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9tTH YEAR, EXPRESS-HERALD 65TH YEAR 



NEWMARKET, ONTARIO, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 TH, 1951 



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Equipment 



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From Newmarket Goes 



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On The Royal Train 

Made especially for Princess Elizabeth and the Duke 
of Edinburgh, a Hoffman press made in Newmarket 
was shipped last Friday to be ready for the royal train. 



H . The press will be installed in a 
special valet car/ It will be part 

Of the equipment to take care of 

the wardrobes for the royal 

.couple and other dignitaries who 

will travel by the ten-car train in 
Eastern Canada. . 
:•' Workmen put the finishing 
/touches to the press last Friday 
.morning at the Canadian Hoff- 
man Co. Ltd. plant on Charles St. 
'7; Although' railway officials mere- 
ly asked if they would supply a 
press, they will receive a special 
"royal tour 1 ' press. . 
- The "princess* press", as it be- 
came known around the plant, is 
a gleaming piece of machinery 
carefully finished like no ordin- 
ary press. The metal was buffed 
and parts and fittings were plat- 
ed to shine like silver. 

; It is not the first "royal" press 

that Hoffman workmen have 



Plant Manager Dewey Khuns 
said that the press was prepared 
on short notice. The request al- 
lowed Hoffman workmen a week 

to have it ready. The valet car 

will be -a Canadian National 
Railway car although the train 
will be made up of both C.N.R. 
and C.P.R. cars. 






WILL RECEIVE $300 
SCHOLARSHIP 

The Ontario Command of the 
Canadian Legion announced yes- 
terday that Mike Maughan, Au- 
rora, is to be given a $300 Legion 
scholarship. 

The Aurora high school stu- 
dent won this beside the John 
Stuart scholarship. He had high- 
est marks in grade 13. The Lc- 
. .., 11t[ ,. , - , gion award is given to 20 stu- 

b ! ,I .l t ' J y""" 1 *? k ^l and ? U ?, 6n dents throughout Ontario who 
visited Canada in 1939, 3 similar are SQns or daughtors of veter . 




SINGLE COPIES 5 CENTS EACH 



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| press was on the valet car. But 
Hoffman's contribution to royal 
visits goes back further than 

.that The United States plant 
supplied a press when the Prince 
of Wales visited the U.S.A. The 
tradition' was carried on from 
there. 

The press will be supplied only 
while the royal tour Is on, as re- 
quested. After that it will be 
returned and probably sold. The 

' press used for the king and queen 
went to the Royal Valet Service, 
a cleaning and pressing plant in 
Toronto. First installed in a 
front window, it caused a line-up 
of onlookers for several days. 



ans. 

Mike is the son of A. E. L. 
Maughan, Aurora, a member of 
the Aurora branch of the Cana- 
dian Legion. 



FLORIST MOVES 

Eugene McCaffrey, Newmar- 
ket florist, has moved his store 
to 5 Main St. His flower shop 
was formerly located on Timothy 
St., across from the bus terminal. 

While Mr. McCaffrey's store is 
now open for business, he said 
today that he plans to have a 
grand opening shortly. 



Township Rate 30.2 

ols Raised 5.4 




In East Gwillimbury 

The East Gwillimbury township council struck a 
township rate of 30.2 mills, a mill higher than last year, 
at its regular monthly meeting on Saturday. 



MORRISON, LAMONT 
NEW REEVE, DEPUTY 
ELECTED IN SUTTON 

Grover Morrison was elected 
to the office of reeve of Sutton 

last Friday. The election, which 

was made necessary by the death 
of Reeve Charles* Scott, saw the 
defeat of Miss Lillian Holborn 
by George Lamont for the dep- 
uty reeveship. 

Morrison defeated William J. 
Park, the other candidate for 
reeve, by a slight margin of 15 
votes. Morrison polled 278 votes 
against Park's 263. 

Morrison was reeve of Sutton 
before the late Charles Scott. 
He is a garage operator in Sut- 
ton. 

Miss Holborn, who has been a 

candidate a number of times 

previously in both Sutton and 

,,,,.. , , , , , ,- , , , North Gwillimbury township 

A product of Hoffman s, made by Newmarket workers, the press for the royal couples ejections, was defeated by 

valet railway car during their tour of the eastern part of the country was completed George Lamont, a Sutton con- 

and shipped last Friday. With the gleaming plated and lacquered machine above arc Jvacfcn* *>y 32 *»***■ ML ! S J*oi- 

t it -*. *i e t ? % * tv s*ftn xr t t —• r> i T-* i r ii born is a property owner in both 

men who worked on it, left to right, Dan Gill, Ken Jones, ionimic Proud, Earl Lovelock s utton an< j North Gwillimbury. 

and Frank Daniels. Era and Express photo 





Increases 
District Rates 



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WILCOX THEFT RING 
BELIEVED STOPPED 

Police believe that an end has 
been put to a juvenile theft ring 
operating in the Lake Wilcox 
area with the arrest on Monday 
of nine boys, aged nine to 14 
years. The arrests were made 
after police had investigated the 
theft of chocolates and cigarets 
from the community hall. The 

stolen articles were found in a 
sand pit. 

O.P.P. Const. Holdsworth, who 
made the arrests, said that the 
operations of the ring were quite 
professional. They usually 
worked in gangs of two or three 
and they specialized in summer 
cottages-. . 

The boys would wait until 
summer cottage owners had left 
for an evening and then break 
into the cottages which they 
thoroughly ransacked. The dam- 
age often was greater than the 
value of the articles stolen. 



Hessian Fly Losses No Reason 
For Winter Wheat Acreage Cut 

Because of the heavy loss in and compensates for later secd- 



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To the township rate is added 
rates for the 20 school sections, 
including unions which averages 
at 13.2 mills, an average increase 
. of 5.4 mills over last year. 

The new rate breaks down as 
follows: county, 6.1; high schools, 
5.2; roads, 10.4; general purposes, 
6; relief and hospitalization, 2.5. 
The county rate is up .6 mills 
and the high school rate is up 
2.6 mills. It was noted in the re- 
port that the total of these in- 
creases plu3 the average school 
: Incease, is 8.6 mills and was 
'. made hy levying bodies over 
which, it was said, the township 
~_ council had no control. 

Other council business was the 

sale of debentures for $*J,550 on 

the water main at Bolton and 

Lundy avenues for 414% percent; 

tho report of Chief Constable J. 

! B. Jardinc that fines paid for the 

month of June amounted to over 

$800, and also that he hud not 

• . yet received an application for 

- the position of part-time police 

. officer. 

:; The board of health ordered 
\ the provision of dental services 
: for S.S. 10. The dark was in- 
structed to insure the new town- 
ship building for $12,000 Wm. 



to supply and install the heating 
equpment in the new building. 
Valley View Drive on lot 3, con. 
2, and the extension of Pen Ave. 
on plan 128 and Howard Ave. on 
plan 325 were included within 
the township system. 

The township has been declar- 
ed a sub-division controlled area 
and all small parcels of land of 
less than ten acres must be ap- 
proved by the York County Plan- 
ning board before being allowed 
to be registered unless the pro- 
perty is already included in a 
registered plan. 



GUEST SOLOIST 

Master David Wink worth, 
Newmarket, boy soprano, was 
guest soloist at St. Andrew's 
Presbyterian church last Sunday 
morning. 



this year's winter wheat crop 
from Hessian Fly, with yields re- 
duced to five bushels per acre 
in some districts, some farmers 
arc cutting down on their acre- 
age for this fall. Agricultural 
authorities, however, suggest 
this should not be necessary. 
However they do urge farmers 
to delay the date of seeding 
somewhat to reduce the possibil- 
ity of damage from this pest. 

Any pupae of the Hessian Fly 
in this year's crop that has not 
been plowed under will produce 
an adult fly which emerges in 
late August or early September. 
This fly looks for some early 
sown or perhaps volunteer wheat 
on which to lay its eggs in early 
September. 

By delaying seeding till ap- 
proximately mid-S cptembcr, 
there is less possibility of the 
fly laying eggs on the new crop 
before the fly dies. The use of 
fertilizer steps up the growth 



READIN 1 'N WRITIN' 



CORRECTION 

A source of information for a 
report last week produced an in- 
correct statement in the Era and 
Express that hydro workmen 
neglected to rescue a stranded 
cat. Residents called offices of 
some public services but not the 
hydro, a week ago Monday, to 
rescue a cat which was stranded 
at the top of a hydro pole over- 
night. When called Monday even- 



School's In, The Town Is Quiet 
Child Grown Up, Home No More 

A strange quietness lies over. with an anxiety that she'd never 
Newmarket. It is Tuesday, Sept. {be able to take care of him pro- 



log. It should be understood 
however, as Agricultural Repre- 
sentative W. M. Cockburn, New- 
market, points out, that late 
seeding only reduces and might 
not entirely prevent infestation 
since a warm open fall might de- 
lay emergence of the Hessian 
Fly. 

The Ontario Agricultural Col- 
lege has published a short "pam- 
ph?et on the life history of the 
fiy and methods of control which 
can be secured from the office j 
of the Ontario Department of 
Agriculture at Newmarket. 



ing, hydro crewmen Immediately 

Slorach was given ihc contract! went to the rescue. 

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4 and school has re-opened for 
another year. 

No Pied Piper appeared on the 
streets but children from five 
years of age on disappeared as 
completely as if such a visit had 
been made. Some with reluc- 
tance left the familiarity of their 
homes; others rushed to meet 
new experiences; some clung to 
their mothers. 

Walking home, each mother 
retraced more than just the road 
to her house. The intervening 
years from infancy to this day 
passed before her mind's eye. 
There was the baby, so small and 
helpless that she was overcome 




mm 



mm 



perly. 

Gradually he changed from a 
small bundle requiring almost 
constant attention to an indivi- 
dual rewarding those who cared 
for him with flashing smiles and 
looks of recognition. One day he 
has a tooth. On another he at- 
tempts to sfund. 

llaby ways are left behind. 
One year there are three candles 
on the cake. He is interested in 
other children, enjoying play- 
time more if he has companions. 
"Why, Mama?" appears with ex- 
asperating regularity in his con- 
versation. 

Yes, it is a long way back 
home. It covers five years of 
growing; five years when he be- 

(Page7, Col.2) 



GET BIKES TAPED 
FOR SAFETY, FRIDAY 

As a part of their safety cam- 
paign, the Newmarket Home and 
School association sponsored a 
Scotch lite-a-bike program prior 
to the closing of school in June. 

fn this program, bikes of alt 
youngsters registered m the ele- 
mentary schools in town were 
taped with a reflective material. 
Silver tape was applied in June, 
but as the red tape had not ar- 
rived, the bikes did not receive 
the latter tape. 

Members of the Home and 
School association will be at the 
schools on Friday morning, Sept. 
7, to apply this Scotchlite tape. 
Youngsters are requested to have 
their bikes at the elementary 
schools which they are now at- 
tending. Those pupils who were 
in Grade B last year and are now 
at high school should have some- 
one bring their bikes to the ele- 
mentary school they attended las 
year. If it is impossible for them 
to do this, they may bring their 
bikes directly to the home of 
association's president, Mrs. How- 
ard Morion, Lome Ave. to "have 
the tape applied. 

Elementary school children 
who have new bikes or were un- 
able to have the red tape ap- 
plied in June may receive both 
colors at the schools tomorrow. 

Those who arc able to do so, arc 
requested to pay 25 cents per bike 

for both the silver and the red 
tapes. 



THROWN FROM CAR. 
FOUR INJURED AT 
DEAD END OF ROAD 

Four persons were thrown 
from a convertible car which 
overturned in Whitchurch town- 
ship early Monday morning 
when the driver applied his 
brakes at the end of a road. 

William Starkey, 22, Aurora, 
one of the passengers, was tak- 
en to York County hospial, New- 
market, suffering from a frac- 
tured skull. His condition was 
first described serious but now is 
rcporV'd favorable. 

The car was travelling along 
the third concession of Whit- 
church, 1 1-4 miles south of 
Wellington St. When the driver, 
Edward Flood, Jefferson, realiz- 
ed that he was coming to a dead- 
end, he suddenly applied his 
brakes. The occupants were 
catapulted from the car. 

Others injured were Mrs. 
Mary Clarke, Lake Wilcox, who 
suffered from a broken collar 
bone and head lacerations, Mrs. 
Dorothy Cunningham, an injured 
arm, and the driver, Edward 
Flood, slight face cuts. 

Flood's new convertible was 
damaged to the extent of $1,200. 



WINNERS OF AURORA 
H. S. AWARDS 

J. H. Knowlcs, principal of 
Aurora high school, made an an- 
nouncement yesterday of the 
Aurora high school awards. The 
John Stuart award of $200 went 
to Mike Maughan, Aurora, who 
stood highest in grade 13. 

A $75 award went to Robert 
Staloy, Vandorf, who stood high- 
est among Whitchurch township 
students attending Aurora high 
school. 

According to Mr. Knowlcs, the 
registration figures for the new 
term show 13? in grade and 
386 in the whole school. 






COMING EVENTS 



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e Mundingcr Accordian Band which has won prizes in both the Kiwnnis Music Fes- 

^tiy«l and the Canadian National Exhibition is being brought to Newmarket by the Lions 

|\C!ub; The band will give a concert in the Newmarket Memorial Arena on Friday even- 

^^Jng'/Sept. 14. Proceeds from the concert will go towards Lions Club service work in Ncw- 

■ **"**<& an ddistrict. Reserved seats for tho performance aro on sale at Best's drug store. 




Thursday, Sept. 6— Opening re- 
hearsal of Trinity Senior Choir, 
commencing -sharp at 8 p.m. All 
members are urged to be present. 

♦rlw36 

Thursday, Sept. 0— Opening re- 
bcarsnl for Trinity Junior Girls' 
Choir, commencing promptly at 7 
p.m. clw36 

Thurs., Fft„ ainl Sat., Sept. C, 
7, K— Bond's 26th Anniversary sale. 
Order your tnllorcd-to-mcnsure 
suit ut Cliff InsSey's and order an 
extra pant for only 2Cc- cl\v3G 

Thu«**tu%y» Sent.! 0— Euchre and 
cribb under the auspices of the 
Ladles Auxiliary of tho Canadian 
Legion, In the Legion hall, New- 
market, ut 8 p.m. Admission 35c. 
Refreshments. clw36 

Sunday, Sept. 9— Chartered bus 
to Buffalo. Faro £1.50. Phone E. 
Andrews, 1090J, Newmarket, c2w35 

WVitneaday, Sept, if— Bingo in 

tho Newmarket town hall under 

the auspices of the Veterans' 

Ass'n at 8 p.m. Attendance prize 

y>. Jackpot 525. 2 cards 35c. 

c2w35 

Thurwhiy, Sept IS— Professional 

wresting at the Newmarket Mem* 



orlal arena. All seats reserved, 

c3w35 

Friday, St»pt. 14 — The famous 
MundlnKcr Accordion Band will be 
at the Newmarket Memorial 
Arena, sponsored by the Newmar- 
ket Lions Club. clw31 

Sat uniay, Sept. 15 — Opening 
dance at Belhavcn hnll to Norm 
Burling and His KlnKsmcn. Jack- 
pot S-ir>. Admission 50c. itX> 

Wednesday, Sept* 10— Bingo at 
Grnyslones. Grand opening. Ca- 
nadian Leejon, Aurora branch 3S5. 
Fall and winter bln^o. clw3G 

Thursday, Sept. 30— The Even* 
ln« Branch of St. Paul's W.A. will 
hold a used ctoihinj; and white 
elephant sale In the parish halt 
from 2 to 5 p.m. Anyone who may 
have contributions please contact 
Mrs. Bert Budd. e3w35 

.Monday, Sept. 'ii — Euchre and 
bridge at Aurora I<oglon hall un- 
der auspices of l.ndles Auxiliary 
branch 3S5. Refreshments. Ad- 
mission 35e. Good prizes. c3w36 

Every Saturday bingo in North 
Gwillimbury Memorial hall, Kes* 
wick, at 8.30 p.m., under the aus- 
pices of the Building Board. Spe- 
cial prizes, 2 cards 35c tf27 



WINS C.N.E. PRIZE 

Mrs. T. A. Mitchell, Newmar- 
ket, attended the Food Products' 
day luncheon at the C.N.E. given 
by the women's division. Host- 
ess was Kate Aitken. Mrs. Mit- 
. chell won a four-pound package 
of biscuits as the only represent- 
ative fro mNewmarket present. 
Mrs. Mitchell is a past president 
of the Newmarket Women's In- 
stitute. She judges annually for 
the provincial department of ag- 
riculture nt many of the fall 
shows throughout central Ontario, 
Mrs. Mitchell judges the women's 
contributions of needlework, 
crafts, cooking and baking at the 
fairs. 



If the Board of Transport Commissioners grants the 
Bell Telephone Co/s new application for increased rates, 
it will mean an increase of 70 cents a month for the 
single Hue phone user in Newmarket, and 50 cents for 
the single line phone user in Aurora. 



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Present monthly rates in New- 
market and Aurora for individu- 
al residence lines are $3.05. The 

company's application for in- 
creases would make the monthly 
rate in Newmarket $3.75 and 
Aurora $3.55. 

The company has asked for 
the increases in phone charges 
because of increases in wage 
rates, tax levels and other costs. 
The increase is designed to raise 
the estimated operating reve* 
nues by about 10 percent. 

The application filed with the 
Board of Transport Commission- 
ers asks that the proposed revis- 
ions be made effective October 
1 either as interim or as estab- 
lished rates. 

A comparison of the proposed 
increases for Newmarket shows: 
for homes, individual line, pres- 
ent rate, $3.05; proposed rate, 
$3.75; increase, .70; two-party 
line, $2.65; $3; .35; rural, $2.45: 
$2.90; .45; 

For business phones, individu- 
al line, present rate, $5; proposed 
rate, $6.75; increase, $1.75; two- 
party line, $4.25; $5.50; $1.25: 
rural, $3.25; $4.25; $1; PBX 
trunk, $7.50, $10.25; $2.75. 

A comparison of the proposed 
increase for Aurora shows: resi- 
dence, individual line, present 
rate, $3.05; proposed rate, $3.55; 



increase. .50; two-party line, 

S2.65; $2.90; .25; ruraU $2.45; 

$2.80: .35: 

For business phones, individu- 
al line, present rate-, $5; proposed 
rate. $6; increase. $1; two-party 
line, $4.25; $5; .75; rural, $3.25; 
$4: .75; PBX trunk. $7.50; $9; 
51,50. 

Differences in the proposed in- 
creases for Newmarket and Au- 
rora are explained by the dhV. 
'Vrence in the si/.e of the opera- 
tion in the two towns. Newmar- 
ket has over 2,000 phones on its 
switchboard while Aurora has 
about 1.400. 

There are no increases in long 
distance rates. 

This is the second increase the. . 
Bell has sought. The first was 
applied for ir. October, 1940, and 
went into effect last January L 
Despite this increase, the com- 
pany's earnings continued to 
drop. * 

In addition to having to meet; 
higher operating costs, the com- 
pany has since the war carried . 
on an extensive construction pro- 
gram involving gross construe* 
tion costs of $336,972,000. This 
program has enabled the com- 
pany to place in service 676,200 
additional telephones, an in- _. 
crease of 64.4 percent, to provide 
for a greatly expanded volume 
of long distance service. 






Mother, Child Killed/ 

m 

Rest Of Two Families 
Are Still In Hospital 

Funeral services were held in Newmarket on Tuesday 
for Mrs. Jack Fulchcr, Toronto, and her H-year old 
daughter, Brenda, who were killed at a level railway 
crossing accident at Gamebridge Saturday night. They 
were daughter and granddaughter of Mrs. Fred Hoare, 
Newmarket. 

Mrs. Fulcher was raised and.Orillia hospital after they were 
educated in Newmarket. The) severely burned in a gasoline 






surviving relatives are George 
Hoare, Mrs. Ernest Bonnitz, Mrs, 
Jack Legoode, Mrs. Les Paige, 
Mrs. Harold Brown and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Gardiner, brother and sis- 
ters, all ot Newmarket. Another 
sister, Mrs. Loftus Buckley, lives 
in Halifax. Mrs. Allan LaPiante 
Newmarket, predeceased Mrs. 
Fulcher in 1044. 

The crash occurred at Game- 
bridge, near Beaverton at a level 
crossing on highway No. 12. In 
serious condition at Soldiers? 
Memorial hospital in Orillia are 
Mr. Jack Fulcher who has been 
suffering from concussion, back 
injuries and head 6nd facial lac- 
erations. Harold Finuegun and 
his wife who is a sister to Mrs. 
Fulcher are also injured and in 
hospital. Their 2l.;>-years-'jhl son 
Michael, was seriously hurt. 

l^ast Friday Allan Finnigan, 0, 
and the two Fulcher boys, Robert, 
14, and Murray, 12, were taken to 



ZONE COMMANDER 

Harold Katon, Newmarket, 
was installed last night as com- 
mander of the Canadian Legion 
Zone K2. The installation wns 
made by the new provincial pre- 
sident, T. A. M. itttlse, Aurora, 
in the K.C.A.F. Wing hall. New- daughter 
market. 

Also installed was F. Cornier, 
Sutton, deputy zone commander. 
Mr. Hulse cancelled other en- 
gagements in Toronto to carry 
out Ids first official function as 
provincial commander. Repre- 
sentatives of eight Legion bran- 
ches uttended the installations. 



fire. They had been playing at 
the Fulcher's cottage on the 
Severn river and had poured 
gasoline from an outboard motor 
to light a fire. One of the boys 
lit the fire and the explosion 
burned the three severely. 

The two families had gone from 
the cottage to Toronto where the 
Fulchcrs were moving into a 
new house and were returning to 
Orillia to see the boys Saturday 
evening when me accident oc- 
curred. 

A dicsel train struck the car at 
the crossing which meets the 
highway at an angle. It is be- 
lieved that Mr, Fulchcr who was 
driving the Finncgnn car, turned 
away from the approaching train 
and skidded broadside onto the 
track. Except for Mrs. Fulcher 
and her daughter, all were 
thrown from the car. 

The two accidents, first when 
the boys were burned and the 
next night when the accident oc- 
curred, put a tragic end to a 
month's holiday for both famil- 
ies at the Severn river. As a 
result, every member of the fam- 
ily is in hospital except the two 
that are dead. 

Interment for the mother and 
was at Newmarket 
cemetery. Pallbearers were Er- 
nest Bcnnitz, Jack I-egoode, Wil- 
liam Gardner, Allan LaPiante* 
Harold Brown, Sydney Simmons, 
all of Newmarket, and Robert 
Fulchcr, Sr., Herb Fulchcr, Norm. 
Fulchcr, Harry Hnntson, Robert 
Brown and Herbert Brown, all 
of Toronto. 



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SEES 1900-1951 CHANGE 



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Renews Exhibition Visit After 50 Years 



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When Miss Elizabeth Egan, 8th 
concession of King township, at- 
tended the Canadian National Ex- 
hibition on music day last week, 
she could scarcely believe she 
was there. Her previous visit 
to the exhibition was 50 years ago, 
in 1900. 

Miss Egan, who is now 81 years 
old, said that the sights and 
changes were unbelievable to her. 
"! had thought about the Exhibi- 
tion for a long time but I never 
dreamed it could be carried out 
on such a large scale. It is noth- 
ing like the fair I saw in 1900," 
she said. 

Half a century ago she WttS 



visiting a friend in Toronto *md 
had gone to the fair but in the 

years gone by, a long illness has 
kept her away. Now fully re- 
covered, sho walked through the 
grounds with amazing energy. 

She climbed steps into various 
buildings and made a hasty in- 
spection of the midway. She 
thought that the grandstand was 
a great change from the original 
grandstand where she sat through 
n performance in 1000. The only 
objectionable feature of the 
C.N.E., she said, was the blaring 
of loudspeakers throughout the 

grounds. 
The coliseum was important to 



her for she had read about the 
Royal Winter Fairs every ycarv 

She took particular interest in the 
flower show and the singing birds 
because at home she grows beau* 
tiful flowers herself and has bird . 
houses posted about the gardens. 
Sho also saw the color A*l band- 
stand and heard excellent band 
performances. 

One of Miss Egan*s hobbies at 
home is making rugs. Friends 
had told her that she should have 
entered one rug which she had 
made for Kingcrafts Guild but 
she was content to merely view 
the handicraft exhibits at the 
C.N.E. made by others. 



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Any person dumping dead animals or seeds at the dump 
of -M f Con. 6, will be prosecuted. .Waste paper should be 



burned before leaving- 




- T* 



'_'• - 



* 






NOTICE 






BOARD OF HEALTH 
EAST GWILUMBURY TWP. 



- 



Maplewood Jersey Dispersal 



AT THE FARM 



•■ ** 



*- * » * 






/ • . 




LOCATED ONE MILE SOUTH OF MAPLE 

, SEPTEMBER 11 

• * i ■ 

AT ! P. M. 

70 HEAD 

ACCREDITED CALFHOOD VACCINATED 

Farms Limited 

SALES MANAGER, PHONE 64, OAKVILLE 



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IRNATIONAL HARVESTER 
tvwmwl REFRIGERATORS 



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KETTLE8Y 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Gilham and 
family left our community last 
week to take up residence in 
Sharon where Mr. Gilham has 
purchased a farm. A parting 
gift of china cups and saucers 
was given to Mrs. Gilham from 
the Christ Church Ladies Guild. 
We wish them happiness and 
prosperity in their new under- 
taking. 

Congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs. H. F. Funnell on their first 
wedding anniversary, September 

2. 

Birthday greetings to Dorothy 

Pleasance on September 2. 

Christ Church Ladies Guild 
will meet at the homo of Miss 
Clarice Sharpe on Tuesday, 

Sept. 11, at 1.30 p.m. 
A beautiful basket of gladioli 

was placed in church on Sunday, 
Sept. 2, by Mrs. Crane in loving 
memory of Mrs. Viola Sibloy. 

Flowers from the church were 
sent to Miss Laura Goodwin who 
is recovering from sickness. 

We are glad to report all mem- 
bers of the Beatty family, who 
have been ill with summer 'flu, 

are fully recovered except the 

baby, and she is now convales- 
cing. 

Holiday guests at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Fry were Mr. 
and Mrs. G. Knight from Eng- 
land who have come to this 
country to live. 

Will the lady who took Mrs. 
Fry's coat by mistake from the 
W.I. meeting at Mrs. N. Green- 
side's home on Wednesday, Aug. 
22, kindly return it as soon as 
possible. 

We were very glad to welcome 

our vicar, Rev. F. V. Abbott, 
home again from his vacation. 
Mrs. Abbott has improved very 
much from the month's rest. 

Services next Sunday at Christ 
church will be 9.45 a.m. for both 
morning service and Sunday 

school. Holy Communion. 



PLEASANTVILLE 

Mrs. Thos. Cleaver of Simcoe 
returned to her home on Friday 
after an extended visit with her 

sister, Mrs. E. Hawtin. 

The Misses Patsy and Sheila 

McCullough of Claremont visit- 
ed at the home of their uncle, 
Mr. Don McCullough, a few days 
last week. 

Miss Krla Toole spent a few 
days lasi week in Toronto, the 
guest of Miss Betty Rchill. 

Mrs. G. McCIure had Tuesday 
night tea with Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Cotville. 

Master Elgin Toole was a Mon- 
day supper guest of the Morlson 
family. 

Mr. E. Madill spent last week 
with Mr. and Mrs. A. Richardson. 
Aurora. 

Sunday guests at the homo of 
Mrs. G. McClurxr included Mr. 
and Mrs. K. Jewitt and Glenna 
of Kelt lo by, some members of 
the Richardson family of Aurora 
and for tea, Mr. and Mrs. A. Col- 
ville. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. McNicol mo- 
tored to Mindcn on Sunday, also 
calling on relatives at Stroud, 

Mrs. Frank Williams and Gar- 
net .spent the long weekend with 
relatives at Sehomberjg. 

On S u n d a y, visitors of the 
Toole family were Mr. and Mrs. 
Stuart Taylor of Cedar Brae, 
Mrs. Win. Barker of Zephyr and 






■ - 

Queensville News 



We appreciate the kindness of 
Mrs. D. Beckett in writing for 
this column the past three weeks 
while your scribe was absent be- 
cause of the illness and death of 
her mother. 

Miss Shirley Crandell of Lake 
Megantic, Quebec, is spending 
two weeks as guest of Misses 
Joyce Kyle and Elsie Huntley. 

We wish a speedy recovery for 
Mr. Irving Arnold who is a 
patient in York County Hospital. 
Also a speedy recovery for Mrs. 
Carl Gordon who is in York 
County hospital too. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Pearson 
were weekend guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Roy Lcgge of Toronto and of 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Snowden of Jar- 
vis. 

Recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
H. Kershaw were Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer Fry of Sharon, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Lew Knowlcs of Bar- 
rio. 

We welcome to our commun- 



with her brother and jilslvrin- 
law, Mr. and Mrs. Win. HurkhoM- 
cr, Bn Tills "younft" old lady 
still drives Iter own car alone on 
this long trip each year. 

Mr. and Mm. Ail (Ireig :i\M'u\ 
the l^abnr Day weekend at Al- 
gonquin Parti. 

Weekend guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Koss Chapman were Mr. and 
Mrs. Hobt. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
U. Wilson, and Mrs. J. Hall, all 
of Owen Sound. 

Wc welcome to onr community 
Mr. and Mrs. Kthan Fairbarn and 
family who have moved into Mr. 
It. Strasler's other house. 

Friends of Miss Lydia Small of 
Stayner, a former teacher here, 
will be interested in reading the 
account of her school teaching 

career in the latest issue of the 
Chatelaine magazine. 

Mr. and Mrs. Angus Smith 
were weekend guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Smith of Rlmira. 

Mr. H. Hulse and Miss Pear! 



ity Mr., and Mrs. Earl French and Gynnc attended the funeral of 



son, Peter, Toronto, who have 

rented rooms at Mrs. M. Thatch- 
er's, and also to Miss Bernic3 
Davidson, Bclhaven, who is 

boarding with Mrs. P. Boag. 

School bells again rang out on 
Tuesday morning. For some lit- 
tle folks it was their first day on 
their "journey of education." Mr. 
Earl French is the new principal 
at Queensville school; Miss Bar- 
nice Davidson in the Junior room 
at Queensville: Mrs. A. Smith 
again at Union St. school and Mrs. 
C. Milsted again at Hillside 
schooL 

Miss Jean Cunningham return- 
ed on Sunday to resume her 
duties at Bowmanville High 
school* 

Miss Donna Bath is convalesc- 
ing at the home of her aunt, Mrs. 
Mary McEthron in Toronto, fol- 
lowing a few days in Toronto 
General hospital. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Morley Andrews were Messrs. 
John Menzies and Joe Winson of 
Toronto, and Mr, and Mrs. Selby 
Evans of Hope. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Lcck, Carol 
and Allan, Sudbury, spent sev- 
eral days at the home of Mrs. 
Leek's sister, Mrs. Rex Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Burkhold- 
er, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Reynolds, 
and Miss Maude Burkholder of 
Detroit, Mich., spent the week- 
end with Mr. ami Mrs. Wm. Burk- 
holder, Jr. 

Mrs. G. E. Berdenburg of Mel- 
bourne, Fla., spent three weeks 



Miss Annie Moore in Toronto on 
Saturday. 
Sunday visitors of Mr. and Mrs. 

John Pindcr were Mr. and Mrs. 

Lome Fines and family of Brad- 
ford, Mr. and Mrs. Ken Davis 
and daughter of Toronto, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Cecil Pindcr. 

The W.A. of Queensville 
United church will meet in the 
basement on Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 
3 p.m. The supper hostesses are 
Mrs. J. B. Smith, Mrs. Stallibrass, 
Mrs. J. B. Ayhvard, Mrs. Roy 
Watts and Mrs. E. Buckle. The 
president urges a good attendance 

of ladies at this first meeting of 
the fall season. 

The ladies of Queensville Wo- 
men's Institute enjoyed a bus 
trip to the C.N.E. on Tuesday. 

A meeting of Queensville Ath- 
letic Society will bo held in the 
Queensville school on Friday 
night, Sept. 14, at 8.15 p.m. A 
financial report of the year's ac- 
tivities, including Sports Day, will 
be given. There will also be the 
election of officers for the next 
year. Also bring along your sug- 
gestions for next year's sports 
day. Please plan to attend and 
see what progress has been made 
in the past year. 

Mr. Eyril Blanchard began his 
teaching career on Tuesday at 
Jersey school in the intermediate 
room. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Banks of 
Kingston, Nova Scotia, were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. II, Ker- 
shaw for several days. 



BELHAVEN 

Once «K«in the r-chool bells 

are ringing. 

Wi'f'kiriul vfctilorn of Mr. and 
Mi::. SHby Fairbarn wi*re Mr. 
and Mi 8. Raymond Fidrhatri and 
I'.ivm! nod Mr. mid Mni. Frank 
Kydd. Toronto, 

Mi:w June Motion, Claremolit, 
ripi'nt a few holiday a with her 

cousin, M:i:;t«'r Floyd King. 

Mr. mid Mr;:. .!aiue*i Taylor and 
daughter vtniled Mr. and Mm. 

Ho;;:; Maill|>|'l/e. 

Mr. John Moi ton, Toronto, 
spent a few day:i with Mr. ami 
Mrs. Norman King. 

Mr. Norman Willotighhy, Tor- 
onto, railed on his parent*, Mr. 
and Mrs. Mlja Wilioughhy, on 
Labor Day. 

Don't forget the Institute 
which will be at Mrs. H. Crit- 
tenden's home at Willow Beach 
on Tuesday, Sept. 11, Roll call: 
"Why Women Shou Id Vole." 
Convener: Mrs. M. Sedore; hos- 
tesses: Mrs. Jacob, Mis. Huntley 

and Mrs. Crittenden. 

Horry to hear that Mrs. II. 

Winch had the misfortune to 

break her knee and wish her a 
speedy recovery. 

• Mr. and Mrs. Markle, Hunts* 
vilte, .spent Sunday with Mr. and 

Mrs. J. A. Nelson. 




■;-'^^^r^7^3 



* 



Blue is STILL the Hue! 

emm in and skk 

MORRISON'S 

Exhibition Blue 

SUITS 

The popular color 



03 Mala 



FOR THIS TAIX 

Newmarket 



Phone XTA 



X 



BLUE IS THE HUE! 

Come in and see Morrison's Ex- 
hibition Blue suits — the popular 
color for this fall. .63 Main St., 
Newmarket, phone 158. (Advt.) 



WHEAT GROWERS 

_ 

Delay Seeding Till Mid September 

THE HESSIAN FLY EMERGES IN LATE AUG. 
UST AND EARLY SEPTEMBER TO ATfACK 
THE NEW CROP 

FERTILIZE AND DELAY SEEDING TO MISS 
THE EGG LAYING. 

FOR PAMPHLET OR INFORMATION ON 

HESSIAN FLY CONTACT 

W. M. COCKBURN 

Agricultural Representative 
Newmarket 




For hardware of iron 
of copper or zinc 

VtUOWPAG£S will find 

Quick as a wink ! 




PAGiS 



« i ; - * i * * ) 



,^r.-*V^W* -*:■ 



OF, YOUR k 
TELEPHONE , 

'DIRECTORY 



- • 



■■■m 



- - . 

