differences 


Country Markets 


• Austria 

• Netherlands 

• Belgium 

• Norway 

• Denmark 

• Spain 

• Finland 

• Sweden 

* France 

• Switzerland 

• Germany 

* United Kingdom 

• Italy 

• Rest of Europe 

End-User Environment 


• The Service Concept 

• The Changing Environment 

• Service Opportunities 


Applications 


• Applications features and examples 


Trends 


• Technological threats and 

opportunities 

• Impact of end-user markets 

• Outsourcing 

• Vendor challenges 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialisation. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 


Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 




INPUT OFFICES 


North America 


International 


San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 
Tel. (703) 847-6870 
Fax (703) 847-6872 


London 

Piccadilly House, 33/37 Regent Street 

London SWl Y 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, West Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 

Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 



1 


INPUT 


If You Compete in the Processing 
Services Markets. . . 



> What is the market’s overall 
size and growth rate? 

I Which segments of the 
market are growing fastest? 
Slowest? 

I How are user demands 
changing processing 
services? 

> What successful strategies 
are other vendors using? 

I What do their five-year 
financials look like? 


INPUT’S Processing Services Market Survey ^ 
Can Give You the Edge You Need 


It's a market that continues to astound the nay- 
sayers. For years, people have said processing 
services were dead. And for years, processing 
services vendors have had an unbroken record of 
profitable growth. 

INPUT has just published a report that gives you 
carefully researched, up-to-the-minute 
information on what's going on in processing 
services, and how you can be sure to participate in 
the market's steady growth. 


U.S. Processing Services Markets 
1989-1994 

Processing Services 

• Issues and Trends 

• Market Forecasts 

• Mergers and Acquisitions 

Transaction Processing Services 

• Overview 

• Sector Markets 

Utility Processing Services 

• Issues and Trends 

• Market Forecasts 

Other Processing Services 

• Issues and Trends 

* Market Forecasts 

Systems Operations 

• Issues and Trends 

• Market Forecasts 

• Competitive Environment 

Vendor Activities and Profiles 

• Vendor Activities 

• Public Company Performance 

• Vendor Profiles 


And if you act before June 15, 1990, 
you’ll pay $250 less than the regular list price 
for the report— a savings of 10%! 

The report, US. Processing Services Markets, 1989- 
1994, provides in-depth analyses of the trends and 
market forces shaping the future growth of four 
different processing services markets; 

• Transaction Processing Services, in seven of 
the fastest growing vertical markets: discrete 
manufacturing, banking and finance, insurance, 
medical, telecommunications, transportation, 
and human resources 

• Utility Processing Services, generalized 
services customers use to perform a range of 
processing and to develop and run custom 
programs 

• Other Processing Services, including (' 

specialized services like output microfilm, 
disaster recovery, and scanning 

• Systems Operations, facilities management 
using vendor-supplied systems 

For each of these service delivery modes, INPUT'S 
survey gives a five-year market forecast, 
investigates the forces acting on the market to 
enhance or inhibit its growth, and analyzes 
leading vendors' product offerings, strategies, and 
financial profiles. 

The report answers the following kinds of 
questions: i 

• What role has the demand for innovative 
industry-specific applications had in shaping 
today's services vendors? 

• How is the trend toward outsourcing growing, 
and how can vendors take advantage of the 
success enjoyed by IBM, EDS, and Litton? 

• Why has the development of PCs and high- 

powered workstations not killed demand for / 
processing services? ^ 

• How are vendors addressing customer 
objections about lack of control? 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street, Mountain View, CA 94041 
415-961-3300 Fax 415-961-3966 


Dear Colleague: 

Do you need intelligence on the relative size and growth rates of 
processing services markets, by delivery mode and market 
segment? Would you like to know how successful vendors are 
responding to the advent of ISDN, mergers and acquisitions, 
transborder data flow restrictions, and the looming new market 
for consumer processing services? 

INPUT has just released the newest volume of its respected 
annual survey, U.S. Processing Services Markets, 1989-1994. The 
report provides processing services vendors with timely and 
exhaustively researched market intelligence on the trends, forces, 
and players shaping the future of processing services. 

The report is based on interviews with more than 500 information 
services vendors, including nearly all of the 250 largest 
companies. The information in those interviews can give a 
distinct competitive advantage to all processing services 
marketers, no matter what their size, product orientation, or 
geographic location. 

You need more than guesswork on these issues. You need hard 
data and thoroughgoing analysis of all the factors affecting these 
changing markets. 


INPUT'S new leport offers you all of that. 



Director, Market Analysis Program 


Order it today. 





FI . , , .•* .. ’'I-I B»» , : ,1,1 -r 


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■V * I ^0^ 

-4^ A 

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ORDER FORM 


YES! I need a competitive edge in the processing services markets. Send me a copy of 
INPUT'S newest report, U.S. Processing Services Markets, 1989-1994. 

I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send this form 
by mail. I understand that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 


SECTION ONE: Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S report, 

MY ORDER jj ^ Processing Services Markets^ 1989-1994. 

□ I want to pay $2,250, a savings of $250 off the regular price. I'm ordering 
before June 15, 1990. 

□ I'm ordering after June 15, 1990, for the regular price of $2,500. 


SECTION TWO: □ Enclosed is my check for $ to cover the cost of my order. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

(CHOOSE ONE) □ Charge $ to my American Express card: 

Card # 

Exp. date 

Signature 

□ Bill my company for $ on purchase order number 


California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 
Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Tlfle 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


SignatuB C&te 

(SEE TERMS OTHER SIDE) MAN1 S90 


INPUT 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or 
person — including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations — without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information 
provided under this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be 
accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result 
from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the 
right to change or modify the content of the program in response to changing client 
requirements. 


INPUT 




• How will international restrictions 
on transborder data flow affect the 
globalization of the processing 
services industry? 

• Why have some vendors failed to 
adequately control the costs of 
processing services? 

• How are vendors expanding their 
product mix to include software 
products, turnkey systems, systems 
integration, and professional 
services? 


Processing Services 
Vertical and Cross-Industry Markets 
1989-1994 


Vertical 

Markets 



Cross- Industry 
and Other 
Markets 



□ 1989 
^ 1994 


U.S. User Expenditures ($ Billions) 


THE SHIFT AWAY from cross-industry processing services to services more 
closely targeted to specific vertical markets is clear in this graph from 
INPUT’S newest survey of the processing services markets. 


And more... 

Comprehensive 

In addition to thoughtful analyses of 
•ge-scale issues and market trends, 

)pUT's research staff spent 
hundreds of hours putting together 
one of the most comprehensive and 
authoritative collections of market survey data 
ever gathered for processing services. 

INPUT'S data base gives vendors a long look into 
how the size and growth rates of significant 
markets and vendors are changing, including: 


Will ISDN be a help or a hindrance to processing 
services providers? How can mergers and 
acquisitions affect your performance? How will 
your company exploit the tremendous 
opportunities afforded by consumer processing 
services? 


• How will the annual growth percentages 
(nominal, deflator, and real) change over the 
next five years? 

• How will the relative rankings of back-office 
processing, credit card processing, and credit 
authorization change in the banking industry 
over the next five years? 

• How will the massive expenditures on turnkey 
systems open the market for systems operation 
services in the medical market? 

• What are the industry and geographic markets 
of the largest processing services vendors? 

^hat are their various revenue sources? 

• What are their key products and services? 


INPUT'S report, U.S. Processing Services Markets, 
1989-1994, gives you the answers that can provide 
a competitive edge in processing services. 

Use the enclosed form to order your copy today! 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 




About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/ software maintenance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supplj' practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 


INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWIY 4NF, England 
(071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


MAN1 5/90 








INPUT 



Do You Need Good Information on 
the Network Services Markets? 



I How big is the network 
services market and how 
fast is it growing? 

I How have EDI, ISDN, and 
cellular technology altered 
the market? 

I What are the RBOCs doing 
in network services? 

I What impacts will high- 
bandwidth fiber optic 
networking have? 

I What parts of network 
services are growing 
fastest? 


INPUT’S New Report Has It 


The explosive market for networking and data 
communications services has challenged 
marketers for years. It's been simply too 
fragmented, too fast-changing, too legally and 
technically intricate to pin down easily. 

But now INPUT, one of the most respected names 
in computer industry market research, has 
released a new survey called U.S. Network Services 
Markets, 1989-1994. The report covers the entire 
range of technological and market developments 
in network services and gives you an effective tool 
for gaining competitive advantage in specific 
network markets. 

This report is the latest edition of INPUT'S 
respected survey of this sector of the information 
services market. . 


U.S. Network Services Markets 
1989-1994 

Network Services Market 

• Issues and Trends 

• Regional Bell Operating Company Activities 

• Market Forecasts 

• Network Services Vendor Profiles 

Electronic Data Interchange Market 

• Market Developments 

• EDI Market Forecast 

• Significant Events and Trends 

• Opportunities and Recommendations 

Electronic Information Services Market 

• Market Developments 

• Electronic Information Services Vendors 

• EIS Vendor Profiles 


And if you act before June 29, 1990, 
you’ll pay $250 less than the regular list price 
for the report— a savings of 10%! 

The far-reaching technological developments of 
the last few years have made the network services 
market much more difficult to summarize and 
understand. INPUT'S report gives you five 
different kinds of information that help you 
analyze the essential dynamics of the market: 

• A review of driving forces and trends for three 
market areas: network services, network 
application services, and electronic information 
services 

• Calculations of market sizes and growth rates 

• Profiles of leading vendors 

• An in-depth look at EDI 

• A survey of electronic information services 

markets ^ 

Strategic Issues 

The forces at work on these markets raise 
significant questions for vendors' present and 
future market position and strategies: 

• How has the pressure for product 
differentiation affected the competitive 
environment, and how can you profit from it? 

• How fast will the market for consumer-oriented 
network services evolve, and how should you 
respond? 

• How will industry consolidation influence 
pricing? Competition? Product differentiation? 

• What role will EDI play in the new services 
marketplace, and how will it affect you? 

• Will the RBOCs be major competitive factors in 
the future? What are their strengths and 
weakenesses? 

• How will the development of digital virtual 
private networks (VPNs) and metropolitan a | 
networks (MANs) provide new product 
development opportimities? 


INPUT 


Competitive Analysis 

The report also concentrates on the particulars of 
network services and gives you careful market 
analyses, projections, and in-depth profiles of 
major vendors. INPUT utilizes its years of 
research and consulting experience to produce 
information that will help you answer some of the 
most crucial questions about these companies and 
new technologies: 

• What parts of the market are growing fastest 
and how can you benefit? 

• How has low-cost PC and CD ROM technology 
affected the market potential for on-line data 
base services? 

• How are the largest and most successful 
vendors in these markets responding to market 
and technological change? 

• How are giants like Dow Jones and Dun & 
^radstreet handling the completely new 
^allenges coming from entities like the RBOCs? 

The report answers these and many other 
questions about issues that can have a profound 
effect on the most important business of all in the 
network services arena — yours. 

Network services has long been touted as one of 
the hottest segments in the information services 
market, but practical and closely reasoned market 
analysis has always been difficult. INPUT has 
solved that problem, producing a report based on 
interviews with 500 vendors, including nearly all 
of the 250 largest. INPUT took that research data 
base and packaged it in a terse, no-nonsense 
report that takes a hard look at the kinds of 
questions you have to answer every day. 

The Future of Network Services 

Will remote network management services be a 
major delivery mode in the near future? Will 
network service providers feel the heat of the 
merger and acquisitions game? Will the 
^othetical global communications infrastructure 
be completed anytime soon, and what kinds of 
product development opportunities will that 
infrastructure give vendors? 


EDI Network Services Market 



Year 


THE DRAMATIC RISE in end-user expenditures on 
electronic data interchange is evident in this graph from 
Chapter IV. 


INPUT'S report, U.S. Network Services Markets, 
1989-1994, was conceptualized, researched, and 
written to give you straight answers to these 
questions and many others that could change the 
way you do business. 

INPUT would like to give you a competitive 
advantage in one of the most competitive markets 
in the world. 

Use the enclosed form to order your copy today! 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPLJT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 


Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and sei'vices (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 



INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

Headquarters 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

(415)961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(071)493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


MAN2 5/90 


INPUT 



If You Have Questions about 
Success In the Turnkey Systems 
Markets . . . 



> How are standards 
changing the marketing 
rules? 

> How big are these 
markets? How fast are 
they growing? 

> How can marketers avoid 
the commodity-pricing 
crunch? 

> Are support services a 
competitive advantage? 

> Which vendors are 
succeeding, and why? 


...INPUT Can Give You the Answers! ( 


To make the right decisions in turnkey systems 
markets these days, you have to have targeted 
intelligence on market size and growth rates, 
major trends, and successful vendor strategies. 

INPUT'S new report on U.S. Turnkey Systems 
Markets, 1989-1994, a powerful competitive 
weapon, gives you all of that market intelligence, 
and more. 

And if you act before May 15, 1990, 
you’ll pay $250 less than the regular list price 
for the report— a savings of 10%! 


U.S. Turnkey Systenns Markets 
1989-1994 

Market Size and Forecast 
Issues and Trends 
Value-Added Reseller Survey 

• Hardware/Software Platform Support 

• Selection Criteria 

• Platform Vendor Support Characteristics 

• Distribution Channel Conflict 

• Value-Added Product Features 

• Product Support Provided by Turnkey 
Systems Vendors 

• Marketing Approach 

• Geographical Markets 

• Product Expansion Plans 

• VAR Market Issues 

• Successful Turnkey Systems Strategies 

• Profitability and Revenue Growth 

• Competition 


Competitive Environment 
Supporting VARS 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


The report is a distillation of months of research 
designed to help turnkey systems companies 
shape successful business strategies by answering 
crucial questions about their markets: 

• How large will the turnkey systems markets be 
in five years, and how fast are they growing? 

• What are the aggregate revenues of turnkey 
systems vendors by company size, and what are 
their growth rates? 

• What are the fastest growing segments of the 
turnkey systems markets, by mode of delivery 
and by product and service components? 

Which segments are growing slowest? 

• What are the relative sizes and growth rates for 
industry-specific and cross-industry markets? 

• Exactly how large a share of the total market is 
accounted for by network services? By 
application software? By professional services? 

This market data alone would be a powerful 
argument for obtaining INPUT'S report. But w^ 
give you even more. 

Market Trends, Vendor Profiles 

The turnkey systems markets have been in a state 
of flux recently, reacting to major technological 
and business trends. U.S. Turnkey Systems Markets, 
1989-1994, tracks those trends for you, analyzing 
how they are developing and how they are likely 
to affect your business: 

• Standardization has opened doors to growth, at 
the same time as it has put tremendous 
downward pressure on platform prices. INPUT 
examines how you can turn these contrary 
forces to your advantage. 

• Channel conflict has become a major challenge 
for turnkey systems vendors. INPUT shows 
how some innovative lead-distribution and 
joint-marketing programs are turning conflicts 
into profitable collaborations. 

• Tiered pricing offers advantages and 
disadvantages to almost every link in the 
distribution chain. INPUT analyzes the pros ( 
and cons for all parties. 



• Cross-matching is one strategy for 
broadening your product offerings. 
INPUT points out some benefits, 
and some little-known pitfalls. 

These are only a few of the trends 
treated in detail. Others include 
product and service extensions, 
strategic alliances, cooperation with 
consultants, gray market competition, 
and more. 


In addition to market trends, INPUT'S 
report also provides a thorough 
analysis of the competitive 
environment, including detailed 
analyses of the major players in the 
market: 


* Who are the leading turnkey 
systems vendors? 

* What strategies work best in this 
ijiarket for sales? For distribution? 

* rv^hat do Autodesk, WordPerfect 
Corp., Neuron Data, Sybase, and 
other successful vendors have in 
common? 


Turnkey Systems Industry-Specific Markets, 

1989-1994 


Telecommunications 





Insurance 



Transportation 


Other 

State and Local 
Government 

Education 


Utilities 



User Expenditures ($ Millions) 


USER EXPENDITURES for turnkey systems vary widely across various 
industries. INPUT’S report pinpoints the size and growth rates of these 
expenditures for you. 


• How important are reliability, product quality, 
product availability, and open systems 
architecture for turnkey systems products? 

• How have the stocks of public turnkey systems 
companies performed in the recent past? 

• What are the products of major market players? 

• What have their revenues been over the past 
three years? 

• What are their geographic markets, their 
industry markets, their hardware platforms, 
their service and warranty policies? 

And much more about the companies that in 
many cases are leading the changes sweeping 
these markets. 

How those changes affect your company 
is up to you. You will make the decisions. How 
prmed those decisions are will depend on the 
quality of the market intelligence you can get. 

INPUT gives you the best. 


INPUT'S U.S. Turnkey Systems Markets, 1989-1994, 
puts the resources of one of the most respected 
authorities on turnkey systems at your fingertips. 
It gives you the answers you need. 

So get the market intelligence you have to have, 
and save 10 percent off regular list price. Use the 
enclosed order form to order your copy today! 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 





About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research/consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


INPUT OFFICES 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWIY 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 
Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 

4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 

Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan ' 

(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 

MAN3 4/90 




INPUT 



Special Report 


Do You Want To 
Find Out How the 
Economic Slowdown Is 
^ Changing Your Market? 


How has the slowdown 
changed companies’ 
purchase plans? 

How has it changed their 
spending plans? 

What are the recent trends 
in IS budgets, by industry? 

How should vendors and 
users react to the 
slowdown? 


A Special Report from INPUT Details 
the Impacts of Economic Downturn 
on Your Business 


Reacting to recent recessionary economic figures, 
INPUT has gone outside its planned research 
program to publish a Special Report on the likely 
impacts of the coming downturn. 

Entitled The 1990-1991 U.S. Economic Slowdown: 
Impacts on Information Systems Budgets and 
Spending, the report covers in detail recessionary 
effects on systems and applications software; 
systems integration and operation; turnkey 
systems; and network, professional, and 
processing services. 


The 1990-1991 U.S. Economic 
Slowdown: Impacts on Information 
Systems Budgets and Spending 








Recession Impacts in General 

Organizationwide Planning and Spending 
Information Systems Budget Trends 
Forecast of Impacts on 1991 Spending 
Internal Information Systems Spending 
External Information Services Spending 

Recession Impacts by Industry 


Manufacturing 

Banking/Finance 

Distribution 

Transportation 


Insurance 
State/Local Gov't. 
Services 
More... 


Conclusions and Recommendations 


Implications for Information Systems Users 
Implications for Information Services Vendors 

Demographics of Survey 


But INPUT doesn't stop there. In a three-part 
organizational structure, the report first analyzes 
the general effects of the downturn. Secondly, it 
presents in-depth, industry-by-industry profiles 
to present a picture of the slowdown's effects on 
specific sectors of the economy. And thirdly, the 
report offers an expanded chapter containing 
INPUT'S conclusions about the implications of a 
slowdown for IS users and for IS vendors. 

A Substantial Savings 

This report is a custom research effort designed to 
answer questions likely to have far-reaching 
impacts on how you do business. INPUT'S data- 
gathering machinery gives you the facts you need 
to make informed decisions. 

But you reap benefits beyond facts when you buy 
this report: you get the insights of industry C 
experts who have seen, quantified, and analyzed 
many downturns in all relevant sectors of the 
economy. 

Having this data and analysis at your fingertips 
would be a cost-effective tool at the regular retail 
price of $1,995 for the report. 

But if you act before January 1 5, 1 991 , 
you’ll pay $300 less than that regular list price 
— a savings of 1 5 percenti 

Crucial Questions 

INPUT has surveyed 100 organizations in many 
industry sectors to ask them the crucial questions 
about how companies that buy information 
services are planning to meet the challenge of the 
slowdown. The report asks each of the following 
questions, first about the market as a whole, and 
then again about each major vertical industry — 
Banking /Finance, Insurance, State and Local 
Government, Discrete Manufacturing, Process 
Manufacturing, Retail Distribution, Wholesale 
Distribution, and Transportation, among others, i 


Recession Impact on 
Applications Development Plans 



j I 1 I I I I I I I 


0 20 40 60 80 100 

Percent of Respondents 


This research protocol gives readers an 

unprecedented look at the general impacts of the 

impending slowdown, and the more specific 
^effects on particular markets. The questions the 

report asks include: 

• What are the specific impacts of recession on 
use of external information services? 

• What are the specific plans of industries to 
obtain information services from outside 
vendors in 1991? 

• Are companies using recessionary scenarios in 
their planning? 

• If a recession happens, what are the likely 
impacts on specific information services? 

• What are the leading organization-wide 
spending restrictions in place now? 

• What will they be in 1991? 

• Are information budgets up or down, and what 
forces are driving the trends? 

• What are the three-year trends in system 
budgets from 1989 to 1991? What forces are 
driving those trends? 

I 


•Whatarethe IK.IDI ITT* 

significant budget 1 1 | 

changes from 1990 

to 1991 in staffing, 

hardware, 

software, outside 

services, and 

telecommunications? 

• How are the multiyear trends in outside 
services budgets dovetailing with the multiyear 
system trend toward downsizing from 
mainframes to workstation-based client/ server 
networks? 

Each of these questions is answered in two 
different ways: for the overall market as a whole 
and for eight specific industries. The result 
provides an unprecedented picture — in general 
and in particular — of how the slowdown might 
affect your business during the next 12 months. 

In short, this rep)ort offers research that can give 
you a tremendous competitive advantage in 
shaping your own plans in a troubling economic 
environment. 

The Hottest Available Research 

This report, published in December of 1990, 
contains information that was collected, 
tabulated, and analyzed in November. It 
therefore represents the most accurate possible 
portrayal of how the markets in general, and 
various specific industries in particular, are 
changing their information services purchase 
plans to meet the demands of a changing 
economic picture. 

This is the hottest research available to 
information services users and vendors right 
now — ^because INPUT is the only company to 
have initiated a comprehensive crash research 
program about a question that could have 
profound impacts on every aspect of your 
business. 

And all you have to do to put this research to 
work for your company is use the enclosed order 
form to get your copy of the report today! 


Call, 1^ or mall your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



INPUT- About INPUT 

INPUT provides planning information, analysis, and recommendations to managers 
and executives in the information processing industries. Through market research,( 
technology forecasting, and competitive analysis, INPUT supp>orts client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, proprietary research/consulting, 
merger/acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to users and 
vendors of information systems and services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, communications, and systems/ 
software maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have more than 20 years' experience in 
their areas of specialization. Most have held senior management positions in 
operations, marketing, or planning. This expertise enables INPUT to supply 
practical solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, INPUT has become a leading 
international research and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 of the 
world's largest and most technically advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 


North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

Atrium at Glenpwinte 
400 Frank W. Burr Blvd. 

Teaneck, NJ 07666 

Tel. (201) 801-0050 Fax (201) 801-0441 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/ 37 Regent Street , 

London SWl Y 4NF, England V 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 
Tel. (33-1)42 77 42 77 
Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 



MAREC 12/90 



INPUT 



Special Report 


Do You Want To 
Find Out How the 
Economic Slowdown Is 
^ Changing Your Market? 


How has the slowdown 
changed companies’ 
purchase plans? 

How has it changed their 
spending plans? 

What are the recent trends 
in IS budgets, by industry? 

How should vendors and 
users react to the 
slowdown? 




A Special Report from INPUT Details 
the Impacts of Economic Downturn 
on Your Business 


Reacting to recent recessionary economic figures, 
INPUT has gone outside its planned research 
program to publish a Special Report on the likely 
impacts of the coming downturn. 

Entitled The 1990-1991 US. Economic Slowdown: 
Impacts on Information Systems Budgets and 
Spending, the report covers in detail recessionary 
effects on systems and applications software; 
systems integration and operation; turnkey 
systems; and network, professional, and 
processing services. 


The 1990-1991 U.S. Economic 
Slowdown: Impacts on Information 
Systems Budgets and Spending 


Recession Impacts in General 

• Organizationwide Planning and Spending 

• Information Systems Budget Trends 

• Forecast of Impacts on 1991 Spending 

• Internal Information Systems Spending 

• External Information Services Spending 


Recession Impacts by Industry 


* Manufacturing 

• Insurance 

• Banking/Finance 

• State/Local Gov't. 

