Skip to main content

Full text of "NAMRU-3 Supports Force Health Protection In The Horn Of Africa"

See other formats


NAMRU-3 Supports Force Health Protection in the Horn of Africa I Navy Medicine 



I AM Navy Medicine 



IRSS: Posts Comments 



THE OFFFCIAL BLOG OF U.S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS HEALTH CARE • 2011 & 2012 WINNER OF BEST NAVY BLOG 
Home About Disclaimer Navy Medicine News Navy Medicine WebSite I AM Navy Medicine ^^^^^^^^^^ 



Written on SEPTEMBER 8, 20 11 AT 11: 18 AM by PDILIARD 



Navy Medicine Video 



NAMRU-3 Supports Force Health Protection in 
the Horn of Africa 



FUeduncl. UNCATEGORIZED 



4 COMMENTS 



By Lt. Cmdr. Peter Sebeny, U.S. Naval 
Medical Research Unit 3, research 
clinician 

Camp Lemonnier, established in 
Djibouti in 2002, is the only fixed U.S. 
base under the Africa Command 
(AFRICOM) and is also home of the 
U.S. Combined J oint Task Force- Horn 
of Africa (CJ TP- HOA). 

Originally focused on counter- terrorism 
operations, the camp's mission has 
now expanded to include strengthening 

' partnerships and contributing to 

stability in East Africa. This serves as 
part of a comprehensive approach to increase African partner nations' capacity to maintain 
stable environments for their populations. 




Lt. Cmdr. Peter Sebeny briefs NAMRU-3 
surveillance team members in Camp Lemonnier, 
Djibouti. 



Navy Medicine is a global healthcare network of 
63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world 
who provide high quality health care to more than 
one million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine 
personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines 
worldwide, providing critical mission support 
aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the 
battlefield. 



With the growing presence of U.S. personnel in Africa, there is a need to better understand Navy Medicine Social Media 

infectious disease threats in the region, which can be challenging since little surveillance data t-, n 

^ ^ ^ Follow us on Twitter 

and public health capacity exists. Improved surveillance and laboratory diagnostics are the 

cornerstones to gaining a better understanding. ^^jff^Tfjf!^ J oin us on Facebook 

In order to provide those cornerstones, the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit 3 (NAMRU-3) lOj '^^^^ Read our publications 
initiated a diarrheal surveillance project at Camp Lemonnier's expeditionary medical facility 

(EMF) in 2007 with plans to expand the surveillance to include other illnesses, including n-i ^r- ^ ^ ^ 

f ll^l^HT View our photo stream 

influenza- like illness and acute febrile illnesses such as malaria. As part of our surveillance I 

project, eligible patients may fill out a questionnaire with demographics, vaccination history, 

hospitalization information and antibiotic use. Our research activities are aimed at detecting Yq|J I flliTS Watch our videos 
health threats among deployed military personnel and are executed in accordance with the 
NAMRU-3 Military Infectious Disease and Operational Health Surveillance Network. 

The importance of a surveillance system is that it can identify new disease trends or infectious Navy Medicine Live Archives 

disease outbreaks. For example during the early period of the 2009 HlNl influenza March 2015 (7) 

pandemic, the EMF, with direct support from NAMRU-3, utilized the existing surveillance 

system to identify an outbreak of seasonal influenza A (H2N2). That surveillance also February 2015 (16) 

identified the first confirmed pHlNV 2009 influenza cases in the Horn of Africa among U.S. j an^ajy 20 15 ( 12) 

service members. 

December 20 14 (17) 



http://navymedicine.navylive.dodlive.mil/archives/697[3/l 1/2015 9:32: 13 AM] 



NAMRU-3 Supports Force Health Protection in the Horn of Africa I Navy Medicine 



Ongoing surveillance has also been important in identifying the most common causes of 
acute gastroenteritis in the region, including Enterotoxigenic E. coli and norovirus. Recent 
findings from this surveillance were presented by NAMRU-3 at the European Command and 
AFRICOM Science and Technology Conference in J une 20 11. 