Constable & Magee 

International Harvester Dealers 



Service a Must with Us" 

DAVIS DR W., NEWMARKET 
PHONE 900J 



Miss Emily Francis of Pine Orch- 
ard. 

Miss Annie Dike of Newmar- 
ket was a guest at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry West for a 
few days last week. 

Mr. Stuart Starr returned 
homo on Tuesday after a couple 
of weeks' visit with his sisters, 
ami also attending a Friends 
Conference in Ohio. 

Mr. anil Mrs. Sanders and two 
children of Kirkland Lake were 
guests for the long weekend at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Win. 
Walker and girls. 

Several from this burg have 
attended the C.N.K. and enjoyed 
the day. 









* 

Mount Pisgah News 




The Mount Pisgah W.A. will 
meet at the home of Mrs. It. Hay- 
croft on Wednesday, Sept. 12, for 
its September meeting. Roll-call 
will be: "Name a vegetable men- 
tioned in the Bible" Devotion- 
al: Mrs. PaUenden; pro^iam: 
Mrs. Howlctl; hostess: Mrs. 
lioynlon. Kveiyone welcome. 

We are very pleased to report 
that Joe Duncan is home al- 
though he will still have to make 
visits to the hospital. Joe will 
he very pleased to have* visitors 
at any time. 

We also have word that Don- 
ald lloare is home again. He had 
spent the last few v/eeks in hos- 
pital with the dreaded polio hut 
is O.K. now. 

Congratiilsitions to both Mr. 

and Mr.s. Charlie Crawford and 

to Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nigh 

| who weie married on Saturday, 

Sept. I. 

Mr. ami Mrs. Hi is.se! i Gordon of 
Limerick, Saskatchewan, and Mr. 
and Mr.s. Jvorne Kvans, Aurora, 
were Sunday visitors of Mr. and 
Mr.s. Harry Smith. 

Mr. and Mr.s. Wallace Scott 
and daughter visited Mr. and 
Mr.s. Win. Ferguson, Hingwood, 
on Sunday. 

Miss Sheila Ash is holidaying 
with her cousin. Deanne Broome, 
at Concord for u week. 

Mr. and Mr.s. A. Harding, Tor- 
onto, were supper guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Garnet Kvans on Thurs- 
day of lust week. 

Mrs. Harlow Sr. left for her 
return trip to R n g I a n d last 
Thursday. 

Miss Martha Barker and Mr. 
Hoy Allen, Toronto, were visi- 
tors of Itoy Smith on Friday of 
last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Staley, Urant- 
ford, and Mr. and Mrs. S. Bade 
and Shirley of Vandorf visited 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hewlett last 
Saturday. 

Mrs, Win. Noble is staying with 
her sister, Mrs. H. Wilton, for a 
few weeks. 

Mr, Norman Hicks Is on a 
week's holiday with his parents 
at Sharon. 

Mr. and Mrs. It. Keffer ami 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Snider, Maple, 
were Sunday guests of Mr. anil 
Mrs. Ross Keffer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Smith 
and girls, Victoria Square, vyorc 



Sunday visitors of the Gambles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoy Howlett vis- 
ited Mr. and Mr.s. Albert Howlett 
at Mount Albert an Sunday. 

Mr. and .Mrs. George Hoynlon 
and family visited Mr. and Mrs. 
James Ash. Holt, on Sunday. 



Well Drilling 

LUNNEY 

KESWICK, ONTARIO 

Phone 
Queensville 4805 




A General Motors Value 



Ycur kiy to grtJter &aulimgpnft$ 




Tim i* a nimut' of tiling* as 
ihey m.iy he ulu-u suits mi 
|>rt'gli;tu*<| with .iluiniinmi filu* 

l>ro«<">s has been uatvitfvil) 
keep' wearers at le»M 12* <oi>!<i 

in MiimiUT, warmer in uiaiei. 
Tlicfe u't'iii* tn Ik- no mil to 

I lie me* of aluminum. New 
onus |io|> up every d;iy. hi 
ability to rcflcft heat is only 
one of a do/en reasons for alu- 
minum's xoomiui; |mj»iil.nity. 
To keep up with the drmaud, 
wc are at present busy building 
new daun, powerhouses aial 
smelters for Canada and the 
free world. Aluminum Com- 
pany oi Canada, Ud. (Ahaa). 



lot i want a truck that has plenty of 
heft for the pay load— but the right kind 
of power Is the clincher. 

That's why so many truckers turn to 
(IMC for swift performers that can pack 
home the pay load. 

For In these broad-shouldered carriers- 
chassis and engine are yoked together to 
form a perfect team for hauling, a team 
that's built for keeps! 

The result is a great line of trucks— from 
nimble Vi- tonncrs up to brawny Diesels 
with two-cycle eiTicieney, with horse- 
power unsurpassed in their class, that 



lias made them the talk of the country^ 
truck men. 

That's why— whether your cargo is com- 
pact or bulky, liquid or solid, grain or 
cement— if you load it on a CMC, you 
deliver it faster at less cost per mile! 

As your CMC dealer, wc can give you the 
long-time benefits of the right combina- 
tion of axle, engine, transmission and 
frame for the loads you have to work— 
skilfully engineered by the world's 
largest exclusive manufacturer of com- 
mercial vehicles. 






Get a real truck ! 



---, 



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GMC44U 



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G.M.C. TRUCKS 



Phone 5920, Mount Albeit 





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iijwmNnr 

Barrister, -Solicitor 
Notary PubUc 

BLOCK 

Fhone 406 
25 Connaught Ave. 



1 E. HAWKINS 

Contractor For - 

BULLDOZING, GRADING 

CELLAR EXCAVATIONS 

and 
Hattttnf Grave*, Sand and Fill 

Phone 21 9w f Aurora 



The Story Of 




■ ■ 



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J* UALCi, B.A. 

^At-Law 

^SoUeltw 
bfary Public 

and Residence 
844|n '^150 Main St 
NEWMARKET 

Evenings By Appointment 



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■t^ppc^**?**- -- . »«■£ . -.-* — T< — - 






•\-"^ 



M. HULSE, B.A. 

[Barrister, Solicitor 
Notary Public, Etc. 

PHONE 151 
it Wtfllngton St 



STOUffVlllE SAND 

LTD. 



W*iT5* 





for government approved 

crashed stone of various sizes 

crashed gravel, sand 

concrete gravel and pit ran, 

Delivered or at bin. 

Plant phone 125 
Office phone3 370 and 126 



- 



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JHEWS. STIVER 

^JSflii VALE 
^gwrffiters, Solicitors 

Notaries 

MM Mathews, K.C. 
_ %%fc Stiver, B.A. 

1^^, Lyons, B.A. 
IJ| Joseph Vale 

Sotmarket office 

MAIN St, 
ONE 120 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

House and Farm Wiring 
DOOGBAIN 

General Repairs 

Tiraben Oil Burners 

Fawcett Space Heater 

Ail Electrical Household 

Appliances 

Phone 422 Box 717 

25 Ontario St. W-, Newmarket 



U%r 



By 

» 

ETHEL WILLSON TREWHELLA 

This is the thirteenth installment of a continuing 
Story of Sharon" <*om its founding to the present The 
story was written after almost two years of research 
and will, we believe, be a major contribution to know- 
ledge of the past The remaining installments will 

folloiv weekly. 

The following was written by "My heart I leave in sacred 









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-.-. _- ?JS*& 



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■- 



^-^;^,— .. - 



«*s 



■ AM. MILLS 

-Barrister, Solicitor and 

Notary Public 

51 MAIN ST. 

et Phone 461 



a' 



STEWART BEARE 

Radio Service 

RADIO PARTS, TUBES 

BATTERIES. ETC. 
113 Alain St Phone 355 



' i 



VIOLET 
©BINSON MacNAUGHTON 



': ■ : » 



NOTAftY fUBLIC 

Conveyancing - - Insurance 
Sotsford St. Phone 339 



Newmarket 






DENTAL 



DR. W. O. NOBLE 

■. DENTIST 

KfivJr MUNICIPAL OFFICE 



r-i^' 



i?'.' * 



Office 47 
Residence 1344 



■ 



A. STOUFFER 

* 

19 Raglan St. 

Expert Piano Tuner and 
Repairer 

Pianos Bought, Sold and Rented 

... PHONE 270 



David Willson as he felt age ad- 
vancing and it was read at his 
funeral. 

"Farewell, ye hills, and fields, 
and plains, 
To fruitful vales and shading 
groves; 
Farewell to great and honored 
names, 
Death on my trembling spirit 
moves. 

"Ye heavenly lights that on me 
shine 
To whom the kindred nations 
bow, 
No more your comforts can be 
mine, 
I bid farewell and leave you 
now, 

"Farewell to you my morning 
suns. 

It once was joy to see you 
rise. 
But as the shade of death now 
comes 
I see your light with weeping 
eyes. 

"Farewell ye harvests of the 
field. 
And flowers that in the valleys 
grow, 
Nor grazing flocks their pleas* 
ures yield - 
My thoughts are in the grave 
below. 



* 



James J. Wall 



, 



Dr. C. K. VanderVoort 

DENTIST 

1 Main St. Newmarket 

Phone 464w 



PLUMBING, HEATING 
CONTRACTOR 

Dealer for 

Delco Water Pressure Systems 

Arcoflame Oil Burners 

Cement Septic Tanks 

Constructed 

OAK RIDGES 

Phone King 111 

Phone Aurora 46J 









• >9: 



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^., *- 



MEDICAL 



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S. J. BOYD, M.D. 

— ■ * 

214 Indian Road 

TORONTO 
Phone ME. 9559 



EVANS' FUELS 

NEWMARKET 

< 

Coal. Coke, Wood 
and Stoker Coal 



* 




5 






- 



DB. G. 1UERVYN PEEVEK 

^Physician and Surgeon 

T Phone 485 
nsnltatlon by Appointment 

At residence corner of 

Raglan and Tecumseh Sts. 



Orders taken for Gravel, Sand 

and Crushed Stone 

and General Hauling 






#■*■ iW. C. AJRKINSTALL 

Physician and Surgeon 
MARGARET ARKINSTALL 

Physician 

feOff ice: 121 Prospect St 

Consultation by Appointment 

TELEPHONE: Office 915 

Residence 1240J 



JOHN DALY 

Expert Watch and Clock Repair 

31 Gorham St. 

or 

Phone 656M Newmarket 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



OSTEOPATHY 



WILSON 

Osteopathic and Arthritis 
m?-\ Clinic 

IjijESON BUILDING, BARRIE 

Tf Telephone 2293 

iultation by Appointment 





"Farewell ye little winding 
streams 
That through the growing 
meadows run. 
And flowery gardens clothed in 
green - 
No more to me your pleasures 
come. 

"My feathered friends of morn- 
ing songs 
Whose homes the green and 
spreading bough, 
I lent mine ear to hear your 
tongues, 
It yields no joy to hear you 
now. 

"Farewell to you my walks 
abroad, 
The limbs that bore my frame 
gave way, 

A withering plant before my 
God, 

I am to friends and foes this 
day. 

"Farewell ye altars and my pen, 
I'm drawing near the close of 

time. 
Farewell to you fault-finding 

men, 

I'm weak to write the sacred 
line. 



"Farewell to you, my dearest 
friends, 

That hath with mc my sorrows 
bore, 

On God alone my soul depends 
For you can strengthen me no 
more. 

"Farewell to you, my little ones 

In whom 1 have hid great de- 
light, - 

Where I had joy now sorrow 

comes, 

My mornings are like shades 

of night. 

"Like plants that in the garden 
grow 

Set by your heavenly Father's 
hand. 

No more shall I your blessings 
know, 

I'll cease to at the altar stand. 



praise, 

'Twas heaven above that mov- 
ed my tongue, 
I bid farewell to pleasant days, 

To Sabbaths where your praise 
is sung. 

"Farewell to melody and strains 
That once did fill my listening 

ear, 
Ye joyful band that peace pro- 
claims, 
I leave you with a glistening 
tear. 



"Farewell to you, my house and 

home, 

But a few groans shall I re- 
peat, 
My last companion is the tomb, 
And then my ancient friends 
I'll meet. 

"Farewell to age and sorrow 
worn 
The staff ttnd pillow of my 
head, 
Age and infirmity I've borne, 
A painful night and restless 
bed. 

"Farewell unto the House of God 

Where long my trembling 

frame hath stood; 

Farewell to all that are abroad 

To friends and foes I wish all 

good." 

The Children of Peace abhor- 
red ministers, or priests, and in 
the early days they had celebrat- 
ed marriages, so in 1867 the 
Society was incorporated by Act 
of Legislature which legalized all 



forthwith. The Meeting House J 
was to be open to all interested 
as in the past. The trustees were 
Amos J. Hughes, William Gra- 
ham and Amos Willson, - the 
heirs were John D. Willson and 
Hugh D. Willson. 

In April of 1882 the Children 
of Peace trouble was settled at 
Osgoode Hall. The difficulty 
had been that the heirs were de- 
termined to continue in the man- 
ner of David Willson and to use 
the old patriarch's sermons. The 
trustees wished to become more 
orthodox and had invited other 
ministers to preach. In 1880 
they held property valued at 
$15,000 and a benevolent fund of 
$5,000. In the settlement the 
property remained with the heirs 
and the costs were paid from the 
benevolent fund. 

After the death of John D. 

Willson the buildings remained 
empty for a time, used only oc- 
casionally or when a travelling 
evangelist held services. Then 
Elder Thomas Garbutt, hoping to 
organize a Christian church in 
Sharon, persuaded the Onlario 
Christian Conference to' purchase 
the property. In the County 
Registry Office it is on record 
that on the 2nd of September, 
1890, Absalom Willson sold to 

the Christian Conference, "two 

parcels, the Meeting House and 
the Temple, for One Dollar." 
Elder Garbutt's efforts were not 
successful, so on "July 1st, 1894, 
the Conference of the Christian 
church returned to Absalom 
Willson the same two parcels of 
Meeting House and Temple." 

M. Ramsay Buys Property 

For some time following the 
above the buildings remained in 
disuse until Michael Ramsay 
purchased the entire property. 
Unfortunately the Meeting 
House was demolished. Mrs. 
George Main/prize at Holt be- 
came very much disturbed over 
these historic buildings being 
lost to the community and con- 
tacted the York Pioneer Society. 
Mrs. O. B. Shcppard, who with 
Mrs. Mainprize, had been born 
in Sharon, the daughter of Dr. 
Montgomery, quickly realized 



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THE NEWMARKET ERA AND EXPRESS. THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER &TH. 1951 



THREE 



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these marriages and protected 

the heirs to any property rights, j what "this loss would "mean to I" the 



Heirs and Trustees Struggle 

Along about 1880 trouble be- 
gan when some of the younger 
members invited the Rev. Friz- 
zel, a Presbyterian minister, to 
preach to them every Sunday. 
It was unfortunate and a strug- 
gle ensued for forcible possession 
of the Meeting House, between 
the Heirs and the Trustees, 
which led to an action in a mag- 
istrate's court. A temporary 
peaceful settlement was obtained 
out of court and possession of 
the place of worship was return- 
ed to the trustees by the heirs 



[ future. 

The result of his was that in 
1917 Michael Ramsay sold to the 
York Pioneer Historical Society 
for $1,500 the Temple property 
and David Willson's Study. This 
transaction produced another 
memorable day in the village of 
Sharon. The older residents of 
the community, who for long 
had known the Temple and the 
Davidites with their traditions, 
were delighted that the Temple 
was likely to be repaired and re- 
opened. 



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lubricants 
transform your ride 

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It's a pleasure to settle back in your car 
and feel as free as if you were riding the 
wings of the wind. That's the kind of 
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Copyright. 1951 




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become 



Commissioned Officers 

in the 



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THE VARIETY 
OF DESIGNS 

In our collection of 
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We also make memorials to order 
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INSURANCE 

JOHN E. JARVIS 

Coni ^deration Life Association 

Representative 

Fire, Automobile and Casualty 

45 Eagle St. Newmarket 

Phones: Newmarket HOhv 

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RUSSELL GLIDE 

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It is the evening of Labor 
Day and the thought of tomor- 
row," when we get back to the 
desk after a week of case, is 
like the sword of Damocles. 
Holidays are over for another 
year; wc had at least, the an- 
ticipation of another week to 
sustain us through the heat of 
mid-July and August. Now it's 
a race down the stretch to the 

year end. 

But apart from a parlous lack 

of editorial opinion at the mo- 
ment, the prospect is not en- 
tirely displeasing. Labor Day 
has become for us the end of a 
season; No matter what heat 
waves may descend in the next 
month, in our books fall is very 
definitely here and that's fine 
by us. It is the most delight* 
ful season of the year. The col- 
or of the trees, the soft hills in 
the September mist; none of 
this can be duplicated In any 
other season for inspiration to 
the imagination. 

But even without the parade 
of the trades unionists at the 
Exhibition, and the rising toll 
of holiday deaths broadcast ov- 
er the radio, we f ve seen or ra- 
ther heard, the sign of the new 
season. Montreal opened 
against Hamilton last week and 
were soundly licked, and on Sa- 
turday, Ottawa got the boots 
from the Argos. Then today,. 
Hamilton laid it on the Argos to 
complete the circle. We heard 
the first two over the radio but 
missed the third. Too bad. 
We've our money on the Tigers 
after hearing the way their line 
poured throu'gh Montreal and 
smothered Rattermah. Chart 
Holmes, erstwhile Bell man 
here and sports booster, is on 
the Tigers' executive and al- 
though we've not met the gen- 
tleman, Ab Hulse tells us that 
he expects the title this year. 

Well, it's early to say, but 
when the runner-up of last 
year trounces the champion this 
year, twice too because they did 
it in an exhibition tilt a couple 
of weeks ago, it looks like 
there's reason for great expec- 
tations. 

♦ ♦ • 

Filled in the holiday hours 
(those not spent on our back) 
with a bit of household carpen- 
try and along with a couple of 



bruised .fingers and a torn pair 
of pants where the saw slipped, 
we have conceived a great af- 
fection for fir. 
We'd not particularly trusted 

this wood before. A 1 w ays 
splintered where you least ex- 
pected it and certainly didn't 
want it, and it has a dangerous 
tendency to ram splinters into 
your palms. But even so,^ it 
has a lovely grain so we tried 
it for doors on a couple of kit- 
chen cabinets. 

We found its character as we 
had remembered it but since 
the stuff was more or less pre- 
cut to the sizes we wanted. 
there wasn't too much aggrava- 
tion. We'd always called for 
pine when we wanted to knock 
up a shelf. It's easy to work 

with but after the fir, we found 
it unsatisfactory. Too easy, we 

guess. No character. Fir is a 
likeable curmudgeon; pine is 
milk and toast. The first will 
work up the Old Adam in you 
every so often but at least it 
:s ne\-er boring. 

And when we've polished it 
up a bit and brought out the 
grain, we expect a masterpiece. 
Now, if only we had set those 

screws in a straight line. . . 

» * « 

We like the bit reported from 
the annual meeting of the Fed- 
eration of Women Teachers' 
Association in Ontario. Mr. 
Walter Fisher, past president of 
the Lions International, said: 
"Boys and girls are confused 
these days- We're all confused 
in our thinking. We don't 
know where the world is going. 
Before our children have the 
faith needed to pull the world 
together again, you and I must 
have faith first." 

It's appropriate not just to 
teachers but to every parent. 
Let our children hear us in the 
every day, "aint it a rook" con- 
versation that passes between 
us and you can hardly blame 
them if they take the same 
view-point without the com- 
pensating wider horizon. Think 
back. The last time you talked 
over the state of the world, it 
was hardly with faith in the fu- 
ture was it? But that's the 
key. A belief in the Tightness 
of our convictions. Without it, 
our battle's lost. 



From the Files of 

25 and 50 Years Ago 



SEPTEMBER 3, 1926 

Mr. Harry Collingwood, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Collingwood, 
Newmarket, has been awarded 
the D. E. Thompson general 
proficiency scholarship from 
McMaster University and the 
Gibson mathematics pro- 
ficiency scholarship from the 
University of Toronto. He took 
first-class honors in twelve sub- 
jects in the upper school ex- 
aminations. 

Mrs. Van Norman and daugh- 
ter, Roslyn, Keswick, have gone 
to Alberta v/hcre Miss Van Nor- 
man is to teach in the continua- 
tion school. 

Mr. Arnold Molyneaux left 
on Monday for Golding, Cat., to 
enter college for a course o£ 
mining engineering. 

There were 146 entries in the 
flower show held in the mar- 
ket hall on Saturday. The sil- 
ver cup donated by Mr. E. J, 
Davis, Jr., for the best display 
of gladioli was won by It. B. Me- 
Tavish. Ed Jirammcr won sec* 
©rid and II. Hugo third. Miss 
Newton was the largest win- 
ner having carried off 14 firsts 
and two seconds. The gladioli 
sweepstake was won by-Mr. A. 
E. JJrainmer with the Giant 
HytnpH variety. 

Miss Olive TihsdaJe has re- 
turned to her home at Mount 
Albert after visiting friends in 
Windsor and Detroit. 

The public schools opened on 
Wednesday with a record at- 
tendance. There were 30 begin- 
ners, 

. Mr. and Mrs, Charles Wal- 
ker, Lowell, Mass., are visiting 
Mr. Walker's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. A. Walker, Vandorf. 

On Monday night the store of 
Mr. J, L. Hamilton at the foot 
of Main St. v/as broken into and 
a showcase containing $€0 worth 
of tobacco and eigarets v/as 

taken. The next morning the 
case was found on Mr-. D. 
Roche's lawn, . 

THE OLD HOME TOWN 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1901 

Mrs. Nelson GoUinger, East 
Gwillimbury, brought a stalk of 
corn into the office which 
measured 14 ft, 6 inches. 

Rev. P. C. Cameron. B.A., 
pastor of the Baptist church at 
Schomherg, has received a call 
to the Baptist church at Paris, 
Ont., and will take over the 
end of September. 

The Model school opened on 
Tuesday morning with 311 
scholars in attendance. 

Last week Mr. Th.imat Mil- 
lard received an 18 lb. salmon 
packed in ice sent from British 
Columbia by his sons. It arriv- 
ed in good condition and was 
greatly enjoyed. 

Apples are very scarce in the 

Mount Albert district this year 

and. the price promises to reach 
the peak. 

Messrs Underbill and Sisman, 
Markharn, have started the re- 
moval of their plant to Aurora. 
Four carloads have already gone 
forward. 

The Aurora high school board 
met on Wednesday and engaged 
D. A. McKay, B.A., a specialist 
in science at a salary of $450 per 
annum. 

The red cedar shingles at 
Cane's factory are having a big 
sale. Two cars have been sold 
already and another car arriv- 
ed direct from British Columbia 
on Tuesday, 

There v/as a sugar famine in 
the groceries of Newmarket the 

early part of this week. 

Stokes Stewart, Or i Ilia, and 

Roy Vernon, Newmarket, were 

guests of the Proctor boys at 

. Kettloby for a few days last 

v/eek. 

The fall term of Newmarket 
high school opened last Tues- 
day with between 70 and HU 
scholars attending. W. C. Wid- 
difield, chairman of the board, 
presided during tike opening 
hour. Trustees, J. J. Pearson 
und Is. O. Jackson also deliver- 
ed addresses. 



. 



Serving 



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ice Cat 



♦ ; . . 




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f, Aurora and the rural dlsfrkft of North York 

Th.N.wmorket Era 1852 The Expres* Harold 1893 

"■ , : ' ;*. ■ - 

Published every Thursday at 142 Mam St., Newmarket, by hSe Newmarfcef Era end Express limited. Subscription $4 far two ymi 

$2.50 for one year, in advance. Single copies are 5c each. Member of C/os» A Weekties of Canada, Canadian Weekty Newspapers 
Association, and the Audit Bureau of Circulations. Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Deportment, Ottawa. 

JOHN A. MEYER . . Managing iditer JOHN E. STRUTHERS . . News tdltor 

OEOROE HASKETT . . Sports Ed/for 



CAROLINE ION 



Women's tdttor 



• 



LAWRENCE RACINE . . Job Printing and Production 

THE EDITORIAL PAGE 



PAGE FOUR 



THURSDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIEIYONE 



» 



LINES ARE DRAWN 

The leaders of Canada's two largest labor organiza- 
tions, President Percy Bengough of the Trades and 
Labor Congress and President A. R. Moshef of the Cana- 
dian Congress of Labor, lashed at Ottawa in their Labor 
Day messages for not imposing price controls. In 
reply, the minister of labor, Hon. Milton Gregg, called 
upon labor to increase its productivity and for labor, 
management and consumer to generally exercise some 
discretion in wages, buying and selling. 

The rise in the cost-of-living will be the hottest topic 
on the agenda when parliament re-assembles and these 
statements represent something of the battlelines which 
will be manned. Despite the increased demand for 
price controls, demands backed by the authority of 
substantial increases in the cost-of-living index, the 
government has shown no intention yet of backing 
away from its original claim that the time is simply 
not ripe for price controls. 

The government's contention must be accepted for 
more than simply a stubborn insistence upon a policy 
which could be wrong. The same administration was 
responsible for what was generally regarded as the 
most efficient price control system of the war years, 
and with that experience, the government can speak 
with considerable authority. 

But if Ottawa is standing firm against the demands 
of labor and consumer organizations, there is a possib- 
ility that it may have to relax at least some of its 
credit restrictions because of more potent requirements. 
The government has so far refused to consider the 
possibility as its firmness towards Windsor indicates, 
but the Financial Post last week revealed that house 
building showed a painful drop as a result of tightened 
credit. And that may breach credit control where 
Windsor lay-offs failed. 



AGENTS OF DEFORESTATION 

The Globe and Mail tees off against the hydro com- 
mission and the department of highways as agents of 
deforestation in a recent editorial. Says that paper: 
"The Ontario Hydro Commission and the Department 
of Highways are between them responsible for cutting 
down an immense number of trees every year. These 
agencies of deforestation are seldom given due recogni- 
tion by conservationists, who are inclined to blame 
farmers and greedy sawmill operators for the loss of 
forest cover in Southern Ontario." 

There are farmers in Whitchurch township who'll 
say a fervent "amen" to that. They'll remember the 
swamp, a prime source of water, which was drained 
by the hydro with no apparent concern for what their 
actions would do to the water table of the area. And 
then, in King township last year or the year before, 
there were those bush fires which were blamed on the 
hydro crews. 

And it is not only the provincial department of high- 
ways which has succeeded in rooting up so many trees 
in the name of good roads. Most district road crews 
are also guilty. When grading hillsides or cuts, roots 
are left bare and the trees doomed. Another practice 
which seems to be taking a toll of trees is roadside 
spraying. AH too frequently trees are sprayed high 
in their foliage and it can't be doing them much good. 

The department of highways maintains two nurseries 
and in 1!)K), planted 91,593 trees so that at least some 
effort is being made to repair the damage of graders 
and Mo/.ers. But none of the townships, nor the county 
have nurseries and nothing is done to replace the troos 
destroyed in road building operations. 

The Globe and Mail says that private individuals 
should be encouraged to plant roadside trees but as 
long as the process of widening and re-grading dis- 
trict roads and highways continues, there is not much 
likelihood of such efforts in this vicinity. All too often, 
those plantings are doomed. 



•*f#+t«t * 



*2± By STANLE Y 



1HG MASAJOUA BLOSSOM* 
? X WAS KNOW* AS *BU0 ' 

•TH'MELOAi-COUC BABV-- 




LATEST IN MILK ISSUE 

The milk producers in the district could be pardon- 
ed if they would up their participation in the Milk 
Control Board in disgust. From their point of view, 
they have received nothing but the dirty end of the 
stick in recent years. And this summer, the stick has 
been dirtier than ever. 

And now to climax the whole sorry mess the produc- 
ers were told last week that thoy would not be paid the 
ordered increase of 88 cents by the dairies, and the 
dairies served notice that they were appealing the board's 
award of the increase in Ontario courts. The dairies 



contend that they cannot be expected to pay an increase- 
to the producers when they have been left in ignorance 
as to the retail price of milk. They say they can't 
operate at the loss such a payment will entail on the 
present retail price. 

The producers, of course, have the same argument. 
The increases they asked for was less than half of what 
they contended was necessary. But with a philosophy 
of half a loaf, developed during years of unsatisfactory 
price negotiations, they signed the award. The dairies 

didn't and the appeal follows. 

Now Premier Frost has warned the dairies that if 
they can't provide more efficient retailing methods for 
the benefit of the consumers then someone else would. 
He declined to say who the "someone else" was but the 
way the milk business is nowadays, the producer him- 
self is as good a bet as any to fill the job. 

But the premier's statement is also interesting be- 
cause it is the first time, in our recollection, that some- 
one in authority has put his finger on the real cause 
of all the difficulties of setting price. So far, it has 
been the producer who has been paying the cost of in- 
efficient distribution. 

And finally, the appeal from a decision of a govci*n- 
ment board which has no provision for appeals is going 
to have interesting repercussions. Presumably the pro- 
ducers will have as much right to appeal as the dairies 
if such an appeal is granted, and that will leave the 
Milk Control Board as nothing more than an arbitration 
board or a conciliation board acting only as a referee. 
The producers, with a long history of dissatisfaction, 
would be quick to appeal future unfavorable awards. 

Another by-product, if such an appeal is granted, 
would be the end of political interference in the milk 
board. There's not a producer who isn't convinced 
that the board was packed by the appointment of Mayor 
McCallum, and the mayor's subsequent pronouncements 
did nothing to change the belief that he was on the 
board only to keep the price of milk down, not help 
set a fair price to all parties. 



LESSONS OF NATURE 

A farmer friend of ours says that the yield from his 
fields was not as high as last year. He blames it on 
the excess moisture in the ground in the early part of 
the year. Winter wheat wasn't its best either. The 
constant freezing and thawing in the spring, and one 
wild rain when the frost was not out of the ground, 
washed out a lot of the grain. 

So while* he doesn't expect to starve he does think 
that the forecasts earlier in the year of "best crop 
years" and "record yields" sound a little foolish in the 
light of August harvests. The moral is obvious. In its 
own way, it is a repeat of the federal government's 
attempt to forecast the wheat crop with subsequent 
losses to western farmers for which the payment of 
i?(i5 million only partially compensated them. 

With all our success at ordering our environment to 
suit our convenience, we still haven't found a way to 
demand of nature an orderly cycle of rain and sun, or 
be assured that all insect pests are under control. There 
was very little Hessian fly in the county last year. This 
year, it had infested sis much as 20 percent of some 
fields. And thus it goes. Man proposes but nature 
disposes and there is nothing we can do about it. 

And the same lesson is offered with respect to those 
zealots who, with the best of intentions, would organ- 
ize and plan our lives for us. There are circumstances 
winch, oven the most farscoing of our planners, cannot 

anticipate. But they persist, regardless of human nature 
in the realm of public welfare; regardless of the laws 
of supply ami demand in the realm of economics; regard- 
less of individual aspiration in the realm of education. 
Surely, we must progress to exist, but let us progress 
not by attempting an uniformity of |>ersona!ity and pur- 
pose, but by I he encouragement, of the individual spirit. 
I Ait Us be done with masses and statistics. Let us think 
in terms of the individual and respect the infinite 
variety of human nature as a God-given right, not as a 
nuisance to be exorcised by coersiou. 



EDITORIAL NOTE 

We wonder if present construction plans in New- 
market include the paving of the lanes between Main 
and Cedar Sts. Both lanes are heavily used now that 
the arena is becoming an all-year centre of entertain- 
ment and neither offers, in its present state, safe 
walking. It would end a hazard if the lanes were paved. 






. - 



The ttafr h rif servant, not the matter, of the people; the sfofe is their guarantee 

>»* >« **fr : *t$to*r **•*■ «»«it In international and national issues; it 
9» notmetvmtion of the stale to assume the direction of those activities which rest 

on 




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atnips By Ginger 






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William Rudolph Cursed, the 
tycoon publisher of the Cuttin 
Corners Clarion-Blast, died last 
v/eek. 

In the words of my friend, 
Slim Bfiggens; M He was of the 
steam roller variety, me of 
those What made money out of 
newspapers. He v/as the big- 
gest typhoon that over v/as in 
the Cuttin Corners newspaper 
v/orld. (Note: the Cuttin Cor- 
ners newspaper world consisted 
of the Clarion- Blast and the 
Advertiser in the early days). 

Sllrn worked as a sweeper in 
the Clarion-BJast press room 
when he v/as 18. and. probably 
knew Cursed longer than any- 
one. Vnr this reason, it is with 

pleasure that v/e devote most 
of this column In Mr. Hliggens* 
impressions and portrayal of the 
life of William Rudolph Cursed. 
"Cursed made his fortune in 
th«? early twenties after he 
broke his competitor, the Cor- 
ners Advertiser/* says Slim. 
Cursed sunk a cool 113 dollars 
in a campaign against the hot* 
tlirV works because it used the 
seed of the trillium (provincial 
flower) in the distillin* pro- 
cesses. Cursed conducted the 

biggest campaign and that fin- 
ished the Advertiser which lost 

its distillery backing through 
its failure to outbiast the Blast 

"He was the first to introduce 
yallcr journalism into the Cut* 
tin Corners newspaper world 
during his battle against the 
Advertiser. Yaller journalism 
of course was got from them 
New York papers which ran 
comics on yaller paper. Cursed 
tried to copy them. 

"Since most folks in Cuttin 
Corners couldn't read so good, 
them three letter words in big 
black letters four inches high 
was easier for 'em to read and 
they loved the Clarion-Blast's 
sensashunalism. 

"Cursed sensashunalized the 
suicide of the waterworks fore- 
man over the frog incident i.i 
the reservoir and people lapped 
it up. 

"Every time a dog got pois- 
oned, the Clarion-Blast would 



i 



rouse peoples' 'motions up by 
putfin* in a headline like '&<>%- 
Murdered in - Cold Blood by 
Hideous Huthless Poisoner- 
Seek Fiend*. He supported the 
weight of Mrs. Ella Cuddles for . 
court M i>n a prevention of 
cruelty ticket. 

"At one time Cursed wanted "'.".; 
to he a M.P. so he ran. He J 
issued free botties of Fuzzy "- 
Water on election tiny and was : 
boat and he lost his tend. Alter. ' 
th*t he hated politicians? and in". ' 
his paper, conducted v/aref^re r " 
against every candidate . that ' 
stood thereafter. In one genera! J>' 
election he ran a >»ory \v-th a . 
headline, 'Odd -Virus '•' Befog ^ 
Carried To Many DiMr&i V: 
Babies— Blame Politician*'. "..".,:•" 

"Then he" amassed" f^rfWe ;' 
upon fortune by investi/i' . in \\ 
real estate. He bowghi ih*^V- 
Astoria Hotel and iratalfgfj ;r>-_ V 
door conveniences -WfcicH T?v-. ■/- 
oliatkiniz*rJ tht; Corners. - H£ i* 
bought all the 'pool roo.-r,.-: '.A-rui . •-■;' 
spent large sums on tet/£*±, :'l 
stations. At one point he n-#r)^S :",'.- 
three quarter of Cuttin C>-r*'";. 
ners. ilia Sawyer , ^a id -that hy V : 
1937 he had amassed a &*£coo v 

fortune, tne biggest, in fiift'Cof^^ 

ner3. ■ K- • VI ;.-^'vk : 

"Yep, Will-am ftu^olph Oiri- -.; 

ed was a typhoon .a!I'.fi«SL.; He ':". 
made money iikft mad. StinWv 



says that te$ used to -tfarv* 



*. »■ 



«.- 



fctf-. 