• Distribution 

• Services 

• Transportation 

• More... 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


• Implications for Information Systems Users 

• Implications for Information Services Vendors 


Demographics of Survey 


But INPUT doesn't stop there. In a three-part 
organizational structure, the report first analyzes 
the general effects of the downturn. Secondly, it 
presents in-depth, industry-by-industry profiles 
to present a picture of the slowdown's effects on 
specific sectors of the economy. And thirdly, the 
report offers an expanded chapter containing 
INPUT'S conclusions about the implications of a 
slowdown for IS users and for IS vendors. 


A Substantial Savings 


This report is a custom research effort designed to 
answer questions likely to have far-reaching 
impacts on how you do business. INPUT'S data- 
gathering machinery gives you the facts you need 
to make informed decisions. 


But you reap benefits beyond facts when you buj^ 
this report: you get the insights of industry ' 
experts who have seen, quantified, and analyzed 
many downturns in all relevant sectors of the 
economy. 


Having this data and analysis at your fingertips 
would be a cost-effective tool at the regular retail 
price of $1,995 for the report. 

But if you act before February 28, 1 991 , 
you’ll pay $300 less than that regular list price 
— a savings of 1 5 percent! 

Crucial Questions 

INPUT has surveyed 100 organizations in many 
industry sectors to ask them the crucial questions 
about how companies that buy information 
services are planning to meet the challenge of the 
slowdown. The report asks each of the following 
questions, first about the market as a whole, and 
then again about each major vertical industry — 
Banking /Finance, Insurance, State and Local 
Government, Discrete Manufacturing, Process 
Manufacturing, Retail Distribution, Wholesale ^ 
Distribution, and Transportation, among others. 




Recession Impact on 
Applications Deveiopment Pians 


Accelerate 


Delay 


Cancel 



0 20 40 60 80 100 

Percent of Respondents 


This research protocol gives readers an 
unprecedented look at the general impacts of the 
Vilipending slowdown, and the more specific 
effects on particular markets. The questions the 
report asks include: 

• What are the specific impacts of recession on 
use of external information services? 

• What are the specific plans of industries to 
obtain information services from outside 
vendors in 1991? 

• Are companies using recessionary scenarios in 
their planning? 

• If a recession happens, what are the likely 
impacts on specific information services? 

• What are the leading organization-wide 
spending restrictions in place now? 


• What are the I 1 

significant budget 11^ I I 

changes from 1990 

to 1991 in staffing, 
hardware, 
software, outside 
services, and 
telecommunications? 

• How are the multiyear trends in outside 
services budgets dovetailing with the multiyear 
system trend toward downsizing from 
mainframes to workstation-based client/server 
networks? 

Each of these questions is answered in two 
different ways: for the overall market as a whole 
and for eight specific industries. The result 
provides an unprecedented picture — in general 
and in particular — of how the slowdown might 
affect your business during the next 12 months. 

In short, this report offers research that can give 
you a tremendous competitive advantage in 
shaping your own plans in a troubling economic 
environment. 

The Hottest Available Research 

This report, published in December of 1990, 
contains information that was collected, 
tabulated, and analyzed in November. It 
therefore represents the most accurate possible 
portrayal of how the markets in general, and 
various specific industries in particular, are 
changing their information services purchase 
plans to meet the demands of a changing 
economic picture. 

This is the hottest research available to 
information services users and vendors right 
now — because INPUT is the only company to 
have initiated a comprehensive crash research 
program about a question that could have 
profound impacts on every aspect of your 
business. 


• What will they be in 1991? 

• Are information budgets up or down, and what 
forces are driving the trends? 


And all you have to do to put this research to 
work for your company is use the enclosed order 
form to get your copy of the report today! 


• What are the three-year trends in system 
budgets from 1989 to 1991? What forces are 

thriving those trends? Call, fax, or mail your order to any 

INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



INPUT 


About INPUT 

INPUT provides planning information, analysis, and recommendations to managers 
and executives in the information processing industries. Through market research, 
technology forecasting, and competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, proprietary research/consulting, 
merger/acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to users and 
vendors of information systems and services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, communications, and systems/ 
software maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have more than 20 years' experience in 
their areas of specialization. Most have held senior management positions in 
operations, marketing, or planning. This expertise enables INPUT to supply 
practical solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, INPUT has become a leading 
international research and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 of the 
world's largest and most technically advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 


North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

Atrium at Glenpointe 
400 Frank W. Burr Blvd. 

Teaneck, NJ 07666 

Tel. (201) 801-0050 Fax (201) 801-0441 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 (f 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 
Tel. (33-1)42 77 42 77 
Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 

Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 



MAREC 12/90 


«DATA /NEWLIST/XPROS . DOC 


April 1990 


INPUT 


PICCADILLY HOUSE 
33/37 REGENT STREET, LONDON SW1 Y 4NF 
TEL; (01 ) 493 9335 TELEX: 271 1 3 
FAX; (01 ) 629 01 79 


«NAME1» 
«NAME2» 
«NAME3» 
«ADDR1» 
«ADDR2 » 
«ADDR3» 


Dear «GREET» 


SOFTWARE AND SERVICES MARKETS - INSURANCE SECTOR 

European insurance companies are being forced to 
fundamentally rethink their whole approach to information 
systems as they face up to the need to create fully 
electronic systems to compete effectively in the 1990s. 
This rethink is being driven by EEC deregulation and the 
competitive moves of the banking establishment into the 
insurance field. This is leading to increased demand for 
software and services which is creating opportunties for 
vendors offering networking services, specialised 
software packages and professional services. 

INPUT has produced a new report which examines this 
rapidly changing environment: European Software and 
Services Market 1990-1995, Insurance Sector. In this 
report, INPUT estimates that the market for software and 
services in the banking sector will be worth $12 billion 
by 1995. 

The report provides you with: 

* Analysis of the insurance sector and the 
opportunities available for vendors in three 
areas : 

Life 

Non-life 

Reinsurance 

* Market breakdown and discussion of specific 
opportunties : 

By country 
By delivery mode 

* Discussion of regulatory issues 

* Mergers and acquisitions 

The activity in the insurance market will increase 
opportunities for software and services vendors. 


INPUT LTD. DIRECTORS: P.A. CUNNINGHAM (U.S.A.), P E. CUNNINGHAM. K.W.L. HOCKING, P. LINES 
Registered Office: ROLLS HOUSE, 7 ROLLS BUILDING, FETTER LANE. LONDON EC4A 1NH 

Registered in England No.: 1470416 


' (T 



1 ) 


Insurance companies lag behind the banks in information 
systems and networks, and in order to be competitive in a 
single market, many alliances have been taking place. 

This leads to the creation of large companies offering 
complete financial services product portfolios. 

Opportunites for vendors exist firstly to satisfy the 
needs of pan-European orientated companies to provides 
them with integrated information systems and networks. 
Secondly, vendors have an opportunity to provide software 
products and turnkey systems to increase competitiveness 
in local markets. Thirdly, insurance companies are 
looking for changes in distribution channels to improve 
their levels of service. 

INPUT'S report provides a comprehensive survey of the 
European insurance sector for software and service 
vendors. It will help you plan your future strategies 
whether you are already active in this market or planning 
to enter it for the first time. This report, available 
in June, is essential reading. 

I look forward to hearing from you. 

Yours sincerely 


Carol L. Nice 

Senior Marketing Analyst 

INPUT LTD 


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»TX»oy 





Order Form 


INPUT'S 

Research Studies 


Yes! 

Please enter my 
order as described: 


European Software and Services Market, 1990-1995 
Insurance Sector 


□ £1250 if ordered by 31 May 1990 

□ £1500 if ordered after 31 May 1990 


Standard delivery includes two copies of all reports issued. Clients may purchase additional copies 
at £550 per copy. 

□ Please send extra reports. 

□ Cheque enclosed in the amount of £ . 

□ Please invoice my company on purchase order number in the 

amount of £ . 

The total fee is due and payable upon authorisation. UK prices exclude VAT. 
CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENT 

The client agrees to hold as confidential all information provided by INPUT through this 
service. The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organisation or person 
outside of parent, subsidiary or affiliated organisations without written consent of INPUT. 

The client agrees to control access to the information provided to prevent unauthorised 
disclosure in violation of this agreement. 

INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this 
Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT shall 
have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the 
information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content of the program in 
response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT LTD. 

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Mane 

Name 

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Date 


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Opportunities for 

Software and Services Companies 

in the Insurance Sector 


Use this report to find out: 

• The size of the market for software and 
services in the insurance sector 

• Growth forecasts 

• The driving forces in the market 

• Insurance companies' priorities in software 
and services 

• Recommendations for vendors 



I insurance 
companies to 
become fully 
electronic in the 
1990s 

I Huge increase in 
demand for 
software and 
services 


Discover the Opportunities 

If your company is involved in marketing 
software and services to the insurance sector, you 
will already be aware of some of the issues facing 
insurance companies. Changes such as 
deregulation, extra competition from banks and 
rapid technological development are giving rise to 
an increased demand for software and services. 

However, do you know the demand for the 
products and services that your company 
provides? Are you aware of all the new 
opportunities that are arising? 

INPUT'S recent study of the insurance sector will 
provide you with the information you need to 
assess your company's position in the market. 

Specifically, you will learn; 

• Software and services spend in three sub- 
sectors: 

life 

non-life 

reinsurance 

• The demand for software and services for: 

mainframes 

minis 

PCs 

• Opportunities available for computer software 
and services vendors 

• Country market differences 


High Investment in IT by Insurance 
Companies 

The major opportunities for software and services 
vendors in the insurance sector in the 1990s will 
stem from the insurance industry's move to 
become fully electronic in the 1990s. Investment 
in IT is running at around 15% of insurance 
companies' operating expenses and this is likely to 
increase substantially over the next five years. 
Many companies are finding that the packaged 
solutions that they currently use are not flexible 
enough to cope with their growing information 
requirements. Insurance companies are offering a 
wider range of services now in order to compete 
with banks, which are entering their markets. 

Also, there is still enormous scope for reducing the 
volume of clerical tasks. 

All these factors represent significant 
opportunities for vendors. The more your 
company knows about this fast-growing market 
sector, the more successful it will be in taking 
advantage of these opportunities. 

Insurance companies do not only require systems 
to carry out basic functions such as claims 
registration and acknowledgement, third-party 
instructions, and claims payments. There are also 
a number of 'internal consumers' of technology, 
whose needs the report also addresses. An 
insurance company or broker deals with a number 
of different business areas, and as a result needs 
statistics to monitor trends. 


DEPARTMENT 

INFORMATION 

NEEDS 

Corporate Management 

• trends in complaints 

• renewal trends 

• average time between 
notification and settlement 

Underwriters 

• targeting specific groups 

• marketing profiles 

Marketing Department 

• current client profiles 

• new service opportunities 






Order Form 


INPUT'S 

Research Studies 


Yes! 

Please enter my 
order as described: 


European Software and Sei^vices Market, 1990-1995 
Insurance Sector report at the fee of $2,250 


TERMS OF PAYMENT 

Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current corporate 
structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person including 
parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises 
its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this Agreement and believes the 
information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss 
or expense which may result from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. 
INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content of the program in response to changing 
client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
(415) 961-3300 
Telex 171407 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


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MEVRO-IN 4/90 


INPUT 












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^mand for Services in a Fragmented 
X, market 

The Western European insurance market is very 
fragmented, and in order to survive in a single 
competitive market, many companies have been 
forming alliances. This fragmented market means 
that the software and services market has distinct 
national characteristics, and INPUT'S report will 
help you identify them. 

INPUT predicts that there will be enormous 
demand for a variety of software and services in 
the insurance sector over the next five years, and 
these are summarised below: 


KEY AREAS 

• Systems and network integration 

• Artificial intelligence 
^ • Expert systems 

• Network services 

• PC software 

• Turnkey systems 

• Application development tools 


If your company is active in any of these areas, 
INPUT'S report will assist you in applying them to 
the insurance market. 


Report Contents 

Insurance Industry in Europe 

• Life 

• Reinsurance 

• Market Factors 

Single Market — Fewer Players 

• Regulatory Environment 

• Country Markets 

• Strategic Positioning 

• A Growth Market 

• Mergers and Acquisitions 

Country Markets 

• France 

• U.K. 

• Germany 

• Italy 

• Spain 

Delivery Modes 

• Processing Services 

• Network Services 

• Software Products 

• Professional Services 

• Systems Integration 

• Turnkey Systems 

User Profiles 

User Issues 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


aHi 






About INPUT 




INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialisation. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 


INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(071)493-9335 
Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


MEVRO4/90 






INPUT 


Optimize software product strategy 
through targeting growth market 
opportunities... 


U.S. Software Products Market, 1989-1994 


Current and Prospective Software Vendors: 

• Forecast your potential market for the next five 
^ years 

• Maximize your R&D by focusing on the higher 
growth product opportunities for the 1990s 

• Increase your market share by effectively 
restructuring your software product strategy 

• Compete successfully by assessing your 
competitor's software strategies 

• Identify candidates for potential alliances and/ 
or mergers and acquisitions 

• Stay ahead by evaluating emerging 
technologies for incorporation into an 
integrated product strategy 

• Evaluate current software market issues for 
possible weaknesses in product positioning 

3 


CA, Sybase, Ingres, 
McCormack & Dodge, 
The Santa Cruz 
Operation, and more... 
are profiled in INPUT’S 
U.S. Software Market 
report 




About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialisation. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 


INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWIY 4NF, England 
(071)493-9335 
Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 

MEVRO 4/90 




INPUT 


Optimize software product strategy 
through targeting growth market 
opportunities... 


U.S. Software Products Market, 1989-1994 


Current and Prospective Software Vendors: 




• Forecast your potential market for the next five 
years 

• Maximize your R&D by focusing on the higher 
growth product opportunities for the 1990s 

• Increase your market share by effectively 
restructuring your software product strategy 

• Compete successfully by assessing your 
competitor's software strategies 

• Identify candidates for potential alliances and/ 
or mergers and acquisitions 

• Stay ahead by evaluating emerging 
technologies for incorporation into an 
integrated product strategy 

• Evaluate current software market issues for 
possible weaknesses in product positioning 


CA, Sybase, Ingres, 
McCormack & Dodge, 
The Santa Cruz 
Operation, and more... 
are profiled in INPUT’S 
U.S. Software Market 
report 


Information That’s CRUCIAL for Software 


INPUT'S U.S. Software Products Market, 1989-1994 
forecast is based on a survey of over 500 of the larger 
vendors of software products and in-depth discussions 
with over fifty company executives on trends and 
issues impacting the software products industry. In 
addition, research results from INPUT reviews of 
fifteen industry-specific and seven cross-industry 
markets, based on interviews with leading vendors 
and end users, are incorporated into this annual study 
of the U.S. software products industry. 

Both vendors and users can benefit from the analysis 
of the software products — market size and growth 
rates, market trends and issues, and the changing 
competitive environment — featured in this report. 

The U.S. software products market is maturing, 
reflected in slowing annual growth rates. The 
adjustment to a slower growth environment is being 
complicated by the requirements for increasing 
product complexity, global market positioning, and 
accelerating rates of software product obsolescence. 

The content of the report addresses the following 
questions related to the structural changes of the 
software products industry. 

What are the largest application 
software products markets, and what 
markets represent the higher growth 
opportunities? 

Much of the historical product development emphasis 
in the software products industry was on cross- 
industry (horizontal) solutions. Certain of these cross- 
industry markets now represent the larger, more 
mature software product sectors. However, there are 
still high growth market opportunities in several of the 
cross-industry sectors, which are identified in the 
report. 

Industry-specific (vertical) software products markets 
are receiving considerable attention, particularly from 
the large computer systems vendors, as part of a total 
solutions marketing strategy. Many vertical markets 
represent smaller niche market segments. The larger, 
faster growing vertical markets, which can provide 
sustained longer term growth, are highlighted in the 
report. 


Why will the systems software products 
market reflect a higher growth rate than 
the application software software 
markets in the 1990s? 

The application development tool market is projected 
to represent major product opportunities in the 1990s 
for independent software vendors, computer systems 
vendors, and professional services companies. The 
ability to develop quality software in a cost 
competitive manner will be a major factor for success 
in the software products markets of the 1990s. 

CASE, image processing, and voice recognition all 
represent technologies in early stages of development, 
with large market potential over the next ten years. 

Why should many software products 
companies have formal alliance and 
mergers and acquisitions programs? 

The software products industry is undergoing major 
structural changes which will continue well into the 
1990s. These relate to the maturing of particular 
market segments, accelerated R&D cost stemming 
from the increased product complexity of an 
integrated product requirement, and the rapid rate of 
change in hardware technology which is accelerating 
the pace of software product obsolescence. 

Also, the relative performance of the high technology 
sectors in recent years versus the broader market 
indexes reflects investors' perceptions of the maturing 
of this industry. The ability to raise capital for both 
new and mature software products companies 
through the traditional public markets has become 
much more difficult since the stock market 'crash' of 
October 1987. 

Increasingly, software company managers will be 
required to look to alternative methods for leveraging 
their technology, including marketing relationships 
and obtaining equity from nontraditional market 
sources. 

In addition, the larger computer systems, professiona’ 
services, and non-industry companies with strong 
financial and marketing capabilities are becoming 
much more aggressive in the software products 
markets. This is increasing the level of competition. 




INPUT 


1280 Villa Street, Mountain View, CA 94041 
415-961-3300 Fax 415-961-3966 


Optimize software product strategy hy 
targeting growth market opportunities 

The U.S. software products market overall growth is projected to 
slow modestly over the next five years as the industry continues to 
show signs of maturing. However, INPUT projects that this 
market will continue to provide strong growth opportunities in 
many software market sectors. 

INPUT projects that the systems software products market, in 
particular, will provide a number of high-growth product 
opportunities. 

The just-completed U.S. Software Products Market, 1989-1994, 
focuses on the reasons behind the slowing growth rate, identifies 
the product and market areas expected to provide the highest 
growth rate potential, and discusses strategies for maximizing 
growth opportunities within these software product markets. 


To receive your copy of this pivotal report, please mail or fax the 
enclosed order form, or call INPUT at (415) 961-3300. 

Best regards. 



Mary A. Raymond 
Senior Consultant 


Tuqn 


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A NEW REPORT FROM INPUT 


Optimize software product strategy by 
targeting growth market opportunities... 


Call, Mail or Fax Your Order Today 

Order Form INPUT'S Research Studies 

Yes! LT.S. Software Products Market, 1989-1994 report at 

Please enter my fgg $3 OQO 

order as described: 

SAVE $150 if check included with order 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

Payment in fiall is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

□ Charge $ to my American Express # . 

Exp. date Signature . 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current corporate 
structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person including 
parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises 
its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this Agreement and believes the 
information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss 
or expense that may result from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. 
INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content of the program in response to changing 
client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
(415) 961-3300 
Telex 171407 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By; 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Teleptxxie 


Sgnanjfe 


Date 


MAPP 12/89dm 

INPUT 




INPUT 


Success in the 1990s 


The report outlines approaches for both independent software developers and computer systems vendors to 
maximize product opportunities within this changing environment. 


U.S. Software Products Market, 1989-1994 

Market Size and Forecasts 

• Overall market, 1989-1994 

• Systems software 

* Applications software 

- Market size and growth by principal sub- 

- Overall market size and growth 

delivery modes 

- Industry-specific applications market 

- Leading systems software products 

- Cross-industry applications market 

vendors 

- Leading applications software products 

• Market forces 

vendors 

• Market opportunities 

Issues and Trends 

* Software products technology/market trends 

• Principal software industry issues 

- Client/server implementation 

- Migration 

- Application development tool technology 

- Standards 

- Voice recognition 

- Multi-platform support 

- Image processing/document management 

- Product obsolescence 

- Multimedia applications 

- Downsizing 

- Mergers and acquisitions 

- User confusion 

- Alliances 

- Standards 

- Project management software 

- Decision support systems/executive 
Information systems 

- Return on investment (ROI) 

Competitive Environment 

• Software markets structural change 

• Competitive strategies 

• Software company profiles 


Call, mail, or fax 
your order to INPUT 

at any office listed on the back of 
this brochure. 




c 


About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research /consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


INPUT OFFICES 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 
Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 

4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho ( 

Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


MAPP 12/89 


INPUT 

Identify today the opportunities for 
professional services in the 1990s... 



U.S. Professional Services Market, 1989-1994 


Current and Prospective Professional Services 

Vendors: 

• Forecast efficiently your potential market for the 
next five years 

• Increase your market share by effectively 
updating your professional services strategy 

• Develop your successful professional services 
image based on your customers' requirements 

• Compete successfully by assessing your 
competitors' professional services strategies 

• Identify partners for professional services 
projects 

• Validate your strategic marketing and 
development strategies 


IS Managers and Buyers of Professional Services: 



Stay ahead by evaluating how future professional 
services trends will benefit you 


Call, fax, or 
mail your 
order today 
to INPUT 

to any office listed on 
the back of this 
brochure 


Valuable Information for Professional 


Challenges in professional services include: 

• Identifying, attracting, and retaining technology 
experts 

• Increasingly sophisticated buyers of services 

• More mergers and acquisitions 

• Changing information systems market structure 

Both vendors and buyers need the right answers 
now to these urgent questions. 


U.S. Professional Services Market, 
1989-1994 

Market Size and Forecasts 


• Structure of professional services market 

• Market size and growth rate, 1989-1994 

• Largest markets 

• Leading vendors 

• User expenditures by functional area 

• User expenditures by customer size 

• Market driving forces 

• Growth inhibitors 

• Market opportunities 


Issues and Trends 


• Changing buyer focus 

• Competitive pressures 

• Increasingly complex solutions 

• Changing senior management view of IS 

• Shortages in certain skills 

• Consolidations and alliances 

• Full service suppliers 

• Changing information systems market structure 

• Internationalization 


Competitive Environment 


• Company description and background 

• Key products and services 

• Industry markets 

• Geographic markets 

• Computer hardware and software 


What's the major trend? 

Buyers focusing on core business applications? 
More users becoming buyers of information 
services? New technology applications? Vendor 
focus on repeatable solutions? More competition? 
Validating, assessing, and evaluating current 
strategies against future trends will optimize your 
company's opportunities in the 1990s. 

What vendor alliances and joint 
ventures have the greatest influence? 

INPUT identified more than two dozen key 
alliances and joint ventures between professional 
services vendors. Which vendors have been most 
active in creating alliances? What are the reasons 
behind these flexible alliances? What is the role of 
IBM's investments in professional services and 
software products vendors? | 

What's the size of your potential 
market? 

Vendors need accurate information before creating 
effective strategies. To help with the analysis, 
INPUT segmented the professional services 
market into four components: 

• Software development 

• Consulting 

• Education and training 

• Systems operations 

INPUT determined the size of the professional 
services market through comprehensive user and 
vendor interviews and in-depth market 
intelligence. The report includes valuable user 
expenditure data by: 

• Size of organization within vertical sectors 

• Business functional area 

(J 


INPUT 


1280 Villa Street, Mountain View, CA 94041 
41 5-961 -3300 Fax 41 5-961 -3966 


Identify today the opportunities for 
professional services in the 1990s 

Professional services, now the second-largest segment in the U.S. 
Information Services Industry, affects every user and vendor 
organization. INPUT’S forecast for the next five years calls for 
this market to maintain its double-digit growth, despite a number 
of dampening influences. 

The just-completed U.S. Professional Services Market, 1989-1994 
report focuses on: 

» Reasons behind this growth 

• Demand inhibitors 

• Key trends and issues 

• Leading vendors 

• Opportunities for buyers and vendors 

To receive your copy of this important report, please fax the 
enclosed order form to (415) 961-3966 or call INPUT at (415) 
961-3300. 


Sincerely, 



Robert Goodwin 
Vice President 




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A NEW REPORT FROM INPUT 


Identify today the opportunities for 
professional services in the 1990s... 