1 believe establishing better local laboratory capabilities in Djibouti will be important for 
current surveillance efforts as well as the ability to conduct more advanced studies to 
understand the causes, burden and impact of gastroenteritis, one of the most common 
illnesses in deployed populations. 

It is through efforts such as these that NAMRU-3 has built valuable professional relationships 
with the EMF and the CJTF-HOA staff and continues to play an important role in force 
health protection in Africa. 

For more information on NAMRU-3 go to 

http:/ / www.med.navy.mil/ sites/ namru3/ Pages/ namru3.aspx 



■ Next post 



Previous post - 




Linda Ventura 

To Whom it may concern: My husband Master Chief Eduardo D. Ventura worked at 
NAMRU3 back in 1980. At that time the Compound that NAMRU3 WAS located was 
very humble and we were there for 5 years (long enough for us to see the 1st lab. to be 
built. My husband was stationed there as the "Pay Person" and saw about 3 different 
Commanding Officers. Our friend Dr. Michael Kilpatrick was stationed there as the CO 
when we arrived. At that time Schistosomisome was the vector that the compound was 
especially trying to handle. My family truly felt blessed to have spent those 5 years in 
CAIRO. We were there when Sadat was killed and all the terriorist happenings were just 
beginning. I would appreciate you telling me about todays Namru3 and send me some 
pics of what it looks like now. 1 am training for MLT at the moment and would 
appreciate information about the Research the unit is doing today. My husband passed 
away J anuary 27 of this year. He died of Lung Cancer at the age of 66. Some of our best 
memories were when we were in Cairo. 1 know noone there probably remembers us but 
we remember you and care about the progress that the unit is doing today. Please write 
me back! 



■ CAPTCappySurBtte 

Linda, Thank you for your comment. We are very proud of the many 
achievements of NAMRU-3 and all the Navy personnel who have served 
there and made if great. Stay tuned to this blogsite this week as we have 
the answers to your questions set to come out Thursday ( 10/ 20) in 
conjunction with the lab's 65th Anniversary. 



November 2014 (11) 
October 2014 (15) 
September 2014 (20) 
August 2014 (14) 
July 2014 (13) 
J une 20 14 (8) 
May 2014 (11) 
April 2014(9) 
March 2014 (14) 
February 2014 (7) 
J anuary 20 14 (7) 
December 2013 (7) 
November 2013 (12) 
October 2013 (7) 
September 20 13 (14) 
August 2013 (13) 
July 2013 (11) 
J une 20 13 (22) 
May 2013 (15) 
April 2013(14) 
March 2013 (14) 
February 20 13 (14) 
January 2013(12) 
December 20 12 (11) 
November 20 12 (11) 
October 20 12 (7) 
September 20 12 (9) 
August 2012 (12) 
July 2012 (13) 
June 2012 (17) 
May 20 12 (22) 
April 2012(14) 
March 2012 (13) 
February 20 12 (14) 
J anuary 20 12 (13) 
December 20 11 (13) 
November 2011 (20) 
October 2011 (22) 
September 20 11 (12) 



http://navymedicine.navylive.dodlive.mil/archives/697[3/l 1/2015 9:32: 13 AM] 



NAMRU-3 Supports Force Health Protection in the Horn of Africa I Navy Medicine 



CAPTB. A.OYOFO 
Linda, 

Send me your e mail address, i will be ^ad to send you recent 
information on NAMRU-3. 1 am the current Executive Officer. My e 
mail is, . 

Sorry to hear about the death of your husband. Please contact me 
through my e mail. Cheers. 



August 2011 (16) 
July 2011 (10) 



CAPTOyofo 



■ Dr. J ames Campbell 
Hi Tony, 

I Great to learn that you have been assigned as Executive 
Officer of NAMRU- 3. 1 hope all is going well with you 
and your family. 1 am currently on TDY in Geneva for a 
Humanitarian Assistance course. Pat and 1 are doing 
well. Thanks, J im 




http://navymedicine.navylive.dodlive.mil/archives/697[3/l 1/2015 9:32: 13 AM]