.!.».-- 



workers. Others says, thai Re- 
paid 'em tremen jous sai *?&i •'."• • 
and worked them to d^ath : i«-. 
two " years alth vagh f dor/i Ve- , 
member anyone dyin*. on jha •.*- 
Clarion-Blast.' '■■ -' 

"It was the bigger^ funeral;;.* 
Cuttin Comer*. ever ha<^ :: Aii-';'if •■'• 
Cursed's nephews 1 wai:' palp" : 
bearers. The cemalas kas "tfcSed. -* 
in a cast iron casket. with. b^mser V.: 
rivets a nd . they py t. it into one -i . 
of them marble rr.<^oleufn* -r* 
which. he had built. t5r. years -"'. 
ago. Above the dflojrway ,was - \" 
the inscription in latin: Magatyf;. 
Cursus. "'"."-"/V '■'••'- -: 

"Yep t as I always said, t>srelt V 
never be another typhis like. 
William Rudolph Cursed. Ke : " 
was 30 ju g*head3d he couldn't" 
help hut make mo?Aj" .':■■ .-- : >i! 



by "Dairy Farmer' 

The Tod Six Inch 






.-■ 



m - m * 



■ 



. 



We have been to some of the 
fall shows and watched the cat- 
tle and the men who worked 
with them. It always seemed 
to us an awful lot of effort and 
we always suspected that the 
men who did it very seldom 
got the credit they deserve. 

Of course, you may say that, 
well, they didn't have to do it! 
Maybe a man who does some- 
thing he doesn't have to do de- 
serves more credit than the 
man who has to. But the thing 
that impressed us mostly was 
the way the older veterans 
went about their jobs. In their 
case it was a family effort. Fa- 
ther and sons and the daughters 
all pitched in. We have seen 
them set up a regular house- 
hold at some of the longer fairs. 

And there is a pretty good 
reason for it. In this business 
we put everything ahead of the 
men, or in other words, that 
machine or beast, and our 
whole way of life is more im- 
portant than the human beings 
who work with the m, and 
whose pursuit of happiness we 
should be concerned with. 
Now, i\o not misunderstand as. 
Any livestock man worth his 
salt will feed his animals be- 
fore he eats himself and that 
is as it should be. He will put 
his machine away before he 
goes to the house and so on. 
Hut is this any reason why he 
should freeze on his tractor day 
in and day out in the fall and 
winter and put up with the 
scorching heat in the summer? 
And when he goes to the 
shows, does lie have to put his 
cattle in a $500 barn while lie 
sleeps, if he can, in a dirty hole 
with hardty any facilities to 
clean up. None of the places 
we visited had a cafeteria or 
a decent place lo eat. They 



:-'- 



are all of the Greasy Socon 
variety. The big shots at the 
head of the fairs, the ones that 
wear the ribbons and hand out 
the cigars, never seen: to bs 
concerned whether the men * 
whose .hard we-rk and sacr:;:re , 
and love of the well tr:.r:r^ru 
animal and good cattle — :.ri .;'■ 
other words, the backbone o£ 
the fairs — get a decent meal 
and a good cud of coffee and 
tea. 

Well, of course, you will see 
most of them back at it next" 
year. It is just a proof of our 
statement that these men like 
to do it. that no matter what 
the fairs will do to discourage 
them, they will be back for' 
more in another year, to lead 
around that animal they have 
seen grow up from a wet little 
bundle to a sleek young prom- 
ise: to lead him around the 
ring and to get that ribbon, if 
that is the way it is to be; to 
load hint in a truck and travel 
many a mile and start over 
again. 

You know, we farmers don't 
like unions as a rule. Some--, 
times we think they are too 
ruthless and too grabbing and 
too often their demands, or ra- 
ther their material success, put 
its in a bad position. But let 
us not forget that they did suc- 
ceed in improving their materi- 
al standards. And they did get" 
conditions improved in the 
plants and factories which. were 
very similar to what the aver- 
age farmer or showman is up i 
against today. And they did 
learn to stick together * to do 
it. We wonder if there is d 
moral somewhere in this. Af- 
ter all, they say what's sauce 
for the goose is suuca for the 
gander. At the present it is 
just gravy for the Fair Hoard. 






•;• . 



' --* 



OVERTURE TO WILLIAM TELL 






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W>"\r?^T^ J ,-*_ ',>*>_ >J. £■*:? _^-.^ -_ /£ « 



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es News 



MM. LAURA ROLLING, CORRESPONDENT, PHONE KING S 






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When the new I>ake Wilcox 
school opens tills month the 
teaching staff will be ready to 
hold classes in the four-room 
building. All have first class 
certificates. They are Mrs. Gla- 
dys Cross of Richmond tf ill, with 
music and physical training 
qualifications, principal; Miss 
Beatrice Thistlethwaite, Flesh- 
erton, also holding an auxiliary 
qualification; Mrs. Charles 
Crawford of Lake Wilcox, and 
Mr. Ralph Finlayson of North 
Toronto, a graduate this year of 
Toronto Normal School. 

• m 

The building is well under way 
with contractor Dan Cook clear- 
ing the way to completion as 
quickly ^as possible. The cement 
floor was poured this week and 
plumbing is being installed by 
R. J. Irwin, contractor from 
Newmarket- 
Grandmother In Scottish Dances 

She will dance at your wed- 
ding, will Mrs. Wm. Burns, Bond 
Ave., a grandmother who steps 
the "Flowers of Edinburgh", the 
Highland Fling and Scottish 

reels and does a pretty square 
dance. With her husband, Mrs. 
Burns was one of about 30 to at- 
tend a corn and v/eincr roast at 
the home of a daughter, Mrs. 
Wm. Glass of Malton. 
._ Held on the lawn last Saturday 
night, lit by floodlights and fire- 
light logs, there was a dance 
platform to take care of the 
square dances, called off by Reg 
Burns, a son from Elgin Mills. 
William Espey,. Elgin Mills, play- 
ed the violin and radio music 
filled the in-betweens. It was 
a general get-to-gether for the 
families and included Norman 
Burns, wife and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. Espey, Mr. # and Mrs. J. Wil- 
bur, Miss Ruth Scott of Aurora, 
the . Si Parkers, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert Glass, Toronto. Mrs. 
Burns danced her favorite Edin- 
burgh number for the gathering. 
She has danced since she was 10 
years old. Visitors at the Burns 
home on Bond Ave., have been 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Burns of 
King for Sunday, Mrs. Wm. 
West, Toronto, who is Mrs. 
Burns* mother, and 81 -year-old 
Mrs. S. Parker. Mrs. West will 
spend several days with her 
daughter. 

Attend Fall Fair 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Ash motored 
to Port Perry fall fair on Labor 



REMEMBER 






-i *. 



York County Hospital 






. -■ * 



IN YOUR WILL 



Day accompanied by Mr- and 
Mrs. Fred Hare, Temperance- 
ville. They found the event in- 
teresting, with harness racing, a 

good showing of fruits and veg- 
etables, displays of handcTafts 
and patchwork quilts, one made 
by an 81-year-old lady. . 

First fix Lead Line Class 

Kiders from Oak Ridges Jun- 
ior Riding Club are enjoying the 
competition at the C.N.E. show. 
Last year, with the exception of 
their trainer, Marilyn Hawman, 
they were quite inexperienced 
compared with other entrants. 
Last Friday and Saturday nights, 
three contested with horses own- 
ed by Gordon Ratz of Tavistock. 
In a lead line class for horses, 
the sons and daughters of the 
same horse, and three years old 
or under, Oak Ridges placed 
first Katherine Gunn led Maple 
Lady, a four-year-old Ratz horse; 
Marilyn Hawman, Starlight, 
three years and Don Rennie, Star 
Time, two years. In this class 
there were about 10 groups of 

three horses each, 

In another class for horses four 
years. and under. Star Light, rid* 
den by Marilyn Hawman placed 
second; Brilliant Star, ridden by 
Don Rennie, third and Maple 
Lady, ridden by Katherine 
Gunn, sixth, in a class of about 
25 horses. Miss Hawman and 
others of the club are competing 
this week as well. Arcasu, Taf- 
fy, Sunny Jim, Teddy and Cream 
Puff, local horses, are in the 
show. 

Bride of Saturday to Teach 

Mr. Charles Crawford, Lake 
Wilcox, and Miss Cora Sedore of 
Sutton were married on Satur- 
day, Sept. 1. A community 
shower is being held this even- 
ing (Thursday) in Lake Wilcox 

Community Hall for the couple. 
When the Lake Wilcox school 
opens this month. Mis. Crawford 
will be one of the teachers. 
Holding a first class professional 
teaching certificate with three 
years' experience, the trustee 
board of S.S. 13 is fortunate to 
secure her services. It is hoped 
the newly married couple will 
find living quarters at the lake. 
Charlie is the popular "ice-man" 
for the district. 

A daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Mitchell on Sat- 
urday, Sept. 1. The couple have 
fivo girls now. 

What a Day in Ireland 

Everything happened to Mrs. 
Sue Fox and her sister, Miss 
Lily Brov/n of Nottingham, Eng., 
when they spent three hours in 
Ireland a while ago. On vaca- 
tion to the Isle of Man the sisters 
boarded ship for a few hours in 
the land of the blarney stone. 



When they landed, Aunt Lily lost 
the heel of her shoe. With her 
little less than 200 lb. weight, 
that wasn't funny. Scurrying 
around to find a shoemaker, she 
left her purse, with a goodly sum 
of money and travel fares in a 
store. It has disappeared for 
good. Upset, with this bad luck, 
Mrs. Fox keeled over in the store 
and put her head through the 
window. Back on board ship 
Aunt Lily was sea-sick all the 
way. And the shoe, well, the 
ship's carpenter fastened the heel 
back on. Mrs. Fox is Sue Mos- 
ley's mother, and Miss Brown is 
her aunt. The story was written 
to Mrs. Mosley in Aunt Lily's 
special version. 

Oak Ridges Lions Club has 
cancelled a corn roast scheduled 
for Sept. 7, at the school grounds. 
Mr. Stanley Rule, who was in 
charge of the night, said the Tor- 
onto exhibition now in progress 
and the fact that holidays are 
not over for many people promp- 
ted the cancellation. 

An interesting feature of the 
musical part of Oak Ridges 
Home and School open meeting 
on Monday evening, Sept. 10, 
will be the appearance of Bern- 
ard Boyd, 15, tap dancer and vo- 
calist, who will be accompanied 
at the piano by his mother, Mrs. 
Percy Boyd of Toronto. Bernard 
is a nephew of Norman Boyd of 
Oak Ridges. Miss Shirley Hare 
of Temperanceville will sing. 

Mrs. P. A. McCtellan, president 
of the York Home and School 
Council, is the guest speaker. 

Rev. A. C. Herbert, Anglican 
rector of Alliston, will preach at 
St. John's church, Oak Ridges 
(Yonge St. at Jefferson) on t Sun- 
day, Sept. 9, af 11.15 a.m. 

Transportation to Church 

Langdon's bus service, pick- 
ing up children or passengers for 
St. John's Anglican church. Oak 
Ridges, will re-commence its 
Sunday morning runs around 
Lake Wilcox next Sunday, Sept. 
9, when Sunday school, will re- 
open for the fall and winter ses- 
ion. Leaving C.F.R.B. stderoad 
at Yonge St. at approximately 
10.55 a.m., the bus proceeds 
round the lake via the North 
Road, returning to Yonge St. via 
the south Lake Wilcox Road, 
thence south to the church just 
below Bond Lake. The bus stops 
enroute for anyone caring to sig- 
nal it and regular stops are made 
at Hart's store and the post of- 
fice. A return trip is made after 
church and Sunday school. 

It should be noted that church 
and Sunday school services are 
both held at the same hours, 
11.15 a.m. 



Keswick Optimists Wind Up 

* 

Summer Work For Kids 



The Optimist club of Keswick 

concluded its summer campaign 

for funds for crippled children, 

boys' work and the memorial 

centre last Saturday evening. 

Carol Link, 6, Keswick, one of 
several crippled children recent- 
ly aided by the club, selected the 
ticket, number 11388, for the 
winner of a Pontiac sedan at the 
memorial centre following the 
Keswick community annual fun 
fair and sports day. 
• The winner, Mr. Donald Era- 
ser, Port Cariing, was presented 
with the car by Optimist Club 
President Percy Mahoney, Kes- 
wick. Mr. Fraser accepted the 
car with obvious pleasure. He 
wished the club every success 
and presented a cash donation to 
the club through the chairman 
of the campaign committee. 

The club wishes to thank all 
those who contributed through 

their purchases of tickets to the 
club service work. 



The Beach's team won the 
men's softball and Barrie Valleys 
were the winners in the girls' 
softball at the Keswick fun fair 
and sports day. The Newmarket 
branch of the Canadian Legion 
wona tug-of-war championship. 

Carl Sheppard, Glenswood 
Beach, was champion horse shoe 
pitcher. Beverley Peters, Kes- 
wick had the best decorated 
girls' bicycle; Biltie Anderson, 
Keswick, best decorated boy*s 
bicycle; Marjorie Stevens, Kes- 
wick, best doll carriage. 

Jerry Porter, Paul Dolan and 
Jim Wilson, all of Keswick, won 
the honors for the best decorated 
car. They entered a model T 
flivver decorated with a crib on 
the top and one of the boys in 
it- George Snelling had the 
best decorated store front. 
Three class winners in the old 
time fiddler's contest were Mr. 
Sam Parks. Sr., Sutton, Mr. 
Boyle, New Lowell and Mr. Mul- 
holland, Stroud. 



Keswick News 



SHARON 

The regular service at Sharon 
United church will be held each 
Sunday at 7.30 p.m. Sunday 
school at 10.30 a.m. Everyone 
welcome at both services. 

The regular monthly meeting 
of the Women's Association of 
the United church will be held 

at the home of Mrs. Chris. Jones 
on Thursday, Sept. 13, at 2.30 
p.m. Lunch committee: Mrs. 
Fred McLeod, Mrs. Long and 
Mrs. J. Farr. 

Mrs. Nelson of Winnipeg re- 
turned home with Mr. and Mrs. 

Donaldson for a couple of weeks* 
holiday. 

Mrs. McTaguc is spending a 
couple of weeks with her daugh- 
ter and family at Whitby. 

Mr. and Mrs. Percy Deavitt 
and Sharon, also Mrs. Deavitt's 
sister of Toronto, spent the holi- 
day weekend with Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Gartshore and Audrey. 

Mrs. B. L. Phillips spent a few 
days at Port Bolster with her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Willson. 



The Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Sept. 61b, 1951 Page 5 



bridge spent the weekend with 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Marchant. 

Miss Golda and Miss Gladys 
Edwards attended the C.N.E. on 
Saturday. 

Mrs. M. Hague is visiting 
friends in Toronto this week. 

Mrs. Robt. Matson is visiting 
her son. Rev. Howard Matson 
and his wife in Halifax this 
week. 

Miss Grace and Mrsl Sommer- 
ville of Toronto spent the week- 



end with Mr. and Mrs. H. Rus- 
sell. 

Mrs. R. Davis and Mrs. John 
Bryan of Aurora visited Mrs. W. 
McKinley on Monday. 



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forest lands capable of produc- 
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fied as economically, financially 
and geographically accessible for 
forest operations. 




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Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Humphrey 
and three children of Toronto 
left Tuesday after a month at a 
Keswick Beach cottago. Mrs. 
Humphrey is a daughter of Mrs. 
Leslie Morton of Keswick. 

Miss Etma Bond of Guelph was 
a weekend and holiday guest of 
Miss B. Terry- 

Mr. and Mrs. George Gilroy 
of OakvilJe were guests at Mrs. 
A. Gilroy's home for the week- 
end. 

Miss Lynn Marritt left Tues- 
day with Miss Myrtle Lloyd for 
a visit in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Rye 
and family returned home to 
Toronto on Monday after spend- 
ing the summer at their Keswick 
Beach cottage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Perry and 
daughters Roberta and Winona, 
were at their Keswick Beach 
home for the holiday weekend. 

The Fun Frolic at Keswick's 
Memorial Arena Friday and 
Saturday was the first venture 
of this kind and the Optimist 
committee is to bo congratulated 
on the success. 

The Antique show and sale 
was open to the public both days 
and the weekly dance well at- 
tended Friday evening. The 
first of Saturday's highlights was 



the parade led by St. Andrew's 
Girls Pipe Band with decorated 
jcars, bicycles, doll carriages, also 
j there were ponies and later 
Brampton's Clown Band added 
to the fun. Girls' and men's soft- 
ball games and horseshoe pitch- 
ing was at the school grounds. 
Saturday afternoon's fun was 
principally for the children with 
pony and donkey rides. At 6.30 
p.m. was the old time Fiddlers* 
Frolic. 7.30 p.m. the donkey 
ball game between South and 
North Beaches. This event drew 
a crowd of about a thousand. 
Later a record crowd enjoyed the 
dancing in the arena and the car 
draw. 

Rev. Dan Filyer and Mrs. Fil- 
yer of Simcoe were weekend 
guests of Rev. Filyer's uncle, 
Rev. Scrrick, and Mrs. Serrick. 
Rev. Filyer gave a very, forcible 
sermon in the Christian church 
Sunday morning while Mrs. Fil- 
yer gave a fine solo which was 
much enjoyed. 

The W.C.T.W. will meet Tues- 
day, Sept. 11, at Mrs. Kenneth 
Boothby's instead of Mrs. Wild* 
er's as previously announced. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Cooper and 
Donna of Regina, Sask., spent a 
few days last week at the home 
of Mrs. Olive Smith. 



SCHOMBERG 

Mrs. R. Davis spent the week- 
end with Mrs. J. Bryan at Auro- 
ra. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Sutton 
| and family left on Sunday for 
their home at Sudbury after 
spending a week visiting friends 
here and other points. 

Miss Grace Amey of Wood- 



Music and Art Studio 




i h , 



SEPTEMBER 7 



2 TO 5 P.M. 



7 T0 10 P.M. 



Von are cordially invited to attend. Refreshments will be 

lervcd. 

instruction in piano, theory, classical and popular, violin, 

tccordfan, ballet and tap dancing, kindergarten music classes; 

classes Sn art for adults and children, handicraft and hobbies. 

The WINDMILL 



OAK RIDGES 



PHONE KING 3-R-I3 



Mount Albert News 



Miss Gladys Figsby of Lachine, 
Que, spent her two weeks va- 
cation with her sister, Mrs. Jas. 
Carlin. 

Mrs. Walter i\ Stewart and 
daughter, Jean, of Brockvillc 
visited Mrs. Elsie Crozier last 
week. 

Mr- and Mrs. Sam Harper at- 
tended the Toronto Exhibition on 
Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jtoy Harmon of 



Sept. 4. 

Master Eddy Keating, Sutton, 
returned home last Sunday, after 
spending six weeks* holidays with 
Harold Hayes. 

Mrs. E. M. Hicks, NMuyara 
Falls, returned home Sunday 
after spending a months* vaca- 
tion with her son and daughter- 
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Hick;;. 



Kitchener were Saturday visitors Al Mta ^ K ,SP GES 

^J&J^v^S? fnn A long weekend at Miserable 
Mr and Mrs. E. Carr, and Billy Lak 10 fc |n|I southcast of M in- 

of Willowdale were Sunday visit- 
ors of Mr. and Mrs. Hoy Carr. 



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Mr. and Mrs. Keg. Willbec 
spent Sunday in Meaford. 

Mr, and Mrs. V. Mitchell, New- 
market, were Sunday afternoon 
visitors of Mrs. John Cain. 

Mrs. Hicks, Niagara Falls, is 
visiting her son, Wm. Hicks, and 
family. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Moorhead 
wore weekend visitors of Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Moorhead. 

Miss Myrtle Rear, Toronto, 
was a Monday visitor of her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Morton, ar^l Mr. Mor- 
ion. 

Miss Eleanor Warren, Geneva, 
N.Y., was a weekend visitor of 
Mrs. John Crowle. 

The members of the United 
Missionary church. Zephyr, 6th 
line, held a picnic in the park 
on Monday afternoon. 

Mrs. Ward Gowland, Niagara 
Falls, and Mrs. K. Mclnnis were 
Mont lay callers of Mrs. Roy Carr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Sedore 
returned on Monday, Aug. 27, 
from a week's trip to Indianna, 
U.S.A ' 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Meek and fam- 
ily, Toronto, were Wednesday 
visitors of Mrs. Meek's sister, 
Mrs. K. Sedore and family. 

Miss J. Travis, Quecnsville, 

visited Mrs. Harold Hayes and 
family a few days last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gilroy 
have moved into the apartment 
at Mrs. T. Moorhead's. , 

Mr. Carl Smith has been trans- 
ferred from the Dominion Bonk 
here to the Newmarket branch. 

Congratulations, to Mr, and 
Mrs. Bruce Jordon on the birth of 
their son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Jordon of 
Rochester, N.Y., were weekend 
visitors of Mrs. Charlotte Jordon 
and Mr. and Mrs. F. Kirton. 

Mrs, Jessie Williamson and 
Mi's. Elsie Crozier and Tommy 
and Mr. John Burr visited Mrs. 
Burr at York County hospital, 
Newmarket* on Sunday afternoon 
and had tea with Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed Wrightitian and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jus. Slorach 
spent Monday at their cabin, 
Lake Simcoe. 

Mrs. Reg. Willbec is the new 
school teacher at the eighth 
school. 

Mr, and Mrs. Thos. Watts and 
two children have moved into 
their new home in Newmarket. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Case vis- 
ited the exhibition on Tuesday, 



den, Haliburton district, was en- 
joyed by Norman Taylor, Fred 
Jud^e, Murray Judge and Har- 
old Boyle. It is a fine fishing 
and hunting spot where Oak 
Ridges sportsmen often holiday. 
Just as it sounds, there is a "mis- 
erable" three miles no-road 
stretch before reaching the bass- 
filled lake, a hunter's cabin and 
boat house, the properly of u 
farmer. Norm caught a 5-lb. 
bass. 





HARRY 

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Reg. $2.98 



Sale $f .98 



SR.29 pr. 



Men's DUNGAREES 

SANFORIZED 



53.50 






LADIES' SLIPS 

LACK TRIMMED TOP AND BOTTOM 

Reg. $2.98 



Men's KHAKI PANTS 



Sale S j .98 



SUBS 



: 



52-98 




»»»»♦♦+♦»♦♦♦♦♦++♦»+ 



V 



PILLOW SLIPS (subs) 



EVERYDAY TOWELS, stripes 99c pr. 



BLUE IS THE HUE! 

Come in and see Morrison's Ex- 
hibition Blue suits— the popula;*) 
color for this foil. -G3 Main St., 1 
Newmarket, phono 158. (Advt.) j 



GIBBONS 

+ 

TRANSPORT 

LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE 
MOVING AND CARTAGE 

Furniture Storage 

PHONE 1160 NEWIttARKET 



These are only a few of our bargains — There are many more on 
our shelves, come in and see for yourself. 



H 



- 



"-'■ 



HARRY'S DRY GOODS 



if. _- 



t- 



"THE FRIENDLY STORE ON THE TOP Of THE Hill" 



- 






■ 









97 MAIN ST., NEWMARKET, H. STEPAK, PROP. 



PHONE864W 






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*♦ 



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%mm it? wm* % **"»* sa«s & sMyi« 



YEAH- A GOOOYEAR-IHerRe KSt SPECIALLY 
MOLDED TO COMBAT STRETCHING ANDTHINNINQ, 
M0 BUTT WELDED FOR BETTER BMANCE I 




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f M^KET;E^^&liXPRESS, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH 4 1951 



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i&ale— 6-room stucco bunga- 
Joi^W^lOa Wellington St. E. ( Aur- 
ora. Enquire within. cr2w36 

■ - • ■- 

FWASile — &-room cement block 
house, furnace, electricity, plenty 
of water, close to highways, west 
of Aurora, lot 22, concession 5. 
Apply Mis. Laura Wilson, Kettle- 
by. «lw36 



.« 



10 APARTMENT FOR RENT 



'V- - . 



<4^ 



For sale — $9,500 cash. Down 
payment 53,500 plus small mort- 
gage. 9-roorn duplex. Living- 
room 20" x 16\ hardwood floors, 
beautiful stone fireplaces, large 
verandah, 2 acres, lawn, raspber- 
ries, 16 fruit trees and small fruits. 
Garage for 2 cars. Phone 43Sw2, 
1 Newmarket or write Mrs. D. Gor- 
don, G.P.O. Newmarket. clw36 




For r*nt — 3 rooms, unfurnished 
heated apartment. Total abstain- 
ers. 100 Srigtey St., Newmarket. 

clw36 

For rent — 1 2-room apartment. 
1 3-room apartment, sink in each, 
separate entrance. In Newmar- 
ket. Adults. Apply Mrs. Ralph 
Weddell, Belhaven. c3iv36 



14 ROOMS WANTED 



Rooms wanted — With light 
housekeeping privileges, near busi- 
ness section. Phone S60m. New- 
market. clw36 



■■ 




LOTS FOR SALE 

( _ sale — Choice building lots 
on Bolton and Lundy Ave., New- 
market. Phone C. F. Willis, 497, 
Newmarket. tf27 



^BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



Trucking business 

FOR SALE 

» 




Good 3-<on true*, P.C.V. license 

F.S., for transport of livestock, 

feed, seed, fertilizer, road material, 

: farm machinery and produce, in 

good area. 



}5 BOARDERS WANTED 



Wanted — Boarders. Phone S58, 

Newmarket, or apply 35 Queen St. 
W. *r4w36 



Wanted— Boarder. Lady or gen- 
tleman. Phone 23Sw, Newmarket. 

•2w3G 



ROOM AND BOARD 

Room and board for gentleman. 
Apply 49 Prospect St., or phone 
246w, Newmarket *r5w36 



For vile — Kitchen £rop leaf]— ~ 

, , :; . , „ „: „,»e .,., ,:, ; : . C | assi|ied fl,| Ver |isi „ g Ha|es 



DUCK HUNTER'S SPECIAL 

For sale— New boat, 1-5 motor, 
flat bottom, $100. Apply 3 Ontario 
St. \V- Newmarket. *lw36 



For sale — Studio couch in good 
condition. Phone 1025j, Newmar- 
ket. clw36 



ARTICLES V/ANTED 



Wanted to buy — 2 commode 
chairs for twins. Phone 615j. 
Newmarket. cl\v36 



Wanted to buy — Used Surge 
milking unit. Apply Percy Mort- 
son, 4th con., R. R. 1, Queensvilie. 

clw36 

Wanted to buy — Child's junior 
bed and chiffrobe, in good condi- 
tion. Phone T79j, Newmarket. 

clw36 



PRODUCE 



r»- 



■ 



APPLY FRED BRUNI 

K. R. 3, Newmarket 

Lot 21, com 5/ Whitchurch 

5 miles east of Aurora 

clw36 



1 7 ARTICLES FOR SALE 

For sale — Washing machine, 
"Colefield". Apply S. Babcock, 17 
Wellington St., East, phone 42Gw. 
Aurora. clw30 



i * 



P»" 



t 4 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



E** 



.BUILDING LOTS 

FOR FINE RESTRICTED 



HOME SITES 



'* * 



See 






u-- ■ 



MILLARD AVE. EXTENSION 

_ 

Also 

YONGE STREET FRONTAGE 

Apply 
Your local real estate broker 



i >'. 



■ • 

. •■•• * • ■ 



. 



[*• ' 



or 
CROSSLAND FARMS 

tf25 



v.->- 






For wle *— 8-room brick house, 

all conveniences, corner Raglan 

and Tecumseh Sts., Newmarket. 

Double lot, garage. Apply W- Tra- 

? • viss, Queensvilie. *4w33 

.»*■■ ■ — ■ 

AUBREV STEWART 

Real Estate Broker, Bradford 

f 57300--6 rooms, storey and half, 
4 rooms dov/n, 2 rooms up, hard- 
wood floors, 4-picce bath, hot air 
heating, garage, lar«e lot, good lo- 

; : cation, immediate possession. 

t- $7,9C)0 — 6 rooms, frame house, 
hardwood floors, bath, hydro, oil 
heating, garage, 2 acres land on 
highway, close to Nev/markct. 

":• Possession. 

$7,500-200 acre farm, 100 ac.es 
working land, 100 acres hush aiwJ 
pasiurt*. hydro in house and barn, 
v/oll at house and barn. POSSCS' 
; sion March 1. 

&;,500- 50 ac;es, i;ood fanning 
land, C room house, \z,ot,ft barn, 8-4 
mile from highway. Lake Buncos 
district. 

Apply D'Arcy Miller, *'fj Oorhain 
St., Newmarket, or phono 'J7. 

C2w35 



For sale— Artist's equipment, in- 
cluding well designed and finished 
sketch boxes, easels; palettes and 
sketch carriers. Oil paintings ex- 
pertly framed. Special discounts 
for artist's own work. Apply C. 
E. Ambeiy, rear 23 Church St., 
Newmarket. ■ *2w36 

For sale — 6-piece, natural wood 
kitchen set. Reasonable. Phone 
Newmarket 1353w. clw36 

For fcaJe — Venetian blinds, alu- 
rninurn or steel, made for all styles 
H windows. Fre« estimates and 
installations. Phone 755, apply 
40 Ontario St. W., or write P.O. 
box 400, Newmarket. tf27 

ANTIQUES 

Bought and solrl- Furniture. 
glassware, pictures etc. Apply 151 
Main St., phone 738j, Newmarket. 

tf27 

I'or sale- -2- wheeled trailer. Ap- 
ply p;rle Quinn, CO Temperance 
St., Aurora, phone 475w. ci2w3G 

LAY-AWAY VtJiS 

See our complete line now of 
Christmas Avon gifts at 59 Andrew 
St., or phone 3392, Newmarket. 

c3w31 

For salfc — Pram, maroon, in ex- 
cellent condition. Phone 571 j or 
apply 24 Spruce St., Aurora. c2w35 

For sale— Small Acrne cookstove, 
good condition. Phone 568 w, New- 
market, after G p.m. crlw3G 

For sale— Bargain. 55.50, hoy's 
spring and fall 2-pk-ce outfit, size 
2-3. Small navy and white chock, 
velvet collar. Excellent condition. 
Phone 1072J. Newmarket. •rlw.lG 

For *alrr- -Quebec rookstove in 
good condition, warming oven, 
reservoir. Mrs. P. J. Cole, Roche*s 
Point. *Sw9S 

For salft—C.C.M. man's bicycle, 
in g'^od repair, must sell. Pliono 
512r, Nev/market. e1w35 

I'or Mil't Complolo hockey out- 
fit, large size, b*'>jt quality, must 
sell. Phono 512r, Nev/market. 

c3w5ri 



CUSTOM CANNING 

Canning factory opened on Aug- 
ust 29. We have canned tomatoes, 
peaches, plums and applesauce for 

sale. Phone Mount Albert 7516 

tf35 

For >ale — Potatoes, wholesale. 
Phone Mount Albert '7516. tf35 



PLANTS 

For sale — Gladioli blooms and 
lily bulbs. Will deliver. W. C. 
Hill, 17 Davis Dr. W., Newmarket 
phone 799w. clw3G 



I7B MERCHANDrSE 



STRAIGHT CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Two cents a word, minimum or 50 cents for each advertisement. 
Half price when advertisement is repeated on successive week*. 
Ten percent discount if advertisement is paid within week of pub- 
lication. 

Coming Events costs two cents a word, minimum SO cents. 
Half Price when repeated on successive weeks. 

Sale Registers, $1 for the fast week, 50 cents for each successive 
week. 

Card of Thanks, Wedding and Engagement announcements, 75 

cents for each announcement less 25 cents if paid within week of 
publication. 

In Memoriams, 75 cents for each Insertion plus 5 cents a tine 
for verse, less 25 cents if paid within week of publication. 

Classified advertising may be phoned into, or left at The Era 
and Express office on .Mam St., Newmarket, phono 780; at White- 
laws, phone ,6. in Aurora; at Mrs, I* E. Rolling, phone 8, Kinc; 
or with any correspondent. Advertisements accepted through the 
mail where name of sender and address is clearly indicated. 

Your advertisement Rets into over 3,300 homes in North York. 



body, small mileage, good for many 
miles of hard work. 

Sanderson Motors Ltd., Dodge- 
DeSoto dealer. Main St., phone CI, 
Newmarket. crlwSG 



LOST 



Lost — In Keswick Saturday, 
Sept. 1, lady's brown tortoise shell 
plastic rimmed glasses. Reward. 
Apply Era and Express box 31. 

Clw36 



Lost — Dark green sun-visor on 
Wednesday, August 15, between 
town line and Sharon on third 
concession. Reward. Kinder please 
return to Glen Hulse. Schomberg. 

•Iw36 



For all your chain sawing call 
It o b c r t Young, Zephyr, 2311, 
Mount Albert. Go anywhere. No 
job too large. No job loo small. 
All appreciated. *4w35 



27 



FARM ITEMS 



MORTGAGE WANTED 



TIIOR WASHER & GLADIRON 

Elecric 25 and 60 cycle, gas 
washers, repair parts and service. ] §5,000. 



MORTGAGE MONEY WANTED 

We have clients desiring first 
mortgages on houses i n Newmar- 
ket. Money required $2,000 to 



Stewart Beare, Radio and Applian- 
ces, 113 Main St., phone 355, New- 
market. U27 

For sale— Hearing aid batteries 
for most popular makes. Stewart 
Beare, Radio and Appliance, 113 
Main St., phone 355, Newmarket. 



Charles E. Boyd, Realtor. 17 
Main St., Newmarket, phono 533. 

c3w35 



TRANSPORTATION 



[**'<*- 
&*>' „ 



,?'' 7 



I'i 



For «t!#>— Frame hous«.* in north 
end of Newmarket, all nt-v/iy pain- 
ted, 5 rooms, with 3-piecc* hath, 
'.•iitlre house freshly decorated. 
This house is spotless and wo ore 
anxious for a speedy sale ns own* 
er purchasing larger home. 55,500. 
Terms arranged. 

Charles K. Jioyd, realtor, 17 
Main St., phone 033, Newmarket. 

clw.V; 






.-For Mite— -Immediate possession. 
rS-roorn bungalow, centrally loca- 
ted, second door off Yonge St. 
Cellar, furnaco, 3-piece bath, hot 
levator heater, garage, garden, 
SlPftone 40Oj f Aurora. e2w3G 



\'itr sate -Woods horn*.* freezer, 
12 cubic ft., never used, $900. Ap 
ply Cedar Cottage, CVdar Valley. 