Call, Mail or Fax Your Order Today 

Order Form INPUT'S Research Studies 

Yes! U.S. Professional Services Market^ 1989-1994 

Please enter my report at the fee of $3,000 
order as described: ^ 

SAVE $150 if check included with order 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

Payment in fiill is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

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CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current corporate 
structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person including 
parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises 
its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this Agreement and believes the 
information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss 
or expense that may result from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. 
INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content of the program in response to changing 
client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
(415) 961-3300 
Telex 171407 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


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MAN4 12/39dm 

INPUT 







INPUT 


iJervices Success in the 1990s 


^ input’s Professional Services Market, 
1989-1994 includes primary research and 
provides you with the information you 
need most to succeed in the 1990s. ^ 


Which classes of vendors offer 
professional services? 

More than just computer equipment 
manufacturers and traditional professional 
services vendors now offer professional services. 
Find out the major vendors of professional 
services in each of the following categories: 

• Software products 
^Public accounting 

• Turnkey systems 

• Manufacturing-based spinoffs 

• Processing /network services 

• Non-U.S. vendors 

• Not-for-profit organizations 

• Management consulting 

• Temporary personnel agencies 

• Telecommunications 


What's the major trend in professional 
services? 


Professional Services Market 



Base your strategy on knowing: 

• Key professional services market segments 

• The size and growth rate of each market 
segment 

• Leading vendors 


We’ve Got the Answers! 

INPUT’S U.S. Professional Services 
Market, 1989-1994 

Strategic Information You Need TODAY 
for Professional Services Success 
Tomorrow 



Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research /consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


INPUT OFFICES 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWIY 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 
Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 

MAN4 12/89 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


) 


) 



) 







) 


) 



UIISP 




Service Agroement 


INPUT'S 1991 

U.S. Information Systems Program 


Yes! Subscription to INPUT'S U.S. Information Systems Program: 

Please enter my 

order as described: □ $10,500 if payment received by December 15, 1990. 

□ $11,000 if payment received after December 15, 1990. 

TERM OF SUBSCRIPTION — ^The initial term of this subscription will be for twelve (12) 

consecutive months beginning . The subscription will automatically renew for 

each succeeding year unless INPUT receives written notice sixty (60) days prior to the start of each 
renewal period. The fees for INPUT services defined in this Agreement and it's attachments will 
be invoiced each year at INPUT fees then in effect, due and payable on or before the start of the 
program subscription period. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT — Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

Travel expenses for on-site presentations are additional and will be billed separately. 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 25% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT — ^The information provided shall be used only by the employees 
of and within the current corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other 
organization or person including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided 
imder this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, 
INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content 
of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
Tel. (415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Tide 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


SlgnaUre 


Date 


UlISP 11,90 


INPUT 








INPUT 




If You Need the Best 
Available Analysis of 
Executive 

Information Systems 
Today . . . 


A What are the New Ten 
Commandments of EIS? 

A Who are the major players? 

A What are the technological trends? 

A How big is the market? 


A How do you succeed with EIS? 


. . . INPUT Can Put that Analysis at 
Your Fingertips Now! 


A new INPUT report on Executive Information 
Systems clarifies the emerging opportunities and 
tremendous potential in this new, fast-growing, and 
sometimes confusing market. 

And if you act before December 31 , 1 990, 
you can have the report for $60 less than the 
regular list price — a savings of 1 0 percent! 

Executive Information Systems (EIS) are the vendor 
community's attempt to storm what has been a 
citadel of computer resistance — executive desktops. 

The technological foundations of EIS have changed 
dramatically, with mainframe systems being 
supplanted by personal workstations, local and wide 
area network capabilities, and relational data bases 
with high-level programming tools. But the goal has 
remain^ essentially the same: to provide executives 
who are essentially computer illiterate with a 
flexible, easy-to-use tool for rapid, ad hoc access to 
information of all kinds. 


Developments in Executive 
information Systems 

EIS — Past and Future 

• Prior to 1990 

• EIS — A Definition 

• After 1990 

The User View 

• Demographics 

• Status and Activity 

• Lessons Learned 

• Planning for the Next Wave 

• The Value of EIS 

The Vendor View 

• Market Structure 

• Key Software Vendors 

• The Changing Market 

• Market Forecast 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


EIS Answers 

With INPUT'S report on Developments in Executive 
Information Systems, users and vendors now have 
access to the results of a months-Iong, in-depth 
research effort designed specifically to determine the 
exact characteristics of the EIS arena, and how you 
can shape your development or marketing efforts to 
take advantage of the opportunities emerging there. 

The report analyzes the following questions in detail: 

• What are the new Ten Commandments of EIS 
development and marketing? 

• Who are the new sponsors of EIS development, 
and who makes the purchase decisions? 

• What are the relative degrees of importance given 
by users to 13 different subapplications and 
categories of data in EIS? 

• In what specific ways does EIS differ from 
traditional systems, and how can you exploit those 
differences? 

• What types of users are in the wings, how shou|^ 
you plan to meet their needs? 

• What do users and sponsors say they want out of 
EIS? 

• What job titles and functional areas use EIS today? 
How will that change over next 18 months? 

• What is the relative importance of the goals of 
timeliness, quality of information, support of 
management process, and use of information 
technology, according to executive users? 

• What are the typical development times for EIS? 

• What is the initial total investment, including 
software and staff? 

• Where are the trendlines headed in pricing? 

INPUT answers these and many of the other 
questions that will have a direct, practical bearing on 
your success in penetrating this final frontier of 
corporate computer use. 

An Invaluable Guide 

In addition to these specific issues, INPUT focuses its 
research in this report on some of the broader 
questions surrounding Executive Information 
Systems. The EIS market is in a constant state of 
upheaval because of the rapid technological 
developments that continue to change the basic ( 
platform, and because in the final analysis, EIS must 
be constantly adapted to fit the requirements not of 
classes of users, but of individuals. 


EIS Software Vendors 
Classification and Direction 





Application Tool Kit 


THE FOCUS AND 
DIRECTION of the 
various major EIS 
vendors is instantly 
discernible in this diagram 
from Developments in 
Executive Information 
Systems. This is the kind 
of information that the 
report supplies on vendor 
analysis, product 
analysis, market analysis, 
and other issues central 
to your success. 


^ Developments in Executive Information Systems is an 
^ invaluable guide for vendors who need to 

understand the root causes of the market's changes, 
and how they can capitalize on them; and for users 
who need to understand the obstacles to EIS 
implementation. To determine where the technology 
is headed, INPUT deployed the resources of 
extensive mail surveys, broad telephone polls, and 
in-depth, focused telephone interviews of key 
participants. These survey results answer the 
following strategic questions: 

• How is EIS technology changing? How does EIS 
compare to generalize cooperative processing? 

• What is the size of the EIS user population within 
the typical company, and how will that change 
over the next five years? 

• What are the obstacles to EIS success an how can 
they be overcome? 

• How big is the EIS market now? How big will it 
get over the next five years? What are the 
compound annual growth rates of its components? 

• How will the professional services component of 
EIS change over time, both in dollar value and in 
terms of the types of services required? 

• Who are the key software vendors in this market? 
What are their products? Where are they 
positioned in the market? What are their strategies 
for increasing share? 


Your Advantage 

The EIS game has definitely changed. It is now a 
significant market, and it also shows definite 
potential to grow dramatically over the next five 
years. The EIS users who see the bigger picture; and 
the EIS vendors who shape their product and service 
offerings to take advantage of this bigger picture, are 
the ones who will succeed. 

Be one of them. Order your copy of INPUT'S 
Developments in Executive Information Systems today! 


INPUT 

Call, fax, or mail your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 





About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPI/t supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing services, 
turnkey systems, systems integration, professional 
services, communications, and systems/software 
maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 

This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 


North America 

San Francisco 

1280 ViUa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfiurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 





UIEIS 11/90 


INPUT 





Are You 
Ready for 
Outsourcing? 


^ How can you make the Go/No Go 
decision? 

^ What are the rewards? The pitfalls? 

^ How big is the market? 

^ What kinds of companies have 
succeeded best? 

f How should you structure 
outsourcing relationships? 

^ How will outsourcing change 
your organization? 




Get Ready — Get the Answers 
With INPUTS New Report! 


The potential rewards of outsourcing are 
tremendous. But so are the risks. A new report from 
INPUT entitled Information Systems and 
Outsourcing — A Strategic Assessment puts 
outsourcing in perspective by giving IS management 
and vendors a crisp analysis of risk and reward 
/ -itential in the context of today's information 
environment! 

Analyses of the major outsourcing vendors, the 
increasing role of professional services, contract and 
personnel pitfalls, market size and growth rates, and 
a comprehensive conceptual framework IS 
management can use to evaluate outsourcing on a 
case-by-case basis — these are all provided by 
INPUT'S report. But the report also covers a 


Information Systems and Outsourcing 
A Strategic Assessment 

Outsourcing — Past and Present 

• A Historical Perspective 

• What Is Different 

• A Working Definition 

Information Systems Perspectives 

• Driving Forces 

• IS Organization in the 1990s 

• Information Systems Strategy and Outsourcing 

• Outsourcing Opportunities 

Outsourcing and Vendor Capabilities 

• Vendor Categorization 

• Systems Operations and Systems Integration 

• Vendor Support for Organizational Issues 

• Vendor Capabilities 

• Outsourcing and Systems Management 

Outsourcing — Decision and Selection 

• Outsourcing Decision Factors 

• ClientA/endor Relationship 

• Vendor Selection 

• Managing the Vendor 

• Organizational Impacts 

• Insourcing 

• Information Systems Outsourcing Benefits 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


historical perspective on outsourcing, major market 
forces, vendor selection criteria, organizational 
impacts, analyses of vendors and their strategies, and 
more. 

And if you act before December 1 4, 1 990, 
you’ll pay $1 50 less than the regular list price 
for the report — a savings of 1 0 percent! 

There is no question that outsourcing represents a 
major shift in focus for both vendors and users. The 
only question is who will benefit most. We believe 
that to exploit the outsourcing opportunity requires 
the most comprehensive information and the best 
analysis available. Information Systems and 
Outsourcing — A Strategic Assessment is researched 
and written to give you exactly that. 

Adding Value 

Ever since Kodak contracted out for the majority of 
its information systems function, companies have 
been wondering how they might reconfigure their IS 
effort to allow them to concentrate on the area where 
they add the most value: the architecture, planning, 
and implementation of strategic systems. INPUT'S 
report tackles that issue, along with others like: 

• What are the key benefits to be derived from the 
five basic categories of outsourcing? 

• What are the various types of outsourcing 
relationships and what are their advantages and 
disadvantages? 

• What are the pitfalls in managing the ongoing 
vendor relationship? 

• What are the key factors in analyzing whether you 
should outsource? 

• What kind of organizational impacts can you 
expect from an outsourcing relationship? 

• How can you define business objectives for 
outsourcing relationships? 

• How can you structure these agreements to give 
your company the greatest possible benefit? 

• How can you resolve the inherent conflict in the 
perspectives of the organization and the IS 
department? 

• How will the major market forces of globalization, 

increasing rate of business change, and 
specialization affect the outsourcing trend? L. 



In short, INPUT'S 
report examines all of 
the pressures related 
outsourcing, and 
Aalyzes in detail how 
they are likely to 
transform the IS 
organization in the 
1990s. 

The Vendor 
View 

But INPUT does not 
stop there. Our 
researchers also 
provide valuable 
information on 
outsourcing vendors, 
the market they play 
in, and how their 
product and service 
offerings are being 
forced to evolve. The 
report answers your 
questions about: 

• How big is the market now, how fast is it growing, 
and how big will it be for each of the next five 
years? 

« What are the outsourcing strategies of eight key 
competitors in this field? 

• How do outsourcing buyers rate various vendor 
capabilities in order of importance? 

• Where are the best outsourcing opportunities 
today? Where will they be in the near future? 
What are the forces driving the market in that 
direction? 

• What types of outsourcing relationships are 
becoming common among users and vendors? 

• How is the willingness of users and buyers to 
make longer-term commitments to outside 
vendors for larger contracts affecting the 
outsourcing market? 

And other questions you have to have answered if 
you are going to be able to shape your business so 
that you can reap outsourcing's rewards. 

Clear, Practical Recommendations 

Never has an issue had so much potential to change 
the way you do business. Never has an issue 
involved so many different aspects of information 
management. Never has an issue carried so many 
^ssible benefits, or had the potential for negative 
impacts. 


Outsourcing Benefits 


Outsourcing 

Category 

Benefits 

Costs 

Skills 

Access 

Rapid 

Response 

Use of Skills 

Manage- 
ment Time 

Oper. 

Cap. 

Vendor 

IS 

Applications 

management 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Systems 

operations 

X 

X 

X 

X 



X 

Transition 

management 



X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Applications 

maintenance 

X 



X 


X 

X 

Systems 

integration 



X 

X 

X 


X 


THE FIVE BENEFITS of outsourcing are used to form a matrix with the five different 
outsourcing categories to help IS management determine where the best opportunities lie for 
their companies. 

Outsourcing is unique. And you can't just ignore it. 
IS managers and vendors are going to be forced to 
make a conscious decision on what to do about 
outsourcing. 

That's why INPUT'S report on InforTnation Systems 
and Outsourcing — A Strategic Assessment can be so 
valuable for you. We put all of the resources of our 
sophisticated research infrastructure behind the 
effort to come up with information on this subject. 
And then we put some of the finest minds in the 
business to work on it to come up with incisive 
analysis and clear, practical recommendations for 
action. 

Why not put this powerful research and analysis to 
work for you? Use the enclosed order form to i .der 
your copy of Information Systems and Outsourcing — A 
Strategic Assessment today. 


INPUT 


Call, fax, or mail your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPLIT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing services, 
turnkey systems, systems integration, professional 
services, communications, and systems/software 
maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 

North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201)299-6999 
Fax (201)263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


UIOUT 11/90 


INPUT 


Gain Insight Into Key Trends 

in the Management of Information Systems 

in the 1990s... 



The Future of Information Systems Management 


Read this report if you are: 

■ A chief information officer who is 



• An end-user responsible for information distribution 

• Considering electronic information options in the 
enterprise 

• Needing to understand the technology changes 
affecting operations 

• Looking to have an understanding of the differing 
organizational structures and responsibilities of 
information systems during the 1990s 


■ A hardware, software, or professional services 
vendor that is 

• Participating in or considering entering the systems 
integration/ operations market 

• Responsible for industry market/ systems/service 
development 



Call, mail, or 
fax your 
order to 
INPUT 

at any office 
listed on the back 
of this brochure 



Understand the Impact that New 
Technologies Will Have on the Role of 
Information Systems... 


Since the early 1980s, there has been a growing 
thrust within information systems organizations 
to become more involved in the strategic direction 
of the enterprise. Once a servant of the 
corporation, information systems have now been 
placed, or at least identified, as a critical factor in 
the success of the enterprise. INPUT has 
undertaken a study to gain a realistic view of the 
role of the information systems function, and 
especially the CIO (Chief Information Officer), to 
the business enterprise. 


The Future of Information Systems 
Management 


The Role of the CIO 


• The CIO's objectives 

• Qualifications 

• Critical success factors 


IS Role Structure 


• IS responsibility framework 

• Impact of industry focus 

• Product orientation 


Business and Technology Trends 

Future of the Information Systems 
Function 

• IS organizational structures 

• Network Environments in the 1990s 

• Development Environments in the 1990s 

• Role of the information services vendor 


INPUT has conducted a series of recent projects, 
including: 

• INPUT/ Andersen Consulting CIO study 

• INPUT'S annual user survey of 250 IS executives 

• INPUT/POSP (profit-oriented systems program) 
joint study 

• A number of consulting engagements to analyze 
the information systems functions in specific 
organizations 

INPUT has concluded that the role of the 
information officer is, or should be paramount in 
supporting business goals. 

As revealed in the study, the qualifications of the , | 
successful information officer of the 1990s should''^ 
include: 

• Intuitive understanding of business /technology 
relationship 

• Managerial perspective 

• Business orientation 

• Excellent staff support 

Differentiation of the CIO role within diverse 
industries is also explored. Analysis indicates that 
the actual division of responsibilities between 
corporate and distributed systems is dependent on 
whether the organization is, for example: 

Orientation Industry 

Information-oriented Bank and finance 

Insurance 

Telecommunications 

Service-oriented Retail /wholesale distribution 

Transportation 

Utilities 

Medical | 

Product-oriented Discrete manufacturing 

Process manufacturing 


INPUT 



THE FUTURE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
MANAGEMENT 

Because of its leadership and expertise in research 
into the information needs of leading-edge 
corporations, INPUT has released this report. 
Future of Information Systems Management. This 
report supports the critical requirement of 
organizations looking to the IS group to provide 
the capability to solve competitive attacks to the 
business enterprise. This study will: 

• Provide an understanding of the organizational 
structure and strategic responsibilities of the 
information system function during the next 
'^cade 

• Discuss emerging technologies that will create 
new kinds of strategic applications 

• Analyze opportunities in out-sourcing to 
provide full-solution data center management 
and distributing operations to allow for a focus 
on strategic applications 

• Discuss the need for a more flexible organization 
to address the globalization of business activities 

Four key areas are scrutinized: 

• The role of the CIO 

• Industry differentiation 

• Business and technology trends 

• Forecasting the future 

In addition, the roles and responsibilities of 
information systems officers have been scrutinized 
as to the product or service, including: 

• The involvement in enterprise planning 

' j)e ability (responsibility) to formulate policy 


Information Systems Executive 



An Internal "Systems Integrator" 

The changing role of the IS executive is suggested 
by the above graph. INPUT'S report analyzes the 
importance of this role for the flexible, global, and 
responsive corporation of the 1990 s. 


Although factors such as corporate culture, 
product technology, and organizational 
philosophy have an enormous impact on the 
strength of the IS organization, INPUT believes 
that all-told the role of the IS organization will be 
dominant in the progress of the enterprise. 


Available Immediately 

Call INPUT today to get 
your copy shipped 
immediately 

Call, mail, or fax your order to any office listed 
on the back of this brochure 



About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research/consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


North America 


INPUT OFFICES 

International 


Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/ 37 Regent Street 
London SWIY 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 
Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


UISM1/90 


INPUT 




How Will You Manage Data 
Effectively in the 1990 s . . . ? 



» How is RDBMS 
technology changing 
IS operations? 

^ How can you manage 
these changes? How 
will you address 
integrity and security 
issues? How will 
CASE affect you? 

^ How will the end 
user’s increasing role 
affect you? 


INPUT’S New Report Tells You How! 


Corporate data is a strategic weapon. If you want 
targeted intelligence on how changes in data 
management are changing the way you can use 
that weapon — and how it can be used against 
you — you need the best research you can find. 

You need INPUT'S newest report on the world of 
data management. 

Entitled Data Base Systems Development, the report 
addresses the changes sweeping the entire field of 
data management, showing how those changes 
will affect how you do business, and offering clear 
and concise recommendations for future action. 

The report is based on a research effort that 
consumed hundreds of man-hours and tens of 
thousands of dollars. It is normally priced at 
$ 2 , 000 . 


Data Base Systems Development 

Data Administration : Current Environment 

• Background 

• Changing Environment 

• Effectiveness of Data Administration 

• Changing Role 

• Key Issues 

Impacts of Relational Data Base Technology 

• Status of Relational DBMS Use 

• Impacts of RDBMS on Data Administration 

• RDBMS and the End User 

Impact of Other Technologies 

• Distributed Data Base Technology 

• Impact of Network Growth 

• Role of the Data Dictionary 

• Dat a Administration and CASE 

Data M anagement: Future Environment 

• Data Management's Role in the Organization 

• Roadblocks to Success 

• Planning for the Future 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


But if you act before August 15, 1990, 
you’ll pay the special price of $200 less 
than the regular list price for the report— 
a savings of 10 percent! 

For this comprehensive overview and analysis, 
INPUT interviewed data base managers in 
Fortune 500 companies to find out directly the 
current status of data management organizations, 
DBMS environments, application development, 
and end-user roles. 

This information is not theoretical. 

It is derived from direct interviews with the 
people in the data management trenches today. 
They know how changes in data management 
will affect your operations, because 
they're living through those changes in 
their own operations right now. 

INPUT gives you the benefit of their hundreds of 
man years of experience to help you navigate one 
of the fastest changing fields in American business 
today. The report offers insights into how changes 
in data base management can affect you, 
including: 

• How the overall strategy and direction of 
information systems in general, and data base 
management in particular, has serious 
implications for the scope of your 
responsibilities. 

• How to approach concerns about the security 
and integrity of data files in a data environment 
rapidly changing over to distributed data base 
technology. 

• How to decide when to make major 
technological investments in a market with 
some of the shortest product life cycles in the 
industry. 

• How to accommodate increasing demand for 
data access, no matter where or in what format^ 
the data resides. 


INPUT 


And more. The advent of relational data base 
technology has had a major impact on traditional 
data management techniques. And that impact has 
been amplified by the increasing availability of 
this sophisticated technology on every conceivable 
kind of computing platform — not just mainframes, 
but on departmental minicomputers and on 
desktop systems. 

How do you deal with these changes? 

How can you turn them to your advantage? 

How will you be able to use the evolution of 
traditional data management roles to redefine the 
role of Information Systems? 

INPUT'S report is a comprehensive examination of 
data management designed to help you do just 
that. It investigates in detail the questions that you 
are facing every day, and gives some 
straightforward recommendations on how to 
answer them: 


• How do you best manage distributed data? 

^^hat are the respective responsibilities of users 
and IS management for ownership of this data? 

• How can you play a central role in managing 
both technology and growth? 

• How do you plan for new technology, and how 
do you smoothly introduce it into existing 
environments? 


• What role does corporate management play in 
supporting the data management process and 
how can you get them more involved? 

There are also chapters on the impact of other data 
base technologies, the current environment for 
data administration, and the future of data 
management. 


INPUT'S Data Base Systems Development is written 
for managers in the data management trenches 
with responsibilities for managing a complex and 
rapidly changing technological and organizational 
evolution. It's filled with exhaustive research, 
insightful analysis, and clear recommendations, 
we have a copy of the report waiting for you 




All you have to do is fill out the enclosed order 
form and drop it in the mail today. 


Data Management — Key Issues 


Strategy/ 

Direction 


integrity/ 

Security 


1 ecnnoiogy 

W////A 

Udid DdoUo 

?/////. 

Resources 

z 

Training 


W 

m 1988 


M 1989 

uetinition 

Management 



Issues Mentioned 
(Percent) 


THESE ARE THE ISSUES singled out by the data managers 
interviewed for INPUT’S report. The rapid technological and 
management changes in this area are evident in several 
responses. 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 


INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

San Francisco Bay Area 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
Tel. (415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House, 33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, West Germany 
Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 

UMDA 7/90 





CVVAP 




Service Agreement 


INPUT'S 1991 

U.S. Information Services Vendor Analysis Program 


Yes! 

Please enter my 
order as described: 


Subscription to INPUT'S U.S. Information Services Vendor 
Analysis Program: 

□ $10,500 if payment received by December 15, 1990. 


□ $11,000 if payment received after December 15, 1990. 

TERM OF SUBSCRIPTION — ^The initial term of this subscription will be for twelve (12) 

consecutive months beginning . The subscription will automatically renew for 

each succeeding year unless INPUT receives written notice sixty (60) days prior to the start of each 
renewal period. The fees for INPUT services defined in this Agreement and it's attachments will 
be invoiced each year at INPUT fees then in effect, due and payable on or before the start of the 
program subscription period. Subscription fee payment in full covers lease of all VAP materials for 
term of subscription. Unless subscription is renewed, all VAP Materials must be returned to 
INPUT within ten (10) days of end of subscription period. 


TERMS OF PAYMENT — Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

Travel expenses for on-site presentations are additional and will be billed separately. 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 25% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT — ^The information provided shall be used only by the employees 
of and within the current corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other 
organization or person including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided 
under this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, 
INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content 
of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
Tel. (415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Orgariizalion 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Tide 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


SignalLie Date 


eWAP 11/90 

INPUT 












Informed 
Analysis of the 
Information Services 
Industry 

Distilled into a 
Single Volume. . . 