02w35 



Thtirs., Fri., Sat., Sept. fi, 7, 8 — 

Bond's 2Gth Anniversary Sale. 
Order your tailored-to-measure 
suit at Cliff Insleys and 01 dor an 
OXtra pant for only 2Cc! clw3G 



* Transporlattun iivailahle. I.eav- 

»ng Queensvilie, via Newmarket, 

to Toronto, 5 days weekly, C a.m., 
returning 5 p.m. Phone Art Gra- 
ham, 1700, Mount Albert, clw3G 



At Insley's— 128 pairs of better 
quality men's shoos. Eleven styles. 
Reg. to S11.95. Kale price S0.2C. 

clwrjr, 

For Safe — Roasting chickens. 
Phone 10twl2, Newmarket. c2w36 



USED CARS FOR SALE 

For sale — '49 Ford station WOtf- 
on, excellent condition, recently 
overhauled. Sl„«30. Phone 28rl3. 
Maple. clwSG 



Trunspnrtation avuilahle. to Tor- 
onto five days weekly. Arriving 

1-1 



For sate— Used Wood's milking 
unit, complete. Apply Percv Mort- 
son, 4th con., R. R. i r Queensvilie, 
phone 1621. clw36 

AHENTION FARMERS! 

We will be pleased to pick up 
dead or crippled farm animals and 
pay current market prices. For 
immediate service telephone col- 
lect, Newmarket 79 or Toronto, 
Empire 3-3636. 

GORDON YOUNG LTD. 

c43w6 



3) MISCELLANEOUS 

We repair nil ninKes or sewing 
machines. Now machines SS0.50 
up. Singer Sewing Center, New- 
market, 133 'Main St., phone 1075. 

tf27 

For sale — Trusses, surgical sup 
ports, elastic hosiery for those who 
suffer from varicose veins, ankle 
and knee trouble. Arch supports. 
Lumbago belts. Best Drug Store, 
phone 14, Newmarket. 

AH-IIerbat rneumanc tablets for 
muscular, arthritic neuritic and 
sciatic pains. Price 91. 00. Best 
Drug Store, phone 14. Newmarket 

THE BEST BRONCHIAL 
COUGH STKUP 

For coughs, colds and bronchi- 
tis. A prompt and effective rem- 
edy for the relief of bronchitis, 
tight or chesty coughs nnd colds. 
75 cents. The Best Drug Store, 

Newmarket. 

— — - »- — ■ — ■ ■ — — ■ — — 

MT7COUS IN THROAT 

Thuna's Plnx Tablets for the 
nose and throat, for the dropping 
of mucous discharge, sensation of 
♦he lump In the throat and other 
disturbances. These are the same 
reliable pink tablets that have been 
used for many years by adults and 
children with good results. Price 
$L0u; $1.75; $2.50. The Best Drug 
Store, phone 14, Newmarket. 

Storm sasft, combination doors, 
snsh and frames. 10 days delivery. 
Phone 102r3, Roche's Point. tf27 

FOR SALE OB RENT 

Hospital beds, wheel and invalid 
choirs. Thcaker and Son, Mount 
Albert, 3503. tf23 



SEED 



SEBII WUKAT 

Registered or certified No. 1 

Cornell 505 seed wheat for sale. 
This is a very pure strain and 
above average sample. Play safe 
and use good seed. Phono Roche's 
Point, 52w, Frank F. Marritt, Kes- 
wick. *hv36 



EAVESTROUGIIING 

Shingling nnd roof repairs. Free 
estimates. Phone 760w, Newmar- 
ket. tf33 I 



logs 

A quantity of new and used fence 

rails 
A quantity of fence posts 
Lumber and timbers off a barn 

35* x SO* sold as desired 

HAY, fJKAlX, ETC. 
S50 pales of good Timothy, Alfal- 
fa and Red Clover hay. 
a Tons of cut oat straw * 
200 Bushels of oats, 1050 crop 
Pile of barnyard manure 
Model A Ford car, 1931 

Drive shaft with hangers and put- 
leys 

Sausage press Meat grinder 

HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS 

2 Kitchen stoves 

Quebec heater Kitchen cabinet 
WostinghOUso electric washer 
Dining-room suite 
Chesterfield suite, with two chairs 
Cabinet radio. General Electric 
Bedroom suite, complete with 

mattresses 
A number of dressers, tables and 

chairs 

Barrels, shovels, neckyokes. and 
other articles too numerous to 
mention 

No reserve as farm has been sold 

Time of sale 1 p.m. Terms cash 

F. N. SMITH, Auctioneer 
^_^____^^_ clw3G 

SALE REGISTER 



Saturday. Sept. 8 —Auction sale 
at the Stouffviltc Livestock Sales 
Arena, selling livestock our special- 
ty. Fresh cows, springers, heiftrs, 
sheep, calves, pigs, horses. PicK- 
Up and delivery can be arranged 
This is your community s&to. 
Come early and bring something li 
sell. You bring it and we'll sell p. 
Sale every Saturday at t p.i-.i 
Moke .his your market where b«5- 
ers and sellers meet. Sellers ;»::<l 
Atkinson, auctioneers. clw33 



I 



not sold before the sale, the pro- 
pLMty consisting of HH>-acre farm. 
65 working, rest Inwh add pasture! 
running stream through pasture, 
bank bain, frame house, driving 
Shed, pig pen. Property all in good 
condition. Don't miss ii. Subject 
to reserve bid. Terms on chattels: 
Cash. No reserve. Snle at one 
p.m. A. S. Farmer, auctioneer. 

c3w36 






A.K.C.M. PIANO TEACHER 

Has opening for a few pupils. 
Phono Mrs. M. Scott, IST>JU, 
Newmarket. clw3G 



* 






KVl 10W COST HEARING 




Com 



value ¥i(h oihff akli <Q\tint op • 

to t»Ue «• math. Sec it, of %rii • 

Cor literature ^ 

" Rw ^ e ster BK | T nnm storb 

Phone 11 Newmarket 

clw35 



_ 



Roadhouse & Rose 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

MAIN STREET NEWMARKET 



* 



28 LIVESTOCK FOR SALE 



For sate* -Pure Tamworth hops, 
7 mos.. 5 mos., 3 mr>s. old. Apply 
C. If. nickson, mile east of Aurora, 
phono oar2, Aurora. *2w35 



For sale- Male horse, Omer Leo 



; J - - NCAr n ;uk <- t - _<lw.ifi noIt oiose^s farm. K. P. 2. Ux- 



22 



HELP WANTED 



Help wanted — Married man for 
farm 2 miles from Newmarket, 
irood house with modern conveni- 
ences. Phone 1190w. Newmarket. 

C2w3'i 



For sale — PJ10 Ford sedan. 
black, new motor, good body and 
tires. Phone H20w, Newmarket. 
after C p.m. 



Wanted Electrician, part o.' full 
time. Apply Norman Tavlor, Pond 
Ave., Oak P.idj;es. Phone Kuik. 
!)lr3, after G p.m. clw.'iG 



bridge. 



e2w3G 



Vttr Mile — IS small pigs, 10 weeks 

old. Phono .1220, Queensvilie. 

el\v36 



Tropical Fish: Angels. Betas and 
many other varieties. Special for 
this month, Ked Swordtails, COc 
each. Fi*ed Hare. Temperance- 
ville. Phono Kinjr 26-12. *e3w36 






Saturday, Sept. 8— Auction sale 
of the pioporty of the late John 
A. Civihton, Kettleby, con siting 
of carrrenlcr and blacksmith tools. 
machiuorv and the contents of the 
fornur Kettleby Blacksmith Shop. 
AteQ c quantity of scrap iron an i 



Strasler & Son 

OUEENSVILLE 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS ;\ND 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

PHONES 2509 - 2302 



metal. 



'r.W 2 p.m. h, g. M 



it **Il-l 1 

fount, I 



clerk. F. N. Smith, auction-ei 



*2w;?3 



The un- 
auc- 



NOTICE to CREDITORS 

In the estate of Eiizabeth Kva 
Smiley, late of the Township of 
King in the County of York, Mar- 
ried woman, deceased. 

Creditors of the above named 
deceased who died at the Town of 
Newmarket, in the County of York, 
on or about the 12th dav of Feb- ,. , , , 

ruary. 1051. arc herebv notified »f»X »»«« -*«t concession. Time 

pursuant to the Trustee Act. to '■ : 

send to the undersigned proof of 



their claims on or before the 8th 

day of October. 1051. after which 

date the assets of the estate will 

j be distributed having reeard only 



Wednesday. Sept. Ift 
dersi.uncd will sell by public 
tiort articles belonging to Mrs. Clif- 
ford F o 1 1 i o t 1. consisting of all 
household effects nnd nnthjUes, ti» 
be sold on the premises at lot 29. 
con. 1. King, 1-2 mile east of Ket- 
tleby 

p.m. Terms cash. F. N. 
Smith, auctioneer. *2w36 



For sale — Ayrshire heifer, 
sT>rinjiimc. Apply Jess Harrison. 

I toll. »1w;ig 



Satunlay, Sept. ri— Auction sale 
of household effects, etc.. the j)ix>- 
perty of Mrs. Freeman Lloyd, SO 
Queen Si. F.. in the town of Now- 



to the claims of which the under- 1 market. Sale I p.m. Terms cash. 



For sale M Yorkshire i>i»s. 
weeks old. Phone ll!)wll, New- 
market. crlw:tl> 



H«-lp wanted ■ Stenognrphor- 

bookke^per, r> t]ny week. CSood 

stnrlinK wn^se. Apply MoGulro In- 

•Iw'iG' ,,us,r ^" s Ltd., Newrnarkei, phono 

1P>7. Mw;iG 



For snle 7 little spiinj; calves. 
Durham steers. Apply C. Linstead, 
Helhavui or phone I2r.'i2 Sutton. 

•IwXlS 



KE-CONDITIONEO AX!) 

(UAISANTEKn USEII CAJtH 

AMI TItFCKS 

T«ri«s — Trade — Canti 



Help wanted — Handy man for 
approximately one month's work 
tit callage. Phone 1197, NVwmar- 



For hah- -2 us/-d kitchen cup- 
boards, pfk-rd low for 'pilek .sah». 
Phone SG2m, or apply 5 .Slmcoe St. 
K.,- Newmarket. crlwriG 



For ?ittle - - Piano and bench in 
excellent condition; chesterfield 
and chair. Phone J. V/. Such, 020, 
Newma r kot , <]uyt i me. el w.'iC 

Vor Miffl - 2 hot water radiators 
with several lengths of plfW. liar- 
l^aln .«. r A Phone 1079), Nowinar- 
ket. *MM 



•ftsai 



■^; 



:<u 



REAL ESTATE WANTED 



'•Al& 



:aw** 



•-:• IL 



A— - ^ 



IIOMK8 WASTED 
*^NKWMAUKBT AND DISTRICT 



ir < > 



- i 



^* " - 



St- 



.**- _ , 



' 



f::s& 



Si*-- 




JOSEPH QUINN 
BROKER 

QUKN ST. E., NEWMARKET 
PHONE 1038 



■ 



tf.Jl 



FOR SALE OR RENT 



Vur Mlffi Vt inr-f'.ss Pat rookslovc 
v/ith y/armln^ oven and r<-aervoir 

and oil burner connection. Will 
j/'JI Silent Clov/ $*p»ratO If want- 
ed- Ohiss door cuptx>aid nnd n 

hand elolhes v/iin^er. Apply 22 
Timothy St. V/., Nev/maiket. 



10-iO Ford Custom Tudor, jjrecn, 
air conditioning, heater and do- 
fif»stor, hark up light, fo« light, 
V.iflti) miles. A local car. 

IttfO thrvrohl Tmlor, lonroon, 
air conditioning, heater nnd de- 
f I osier, bark up lights, fo« li;;ht.s. 
priced for quick sale. 

Ford Custom Tudor, tfieen. 
over d j ive. an exceptional 



t'UtU Coiijm*, i;n'i*n, air- 



ff 



HKSTACIU.ST K<iCIPA!K\T 
,'oro/ilo restaurant being re- 
modelled by the P.oht. Simpson f!o. 
Ltd. is disposing of present fix- 
tures. Excellent opportunity to 
wiim complete* outfit at sacrifire 
price. ItoJrljgernted hack-bar, .soda 
fountain, bOf>th, tables, stoves. Kv- 
ciythin^ in one lot. Boat offer. 
Phone MO. <mH or Kandolph 8451, 
Toronto. clw.'ib 



1 950 

radio, 

car. 

VJVJ 

conditioning heater and d''fro.ster, 
.-jonvi.vir, priced ri^ht, 

HUH Mrrrury Tudor, blue, radio, 
hialer, <hffro^ler, a clean ear, new 
tires, S'-e this ear belore you buy 
elsewhere. 

Ifll7 Mrrrury I'ordor, blue, one 
ov.nei, u real buy for quick sale. 

tit'Mt Pontiur, elea/i car, $250 
t\uv/n. 

vs.ih Fonl, §o:> down, 

TICtXKS 

PiM 1'ord 2-ton cab and chassis, 
l.W. 

PKii fntcrnulionul 1 1-2 ton 
stake, a bargain. 

lit'sn IWn i-2 Ion. Cheap for 

thrHlIilkVt*. 

TOM HlttltKfX & SONS LTIK 

FORI! - MONYtltCfl 

SAI.KS AMI KKItVlf'K 

Afttlu St., Ni wmarlcrk 1'hoiift 710 



Ilrlp iviinlrd --llii»h srhool i;ii | to 
do |||{U! household duties in ex- 
change for room and boaid. Phone 

M78, Nowinnrkot. riw.'a; 

NVCtfcd ux on W _m„„ or vvoman 
to lake over establislnd route of 

customers for famous Wat kins 
Pio*lucls In Newniarket. Mini- 
mum eainiiiKs Si. r i weekly. No in- 
vrsiment or expeiii-nre neccssnry. 
V/e hol|> you got started. VVrHti 
immi'dinhly to Dept. Of.'-N'.n. The 
.1. It. Wat kins Company, X»0 St. 

Rot-li St., Montreal, Que. ciw.'ti; 

Mt'lp uiuil.d Fxprrienred 

walliess or on«» who in wilhni' to 

learn. Transportation provided. 
Apply Hidl's f'oiriM-, corner Davis 
Dr. and Yoiw SI., Newmarket. 

♦ 1 wX 



1 



or Mil** or rrni — tvjroorji house 
Nev/rnarkct, convenknecs, «ar* 
ago and garden. Apply i Pleasant 
View Ave., Newmarket. *lwSG 



I 







ROOMS ff QK KENT 

,.- ........ ,._,,, 



^.ren^-3 or 4 rooms. Apply 
20 Millard Ave. Newmarket. 

♦Iw.'JO 




j ■ ^ * . * 



> - V 



'jp£f«nt^Wd!-*lttlng room, gen- 
lemanxdp^ business girls. Phono 
930J, Newmarket. c2wri5 



nt— I^rifo double or single 
K-:CK*i*VM ww* doao .'to', hospital. 
^W^^I^IWWPIW? If 6eiJred. 
^. : j:Phone 1478, Newmarket 

SL L . . iM- ,H rrra^rJi ■■r 1 n iii 1 l:Y'c. 



For M*i» - - .'i-piece chesterfield, 

in good condition. Keasoniibi'-. 
Phone I202w f Newmarket. <:lw»0 

For jute- ~ Quebec heater, com- 
plete with pi|>es and stand, us<*d 
one year, bargain. Phone lOOOw, 
Newmarket. c2w3G 



clw."Ui 



For w|R- -Pointed dinette table 
and 4 chairs; oak sectional l>ook- 
caw, 4-sectiori, top and lower 
drawer; Findlay Oval ran^o, 6 lids, 
warming closet, coal and wood 
grates; heater cooker, stove fiull- 
ahh* for ba>A*ment; baking cabinet, 
oak, porcelain bake board, flour 
and sugar bin. No reasonable of* 
fer refused for nlwve articles. Ap- 
ply Mr*. Jl. J. Noilly, 137 Temper- 
ance St., Aurora, phone 110. clwftl 



For m*I« '.'«; Dixl«e sedan, Al 
condition, reconditioned motor. 
Phone 108-1J, Newmarket. *3w36 

Fer (ittjo— 1032 Frontennc Spe- 
ciul sedan, good tires, small mile- 
age, paint, upholstering lihe new. 
This car is in wonderful condition. 
New battery. Apply 07 Wells St., 
Aurora, or phone 405w. *Iw3fi 

itF/rrKK i;hku cahs - thuckh 

•50 Chevrolet Dehuxo swlnn. 
You will have trouble finding a 
better one. Priced right. 

'50 Dodge 3-ton chassis nnd cab, 
2 speed axle, 825 x 20 tires, long 
wheel base, suitable for 14 * 15 1 



JUSTINE NYLONS 

Men mid women wanted to soil 
lllO finest Indies nylon hosiery 
manufactured in Canada today. 
fuMlui* Nylons »ro now avallabje 
for the first time in Canada and 
are made t<tr I ho women who pre- 
fer the best. No finer storking* 
are made anywhere. Fully r*uar- 
nnlred. Very high commission. 
Apply Km and Fxpress Ih»\ 2!) 

cl\v;«l 



For sale Sow and 7 pigs. 
I .or no Poffif, Mount Albert 



Phone 

7.U0. 

c2w3D 



F«ff Mflv — 2 Ilolstein heifers. 
vaccinated, bred artificially, duo io, 
freshen. Apply \l*?i\ Miner, Bald- 



win. 



ClWltti 



28A LIVESTOCK WANTED 



Wuntcd— Horses for mink feed. 
Highest prices paid. Rex Smith, 
Jueensvllle, phone 1012 collect. 

tf27 



Wanted to tniy — Horses for 
mink. Will call for with truck 
Oood <ash prices paid. FranI; 
Coleman. phOtie KiSO.l. Newmar- 
ket, or write P.O. hox 25, If 27 



29 POULTRY FOR SALE 



Wanted Woman for pioor read- 
iag, general editorial duties and 

offh-e work. Permanent |M>sltlon. 

Apply In writing staling mmlifha- 
tlons to Kru and Kxpress Im>x 30, 
r2w3fi 

Hi'lp wauled — Meehnnle or np- 
prenllco with some experience for 
small garage and service station 
Taylor's Ksso Slallon, Davis Dr 
phone 445 or nights 821, Newmnr! 

^ et : ♦IwHG 

23 WORK WANTED 



Two, Unri-e and four week old, 

non-hexed, pullets, <*<n-ketvls. Spe- 
cial prices mi five to six week old. 
while they last. Haired Hock. I ted 

x Hock. IH 1 lie Is, $-l?,i»"i, non-sexed, 

S:iS1».i. cockeiets. S-1S.0S. Assorte<l 
Heavy Hired. $t.0fl per hundred 
Jess Also day old chicks. 

Tweildle Chick Hatcheries Limi- 
ted, Fergus, Ontario. clw'H) 



29B POULTRY WANTED 



All klutN of ll»e poultry wanted 
Will pay above market price at 
your door. Phone G. r >7, Newmar- 
ket. t(27 



Wanted to buy Poultry, live or 
dressed. Any (plant Ily. Bring 
them In or will call on request. 
Highest prices paid. W. S. Apple- 
ion. Onk llldges, or phone Kim* 
StfrM. tf27 



Hllp covers draperies, bed- 
spreads, etc., made • to • measure. 
Your own materials. Phone Mrs. 
Thelmn Jones, Newmarket 11511 
78 Andrew St. tf27 

UPHOKSTKIUN'O 

Chesterfield suites, occasional 
chairs, rebuilt, recovered In any 
fabric. Apply Ken Sargent, 85 
florhnrn St., or phone 382, New- 
market. cllw29 

-KVKNINflg AND WK.KKKNDs" 

AVAII , AHI.K 

Vor ndmlaUtrntlve, commercial 
and photographic work, also nssls- 
lance In housebuilding, wiring, etc. 
For prompt servlco phone New* 
market 1228. c2w35 



IMPLEMENTS FOR SAt P 



lor sale Save $250 on a fully 
equipped Farmall cub tractor with 
plow and row crop cultivator. Used 
very little-. Allan J, Cody, New- 
market, phone Mount Albert 390& 

*9iv39 



F<ir Mile - - Manure sprea<ter, 
Cocksliutt No. •!, in g»H>d shape. 
Apply W. Zajnezkowski, lot 20, 
<on. 3, North (iwillimhtiry. phone 
Hoehe'S Point t-lGrLM nfter 7 p.m. 

clwriG 



PETS 



Would You I.Ike to Adopt a Pet? 

Wc have pets for adoption at 

the shelter. Phone the Hn-nuuu- 

Hocaty, 8CG or 405m, Newmarket. 

C3w3j 



Have You Lost Your Pel? 

H so, phono the Htimnne Society 
at «6T» or 405m. Newmarket. c3w3S ' A quantity of White Ash and Kim 



signed will then have notice. 
DATED August 3tst, 1051. 

MATHKWS. STIVER. 
. LYONS & VALE 
100 Main Street, 
Newmarket. 
.Solicitors for the ad- 
ministratrix. 

c3w3C 



Auction Sale 

FRED BRUNI 

Of larm Implements, Livrstock, 
Hay, Grain. Lumber nnd Timber, 
Firrwo<ul, Household Fffeets etc. 

The Proptrlv of 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 15 

Lot 3J« ron. 5, >\ liiti-horvh 

CAT1LK 

Durham cow, J> yts.. hied March 5 
OiiOinsey row, t; yrs., broil May 29 
Hoist em cow. ti yrs.. breil June 2tl 
Hlaek cow. G yrs., breil June 11 
Ilol.-tein cow. (J yrs.. call by side 
Guernsey cow, ;* yrs., bred July 5 
Hotsteh) hull, 1 1*2 yrs. 
Ulayk Je» soy heifer, *Ji> months 
Hoist ein heifor, l-j months 
Herefoid heifer, IS months 
Herefoid heifer, IS mouths 
Hlatk Hereford heifer, 15 months 
Ihill calf, 1 months 
A number of vealing calves 

IIOOS 

Tamworth lioar, (! month old 
10 Chunks from 75 to 175 lbs. 

I.MPLKMFNTS 
Silver King tractor (motor over- 
hauled and new rubber) 
Haiumormill, (!ase. nearly new 
Cutting box, Gllsotl 
Hand rutting box 

Hinder, Frost ninl Wood 
Sulky rake 

Mower, Deeiing Meal 
Mower, Miissey-l larris 

Two row coin cultivator, John 

Deere. Iiorse drawn 
Drill, l.t disc, Cockshutt 
Drill, M spout. I.H.C. 

Sol drng harrows, ;t-seetion. Otaco. 
nearly new 

Set drag harrows, .'{-section 

ti ft. cultivator, tractor hitch, pow- 
er lift, MI.C. nearly new 

Cultivator, horse drawn 

Oliver tractor plow. 2-furrow 

Kcuffler, Flenry, t horse 

Dang plow, Floury, No. 21 

Manure spreader, John Deere 

Case manure spreader, tractor 
hitch, neatly new 

2 Disc harrows; horse drawn 

Potato digger; O.K. 

Ituhhcr tired wagon 

Hay rack Huggy, now wheels 

Hay carrier with fork, rope and 
tracks 

Portable Kosro silo 

'J Sets of sleighs Hoot pulper 

Cnsolino engine, 1 t-2 h.p. 

Set of learn harness 

National milking machine, 2 units, 
nearly new 

Cream separator, Kntonla 

Wagner elect tie motor, l h.p., new 

Kleolric brooder stove 

Approximately no cords of mixed 
wood, cut in stove length and 
split 

Huzz saw 

A ounntlty of new and used turn* 
ber 



McCaffreys 

Flowers 

FOR EVERY OCCASION 

Flowers Telegraphed 
All Over the World 

6 TIMOTHY ST. W. 

Phone 573J 

NEWMARKET . 



■ 



F. N. Smith, auctioneer. clw.16 

Suturduy, Sept. 39— Auction sale 
of farm stock and implements. 
horses, cattle, pigs. hav. grain, 
poultry, and household furniture, 
at lot 17, con. 3. Kast Gwillimlmry. 
1-1 mile south of Queensvilie on 
highway, the properly of Otto Par- | US Main St 



PERRIIV s 
Flower Shop 

Alcmber Florists Telegraph 
Delivery x\ssuciat$on 

Flowers wired to all parts 
of the world. 

FUNERAL FLOWERS 

A SPECIALTY 



Also at same time and place if 



Phone 135W 



Newmarket 



Attend One of These 

CHURCHES 



r 






SUNOAY. SEPTEMBER ?t M 



CHRISTIAN HAl'TIST C1II1KCII 

Main St. Newmarket 

Minister, Rev. P. Hreckon 
Organist, Mrs. J. K. Cane 

II a.m.— Subject "Go Fowartl" 

2.30 p.m.— Sunday School Rally 

Service. Meeting in the 
church. Speaker — Hev. F. 
Ilreckon. 

7 P.m.— 'Canada's Salvation 1 
You are invited to these services. 
A warm welcome awaits von. 



XKW.MAKKKT GOSPEL 

TAHKKXACLK 

Kev. A. K- Vietdlng, Pastor 

SlifiS V. Curtis, PianLst 

Sunday Services 

9.50 a.m.— Bible School 

It a.m.— Morning Worship 

'"Cod's Method of Making Men 

Good" 

7 p.m.— Kvcning Service 
John J. Stevenson, Canadian, 
Secretary of Unevangelized Fields 
Mission, speaking and showing 
pictures of work in Haiti. 
Tues., 8 p.m.— Prayer and Bible 
Study 

Thurs., 2.30 — Ladies' Prayer 
Group 

All Welcome 



FRIENDS' MEETING 

Botsford Street 

J>-45 a.m.— Sunday-school 

Ifally Day, let us see you there 

M a.m.— Meeting for Worship 
Douglas Hopp 

Come and join us in worship 
as we hcjsm our services for the 
fail and winter season 

Thurs., Sept. 13, 8 lun.-Month- 

ly meeting 
Sat., Sept. 15, 3 p.m. Yonge Street 
Quarterly Meeting in New- 
market. 

"Christ call us to bear witness to 
Him" 



■4: 



»!: 



•i 



•4 



■ _ ■ 






ST. ANDREW'S 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Herman G. Fowler 

Mus, Wac, R.M.T., Orsanlst 

11 3.m. — Divine worship, Rev. 

Geo. A. Lowe, B.A. 

No evening service 



I 



FREE METHODIST CHURCH 
RKV. E. S. HULL, Pastor 

A Friendly Church with a 

Full Gospel Message 

10 a.m. — Sunday-school 

Miss Clara S. Crowder, Supt 

11 a.m.— 4t 3Iy Responsibility Tq 
The Sunday School" 

Iqstailation and Consecration of 
Sunday School Teachers and 
Officers. 

? p.m.— Evangelistic Rally 

Tues., 8 p.m.— Prayer meeting 

Thurs., Sept 13, 8 p.m.— Class 

Meeting 



j ■ 



*z: 






: • . 



11 



11 



TRINITY UNITED CHURCH 

Rev. SI. J. Aiken, Minister 

Mr. Norman Hurrlc. A.R.C.T. 

ftllnlstry of Music 
a.m.— Morning Worship 
"Dig Again The Wells" 
THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 

a.m. — Nursery, Beginners 

ami Primary 

0.-15 a.m, — The Senior School 

7. p.m. —Evening worship 

"What Shall The Preacher 
Preach?" 

Wed., Sept. 12, 8 p.m.— Induction 
of Rev. M. J. Aiken into the 
pastorate of Trinity Church 
nnder direction of Toronto 
Centre Presbytery 

You will be welcome at Trinity 



-■ - 



;; % 



*- v- ■-* 



*■ '** 



CHURCH OK THE NAZARENK 

Rev. A. E. Petersen, Minister 
Jerry Black, Choir Director 
Mis. Jerry Black, Organist 

Sunday-school — 10 a.m. 

Communion Service — 11 a.m. v 

Evangelistic Service — 7 p.m. 

Prayer Meeting (Wed.) — 8 pan. 

Junior Meeting (Fri.) — 7 pja^ ; 

On Thursday night the young 
people are to meet at Lorae^ 
Baker's cottage for a corn anoS^ 

wciner roast. Meet at the church 
■ * -at 7 p.m. ; :B^ 

No Friday night service this weefc^ .^ 
for N.Y.P.S. 

"Church going families are 
happy I amUIes." 

You are welcome 






.-:-, 



..v* . 






m - 



* r * 



. *I *i 



T • 






pi; -.-.■ : . 



? — . ; 

* 

■MTHS 



> •-,"- 



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.1- 



- 






• * * .•,.-•'*• * * w+** 

- - .*-**- : > ' 






4 






> . 






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% 

<*_" 



«r-At York County 
(■hospital, Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1951, to 
JSIr, and : Mrs- Baxll CharpenUer, 
g.,. Sutton, a son* 

".. I>ur»n— At York County hospital, 
Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1D5I, to Mr. and 
Mrs* Calvin Dunn, Sutton, a son, 

, Koran— At York County hospital, 
Friday, Aug. 31, 1951, to Mr. arid 
Mrs. Frank Foran, R. R. 1, Beet- 
©n, a son. 

Hastings— At York County hos- 
pital, Sunday, Sept. 2 t 1951, to Mr. 

«nd Mrs. Samuel Hastings, R. R. 2, 
: Tottenham, a daughter. . 

Holden— At York County hospi- 
tal. Saturday, Sept. 1, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Holden, Newmar- 
ket, a son. 

V Lot (a— A I York County, hospit- 
al, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 3951/ to 
Mr. and Mrs. Vito Lotto, R. R. 2, 
Newmarket, a son. 

Leplk— At York County hospital, 

Friday, Aug. 31, 1951, to Mr. and 

: Mrs. Armlldo Lepik, Glenville, a 



V*\ 



son. 



■ 



& 



\ Morrison— At York County hos- 
pital, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 1951, to 
Mr, and Mrs. Harold Morrison, 
CZephyr, a son, 

Sfyers— At York County hosplt- 

K al, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 1951, to Mr. 
"^ and Mrs. William Myers, Doneas- 

;■, ter, a son. 

•* McLaujEhUn— At York County 
: hospital, Tuesday, Sept 4, 1951, to 
r- ,Mr, and Mrs. Kenneth McLaugh- 
\ \ ; . llri, Rlchvale, a daughter, 

Murrry — At York County hosplt- 
>al, Friday, Aug. 31, 1951, to Mr. 
. . and Mrs. John Murray, Sharon, a 
i*. son. 

V\< McQuarrlo— At York County 
\ hospital, Saturday, Sept. 1, '1951, to 
■■' :; tytr. and Mrs. Donald McQuarrie, 
■ ^King, a son. 

U • -. MeGlll— At York County hospit- 
-al, Sunday, Sept 2, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert McGUI, Aurora, a 
son, 

Phillips— At York County hospi- 
tal, Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1951, to Mr. 
-and Mrs. Karl Phillips, Newmar- 
. , ket, a daughter. 

• Rcinink— At York County hospi- 

• Art. Sunday, Sept. 2, 1951, to Mr. 
-.'arid Fred Ueinink, Aurora, a son. 

';*•. Hyhka-At York County hospi- 
. .tal, Friday, Aug. 31, 1951, to Mr. 

and Mrs. Alex Rybka, R. R. 2, 

Kewmarket, a daughter. 

v Sanderson— At York County hos- 
$ :' pital, Sunday, Sept. 2, 1951, to Mr. 

and Mis. James Sanderson, New* 
- market, a son. 

'.'■'-' Stickland— At York County hos- 
pital, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 1951, to 

/. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stickland, 
Kewmarket, a son. 

Smfili— At York County hospital, 
Thursday, Sept. 6, 1951, to Mr. and 
Mrs. Leslie Smith, H. R. 1, Corm- 
ley, a son. 

Smith— At York County hospital, 
Thursday, Sept. 0, 1951, to Mr. and 
Mrs. Donald Smith, Newmarket, a 
son. 

Taylor— At York County hospit- 
al, Saturday, Sept. 1, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. William Taylor, Keswick, 

a son. 

'William*— Mr. and Mrs. S. J. 
; Williams (Eleanor Doyle, R.N.), 
v Ttfondel, B.C., announce the arriv- 
al of Joseph Doyle, a brother for 

/ Oary,on Tuesday, Aug. 28; 1951, 
at Creston, B.C. 







■:-■■■■ ::-. v.:.- • - 






* ;*■_ 



f 



- - 



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i 






- . 






Mr. and Mrs. Walter Raymond Thompson, Zephyr, 
were married at Zephyr United church in a pretty wedding* 
The ?>ride, the former Marion Audrey McNelly, is the daugh- 
ter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Morris McNelly, and the groom 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Thompson, Zephyr. 



i? .- 



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* 



. 



/-,-■. 



- 



Recent District Weddings 






- ! 



1 



^r^^^fte «.-^*tfMi, 




The Nen^market Era and Express, Thursday, Sept. 6th, 1951 Fage 7 



- 



: 



- 



f * 



DEATHS 



■■ . 



Fuleher — Suddenly, at Game- 

bridge, on Saturday, Sept 1, 1951, 

v Brenda Fulcher, in her 12th year, 

--'daughter of John Fulcher and the 

late Hilda Hoore Fulcher. ** 

,;.: Interment Newmarket cemetery 

on Tuesday. 

: Fulcher •— Suddenly, at Oame- 

;'■ bridge, as result of accident, on 

:•- Saturday, Sept. 1, 1351, Hilda 

lloare Fulcher, wife of John FOt- 

' : chcr of Toronto, and daughter of 

''-Tylrs. Minnie Hoare. Newmarket, 

• and the late Fred Hoare. 

Interment Newmarket cemetery 
\ on Tuesday. 

-LKydd-At the Toronto Western 

liospltal, Tues*lay. Sept. 4, 1951, 

; Edward Kydd, in his lOlh year, 

husband of liella Hoover, father of 

;. IJoyd, Arthur and l-eonard. Heal- 

ing at his fate home, Zephyr, until 

". tim^ of family Kervice, Friday : af« 

'.ternoon al 2 p.m. I'uhllc .service 

. in Zephyr 'United church at a p.m, 

;'i Interment Mount Albert cenio* 

!; tery, . . . 

v ;• I^ttion— At his home, 477 Mil- 
..^yerton Klvd., Toronto, Wednesday, 
'; '-Aug. 2D, J9S1, James I-awson, In 
;. :-;fil« «2nd year, hushand of Kthel 
Sister and father of Kvelyn <Mri. 
.(W. Mar;k!em>, and Wllbeit. 
; Interment Mount Albert ceme- 
tery on .Saturday. 

■ rark— At his home, 4H ixdisle 

Ave., Toronto, Tuesday,- Aug. 28, 

,<■-: J051, William J. Park, hushand of 

Catherine It o d g 1 n s, in his 81st 

•.:;■ year, father of Harold, Kathleen 

■ land Reginald, 

-Interment cemetery adjoining 
■■:J3t« James' church, Sutton, on Fri- 
day. 



\ : : 



L- 1 



IN MEMORIAM 

Lee — Treusurwl memories of a 
dear mother, Sarah F;)len Ix*e, who 
passed av/ay September 5, 1035. 
Worthy of everlasting remem- 
brance, 

Mary, Jack and Nellie, 






J-ee — In loving memory of our 
...dear mother, Sarah Kllen l*ee, who 
passed away September 5, 1935. 
"Till we meet again." 
Nellie and George and family, 
^.Calgary, Alia- 

8onw*rvlll«— In loving memory of 

our dear father, Charles Somer- 

Vllle, who dlwi August 31, l<Mr>, 

and our dear mother, who died 
April 16, 1931. 

Wo often sit and Ihlnk of litem 
. . when wo are all alone, 

For memory is the only friend that 
grief can call Its own; 

Uke ivy on the withered oak, 
* when all other things decay, 

Our love for them will still keep 
; green and never fade away. 
Ever remembered by Laura, 

Frances and Russell. 



P ! 



ft; 






>■£- 



LADIES MEET 






• 1 



^ The regular monthly meeting 
of; the Sr. Ladies Aid of the 
; CHrUtian Baptist church will lie 
r to|d;it the home of Mrs. Barker. 
)^m^m^. St. on Thurs., 




News Of The W.I. 



New* for this column must be In the office Monday 
night. Copy must he written as briefly as possible and 
confined to news and reports. Other than routine reports 
and announcement* will be printed separately. 




Pine Orchard branch will meet 
at the home of Mrs. Mason on 
Wednesday, Sept. 12, at 2.30 p.m. 
Mr. J. A. Meyer will give an ad- 
dress on Public Relations. Roll 
call is an interesting place I visi- 
ted this summer. 



A lively program will be pre- 
sented at King branch on Tues- 
day evening, Sept. 11 at the 
home of the vice president, Mrs. 
Austin Rumble, and convened by 
Mrs. Harvey Foliiott. It will be 
based on home economics and 
health. It will take the form of 
questions asked by six members 
of the branch to he answered in 
writing by others. For example 
one question may be "do ra- 
dio soap operas justify the ex- 



cessive price paid for soap." 

Three judges will classify the 

answers and prizes will be awar- 
ded. 

■ 

The roll call is "famous doc- 
tors or drugs." Mrs. George 
Brown has been asked to take 
current events. Chorus numbers 
will be given by a group of high 
school girls. The refreshment 
committee composes Mrs. Aub- 
rey Campbell, Mrs. I. L. Scott, 
Mrs. George Brown, Mrs. Ernest 
Cummins and Miss Annie Mc- 
Bride. 






Laskay branch will meet on 
Tuesday afternoon at the home 
of Mrs. Archie McDonald and the 
roll call will be exchange of 
house plants. Mrs. Chas. Black 
will explain an excellent motto, 
namely, "courtesy would prevent 
much unhapptness" A topic- 
dealing with agriculture and Ca- 
nadian industries will be taken 
by Mrs. Francis Powell, conven- 
er of the committee. Lunch con- 
veners are, Mrs. F. O'Brien, Mrs. 
W. Ham, Mrs. M. MacMurchy. 



OBITUARY 

MARVIN W. BARKER 

On Sunday, Aug. 26, one more 
long time resident of Sharon, Mar- 
vin Wilmot Barker, passed away at 
the home of his daughter, Mrs. Vi- 
ola Jones, In Thlstletown, as the 
result of a second stroke. Service 
was held on Tuesday, Aug. 2H f at 
the Scott Funeral Chapel in Wood- 
hridge, Mr* John Holland officiat- 
ed. 

Wilmot Barker, the second son 
of Robert and Martha ( Haines) 
Barker, was born September 8, 
1863, at Slloam, and as a hoy re- , „, 

moved with his parents to Sharon. i;" ncm flanges in Wucation. 
On December 11, 1SS9, he married lne meeting is open to all inter- 
Susan Willson, daughter of Setli jested, and a large turn-out is 



After their early summer wedding, Mr. Jack R. Sproxton, U.C.LW, and his bride 
the former Constance BJakely, are pictured with their attendants. The bride is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Blakely, Cornwall and the groom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. H. Sproxton Newmarket. Miss Shirley MacArthur was bridesmaid, 
and Jill Blakely, sister of the bride, was junior bridesmaid. Best man was Francis 
Sowdall, R.C.N., and the ushers were Messrs Eric Shaver and Barry Blakely. 



W.C.T.U. MEET 

The regular meeting of the 
W.C.T.U. will be held at the 
home of Mrs. H. Hooker, 5 Arden 
Ave.,, on Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 
3 p.m. This is an important 
meeting. 



• ■■ • ./■• 



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BLUE 1$ THE HUE! 

Come in and see Morrison's Ex- 
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The Newmarket Hairdressers Association 



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The Beauty Shops 



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HOLLAND LANDING 

The first general meeting of 
the Holland Landing Home and 
School Association will he held 
al the school on Tuesday, Sept. 
11, at 8 p.m r Mr. Lothian. New- 
market teacher, will speak on 
Current Changes 




Willson of Pickering, and who pre* 
deceased him December 2U, 1931*. 
His fasnily consisted of two daugh- 
ters, Gladys, who tiled in April, 
1920, anil Viola, Mrs. Jones. Two 
'isfcrs survive him, Mrs. Ada Hot* 
ncr of ilt'&lim. Miss Mercy of New* 
rnarke> and u brother, Kdward, al* 

so of Newmarket. There are four 
grandchildren. 

Wilmot Darker was n descend- 
ant of an early pioneer family and 
for mtitty years occupied the farm 
just below the village of Sharon 

which had belonged to his great 
grandfather, Samuel flninex. He 
was interested in public affairs of 
the district, was secretary-treasur- 
er of the local school hoard and a 
life me inter of I he York Pioneer 
Historical Society. He was one of 
the trustees in. the sale of the Tem- 
ple and as president of the Social 
and Athletic- Club of Sharon had 
given untiring service to aid the 
Pioneers, to 'acquire and establish 
their Park. ;". 

Interment, took place In the 

family plot at Newmarket eeme* 
tery. ■•■'■ --- 



urged. 



Newmarket Social Hews 

• 

—Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 
Brooks and daughter* Lorel, of 
St. Thomas, visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Wesley Brooks last week. 

—Dr. and Mrs. J. It De Cos* 
are, N.Y., are visiting for a week 
with Mrs. De Cesarc's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. IL-W. Olson. 






- * 



OIHTUAKY 



SCHOOL DAYS 

; {Continued from Page 1) 

longed almost exclusively to the 
home. When he returns at noon 
he will bring with him a new 
partner, one who v/il! share his 
patents* interest in htm. One 
v/ho will, when given the oppor- 
tunity, help htm with special 
problems. For now, the teacher 
will he a very important person 
in his new world. 

The stillness is shattered. 
Youngsters descend oti the stores 
for their school supplies. The 
kitchen door bursts open. "Morn, 
got any cookie s? and milk? 
Teacher says we have to have 
six work hooks and two pencils 
and we're going to learn to write 
this year. Will I he able to use 
your pc-nl" 



James George Smith 

James George Smith died at 
his home, Mount Albert, on Aug- 
ust 9 following a year's illness. 
He was horn in London, Eng- 
land, on August I, Iti<j7 and on 
December 7, 1007 he married the 
former Sarah Leverton. Mr. 
Smith had farmed all his life 
and was chiefly interested in 
music and the choir, He was a 
member of the United church. 

Surviving besides his wife are 
a son, George William, and a 
daughter, Mrs. Herb Wagg {Vio- 
let Amelia); a brother, William 
Smith and three sisters. 

Dr. Ilutcheson conducted the 
funeral service held at Mount 
Albert on August II and "inter- 
ment was in Mount Albert cem- 
etery. \ 



BETTER MEAT 

YOU BETTER BUY THIS WEEK AT BRICE'S 



Blue Brand 

Boneless 

PRIME RIBS 
lb. 89 c 



a ki;al value 



ENGAGEMENTS 

* . ■ 

Mr. and Mrs. George Stanley 
Smith, Newmarket, announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Owenncth Jean, to Mr. Stanley 
Alvln Watts, win of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Watts, Toronto. The mar- 
ringc will take place on Saturday, 
Sept. 2(1, al 3 o'clock in Trinity 
United church, Newmarket. 

Mr. and Mrs. IX Spezlali. H. R. 
2, Newmarket, announce the en* 
gagemciit of their only daughter. 
Hose Cathedne, to Mr. Reginald 
Anthony Uolcmicr, elder son of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Holcnder, Holland 
Landing, iho wedding will take 
Place at the bride's home Septem- 
ber 21), 10SL 



Medical statistics show G0O.00O 
Canadian* suffer from arthritis 
or. rheumatism. - 




(MUTUARY 

HARRIET BODEN 

Mrs. Harriet ttoden, formerly 
of Mount Albeit, died at the 
home of her daughter in Beeton 
on July 11 following a brief ill- 
ness. Horn in Ktobicokc, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Km* 
manuel Brown, she was H3 years 
of age at the time of her death. 

She married Thomas Hoden 63 
years ago and throughout her 
life, her interests centred about 
her home and the church. She 
was tt member of the United 
'hutch. 

She is survived by sons Ross. 
Toronto; Lawrence, Oshawa: and 
William, Hartman; daughters 
Mrs. Clayton Paisley (Mae). 
Mount Albert; Mrs. Ralph Fock- 

ter (Lily), Saskatchewan; and 
Mrs. Garnet Pegg (Lily), Hccton. 
Funeral service was at the 
Chapel, Mount Albert, on July 
13. Pallbearers were six grand- 
sons, Lome and Stuart Paisley, 
Nelson. Austin. Herbert and Ro- 
bert -Bodcn. Rev. Shapter con- 
ducted the service. Interment 
was In Hartman cemetery. 



Blue Brand 



2* * 



?h\ aiul Mrs. Clyde Adams, Newmarket are pictured following their recent wedding 
with their attendants, Mr. (lone Broughton t Mr. Raymond Sherrard, Mrs. IS. W. Brough- 
ton, Miss Elsie Wo.slyn, Miss Florence ESjKUfi »»*l Heather Sanderson, flowergirl. The 
bride is the former Josephine Wosiyn, daughter of Mr and Mrs K. Wostyn, Aurora. 

NIGH - FOCKLKR 

A wedding of interest took 
place in Ring wood Christian 
cnurch on September 1 when 
Helen isohel, daughter of Jvlr. 
and Mrs. Joseph rockier, Ring- 
wood, became the bride of Mr. 
Norman William Nigh, son of 
Mrs. Leo Nidery and the late 
William Nigh of Aurora. Rev. 
Gibson Brown officiated at the 
double ring ceremony, and the 
church was decorated with gla- 
dioli, asters, and other summer 
flowers. Mr. Roy Grove played 
the wedding music and accom- 
panied Mrs. Harvey Preston who 
sang "O Perfect I-ove" and "i'H 
Walk Beside You". 

The bride chose French illu- 
sion lace and white nylon net 
over taffeta for her wedding j 
gown. The strapless, torso- } 
length fitted bodice was topped 
with a jacket featuring a man- | 
darin collar and 1 o n g, tight j 
sleeves. The bouffimt skirt flar- 
ing from the hipline in crinoline 
effect fell into a long graceful ' 
train. A lace cap outlined with 
pearls held her fingertip veil of 
tulle illusion, bordered with 
French late. She carried a cas- 
cade of Johanna Hilt roses cen- 
tred with caIJa lilies. 

Escorted up the aisle by her 
father, she was attended by her 
sister, Miss Hazel Fockk-r as 
maid of honor, Mrs. Douglas 
Nigh, and Mrs. Bert Clarkson, 
bridesmaids, and little Donna 
May Hisey, flower girl. The 
maid of honor and bridesmaids 
were gowned identically, in 
varying pastel shades of orchid, 
lime green, and buttercup yel- 
low nylon lace and net over taf- 
feta underdresscs. Jackets with 
cap sleeves and Peter Pan col- 
lars lopped the fitted bodices. 
They wore matching mittens, 
and talcs trimmed with lily-of- 
the-valley and carried baskets of 
rows and larkspur to tone with 
their gowns. The flower girl 
was frocked in pink nylon sheer 
over taffeta, with bonnet and 
rnittens to match, and she also 
carried a basket of flowers. Mr. 
Douglas Nigh was his brother's 
groomsman, Mr. Clarence Fotk- 
ler and Mr. John Slaley the ush- 
ers. 

The. bride's mother received 
the guests wearing copen blue 
crepe and luce wih navy acces- 
sories and corsage of pink roses. 
She was assisted by the groom's 
mother in royal blue crepe, with 
navy accessories and corsage of 
red roses. The bride wore a 
grey KnglLsh gabardine suit, with 
pink accessories and Kolinsky 
furs for her trip to Kingston and 
the Thousand Islands. She also 
wore a rhinestono necklace, gift 
of the groom. On their return 
the newly weds will live in 
Stouffville. 

Guests attended from Brant- 
ford, Toronto, Aurora, Petcrboro, 
Shelbourne and Newmarket. 

The bride presented her bou. 
quet to her great aunt, 94-ycar- 
old Mrs, Martin Focklcr of Ring- 
wood, 



THOMPSON'S SALON 
VANITY SHOPPE 
FRENCH'S PARLOUR 
EMBASSY SALON 






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Will continue Saturday afternoon 

CLOSING ALL YEAR 



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Porterhouse 

ROAST 
lb. 89 c 







Blue Brand 



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lb. 79 c 



BLADK RK.MOVKD 



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lb. 53c 



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SLICED BOLONA 
SLICED PORK LIVER 
BEEF BRISKET 
PURE PORK SAUSAGE 



lb. 89c 
lb. 49c 
lb. 49c 

- 

lb. 45c 
lb. 61c 



PURE PORK SAUSAGE MEAT 
SHOULDER LAMB CHOPS 



lb. 55c 



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ROLLED FRONTS VEAL 
SLICED MAC AND CHEESE 
LEG'S SPRING LAMB 



lb. 75c 
lb. 69c 
lb. 89c 



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IT'S A 

Woman ^ 


World 


• By Caroline Ion 



niirriiiiAY 

CLUB 



The Press and Radio Day luncheon at the C.N.E. is 
usually a well-attended affair and this year's was no 
exception. Present were 289 women, all connected with 
the field of publicity. 



We were entertained in the 
private reception and dining 
rooms of the Women's building 
as the guests of the directors of 
the exhibition and Kate Aitken, 
acting in her capacity as women's 
director for the C.N.E., officiated 
at the proceedings. 

As we arrived our names were 
recorded by one of Mrs. Aitken's 
team of stenos. Before we had 
finished the inevitable C.N.E. 
luncheon of assorted fruit and 
vegetable juices, cold plate, van- 
illa ice cream with butterscotch 
sauce and coffee mimeographed 
lists of the guests 1 names were 
distributed to everyone present. 

Many of the guests were from 
Toronto or like myself, from 
the sraai ltowns of Ontario. There 
were newspaper gals from Niag- 
ara Falls, Oshawa, Owen Sound. 
There were representatives from 
the radio stations in Hamilton, 

Barrie, Kitchener, Free lancers, 
publicity girls from trade maga- 
zines and publishing firms help- 
ed to make the luncheon hour 
very pleasant. 

Besides these press and radio 
women from Ontario there were 
many from other provinces. 
They came from S. John's, New- 
foundland, Edmonton, Alberta, 
Edmunston, N. B. and other 
Canadian cities. But it was to a 
Japanese reporter, Yoishiko Yam- 
amuro, Tokyo, that the silver 
tray was presented as the guest 
farthest from home. 

Mrs. It. C. Berkinshaw, wife of 
the president of the C.N.E., who 
had welcomed us to the luncheon, 
presented Miss Yamamuro with 
the tray. Miss Yamamuro is a 
member of the staff of ''The Wo- 
men's Friend" in Tokyo and Is 
studying at the Princeton School 
of Religion. She was in Toronto 
as the guest of the Women's Mis- 
sionary society of the United 
church of Canada. 

Other lucky guests received 
pairs of tickets to the grandstand 
show, large boxes of chocolates* 
nylons and other prizes. As a 
friend said recently, u It*s a good 
thing that there are two kinds of 
luck or you'd never have any." 

My had luck continued to fol- 
low me even at the luncheon. 



The chocolates went to news- 
paper girls with children. Brief- 
ly we thought that our sweet 
tooth was to. be satisfied, but 
there were ten boxes of choco- 
lates to be distributed. We were 
the eleventh newspaper mama. 

In announcing the qualifica- 
tions for that particular group of 
prizes, Kate Aitken said, "Choco- 
lates go to newspaper girls with 
children . . . legitimate, that is." 
There was a long silence and then 
Kate affixed the qualifying ad- 
jective to the correct subject — 
newspaper gals, not the children. 

Oh, the luncheon was not a 
dull affair by any means. During 
the course of the meal, a quarter 
of a million dollars worth of fur 
coats were modelled before our 
envious eyes. We were amazed 
to see racoon sheared and look- 
ing like a beaver's sister. The 
hats were all hand-made models 

and the other accessories were in 

keeping with the fabulous furs. 

Mrs. Catherine Marston, owner 
and editor of "The Elora Express* 
was the principal speaker, Mrs. 
Marston took over the operation 
of this weekly newspaper upon 
the death of her husband who 
had been a turkey breeder. "The 
Elora Express" lias over the past 
five years been a consistent win- 
ner of awards from the Canadian 
Weekly Newspaper association. 

Speaking of the Canadian 
weekly,, Mrs. Marston said, "They 
don't pay they're an institution." 
She went on to explain that it 
was job printing which kept 
most weeklies out of the red, u 
task she has successfully managed 
for the past few years. "The El- 
ora Express" judged for several 
consecutive years as the best 
weekly paper in Canada of its 
size has given Mrs. Marston the 
opportunity to fulfill a long felt 
desire to write, as well as pro- 
viding her children with, an edu- 
cation. 

Mrs. Marston reminded us that 
the weekly paper, taking all 
that's best in the community! and 
making it news, reflects the 
Canadian home. Site urged us 
to remember the importance of 
the home in building freedom. 



Birthday wtnhc* fir© irxt'.-ntlcd 
this week to: 

Richard Yatr*, Newmarket, 9 
years old on Friday, Auk- 31. 

Wesley Joseph ivhittakcr, Kit. 
3, Newmarket, 1 years old on 
Friday, Aujf. 31. 

Carole Cardlner, Newmarket, f» 
years old on Firilay. Aug. 31. 

Grant Hill, Fottagevllle, R years 
on Saturday, Sept. 1. 

Bryon Howard Paton, Toronto, 
19 years old on Sunday, Sept 2. 

Karen Margaret Bcare, New- 
market, 11 years old on Sunday, 
Sept. 2. 

Marie A#ncs Harrison, Mount 
Albert, 11 years old on Monday, 
Sept. 3. ' 

Mary Lehman, K.R. 3, Newmar- 
ket, 7 years old on Tuesday, 
Sept. 4. 

Danny Patrick, Newmarket, 13 
years old on Wednesday, Sept 5. 

Christian F. Wallace, Wood- 
ville, 8 years old on Wednesday, 
Sept. 5. 

Jacqueline Anne W. White 
Holland Landing, 14 years old 
on Wednesday, Sept. 5. 

Billy Glover, Plcxsantville, 1 
years old on Thursday, Sept. U. 

James Cole, 128 Burton Ave.. 

ISarrie, 5 years old on Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 

Send in your name, address, 
age and become a member o£ the 
Newmarket Era and Express 
birthday club. 



DUO-THERM 



SPACE HEATERS 



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EXCLUSIVE FIKEPOT SAVES YOU FUEL 
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BLOWER ATTACHMENT S3233 
TERMS ARRANGED 









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Beare 



RADIO AND APPLIANCES 
113 Main SL, Newmarket 






Phone 335 



_ 



USE ERA AND EXPRESS CLASSIFIEDS IN TURNING 
UNWANTED ARTICLES INTO CASH 



. i 



■ i 



Newmarket Social News 




PR1CIS ifflCTIVt $W. A, 7, 



— Mrs. II. P. Oilman, accom- 
panied by her sister, Mrs. Jud- 
son Kolley, Detroit, leturned on 
Saturday from a five weeks' trip 
to Woodstock and St. Polin, N.B. 

— Mr. anil Mrs. John Devlin, 
Toronto, visited last Sunday at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Cam- 
eron Smart. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Evans 
tttui Susan spent last week at 
the cottage of Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Evans, Blue Water Hcach, Geor- 
gian Hay. 

--Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hone 
wore Sunday gucst& of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lloyd Gilkes. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Noiiuan Woon 
returned last week to South Por- 
cupine after spending three 
weeks with Mr. and Mrs. Hall. 

—Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Ryan, 
London, accompanied by their 
three children, visited the past 
Week with Mrs. Ryan's sister, 
Mrs. Peter Gorman, and Mr. 
Gorman prior to their leaving 
for Geneva, Switzerland. Mr. 
Ryan will spend a yryir at the 
Canadian Kmbasiry in Geneva as 
the representative of the Inter- 
national Labor organization. 

—Mr. anil Mis. Harold Gilkes 
and Patsy spent the holiday 
weekend at Kingston and Ganait- 
iuiue, taking the Thousand Island 
boat trip. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Grant Dillanc, 
Kinsey and Tomiiiie, Guelph, 
were weekend guests of Mrs. C 
H. It Clark. 

—Mr. anil Mrs. Phil Hamilton 
attended the Hamilhm-Gcogehan 
wedding at Roche's Point «n Sat- 
urday, 

—Mrs. James M c If a 1 c and 
Michael, Toronto, spent last 
week with Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Gihncy. 

— Patrick Kv/ing, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. T. M, Kv/ing, returned 
by T.CA. I-one Star from a 
month's holiday trip in the Mari- 
times, stopping in Montreal for 
a visit with his grandmother. 

—Mr. John Dingwull, Detroit, 
is spending the week with Mr. 
arid Mis. J. Chester Rest. 

t~-Mi*s. N. : L. Mathews ami 
Miss Kathleen Mathews returned 
to town on Monday after sum- 
mering at their collage at Thun- 
der Reach. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gitlard, 
Toronto, spent the holiday week- 
end with Mr. and Mrs. Lome 
Merry. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johns 
and family spent the holiday 
weekend with relatives in Mimt- 
co an<l Toronto. . 

—Mr. and Mrs. C R. Near and 
Mr. and Mrs; Wilfred Oliver 
spent the holiday weekend in 
Buffalo and Rochester. 

--Mr. and Mrs, Oliver Gould 
and Lee returned on Monday af- 
ter spending the summer in 
Bradford, the guesls of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lome Church, 

— Mr. and Mrs. Norman Gilpin 
and family, spent the holiday 
weekend at Mo:;iington Park, 

Lake Bimcoe. 

—Mr. Richard Pipher, Sarru- 
n)Qnlo t California, visited Ids 



gran d m o t h e r, Mrs. C. H. It. 
Clark, over the weekend. 

— Mrs. J. L. It Bell returned 
homo on Monday after spending 
the summer at their cottage, 
Miner's Ray, Hulihurtoii. 

— Mrs. Florence ffonnett. Tor- 
onto, is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Smith. 

—Mrs. F. W. Glover and nieces, 
Misses Shirley and Marian 
Wright, were holidaying with Mr. 
ami Mrs. K. Hilt at Clear Lake, 
Huntsville. 

—Mrs. W. Uoadwin and Mrs. 
W. Pen-in spout last week at 
Grand Blue Lodge, North Ray. 

— Mr. A. K. Lawrence, Jr., 
London, spent the weekend at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. F. K. 

R rammer. 



PRESS SECRETARIES 

Tress secretaries of wo- 
men's organizations, clubs 
and church groups as well as 
others having news items for 
the women's pages of the Era 
and Express are requested to 
forward such information to 
the women's editor, Caroline 
Ion, phone 993. Copy should 
be received by Mr. Ion by 
Tuesday of each week. 

EVANGELINE AUXILIARY 
The Evangeline Auxiliary of 
the W.M.S., Trinity United 
church, Newmarket, wil meet in 
the schoolroom on Tuesday, Sept. 
11. 8 o'clock. The new study 
book, "From Lakes to Northern 
Lights", by Dr. M. C. Macdonald, 
will be introduced. Miss Jean 
Rose will be guest pianist. All 

the ladies of the church are in- 
vited. 




TEA TOWEL SHOWER 
A lea towel shower for the 
church kitchen will open the fall 
season for the Junior Ladies* aid 
of the Christian Baptist church, 
Newmarket. This first meeting 
of the fall will he held at the 
home of Mrs. William Rpworth, 
15 Raglan St., on Tuesday, Sept. 
II, tt p.m. Each member is re- 
quested to bring one tea towel 
to the shower. 



HERE'S a great new washer, combining all 
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whtcn VE'e£titt£iuut!Ec wasliers have always been 
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ill extra protection for you 
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of trouble-free 



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A good fur trapper, given any 
kind of "breaks", can make about 
$2."»00 a season in Canada. 



Spillettes Appliances 

36-38 Main St., Newmarket Next to I.ohlawV ritoue 1311 



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NEWaLVUKET. AUKOKA 

UUADFOiCD AM) SltttlUWNO* 

inc; niSTiurrs 



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Auroral 

$«»eial I\««vs 

At a meeting of the Ladies 
Auxiliary uf the Canadian Le- 
gion held on Tuesday night, it 
was decided to hold the monthly 
bridge and euchres on Die htst 
Monday of each mouth. The 
president, Mrs. K. Mugford will 
aitend the annual convention be* 
ing held in Timmiiis in October. 

Mr. ami Mrs. Alex Daniels 
have returned home after visit- 
ing their daughter in Dunnvtlle. 

Miss June Coleman left Mou- 
duy for Mumesing where she 
will teach this year. 

Mr. and Mrs. L C Lee return 
ed home alter their trip to fWI 

Arthur, 

Mr. «md Mrs. Jack Hudson 
have rein r u a d home after a 
month's trip in Eastern Camilla 
and Newfoundland. 

Mr. and Mis. CJeo. Out field 
have returned home after their 
trip to New York City. 

Mr. Gordon laio spent the 
week with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs*. L. C. Lee. ; • - 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Oianl and 
Phillip were Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Foster. 

Last week, Mrs. W. Dion gave 
a T miscellaneous showcj* at her 
home in honor of mi^ Dorothy 
Foster, a hride uf lids month, 
The hride received many useful 
and beautiful gifts. . 

The Misses Lena and Kdna 
Corp of Toronto spent au enjoy- 
able two weeks' vacation at the 
home of Mrs. H. Willis, Spruce 
Sheet. 





i -_* 



With any eusttm tattored-to- measure suit at INSLEYS during lUlNO'S 2CTII ANNIVERSARY 
SALE! Save $1X21 to $25.21 In the following raiigcn 



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lUg Saving* 
In 
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$39.75-$49.75-$59.75-$69.75 



The advance sale has been terrific! Our showing of »cw fall selections is the largest ever . . . V J 
Over 350 samples! Early orders get n le |, e st selection ami fastest delivery. 30 Styles to 

choose from! OKDEIt NOW! 



- - 



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ENTEKS NtlliKING SCHOOL 
Miss Elaine Robinson, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Hohinson, 
graduate of st. Mildred's C-'ol* 

lege, has entered the School of 
Nursing at Kt. Joseph's hospital, 
Toronto. 



JOINS IUJ.A.F. 

Hetty Stephens, daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. W, L. Stephens, 
left Monday for St. John's, Que- 
bec, where she* will be a mel- 
corlogicat observer for the 
H.C.A.F. She enlisted last month. 



SALE STARTS TODAY - 



SEE TO-DAY'S TOKONTO PAVERS FOR 
ItOND'S EXTRA 1>ANT VALUES! 



1 •'J 



Bond 



Kimly-To- 
XfVar 



Values at 



SAVE ffcfll t«i WM ON NATIONALLY-KNOWN TOPCOATS 



$11.15 Coverts 
and Gabar- 
dine Tiinctmts 



38.26 



AH-wool 
tialraiillno 

Topcoat* 

$51.75 EnidUn 



48.26 




$311.50 'Zip-In- 

Lining 
Topcoats 

A ^-season coat 



SAVE $tivM TO $1 LIS) ON MEN'S ANh YOUNG MEN'S SUITS Save up to $M2 on Trousers! ; 



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l-laouels! 
Coverts! 
Worsteds! : 

Sues 3340 



35.26 



EngtMt All- 
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ilhies, Serges, 
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SUcs ^5-M 



48.26 



Gabardine-? 
Coverts, checks 

Sharkskins 
sum 29-11 



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SAVE TO $11.21 ON ALL ItflVS 1 uml JUNIOU UOYS' SUITS! 

Ago 10-10 y». 
I'laliu and 



Ago 10- IB yrs. 
t uul Ulld 

S.uugs 



16.26 



Evtru I.eugh'-iOo 



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21.26 



Age 6-10 yrv 
Coat una 
Itrerk 






K\tr* Longs 26e 







Short Pants 2€c 



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SAVK VV TO J5.C9 OS MKN'S ANO VOUNO AIKN'S SHOKS! 

Slti>O.I5 STOCK OF $»^S TO 914.95 SHOES 
ItKIH'tHK TO SUK5.28. OVKU II STYLES . . - . . 
ItKOKKN UAN<iES IHIOWNS AND BLACKS 



'- * -• 



SHOES 



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x^va 



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.SIZES 6 TO II 



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SALE PRICE 




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LIMITED TIME ONLY! 



SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SEL 










YES YOU TAN 



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MR. FARMER: 



Six weeks 
Early 
Bui 

.Cliff Insley gives you a pre- 
season saving; on nationally- known 

TURNBULL'S UNDERWEAR 



• * * • 



■ ■ 



- 



Winter September 
Price Price 

'81" Combinations $4.95 2 for $S.26 
"81" .Shirts Drawers 2.93 2 for 5.26 
"88" Combinations 5795 2 for $14.26 
'88* Shirts - Drawers §4.95 Z for $8.26 

PENMAN'S UNDERWEAR 

'71" Combinations $i.G9 2 for $8.00 
'71" Shirts - Drawers $2.89 2 for $5.00 

if you can buy for less? 
Your deposit will hold your winter 
needs 'til you want it- Why pay more 



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CLIFF. INSLEY'S 



M - N ■=■ 



. > R O - S WEAR 



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NEWMARKET. ONT 



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OIL-BURNING 
HOME NEATER 

If you wfeh to heat 
anywhere from 2 to 5 
rooms it will pay you 
to investigate the many 
advantages and econo- 
mics of an Addifton* 
Norgo Home Heater. 

You don't need n 

basement to install an 

Addison-Norge. And 

look at these other 

advantages: no ashes to haul; no firea to build; no 

coal to stoke; no wood to chop. 

tC With on Addi»oii-Norgo oil burning space heater 
_ j get the moat modern -method of small-home 
leutinjj. It's workless, dirtiest* and cosh* less. . . 

Drop in tomorrow and tee those models 



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Phone 139 



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- 



Markham Family Put 
Hub On Archery Map 



Newmarket Archery Club, put 
the Hub of North York on the 
map in the Canadian National 
Exhibition archery contests. The 
Markham family in particular 
gathered up a flock of prizes. 

Frances Markham was the out* 
standing junior bow and arrow 
shot at the C.N.E. Frances took 
first place in ail events which 
included a double American 
round, a double Canadian round, 
flight shoot, clout shoot and field 
shoot. Frances broke the ex- 
isting Canadian record for Cana- 
dian round shooting. 

Pat Markham won the Cana- 
dian Field Archery championship. 
And Harry Markham took third 
place in the C.N.E. broadhead 
shoot. Edna Markham took the 
target prize for high score in her 
group. 



Ten members of the Newmar- 
ket archers attended the various 
C. N. E. matches, competing 
against 100 bow and arrow shots 
from the U.S.A. and as far west 
as Edmonton. 

Jean Wheeler and Pat Mark- 
ham attended the National Field 
Archery Shoot at Watkins Glen, 
New York. Jean won third 
place in the hunter's round, 
archery class. Pat Markham won 
first place in broaShead round, 
second place in hunter's round 
and compiled second highest ag- 
gregate tally in the archer's class. 

The local bow and arrow en- 
thusiasts are now looking ahead 
to their second annual deer hunt. 
A larger entry list from all dis- 
trict clubs and the U.S.A. is ex- 
pected. __. 



Haskett's 



' 



i 



* 



HASH 




■* 



-™ 



by George Haskett 

Newmarket Sports Editor 



Otvls and Night hawks: Those chappies in the Lake 
Simcoe Softball loop added a new twist to the late sum- 
mer rows. Latest and possibly most startling 1 innova- 
tion is moonlight softbail. 

Your scribbler saw it happen say "you should have done this 



The Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Sept. 6th, 1951 Page 9 



- 



. 



^»*i'V**> _*«.t- 



.: . . 



- BLUE IS THE HUE! 

Come in and see Morrison's Ex-| 
hibition Blue suits — the popuh 
color for this fall. .63 Main St,| 
Newmarket, phone 158. (Aclvt.)- 

. - --■ 



£>/?/jVK 



■ > 



*_ * 



i 



"l»M **»* #11 



1-. 



The pause that refreshes 



i^i- • 



I 



Zephyr Makes Finals 
P.O., Keswick Still At It 



It's been mentioned that Pine Roberts* Pine Orchard tribe hold 
Orchard and Keswick are inter- 
esting in lifting the Stan Cook 




mug and the Lake Simcoe Soft- 
ball League title. 
If they are, it means they have 

to lick Ches. Lunney's Zephyr 
"Blues" to get it. Main event of 
the past week's hopped up semis 
is that Zephyr "Blues" gave 
Hope the business Tuesday 16-1. 
That meant v/in two for the 
Blues and a stride into the finals. 

The Blues romped in with an 
explosive 14-hit assault against 
Hope's southpaw slingcr, Donn 
Glover. Glover in turn could 
have sued his mates for non sup- 
port as the scorekeeper broke off 
counting Hope bobbles when he 
reached the even dozen mark. 

It wasn't a bad ball game until 
the fourth. The Blues had only 
a 3-1 edge to this point. Then 
the Blues emerged with a six- 
run explosion in the fifth. Clark 
Arnold gave the big frarn a start 
with a single, Carl Meyers kept 
it booming with a double and 
Ken Pickering put the finishing 
touches with a triple. Again in 
the sixth, Blues* power hitting 
made a shambles of Hope with 
a five-run spurt and finished up 
with two, in the seventh with 
nary a sign of a hit to rnu away 
with the decision. 

Jton Kester, Blues' slde-whcel- 
had razor edge control and 



a 2-1 game advantage over Kes- 
wick. Friday's* game was post- 



poned dut to rain. 

It's possible, reports Prexy 
Ross Chapman, if Boak-Roberts 
Orchardmen can waylak Keswick 
at home Wednesday the finals 
will open Friday. If Keswick 
extends the series the next game 
goes Friday at Pine Orchard. 




'Berg 

i 

Champs In 
York - Simcoe 



Schomberg ladies are "the 
champs" in the York Simcoe 
Ladies Softball League. Tues- 
day evening they wrapped up the 
finals in three straight by crush- 
ing Bradford 180. 

Previously, the Schomberg 
smoothies polished off Bradford 
by 11-5 and 15-7 margins. A 
pile driving batting round for 
ten runs in the fourth wrapped 
Tuesday's contest under the 
Schomberg lights. 



Tuesday in the Pine Orchard- 
Keswick scrap. It was a success- 
ful experiment too for the Pine 
Orchard owls. We felt sheepish 
fgoing back out there the next 
day cross-cut saw in hand to nip 
off the end of the bench. How 
were we to know we finished the 
last two innings on the bench and 
not the score-book. . It was that 
dark we couldn't see a thing. We 
have always wondered if the 
j players could really see the apple 
1 after the moon got that high over 
the cowshed. 

For the benefit of our fireside 

filberts here's our findings: first 

interviewee was Harry Brammer t 
Pine Orchard's converted out- 
field stoinper. "Could you see 
the ball?" "Well urn urn no yes 
maybe anyhoo it was a nice 
night to study the night life of the 
owl." 

Next caller, Claude Pollock, 
Keswick's outer-pasture clipper. 
Claude happened to pop up a 
little blooper in the gathering 
gloom. "Me see it? Nah. I just 
listened for the whistle and 
swung. Can't figure yet whether 
I hit a Tidman pitch or the 
catcher's return." 