Information Services Industry 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL STUDY 


...The All-New 1990 Information Services 

r 


...It is the landmark report on information services, the 
touchstone against which all other analyses are 
measured. Its publication is eagerly awaited by 
marketers, strategic planners, chief executives, 
analysts, and members of the press who have to know 
what's going on in our business. 

And it is soon to be released. The 1990 Information 
Services Industry Report from INPUT is now available. 
Containing the most useful analysis of this ever- 
changing market that information professionals can 
buy, the 1990 report follows the path pioneered by 
earlier editions: 

• Only the best market intelligence is used, data that is 
cross-correlated with independent sources and that 
is consistent with overall market figures when the 
various segments are totaled. Each individual 
element makes sense. And so does the larger picture 
composed of those elements. Only INPUT offers this 
consistency throughout its analyses from the 
smallest submarket to the entire industry. 


THE DOLLARS AND MARKET SHARES attributable to the various 
submodes in the Information Services Industry Market. This is the 
kind of fine-grained analysis that INPUT offers industry professionals. 


• Only the most informative market divisions are used 
to make sense of recent market changes, giving you 
insights into the overall growth and transformation 
of the industry. 

• Only the analyses of the best minds in the research 
community are used, men and women with decades 
of experience as users and vendors, buyers and 
sellers, people who know first-hand the forces that 
shape these markets. 

These are the elements that make up the 1990 
Information Industry Report from INPUT. 

And if you act before October 31, 1990, 
you'll pay $150 less than the regular list price 
for large-scale analysis you can get nowhere 
else — a savings of 15% ! 

But what can the report offer you? 

Unpa ralleled Information Con centration 

The 1990 Information Services Industry Report give^ ^ 
vendors and users an accurate summation of the v ge- 
scale trends in this industry today and for the next five 
years, including: market sizes and growth rates; 
detailed case studies of companies that have succeeded 
in all of the major delivery modes; major forces 
shaping market-segment growth; competitive analysis 
for each delivery mode, including revenue and net 
income analyses of companies successful in each mode; 
and more. 

The report is designed from the ground up to be a 
single-volume resource you can use to answer the 
questions that will affect your success in the market as 
a whole: 

• Where are the biggest growth opportunities in the 
industry and what are the forces driving them? 

• How long-term are these forces and the 
opportunities they create? How are they likely to 
change? 

• How are the growth rates for various market 
segments changing over time? 

• How many companies are there in each segment? 
What are the implications for the competitive 
environment? 

/ \ V 

• How have revenue growth and net income groV ^ 

compared over the last five years for the industry as 
a whole? 



Information Services Industry 
Market by Delivery Mode, 1989 


Source: INPUT 


Total Size: $92 Billion 


Processing 

Services 


Electronic 

Information 

Services 


Network Services 
2% 


Systems 

Operations 


Turnkey 

Systems 


Systems 

Integration 


Applications 

Software 

Products 


Professional 

Services 


Systems Software 
Products 


Industry Report! 


• What impacts will the emergence of truly global 
information services companies have in the 1990s? 

Only input's 1990 Information Services Industry Report 
gives you answers to these large-scale questions that 
can be trusted in the context of our analyses of sectors, 
markets, and submarkets. All of the numbers agree. 
And all are updated every year, so that you get the best 
and most accurate picture available of what's 
happening out there. 

INPUT'S report also helps you answer questions at a 
much finer level of granularity. We analyze in detail 
the following delivery modes: Systems Software, 
Applications Software, Professional Services, 
Processing Services, Electronic Information Services, 
Turnkey Systems, Systems Integration, Systems 
Operations, and Network Services. 

Then we address the questions about these delivery 
modes whose answers can affect the tactical and 
operational decisions you have to make every day: 

• What are the potential impacts of new user 
strategies like outsourcing? 

• ^))w can you use the demand for outsourcing to 
rdrge long-term relationships with users in the areas 
of applications management, applications 
maintenance, and transition management? 

• How will the actions of key vendors like IBM, EDS, 
and Andersen Consulting change the competitive 
environment in systems integration and systems 
operations? 

• How fast is each delivery mode growing? What 
share of the total market is accounted for by each 
mode? 

• How are increasing complexity, standards, 
workstation power, and the demand for custom 
solutions affecting the applications software mode? 

• How can systems integrators respond to increasing 
systems complexity, strategic alliances, large-vendor 
competition, and the shift away from professional 
services? 

And many more questions whose answers can have a 
significant impact on your bottom line. 

This report contains the research against which all 
other industry analyses are measured. If you have 
used the report before, you know how good it is. If 
yf Jhaven't, why not use the enclosed order form to 
findmut how easy it is to understand the market 
you're in? 


— 

REPORT CONTENTS 

Information Services Industry 

Information Services Industry Structure 
U.S. Information Services Industry market 
Growth 

Stronger Information Services Markets 
Worldwide Information Services Market 
Potential 
Oitsourcing 
Competitive Trends 

Public Information Services Vendor Performance 
Conclusions 

Processing Services Market Analysis 
Processing Services Market, 1989 
Processing Services Market Trends and Issues 
Leading Processing Services Vendors 
Public Processing Services Company 
Performance 

Network Services Market Analysis 
Network Services Market, 1989 
Network Services Market Trends and Issues 
Leading Network Services Vendors 
Public Company Network Services Performance 

Professional Services Market Analysis 
Professional Services Market, 1989 
Professional Services Market Trends and Issues 
Leading Professional Services Vendors 
Public Professional Services Company 
Performance 

Systems Integration Market Analysis 
Systems Integration Market, 1989 
Systems Integration Market Trends and Issues 
Leading Systems Integration Vendors 

Systems Operations Market Analysis 
Systems Operations Market, 1989 
Systems Operations Market Trends and Issues 
Leading Systems Operations Vendors 

Software Products Market Analysis 
Software Products Market, 1989 
Systems Software Products 
Applications Software Products 

Turnkey Systems Market Analysis 
Turnkey Systems Market, 1989 
Turnkey Systems Market Trends and Issues 
Leading Turnkey Systems Vendors 
Public Turnkey Systems Company Performance 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



r 


About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, and 
recommendations to managers and executives in the 
information processing industries. Through market 
research, technology forecasting, and competitive 
analysis, INPUT supports client management in 
making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software maintenance 
and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. This 
expertise enables INPUT to supply practical solutions 
to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically advanced 
companies. ^ 


INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House, 33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sedetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, West Germany 
Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


CVAN3 9/90 



EDEDI 


I 



1 






Service Agreement 


Electronic 


YesI 

Please enter my 
order as described: 


INPUT 

1280 Vaia Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
Tel. (415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


INPUT'S 1991 

Data & Information Interchange Program 


Subscription to INPUT'S Electronic Data & Information 
Interchange Program: 

□ $12,000 if payment received by December 15, 1990. 

□ $12,500 if payment received after December 15, 1990. 

TERM OF SUBSCRIPTION — ^The initial term of this subscription will be for twelve (12) 

consecutive months beginning . The subscription will automatically renew for 

each succeeding year unless INPUT receives written notice sixty (60) days prior to the start of each 
renewal period. The fees for INPUT services defined in this Agreement and it’s attachments will 
be invoiced each year at INPUT fees then in effect, due and payable on or before the start of the 
program subscription period. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT — Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

Travel expenses for on-site presentations are additional and will be billed separately. 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 25% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT — ^The information provided shall be used only by the employees 
of and within the current corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other 
organization or person including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided 
under this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, 
INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content 
of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


Authorized By; 

Accepted By INPUT; 


Orgarizaiion 

Signature 


Name 

Name 


Tide 

Title 


Address 

Date 





Telephone 



Signanre 

Date 

EDED1 1 1/90 


INPUT 








. I 




, 1 








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1 


INPUT 




If You Need To Know 

How To Turn New Developments in 

EDI To Your Advantage... 


How is EDI being 
applied? 

What are users’ 
concerns? 

How big is the market 
now and through 
1995? 

Who are the leading 
EDI vendors? 

J What sets their 

products and services 
apart? 


... INPUT Shows You Where the 
EDI Opportunities Are! 


The potential is that Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) 
could revolutionize every aspect of the way companies 
do business with each other. 

But what exactly is happening in the EDI markets 
today and for the next five years? How fast will they 
grow? What forces are at work accelerating that 
growth? Slowing it down? How will they affect your 
company? 

If you are an EDI vendor or user, the answers to these 
kinds of questions could have a dramatic impact on 
how you structure your ow n plans for growth over the 
next five years. 

INPUT has published a new report entitled The EDI 
Market, 1990-1995, that is designed from the ground up 
to answer these questions. 


The Electronic Data Interchange 
Market, 1990-1995 


Background on EDI 
EDI Input-Output Analysis 

• Definition and Relevance 

• EDI Input-Output Matrix 

• Implications of Input-Output analysis 

Market Size and Forecast 
EDI Market Trends 

• Software Products 

• Network Services 

• Professional Service Trends 

EDI Trading Communities and Applications 

• Automobile Manufacturing 

• Paper, Printing, and Publishing Industries 

• Retail, Apparel, and Textile Industries 

• Etc. 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


And if you act before November 19, 1990, 
and buy just this report, you'll pay $300 less than the 
regular list price for the report — a savings of 10 
percent on targeted market intelligence that could 
change the way you do business! 

INPUT is also publishing a report that complements 
this report's total-market focus. Entitled EDI: Business 
Integration Issues, this second report focuses on the 
practical questions of how individual businesses have 
solved the problems of EDI integration in the real 
world. 

And if you buy that report too, 
you can save an additional 10 percent 
off the total price for the two reports. 

A 20 percent savings for the complete picture! 

EDI could transform companies' relationships with 
large vendors, with large customers, with banks, 
insurance companies, and firms at every level of the^ 
product development, manufacturing, and distributre^/ 
chain. And that will create tremendous opportunities 
for people with the right information. 

A Unique Analytical Tool 

INPUT'S report gives you that information. The result 
of more than a man-year of primary research into 
every aspect of electronic data interchange. The EDI 
Market, 1990-1995 gives EDI marketers and users 
unique insights into where this rapidly changing 
technology is headed and why. The report tells you; 

• How big the market for EDI network services, 
software, and professional services is now, and how 
fast it will grow over the next five years. 

• Who the leading EDI vendors are, and why their 
products and services have been embraced by the 
marketplace. 

• Where the new market and product opportunities 
will be. 

• What the dominant user trends are in EDI adoption, 
including what users say their reasons for 
implementation are, what kind of platforms they are 
using, how they are reconciling parallel paper an(^,, 
electronic systems, and more. 


INPUT 


I 



EDI SERVICES AND SOFTWARE are provided by third party vendors as well as large 
hub users as shown in this exhibit from The EDI Market, 1990-1995. 


The report also introduces a 
unique analytical tool called the 
EDI Input-C5utput Matrix. Using 
this matrix, vendors and users 
can focus on the issues that will 
have the greatest impact on their 
operations and overall 
profitability, clearly analyze the 
costs and benefits, and come to a 
rational conclusion regarding 
where EDI can give them a 
competitive advantage. 

Creating Competitive 
Advantage 

The report does not stop with 
these issues. The EDI Market, 

1990-1995 is a compendium of 
research that touches literally 
every significant aspect of this 
revolutionary technology: 

What impacts can be 
f anticipated from EDI server 
architectures? 

• What role will value-added 
networks play in the future? 

• How will the "Hub-and Spoke" phenomenon affect 
users' choices and vendors' product offerings? 

• Where is the three-tiered market for message- 
switching software headed? 

• How will market consolidation affect providers of 
network services? 

• Where are the opportunities in education and 
training? 

• What are the major industries adopting EDI? 

• How are their demands pushing development of 
real-time EDI and other advanced services? 

Plus detailed case studies of institutions that have 
adopted EDI, analysis of future market and technical 
directions, and a set of in-depth recommendations for 
the major EDI constituencies (users and vendors). 

Companies that want to take advantage of 
-developments in EDI need the best market intelligence 
^ailable. They need detailed analysis based on new 
primary research into every major facet of this 
potentially revolutionary technology. 


That is what INPUT'S The EDI Market, 1990-1995 gives 
you. It gives you the best data and analysis available. 

It gives you a tool for building competitive advantage. 

Use the enclosed order form to order your copy today 
and save 10 percent off the regular purchase price. Or 
buy the companion volume on EDI: Business Integration 
Issues too, and save 20 percent. 

Do it now. Reliable information is the key to your 
success. 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analvsls, INPUT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/ software maintenance and support). 


INPUT 


North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 


Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

TelJ03J^64^531_^x^22l^^^j^^ 


OFFICES 


International 



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Service Agreement 


INPUT'S 1991 

U.S. Systems Integration Program 


Yes! Subscription to INPUT'S U.S. Systems Integration Program: 

Please enter my 

order as described: □ $15,500 if payment received by December 15, 1990. 

□ $16,500 if payment received after December 15, 1990. 


TERM OF SUBSCRIPTION — ^The initial term of this subscription will be for twelve (12) 

consecutive months beginning . The subscription will automatically renew for 

each succeeding year unless INPUT receives written notice sixty (60) days prior to the start of each 
renewal period. Tlie fees for INPUT services defined in this Agreement and it's attachments will 
be invoiced each year at INPUT fees then in effect, due and payable on or before the start of the 
program subscription period. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT — Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

Travel expenses for on-site presentations are additional and will be billed separately. 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 25% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT — ^The information provided shall be used only by the employees 
of and within the current corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other 
organization or person including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided 
under this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, 
INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to chang-' ur rnoc’ify sne .. -n.cnt 
of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
Tel. (415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organcation 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Titie 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


Signai/e 


Dale 


SISIP 11/90 r 

INPUT 




INPUT 



If Knowledge 

(of Network Integration) 

5 Is Power. . . 



^ How big is the market? 

How fast is it growing? 

What forces are behind 
its growth? 

^ How important is 
network integration to 
users? 

^ What do vendors have 
to know to succeed? 


...Then INPUT Has a Powerful New Report for Ye I 


INPUT has just released a comprehensive new 
report that carefully analyzes the opportunities 
and pitfalls in network integration, one of the 
hottest segments of the computer market today. 

Entitled Network Integration, 1990-1995, the report 
focuses on the practical needs of network vendors 
and system integrators, offering an oasis of hard 
data to marketers lost in a desert of speculation. It 
provides firsthand research on important market 
trends, a factual overview of the evolution of 
network technology, and a careful analysis of how 
users' needs for network integration have changed 
in recent years. 

Getting this report at the full retail price could 
give you a significant competitive edge. 

But If you act before July 9, 1990 you’ll pay 
$200 less than the regular list price for the 
report—a savings of 10 percenti 


Network Integration, 1990- 1 995 

Market Forecast 

• Network Integration 

• Network Component of Systems Integration 

• Major Markets 

Integrating Corporate Networks 

• Networks Defined 

• Importance to Business 

• Trends toward Integration 

• Benefits of Integration 

Network and Systems Integration 

• Network Integration Defined 

• Network Integration Plans 

• Network Integration and Systems Integration 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


Cashing In on Major Trends 

Major trends in business and technology are 
pushing companies toward large-scale network 
integration projects. Network Integration, 1990-1995 
investigates both arenas, including: 

• What are the major forces driving businesses 
toward a greater need for integration services, 
and how can you benefit? 

• How has the flattening of organizational 
hierarchies made networking more important, 
and what opportunities has it opened for you? 

• Where in the typical business is the need for 
instant information access growing fastest, and 
how can you help satisfy that need? 

• How have network vendors responded to the 
demand for standardized integration tools, and 
how has that changed the integration rules? 

• How will the growth of robust public networks, 
the emergence of virtual network capability, (7 
enhancement of PBX functionality, the rise of 
intelligent multiplexers, and the tremendous 
advances in relational data base management 
and distributed processing affect your business? 

INPUT answers all of these questions, and more, 
offering you unique insights into complex 
phenomena based on actual surveys of the users 
and vendors defining this market. 

Market Sizes, User Requirements 

In addition to analyzing market trends, INPUT'S 
Network Integration, 1990-1995 focuses on other 
kinds of competitive information that could spell 
the difference between success and failure for 
marketers in this fast-changing competitive arena: 

• Exactly how big is the market for network 
integration? 

• How fast is it growing today? How fast will it 
grow over the next five years? 

• How big will it be in 1995? 

• How can you avoid confusion between netwo( ^ 
integration and systems integration, and set 
customers' expectations correctly? 


INPUT 


What do users expect from network 

• integrators? 

• What do network managers expect? 

• What kind of skills, and what level of 
competence, do users say they require 
from network integrators? 

• Who are the leading vendors in this 
market? 

• How have they successfully sold their 
services? 

And more, including a full set of 
conclusions and recommendations, in 
which INPUT analyzes its own research 
findings and translates them into practical 
considerations for network and systems 
integration vendors. 

Leveraging INPUT’S Expertise 

The days of the single-vendor, 
homogeneous computing environment are 
-!^ng gone. Computing power has been 
"ispersed throughout organizations — first 
to the department level, then to the 
desktop level — with end users having a 
tremendous amount of influence over 
what kind of computer they will use. 
Mission-critical information now exists all 
over the typical company, on every 
conceivable kind of platform, accessible through 
every conceivable kind of communications 
architecture. 

The opportunity for network integration is clear. 
But to make the most of that opportunity requires 
more than just aggressive development and 
marketing programs. It requires detailed, timely, 
and firsthand research so that you can know 
exactly where to deploy your scarce resources for 
maximum sales impact. 

To do such a study yourself would require tens of 
thousands of dollars and hundreds of man-hours 
in staff time. 

But to obtain the complete results of such a study 
squires only that you get in touch with INPUT, 
iiclosed is a coupon that outlines your options for 
getting this information as soon as possible. 


' 3 . 


Importance of Network Integration to 
Systems Integration Projects 


Importance 
to Users 




Importance 
to Vendors 



2 3 4 

Importance Rating 


^ Current Importance 
□ Importance in Five Years 


The fact that users rate the importance of network integration in 
systems integration projects lower than vendors indicates a sales 
pitfall, and the need for client education on this subject. This is just 
one example of the kind of question INPUT answers in Network 
Integration, 1990-1995. 


So take a moment now, fill out the coupon, and 
drop it in the mail today. We spent weeks talking 
to your prospects, and months analyzing their 
responses. And isn't that the kind of information 
you need to compete in today's network 
integration market? 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



About INPUT 




INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the infonnation processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Fonned as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting finn. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 



INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

London 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(071)493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 



SIIR4 6/90 


INPUT 


SYSTEMS INTEGRATION: 
APPLICATION OPPORTUNITIES 



A Conference on the 
Hot Applications in 
Systems Integration 



May 3 & 4, 
1990 

Sheraton 

International 

Conference 

Center 

Reston, Virginia 

n INPUT 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 • Vienna, VA 22182 

California • New York • Washington D.C. • London • Paris • Tokyo 


Systems Integration: 
Application Opportunities 


Key Benefits of Attending 
this Conference 

> You will leam about the 
demand and opportunity for 
three of the most widely 
discussed application and 
technology areas: 

• Image Processing 

• Network Integration 

• Computer-Integrated 
Manufacturing 

>■ You will leam about the 
status and recent 
developments in CASE 

> Bring yourself up to date on 
current market issues 

Who Should Attend? 


CONFERENCE OVERVIEW 

INPUT, a leading provider of information systems and services 
research and consulting, is pleased to present a conference that 
focuses on the new and expanding issues of the systems integration 
(SI) market. Seldom has an information service caught on as rapidly 
as SI. 

Users have embraced it as an alternative for implementing 
information-based solutions. Vendors are using it as the ultimate 
channel for delivering their products and services to large and 
intermediate customers. The SI market offers revenue and profit 
opportunities for large and small vendors as prime or 
subcontractors. 

Expand your perspectives regarding systems integration by 
attending this INPUT conference that will include presentations and 
a panel discussion on the market and three key application areas. 
Systems integration users and buyers will discuss their actual 
experiences implementing systems. INPUT consultants will present 
industrywide research on opportunities for these applications and 
technologies. If you're involved in SI today, or contemplating entry, 
you need to be aware of new market developments. This is a 
valuable opportunity to inform yourself. 


> Systems Integration vendor 
marketing and operating 
executives 

> Systems Integration 
planning management 

> Information Services firms 
considering SI participation 

> Executives of companies 
who are contemplating 
using Systems Integration 
Services 

> Computer equipment 
providers 

> Professional services firms 

> Systems Operations 
companies 


OUR SYSTEMS INTEGR ATION CREDENTIALS 

In 1984, INPUT foresaw the growing need for SI planning data, and 
we included it in our Market Analysis Program (MAP). Since then, 
SI has become the fastest growing opportunity in the information 
services market. In 1987, INPUT established a separate Systems 
Integration Program (SIP) to handle the special needs of clients that 
were focused on the SI market. This research and consulting service 
is extremely comprehensive — we believe the best in the business — 
and it is coordinated with INPUT'S other information services 
research and consulting programs. Our service is subscribed to by 
most of the leading SI vendors in the U.S. We have a similar service 
in Europe and have developed sizings of this market in the 
remaining areas of the world, as well. . . 

In conjunction with the Systems Integration Program, INPUT 
provides the annual conference which is described herein. Our 
clients can attend the conference as part of their service contract. 
Companies that do not yet subscribe are invited to attend the 
conference for the fees listed on the back of this brochure. A limiteu 
number of seats are available for non-subscribers, so please register 
early. 


INPUT 


1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560, Vienna, VA 22182 
703-847-6870 Fax 703-847-6872 


Dear Executive: 

Systems integration has become one of the most successful 
delivery channels for information products or services. If 
you are already participating in this market or considering 
entering it, you should attend INPUT'S Systems Integration 
Conference described in the enclosed brochure. 

The conference will provide you with important information 
on SI market trends and user and vendor issues. Please join 
us on May 3 and 4 in Reston, Virginia. 

Yours sincerely. 



Douglas R. Wilder 

Director, Systems Integration Program 


a. 

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INPUT 

Systems Integration 
Conference 
Mays & 4, 1990 
Sheraton Hotel, Reston, VA 


Register today 
by calling 
703 - 847-6870 


Fee Schedule 

The regular conference fee is $695; $495 for additional attendees from the same company. 
Per their contract, subscribers to INPUT'S Systems Integration Program may send two 
representatives at no charge. Additional client personnel may attend the conference at a 
charge of $295. 


EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT-Registrations received before April 1, 1990 take off 10% 


Registration Form 

Yes! Please sign me up for the Systems Integration Conference, May 3 & 4, 1990 at the 
Sheraton Hotel, Reston, VA. 

□ Check enclosed in the amount of $ 

□ Bill me in the amount of $ on Purchase Order # . 

Payment must be received before conference. 

□ Charge $ to my American Express # 

Exp. date : Signature 

□ Systems Integration client attending at no charge. 

Name: 

Title: ^ 

Company: 

Address: 

City: State Zip 

Telephone: ( ) Signature: 

(Please duplicate this form for additional attendees and return the forms together) 

Conference space is limited! To ensure your reservations, either mail this form to 
INPUT, 1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560, Vienna VA 22182, 
or call Barbara Fisher, Conference Coordinator, at (703) 847-6870. 

\ou can also FAX your registration to us at (703) 847-6872 


Cancellations must be in writing. Cancellations received after April 3 will be assessed a $50 cancellation fee. 







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CONFERENCE AGENDA 


URSDAY, MAY 3 


8:00 

8:45 

9:00 


10:00 


11:00 

11:15 


3 

12:15 

1:30 


3:45 

4:00 


Registration and Continental Breakfast 

Welcome and Introduction 

Systems Integration Market — An update 
of INPUT research on the systems 
integration and systems operations 
markets 

Network Integration — A presentation of 
INPUT'S study of the network integration 
submarket, including user and vendor 
views of its relationship to systems 
integration opportunities. 