After dark, Softball minus flood- 
lights should be strictly taboo — 
somebody will get conked and 
then after the damage is done, 
remedial measures will be taken. 
The answer of course is to get 
rolling earlier, 6.45 at the latesL 
Upshoot of the after dark finish is 
that Keswick have filed n protest 
and the Board of Governors will 
have another hassle to straighten 
out. 



or that". Remember, all out. 

The Yukon Eric vs Ski Hi Lee 
match that wil feature the Sept. 
13 wrestling card at the arena 
has the earmarks of being one of 
the best in the current grunt md 
groan contests. Alderman Frank 
Bowser has claimed the wheel- 
barrow toting championship of 
the Newmarket council. Frank 
bases his claim on experience and 
know-how. After the Pine Or- 
chard-Keswick tilt — Frank had to 
tote coach Murray Roberts 
around the bases in a jet power- 
ed barrotv. 

Midland have snapped a game 

lead in the Barrie and District 
Ladies finals, downing Barrie 
Valleys by an upsetting 12-0 
count. Skipper Frank Courtney 
of our own set will vouch for the 
fact the Midlanders are going to 
be tough to handle. 




HEAR YE! 



; -> 



— ■• - '- ■ 



\ * . 





HEAR YE! 
CITIZENS 



* ** 



' 



. 



Ye Olde Tyme 




Saturday, SEPT. 15, 2, 7 p.m. 

SPONSORED BY NEWMARKET LEGION BRANCH 



News Of 
NEWMARKET 



- 



Up to this point, Bradford 
er, had razor edge control aiidi wern 't doing badly as they flath- 
had command with his f ive-lut- eret j a » a | r f runs j n the first 



tor. • Kester capped his solid 
pitching with three hits to pace 
the Hiues. Ills main props in the 
hit department were Carl Meyers, 
Stan. Lunney, Harry Hawse and 
Ken Pickering with apair of v/ell 
tagged efforts per man. Zephyr's 
outfielding trio of Clark Arnold 
and Don Hewlett put away seven 
Hope lofts in fine stylo, left- 
fielder Hewlett setting the prime 
example with four v/el lhandted 
chances. 

Doug Kves was Hope's hit 
leader with two of their five hits. 
Doug poled a Kester Sunday 
pitch on I he nose for a homer to 
break the goose-egg and whacked 
a double. Al Wilson doubled, 
Cliff Ward and'Don Glover singl- 
ed to complete the. Hope hit 
picture. "Bun" Cook ran miles 
to haul down Harry Hawse's 
drive in center, and Doug Eves 
picked off an oyer- the -shoulder 
hoist at short for the final out, in 
the seventh. 

Both teams went into a stalling 
gymnastics that left the bulk of 
the sunshine soakers on the 
side-lines disgusted. 

f n the other bracket of the 
semi-finals, which has now 
stretched to five games— one tied, 
one darkness erased — Murray 



Phone !>87j Estimates Free 
A Mason and Itisch and 
Wurlil/or Organ Dealer 

KENPONTING, V: 

Piano Tuner and Technician 
New and used pianos sold 

M Grace St., 
Newmarket, Ont. 



pair 

and three in the second to hold 
the ultimate winners to a 7-5 ad- 
vantage. All of the Hastings 
ladies got into the hitting act. 
Top honors went to Marilyn 
Campbell, Lorna Brown and 
tlolda Aitcheson with a trio of 
hits each. Gladys Edwards in- 
cluded a round tripper in her 
twn hits, and Peggy Ellison got in 
on big hit swag with a two bag- 
ger. 

Bradford's hit star was Marg. 
Wilson with three. Ann Mulder 

co i Keeled two, < »nc a double, 

Edith Dow and Lillian Marchant 
and Audrey Fuller shared The 
winning pitching job. Edith 
Dow, making a first appearance 
on the Bradford mound, had con- 
trol trouble and her mates allow- 
ed her support to wither unci 
wilt. 

• Schomberg: Marian Dnve, 
Gladys Edwards, Marilyn Manip- 
bell, Ann Sheardown, Loma 
Brown, Marie Marchant, Audrey 
Fuller, Peggy Ellison, Verna 
Hamilton, Marie Edward*, Gokla 
Aitcheson. 

Bradford: Li) McLaughlin, 
Grace McDonald, Josephine Xim- 
inski, Marg. Wilson, Ann Mulder, 
Edith . Daw, Mary Kavochuk, 
Shirley FallLs, Helen Wrahco, 
Olga Malko. 



Tons Past Performances ' 

This year's run to the wire in 
the softball circuits tops all past 
performances. Everywhere you 
turn there 1 re protests cropping 
up. Bill Stanyer, Keswick's 
playing coach, has been ruled in- 
eligible. After playing most of the 
season, Bill was given his exit 
papers during the mad play-off 
si-ramble. Personally, we don't 
hold with tliis protesting so lute 
in the campaign. Neither does 
the O.S.S.A. Here's what 'they have 
to say about it: "Clubs or players 
who knowingly play against in- 
eligible players and who wilfully 
conceal this knowledge until it 



LEGION 



Our Legion tug-of-war team 
came through to win the shield 
at Keswick last Saturday. Con- 
gratulations to John iljsey, Mick- 
ey Smith, Myles Mclnnis, Bill 
Tul loch, Charles VanZant and 
coach Fred Gardiner. Comrade 
Gardiner provided transporta- 
tion for the team. 

The walls of the kitchen are up 
now, and Comrade Aubrey, 
Scythes wishes help this Saturday 
with the roof. Come up for a 
while and give the boys a hand. 

Comrade Tulloch, chairman of 
the Auction Sale committee, tells 
us that in spite of the fact that 
most advertisements have the 
time of the Big Sale as 7 p.m., 
Saturday, Sept. 15, the starting 
time is 2 p.m., and the sale will 
continue right through. 

On Wednesday night. Comrade 
Harold Eaton, was officially in- 
stalled as zone commander. There 
was a good attendance, with 
Zone Commander Eaton giving a 
short address, stressing the ad- 






> - .* 



CANVASSERS ARE SEEKING DONATIONS FOR THE SALE 

Everything from Pianos to Perambulators 

A PROFITABLE EVENING IS GUARANTEED 

Everything will be sold 

Watch For Further Details 

: " : ' - - - 

Pianos • Ice Boxes - Implements - Toys - Paint - Clothing 

Tools - Machinery - Drinks - Etc., Etc., Etc. 

Afternoon 2 o*clock Evening 7 o'clock 

Everything to sell* Everything wilt be sold. 




nces 



shall suit their convenience tot vantages of close co-operation 



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HEAR YE! HEAR YE! 






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EWMARKKT LIONS CLUB 



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Heavers make mud pies, then 
scent them to advertise for a 
mate. 

Cotton can be grown in differ- 
ent colors so that it doe.sn't have 
to he dyed. 

* 

Snakes have as many as 300 
pairs of ribs. 

Quebec has one of tin; largest 
and mast accessible deposits of 
the metal titanium, as strong as 
steel, hut much lighter. 

A man who makes money 
hand over fist usually has a wife 
who makes the fist hand over 
the money. 



TIME TABLE CHANGES 

Effective Monday, Sept. 10 

LEAVE NEWMARKET 
TO TORONTO 



5.35 a.m. 


1.10 p.m. 


a 7.00 a.m. 


3.3.1 p.m. 


a 8.20 a.m. 


5.10 p-m. 


y.io a.m. 


0.40 p.m. 


12.20 noon 


8.40 p. nt 




10.30 p.m. 



Dally except Sunday 
and Holidays 

DAYLIGHT TIME 

Tickets and Information at 

King George Hotel, Agent 

Phone 500 

GRAY COACH LINES 



fc£" 



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use it in any protest which may 
arise shall then he considered 
equally guilty with the offending 
club or players and shall be 
dea It with according ly ." Does 
that put Pine Orchard and Kes- 
wick out? If so, then Zephyr or 
Hope could he the champions. 

Makes a few chaps begin to 
wonder if anybody plays the 
game for the sport of it anymore. 
These protests and counter-pro- 
tests flying hither and yon are 
certainly causing the executive a 
good many headaches and from 
what your observer has seen, 
this year's edition headed by Ross 
Chapman is about* the fairest 
l>ody of men it would be possible 
to secure. 

The other matter that draws 
our ire this week concerns Ron- 
nie Kowe, recently appointed 
coach of Sutton ladies softball 
crew. Coach Rowe was away 
offside in his language in discus- 
sing n call . with base-umpire 
Don Brice in Sutton-Newmarket 
junior ladies play-off at Queens- 
villc.' There's little or no place 
around a ball field for such tan- 
trums, especially if the language 
is unprintable and the chap hel- 
lers like a hog caller. Umpire 
Hriee rightfully thumbed him off 
the field and out of the game. 
This flagrant offense should 
draw a stiff reprimand from the 
league executive if not an out- 
right suspension. Incidentally, 
that Newmarket - Sutton junior 
ladies set is developing into a 
merry-go-round as game after 
game dies from darkness. 

Cuff Notes 

Hear tell that Bah Peters has 
turned in his coach's ticket at 
Hope. Tom Dickson, Aurora's 
popular recreation director, 
leaves our midst shortly for Ayl- 
mer. The genial Thomas is 
bound to be missed around the 
Aurora sport scene. And it's 
congrats to our side-kick, Aurora 
sports editor Abner llulse. Ab 
is now "the boss" of all the 
Legion branches in Ontario. Nice 
work sir, nice work. : 

Score-board went up at the 
Fair Grounds over the Labor 
Day weekend. Donor was Ted 
Robinson, yo Mariglod Shoppe 
prop. 'IVd usvd to serve tip a 
fancy brand of baseball pitching 
in liis hey-dey, you'll recall. 

Lights, lights. When do we get 
•cm*.' Probably a couple of j 
weeks. First lights were put tip 
on Labor Day. Harold, Imi- 
Plant i' did the actual installation. 
Hell Telephone Co. employees 
headed by Harold, and our vol- 
unteer work crew headed by Ed- 
die CJibson and C5eo, Watt, have 
done a marvellous job. 

Rink Manager Stan Smith re- 
ports Spits will hold their organ- 
ization meeting next Wednesday 
night in the rink. Be there and 
hove your say. Otherwise, in 
February don't come along and 



among our brandies in the zone. 
Our next general meeting is 
Wednesday, Sept. 12. 



PUMPING SERVICE 

Cellars excavated, septic 
tanks, tile lines repaired. 

N. CHURCHILL 

KESWICK 

PHONE ROCHE'S 

POINT I35R32 



CEDAR BEACH PARK 



NORTH SMOKK 



MUSSELMAN'S LAKE 

VAN WALKER & HIS ORCHESTRA 



DO YOU REMEMBER THIS NIGHT IN 1950? 

Special Anniversary Dance 

Saturday, Sept. 15, 9 p.m. 

BALLOONS, NOVELTIES, PRIZES, ETC. 

: ■ . 

Stouf f viile Badminton Club 

ANNUAL DANCE 

NOVELTIES ANO IMUZKS 

Saturday, Sept. 22, 9 p.m. 









. 




* 




PROFESSIONAL 



. 




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COMMUNITY 

MEMORIAL ARENA 



NEWMARKET 



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9 p.m. 



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FIRST BOUT — ONK FAI.I-. 30-MINUTK TIMK LIMIT 

DAN O'CONNOR. 247 lbs. VS. BILL STACK, 238 lbs. 

SEMIFINAL. ONK FALL. 30-M1NHTK T1MK LIMIT 

PAT FLANHAGAN, 227 lbs. VS. STEVE STAHUE. 238 lbs. 



' - 



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■MAIN BOUT- 

UKST TWO OUT OF TIIRKK - ONE-HOUR TIMK LIMIT 



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Th» Alaskan Lumberjack. 216 Lb*. ■, ** Og gG b»«t. gg gjj % K 

RKSKRVK SKATS ON SALK AT TIIK ARKNA SATURDAY SK^PT. ^ AT 9 AAI, 
Phone orders accepts. Tickets must be picked up by '*^tStJSSL^ 
ADMISSION: RlimWe SI J85: Centre sections SI; Remalnin, 



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CONTINUOUS NIGHTLY FROM 7 P.M. SAT. FROM € P.M. 

SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2 P.M. 



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9ATRWU ..... SCQTT F0ReES 

DOROTHY HART 

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E07/IIJ L MARIH 

PLUS 






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A HUNTING WE WILL GO 






MONDAY and TUESDAY • SEPT. 10 and 11 






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AVKOSA TOWN FINALS 

The Aucwm Tow« League 
final* will open fcmlfht 
(Tharaday) at MYtn diimes 
at the Park* It will be Andy 
CIoss's Merchants baddna 
Mick Sntton'8 Ditch Diggers 
for the title. .The league 
crown is to be settled on a 
best three oot of live series 
basis. .All indications point 
to a terrific battle before a 
final winner emerges. 



l m ^ 1B # 1MI UACUUAM AWADn Pate 10 Th« Nfturm^rfc*! §** 

Pin Ups Win ,._. c „ c ... u:iJl „ ... . ., . 

Floods, 



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' 




Aurora-Mewmarket Team 
No Match For LeasWe 

Leaside "Rumble Motors", one 
of the big city's better bantam 
sides, downed a combined New- 
market-Aurora team 7-0 in an ex- 
hibition baseball game in Aurora 
Town Park Monday, evening. 
Crawford Dales fast balled the 
Combines to death, striking out 
an average of two per frame. 
Wayne Robinson took the mound 
for the Combines and was nicked 
for three runs in the first as the 
visitors never gave a second 
glance backward. 

Ncwrnarket - Aurora: C. Mc- 
Guire, W. Robinson, E. Lothian, 
B. Forhan, J. Mills, G- Davis, D. 
Thorns, A. McKnight, B. Wilson, 
G. Edwards, J. Saunders, B. Love- 
less, 



Joan Peppiatt, K. Davis- 
Win Mixed Doubles 

Joan Peppiatt and Keith Davis 
won the Newmarket Tennis 
Club's mixed doubles invitation 
tourney over the l-abor Day hol- 
iday. The tournament was eon- 
ducted on a round-robin basis 
with ten teams from Mount Al- 
bert, Richmond Hill. Aurora and 
Newmarket entered- 
} In the final match Joan Pep- 
piatt and Keith Davis defeated 
Marg Davis and Chas. Lee, 6-3, 
6-3, 6-1. The winners accumu- 
lated a 54 game total, Marg Davis 
and Chas. Lbe 47. Third place 
v/ent to Alverna Smith and 
Harry Hill with 46, fourth place 
v/as captured by Joyce Bothwcll 
and Frank Wims with 44. 

In the North York Tennis 
League Aurora will be visitors 
here tomorrow evening for a 
semi-final tie-breaker with New- 
market forces. The victor will 
meet Richmond If ill for the 
championship. 

Other item of interest on the 
local tennis scene is the an- 
nouncement that play for the 
Newmarket Tennis Club's men's 
and ladies' single lilies will be 
conducted on Monday and Tues- 
day of next week. 



Over 
Protested 



If the score-hook is followed, 
Newmarket "Pin-ups" will meet 
Mount Albert for the Lake Sim- 
coe Junior Ladies Softball Lea- 
gue title. Tuesday evening, New- 
market pounded Sutton into sub- 
mission 11-7 at Qucensville. That 
win gave the Pin-ups the series 
two games to one. 

Sutton, however, has filed a 
protest on the eligibility of two 
Pin-up regulars, Jeanne MacDon- 
ald and Barbara Watt. Offshoot 
is a league executive meeting in 
Keswick tonight to settle the 
issue and a hopped up session is 
anticipated. 

In Tuesday's game, the Pin-ups 
left little doubt of their super- 
iority. They loosed a torrent of 
base-hits to corral an early six- 
run edge. Jeanne MacDonaKd's 
two-on homer and Isobel Rogers' 
two-run plating single provided 

the main blows. 

Tiie Pin-ups furthered their 
cause with three insurance runs 
in the second to gather in a 9-0 
edge and wrapped it up safely 
with two in the fourth. 

•Sutton's scoring punch develop- 
ed late. They bunched three litis, 
the only time they were able to 
do this, off Jeanne MacDonald's 
seven-hit pitching— plus a walk 
and an error for four runs in the 

fourth. 

The Pin-ups tabulated M hits. 
Glcnna Woodhousc was the most 
effective swinger with three. 
Joan Robinson, Barbara Shrop- 
shire, Jeanne MacDonald and 
Barbara A. Watt counted two 
each in three official trips to the 

plate. 
Mary CHmpson with the only 

two-hitter on Sutton side. 



Joint For Five-Hitter 

Back In our own back yard, this week. .Yck sir. Hill "Joint"* 
McCorab is our nomination for the lfa.shm.in award and ftoxy 
Theatre pass. Last Wednesday, Bill came up with a magnifi- 
cently hurled five hitter to put the hex on the Fete NetifcM- 
Ilarry Boag Specialties. .Rill's fast ball was working like a trip 
hammer, claiminjr. an even dween strike out**. .Thai victory 
started the Triple Seven Taxlmen off to a flying start In the 
town league finals. - 



Page 10 The Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Sept. 61b, 1951 







Score Board 



L : 



Taximen Win First Of Finals 




. . 



McComb Pitches Five-Hitter 



Office Specialty supporters had 
gloomy statistics to pour over 
when considering the plight of 
their heroes in the first game of 
the Town League finals. Here's 
what happened. The Cabmen 
loosed a torrent of eight base- 
hits in the first and third frames 



and capped a 1000 battjng average 
with a looper single in the sixth, 
Harry Brammcr, Pine Orchard's 
gift to the Specialty was customer 
two buying McComb's stuff. He 
snagged two, a bunt in the fifth 
and a rifle shot ground skimmer 
through the middle in the seven* 



. The first floodlight* an: up. A 
bank of five were Mounted Mon- 
day. It Is hope-d Iti ta abhr to 

complete the mounting of the 
lights thit y/«t~eJc, Five lit-hti are 
set up oti <raeli of th«,- oulfi«?!d 
pok-.s, four are required on the 
center poles and thrt**.* fach on 
the pok"> h'.-hind h*v?n<* pl-ite, 
nu*kfrig a total of 24 light*. 
. The floods •'■' , * '*'* -j1urrii # *ur*i and ! 
are of the latent deftlgri. There 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Uates of the finals in Lake 
Simcoe Junio<- Ladivs' League 
w*tv not available at press lime. 
.Scrits could start tomorrow, 
Sept. 1, with either Newmarket 
or Sutton at Mount Albert. " 

Sept. fi f 1 p.m., Aurora Park, 
Town League finals. Merchants 
vs Ditch Diggers; 7 p.m.. I-ake 
Slmc'ie Jr. Men's, Cedar Brae at 
Keswick (second game); 

Sept. 7, 7 p.m. Fair Grounds, 
Town League finals, Office Spe- 
cialty vh Triple Sevens; 8 p.m.. 
North York Tennis League semis 
Aurora at Newmarket; 

Bent a, n p.m., Ilxsehall, New- 
market Optimist bantams at 
Leashle Lions. 

Sept. 10, 7 p.m.. Fair Grounds, 
[Town League finals, tth game 



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Wednesday to crush the Specialty th. Don Burch tagged the other 



are 1500 watt b'tlfa iiih^h Uwd. 1 1" necessary), triple Sevens v% 
The floodlights . arid er^WJrJt*S£™* i s P € < j|a! *y; 7 p.m., Lake 
arrived Friday and ttfitwd* of . a 1 sirn «>e *i Men's League final* 
few minor items all tb« rtvtterinl'l J? f ™ ;W**rf Keswiik at Cedar 
required f'>r th«r compV'te 
iation har> arrived* . i 






V 

■ 



1 Sept. 



11-3. 

Bill McComb caused most con- 
sternation in the Specialty camp 
by tossing an effective five-hit- 
ter, claiming an even dozen of 
strike-outs. "Joint" had a -no- 
hitter simmering until the* fourth. 



Specialty hit. It came on top of 
Harry Bramtncr's second safetie 
and advanced him to third from 
whence he trotted home with 

Specialty's third rim on a wild 
heave. Specialty's two second 
frame runs were spiked minus. a 

hit as Charle VanZant strolled, 



Texas Icaguret into right. 
Jointer couldn't get VanZant out. 
He walked him in the second, 
VanZant hit hard in the fourth 



'Berg Wins Peel-York 
Takes Series In Three 

Schomberg are Peel-York 
Softball League title holders. 
They downed Woodbridge 0-2 
last v/eek to win the series three 
games to one. 

Ken Ellison tamed the Wood- 
bridge clouters on five scratch 
hits. He received strong hit sup- 
port from Mickey McCahe, -Tee- 
Wee" Aitcheson and Murray Ed- 
wards. 

The Hastings-Cabell platoon 
set up the kill of Woodbridge by 
breaking up a 2 - 2 tie with a 
three-run crop in the fourth. 
Murray Edwards homered, Mick- 
ey McCabe, making one of his 
few starts in the Schomberg out- 
field, cooked up 800 batting av- 
erage going four for five. "Pee* 
Wee" Aitcheson hit three for 
five. 

Jack Kitchener on the Wood- 
bridge mound v/as tabbed with 
the loss. The Peel-York cup is 
now safely set up in the Schorn- 
beig show window and its con- 
gratulations to the Mergers one 
and all including club president 
Bill Breedon, sec'y-treas. Elgin 
Hastings, coach Albert Stephen- 
son; ass't. coach Art Walker and 
manager Alb. "Pike" Cabell. 
Schornbcrg: Doug Marchant, 



Pine Orchard, Zephyr 
In Simcoe Finals 

North-South battle looms tor 
the Lake Simcoe Softball 1 
league crown. It will be Pine 
Orchard and Zephyr in the fin- 
al. Behind steady chucking 
from Ted Ttdman and timely 
hit support furnished by his 
males, Pine Orchard put an end 
to Keswick Wednesday 11-3. 
Tiilman had a shut-out until 
Keswick swingers came out of 
the doldrums in the final frame 
for three runs. "Hub" Prest- 
on's three-on triple was crunch- 
ing blow for Pine Orchard. 
Prexy fares Chapman came up 
with the following schedule of 
games for the finals. . Scries 
goes three out of five. All 
games must start at 6.30 p.m. 
Sept. 7, 'Zephyr at Pine Or- 
chard Sept. 10, Pine Orchard 
at Zephyr; Sept. 12, 'Zephyr at 
Pine Orchard; Sept. II, Pine 
Orchard at Zephyr; Sept. 11, 
Zephyr at Pine Orchard. 



It, 7 p.m., Aurora Park* p 
Another welcome a<Hit;oh fctj' r V wn [-*?*«* *biaLs <2nd *aiue> % 
the Fair Ground diamond is the| Da , ch W«m v* Merchants; 
new scor«.-bo*fd, It wai py* up? h*pL 13, 7 p.m., rair Grounds 
Monday morning. T«dfetosfs, ! ? W ^ "-sue finals <5th «axne 

proprietor of the Marigold "OHii" j* c *»* r 3 r| 0lfwe Specialty v * 

Shoppe, is the donor. ! Jn J> ] \ h !™™ : " 

< Sept. 12, 7 p.»., Like Simcoe 



It was then that Charlie Van- 
Zant, his former battery mate, j John Hiscy punched a drive at 
strode to the platter to hoist a Aivie McKnight, Cabmen's sec- 
ond sacker, and Ifarry Barmmer 
lofted a run scoring right field 
fly out. 

The Cabmen hit like a ton of 
bricks in the jump-off frame and 
after two were out. Jerry Hugo 
started it by hitting into a force 
out. Hack Cain busted a sizzler 
through the infield, Harv. Gib- 
ney got life as Don Gibson muffed 




Merchants Oust Harts 
In Aurora Semis 

"That's my first surprise and j hi: : f- ft ^ back of ^ rt7"Tnai wu" 



his ground crew on 
stallation. Other volunteer work-^ 
urs over the holiday w*ie'<<sr.d-. 
were Eddie Gibson, Gso. -Wa£^| 
Lome Paynter and Ned Ske^d. 



Yukon Eric Meets 
Ski-Hi At Arena Sept. M 



! T7 



ft? 



just say for the Ditch Diggers 
there's more to follow." That's 
what bossman Closs had to say 
following Tucs d ay's Aurora 
Town League semis. Closs' Mer- 
chants had just writcn out the 
ousters for Harts "Diamonds". 
The Clossmcn fired away with 
everything they had to smash the 
Diamonds 14-9. 

The big innings for the Mer- 
chants was the third when they 
punished Harts' chucker, Doug 
Hichardson, with u nine-run up- 
rising. The Merchants had the 
Hartsmen on the ropes, building 
up it 14-1 advantage in the fifth. 
The Diamonds finally got the 
key to Lefty Jack Andrews, who 
starred on the Merchants' mound, 
for a run of base hits in the 
sixth for six runs. They added 
two in the seventh before saying 
"undo". Andy Closs Jr., Torn- 
ado Brodie and Jack Andrews 
gained high hit marks for the 
winners. Alex Campbell whack- 
ed away for three hits to keep 
busy with the but in the Harts* 
cause. Finals open tonight with 
Merchants vs Ditch Diggers. 



King Meets Tansley 
In O.R.S.A. Third Round 



-*4 



♦«* ***** 






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cue counted two runs and ; \joint" 
McComb gave himself a four-run 



working edge by doubling into j «n 



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center and stretched it to a 
round tripper as Long John Hisey 
juggled it. The Cabmen turned 
it into a rout in the third 33 Ai- 
vie McKnight and Jerry Hugo 
singled. Hack Cain waited John 
Shcdlowtck out for u stroll Harv 
Gibney Joint McCornb and Bruce 
Townsley singled and Normze 
Lcgge climaxed the big seven run 
innings with a two base belt that 
he promptly turned into a homer 
on an error and a wild peg. 

From that point on John Shed- 
lowick got back in character 




reports 



third round. 

King coach John Mab**y 
pecting a 



en Jorm Mao;*y 23 52- 1 r^-af Gsr^ie^ Slk^ via '?atf-dfe>i 
tough mOU « *r«*; &««•«?«:«. iti-fia* ^m:-ars^ 







shutting off the Triple Sevenns j banner in O.R.S.A., 
hitting and run scoring. 



Friday evening 

WO. f 

Schomberg, th* o?h*r %&m : 
carrying th* ?eei-Y?r*t L*2gi?' 

awaiting. 
en shetr* 



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advice at the moment 



Cedar Brae Given 



er 





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Optimist Bantams Lose 
To Leaside 4-0 

Newmarket Optimist bantams, 

idle throughout most of the sum- 
mer from luck of local opposition, 
took Leaside "Lions" on in an 
exhibition baseball tilt at the fair 
grounds .Saturday afternoon. The 
invaders, one of the city's and 
suburbs better minor baseball 
crews, shut-out the locals 4-0 in 
u fast, well played game. Jim 
Taylor, visitors' pit* hing ace, re- 
lied mostly on fogging 'em 
through to keep his shut-out in- 
tact 

The Optimists came close to 
cracking it with a last ditch 
eighth innings rally that loaded 
the bases with two out but the 
visiting hurlor was equal to he 



The chestnut tree is a great 
source of tannin, used in the Can- 
adian leather industry. 

A camel can run about 10 miles 
an hour. 



SP1TFIKKS MEETING 
The annual meeting of the 
Newmarket intermediate 
hockey club will be held at 
the Memorial Areua on Wed- 
nesday, Sept. 12, at S p.m. 
Everybody is invited to at- 
tend. .The first step in a* 
eltieving a first rate hockey 
team is to get started away 
on the right foot. So lets 
make the start by having 
everybody out tu this meet- 
ing and an overflow attend- 
ance. Arena Manager Stan 
Smith reports ther'll be ;i 
vacant chair for everybody. 



third round eppeneats. Schorr*- ' m% 
berg eliminates Kalfourton in " 
two straight and draw a bys in r .„„^ 
the second round. Third round ^ iame 
opposition is expected to ;ome' 
from either Ermcsa or MiKgcove. i 



Cedar 3ne. ?easca ic-sa-'fr-on.^s 



runners In .the Lake Simcoe; 

[ Junior Men s ' League .{ haye $m 

"e-sd'Sa The.fina:^*-;Tri^j^j 

"A*»5n an sasy yictory.oysr.-HissK 

■-wick, their €peo$:tiO!x.'!ri--ike'f&&^ 

^_ \ a^ iri the initial 3ams ; :6|- the<^ 

j iiaai series, as Kssivick f9?^fto>^ 
The average Canadian weeds- 1 IH« game b«caui4.Qf piav^r •?H*--rt*3 



man eat5 a pound of msat a day \ age 
when working; in the bush. 



More Sports 
On Pago 9 



TMhsp»>r?3tioii . V\i&*v&$ 
I ::e*'. r^p'irte riesivick cc*eh *€53*> : | 
jac* Brown. -;-;-.. ''£l 

{ The second gsme of && series -'i^-J 
) up fo? decision before the Kes^.| 
Swiek faithful; tcnlght- ;'Thirtli 



game will, be played as Cedar> 
j Brae Monday. Fourth ganu>, i£g 

j needed^ is .at. Keswick, -We*Ines*^ 

[day. .Sept. '22.; '■;■-•..' ' vK 



K. Ellison, V/. Thompson, Don ««»*5 •* »*»?« Karl Lot hian 
Mai chant, 1). Jirown, M. Kd- 



v/ards, f). Aitcheson, O. Hainey t 
V/. Breedon, B. McCabe, hi. Mu- 
Cabe." 



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HOLLAND 
THEATRE 



to nibble on a high pitch to sil- 
ence the budding rally. 

Jackie Mills worked the Optim- 
ists* rubber shift and was hi good 
form setting the visitors down on 
.six bits an dv*ith a little hit sup- 
port from bis mate., might have 
scraped through for a win. New- 
market collected only two hits 
from Donnic Mcknight and iifllic 
Foilum. 



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Spcuccr Tracy — Joan licuuctt 
mtdhcth Taylor 

'Father's Little Dividend' 



SECOND FEATUHr'/iTK 

WAI/r DISNKV'S 
"NATOKK'K HAi.t ACHK" 

ill tcrlmlcolor 

i'i.liS IN TtX^ilNICOLOIt 
TOM AND JrlUHV CAItTtlON 



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mund fiwenn, Spring Itynsion 
SECOND KKA'lliUi: 

Caged" 

(Adult) 
Kleanor Parker, Agnes Moorktcad 



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Lawn Bowlers Active 
As Season Hears End 

It's been an aciive season for 
the lawn bowlers. Kealured last 
v/cck was the twilight iuixc<l 
I re hies competition. Twenty-two 
Newmarket and district rinks 
entered. Sieve Hose, with Mrs. 
Goring and Mrs Etc, won first 
prize with three wins for -II plus 
% Vaughan (luring with Mrs. 
Frank Doyle ami Mrs. E. Coate.> 
were second with three wins for 
41. Frank Brammcr with Mrs. 
F. Cuurtiiey and Ernie Wright 
were third with three wins for 
3*. 

High with two wins were Norm 
iiopper with Mrs. C Willis and 
Grace Dnylo with M\ plus 41. High 
for one win was Guu. Pattcmlcu's 
Aurora rink 01 Mis. U. Patteuden 
and Hill Morris with 31 plus 19. 

U'ibor Day luought in 12 rinks 
in search of the J. O. i.iUlu Mix- 
ed Trebles Trophy. Fur «H« ni 
the few times in history of the 
trophy, it went out of town to 
Gordon Kemou's Stoufiville ent- 
ry. Horace Cumber's rink of Br> 
nie Wright and Mrs. B. Wright 
were second. High for two wins 
was Mrs. Chnlrtge'ft Tottenham 
rink. Hay Jejley with John Mae- 
nab and Mrs. J. Macnab were 
fourth. 



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Want 
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Try The Era And Express 



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HERE IS THE BARGAIN COUNTER OF NORTH YORK 
A PROVEN MEDIUM TO BRING BUYER AND SELLER 

TOGETHER 

YOUR 'ARTICLE FOR SALE' GOES INTO 3.500 HOMES 

FROM KING CITY TO SUTTON. FROM SCHOMBERG 

TO ZEPHYR 

THE LARGEST CLASSIFIED MARKET IN NORTH YORK. 

Volume Is Proof Of Satisfaction 

IN 1950 OVER 10,000 CLASSIFIED ADS APPEARED IN 

THE ERA AND EXPRESS 



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SIMN.Y call NEWMARKET 780 for 

CLASSIFIED AD SERVICE 

RATES: 2 cents a word, minimum so cents 

HALF PRICE FOR REPEATED ADS. 












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Opposition To Plant 
M Insists That Hydro 

Building Be Reconstructed 

A general meeting of the town council was held in 
the municipal chambers on Tuesday night, when there 
were present Mayor Bell, Reeve Cook, Deputy-Reeve 
Murray, Councillors Corbett, Davies, Fielding, Gundy, 
Jones and Pringle. Also present were town clerk K. 
G. Moses and Mrs. Dickson, asst. town clerk. 



-■' • 



* * 



A considerable number of pet- 
itioners were present, led by Mr. 
h. P. Evans, regarding the Gar/at 
company plant. Mr. S. Gordon 
Hoffman was also present. 

The usual first business of 
council dealing with correspond- 
ence was held over in order to 



they were still of the same mind, 
and were definitely opposed to 
the installation of the plant in 
their area. Mr. Evans further 
claimed that it was set forth in 
planning board rulings that 
where a majority of the residents 
were opposed to the setting up of 



immediately hear the petitioners a plant in their area, the views of 






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j. G. SINCLAIR, Editor 



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L * . - _ _ _ 



PAGE ELEVEN 



THURSDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF SEPTEM8ER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-ONE 



-- 



represented by Mr. Evans. Be- 
cause there were not enough 
chairs to accommodate the visi- 
tors, most of whom had to stand 
during the hearing. " 

Asked by Mayor Bell what he 
had to say further in the matter, 
Mr. Evans replied that they had 
stated their case at the earlier 
meeting of council and he saw no 
reason to rehash it. It was for 
council to say what it proposed 
to do in view of the petition op- 
posing the installation of the 
Garfat company's plant in a 
residential area. 

Mr* Garfat and Engineer 

Invited by the mayor to speak, 
Mr. W. Garfat dealt at some 
length with the features of the 
proposed plant of the company. 
He maintained that as it would 
be constructed on the newest and 
most modern lines there would 
be no risk of odors. 

The town engineer was under- 
stood to concur in Mr. Garfat'? 
claims that the new plant would I hydro now admitted that they 



residents must be allowed. 

Asked by the mayor if that 
was their final view in the mat- 
ter, Mr. Evans replied that they 
were firmly opposed to the plant. 

A petitioner asked the mayor 
where the matter stood now, and 
received the reply that no action 
would be taken in the matter at 
present. The petitioners with- 
drew after Mr. Evans had thank- 
ed the mayor and council for the 
attention received. 

Infraction Of By-laws 

Deputy-Reeve Murray brought 
up the subject of the new hydro 
building, asking what was being 
done to conform with the in- 
struction of council that it be re- 
constructed in accordance with 
the motion that had been passed 
at their last meeting. He said 
that it was being freely rumored 
that the hydro commission had no 
intention of carrying out the re- 
quest of council. 

Mayor Bell replied that the 



* * 



not be detrimental in any way 1 
fo the interests of the residential 
area concerned, and was further 
understood to say that the de- 
partment of health was fully sat- 
isfied in the matter. 

An argument put forward that 
the interests of the residents 
would be guaranteed was chal- 
lenged by a petitioner opposing 
the plant, who asked what value 
they could place in guarantees 
in view of the fact that the coun- 
cil allowed its own by-laws to be 
broken in the building of town 
properties. 

: Deputy-Reeve Murray inter- 
vened to say that the infraction 
of by-laws was a matter that 
would have to be attended to im- 
mediately* 
No Action Yet 

Following considerable discus- 
sion, the deputy-reeve suggested 
that the petitioners withdraw for 
a little time to study the argu- 
ments put forward by Mr. Garfat 
and the submissions of the town 
engineer, and then return to 
council and say whether they had 
found reasons for any alteration 
in their opposition to the plant 
being installed on the proposed 

site. 

Absent for about half an hour, 
Mr. Evans and other petitioners 
came back to council to state that 



had made a mistake, to which 
Mr. Murray replied that there 
was no -excuse at all for the 
building or the canopy going over 
the line and the sidewalk. 

In a lengthy statement the 
deputy-reeve attacked the coun- 
cil's neglect of its own building 
by-laws, and said that they must 
take a stand now in regard to the 
hydro building. Unless they did 
so it would be useless for coun- 
cil to instruct other people on 
by-laws which council did not 
itself carry out. 

Motion For Action 

Following a protracted discus- 
sion on the Land Use By-Laws, 
it was resolved that the new 
hydro building should be made 
to conform with the motion pas- 
sed by coucil at its meeting on 
August 20. 

A motion by Councillor Field- 
ing, seconded by Councillor Cor- 
bett, to the effect that the hydro 
commission show evidence of 
what action was being taken in 
reconstructing the building, and 
that such evidence be produced at 
the next meeting of council, was 
carried. 

(A full review of the fore- 
going meeting of council will ap- 
pear in next week's "Council 
Sidelights.") 



AURORA PERSONALITIES 



T. F. Swindle 



* _ * "- 













To become designated as a 
"personality" one must possess 
certain traits that differentiate 
its holder from the mass of men. 
These traits may lie either intel- 
lectual or physical in character. 
In the latter category an' unusual 

\hat will set off a man as a per- 
sonality. 

We remember a time when Mr. 

.Winston Churchill was known 

throughout his native land as the 

'• "man who wears the funny hats". 

..Churchill's 50 to 60 different 
styles in hats were a source of 
national amusement and because 
of his flair for unusual headdress 
he became a British personality. 

r This phase preceded his later 
fame as politician and a connois- 
seur in cigars. 

Mr. T. F, Swindle, better known 

as 'Tom" Swindle, is a personal* 

: ity, not because he wears funny 

'\ has but for other reasons not 

-so common. He is known as an 

aggressive man whose sharp 

" tongue can make enemies. But 

: none would deny his mental abtt- 

',,. ity and his enthusiasm for the 

r success of causes once he has 

thrown in his lot with them. 
• guceewffu! Fanner 

. Born on a farm at Ardtree, near 

OrHlia, he later farmed there tin* 

- til 1&23 when in the spring of 

that year he was appointed sup- 

. . erlntendent of the Innisfree 

farms, a position he was to hold 

- : for 18 and a half years. 

He did not secure that impor- 
tant position without proof of 
" . farming merits. He studied agri- 
culture and out of his studies won 
a prize entitling him to a course 
V> at Guelph O.A.C. 

As a practical former, the num- 
erous trophies he won in compe- 
t ions provide solid evidence of 
his skill, knowledge and energy. 
-\ Troubles Won 

A beautiful silver trophy was 
; his award as second prize in the 
r Ontario plowman's association in 
, . th.o, provincial plowing match 
-held ai the Guelph experimental 
S fir&ph :JfOveirjber 5/ IMS; 



association he took first prize at 
King, his award being a four- 
piece silver tea set. On the same 
day at King he won a special 
prize for the best finish in sod 
in any class. 

On November 2, 1916, he won 
a silver trophy in a plowing 
match in the O.P.A. at Whitby. 
In the same month and year at 
Richmond Hill he won a swivel 
hook for the best crown in sod 
in a King and Vaughan match. 
While these are not all, they rep- 
resent major triumphs in com po- 
tions in the practical farming 
career of Tom Swindle, 
Innisfree Farms 

During the 18*4 years Mr. 
Swindle held the position of sup- 
erintendent of the Innisfree farms 

he won a number of important 
awards. Chief among these was 
a silver tea set and silver 
tray for the best dairy 
herd showing for two years in 
succession. A member of this 
herd won the reserve aU-Ameri- 
can award for two-year-olds in 
1932. 

On retirement Mr. and Mrs. 
Swindle received from the Walk- 
er family, owners of Innisfree 
farms, a very beautiful Westmin- 
ster chiming clock as an expres- 
sion of appreciation for his ser- 
vices during which he had entire 
control of all the farms. 

The inscription on the clock 
reads: "From the younger mem- 
bers of the Walker family". Dur- 
ing Mr. Swindle's years of service 
the older, original owners of the 
farms had passed on. 
Retirement Irksome 

Finding retirement irksome, af- 
ter a long, active life, Mr. Swindle 
accepted a position offered to him 
by the Col I is Leather Company. 
This was in the blue sorting de- 
partment of which he was placed 
in charge. 

In 1944 and again In 1947-8 he 
was elected to the Aurora town 
council. He was appointed as one 
of the seven arena commissioners 









..una .served for two years. His 
|MJW^^*^lirec«nt resignation from the com- 



yy--« 



EDITORIALS 

UNSIGNED ARENA REPORT 

The first fault we have to find with the report 
from the arena commission, a copy of which was pub- 
lished in our issue of August 23, is the absence of 
any signatures to it. It is reasonable to expect that 
such a report would have been signed by the chairman 
or the secretary-treasurer or both, of the arena com- 
mission. In the absence of any authorizing signatures 
the report has no more value than a scrap of paper. 

We would like to have been informed on what auth- 
ority the report was issued and by whom it was sanc- 
tioned. All we' know is that a copy of the unsigned 
report was handed out by Mayor Bell at the council 
meeting on August 20 for the use of the press. No 
member of the commission was present at council to 
explain any questions that might be asked; and the 
unsigned report was adopted by council without com- 
ment or discussion. 

This would appear to be a very offhand method of 
proceeding with arena activities involving more than 
$18,000 for a year's operating figures. No insurance 
policy, motor licence, building permit and so on would 
have any value whatsoever unless signatures were on 
them to ensure guaranty. We do not like to discuss 
statements thai are unsigned, emanating from unspeci- 
fied sources; but as regards the arena commission report 
there is no alternative. 

Assuming the report was signed, there are a num- 
ber of questions concerning it of public interest. The 
unsigned report represents a payment of $1,850 for 
interest on debentures and principal on debentures, 
and presumably these payments were for the year 1950. 
There is the sum of §1,354.09 shown as a balance on 
hand as of July 31, 1951. If it is true, as we believe is 
the case, that a further payment of $1,850 for interest 
and principal on debentures fell due in August, 1951, 
there will be a deficit and not a credit. 

FREE TIME COST? 

Simply the unsigned report appears to show a two 
years' earning period but only one interest and debenture 
payment. If this is correct, then the report suggests 
a rosy financial picture which does not now exist in 
view of the further interest on debentures and principal 
on debentures amounting to $1,850 falling duo for pay- 
ment last month. The balance on hand on July SI, 1951, 
of $4,351.09 would be wiped out in August, 1951, and the 
arena project will commence its winter activities faced 
with a cash deficit. 

The unsigned report claims that 272 hours of ice 
time was supplied free for minor hockey practices and 
games and Sunday public skating. This free time 
should have been estimated at cost and set out in the 
report so that an overall picture could be shown. No 
such estimate has been made in the report and any 
comment on it would be mere speculation, serving no 
useful purpose. 

The arena is one of Aurora's major public invest- 
ments of $80,000 and we suggest that the public is 
entitled to better treatment than is provided by an 
unsigned report. Instead of adopting the report with- 
out comment or discussion, the town council ought to 
have held it over for purposes of clarification. 

Council should have requested information on such 
matters as the auditing of the accounts and by whom 
the report was authorized. Council did none of these 
elementary things and by neglecting them failed in 
another of its public responsibilities. 

Unless the arena activities are self-supporting an 
additional financial load will have to be carried by the 
taxpayers. There is no apparent reason why the arena 
activities should not be self-supporting if they are 
handled in a business-like manner. Any committee that 
does not issue signed reports of its activities can hardly 
claim to be business-like. 

WHY DID SWINDLE RESIGN? 

It was surprising that no member of council brought 
up the question of Mr, Swindle's resignation at its 
meeting on August 20 when it was decided without dis- 
cussion to reappoint the remaining members of the 
arena commission for a further two years of office. 
Was council afraid of Air. Swindle and thought it better 
to try and "bury" him with as little comment as pos- 
sible? 

Surely he deserved a vote of thanks from council 
for his two years' service on the arena commission. It 
would have been a gracious thing for council to have 
said: "Thank you, Mr. Swindle, for the time you have 
given to the unpaid job to which we appointed you two 
years ago. You have thought fit to resign, but thanks 
all the same." 

- 

Mr. Swindle's major trouble appears to be that ho 
speaks his mind in the public interest. Some members 
of council don't like that Their nervous systems are 
disturbed by a little criticism, and from whatever source 
it comes they'd like to close that "noisy trap". For- 
tunately, however, they don't always succeed. 

Mr. Swindle, who was the representative of the 
recreation commission on the arena commission, in 
his explanatory remarks to the former body, said it 
was "hopeless" trying to work with the arena commis- 
sion. Members didn't attend regularly; even the mayor 
and Councillor Gundy had attended two meetings only. 

Members of the arena commission are appointed by 
the town council. The present membership is com- 
posed of Mr, F. H. Underbill, chairman; Mr. W. It Stod- 
dart, secretary treasurer; Mayor Hell, Councillor Gundy, 
Mr. A. Cousins and Dr. Henderson. A seventh member 
is to bo appointed to succeed Mr. Swindle. 

Some more elucidation on Mr. Swindle's resignation 

13 due to m^wmmM^^ ^mM&M^mm 



WHAT THEY ARE SAYING 






-> 



Why Is Tom Dickson Going? 

Stories Of Vacation Tours 

Through Canada And U.S.A. 

There have been so many changes in Aurora since 
the beginning of the year that one is inclined to wdnder 
what is coming next! They are saying there will be 
some changes in the town council setup when the muni- 
cipal elections come along in December, 




_--- ** 



THEATRE 

CLIFFORD GRIFFITHS - MANAGER 



• - 



AURORA 

— TEL. S 



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[FRIDAY. SATURDAY 



SEPT. 7. 8 



• 



We are concerned, however, 
with what has already happened, 
not with what may happen. And 
one thing that is disturbing many 
people is the imminent depar- 
ture of Mr. Tom Dickson. 

We were in a friend's house 
when a telephone enquiry came 
through. This was to ask for 
confirmation of Mr. Dickson's 
reported intention to accept a 
position as arena manager and 
recreation director in the town 
of Aylmer. Our friend had 
heard nothing of the report and 
was considerably taken aback 
with the enquiry. He was not 
more astonished than we were. 

The first thought that such 
news provoked was: "What has 
Aylmer got that Aurora hasn't?" 
They are towns of comparable 
size. Neither town, so far as we 
know, is on the crest of a new 
prosperity. Why should Tom 
Dickson want to leave Aurora 
to make a new home in Aylmer? 
These were natural questions in 
such a situation. 
A Popular Man 

We make no bones about it: 
We like Tom Dickson. He has 
always seemed to us the right 
man for the job he has held in 
Aurora for the past two years. 
He has an easy friendly manner. 
He has made himself very pop- 
ular, especially among the 
younger folk. And the.se are the 



tendance on the part of the mem- 
bers of the commission. 

These are matters which we 
are dealing with in our editorial 
column at the present time. 
Without enthusiastic • co-opera- 
tion on the part .of all the mem- 
bers of the commission success 
will not come to the Memorial 
Arena. 

Meantime, it is a matter of the 
deepest regret that Aurora is to 
lose Tom Dickson. He seemed 
to us the ideal man for the job 
he was given. 

IS. F. Davis 

In June of this year we noted 
in these columns the 47th anni- 
versary of the wedding of Mr. 
and Mrs. B. F. Davis. In an 
old history which included Au- 
rora, we read this of Mr. Davis: 
"Mr. Davis established himself 
in business here twelve years 
ago and since that time has met 
with pronounced success." 

The Mr. Davis of that time is 
still going strong. He can make 
the honorable claim of being 
Aurora's oldest business man 
and will celebrate 50 years of 
activity as a merchant at an 
early date, having commenced 
here in the year 1902. We are 
happy to state that both Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis are enjoying the best 
of health. 

In conversation with his son, 
C 1 a r e n c t\ the other day, we 



i 



•*■ - - -*» — — — — -- - — -- — _____ _ — _ _ B _ __ ^ r 

folk that matter in the job lie | learned of new projects that 



are 



was appointed to do. 

If the arena is to be successful 
it will have to attract to itself 
the young people in Aurora. Mr. 
Dickson has the right tempera- 
ment, and the right manner, to 
appeal to younger people. Him- 
self a successful sportsman, he 
has developed many excellent 
young Aurora sportsmen. 

He. has done wonders in work- 
ing for the young folk through 
the recreation commission. He 
hasn't spared himself. We be- 
lieve we are correct in stating 
that he has had no vacation since 
his appointment in Aurora. We 
know that he has done a lot of 
voluntary work, purely in the 
interests of the young. And the 
young folks, to our knowledge, 
have idolized Tom Dickson. 
Why Is He Going? 

We have not seen Mr. Dickson 
since the last meeting of the rec- 
reation commission, which was 
held on August 17. If there is an 
inside story we have not heard 
it. All we have beard is that 
Aylrner has offered him oppor- 
tunities that he has not had here, 
especially as regards remunera- 
tion. He will, we understand, 
better himself financially. 

The arena problem Is one that 
is becoming increasingly discus* 
sed in Aurora. The public 'has 
$80,000 invested in the arena, 
and that is a big investment. 
The arena will have to enjoy an 
accelerated success if the deben- 
ture loan is to be liquidated, 

That sort of success docs not ap- 
pear to be coming its way at the 
present time. 

To our best knowledge, the 
arena commission had a meeting 
in April, and a further meeting 
in July. Another meeting, we 
believe, is scheduled for this 
month. That pace is much too 
slow to make a success of the 
arena, especially in view of the 
fact that there is no regular at- 



under consideration affecting the 
modernization of their business 
premises. These are to be alter- 
ed so as to provide greater of- 
fice space and other trading fa- 
cilities. 

Koyal Theatre Feature 

We draw the attention of our 
readers to a special serial feature 
which will be released at the 
Koyal theatre on September 7, 
entitled "The Sea Hound," writ- 
ten around the dare-devil ad- 
ventures of that celebrated char- 
acter, Capt. Silver. 

The serial will be released in 
15 episodes and will star Larry, 
"Buster". Crabbe. and will make 
an especial appeal to the young 
folk of all ages. Other excellent 
attractions at the Royal are an- 
nounced in an adjoining column 
of theatre news. 

Manager Clifford Griffiths re- 
ports a continuance of fine at- 
tendances at the Koyal, where 
every effort is made to put on 
shows of outstanding interest. 

Canadian Tour 

Entering the Hudson confec- 
tionery store on Yonge street the 
other evening we saw a deeply- 
tanned, stoutish man emerge from 
the rear shadows. It was none 
other than John Hudson himself, 
gaek from a Canadian tour last* 
ing over a month. In his Pontine,] 
Mr. and Mrs. Hudson had covered i 



1 



j 



over 5,000 miles, including one 
day's run of around 400 miles. 

He had a delightful story to re- 
late of the fine time they had had 
together. From Aurora they pro- 
ceeded to Ottawa, Montreal, 
Quebec city, and down the St. 
Lawrence to Montjoli, to New 
Brunswick, Sydney, N.S., and 
across the Gulf of St, Lawrence to 
Newfoundland. 

For fifteen days they toured; 



Newfoundland, doing 1100 miles 
by train, 500 miles by car, and 

(Page 13, Col. 4 



— 

Aurora Lawn Bowlers At 
Stouffville, Newmarket 

With lawn bowling contests in full swing 1 , members 
of the Aurora club are enjoying n share of some of the 
winnings. It is generally admitted that the Aurora 
lawn bowling greens are not .surpassed by any and are 
in fact superior to most. Tito Aurora club is not among 
the largest in numbers, but its members are exceedingly 
active ami include some very fine bowlers. 



-■- -a* ^- 



3£-£* 



«^"SS 



The Aurora club was represent- 
ed at the Stouffville mixed 
treble.'; contests last week, where 
20 rinks competed for the Watts 
trophy and accompanying prizes. 
Aurora was represented by 
George Pattenden, Mrs. Patten- 
den ami Russell Sinclair, 

This team was surpassed only 
by C. Pipher's rink from Stouff- 
ville, who won the tournament. 
They did, however, come in sec- 
ond, with Karl Beare's loam 
from Clarcmont taking third 
place. 

Another Aurora rink skipped 
by W. Morris, and which includ- 
ed Mrs. Clauson and Leo Potter, 
Vifas high for one win. 




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There was a splendid turn- 
out for the Newmarket mixed 
trebles' contest when 22 rinks 
entered. 

The Newmarket teams, playing 
in great style, proved themselves 
the victors by taking first, sec- 
ond nnd third places. S. Hose, P. 
Itrummcr and V. Goring won the 
nbove contests respectively. 

Two high wins were brought 
off by N. Uonper, skip, while 
high for one win was recorded 
by G, Pattenden, Mrs. Pattenden 
and W. Morris. 

Although the ancient summer 
game is now passing its heyday 
for 1951. there are still many 
contests ahead during the months 



4 



OH! FOR THOSE WILD AND 
WONDERFUL DAYS when you 

kissed, blushed and blundered through 

theteensl^^fii^ 

ON THE SCREEN 
AT LAST! 



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The stories that thrilled 
and delighted America 
lot eleven years in the 
Saturday Evening Post! 




tOtOR I 

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OWEN 

JOHNSON'S 

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scour hdiit • w m$ • mm aunt 



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Starting Friday, Part I of Our New Serial 



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ami Saturday Matinee Only 



MONDAY, TUESDAY 



SEPT. 10,11 



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SEPT. 12. 13 





he story of ... 
Valerie and Ben 
Hogan-///* gtiy 
who never gave up 
and the girl who 
never let him 
down! 



Glenn FORD • Anne BAXTER • Dennis REEK ^ mmm 

to JUNE HAVOC • fto*«a b, SAMUEL G. EN6CL • WmM W SIDNH lAWKLO 






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DMRIO'UUOSA ■ ANN m.YTB 

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The Common 

Rounds. 

By Isabel Inglis Colviile 

TO WELCOME 
THE DAY 

The sun was. shining" to welcome the day when 
. on Thursday we accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Elgin Evans 
,* to that mecca toward which most feet turn in these two 
enchanted weeks — the C.N.E. 

Usually our feet turn almost of | ba "d stand for we wanted to 
their own volition toward thej hear the section the Newmarket 
flower show, but this year a long- ba "d was playing in. We heard 

three bands from London, Ont. 
which we thought was a mighty 
good showing. There was the 
London Girls' and Boys' Rand, 



ing not to be denied was mine — 
to see the cats. So we hied us 
off to the Horse Palace and as 
we were early, we visited some 



«.*. •>«»*£ «_-«iij ; %»« vwiitu aviiMfi " " —-*-*. ~*.i* «uja Dana. 

friendly horses, watched some of the London Police Club Bovs' 



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for OOT wAnt Jny, rnTicf 

DAIRY FOODS 
SERVICE BUREAU 

409 Huron Street, Toronto 



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I Keep up with 
classes and after- 
class fun by 

7 .drinking plenty 

of Nature's Inrst 
food . . . Milk. 

It's nourishment In 
a glass! Milk gives 
you vitamins, 
proteins and 

. minerals, so 
important for dear 
skin, growth and 
vitality. 

Try Milk these 
refreshing ways: 
in creamy malteds 
and shakes; with 
chocolate or any 
flavour fruit syrup; 

or poured over 
slices of fresh fruit. 
For real food value 
at litde cost, you 
can't beat Milk. 






them being scrubbed and tails 
braided — as one attendant said, 
they needed lots of care for they 
suffered 1 from the heat. 

When we came to the tiny pon- 
ies we lingered. One little lad 



Band and the London Police 
Club's Junior Boys' Band. They 
were excellent, with a mellow- 
ness of tone that did credit to 
bandmaster and members. Bur- 
lington also had a good boys* and 



who was making a pony almost; S irls hand as had Brussels and 

- small look beautiful, showed \' li seems so good to see how many 

the long line of stalls occupied! bo >' s nn d g»i*ls are taking music 

seriously and how many people 
will sit happily for hours listen- 



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as 

us the long line of stalls occupied 

by his father's exhibit. Two 

girls were also busy. We were 
amused when their father came 
along, for he said to us *'I paid 
$1,000 for. those ponies and 
all the girls think of is to 
see everything else and go off 
with their boy friends" How- 
ever, I saw the girls exercising 
the ponies in the ring afterwards 
so they must have been of some 
use. 

We were intrigued by the 
string of wooden balls round 
some of the riding horses* feet — 
the ponies too—and we asked an 
attendant "why?" Said he, "I've 
asked everyone and no one 
knows," So they are still a mys- 
tery as far as we are concerned. 

We walked along with half the 
Ex visitors through Elsie the 
Cow's reception room. She was- 
n't using her telephone but was 
eating lunch, so we had no con- 
versation with her as she was ex- 
tremely busy. One mother told 
me that all her children wanted 
to see was Elsie and indeed they 
seemed quite satisfied. 

An awful disappointment 
awaited me when we went back 
to the pet show exhibit— cats had 
been taken home the night be- 
fore! Cats, apparently, are too 
temperamental to stand being 
looked at very long. 

Then we made our way to the 



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ing. 

When section II came we were 
all ears. The test piece, "Roman- 
tic Overtures by Erik Leidzen ' 
was rather out of the ordinary 
and unlike most overtures. Jt 
opened with a passage played 
almost pianissimo which is a test 
in itself especially if there is no 
flute or oboe section. Bill Greig 
did wonders with substitutions 
and if he had had those instru- 
ments there is no doubt that his 
band would have come first in- 
stead of second. 

We thought its fugue part- 
runs following runs, was away 
ahead of the Georgetown band. 
I'm afraid I use piano terms— 
and in the allegro there was a 
crispness and precision that was 
very fine. The adjudicator said 
that it was hard on bands that 
lacked woodwinds and it was 
quite wonderful how the band- 
masters tailored their parts to 
suit their material. He also said 
that cymbals, drums and tri- 
angles should be given far more 
attention and we understood bet- 
ter what he meant when we lis- 
tened to and watched the United 
States Air Force Band in the ev- 
ening. 

About six o'clock, a slight feel- 
ing of emptiness prevailing, we 
went to Stoodleigh's for dinner 
and at our table was a young 
man from Lithuania. He told its 
that as a school boy with 60 other 
women and children, he 




■■ 






Martin Patterns 






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N ' O 3 M A T I O N SERVICE 



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MONTREAL — What fun it must have been at 
P^M** ^t?^ 3 Pflfty in "Alice in -Wonder- 



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9212 24'-30 



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WEEK'S BUUGKT-STVLB 

HAVE n skirt in the luxurious 
wool of your choice! Tins fash- 



LOOK your best: 

SMARTEST dress you ever sew- 
ed! Really clover flattery, the 

way those cuffs stand out and the . " ~: <£ — , '?"?"■*• " ,ia »*"»"■ 

bodice hugs your waistline. Skirt *on-paefe©cl. rnbrtc-saving design 

is a beatuy, with a big pnnel and takes ONE YARD of at M fabric for 

soft pleats. Make it for a casual any °\ ", s s ^- cs - fcnsy-sew too, tl>e 

in a rayon flannel with saddle- 2S?** 1,e « ,nnor couW makc il - 

stitching, for dates in faille! £f? fEE ! " ain P»rts to cut nnd sew. 

Pattern 9230 comes In sizes 12, ^ iakt > "Pf^tern 1)212 right now to 

H 16, 18. 20; 40. Size 16 takes tcam , w . l,h fo " jg 3 ^* Come& m 

4 1-8 yds. 30" fabric. xvaisl s,zes H ^ 2R . 23. 30". 

This easy-to-use pattern gives Tills easy-to-use pattern gives 

pocket fit. Complete, illustrated perlc-cl fit. Complete, illustrate? 

Sew Chart shows you every step. S-.w Chart shows you everv step 

Send TIIIRTY-FIVB CENTS Send THIRTY-FIVE CENTS 

(SSc) in coins (stamps cannot be (35c) in coins (stamps cannot be 

accepted) for this patern. Print accepted* for (his natern. Print 

plainly SIZE, NAME, ADDRKSS, plainly SIZE. NAME. AOURKSS. 

STYLE NUMBER. STYLE N17MRER. 

Send your order to MARIAN Send your order en MARIAX 

MARTIN, care of The Newmarket MARTIN, care of The Newmarket 

Era and Express, Pattern Dept., Era and Express, Pattern Dent., 

Newmarket. Newmarket, 



m*M I Ian.l"I* With the March Hare and the sleepy Dor- 
H/Jtak. fi mouse . . . and an UN birthday Cake! Well . . , 
for yeui- enjoyment, here ia Swans Down's {]$. 
birthday Cake. This UNbirthcfov Cake a delicioa- 
ly ; moist, wonderfully tender— aa arc all e-.:kc3 made 
with Swaiw Down Cake Flour! Trv SWANS 

——— DOWN UNltlHTHDAY CAKK: Ikik^ DcviS 

lood Cake 03 llirectul on back of Swans Down Cake T\v\n nackacc, 
but use 2 deep layer pans— one 10-inch, one 8-inch, lined on bottom; 
with paper, then greased. Cover larger cake with vanilLi-ilavoured 
imttcr-lyne frosting . . . place smaller cake on top . . . cover with buttci 
frosting. Melt 2 squares ltaker's Unsweetened Chocolate and 2 tea. 
spoons butter over hot water and blend. Tour slishtlv cooled chocolate 
mixture over the set fronting on cake layer?, letting it run down sides 
Keep cake in cool place until chocolate is firm. 
*2kc Walt Disney's all cartoon wonder film "Alice in ]Yondcrhr.d" 
at your theatre. 

/ Feel Like Saying "Thanks A Million" to the Blue-Jay folks for giv- 
ing us wonderful I'hcnyliuui. It's the greatest scientific „* W 
discovery in years for people who suffer from corns and " 

calluses . . . anil Bhic-Jav have put it in their new 
BLUE-JAY Corn and Callus Piasters to give us all 
"happy" tcct. It took 10 years of scientific research for 
Blue-Jay to develop this wonder-working medication. 
Xow actual scientific tests prove that it ends Qfrfy of oil 
corns and calluses in record time . . . quicker than any 
other treatment/ Ask your druggist today for Blue-Jay 
Corn Plasters with PhcriyUum! 

"Decrepit" is the word you may 

apply to that 
ageing refriger- 
ator or range 
of yours. But 
to _ your Frig- 
id aire dealer 
they're good, 
saleable appliances, lie ran recon- 
dition and refinbh them so they'll 
give a lot of -service to some other 
customer of his. That's why he's 
ready to take them off your hands 
and give you such a handsome 
trade-in allowance on a new 
FRIGID AIRE REFRIGER- 
ATOR or FRIGIDAIRE ELEC- 
TRIC RANGE. That trade-in 
allowance will go a long way on 
the down payment. And budget 
terms will take care of the bal- 
ance. Yes, it's easy to get that 
wonderful "lift" a really modern 
kitchen will give you. Talk it over 
with your Frigidaire dealer soon. 



K — 



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The Smell 0/ Grapes, warm off 

the vino, is nn 

arotna that de- 
fies description. 
But I've discov- 
ered how to cap- 
ture it, in the 
best jellies and 
jams ever. You 
see, with CERTO 
Liquid Pectin I 
can do down 
grapes when fully ripe — at th* 

peak of their flavour perfection — 
and their fresh, delicious flavour 
is retained because a onc-minuta 
boil h all that's necessary with 
Certo. The same with all fruits. 
And with Certo, results are al- 
ways so turc, if you follow the 
easy instructions found in the 
booklet under the label of every 
Certo bottle. Besides saving up to 
2/3 the time of the former long 
boil method, with Certo vou get 
up to oGft more jam or jelly from 
the same amount of fruit. 









, - » . 



ftext Ttme Granny snuTs at those "new-fangled'' tea bags just tell her 

they re not really so new. They were patented in 

London at about the time she married Grandad! 

'I hen convince her of how pood tea, yes— tea in tea* 

l>.*ys--can he. Give her a cup of "delicious RED 

HOSE TEA! Or you ran buy delicious Red Rose 

Tea by the pound if you wish. It's good no matter 

how- you buy it? And it's pood no matter when vou 

* L 1 I Fi 1 t. & * 






* 



men, 

was shut up in a car and with- Whcoland. Newmarket, were 



WHEKLANI) — KREGER 

At St. Andrew's United 
church. Port Dalhousio, on Aug- 
ust 20 at 7 p.m. amid a setting of 
gladioli, Winifred Mary, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. End] Krcger, 
and Mr. Graeme Taylor Whecl- 
and. son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. 



A pure, coarse salt made especially for pickling 
purposes. Assures a clear brine and crisp, 

natural-colour pickles. Try id 

THE FIRST PACKAGED 
PICKLING SALT IN CANADA 

A product of 

The Canadian Salt Company Limited 



^ r mmm M *r*«4 UUU V* till- 

oiYt food for ten days, but he es- 
caped and came hero and thinks 
Canada a wonderful place. He has 
a job with the railroad and is 
content. His mother is in West 
Germany. 

Wo were on the grandstand in 
the afternoon, but the horses 
were the only thing I really en- 
joyed. Surely the C.N.E. could 
Una something better than hell 




- 



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drivers and I always fed sorry 
for the monkeys. . 

At night, we, with thousands 
of others listened to the Bell 
singers and then to the U.S.A F. 
Band. Many had to stand but 
a silent, appreciative and delight - 
od audience- and no wonder with 
so much to delight them. One 
cannot speak of everything but 
among the many beautiful things 
was a solo "Ave Alaria" sung by 
one of the gh-l s with a v<!ry wo „* 

Reli U Lm tal . ^ co ™l> a «i'ne»«. Dr. 
Boll will add new laurels to his 

*™ d y * »' e « «nf by ,he use o 
Uiese fine solo voices 

on. ij,„ f Jr? t J>art of Us 
ftntm was orchestral and anything 
hke the perfect .co-ordination ' *t 
every part-the precision wn* al- 
most unbelievable. When I could 
tear my ey*s~what an cxpres- 

ST7n3hi Sft* ,n « ovtry *« 

WW In the violin section moving 
m perfect unison, I'd look at the 
cellos or the bass viols and there 
too ^ every bow moved as if , na(? . 
netted by the conductor's baton 
1 ' never ' 



united in marriage. Hcv. T. Car- 
michael officiated at the double 
ring ceremony. The guest org- 
anist was Mr. E. Henry who will 
take over in place of the bride 
who has been organist for two 
years. Mr. W. A. Gibson, bari- 
tone, sang three solos. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride wore a tradition- 
al white satin gown with fitted 




Sanitary Contractor 



Septic Tanks Pumped 

Drains Cleaned and Repaired 

24-Hour Service 




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C. STUNDEN 

■-Richmond Hill Phone 320W 



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I ve never heard the Poet and 
J easmii overture played as they 
Played ,t Ti,ey had a magnify 
cent sohnst-one of the Seven 
mmmu Sargeants. rt m \ what lm 
JJggiegalion of singers they are. 
ihe second part of the program 
was by the symphonic band por- 
ion~-i.o violins-but cornets and 
tromlx>nos in their place. 

H v/as fine too ami they did 
one piece that was awfully funny 
—and a masterpiece in ifc way— 
A Wedding. Kverylhlng from 
starting tl, e old Ford in the mor- 
ning through the ceremony to the 
return via a train which nearly 
fell into a river— we heard the 
>iHlgc go down. The pan f 
tiio minister was taken by the 
oboe the bride by the clarinet 
imtl the groom by the trombone 
You could follow it perfectly af- 
ter Lome Green's introduction. 
We heard some fine singing for 
besides the band soloist and the 
hinging Sargeants, Dr. Hell had 
a fine soloist and also n solo 
pianist. Altogether, for two 
hours and a quarter we had a 
time of exquisite pleasure and 
not the least of it was enjoyhm 
the beauty of the band shell with 
ita fairylike lighting ami this 
litfhtmg effect on the brass horns. 
It made of them huge jewelled 
flowers! We had only one fault 
to find with the day— like all 
days at the Ex it was far, far 
too short! 



bodice featuring Peter Pan collar 
of lace and seed pearls, the full 
skirt had a short train. Her fin- 
gertip veil was held by a halo set 
with pearls. She carried a white 
Bible with cascade of red rose- 
buds and a beautifully embroid- 
ered heirloom handkerchief 125 
years old. 

The bride was attended by 
Miss Joan Slade, maid of honor, 
and bridesmaids, Misses Beatrice 
Hooper. Patricia Crumb nnd 
Marie Kroger, sister of the bride. 
All wore strapless gowns of or- 
ganza over I a f f e t a in pastel 
shades with bouffant skirts, lace 

capes awl halo headdresses. 
They carried matching bouquets 
of gladioli and ail wore matching 
pearls and earrings, the gift of 
the bride. - 

Mr. Douglas French was 
groomsman and ushers were, Mr. 
Alfred Kroger, brother of the 
bride, Mr. Robert Shields, and Mr. 
Kenneth Whceland. brother of 
the groom. An interesting feat- 
ure was the attendance in two 
groups of the bride's Sunday 
school girls and C.C3.I.T. The 
latter group served the guests at 
supper which followed in the 
church hall. 

The bride's mother received in 
navy sheer with small pink 
feather hat and corsage of roses. 
assisted by the groom's mother 
in green sheer, picture hat and 
corsage of roses. For the trip to 
Niagara and New York state the 
bride chose an aqua suit with 
pink ac< essories. The couple 
will live in Ottawa where the 
groom is stationed at Military 

Headquarters. 

During the reception a mes- 
sage of congratulations and good 
wishes was received from the 
groom's brother, Hubert Wheel- 
ami, at Fort Chun-hilt. * Guests 
were present from UngersvUIe, 
SI. Catharines, Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London, HranUord, and 

Newmarket. 




How"Skinny'.'Girfs 
Get Lovely Curves 

Cain 5 t o 10 lbs. New Pep 

frayou up. too. lofrurw ^,u* iiKiVnii 

r^!ii%T^^iL t , *f ?$ y ' lty **"« *«S 



?erve it! Ami. btenuse its good to.» — it actu^Hv 

ujvis you more cups per pound — it.s flavour -o'os a lonjr. lone wav. 

Know wh:it7— :i cup of Hul Hoso To.x costs his th;r t a ard — mclmt- 

in- tho crciiat awl sugar I When ym'to onlering Ret! Ha-c Tea — a^k 
for Itotl Rose CoiTeo, too. It*^ evety hit a.* good as Kcil Itose Tea. 