Break — Refreshmen ts 

Image Processing — A discussion of 
INPUT'S analysis of image processing 
technology and applications prospects, 
based on both user and vendor views of 
this submarket. 

Lunch 

Buyers' Experience — ^Two systems 
integration executives will discuss their 
firms' actual experiences in planning for 
and implementing systems integration 
projects. These discussions will focus on 
managing the vendor interface and the 
benefits that systems integration provides. 
Projects that include image and network 
integration will be addressed. 

Break — Refreshments 

CASE Products — A presentation and 
discussion of INPUT'S research on CASE 
products and their impact on 
the systems development and 
implementation process and on systems 
integration. 


FRIDAY, MAY 4 

8:00 Continental Breakfast 

8:30 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing — A 
status report and intermediate results of 
INPUT research of vendor and user views 
of the CIM market- place including 
driving forces and a forecast of end-user 
expenditures. 

9:00 Buyer's Experiences — A systems 

integration buyer will discuss actual 
experiences implementing a CIM system 
through systems integration. The 
discussion will include managing the 
vendor interface and the benefits that 
systems integration provides. 

10:00 Break — Refreshments 

10:15 Outsourcing — A Variety of Options — A 
panel discussion by vendor executives of 
the pros and cons of outsourcing 
alternatives. The discussion will include 
business consulting, systems integration 
and systems operations, and relationships 
between these information services 
delivery modes. 

12:00 Report on INPUT'S 1990 Systems 

Integration Program progress and plans. 

Lunch 


12:30 

1:30 


A 


INPUT Consultants will be available to 
discuss with you topics of your interest in 
the systems integration market. 


REGISTER TODAY! 
CALL INPUT 
( 703 ) 847-8670 
FAX (703) 847-6872 




INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and com- 
petitive analysis, INPUT supports client manage- 
ment in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, proprie- 
tary research/consulting, merger/acquisition assis- 
tance, and multiclient studies are provided to users 
and vendors of information systems and services 
(software, processing services, turnkey systems, 
systems integration, professional services, commu- 
nications, and systems/software maintenance and 
support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically ad- 
vanced companies. 


SYSTEMS INTEGRATION: APPLICATION OPPORTUNITIES 

May 3 & 4, 1990, Sheraton International Conference Center, Reston, Virginia 


CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEES 


Clients — Of course, INPUT Systems Integration 
clients may send two representatives as part of their 
service contract. Additional client personnel may 
attend the conference at a charge of $295. 

Non-clients — The first representative of a non-client 
company may attend the conference for $695. 
Additional attendees from the same non-client 
company may attend for $495. 

PAYMENT AND CANCELLATION POLICY 
You may cancel your reservation without a $50 
cancellation fee until April 3, 1990. Cancellations 
must be in writing. INPUT will consider purchase 
order numbers or company checks as proper 
reservations. INPUT reserves the right to make 
changes to this conference without notice. 


ACCOMMODATION 


Only minutes from Washington Dulles International 
Airport and only twenty minutes from downtown 
Washington D.(Z., the Sheraton's International 
Conference Center provides complete conference 
and guest accommodations. The hotel offers the 
finest amenities and accommodations and a very 
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REGISTER TODAY! 

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SI-IRC 2/90 



SOSOP 





Service Agreement 


INPUT’S 1991 

U.S. Systems Operations Program 


Yes! Subscription to INPUT'S U.S. Systems Operations Program: 

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CONDITIONS AGREEMENT — ^The information provided shall be used only by the employees 
of and within the current corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other 
organization or person including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided 
imder this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, 
INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content 
of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 

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SOSOP 11/90 


INPUT 





FIM 












FITPP 





INPUT 


If You Need 
Specific Intelligence 
on 

Opportunities in the 
Federal Computer 
Equipment 
Maintenance 
Market . . . 


■ What are specific agencies’ 
procurement plans through 1995 ? 

■ How do buyers evaluate 
maintenance vendors? 

■ How big is the market, and how 
fast is it growing? 

■ What are successful 
competitors doing? 


. . . You Need the Latest Report 
from INPUT! 


INPUT has released a new report entitled Federal 
Equipment Maintenance Market, 1990-1995 that 
identifies and analyzes hundreds of millions of 
dollars worth of federal computer equipment 
maintenance contracts through GPT 1995. 

And if you act before January 25, 1991, 
you’ll pay $1 75 less than the regular list price for 
the report — a savings of 1 0 percent! 


Federal Equipment Maintenance 
Market, 1990-1995 

Market Analysis and Forecast 

• Current Market Conditions 

• Market Structure 

• Market Forecast 

• Federal Market Issues 

• Competitive Environment 

• Leading Agencies 

Federal User Requirements and Trends 

• Agency Hardware Environment 

• Performance Requirements 

• Agency Acquisition Plans and Preferences 

• Agency Satisfaction with Vendor 
Performance 

• Trends 

Competitive Trends 

• Vendor Participation 

• Vendor Perceptions 

• Discounting and Alliance Practices 

• Maintenance Contractor Selection Criteria 

• Trends 

Key Opportunities 

• Present and Future Programs 

• Equipment Maintenance Opportunities by 
Agency 


If pinpointing procurements was all it did, this 
report would be well worth such a moderate 
price. After all, you have to have this 
intelligence if you are going to know where to 
deploy your sales, marketing, and engineering 
resources to make the most of these 
multimillion-dollar opportunities. 

But INPUT does more than just flag pending 
procurements. 

Answers 

The report puts this specific information in the 
context of both the larger forces shaping the 
market, and the tactical considerations you 
cannot afford to ignore. Its purpose is to give 
you answers to all of the major questions you 
have to address, including: 

• To buyers selecting maintenance providers, 

what is the relative importance of ^ 

performance and contract cost? 

• How do buyers weight other factors in their 
decisions, such as reputation, cost control 
procedures, proposed technical solution, and 
contract type? 

• How big is the equipment maintenance 
market, and which segments are growing 
fastest? 

• How can you shape your business to turn 
budget constraints, computer obsolescence, 
the new emphasis on competition, 
multivendor installations, and widespread 
microcomputer penetration to your 
advantage? 

• Who are the leading vendors in federal 
equipment maintenance, and what strategies 
are they pursuing? 

And other information that lets you shape 
effective strategies for exploiting all kinds of 
equipment maintenance opportunities for the; 
next five years. 




A Competitive Edge 

In addition to this large-scale analysis, 

INPUT'S report concentrates on providing 
specifics on pending procurements together 
with information on agency practices and 
competitive trends. And that gives you an 
edge on companies without access to this kind 
of in-depth, informed analysis. The report 
answers questions about: 

• Which agencies have obligated the largest 
expenditures to equipment maintenance 
over the last two years? 

• What is the total number and dollar value of 
large and midsize systems installed at 
federal agencies? 

• What is the average age of the installed base, 
by agency? 

• What percentage of federal users employ 
third-party maintenance organizations? 
OEMs? In-house maintenance services? 

• What are the present satisfaction levels of 
agencies with their maintenance services? 
What areas do they say need improvement? 

And 86 specific agency procurement 
opportunities, including PAR reference, RFP 
schedule, and funding for GFY 1990-1995, where 
known. 

INPUT is able to provide some of this 
information to you through a careful analysis of 
the OMB/GSA Five-Year Plan submitted in 
compliance with OMB Circular A-11, budget 
requests, and other documents. But we have 
also tapped sources for information not 
available to the general public, including the 
Five-Year Defense Plan and supporting 
documentation. 



INPUT IDENTIFIES THE LEADING AGENCIES for purchase of 
equipment maintenance products and services. This is only one 
kind of market research available in the report, which includes 
market analysis and forecast, competitive trends, key 
opportunities, and user requirement data. 


The result is a distillation of millions of words of 
federal procurement verbiage into a single, clear, 
and concise volume that pintpoints 
opportunities and offers a means of exploiting 
them. This is a powerful competitive weapon in 
a market where having the right information at 
the right time can make all the difference. 

So use the enclosed order form to get your copy 
of Federal Ecjuipment Maintenance Market, 1990- 
1995 today. 

INPUT 

Call, fax, or mall your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


About INPUT 


(3 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPIJT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing services, 
turnkey systems, systems integration, professional 
services, communications, and systems/software 
maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 


North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

Atrium at Glenpointe 
400 Frank W. Burr Blvd. 

Teaneck,NJ 07666 

Tel. (201) 801-0050 Fax (201) 801-0441 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 3864-0531 Fax (03) 3864-4114 




FIFEM 12/90 


INPUT 




How Can You Find — 
and Make the Most 
of — 

International Network 
Service and Support 
Opportunities. . .? 


♦ How big is the market? 

♦ Where is it growing fastest? 

♦ What do users say they require? 
♦ Who are your competitors? 

♦ What is driving growth? 


. . .INPUT Makes It Easy with a New 
Network Service Market Report! 


As networking becomes a strategic necessity for 
modern business, the revenue opportunities in 
network service and support will grow dramatically. 
But how can a service organization best take 
advantage of those opportunities? A new report 
from INPUT, entitled Network Service Opportunities, 
analyzes these opportunities in detail, showing you 
how to shape your service offerings and competitive 
strategies to make the most of the most exciting new 
growth markets in customer service. 

The report represents more than a man-year's worth 
of targeted research into the American and European 
markets, and is a superb value at full price. But 
INPUT is offering you the opportunity to have all of 
the benefits of this research at a considerable savings. 


Network Service Opportunities 


Market Forecast 

• Network Service Components 

• Market Forecast 

• Factors Affecting Growth 

Key User Needs 
•User Networking 

• User Network Service Requirements 

• Future User Requirements 

• User Attitude toward Systems Operations 

• Source of User Services 

• User Requirements for Vendor Services 

• User Interview Comments 

Vendor Requirements 

• Need for Focus 

• Network Development 

• Key Vendor Requirements 

• Factors Influencing Network Service 
Development 

• Opportunities 

• Competitive Environment 

• New Skill Requirements 


If you act before December 31 , 1 990, 
you’ll pay $250 less than the regular list price 
for the report — a savings of over 1 0 percent! 

The opportunities for network support are there; but 
they're not always easy to find. INPUT'S research 
has been carefully designed to track down and 
highlight those opportunities, giving you the 
information you need to focus your resources where 
they can earn you the highest possible return. 

Strategic Analysis 

The market for networking is diverse and confusing, 
and the market for network services reflects these 
characteristics. INPUT'S Network Service 
Opportunities helps you unravel the market to see 
where your company can make money in a whole 
new growth area, answering strategic questions like: 

• How big is the network services market in the 

United States and Western Europe today, and howr 
fast will it grow over the next five years? v 

• Which market segments and services will grow 
most rapidly? Least rapidly? 

• What are the four key factors driving the markets 
for network service and support? 

• Which four factors are inhibiting growth in these 
markets? 

• What do users really require from network service 
providers, and how do those requirements change 
as users grow? 

Tactical Insight 

In addition to these large-scale concerns, the report 
offers insight into the day-to-day tactical questions 
that you have to answer to keep your company 
growing: 

• How do users rate the relative importance of 

hardware maintenance, systems software support, 
applications support, network monitoring, 
network/systems operations, communications 
evaluation, application evaluation, network 
customization, and network planning in the / 
United States and Europe? ' . 


Recommendations for Customer Service 



How can you fight the minitrend toward self- 
service among experienced users in large 
companies? 


• How will the user demand for open networking 
standards affect your service offerings? How 
will you differentiate your company? 


• What new skills should service organizations 
cultivate to be able to exploit the new 
requirements for network support? 


• How can you design and deliver services to 
support the large number of inexperienced 
network users? 


• How can you accommodate the increasing 
demand for design, consulting, and management 
skills in your service offerings? 

• How can you structure service offerings that will 
satisfy the needs of all customers, large and 
small, experienced and inexperienced? 

• How do successful network services vendors rate 
the relative importance of multivendor 
environments, larger skill sets, software 
compatibility, and other market issues? 



The report also goes beyond evaluating these 
tactical issues to offer you specific, research-based 
analysis and recommendations for future action in 
this changing business. 


We Know the Market 

input's customer service analysts have decades of 
experience on both the user and vendor sides of the 
network service question. They have watched the 
market evolve from the beginning, always noting 
growth areas, key trends, and the major 
characteristics of successful vendor strategies. 

And now they have distilled their experience and 
targeted market intelligence into a single-volume 
report designed from the ground up to guide you 
to the most promising opportunities in a very 
important market. 


In-House-Provided Services 



Percent 

Sample Size:U.S. - 28 

Europe - 25 


THE THREAT of do-it-yourself network service is quantified in 
this exhibit from INPUT’S report on Network Service 
Opportunities. 


To make the most of those opportunities, you have to 
have excellent information and incisive analysis. 

INPUT'S Network Service Opportunities offers you 
both. Use the enclosed order form to order your 
copy today. 

# 


INPUT 

Call, or mall your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPlJT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/ consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing services, 
turnkey systems, systems integration, professional 
services, communications, and systems/ software 
maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 

North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

Atrium at Glenpointe 
400 Frank W. Burr Blvd. 

Teaneck, NJ 07666 

Tel. (201) 801-0050 Fax (201) 801-0441 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 

Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgdns-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


INPUT 


I 



For Marketers with a Thousand Questions 
about Service Programs Offered 
by the Seven Giants of 
Large-Systems Service . . . 


A What are the strengths of 
the major vendors? 

A How are service contracts 
structured? 

A How many service 
employees do they have, 
including FEs? 

A What are thier discount 
structures? 

A How do they support 
other vendors’ 
equipment? 



Only INPUT Has the Answers! 


Comprehensive, objective information on what 
your competitors are doing in large-systems 
service — that's what you get from INPUT'S latest 
analysis of the service vendors that dominate your 
market. 


The report provides complete profiles of these 
companies, including the history of their efforts in 
large-systems service, their service demographics, 
and an investigation of their various service 
delivery modes. 


And if you act before March 30, 1990 
you’ll pay $250 less than 
the regular list price 
for the report — a savings of 10%! 

Entitled Service Vendor Analysis — Large Systems, 
this newest INPUT report profiles the seven giants 
of large-systems service: 

• Amdahl • IBM 

• Bull • NCR 

• CDC • Unisys 

• Hitachi 


Service Vendor Analysis— 
L arge Systems 


Service Vendor Profiles 


• Amdahl Corporation 

• Bull HN Information Systems Inc. 

• Control Data Corporation 

• H itachi Data Sy ste m s Co rpo rati o n 

• IBM Corporation 

• NCR Corporation 

• Unisys Corporation 


Large-Systems Service Vendor 
Comparative Tables 


But the report goes on to offer a comprehensive 
strategic commentary on each, outlining the 
pressures on the various vendors, how they are 
responding, and how these repsonses create 
opportunities for established providers or new 
entrants in this fast-growing market. 


With the changes in large-systems service, 
companies have had to reappraise their objectives. 
Even the seven largest players have begun to 
reevaluate their direction and strategy. 


INPUT'S report analyzes the seven giants' service 
business and plans for change: 

• What are the total revenues and service 
revenues of each company, and the percent 
change over the last year? 



• How are they performing on a revenue-per- 
employee basis? 


• How are each vendor's service contracts 
structured? 


• What kind of billable exclusions does each 
vendor have? 


• What are the hourly rates of each vendor, by 
time of day, by time of week, and by time of 
year? 

• What kind of multiyear and prepayment 
discounts does each vendor offer? 

• What other kinds of discounts apply, including 
carry-in, call screens, dollar and unit volume, 
and so on? 


How many service employees does each 
company have, including EEs and CEs? 


INPUT’ 

1280 Villa Street, Mountain View. CA 94041 
415-961-3300 Fax 415-961-3966 


Dear Colleague: 

How much value could you get out of detailed and 
comprehensive analysis of the seven dominant players in the 
large-systems service market? 

How much would it mean to you to be able to know what 
their contract coverage is, what their revenue per employee 
is, how they bill their time, and all of the other nitty-gritty 
details that make large-systems service such a complex and 
lucrative enterprise? 

INPUT has just released the most comprehensive and up-to- 
date report available on this market. Service Vendor 
Analysis — Large Systems. In it, we analyze the service 
organizations, delivery modes, and strategic focus of the 
service organizations of Amdahl, Bull, CEXT, Hitachi, IBM, 
NCR, and Unisys. 

The report is based on in-depth studies of individual 
vendors. The results apply to every company that wants to 
play in this market. 

Why be satisfied with hearsay when you can get 
fundamental market data based on hard facts and careful 
analysis? 

INPUT'S new report offers you all of that. Order it today. 
Regards, , 

I 

Thomas O'Haherty 
Vice President 


I* » I 



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ORDER FORM 

YES! I need answers to all of my questions about what the major players are offering in 
large-systems service! I need INPUT'S report. Service Vendor Analysis — Large Systems, 
today! 

I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send this form 
in by mail. I understa nd that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 


SECTION ONE: Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S report on 

MY ORDER Service Vendor Analysis — Large Systems. 

□ I want to pay $2,250, a savings of $250 off the regular price. I'm ordering 
before March 30, 1990. 

□ I'm ordering after March 30, 1990, for the regular price of $2,500. 


SECTION TWO: □ Enclosed is my check for $ to cover the cost of my order. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

(CHOOSE ONE) □ Charge $ to my American Express card: 

Card # 

Exp. date 

Signature 

□ Bill my company for $ on purchase order number 


California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 
Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: Accepted By INPUT: 


Organization 

Signature 


Name 

Name 


Title 

Title 


Address 

Date 



Telephone 


Signature Date 

(SEE TERMS OTHER SIDE) FLVAasoctn 


INPUT 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person 
including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. 
INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this 
Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT 
shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the 
content of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 


INPUT 



IBM Total Company and Service Revenue Growth 



ServicG RevGiiue o Total Revenue 

Growth Rate Growth Rate 


THE GROWTH RATES of IBM’s total revenue versus service revenues 
are graphed in the above report exhibit. This relationship is crucial. It tells 
you how much room a company has to manipulate service pricing, and 
suggests how likely such manipulation might be. 


Company Trends 
and How They Affect You 

INPUT analyzes changing market 
issues, the pressures being brought to 
bear on the dominant players, and the 
effects on companies offering service 
in this environment: 

• Where will the strategic focus of 
each company be during the next 
few years? 

• What does IBM's relatively small 
proportion of service revenues 
mean for competitors? 

• What are the overall trends for 
service revenue growth versus total 
revenue growth? 

' TVhat effect will IBM's bold strokes 
service mean for other 
companies' offerings? 

• What impacts do the services 
offered by VARs and OEMs have 
on the total large-systems service 
picture? 

• How are the service organizations of each 
company structured? 

• How are CAD tools, RE and hardwired data 
communications, network consulting, and other 
innovations changing the overall service 
picture? 

And more... 

This information can spell the difference between 
success and failure in determining pricing, 
developing service offerings, structuring contract 
coverage, even in knowing when and how far to 
extend or reduce present ser^uce operations. 


INPUT'S Service Vendor Analysis — Large Systems 
puts the resources of one of the most respected 
authorities on service at your fingertips. The 
report provides information to assist in planning 
your company strategy. 

So use the enclosed order form 
to order your copy today! 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



About INPUT 




INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 


Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research/consulting, merger/ acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


North America 


INPUT OFFICES 

International 


Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Read, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 
Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 



FLVA 2/90 


INPUT 





If an Objective Analysis of 
Users’ TPM Requirements 
Would Make Your Job Easier... 


% 



A What level of system 

availability do users require? 

A What selection criteria do 
they use? 

A How do they rate TPM 
compared to manufacturers’ 
service offerings? 

A What is the relative 
importance of support, 
response time, and parts 
availability to users? 

A How important is hardware 
support? Response time? 


...Then INPUT Just Made Your Job Easier ( 


We've just produced a new INPUT report that 
gives you the best and most comprehensive 
market intelligence on third-party maintenance 
available. 

Information on how buyers rate third-party 
maintenance offerings, on what they demand from 
third-party suppliers, and on what criteria they 
use to decide who will provide this lucrative 
service — INPUT'S Analysis of Third-Party 
Maintenance gives you all of these powerful 
competitive tools, and more. 


Analysis of Third-Party Maintenance 


User Service Requirements — All TPM Users 


• TPM Selection Criteria 

• TPM Contractual Coverage 

• TPM Services Performance Analysis 

User Service Requirement.s — Large Systems 


• TPM Selection Criteria 

• TPM Contractual Coverage 

• TPM Services Performance Analysis 

User Service Requirements — 
Midrange Systems 

• TPM Selection Criteria 

• TPM Contractual Coverage 

• TPM Services Performance Analysis 

User Service Requirements — 
PCA/Vorkstation Systems 


• TPM Selection Criteria 

• TPM Contractual Coverage 

• TPM Services Performance Analysis 


And if you act before April 30, 1990, 
you’ll pay $250 less than the regular list price 
for the report— a savings of 10%! 

INPUT interviewed 178 of the top information 
systems executives of companies that rely on TPM 
for service of large systems, midrange systems, 
and workstations/PCs. Every aspect of the 
service markets was explored: how the markets 
are changing; what companies look for in service 
providers; how they weigh manufacturers versus 
third parties; how factors like price, quality, 
system availability, remote service, and others 
influence the purchase decision; and more. 

Reliable Competitive Data for Systems 
and Software 

The resulting data has been compiled into a 
timely, manageable, and coherent distillation of 
the major competitive factors in TPM today. 

Analysis of Third-Party Maintenance 
is not just a report. It is intelligence 
organized to give you a weapon for enhancing 
your products' strengths. 

The volume includes the following kinds of 
competitive information for hardware 
maintenance and support: 

• The relative importance of price and quality in 
service and support agreements 

• Users' demands for system availability, ongoing 
maintenance, and parts availability, and how 
TPM companies compare with manufacturers 

• The growing requirements for three-shift, 24- 
hour-a-day contract coverage 

• How users decide between TPM vendors and 
manufacturers for hardware support 

• The ever-increasing demands for system up- 
time, and how TPM companies and 
manufacturers measure up 

• How TPM companies have lost a significant ^ 
advantage now that several large manufacturers 
service equipment from other vendors 


ORDER FORM 


YES! I need objective information on users' requirements for third-party maintenance! I 
need INPUT'S report. Analysis of Third-Party Maintenance, today! 


I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send this form 
in by mail. I understand that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 


SECTION ONE: Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S report on 

MY ORDER Analysis of Tliird-Farty Maintenance. 

□ I want to pay $2,250, a savings of $250 off the regular price. I'm ordering 
before April 30, 1990. 

□ I'm ordering after April 30, 1990, for the regular price of $2,500. 


SECTION TWO: 

□ 

Enclosed is my check for $ 

to cover the cost of my order. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 



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□ 

Charge $ 

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on purchase order number 


California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 
Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Titfe 

Title 

Address 

Date 


telephone 


Signanjre DaE 

(SEE TERMS OTHER SIDE) FTUR 390 tJn 


INPUT 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person 
including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. 
INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this 
Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT 
shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the 
content of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 


INPUT 


Analysis of Third-Party Maintenance also 
investigates the increasingly important area 
of software support, with detailed analysis 
of: 

• What kind of software support do users 
typically receive, versus what they 
require? 

• How do users rate the importance of 
ancillary services like training, planning, 
network design, and network 
management, and how do they laie the 
service they get from TPM vendors? 

• How willing are customers to use TPM 
for growth products like applications 
support, operating system support, and 
operator education and training? 

• How do users respond to existing 
discount programs, and what impact do 
these programs have on their willingness 
to change vendors? 

And more on the market and competitive 
forces that are changing the way you'll do 
business in the 1990s. 


TPM System Availability Satisfaction at 
Each Requirement Level 



System Availability 
Requirement Level (Percent) 

Percent of Sample at Requirement Level 

Percent of Users Satisfied at the Requirement 
Level 


How will you have to improve service? 

How will you achieve the levels of system 
availability demanded today? 

How will you respond to the entry of large 
manufacturers into multivendor maintenance? 
How will you get the competitive information you 
need to keep growing in a changing market? 

INPUT'S Analysis of Third-Party Maintenance 
provides guidance and information on all of these 
questions, and more. Use the enclosed order form 
to order your copy today! 


The relative lack of satisfaction among the most demanding 
customers shows how demands for system availability have 
skyrocketed. INPUT’S report gives you hard data to evaluate the 
importance of this trend for your business. 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 




About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/ software maintenance and support). 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 

INPUT OFFICES 

North America 

International 

Headquarters 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

New York 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 

Paris 

Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 

75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

Tokyo 

Saida Building 

4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 

Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 




FTUR a'90 


INPUT 




If You Need an Edge in the 
Federal Financial Systems Market... 



> Where are the major 
active procurements 
right now? 

>Where are the financial 
systems growth areas? 

4“ Will Reform 88 ever 
affect you? 

^What are the Impacts 
of the JFMIP? 

4^ Who are the dominant 
competitors, and what 
are they doing? 


...INPUT Can Show You Exactly Whert 
the Opportunities Are! 


The federal financial systems market is one of 
the government markets with the highest potential for 
explosive growth. 

And INPUT has just published a new report 
titled Federal Financial Systems Market, 1990-1995, 
designed to give you the competitive advantage that 
comes with targeted intelligence on agency 
requirements, legislative impacts, and where the major 
procurement opportunities are. 

At full price, it is an exceptionally cost-effective 
way to concentrate your resources on only the best 
available opportunities. 

And if you act before November 5, 
you’ll pay $9u less than the regular list price 
for the report— a savings of 10 percent! 

The report contains two kinds of information 
that you cannot find anywhere else in such a 


Federal Financial Systems Market, 
1990-1995 

Market Analysis and Forecast 

• JFMIP Background 

• Financial System Standardization Measures 

• Agency Awareness of Regulations 

• Impediments to Vendors 

• Budget Constraints and Software 
Procurement alternatives 

• Procurement Opportunities 

• Market Forecast 

• Conclusions and Recommendations 

Competitive Considerations 

• Current Software Vendors 

• Future Software Vendors 

• Impact on Hardware Vendors 

Key Opportunities 

• Financial Systems Opportunities by Agency 


concentrated form. The first is in-depth analysis of this 
market, including all the factors now working to 
enhance its growth. 

And the second is specific, tactical information 
on what the procurement plans 
of the major agencies are, 
how big they are, when the RTFs are due, and 

what the selection criteria are likely to be. 

The kinds of tactical questions covered in the 
report include: 

• Which seven federal agencies represent the hottest 
current opportunities for financial software vendors, 
either at the RFI or RFP level? 

• What criteria are used to evaluate financial system 
vendors, and how do they differ from agency to 
agency? 

• How important are custom programming service^ I 
agencies needing financial systems? 

• What strategies have Computer Data Systems 
Incorporated and KPMG Peat Marwick used to sell 
in the federal market? Why have they been 
successful where others have failed? 

• Which firms not currently on the GSA schedule may 
become significant competitors in the future, and 
why? 

• How can strategic alliances help you penetrate the 
financial systems market? 

And other questions concerning the types and 
sizes of opportunities for financial systems 
procurements by agency. 

The Highest Possible Returns 

As you know, the laws of supply and demand 
sometimes do not have the most influence on which 
agencies buy which financial systems in the federal 
market. 

Other forces, including attempts at 
standardization, agency requirements, legislative 
initiatives of one kind or another, attempts at refom^ |i 
and the constriction of federal budgets sometimes 
predominate. 


ORDER FORM 


YES! I need an edge in the Federal financial systems markets. I need the concentrated 
intelligence in INPUT'S report Federal Financial Systems Market, 1990-1995. 

I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send this 
form in by mail. I understand that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 


SECTION ONE: 
MY ORDER 


Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S Federal Financial 

Systems Market, 1990-1995 report at the fee of $950. 


SECTION TWO: 
TERMS OF PAYMENT 
(CHOOSE ONE) 


□ Enclosed is my check for $ to cover the cost of my order. 

□ Charge $ to my American Express card: 

Card # 

Exp. date 

Name as it appears on my card 

Signature 

□ Bill my company for $ on purchase order number 


California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 
Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organizatian 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


SignalLre Date 

(SEE TERMS OTHER SIDE) FFIN 1090 


INPUT 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or 
person — including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations — without written 
consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information 
provided under this Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be 
accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result 
from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. 


INPUT 


INPUT 


. Federal Financial Systems Market, 1990-1995 
analyzes these forces in detail, bringing to bear 
INPUT'S tremendous research resources and our staffs 
decades of experience in the federal maze on such 
questions as: 

• How big is the market for federal financial systems, 
and how fast is it growing? 

• Which delivery modes (professional services, 
software, and computer equipment) represent the 
best growth opportunities? 

• Which procurement mode do most agencies use for 
obtaining core-compliant software? 

• How can you use the Joint Financial Management 
Improvement Program (JFMIP) to help you 
penetrate this market? 

• How big is the market for federal financial systems? 
How fast is it growing? Which category 
(professional services, software, equipment) is 
growing fastest? 

• How have GAO audit targets affected the market for 
financial systems? 

• How will the Financial Integrity Act of 1982, Reform 

' 88, OMB Circular A-127, and GAO Title 2 affect your 
/ -selling in these markets? 

• How are some agencies getting around the 
requirements for core-compliant financial software? 

INPUT goes into all of these subjects — and 
many others — in depth, so that you can understand 
how the larger market forces are affecting financial 
systems procurements, and can concentrate your sales 
and marketing resources where they will yield the 
highest possible returns. 

Concentrated Intelligence 

The information in this study represents 
months of research, including interviews with key 
agency procurement officers and an exhaustive search 
and analysis of vast numbers of federal documents 
related to financial systems procurement. And all of 
it — sun^eys, interviews, search, and analysis — have 
been tempered by our unmatched experience in 
uncovering opportunities in one of the most complex 
markets in the world. 

The result is five chapters of concentrated intelligence 
that can help you target the best procurements — 
intelligence that would be impossible for you to 
V duplicate on your own. 


Federal Financial Systems 
Market Forecast 



□ Professional Services 
^ Software Products 

□ Computer Equipment 


SIZE AND GROWTH RATE DATA for three key segments of 
the Federal financial systems market are shown in this 
graph, which is typical of the kind of information contained in 
the INPUT report. 


But you don't have to. Because to get the same 
results — to get all of the benefits of one of the most 
sophisticate research efforts ever conducted in the 
federal market — all you have to do is ask. 

So use the enclosed order form to ask for your 
copy of Federal Financial Systems, 1990-1995 today. 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 





About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/ software maintenance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT OFFICES 


North America 


International 


San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 


London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 


New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201)299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, V A 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847 6872 


Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 

Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, West Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


INPUT 


1 


The Most 
Comprehensive 
Overview of the 
Federal Computer 
Security Market 
Available Today . . . 


✓ Complete Market Analysis and 
Forecast 

✓ Trends in Federal User Requirements 

✓ What the Competition Is Doing 

✓ Analysis of Legislation and Budget 
Constraints 


✓ Where the Opportunities Are 


. . . A Competitive Advantage for Federal 
Computer Security Vendors 


You rarely have access to this kind of market 
intelligence in any market, let alone one as complex 
and volatile as the federal computer security market. 

But INPUT has just released a report entitled Federal 
Computer Security Market, 1990-1995 that gives 
vendors access to highly focused research on market 
and technology trends, federal user requirements, 
competitive trends, and where current and future 
opportunities lie for those flexible enough — and 
well-enough informed — to exploit them. 

A report with this much distilled data and analysis 
would be worth full price to any vendor serious 
about selling to the federal government. 

But if you act before November 30, 1 990, 
you can pay $1 75 less than the regular list price 
for the report — a savings of 1 0 percent! 

Changing user requirements, the dictates of six 
different security watchdog agencies, the 
contradictory pronouncements of Congress — these 
all make the security market tough to plan for, tough 
to understand, tough to penetrate efficiently. But 
input's report concentrates man-years of research 
and decades of federal market experience into a 
sharply focused competitive weapon that helps you 
do all of this, and more. 

Exhaustive 

INPUT systematically explores the market, the 
requirements of users, the activities of competitors, 
and the opportunities hidden in millions of words of 
federal reports. We then give you answers to the 
questions that will have the biggest impact on your 
success: 

• What will the actual effect of the Computer 
Security Act of 1987 be in an age of tightening 
budgets? 

• Exactly what roles do the GSA, OMB, NSA, NIST, 
GAO, and PCIE each play in the computer security 
market? 

• How has the move toward more open networking 
systems opened opportunities for security 
vendors? 

• How has bureaucratic maneuvering reduced the 
importance of the NSA and NIST staffs dedicated 
to computer security? 


• How big is the market? Where are the real 
opportunities in a market that is showing a 
sluggish overall growth rate right now? Where 
will the future opportunities be? 

• What trends in technology and the industry will 
affect agencies' security requirements through 
FY 1995? 

• What are the major competitive trends in federal 
computer security? 

• How big are the vendors in this market, and how 
dependent are they on the federal market for their 
revenues? 

• How are teaming patterns changing? 

And hundreds of other answers about every aspect 
of the federal computer security market. This report 
is an exhaustive survey that leaves readers with 
information they can use immediately for long-term 
planning and in their daily marketing and sales 
efforts. I 

Practical, Tactical Intelligence 

One of the things that sets INPUT'S federal reports 
apart is their provision of information that can be 
used directly to enhance sales. We combine the 
decades of experience of our senior staff with 
targeted survey data and thorough research in 
existing agency documentation to find unexploited 
opportunities. We also use our sophisticated 
research infrastructure to answer questions about the 
people and institutions that make your market: 

• What are the product selection criteria of the major 
players? 

• What are their acquisition plans now and in the 
future? 

• How important are ease of implementation, 
training features, price, and the vendor's federal 
experience in the procurement decision? 

• What do the big agencies require from vendors in 
software, encryption, support, price, hardware, 
training, and experience? 

• What roles will GSA schedules, RFPs, and other [| 

procurements play? I 


National Computer Systems Laboratory 



THE NAMES, PHONE NUMBERS, and responsibilities of the key liaison personnel in the National Computer Systems 
Laboratory are just one example of the kind of detailed, practical intelligence you get in Federal Computer Security Market, 
1990-1995. This illustrates an INPUT specialty: information for day-to-day use in the market that exists, not abstract 
theorizing. 



How do large users evaluate vendors' security 
performance? 

What type of vendors do they prefer? 


• What do agencies want vendors to do to improve 
their products and services? 


• What impacts will European computer security 
standards have on your business, and how can 
you accommodate them? 

• What have the various agencies done and not done 
to comply with CSA 1987? What kind of 
opportunities does this afford you? 


To duplicate this study would require not just the 
creation of a highly efficient research machine from 
scratch, but several years of actual digging through 
the paper blizzard that hides some of the most 
lucrative contract opportunities in the federal 
computer market from view. 

But to get the study results requires nothing more 
than a couple of minutes of your time to specify your 
order. 

Why not take that time now? Fill out the enclosed 
order form and send it in today. 


• What are the likely futures for computer security 
measures and agency requirements two to five 
years out? 

And more on the specific developments that can give 
you and your company a competitive edge in a 
market where good information is more important 
than ever. 

This report has it all. If you need information to help 
you understand the market as a whole, it's here. If 
you need intelligence to help you understand your 
competitors, it's here, too. And if you need analysis 
to help you understand specific sales opportunities, 
you can find it here as well. 


INPUT 

Call, fax, or mail your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPL/T supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing services, 
turnkey systems, systems integration, professional 
services, communications, and systems/software 
maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Fomied as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 

North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


INPUT 



Are You 
Ready for 
Outsourcing? 


^ How can you make the Go/No Go 
decision? 

1^ What are the rewards? The pitfalis? 

^ How big is the market? 

> What kinds of companies have 
succeeded best? 

^ How should you structure 
outsourcing relationships? 

^ How will outsourcing change 
your organization? 




Get Ready — Get the Answers — 

With INPUTS New Report! *" 


The potential rewards of outsourcing are 
tremendous. But so are the risks. A new report from 
INPUT entitled Informatioii Systems and 
Outsourcing — A Strategic Assessment puts 
outsourcing in perspective by giving IS management 
and vendors a crisp analysis of risk and reward 
potential in the context of today's information 
environment! 

Analyses of the major outsourcing vendors, the 
increasing role of professional services, contract and 
personnel pitfalls, market size and growth rates, and 
a comprehensive conceptual framework IS 
management can use to evaluate outsourcing on a 
case-by-case basis — these are all provided by 
input's report. But the report also covers a 


Information Systems and Outsourcing 
A Strategic Assessment 

Outsourcing — Past and Present 

• A Historical Perspective 

• What Is Different 

• A Working Definition 

Information Systems Perspectives 

• Driving Forces 

• IS Organization in the 1990s 

• Information Systems Strategy and Outsourcing 

• Outsourcing Opportunities 

Outsourcing and Vendor Capabilities 

• Vendor Categorization 

• Systems Operations and Systems Integration 

• Vendor Support for Organizational Issues 

• Vendor Capabilities 

• Outsourcing and Systems Management 

Outsourcing — Decision and Selection 

• Outsourcing Decision Factors 

• ClientA/endor Relationship 

• Vendor Selection 

• Managing the Vendor 

• Organizational Impacts 

• Insourcing 

• Information Systems Outsourcing Benefits 

Conclusions and Recommendations 


historical perspective on outsourcing, major market 
forces, vendor selection criteria, organizational 
impacts, analyses of vendors and their strategies, and 
more. 

And if you act before December 1 4, 1 990, 
you’ll pay $1 50 less than the regular list price 
for the report — a savings of 1 0 percent! 

There is no question that outsourcing represents a 
major shift in focus for both vendors and users. The 
only question is who will benefit most. We believe 
that to exploit the outsourcing opportunity requires 
the most comprehensive information and the best 
analysis available. Information Systems and 
Outsourcing — A Strategic Assessment is researched 
and written to give you exactly that. 

Adding Value 

Ever since Kodak contracted out for the majority of 
its information systems function, companies have 
been wondering how they might reconfigure their IS | 
effort to allow them to concentrate on the area where 
they add the most value: the architecture, planning, 
and implementation of strategic systems. INPUT'S 
report tackles that issue, along with others like: 

• What are the key benefits to be derived from the 
five basic categories of outsourcing? 

• What are the various types of outsourcing 
relationships and what are their advantages and 
disadvantages? 

• What are the pitfalls in managing the ongoing 
vendor relationship? 

• What are the key factors in analyzing whether you 
should outsource? 

• What kind of organizational impacts can you 
expect from an outsourcing relationship? 

• How can you define business objectives for 
outsourcing relationships? 

• How can you structure these agreements to give 
your company the greatest possible benefit? 

• How can you resolve the inherent conflict in the 
perspectives of the organization and the IS 
department? 

• How will the major market forces of globalization, 
increasing rate of business change, and 
specialization affect the outsourcing trend? 


In short, INPUT'S 
report examines all of 
the pressures related 

n i outsourcing, and 
lalyzes in detail how 
they are likely to 
transform the IS 
organization in the 
1990s. 

The Vendor 
View 

But INPUT does not 
stop there. Our 
researchers also 
provide valuable 
information on 
outsourcing vendors, 
the market they play 
in, and how their 
product and service 
offerings are being 
forced to evolve. The 
report answers your 
questions about: 

• How big is the market now, how fast is it growing, 
I and how big will it be for each of the next five 
years? 

• What are the outsourcing strategies of eight key 
competitors in this field? 

• How do outsourcing buyers rate various vendor 
capabilities in order of importance? 

• Where are the best outsourcing opportunities 
today? Where will they be in the near future? 
What are the forces driving the market in that 
direction? 

• What types of outsourcing relationships are 
becoming common among users and vendors? 

• How is the willingness of users and buyers to 
make longer-term commitments to outside 
vendors for larger contracts affecting the 
outsourcing market? 


Outsourcing Benefits 


Outsourcing 

Category 

Benefits 

Costs 

Skills 

Access 

Rapid 

Response 

Use of Skills 

Manage- 
ment Time 

Oper. 

Cap. 

Vendor 

IS 

Applications 

management 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Systems 

operations 

X 

X 

X 

X 



X 

Transition 

management 



X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Applications 

maintenance 

X 



X 


X 

X 

Systems 

integration 



X 

X 

X 


X 


THE FIVE BENEFITS of outsourcing are used to form a matrix with the five different 
outsourcing categories to help IS management determine where the best opportunities lie for 
their companies. 

Outsourcing is unique. And you can't just ignore it. 
IS managers and vendors are going to be forced to 
make a conscious decision on what to do about 
outsourcing. 

That's why INPUT'S report on Information Systems 
and Outsourcing — A Strategic Assessment can be so 
valuable for you. We put all of the resources of our 
sophisticated research infrastructure behind the 
effort to come up with information on this subject. 
And then we put some of the finest minds in the 
business to work on it to come up with incisive 
analysis and clear, practical recommendations for 
action. 

Why not put this powerful research and analysis to 
work for you? Use the enclosed order form to order 
your copy of Information Systems and Outsourcing — A 
Strategic Assessment today. 


And other questions you have to have answered if 
you are going to be able to shape your business so 
that you can reap outsourcing's rewards. 

Clear, Practical Recommendations 

Never has an issue had so much potential to change 
the way you do business. Never has an issue 
involved so many different aspects of information 
management. Never has an issue carried so many 
possible benefits, or had the potential for negative 
impacts. 


INPUT 

Call, fax, or mail your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


o 


About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing services, 
turnkey systems, systems integration, professional 
services, communications, and systems/software 
maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 

North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgbns-Niederkleen, Gem'iany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


UIOUT 1 1/90 



INPUT 



) 


How Can You Find — 
and Make the Most 
of — 

International Network 
Service and Support 
Opportunities. . .? 


♦ How big is the market? 

♦ Where is it growing fastest? 

♦ What do users say they require? 
♦ Who are your competitors? 

♦ What is driving growth? 


. . . INPUT Makes It Easy with a New 
Network Service Market Report! 


As networking becomes a strategic necessity for 
modern business, the revenue opportunities in 
network service and support will grow dramatically. 
But how can a service organization best take 
advantage of those opportunities? A new report 
from INPUT, entitled Network Service Opportunities, 
analyzes these opportunities in detail, showing you 
how to shape your service offerings and competitive 
strategies to make the most of the most exciting new 
growth markets in customer service. 

The report represents more than a man-year's worth 
of targeted research into the American and European 
markets, and is a superb value at full price. But 
INPUT is offering you the opportunity to have all of 
the benefits of this research at a considerable savings. 


Network Service Opportunities 


Market Forecast 

• Network Service Components 

• Market Forecast 

• Factors Affecting Growth 

Key User Needs 
•User Networking 

• User Network Service Requirements 

• Future User Requirements 

• User Attitude toward Systems Operations 

• Source of User Services 

• User Requirements for Vendor Services 

• User Interview Comments 

Vendor Requirements 

• Need for Focus 

• Network Development 

• Key Vendor Requirements 

• Factors Influencing Network Service 
Development 

• Opportunities 

• Competitive Environment 

• New Skill Requirements 


If you act before December 31 , 1 990, 
you’ll pay $250 less than the regular list price 
for the report — a savings of over 1 0 percent! 

The opportunities for network support are there; but 
they're not always easy to find. INPUT'S research 
has been carefully designed to track down and 
highlight those opportunities, giving you the 
information you need to focus your resources where 
they can earn you the highest possible return. 

Strategic Analysis 

The market for networking is diverse and confusing, 
and the market for network services reflects these 
characteristics. INPUT'S Network Service 
Opportunities helps you unravel the market to see 
where your company can make money in a whole 
new growth area, answering strategic questions like: 

• How big is the network services market in the 

United States and Western Europe today, and how 
fast will it grow over the next five years? ( 

• Which market segments and services will grow 
most rapidly? Least rapidly? 

• What are the four key factors driving the markets 
for network service and support? 

• Which four factors are inhibiting growth in these 
markets? 

• What do users really require from network service 
providers, and how do those requirements change 
as users grow? 

Tactical Insight 

In addition to these large-scale concerns, the report 
offers insight into the day-to-day tactical questions 
that you have to answer to keep your company 
growing: 

• How do users rate the relative importance of 
hardware maintenance, systems software support, 
applications support, network monitoring, 
network/systems operations, communications 
evaluation, application evaluation, network 
customization, and network planning in the 
United States and Europe? 


Recommendations for Customer Service 




How can you fight the minitrend toward self- 
service among experienced users in large 
companies? 

How will the user demand for open networking 
standards affect your service offerings? How 
will you differentiate your company? 

What new skills should service organizations 
cultivate to be able to exploit the new 
requirements for network support? 

How can you design and deliver services to 
support the large number of inexperienced 
network users? 

How can you accommodate the increasing 
demand for design, consulting, and management 
skills in your service offerings? 

How can you structure service offerings that will 
satisfy the needs of all customers, large and 
small, experienced and inexperienced? 

How do successful network services vendors rate 
the relative importance of multivendor 
environments, larger skill sets, software 
compatibility, and other market issues? 

The report also goes beyond evaluating these 
tactical issues to offer you specific, research-based 
analysis and recommendations for future action in 
this changing business. 

We Know the Market 

input's customer service analysts have decades of 
experience on both the user and vendor sides of the 
network service question. They have watched the 
market evolve from the beginning, always noting 
growth areas, key trends, and the major 
characteristics of successful vendor strategies. 

And now they have distilled their experience and 
targeted market intelligence into a single-volume 
report designed from the ground up to guide you 
to the most promising opportunities in a very 
important market. 


In-House-Provided Services 



Percent 

Sample Size:U.S. - 28 

Europe - 25 


THE THREAT of do-it-yourself network service is quantified in 
this exhibit from INPUT'S report on Network Service 
Opportunities. 


To make the most of those opportunities, you have to 
have excellent information and incisive analysis. 

INPUT'S Network Service Opport unities offers you 
both. Use the enclosed order form to order your 
copy today. 

Call, fax, or mail your order to any 
INPUT office listed on the back 
of this brochure 




About INPUT 


( 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing services, 
turnkey systems, systems integration, professional 
services, communications, and systems/software 
maintenance and support). 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international research 
and consulting firm. Clients include more than 100 
of the world's largest and most technically 
advanced companies. 


INPUT Offices 

North America 

San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

Atrium at Glenpointe 
400 Frank W. Burr Blvd. 

Teaneck, NJ 07666 

Tel. (201) 801-0050 Fax (201) 801-0441 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 

Tel. (703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

International 

London 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWIY 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 


Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6 

Kanda Sakuma-cho, Chiyoda-ku 

Tokyo 101, Japan 

Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


FCLAN 12/90 



GXXX 



> 



Customer Service Organizations— 
How to Recover from Declining 

Equipment Revenue Growth 


• Companies must reduce dependence on 
low-growth markets in order to survive 
in the 1990s. 

• Typically, 75% of customer service 
revenues are provided by equipment 
maintenance, which is growing less than 
4% per annum. 

• Use INPUT'S report to find out how to 
enter systems operations and disaster 
recovery markets using existing skills 
and resources. 

• Find out how to develop the service into 
a complete 'total solution' package. 



• Systems Operations 

• Disaster Recovery 

The key to declining 
equipment revenue 
growth 


Systems Support Opportunities for ^ 
Customer Services Vendors in 
Western Europe, 1990-1995 


Are you interested in finding out how to increase 
your revenues by 20%, rather than depending on the 
current low growth rate for equipment maintenance 
revenues? 

INPUT'S new report on systems operations 
(facilities management) and disaster recovery can 
help you achieve higher growth. 

Entitled Systems Support Opportunities for Customer 
Services Vendors in Western Europe, 1990-1995, the 
report addresses the issue of falling growth rates 
from equipment maintenance revenues and gives 
valuable strategic guidance on entering two new 
markets: 

• Systems operations 

• EMsaster recovery 


Western Europe Systems Operations 
Market Growth 
1990-1995 


User-Owned 

System 

(Professional 

Services) 



□ 1990 
^ 1995 


Vendor-Owned 

System 

(Processing 

Service) 



User Expenditures ($ Millions) 


Western Europe 
Disaster Recovery Services 
Subsector Market Growth — 1990-1995 

DBS Subsector 


Cold 1 



Restart ^ 






Warm | 



Restart ^ 


Hot 1 
Restart ^ 


m 1990 C 

Ancillary 
Services ^ 


□ 1995 

1 1 1 


User Expenditures ($ Millions) 


INPUT believes that these markets are available to 
customer service organisations almost immediately, 
using existing skills and resources. INPUT'S report 
puts forward a strategy for entering each market, 
providing you with vital information such as: 

• Size of unpenetrated market 

• Market segmentation 

• Competitive environment 

• Market size and growth forecasts by country 

• User levels of interest 







Order Form 


INPUT'S 

Research Studies 


Yes! 

Please enter my 
order as described: 


Systems Support Opportunities for Customer Services Vendors 
in Western Europe, 1990-1995 report at the fee of $2,550 each. 


TERMS OF PAYMENT 

Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current corporate 
structiu’e of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person including 
parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises 
its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this Agreement and believes the 
information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss 
or expense which may result from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. 
INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content of the program in response to changing 
client requirements. 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
(415) 961-3300 
Telex 171407 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Onganizalion 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


Sgnaiure 


Date 


CEPRS 8/90 us 


INPUT 



Disaster Recovery 

INPUT believes that the disaster recovery market 
offers good growth potential, as it is currently 
relatively unpenetrated and there is a high level of 
user interest. The increasingly high reliance on 
computer equipment within industry is also driving 
the market, as users realise the effect that a disaster 
could have on their business operations. 

input's report gives valuable information on this 
market. It breal« the market down into three 
sectors: 

• Cold restart 

• Warm restart 

• Hot restart 

INPUT'S report will tell you which sector is growing 
the fastest and will highlight some of the differences 
in the major country markets. 

The report also warns of possible pitfalls to avoid 
when setting up a disaster recovery service, and lists 
essential elements that a disaster recovery service 
\ should contain. This is essential information for 
companies traditionally deriving revenues only 
from maintenance activities. 

Systems Operations 

The systems operations market is slightly different 
from that of disaster recovery. User levels of 
interest are lower, but the market is less penetrated. 
INPUT divides the market into two sectors: 

• User-owned equipment 

• Vendor-owned equipment 

INPUT'S report explains user attitudes to this 
service and describes the choices available to 
vendors when setting up a systems operations 
service. It describes two strategies and tracks the 
probable future development of each. The report 
can be a valuable contribution to planning for 
companies considering entering this market. By 
adopting INPUT'S strategy, companies can reduce 
the need for substantial investment in a market that 
is traditionally costly in terms of skills required. 

Service Packaging 

The report discusses this important future challenge: 
to be able to be a client's sole provider of service for 
all computer equipment, taking care of not only the 
maintenance, but also the operations, contingency 
planning and consultancy. 


REPORT CONTENTS 

Revenue Growth Opportunities 


• The Need for New Markets 

• Market Opportunities 

• Packaging Total Solution Service 


Systems Operations Opportunities 


• Drivers and Inhibitors 

• Participants 

• Competitive Pressures 

• Country Market Forecast and Growth 

• Service Strategies 

• Problems Management Leverage 

• User Attitude 

• Need to Market 

• Vendor Challenges 


Disaster Recovery Service 


• Drivers and Inhibitors 

• Participants 

• Country Market Forecast and Growth 

• Subsector Definitions and Market 
Growth 

• Level of Service 

• Vendor Opportunities 

• Potential for Success 

• Stimulating Interest 

• Service Packaging 

• User Interest Levels 


Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


f 


About INPUT 


INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPLTT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research/consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialisation. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically ad vanced companies 



INPUT OFFICES 


North America 


International 


San Francisco 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 

Tel. (415) 961-3300 

Fax (415) 961-3966 

New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
Tel. (201) 299-6999 
Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 
Vienna, VA 22182 
Tel. (703) 847-6870 
Fax (703) 847-6872 


London 

Piccadilly Flouse, 33/37 Regent Street 

London SWl Y 4NF, England 

Tel. (071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

Tel. (33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Frankfurt 
Sudetenstrasse 9 

D-6306 Langgons-Niederkleen, West Germany 
Tel. (0) 6447-7229 Fax (0) 6447-7327 

Tokyo 

Saida Building, 4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
Tel. (03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


CEPRS 8/90 


INPUT 



Network Support — 

A Customer Service Opportunity 


input's Report Will Help You to Work Out 
Your Strategies for Network Servicing 


It will provide you with: 

• market size for 1990 in Europe and the USA 

• market forecast for 1995 and growth rates 

• recommendations on how to develop 
network servicing 


and will discuss: 

• user and vendor issues 

• the likely future development of networks 

• the impact of future developments on 
service 



The network servicing 
market is confused 
and badly defined 

Accurate market 
information is 
therefore essential 
for success 


The Challenge of Network Service in 


Criticality of Data Networks Demands 
Full Service Solutions 

Data communications networks are now becoming 
critical to user organisations, but the service and 
support necessary to maintain uptime and 
accessibility remains fragmented. Users are left 
exposed in a vital area of their information 
systems infrastructure, as only a few vendors offer 
comprehensive approaches to network support. 

A Confused Market 

There is a high degree of confusion in the network 
servicing market. One of the problems is that 
there are differences of opinion over what 
comprises a network; users tend to take a wider 
view of networks than vendors. It is essential, 
therefore, that vendors involved in this market 
should be aware of these differences in order to 
understand the needs of their clients. INPUT'S 
report identifies these issues. 

Market Inhibitors and Drivers 

The report. The Challenge of Network Service in 
Customer Services, discusses the forces inhibiting 
the growth of the market. One of these is the 
reliability of the equipment which reduces the 
requirement for maintenance and hence the 
opportunities for vendors. Also, there is a 
relatively high percentage of users who opt for 
self-service (usually large and experienced users) 
and around one-third of users do not recognise the 
existence of a formal network service contract. 
Vendors need this type of market size and growth 
information in order to plan their strategies. 

The report also identifies the driving forces for 
network servicing, such as: 

• a growing user base 

• many new applications 


Report Contents 

Market Opportunities 

• Market forecast and growth 

• Competitive environment 

• Service opportunities 

• New skill requirements 

Key User Needs 

• User networking 

• Network service requirements: 

- access 

- small users 

- inexperienced users 

- service needs 

• Future user requirements 

• Systems operations 

• Source of service 

• User comments 


The Vendor Challenge 

• Network development 

• Key vendor issues: 

- multivendor environment 

- wider range of skills 

- software compatibility 

- wider range of service 

• Service development: 

- standards 

- intelligent buildings 

• Opportunities: 

- network disaster recovery 

- network implementation 

• Vendor recommendations 

b 


Order Form 


INPUT'S 

Research Studies 


Yes! 

Please enter my 
order as described: 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041 
(415) 961-3300 
Telex 171407 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


The Challenge of Network Service in Customer Services report 
at the fee of $2,250 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

Payment in full is due within 30 days of invoice date. 

□ Enclosed is my check in the amount of $ . 

□ Bill my company on purchase order number in the amount of 

$ . 

California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 

Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 

CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current corporate 
structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person including 
parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. INPUT exercises 
its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this Agreement and believes the 
information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT shall have no liability for any loss 
or expense which may result from incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information provided. 
INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the content of the program in response to changing 
client requirements. 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


Sg nature 


Date 


CESIN 4/90 


INPUT 


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INPUT 


Customer 


Services 


Guidance for Vendors 

INPUT has studied the market for network 
servicing and has assessed its potential growth 
and direction. As a result of this, INPUT has 
formulated some recommendations for vendors. 
These cover the new skill areas that INPUT 
believes vendors need to acquire to be able to take 
on multivendor network installations. The nature 
of these installations calls upon skills that are very 
often outside the traditional domain of customer 
service. INPUT has also carried out research into 
user attitudes. Vendors need to know users' 
views if they are to fully satisfy the needs of their 
clients. One important user requirement is for 
access to the network on demand, which implies a 
need for early detection of potential network 
problems. 

. 

xnis is an important strategic report for marketing 
and planning executives. It will help you to 
position your company for the 1990s. 



Call, fax, or mall 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


mm 






About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialisation. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 


Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/software maintenance and support). 


Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 



INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(071) 493-9335 Fax (071) 629-0179 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03) 864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 



CESIN 4/90 


3 


INPUT 


Identify and Assess Opportunities in 
the Rapidly Changing DLA Market... 



Defense Logistics Agency Information 
Services Market 


This report will help you develop: 

• Forecasts for the market opportunities at DLA for 
the next five years by understanding the factors 
affecting DLA information systems modernization 

• Competitive strategies in this market based on a 
thorough knowledge of the competitive 
environment — leading suppliers, shares, and 
strategies 

• Sales approaches to the DLA that take into account 
the agenc/s procurement policies, procedures, 
and vendor preferences 

• Marketing plans that consider major initiatives, 
acquisition plans, and budget trends 

This report contains: 



• Market forecasts through 1995 for major market 
segments 

• Procurement procedures and trends 

• Budget trends and other funding issues that will 
impact the market 

• Recent and upcoming initiatives 

• Complete background and organization of the 
DLA 


Call, fax, or 
mail your 
order today 
to INPUT 

to any office listed on 
the back of this 
brochure 




B 



The Key to Success in DLA Information 
Strategic Information on Acquisition 
Plans and Trends 


This new study. Defense Logistics Agency 
Information Services Market, was undertaken to 
keep you up to date with the rapid changes in 
DLA information systems acquisition practices 


Defense Logistics Agency 
Information Services Market 


• Systems Operations 

• Telecommunications 

• Software Products 

♦ Professional Services 

♦ Processing Equipment 

* Computer Equipment 

* Office Information Systems 

* Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) 


Agency Perspectives 


• Agency Overview 

• Major Information Systems Acquisition 
Plans 

• Acquisition Plans and Procedures 

• Vendor Preferences 

• System Integration Trends 

• Centralized/Decentralized Directions 

• Use of IS Vendors 


Vendor Views 


• Contracted Services Changes 

• Contract Functionality 

• Contracting Views 

• Marketing Perceptions 


We Unravel the Opportunity 

The report focuses on providing you with a clear 
picture of the agency — its organization, mission, 
and directions — along with strategies on how to 
plan for and conduct business in this market. 
This report gives you the information you need 
to establish successful marketing strategies and 
to select addressable opportunities in DLA 
information services. The report summarizes the 
major DLA initiatives and programs and the 
markets they will affect. 

The report examines agency requirements, ^ 
preferences, and perceptions that impact 
contractors of information systems and services. 
Current DLA purchasing patterns and 
procedures are also covered in the report. 

We Provide Hard Analysis of the DLA 
Market 

The report provides a comprehensive market 
analysis of the DLA's potential. We forecast the 
information services market by delivery mode, 
and identify the critical market issues and 
budgetary and economic trends that are guiding 
market growth. Special attention is devoted to 
analyzing how the agency is striving to 
modernize in the face of continuing budget cuts. 
User trends, such as increasingly decentralized 
computing, are also examined. 




INPUT 



ervices 


The report provides forecasts for the following 
vendor service modes at DLA: hardware, 
software, professional services, integration 
services, systems operations, processing services, 
telecommunications, office information systems, 
and EDI. 


Based on Information From the Field 

This report is based on information collected in 
an extensive INPUT survey of agency 
representatives and vendors. Data collected from 
"jgency and government sources and leading 
vendors summarizes current status and views 
on: 

• Future use of information systems 

• Strategies and market perceptions 

• Important vendor characteristics and services 

As a comprehensive analysis of the important 
competitive factors and considerations in the 
DLA market, this report is an indispensable 
planning tool to information services executives 
and managers who want to take advantage of 
DLA opportunies. 


DLA Information Services Market 
Obligations Forecast 
FY1990-FY1995 



Percent of Budget 


Who's buying, and what they spend, is just one 
kind of market data provided in this report. 


Call, fax, or nnail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 






About INPUT 




INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPhTT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 


Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research /consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


INPUT OFFICES 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 
Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 

GDLA 1/90 


INPUT 

How to Find and Manage the Market 
Opportunities in Federai Processing 
Services and Systems Operations... 



Federal Processing Services/ Systems Operations 
Market, 1989-1994 




This report will help you: 

• FIND specific agency opportunities in this market 

• DEVELOP marketing strategies and services that 
will bring agency business 

• IDENTIFY competitors and potential teaming 
partners 


• REFINE your bidding and pricing strategies to 
maximize profitability 

• IMPROVE agency satisfaction with your services 

The report contains: 

• Market forecasts through 1994 

• Agency requirements and purchasing trends 

• Competitive analysis 

• Recommendations 


Call, fax, or 
mail your 
order today 
to INPUT 

to any office listed on 
the back of this 
brochure 



Develop Your Successful Strategic/Market 
Plan from Our In-Deprh Industry Coverage 


The federal government market for processing 
services and systems operations is experiencing 
new growth. The federal government's 
increasing reliance on information technology to 
improve productivity and accomodate staffing 
inadequacies provides numerous opportunities 
for vendors that supply transaction processing, 
batch, and operational support services. 


Federal Processing Services/ 
Sysfe^ns Operations Market 

Market Analysis and Forecast, 1989-1994 

• Historical Perspective 

• Budgetary Constraints 

• Software Integration and Productivity 
Improvements 

• Artificial Intelligence 

• Leading Vendors 

Federal User Requirements and Trends 

• Problems and Issues 

• Budget and Application Distribution 

• Agency Perceptions 

• Acquisition Plans and Preferences 

• Projected Trends in Processing Services 
and Operational Support 

Competitive Trends 

• Vendor Participation 

• Vendor Market Perceptions 

• Vendor Contracting Views 

• Trends 

• Recommendations 


Key Opportunities 


This new report from INPUT, Federal Processing 
Services! Systems Operations Market, 1989-1994, 
shows you where and how to compete in the 
federal market for operational support. This 
report is a comprehensive analysis of the factors 
driving this market's growth, providing 
strategies needed to succeed in the intensifying 
competitive environment. It answers the 
important questions you have about this market. 

Why is the federal processing 
services/systems operation market 
growing? 

This report presents INPUT'S analysis of the 
federal market for processing services and 
systems operations (operational support). It 
analyzes how market growth is being 
encouraged by the increasing versatility of ' 
processing services and operational support and 
the trend towards automation of government 
operations. 

The report identifies the market segments and 
applications that will grow rapidly and the 
markets that will experience slower growth. The 
growth of systems operations is a focus of this 
report. The report also discusses the factors that 
will sustain the market despite its maturity and 
budgetary constraints, including the 
government's facilities limitations and its efforts 
to modernize and improve efficiency. 

How do I market to the various 
agencies? 

Vendors in this market need to maximize their 
marketing efforts towards current and future 
government requirements in key applications. 

By analyzing the types of functions government 
agencies are contracting out, this report helps to 
focus your product and service offerings in hig 
growth segments. 


INPUT 


1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560, Vienna, VA 22182 
703-847-6870 Fax 703-847-6872 


Gain Insight into the Federal Processing ServicesI 
Systems Operations Market 

The federal government’s reliance on information technology to 
improve productivity and overcome staffing inadequacies has 
spurred growth in the processing services and systems operations 
markets. INPUT’S forecast for the next five years calls for the 
market to continue its growth despite budget restrictions and 
regulatory conditions impacting the federal marketplace. 

The just-completed report on the Federal Processing ServicesI 
Systems Operations Market, 1989-1994 focuses on the current 
responses of the federal agency and vendor communities to issues, 
trends, and changing needs of this market. It also analyzes the 
government’s continued requirements to support a wide range of 
applications to develop recommendations to vendors for better 
focus of their product offerings. 

To receive your copy of this informative report, please mail or fax 
the enclosed order form, or call INPUT at (415) 961-33(X). 

Best regards. 



dbhn E. Frank 
President 
INPUT, INC. 



ORDER FORM 


YES! I need to find and manage the market opportunities in federal processing services 
and systems operation! I need INPUT'S report on the Federal Processing Services! Systems 
Operations Market, 1989-1994! 

I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send this form 
in by mail. I understand that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 


SECTION ONE: Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S report on 

miV ODPiPD — X •/ i. X 

Federal Processing Services! Systems Operations Market^ 
1989 - 1994 . 

□ I want to pay $1,350, a savings of $150 off the regular price. I'm ordering 
before April 30, 1990. 

□ I'm ordering after April 30, 1990, for the regular price of $1,500. 


SECTION TWO: 

□ 

Enclosed is my check for $ 

to cover the cost of mv order. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 




(CHOOSE ONE) 

□ 

Charge $ 

to my American Express card: 



Card # 




Exp. date 




Signature 



□ 

Bill my company for $ 

on purchase order number 


California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 
Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 

Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 



Organizatcxi 

Signature 



Name 

Name 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 

CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Title 

Title 


Address 

Date 





Telephone 



Fax (415) 961-3966 

Signature 

(SEE TERMS OTHER SIDE) 

Date 

GPFM3a) 


INPUT 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person 
including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. 
INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this 
Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT 
shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the 
content of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 


INPUT 



I The report also explores marketing and sales 

issues unique to the federal government, 

including procurement policies and preferences, 

vendor selection criteria, and planned uses of 

, contractor services in operational support. 

1 

! 

What are the most appropriate pricing 
strategies in this market? 

Successful pricing strategies are vital to 
capitalize on agency opportunities in this 
market. The report includes recommendations 
on how to improve margins and gain 
competitive advantage through cost controls and 
alliances. 

The report identifies the leading vendors that 
have established significant shares of the federal 
^ernment's processing services and systems 
(.operations market. Hardware, sottvv'are, and 
service vendors can use the report to identify 
specific agency opportunities, possible teaming 
partners, and appropriate bidding strategies. 

Features and Benefits of this Report 

This study is based on interviews with agency 
officials and vendor representatives, as well as 
data collected from published government 
sources. (Agency program data and updated 
vendor information was collected by INPUT 
during 1989.) 

The survey illustrates the views, in both the 
government and the industry, regarding: 

• Current and future agency use of processing 
services and systems operations 

• Leading vendors and performance 
evaluations 

• Strategies 

% Issues and trends 


Federal Market Pressures 


• Staff shortages 

• Labor-intensive process 

• Mission contracting 

• Cost-cutting 

• High attrition 


Federal Processing Services I Systems Operations 
Market, 1989-1994 is a complete assessment of 
agency requirements, competition, and evolving 
trends and issues. It provides market intelligence 
to marketing and planning executives to assist 
them in developing successful marketing plans, 
assessing capabilities, and analyzing the 
competition in contractor-supplied processing 
services and systems operations. 


Call, fax, or mall 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 



About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialisation. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Continuous-information advisory services, 
proprietary research /consulting, merger/ 
acquisition assistance, and multiclient studies are 
provided to users and vendors of information 
systems and services (software, processing 
services, turnkey systems, systems integration, 
professional services, communications, and 
systems/ software maintenance and support). 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international 
research and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most 
technically advanced companies. 

INPUT OFFICES 

North America 

International 

Headquarters 

1280 Villa Street 

Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 

Eiuope 

Piccadilly House 

33/37 Regent Street 

London SWl Y 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

New York 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 

Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 

75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 

Tokyo 

Saida Building 

4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 

Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 


GPFM 3/90 


INPUT 


I 



If You Need to Know 

What's Going On in 

Government Systems integration . . . 


▲ Pressure to redesign 
aging systems 

A Changing agency 
requirements 

A Pressure to share risks 

A Pressure to do more 
with less 

A Attacks on the 
concept of systems 
integration 


You need INPUT’S latest comprehensivt 
The Federal Systems Integration Market, 


You can have a report that explains in detail the 
crucial dynamics of the Federal Systems 
Integration market today. 

And if you act before February 28, 1990, 
you'll pay $150 less 
than the standard list price — 
a savings of 10% ! 


Federal Systems Integration Market, 
1989-1994 


• Market Analysis and Forecast 

• Agency Requirements 

• Systems Integration Vendors 

• Key Opportunities 


Agency Perspective 


• Hardware Systems 

• Systems Applications 

• Agency Perceptions 

• Case Studies of Contracts 

• Acquisition Plans and Preferences 

• Projected Trends 


Vendor Perspective 


• Vendor Participation 

• Vendor Market Perceptions 

• Vendor Contracting Views 

• Trends 


A brand new revision of INPUT'S respected 
survey. Federal Systems Integration Market, 1989- 
1994, gives executives who must sell into this 
market invaluable intelligence tailored specifically 
to their needs — and to the needs of a gigantic 
market in a state of flux. 

The rules for successfully penetrating this market 
will never be the same. INPUT'S new report tells 
you how they've changed, and helps you turn 
those changes to your advantage. 

Of course the report gives you a broad market 
overview, seasoned with the combined experience 
and expertise of a research staff that knows more 
about how Washington works than any other 
computer market research firm. But the report 
also gets down to the nitty gritty, giving you 
detailed analyses of: 

• What the requirements of the different agencit.. 
are today, and how they are likely to change 
over time; 

• Who the major players are in federal systems 
integration, and how they can give flexible 
competitors new opportunities for increasing 
market share; and 

• When and how the major contracts will be put 
out to bid, and who will be involved. 

And that's not all... 

Six Ways the Market Is Changing 

The report also details the six major pressures on 
the federal systems integration market, and 
explains how they are acting in concert to change 
the way you have to do business: 

• Pressure for Improved Productivity — The 
overall constraints of the Gramm-Rudman 
budget axe and the increasing scrutiny of 
information systems expenditures could 
seriously affect you. The report offers an 
analysis. 






•'.•an 


INPUT 


1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560, Vienna, VA 22182 
703-847-6870 Fax 703-847-6872 


Dear Colleague: 

Marketing systems integration products and services to the 
federal government just got a whole lot easier. 

INPUT recently released the newest edition of its respected 
survey of the Federal Systems Integration Market, 1989-1994. 

This publication is written for just one audience: marketers who 
must master the intricacies of this evolving market. The report 
clarifies the complex trends, changing policies, and shifting 
growth rates of government systems integration — and then offers 
clear recommendations for future action. 

Systems integration is growing fast. In fact, it is one of the star 
segments of the government market. But the influence of 
budgetary concerns, new policies, scarce personnel, and 
changing agency requirements make the market's growth 
anything but easy to exploit. 

input's report offers guidance: timely data, some difficult-to- 
obtain market intelligence, and a lot of clear recommendations for 
making the most of this vast opportunity. 

So order the report today. Make the most of it! 

Yours sincerely. 



jbhn Frank 

President, INPUT INC. 



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ORDER FORM 


YES! I nee to know what's going on in government systems integration! I need INPUT'S 
report on the Federal Systems Integration Market, 1989-1994! 

I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send this form 
in by mail. I understand that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 


SECTION ONE: Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S report on 

MY ORDER Federal Systems Integration Market, 1989-1994. 

□ I want to pay $1,350, a savings of $150 off the regular price. I'm ordering 
before February 28, 1990. 

□ I'm ordering after February 28, 1990, for the regular price of $1,500. 


SECTION TWO: □ Enclosed is my check for $ to cover the cost of my order. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

(CHOOSE ONE) □ Charge $ to my American Express card: 

Card # 

Exp. date 

Signature 

□ Bill my company for $ on purchase order number 


California clients: Please add applicable sales tax on 70% of purchase price. 
Connecticut clients: Please add 8% sales tax on the total amount. 


SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 


INPUT 

1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View 
CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 
Fax (415) 961-3966 


Authorized By: 

Accepted By INPUT: 

Organization 

Signature 

Name 

Name 

Title 

Title 

Address 

Date 


Telephone 


Signature Date 

(SEE TERMS OTHER SIDE) GSPvsodhi 


INPUT 


CONDITIONS AGREEMENT 

The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
corporate structure of the client and will not be disclosed to any other organization or person 
including parent, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations without written consent of INPUT. 
INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this 
Agreement and believes the information contained therein to be accurate. However, INPUT 
shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the 
content of the program in response to changing client requirements. 


INPUT 


INPUT 


Purvey, 

1989-1994 

• Pressure to Redesign Aging Systems — 
Government hardware and software systems are 
patchworks with no integrated design. That 
means tremendous opportunities for systems 
integration work, which the report analyzes in 
some detail. 

• Pressure to Overcome Staff Shortages — 
Government agencies are having a hard time 
hiring and retaining qualified technical staff, so 
they must offload technical work onto the 
private sector. INPUT'S report discusses how 
you can turn this trend to your advantage. 

• Pressure to Maintain Fair Competition — The 
entire process of awarding contracts has slowed 
significantly. INPUT offers some insight on 
how to avoid the worst delays, and how to 
minimize their impact on your company. 

^^Pressure to Share Risks — Agencies now want 
vendors to assume some of the financial risk of 
large systems integration contracts. The report 
analyzes how this problem could affect your 
operations, and offers guidelines on risk- 
sharing. 

• Pressure to Justify Integration — Recently, the 
GSA characterized systems integration as a 
"Grand Design" and suggested that it would not 
work. INPUT surveys the market's response. 

How To Cash In 

The game has definitely changed. There's a new 
emphasis on project teams, joint ventures, 
subcontracting, budgeting, and project 
management. And above all, there is an 
overwhelming need for vendors to understand the 
details of the procurement process and how they 
can affect the bottom line. 

Executives that understand how all of these 
changes are working to change their businesses 
can make intelligent decisions in the new Federal 
"^tsystems integration market, which is forecast to 
grow at a rate significantly faster than other 
technology markets over the next five years. 


Systems Integration Markets 
GFY 1989-1994 



M Professional Services ■ Software Products 
□ Hardware Systems □ Other 


OVERALL GROWTH is useful information, but 
knowing which segments are growing fastest can 
help government marketers more. INPUT'S report 
gives differential growth rates for the most 
important market segments. 


And INPUT'S Federal Systems Integration report 
gives you all the information you need 
to make those decisions today. 

Why not fill out the enclosed order form and 
send it in today? 


Call, Fax, or Mail 
Your Order to 
Any INPUT Office 

listed on the back 
of this brochure 


c 


About INPUT 



INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPLIT supports client 
management in making informed decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research/consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


North America 

Headquarters 
1280 Villa Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041-1194 
(415) 961-3300 

Telex 171407 Fax (415) 961-3966 
New York 

959 Route 46 East, Suite 201 
Parsippany, NJ 07054 
(201) 299-6999 

Telex 134630 Fax (201) 263-8341 

Washington, D.C. 

1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 847-6870 Fax (703) 847-6872 


INPUT OFFICES 


International 

Europe 

Piccadilly House 
33/37 Regent Street 
London SWIY 4NF, England 
(01) 493-9335 

Telex 27113 Fax (01) 629-0179 
Paris 

52, boulevard de Sebastopol 
75003 Paris, France 

(33-1) 42 77 42 77 Fax (33-1) 42 77 85 82 
Tokyo 

Saida Building 
4-6, Kanda Sakuma-cho 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan 
(03)864-0531 Fax (03) 864-4114 

GSI7 1/90 


INPUT 





Professionals Who Need 
The Best Available Analysis of 
Government Software and Services 
^ Markets... 


▲ Critical Intelligence 
on future trends 

A Acquisition criteria 
and methods 

A Certification pitfalls 

A The move toward 
standardization 

A Competition 



...Need INPUT'S Survey of the Federal 


INPUT has just released the best, most up-to-date, 
and most comprehensive guide to the complex 
market for government software and services 
money can buy. 

And if you act before February 28, 1990, 
you'll pay $150 less 
than the standard list price — 
a savings of 10% ! 


Federal Software and Related 
Senrices Market, 1969-1994 


• Market Analysis and Forecast 

• Federal Requirements and Trends 

• Competitive Trends 


Agency Perspectives 


• Changes in Product/Service Acquisitions 

• Hardware Platforms 

• Selection Criteria 

• Agency Use of Ada 

• Software Technology Trends 

• Fourth-Generation Languages 

• Artificial Intelligence 

• Impact of Standards and Certification 

• Acquisition Methods 

• Testing and Acceptance Procedures 

• Follow-On Support 


Vendor Perspectives 


• Vendor Market Participation 

• Market Perceptions 

• Selection Criteria 

• Trends for Specific Products 

• Factors Impacting the Market 

• Marketing Strategies 


A completely updated revision of the 
acknowledged '‘bible" of government software 
and services marketers, INPUT'S report on the 
Federal Software and Related Services Market, 1989- 
1994 is packed with the information you've got to 
have to make your marketing plans work. 

Critical intelligence on trends, agency activity, 
acquisition criteria and methods, testing and 
acceptance procedures, competition — 
the report analyzes all of the factors that 
define the competitive edge in your business. 

And that's not all... 

The report also: 

• Analyzes the wide-ranging impacts of increased 
functionality in off-the-shelf packaged software; 

• Investigates the increasing perception of agency 
requirements as having more similarities than 
differences; 

• Details the demands that the government do 
more with less; 

• Highlights current and future plans for 
agencies' use of Ada; 

• Examines the larger impacts of CASE tools, 
artificial intelligence, UNIX, and other 
technological developments on the government 
market as a whole. 

And more. . . 

But most important, the report puts all of this 
information and analysis in the context of how 
larger government market trends will affect the 
strategies of software and services marketers— 
today, and in the immediate future. 


INPUT 


1953 Gallows Road. Suite 560, Vienna, VA 22182 
703-847-6870 Fax 703-847-6872 


Dear Colleague; 

The difference between successful and unsuccessful marketing 
plans in the government software and services arena is good 
market intelligence, pure and simple. 

And INPUT gives you the best market intelligence money can 
buy. 

We have just released the latest edition of our report on Federal 
Software and Related Services, 1989-1994, a compendium of 
difficult-to-obtain data on market trends, specific agency activity, 
how acquisition criteria and methods are changing, the impact of 
increased functionality in packaged solutions, and much, much 
more. 

The report gives marketers who must succeed in this most 
complex and changeable of all software arenas the hard data they 
need to sell successfully. 

The government software and services market is in a state of flux. 
Marketers who know where to concentrate their resources are 
going to prevail. 

Be one of them. Order INPUT'S report today. 

Yours sincerely. 



John Frank 

President, INPUT INC. 



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ORDER FORM 


YES! I want the best, most up-to-date, and most comprehensive intelligence on the 
market for government software and services money can buy! 


I understand that I may call my order in, fax it to you at the number below, or send this form 
in by mail. I understand that I must supply the relevant information for all three of the 
following sections. 


SECTION ONE: 
MY ORDER 


Send me copy (copies) of INPUT'S report on 

Federal Software and Related Services Market, 1989-1994. 

□ I want to pay $1,350, a savings of $150 off the regular price. I'm ordering 
before February 28, 1990. 

□ I'm ordering after February 28, 1990, for the regular price of $1,500. 


SECTION TWO: 
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SECTION THREE: 
AUTHORIZATION 


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The information provided shall be used only by the employees of and within the current 
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INPUT exercises its best efforts in preparation of the information provided under this 
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shall have no liability for any loss or expense that may result from incompleteness or 
inaccuracy of the information provided. INPUT reserves the right to change or modify the ' 
content of the program in response to changing client requirements. j 


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INPUT 


Software and Related Services Market 


Tremendous Potential 

The 1989 market is already large: $1.97 billion. But 
by 1994, it is projected to reach $3.8 billion, a 
compound annual growth rate of 11%. 

INPUT'S report gives you the in-depth 
information you need to exploit this tremendous 
potential. Some of the major trends the report 
examines include: 

'’j / .. .< 

• A separate and comprehensive forecast focusing 
on Ada products and services; 

• The technical staff shortages plaguing some 
agencies, and the opportunities this trend opens 
for all vendors; 

''c^e increasing trend toward software 
certification, the pitfalls and opportunities it 
represents; 

• The increasing difficulty associated with going it 
alone in this market, and how various kinds of 
alliances can open doors for you; 

• The increasing inclination toward economical, 
noncustom solutions in some agencies, in 
situations where economy and full functionality 
are in the balance; 

• And the growing trend toward standardization, 
including recent developments in the POSIX 
and GOSIP markets. 

The market for government software and services 
is growing steadily, but to find the best 
opportunities there, you need timely and 
comprehensive market intelligence. 

That is the purpose of INPUT'S new report on 
Fp^eral Software and Related Services, 1989-1994. 



THE BIGGEST BUYERS are highlighted in this 
exhibit from the report. Note the difference 
between products and development services. 


To give you a concise but thorough overview 
of a rapidly evolving market. To help you make 
the most of a complex and challenging 
opportunity. And ultimately, to help you turn 
the trends in the government software markets 
to your own advantage. 

INPUT is offering you the best tool you could ever 
have to help you penetrate the government 
software markets. Why not fill out the enclosed 
order form and send it in today? 

Call, fax, or mail 
your order to INPUT 

to any office listed on the back 
of this brochure 


'j 


About INPUT 




INPUT provides planning information, analysis, 
and recommendations to managers and executives 
in the information processing industries. Through 
market research, technology forecasting, and 
competitive analysis, INPUT supports client 
management in making inform^ decisions. 

Continuous-information advisory services, pro- 
prietary research /consulting, merger/acquisition 
assistance, and multiclient studies are provided to 
users and vendors of information systems and 
services (software, processing services, turnkey 
systems, systems integration, professional services, 
communications, and systems/software mainte- 
nance and support). 


Many of INPUT'S professional staff members have 
more than 20 years' experience in their areas of 
specialization. Most have held senior management 
positions in operations, marketing, or planning. 
This expertise enables INPUT to supply practical 
solutions to complex business problems. 

Formed as a privately held corporation in 1974, 
INPUT has become a leading international re- 
search and consulting firm. Clients include more 
than 100 of the world's largest and most techni- 
cally advanced companies. 


North America 

Headquarters 
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Tokyo 

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GSR3 1/90 


INPUT 


■ MARKET INTELLIGENCE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING SERVICES 

Effective Applications 
Development Program — 1 992 

The program provides extensive analysis and recommendations for improving 
the applications development process, based on primary research and a 
comprehensive data base. 

WRITTEN ELEMENTS: 


Reports 


User Profiles 


Vendor Profiles 


. Index and Cross-References 


Research Bulletins 


Applications development success factors, 
applications development trends and 
requirements, organizational readiness for 
CASE, the need for vendor-supplied CASE- 
related services. 

Analyses of the experience of selected 
organizations using applications development 
tools and methodologies. 

Profiles of companies active in the 
applications development market, including 
CASE companies and other software product 
vendors as well as systems integrators and 
professional services firms. 

Subscribers will receive a diskette that will 
allow them to look up topics and key words 
for all published materials in the program. 

Frequent summaries of research projects, 
analyses of events and opinions on issues 
from experts. 


SERVICE ELEMENTS: 

Telephone Inquiry 


Consultant Access 


On-Site Visits 


Industry or Client Conference 


Use the “hotline” to obtain answers to your 
immediate questions. 

Obtain opinions and advice from INPUT 
executives and consultants through 
meetings, mail, and telephone. 

Discuss your issues and concerns, introduce 
experts to your organization and obtain 
presentations on industry trends. 

Review the state of the industry and network 
with executives from other INPUT clients. 


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Effective Applications 
Development Program — 1992 


BACKGROUND 

For the first time in a generation there may be potential for broad 
improvements in the applications development process. The attention being 
given to CASE environments underlines this opportunity. INPUTS research to 
date has identified a critical need for further fact-based analysis and action- 
oriented recommendations for improving the effectiveness of applications 
development. This need is addressed by a new INPUT service, the Ejfective 
Applications Development Program. 



THE SCOPE OF THE SERVICE 

This is a research-based service building on INPUTS extensive research base 
among vendors and users. The source of the research will be continuing, in- 
depth analyses of the applications development experience. 

The results will focus on a key question: How can the barriers to applications 
development effectiveness be lowered? Take advantage of INPUT s findings — 
and the experiences of others; this will increase the probability of achieving 
success. 


DELIVERABLES 

The service delivers its information and recommendations by means of written 
reports and services. 

WRITTEN ELEMENTS 

Standard materials will contain significant amounts of quantified data that has 
been statistically analyzed. The written deliverables will include extensive 
analysis as well as pertinent recommendations. 


2 


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Effective Applications 
Development Program — 1992 

Applications Development Success Factors — ^This report series will use primary 
research to examine the factors leading to success and/or failure in 
applications development and in improving the process. Factors to be 
considered will include: 

• Tool quality and integration 

• The planning process 

• Methodology 

• Hardware and software platforms 

• Vendor support 

• Corporate management involvement; IS management strategies 

• IS work group composition 

• Training 

• Applications characteristics 

INPUT will provide recommendations, for users and vendors, on how to 
maximize the probability of success. 

Applications Development Trends and Requirements — ^The data from INPUT s 
user panel will be used to show overall trends and requirements. Topics 
covered include: 

• Stages of applications development; progression from one stage to another 

• Current and planned types and levels of CASE-related resources 

• Current and planned personnel skill requirements (actual versus available) 

• Applications development software and systems 

- Current/ planned - Satisfaction levels 

- Sources 

• Relationship between tools and methodologies 

• Current and planned training 

- Types - Gaps 

- Sources 

• Contrast of user and vendor expectations 

• Analysis of variations by industry, company size, and corporate culture 

INPUT will forecast growth rates of tools and methodologies use and related 
markets for 1992-1997 and will analyze factors affecting growth. 


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Effective Applications 
Development Program — 1992 


Organizational Readiness for CASE — INPUTS research shows that 80% of 
organizations identify the “soft” issues (e.g., methodology, knowledge, training, 
organization/culture) as being major impediments to implementing or gaining 
significant benefits from CASE. INPUT refers to these as “organizational 
readiness” issues. Those that will be assessed include: 


• Corporate culture factors and impact on: 

- CASE choices 

- Planning 

- Organization 

• Development methodology 

- Current practice /impact 

- Plans 

• Measurement 

- Philosophy/ practice 

- Impact on CASE 

• Planning environment 

- Corporate commitment and success 

- IS planning 


User relationships 
Application selection 


Relationship to CASE 


Relation to quality 


All these factors represent “best” practices; however, it may be infeasible or 
wasteful to maximize each one of these factors. INPUTS research will quantify 
the relative importance of these factors (and others that are identified in the 
course of the research) as well as indicating where there are diminishing 
returns in going beyond the good to achieve the best. 


The Need for Vendor-Supplied CASE-Related Services — Professional services 
firms and systems integrators are offering a wide range of CASE-related 
services. To what extent will or should these be used by corporate customers, 
and what kind of services will be most useful? This report will answer the 
following questions: 

• What are the reasons for turning to an outside service vendor? 

• What types of services are used now? Will this change in the future? 

• What has been the experience and satisfaction so far in using outside 
services? 

• What are the strengths and weaknesses of using vendor-supplied services 
(as perceived by both vendors and users)? 

• Are enterprises establishing enterprise-wide CASE standards to which all 
vendors must conform? 


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INPUT 


Effective Applications 
Development Program — 1992 




• How large a proportion of IS budgets are being spent on applications 
development-related services? What is this likely to be in the future? 

• What types of vendors are looked on most favorably to provide these 
services? 

These results will be quantified wherever possible (e.g., dollars, growth rates, 
preference ratings, etc.). INPUT will provide additional analysis and 
recommendations. 

Applications Development User Profiles — These profiles will be a series of 
analyses of the experiences of selected organizations using applications 
development tools and methodologies including CASE. Material will be 
presented in a standard format that includes: 

• The planning and R&D process 

• Projected /actual qualitative and quantitative benefits (quality, productivity, 
elapsed time, etc.) 

• Methodology: Current, planned 

• Tool selection and experience 

• Costs, by category (CASE products, training, and hardware) 

• Extent of tool use: past, present, and future 

• How interactions with other parts of the organization have changed as a 
result of changes in applications development processes 

• Impact of AD /Cycle and other products 

• Identification and analysis of lessons learned 

User profiles will represent organizations at different levels of achievement and 
will be categorized by enterprise size, industry, and type of organization. 
Particular attention will be focused on selecting companies that have achieved 
success. 

Vendor Profiles — Companies active in the applications development market will 
be profiled. Vendors will not be limited to CASE product vendors, but will 
include: 

• Other systems software product companies (e.g., DBMS, 4GL) - Information 
provided will include their plans to respond to CASE and other changes in 
the applications development environment. 

• Applications software products vendors - Information provided will include 
the expected impact on their products and services of changes in the 
applications development environment. 


5 


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INPUT 


Effective Applications 
Development Program — 1992 


• Professional services firms - Information will be provided on their 
expectation of the impact of changes in applications development tools and 
methodologies and the types of applications development services they . 
expect to provide to information systems and user organizations. 

• Systems Integrators - Profiles will show how systems integrators expect to 
use applications development tools and methodologies to develop business 
solutions. 

Information will be presented in a standard format and will include: 

• Applications development-related product and service descriptions, existing 
and planned 

• Size of CASE-related business 

• CASE function specialties (e.g., design, implementation, re-engineering) 

• Industry knowledge templates 

• Partners and partnership strategies 

) • AD /Cycle strategy and implementation 

• Largest and typical implementations 

• CASE strategy and, if applicable, linkage to other business strategies 

This information can be used to identify industry and competitive trends, to 

establish partnerships, and for potenti^ customers to identify vendors. 


INDEX AND CROSS-REFERENCES 

Subscribers will receive a diskette that will allow them to look up topics and 
key words for all published materials in the program. 


RESEARCH BULLETINS 

Issued periodically, these will describe developments and announcements, and 
provide analysis of a time-sensitive nature. 

Written materials will be issued in loose-leaf form. Research and analysis will 
be continuously delivered to subscribers as particular topics are completed. 


6 


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10/91 


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INPUT 


ft 


Effective Applications 
Development Program — 1992 


SERVICE ELEMENTS 

Use the “hotline” to obtain answers to your 
immediate questions. 

Obtain opinions and advice from INPUT 
executives and consultants through 
meetings, mail, and telephone access. 

(Note: Each client site have 24 hours of 
telephone inquiry and consultant access time 
annually that is included in the standard 
subscription; arrangements can be made for 
additional time if required.) 

A tailored presentation of research findings 
and recommendations (travel expenses 
additional). 

Industry or Client Conference Review the state of the industry and network 

with executives from other INPUT clients. 

Two seats are reserved per client; additional 
seats are available at two-thirds off the list 
price. 


OPTIONAL DELIVERABLES 

In addition to the standard deliverables described above, INPUT also offers the 
following optional services and information: 

• An on-site review of a client’s operations 

• Detailed survey data in machine-readable format for client analysis 


Telephone Inquiry 
Consultant Access 

On-site Presentation 


PRICING 

The initial price for subscription to the standard program is $19,950 for a 
twelve-month service. Arrangements can be made for subscriptions for 
additional sites within an organization. 


Effective Applications Development Program — 1992 is available from INPUT, 

1280 Villa Street, Mountain View, CA 94041; Tel. (415) 961-3300, 

The Atrium at Glenpointe, 400 Frank W. Burr Blvd., Teaneck, NJ 07666; Tel. (201) 801-0050, 
or 1953 Gallows Road, Suite 560, Vienna, VA 22182; Tel. (703) 847-6870. 


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INPUT 





Information Services Programme — ^Europe 


CURRENT REPORT DESCRIPTIONS 
Processing Services Opportunities, 1991-1996 

There will be a major restructuring of the transaction processing market over the next 
decade. This report will help vendors understand what changes are taking place and 
how they are affecting businesses. Research shows that there are significant 
opportunities available for vendors, despite a decline in growth rate. The report 
provides market forecasts and vendor rankings, with percentage market shares for 
each vendor. 

Professional Services Opportunities, 1991-1996 

This report provides market forecasts and growth rates for the European professional 
services market and assesses the impact of the trends in the marketplace on 
professional services vendors. It also discusses users’ concerns and requirements so 
that vendors can evaluate their strengths and weaknesses. The report identifies leading 
vendors, providing valuable competitive information. 

Software Application Solutions Opportunities, 1991-1996 

This report forecasts the size of the application solutions market, identifies the leading 
vendors and discusses the trends affecting the market in each European country. It 
discusses the opportunities for applications software products and turnkey systems. It 
discusses market issues such as industry standards, quality and integration. The report 
provides valuable market intelligence for companies involved in selling and marketing 
software products. 

Systems Software Product Opportunities, 1991-1996 

This report examines the market for systems software products, segmented into 
systems control products, applications development tools and data centre management 
products. The report discusses trends such as the move towards distributed processing 
and assesses the likely effect on the systems software market. The impact of open 
systems is also discussed. Companies offering systems software products can find in 
this report valuable market size and growth data, analysis and competitive 
information. 

Education and Training 

This report surveys developments in education and training in the software and 
services industry, examining issues such as skills shortages and retraining. This report 
can help vendors of education and training services to assess the level of interest in 
various types of training services by examining the requirements for training and 
providing data on levels of satisfaction with training standards. The report also 
highlights differences in European countries, and discusses governmental issues. 


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INPUT 


Information Services Programme — ^Europe 


CURRENT REPORT DESCRIPTIONS (Continued) 

Software Applications Maintenance 

This report examines the specific area of user-written software applications 
maintenance. It identifies the business opportunities in this rapidly developing 
business sector of the professional services market. The report also addresses such 
issues as the use of reverse engineering tools and provides market sizing and 
competitive information. 

UNIX Market Opportunities 

UNIX has become an important operating system as suppliers move away from their 
own proprietary systems. This report examines the opportunities being created in this 
market for consulting services and other professional services, software products and 
related areas. The report provides European country market analyses and competitive 
information. 

Collaboration and M &A Issues 

As European software and services companies plan their business strategies for the 
1990 s, many are entering new markets by entering into partnerships and acquisition 
activity. As companies compete against pan-European giants in a single market, it is 
becoming essential for them to quickly acquire market penetration into new countries, 
or to be able to offer new skiUs. This can ^ achieved by establishing partnerships or 
by seeking to acquire companies already operating in target markets. This report 
examines the issues and discusses the implications of such strategic activity. 



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Information Services Programme — Europe 


RESEARCH BULLETINS 

Research Bulletins are frequent, short reports that: 

1. Present results from research studies as quickly as possible. These Research 
Bulletins communicate key findings on issues, trends, new developments and ideas, 
market forecasts, and vendor analysis. 

2. Provide INPUT’S analyses of important industry announcements, events, awards, 
and other activities. These Research Bulletins analyse the meaning of these 
activities rather than just give the news. 

Research Bulletins already published that are provided immediately include: 

• Processing Services Markets 

• Application Integration 

• Financial Deregulation Creates Major New Opportunities for European 

Software and Services Vendors 

• European Software and Services Market — Insurance Sector 

• Market Analysis and Forecast for Western Europe— Distribution Industry Sector 

• Software Product Specialisation in Discrete Manufacturing Drives Collaborative 

Ventures 

• Preliminary Market Forecast for Western European Discrete Manufacturing 

Sector 

• The Five Stages of Information System Development in Distribution Companies 

• Preliminary Market Forecast for Western European Process Manufacturing 

Sector 

• New Opportunities in Western European Process Manufacturing Sector 

• Integration of Supervisory Control and Production Management Systems Now 

Imminent in the Process Manufacturing Sector 

• European Professional Services — Market Trends 

• European Professional Services Market Forecast 

• Consulting and Account Management Are the Keys to the CIM Market 

• UNIX Software and Services — European Market Issues 

• Impact of UNIX on Software and Services Vendors 

• UNIX Systems Software Products— European Market Forecast 

• Software Support and Maintenance— Western European Market 

• Daimler-Benz! So geti Alliance Raises Stakes for Global Leadership in 

Information Services 

• Third-Party Software Support and Maintenance — User Profiles 

• CA90s and ENTIRE— New Systems Software Architectures 

• CAP Gemini Selects Insurance for Growth 

• IBM’s lAA Fosters Mix-and-Match Insurance Solutions 

• The Role of Applications Software Products in the Banking Industry n 


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