It's Just Like A Party . . . suvh a special treat . . . when you serve the 
£-:?v fatuity piping hot, homemade biscuits for dinnorl 
0.*?/ 1. And how nreud vou feel wfarti they'te feat her Hunt 
and melting and delieious— *i5 all vour tukir.j* i.< s\re 
to he. whiMi you 11*0 CALUMET BAKING i\)\V- 
pfflt! \\>, Calumet means ftifh wast. s«ece«s in 

baking eaVc.v muillns or iea-bi<einis. The doulde 
action of Calumet, tiiyt in the rai\;ti£ l-ow| and then 

in the oven, a->n:is you licht. evenly tcViurext i»U- 
cutts . . . tender nnd IhiiTy cakes "n" muitins. The two sip rale action^ 
that neither slirritii: nor intetrupuon> can disturb, are tho best iiuaraa- 
Ue I know for wonderful baking results! 

"SnttiHtertimc . . • Ami The tiring im*i Easy!'* Tardon me if I make 
free with the Ueishwin somr. hut with ntievs ^ettim: {^bmpv-^ 
«» hiph and inijihty. thinu* 5 just onn't e;isj- any mote ™rW i /% l 
— even in summertime. Kiidit about now is when I 
really appreciate the advanmurs of Pergonal Phn- ., 
nf«'/— the UAKK OF MONTUi:Al. way ei titdkitu g 
tOilay s dollar j;o almost as far as the phl-fastuoned 
kind. 'Way back in .lamia w when my budget was 



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>win-' siims of gotUK in i a tail-soin. 1 he^an 

Pemmnl Pitwninti. Sow I'm Ivucr off fiimactatCv than I've been for 

; Te:il3 — even if my iiuome diiin'l shoot up with the eosUof-Iivim; index. 

There's money in my hank aecouni . . . and I'm adding to it tc^uhriy. 

Why not try Personal Planning yoursettV Vou'll he d'iisJited with tho 

results once you r«I down t»*» it. Just a>k for vour free eoov of tho 

booklet "PERSONAL PLANNING" at your ncidd-.auhood'K of M 
branch. 



USE ERA AND EXPRESS CLASSIFIEDS TO TURN 
ARTICLES YOU NO LONGER NEED INTO CASH 



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will usually weigh between eight 
and nU\fi pounds after cremation. 

<Jiab 4 *tthen faced with a diffi- 
cult pr|j$em 4 will bito their 



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HiUDK-To-itK m:ti:d 

Mbs Kliznheth Hnnninor, n 
brie to-to-bLS has hetui entertained 
in London several times re- 
rttoy, Mrs. I). M. Stevenson 
tnterlnincMl at n handkerchief 
ihower ami tea, Mrs. M McKtti- 
lion at n luncheon, nnd Mis. A. 

K. Lawrence, mother of the 
groom, at a tea. Misa Hraimncr 
and Mr. Rdward I*nwrence will 
he ma tried in Trinity United 
church, Newmarket, ou Scptem- 
ter 22. 




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fin-Resistant Mineral Surf ate 



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3 Colours -RED, GREEN and BLACK 



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Roofing 
Barrett Dealer has a corn- 
line of roofing, insulation 
wcathcrproofing materials. 




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Montreal's 4B0-acre park on 
Mnnni noyal Is tho largest nat- 
ural park within a city limit In 



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THE BARRETT COMPANY, LIMITED 

Halifax • Saint John ♦ Montreal • Toronto * Winnipeg • Vancouver 




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PINE ORCHARD 

Congratulations to Pte. and 
Mrs. Albert (Bert) Pyle who 
were married recently at Cal- 
gary. Pte. Pyle is a son of Mt. 
and Mrs. John Pyle, Cedar Val- 
ley. 

Congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs. Arnold Johnson of Cedar 
Valley on the birth of a daugh- 
ter. 

Mrs. W. Reid and Miss Helen 
Reid were recent guests of Mr. 

and Mrs. E. Courtney and fam- 
ily at Kincardine. Mrs. Courtney 
was the former Miss Pearl Wat- 
son, at one time teacher at Pine 
Orchard school. 

Rev. and Mrs. P. L. Graham of 
Armada, Mich., were recent 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ar- 
mitage. 

Mrs. Fred Reid and Betty Lou 
had dinner on Tuesday with Mrs. 
W. Reid. 

Miss Emily Francis has gone 
to Toronto for winter months. 

Rev. Doggett of Newmarket 
delivered a splendid sermon on 
"The unsearchable richness of 
Christ" at Union church on Sun- 
day, Sept. 2. The congregation 
was pleased to welcome Rev. 
Doggett. 

Service on Sunday, Sept. 9, at 
11 o'clock and Sunday school at 
10 ajm. A hearty welcome to all. 

School Fair at Pine Orchard 
school on Friday afternoon, Sep. 
7, a 1.30 p.m. Everyone wel- 
come. 



;.. 



What They Are Saying 

In Aurora 



(Continued from Page 11) 



EXPRESS CLASSIFIEDS 




^y, *sj$r?F¥pci+m 







WOMEN! 



Harvest Help! 



Ontario fruit growers arc expecting a big crop and extra [ 
j|?fa heeded to harvest it. Here is your opportunity to 
£isik to eight weeks healthy, well paid work on one of 
Ontario's finest fruit farms. 



i 



SNOWBALL 



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'■• - M*. 



Help Is needed to pick peaches, plums, apples and grapes. 

Comfortable accommodation Is provided in beautifully 
situated summer camps. All you have to supply is your 
own bedding. Transportation is provided. Each camp is 
[i^Kler expert supervision and all meals are prepared under 
the direction of a fully qualified dietitian. 

Apply Now ... Help Is Needed Immediately ! 



* 



**- 



4> 



Ontario Farm Labour Service 
9 Richmond St East, 

Toronto KMpire 3-91G1 

. . 

Please send me more information on this joli op- 
portunity: 



Name ... 

Address * 

.Telephone 



******** 



* * * 



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Weekend guests at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Teas- 
dale were their son, Norman Jr., 
and his fiancee, Betty Chappell, 
of Welland. 

Miss Marion Stephenson of 
Aurora spent the weekend with 
Miss Barbara Gould. 

Mrs. Frank Hollingshead spent 
Sunday with her sister-in-law, 
Mrs. N. O'Malley, Toronto. 

Snowball W.A. and W.M.S. 
will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 
12, at the home of Mrs. Tom Pell, 
7 Green Acres, Toronto! 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Evans, 
Toronto, spent the weekend at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Win, 
Davidson and Sheila. 

Mrs. Frank Hollingshead at- 
tended the 90th birthday of Mrs. 
S. Geer. The party was held at 
the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Herb- Webster. Kettleby. 

Mrs. Cliff Cunningham and 
daughter Sherrie of Brantford 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lome Graham last week. 

Mrs. Emma Farren and Mrs. 
Wm. Gould spent Monday visit- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. Albert Kerr, 
Mr. and Mrs. Art Kerr and Pet- 
er. 

Tuesday, Sept. 4, Snowball 
public school opened and the 
children welcomed their new 
teacher, Mrs. Allan Connor. 



nearly 200 miles of water travel. 
On this tour Mr. Hudson visited 
his home-towns of Pouch Cove 
and Cape St. Francis. Not far 
distant is* St. John's Signal Hill, 
where Marconi's first wireless 
message was received. 

John told. us of many changes 
he had seen for the better since 
his last visit to Newfoundland. 
Incidentally, this was his second 
visit in the long period of 44 
years. * "The people art? better- 
dressed and are enjoying greater 
prosperity," he said. There was 
one change he found, however, 
that was not for the better. "Old 
school mates are beginning to 
look like old men," he reflected. 

Visits were paid to about a 
score of Newfoundland outposts. 
One out-standing memory was 
the sight of literally acres of ripe 
blueberries, all of which are 
under government regulation. On 
fishing expeditions some excell- 
ent speckled trout was caught, 
among other varieties. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hudson had a real 

vacation. No flat tires or 
troubles of any kind. Just a 
shoal of happy memories to look 
back on. 

American Tour 

In Aurora News Page issue of 
July 12 we repored the departure 
of Mr. and Mrs. Garstang and 
family by car and trailer for a 
tour in the United States. The 
actual date of their departure 
was July 3, and they arrived 
home on August 28, via Montreal 
and Ottawa, having covered a 
total of 3010 miles. The travel- 
lers describe their tour as a 
wholly delightful one. 

Mr. Garstang kept a careful 
log-book of each day's journey 
and only the limitations of space 
forbid our reproducing it here. It 
is interesting to note daily distan- 
ces covered- For example, on 
their first day out they did 123 
miles, which took them near to 
Trenton. On three successive 
days they covered a total mile- 
age of 355. 

These journeys were made on 
August IC, 17 and 18, from Con- 
cord, N.H., to White River Junc- 
tion, through Vermont to Essex, 



Cod, Boston, Biddeford Pool, 
Maine, where the Garstangs visit- 
ed the Aurora Rowatts, who had 
a cottage near Biddeford Pool. 
Highlights 

A highlight of their stay at 
Cape Cod was their meeting with 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Cornish (the 
latter a sister of Mrs. B. Willis) 
who were on a vacation at Yar- 
mouth. These "home" touches 
added greatly to the enjoyment of 
their itinerary. 

The travellers often went by 
car, minus the trailer, to points 
of historic interest. Among these 
were Salem, where they saw the 
"House of Seven Gables," made 
famous by Hawthorne, and, of 
course. Boston. 

They were fortunate in having 
generally wonderful weather. Mr. 
and Mrs. Garstang are full of 
praise of American friendliness. 
Although tired after their long 
journey, they are giad to have 
had what they dcscrible as a 
"wonderful experience". There 
Persian cat, which they took 

with them, returned fit and well. 



RAVENSHOE 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Walker and 
Mrs. J. Money, Toronto, are vis- 
iting Mr. and Mrs. 1. Rose. 

Miss Beth King returned to 
Toronto on Monday to resume 
her work. 

Mrs. Jack Bosworth was on 
hand Tuesday morning with her 
cheerful smile to greet the chil- 
dren as they eagerly returned to 
school. 

The United church anniversary 
will be September 30. Special 
speakers and music will be held. 
Full particulars later. Please 
keep this date in mind. 



The Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Sept 6th, 1951 Page 13 






BLUE IS THE HUE! 

Come in and see Morrison's Ex- 
hibition Blue suits— the popular 
color for this fall. .63 Main St., 
Nevvmarket, phone 158. (Advt.) 



■ 



■ * 



i 



JOSEPH QUINN 

Real Estate - General Insurance 



Homes 

Businesses 

Farms 



Covrtest 



61 queen st. e. 
newmarket 

Phone 1038 



Fire 

Anto 

Casualty 



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Service 



CLASSIFIEDS GET RESULTS 



ARMITAGE 

Miss Margaret Cook accomp- 
anied Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Reid 
and family to their cottage at 
Lake Simcoe for the weekend. 

Mr. Ron Doner spent last week 
up in the Gravenhurst district. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Staley and 
Mrs. Ross McKinley, Brantford, 
were weekend guests at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Doug Nigh. 

Mr. Ed. Waltho, Toronto, and 
Mr. John Wallbutton spent the 
weekend with Mr. and Mrs. M. 
Cook. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Paul moved 
into Newmarket l3St Saturday. 

Mr. Doug Nigh was the 
groomsman and Mrs. Doug Nigh, 
a bridesmaid, at the wedding of 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nigh on 
Saturday, Sept. 1, at the Ring- 
wood Christian Church. Mr. and 
Mrs. Morlcy Cook also attended 
the wedding. 

Mr. Edgar Dennis was the 
victim of a very unfortunate 




i i 



*.- 



* 






accident last Thursday when the 
V.T., Lake Champlain, thence to I wagon he was riding on upset on 
Lachine, Montreal. Famous; top of him, fracturing his leg. He 



names appear in the log-book: 
Thousand Island Bridge, Scotia, 
New Lebanon, Yarmouth, Cape 



is in York County hospital and 
his many friends and neighbors 
wish him a speedy recovery. 



TO THE CANADIAN NATIONAL EXHIBITION 

AUGUST 25 TO SEPTEMBER 8 (Except Sunday) 
Reduced Fare $2.15 Round Trip 

for children's fares see your agent 

Includes Exhibition admission ami bus transfer direct into and from the grounds 

- 

LEAVE NEWMARKET LEAVE TORONTO 

10.10 A.M. (DAYLIGHT TIME) 11.15 P.M. 

Exhibition passengers travelling on regular buses will transfer at Toronto Bus 

Terminal to buses running into the grounds. 

TICKETS AND INFORMATION AT 

King George Hotel ■ Phone 300 



»" 



'* 



* * - * ■ • 



■ * * 

(Auspices Federal-Provincial Farm Labor Committee) 



i 




MOUNT ZION 

Glad to report a good attend- 
ance at the Sunday school picnic. 
Everyone had a most enjoyable 
afternoon at ball games and 
races and then after the supper, 
a time was spent in singing. 

Mrs. Jack Cooper and son Har- 
ry spent the long weekend at 
Kitchener visiting relatives. 

Mr. Priddle has started to dec- 
orate the church. Willing hands 
are needed. 

There will be no service in 
Mount Zion church this Sunday. 
The Sunday school will be held 
in school on Sunday. 

Sharon Sweet has returned 
home after spending her holidays 
with her grandmother, Mr.s. Mc- 
Neil, at Ionising. 

Tha W.M.S. will held their 
next meeting at Mrs. Walter 
Curl's home on Wednesday even- 
ing, Sept. 12. Bach member is 
to answer the roll call v/ilh the 
name of a missionary, telling 
.something about them. Every- 
one welcome. 




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on the healing jih facet— not 
in the ashpit* iiurncr reaclicf 
top clfieiency in a few secomls 

TV-saves ■'%% inucji as u third or 
ntore^n^ybiir oil bills. Yes, 
an Iron Fireman Vortex gives 
you wcvf/.'usablc heat*'., .saves 

-you money year after year. It's 
clean, quiet, compact and com- 
Ictcly automatic. 

Convxnion burncn for your present 
furnace, or boiler; or complete oil* 
fireiJfurnaco or boiler-burner units 
-~ available on easy budget term?. 
IZB 

Today! 



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ZEPHYR 

The Suerainent of the Lord's 
Supper was observed in the Uni- 
ted ehurch on Sunday evening. 

Kev. Mr. Thurnlovv conducted 
the s e r v i e e. Quite a goodly 
number v/erc present at the ser- 
vice. 

Miss Hetty Meyers wns taken 
to the Western hospital last 
Thursday for treatment and ob- 
servation. We hope she may 
soon be well and able to return 
home again. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sid Bradley, and 
daughter, of Toronto, and Mr. 
and Mrs. G. Crosby of Uxbridgc 
were visitors on Sunday with 
Mrs. CronslMHTY. 
• The August meeting of the W. 
A. of the United eluireh was held 
on Thursday evening at the 
home of Mrs. h. Case. A goodly 
number were present. Kev. Mr. 
Thorn low showed some interest- 
ing slides on Newfoundland. 

Mr. Jacob Meyers suffered 
slight injuries when struck by an 
automobile on Thursday evening 
of last week. 

Zephyr public school reopened 
ori Tuesday. Mr. Donald Hew- 
lett is the new principal and Miss 
NesbUt of Nevvmarket the new 
assistant. 

Miss Marion I«otkje, D.C., 
spent the weekend in Tdronto. 

Mr, and Mrs. Robt. Ward. Mr 
Stewart Graham and boy friend* 
alt of Toronto, spent the week- 
end at Mr. and Mrs. Dewey 
Graham's home. 

The W.M.S. of the United 
church will hold their Septem- 
ber meeting on the evening of 
Wednesday, Sept. 12, ot 8 o'clock 
at the home of Mrs. Dewey Gra- 
ham. Mm, Thornlow wilt be 
guest speaker. Come and enjoy 
a pleasant and profitable even- 



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fn the low-pdco Meld PowerGlide was Iho finf automatic 

IransmUslon . ♦ . and PowerGHde Is the fmcil . , . giving you 

smooth, dependable no-shifi driving at lowest cosll 

Take die wlicrlof a ncwClicvroltft tvilli tiinc-|irov«.*d Powcr(»lkle 
mid you'll say, thi% m /*/ Par lNiwcr(#lido £• utl yo»\o wauled 
in nu aulotiiatic IriitHnujsion ... bringing you finest no-Jiif l 

driving nt lowest t cost! 

Here's romn/eJu Jnvttnm (torn dutch |»cdul ami gcmvhiftliig! 
Herc'e ix'/rel irAirtly, a fiuoolh. iialiroktu linn* of j«nvcr» nt all 

engine njieeiLt! Here** c\tra<-itsy "rml out*' of mud or samll 
And, lH»t of all, here** truly tfcpmdaltc no-dilfl rfriving, wich 
tin; only auloiiiatie iraniiiii^inii in the luw-|tricc field that lias 
hmxfulfy proivd in more than a billion outier-i/riiv/i miles! 

Come in and Id tM turnover lliekcy to you for a demonstration. 
Put a i'owertrlido Chevrolet through iltt |>acra ami discover 
low.co»t motoring ut its AtiuHith ami easy brat ■ . • 
in Canada** lurf.es* and finest low-priced curl 



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AutomaHe Transmission* 

Kir »t « 4 • fmejt * . . and only fully 
proved automatic trmiioujAion 
la the low-price field. No clutch 
pcdal—no gearshiftlog— not 
even * blot of ge«r clmnfte tn 
(oorsrd diIWnjr.1 



EMtro-Powetfot 105-h.p. 

Valve-lrvHectd Engine 

PoHctCUde U i\Hii>te«l with the moti 
poKtrful co$tno In tho fc>w-|rke fi<M 
—Chevrolet's 103 h.p,V«lT«-to-l!Md 
Engtoe. It marks the highest develop- 
meat In Chtvrutet'e 39 yesre of eon* 
ceatratioa on Yalf«-ia-llc«d design. 



EconoMUtr 
Rear Axle 

Still toother feature of this aatomatfo 
powe* team U ChaTtofct's Eeooo* 
Miser Rear A*!*> Rear woeeU twal 
farther st eeeh engine revomtba .»« 
Fewer engine rerolulkioa and Ism g« 
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Tftigg 14 the Hewn uJfcrt gr* and Kxyrtm, Thursday, &ept» fit*b 195i 

King City And District 

COR*., BIK8. L. B. BOLMNG, PHONK KING t 



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Guests of Mr. and Mrs. Colin 
Stewart have been Mr. and Mrs. 
Eobt. Loffree and son, Glen, Fort 
William. Mr. Loffree is head of 
the commercial department of 
the vocational school In that city. 
Mrs. Loffree was formerly in the 
teaching profession with Mrs. 
Stewart. Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Wideman and children, Elizabeth 
and John, Markham, were others 
on the list of recent guests at 
the Stewart home after Mrs. 
Stewart bad returned from a vis- 
it to her father's home in Strat- 
ford. 

Bride Elect Feted 

Miss June Brown, a popular 
bride to be of this month, has 
been honored with four pre- 
nuptial showers and a presenta- 
tion from the manufacturing firm 
with which she is employed. A 
community shower was given at 
King United church; a miscellan- 
eous shower given by Mrs. Les- 
ter Brown, a sister-in-Jaw, held 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. 
Brown, June's parents, and when 
family relatives were guests; an 
evening at the home of Mrs. W. 
Walker at Weston when June's 
fellow employees were shower 
guests. The family and relatives 



reception was held in Nobleton 
community hall. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ixjck- 
ridge, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Stor- 
ey, Napanee, were guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. I. L. Scott from Friday 
until Sunday and all attended the 
Exhibition on Saturday. 

Billy and Donnie Scott, young 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Lome 
Scott, returned from St. Cathar- 
ines early this week to find a 
baby sister in the home, born on 
Friday, Aug. 24, at York County 
hospital, Newmarket. The little 
lady, whose name is Anne Jose- 
phine, weighed eight pounds, 
eight ounces at birth. 

The Hately family was rejoined 
this week when George Jr., re- 
turned from Edmonton where he 
found employment for vacation 
weeks, Joyce returned from Port 
Severn after enjoying summer 
work in the Severn House and 
Carol returned from Beverley 
Farm, Aurora, where she was a 
guest for two weeks. Carol, who 
enrolled at Aurora high school 
this week, rode Billy Sunday, a 
hunter owned by R. B. Russell, 
Toronto. Her brother, George, Is 
returning to high school to com- 
plete two subjects of the senior 



of the prospective groom. Jack mau -iculation course. 



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Young, Downsview, gathered at 
the home of his aunt, Miss Olive 
Young, Toronto, for presentations 
from 20 guests. A tri-Hght lamp 
was presented to June by the 
executive of the Canadian Acme 
Screw and Gear Company in 
whose office she is employed. 

Food Forum Sponsored By WX 
"Whether your food is friend, 
fad or fallacy", a short course 
food forum especially designed 

to interest men as well as women 
of the community, will be held 
September 24 at 8 p.m. sharp in 
the basement of King United 
church. It is open to everyone. 
The home economist of the Wo- 
men's Institute branch and home 
economy service of the depart- 
ment of agriculture will conduct 
the forum, showing a film and 
leading in discussions. 

first Church Wedding 

A service of unusual interest 
v/as held in St. Paul's Presbyter- 
ian church, ninth line, on Sat- 
urday, Sept. 1, when the first 
wedding ceremony in the 102- 
year-old church was performed by 
Rev. W. W. Weir, Brampton, for 
Miss Lundy June Johnston, 
daughter of Mrs. Gladys Brough- 
ton, Bond Head, to Gordon Mur- 
ray, Toronto. Mr. David Wother- 
spoon assisted in the ceremony. 
In recognition of the first mar- 
riage in the church, the bride 
was presented with a Bible by the 
elders of the congregation. The 



Rev. Harry Bartlett, his wife 
and children, Helen and Harry, 
Brechin, called on Mrs. Arthur 
Wcllesley last week enroule from 
Hamilton where they had been 
vacationing with their married 
daughter. Mr. Bartlett is pastor 
of the Brechin United church. 
Mrs. Bartlett is a sister of Mrs. 
Wcllesley. Tony Burger, Barrie, 
visited his grandmother, Mrs. 
Wcllesley, on Sunday and Mon- 
day and with the Burger family, 
had Sunday lunch with Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris McKinnon at Tor- 
onto. Mrs. McKinnon was the 
former Blanche Wcllesley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Green 
motored their daughter, Mrs. 
Kemp, her husband, Bob, and son, 
Robbie, back to Niagara Falls 
during the weekend. Mr. and 
Mrs. Green are 25 years married 
this week. Their friends, Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Zimmerman, Niagara 
Falls, also had their silver wed- 
ding anniversary this week. On 
Saturday, Sept. 3, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Hately will be 23 years 
married. 

Goes to England September 14 

Mrs. Geoffrey Whittle and her 
daughter, Catherine, leave New 
York harbor on Friday, Sept. 14. 
sailing on the Queen Elizabeth 
for their home in Crown Hill, 
Plymouth, Eng. They will have 
visited here for three months and 
the time has flown so rapidly, 
Mrs. Whittle can scarcely realize 



the time Is drawing near when 
partings must be made. She and 
her husband and daughter have 
lived In England for five years 
and while Mr. Whittle returned 
to his own people, for her, life 
there is a new and pleasant ex- 
perience. And while she would 
willingly live in Canada again 
were her husband so disinclined 
Mrs. Whittle finds the old coun- 
try mode of life good for one's 
well being. 

"Everything moves more slow- 
ly; there is little hurry and bus- 
tle in the daily routine," she said 
depicting the beauty and seren- 
ity of the countryside at Ply- 
mouth. Catherine; just turning 
14, is quite convinced she "could 
never live in Canada". She has 
made her girlhood friends in Eng- 
land, attends the secondary school 
there and is quite sure her teen- 
age group there enjoy life better 
than Canadian young people. 
Catherine is an art student 

among other interests. 

While at King, Mrs. Whittle 
made her headquarters at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Earle Scott, 
living on the farm where as Mary 
Mitchell, daughter of the late 

Robert Mitchell, a pioneer settler, 
she was born and raised. Her 
brother, John, lives nearby on the 
7th con. and a brother, Willie 
Mitchell, is at Kleinburg. She 
visited relatives at Weston, Tor- 
onto, Zephyr and other places. 
Entertains Dinner Guests 

Mrs. Aubrey Campbell was 

hostess to dinner guests on Sun- 
day, her sister, Isobel Hawkins, 
and husband, Chris, Toronto, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Folliott, 
Weston, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Fol- 
liott and grandchildren, Bruce, 
Ronald and Carolyn Parker. 
Bruce Parker is taking a week's 
holiday at Weston. He works at 
King City Cold Storage. 

Wins Red Cross Jr. Swimming 

Miss Julia Bell, 12 attained the 
Red Cross junior swimming cer- 
tificate in a test taken at the 
Thornhill pool on August 30. 
She was one of 18 in the contest 
and now has her certificate card 
gained her experience from her 
and button in recognition of the 
accomplishment. Julia has never 
taken swimming lessons, having 
gained her exeprience from her 
love of the water. "Wherever 
there is a pool she is in it," her 
mother said. The test taken .in 
10' 6" of water requires swim- 
ming the width of the pool on 
the back, twice on the stomach, 
treading water for two minutes. 
Her brother, Rodney, ten, and Jo 
Ann Wilson, ten, who have been 
in regular classes at Thornhill 
during the holidays, made a 
creditable showing in this contest 
but did not qualify for the stand- 
ing. Jo Ann, unfortunately, was 
seized with a cramp. 
Receive Graduation Button 

Rodney Bell and Richard Chap- 
lin won their graduation but- 
tons in one day at the Thornhill 
swimming pool conducted under 







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30th Anniversary Sale 



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As we did 30 years ago this year, we are giving away a plow with 
each of three new tractors sold— our special anniversary offer, 



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TRACTORS 



CULTIVATORS, HARROWS, PLOWS 



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W.D.9 
Farmall M 
Farmall II 
Farmall Super C 
Farmall C 
Farmall Super A 
Farmall Cub 









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HORSE SCUFFLE RS 

No. 200 Tractor manure 
Hpreaders, Fleury manure 
spreaders, horse hitch. 



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DRILLS 



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Farmall cub cultivators 

%W heavy spring-tooth cultivators 

•H* regular spring-tooth cultivators 

7' regular spilng-tooth cultivators 

10' regular spring-tooth cultivators 

Cub disc harrow 

V tractor disc harrow 

8* tractor disc harrow 

Spring-tooth harrow* 

10-plate harrow plow 

(Opiate harrow plow 

4- furrow U&4iU*r plow, rubber 

3-furrow tractor plow, rubber 

3-furrow tractor plow, steel 

2-furrow tractor plow, steel 

Farmall C plow 

Farmall A plow 

Farmall <;uh plow » 

€251 two-row cultivator 



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13 disc fertilizer drills, 2- 
- horse hlteh. 

IS d o u b 1 e disc fertilizer 
.: drills, tractor hitch, power 
lift. 
?' lithe spreaders 



MOWERS 



(*' fJr.crhitf mower, horse hitch 
Farmall © mower, V 
Farmall A mower, 7* 
3-bar side rake 
Farm wagon, rubber 
No. G liammermlll 



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t^"' ; :. -M is? '• 
v Shallow well pump* 



USED MACHINERY 



£eep well pump* 
U |am|t,i*ii»i» 
%.; -^Vtmat?- tanks.: 
P Manure earrim 
| Water bowls 
Klectrfc grinder 

/Wheelbarrows 



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WC tractor; Farmall If tractor 

Farmall Cub tractor with cultivator attachment 

Farmall Cub tractor with mower 

No. Z enslfajce harvester 

Z manure spreaders on steel, horse drawn 

Manure spreader on rubber, horse drawn 

W hay rake 

Farmall A buck rake 

8' lime spreaders ,. 

10' lime spreaders 



the auspices of the fted Cross for 
children this summer. 

They wear the minnow, sunfish 
and shark buttons. Others from 
King taking the course won 
theirs at separate times. The 
King children with many others 
in the county have had a splen- 
did summer under competent in- 
structors to anticipate next sum- 
mer's course. 

Mrs. Ralph Baker and daugh- 
ter, Jean, Stouffvilie, were guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. If. H. Bell on 

Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Ascott and 
Bobbie enjoyed a 1,500-mile mot- 
or trip to Detroit, through the 
state of Michigan along the shores 
of Lake Huron, crossing by ferry 
through the Mackinaw Straits, to 
Sault St. Marie, to Sudbury and 
North Bay. They had intended to 
camp but the weather proved too 
cold, so cabin accommodation 
was welcome. They found roads 
excellent and tourist park accom- 
modation in Michigan but find 
the "best scenery in Ontario". 
They were glad to see grain fields 
again after the extensive acreage 
of corn and soy bean in the 

U.S. 

Mr.- and Mrs. Ernest F. Wilson, 
Toronto, spent part of Monday 
at the home of Mrs. Wilson's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Keliey. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Muir and 
family, Douglas, Marjorie and 
Shirley, Brechin, were Sunday 
guests of Mr. Muir's sister, Mrs. 
Norman Ferguson. 
Wrestling- Club Needs Assistant 

King City Wrestling club will 
resume activities on Monday. 
Sept. 10, under coach Bob Mo 
Leod. Physical development and 
clean sportsmanship are featured 
in the training. More members 
are welcome as it makes for more 
fun for all, the coach points out. 
Mr. McLeod would like to have 
some assistance with the coach- 
ing. No technical knowledge is 
necessary, he states. Anyone who 
could lead or keep order would 
be a great help in this commun- 
ity work. No salary is attached 
to any position in the club but 
funds are necessary to keep the 
club in operation. Mr. M. H. 
Bell, the treasurer, announces a 
public drive for funds will be 
set up on October 1 for the pur- 
pose of fixing up the present 
gym. 
"And Now I See" Excellent Film 

A sound drama film, depicting 
the wider aspects of the church 
with an inspirational message and 
possessing educational value, will 
be shown by Mr. David Wother- 
spoon under the heading "And 
Now I See", at Eversley Pres- 
byterian church Sunday evening, 
Sept. 9, at 8 p.m. It will be 
the annual W.M.S. service to 
which all neighboring congrega- 
tions are invited as well as Aur- 
ora, Richmond Hill, Strange and 
Maple. The story of the picture 
has a real appeal and is known 
to many for its excellence. Ev- 
ersley Society will be in charge 
of the service with Mrs. Fred 
Curtis, the president, in the chair. 
Mrs. Gordon Orr, King, will be 
vocal soloist. 

On Sunday, Sept. 30, the sac- 
rament of the Lord's Supper will 

be conducted by Rev. W. W. Weir 
uf Brampton in the Presbyterian 
charge at the regular hours, 
Ninth Line, 11 a.m.; St. Andrew's 
Strange at 2.30 and Eversley at 
8 p.m. On Sunday, Oct. ?, ser- 
vices at St. Paul's and Eversley 
will alternate morning arid even- 
ing as by the former arrange- 
ment. Sunday-school at All 
Saints' Anglican church will be 
resumed on Sunday, Sept. 9, at 
2.30 in the afternoon. Everyone 
interested is urged to attend on 
the opening day. 

Mrs. Jefferson of Uuthsay, 
NMJ., and her daughter, Miss 
Elizabeth Jefferson, were recent 
visitors of Mis. David Lewis, 
who, will) liter husband, lives in 
the home of Mr. Walter Monk- 
man. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Bums, 
London, OriL, wore weekend vis- 
itors of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Grew. 
Mr. Burns i:; a nephew of Mis. 
Grew. 
Iter First Visit to Canada 

Miss Joan Sm-il, ii\ Bramble 
St., Coventry, Eng., has been a 
guest of Mrs .George Mutely at 
Eaton Hall Farm fur lime 
weeks. She returned home on 
August 20, sailing on the Fran- 
C'ortia, Her first visit to Canada, 
she saw plows of interest dur- 
ing her stay, N i u g a r a Fulls, 
Ouclph, Hamilton, Port Severn 
to see Joyce Hately. llefore 
mailing the visitor spent u few 
days in Quebec cily. She is a 
physical instructor in « high 
sdifuil in Loudon, mid will re- 
sume hot work on arrival in 
Kngtand, 
Afternoon Tea ill t\N.H. 

The afternoon ten given for 
press arid imlio women in tho 
tea room of Ihe Women's Huild- 
iug at the C.N.K. last Friday uf- 
tcrnoon provided relaxed mom- 
enta for busy women who earlier 
had attended the more formal 
luncheon. Mrs. Koy Mmston, ed- 
itor of the Minn* Kxpress was 
principal a p v a k « r. Receiving 
were Mrs. Hugh Tcmplin, wife 
of Ihe editor of the Fergus News 
Record, Mrs. T. E, Hoyce, Tor- 
onto, Mrs. J. J. K. McCague of 
Allhitim and Mrs. Shannon, wife 
of Controller J. h Shannon. Tor- 
onto. A report of the luncheon 
can Ik? read elsewhere, written 
by Mrs. Caroline Ion, Women's 
Kditor of Iho Km and Express, 
the official representative at the 
luncheon. 

A corn roast will he held in 
King Memorial Park under the 
auspices of the Lake Mario and 
King Athletic Assoc, on Friday 
evening. Sept. 7. A good time 
is promised by the association. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Cassia 
of Uxbridge called on Mrs. T. L. 




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ranceville Church 






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Successful services were held 
at Temperanceville United 
church Sunday to mark the re* 
opening after a period of exten- 
sive renovation. Large congre- 
gations attended. They heard 
impressive messages and music 
by the 16- voice ladies' choir. 
Mr. Sam Dickey of Vandorf, or- 
ganist and choir leader, rendered 
excellent music. 

The walls of the church are 
painted in soft aqua, the chancel 
in dusty rose, corresponding 
with color effects of the stain- 
ed glass windows. The natural 
color maple flooring and the 
pews gleam with new finish. 
The doors leading into the audi- 
torium arc freshly felt covered, 
the handiwork of two members 
of the congregation. Three-tone 
rose broadloom carpet covers the 
aisles, the altar and tiic choir 
loft. 

Indirect electric lighting in 
chrome finish gives fine effect. 
Other improvements have also 

been made at a total tost of 
$3,500. In 1897, 54 years ago, the 
building was erected at a cost of 
S2.400. At the morning service, 
Wilbcrt Jennings, chairman of 
the board of stewards, thanked 
all who had contributed financi- 
ally, in labor and in other capa- 
cities. He spoke on behalf of the 
minister, Rev. E. C. Moddle, who 
was conducting services at other 
points in the charge. The build- 
ing committee, headed by W. S. 



Miss Addic Thompson and 
Miss Flo Butt, Toronto, were re- 
cent visitors of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ross Stewart. 

Mrs. M. M. Downey, Edmon- 
ton, and her sister from Hamil- 
ton called on Mrs. M. J. Winter 
and Mrs. E. M. Legge. Their 
father, Mr. Carley, and his fam- 
ily had once lived in the Legge 
house before moving to Hamil- 
ton. 

Other visitors of Mrs. Legge 
have been her brother, Mr. Dave 
Paxton, his wife and daughter, 
Shirley of Woodstock; her cous- 
ins, Mrs. Ruby Whitcomb and 
Miss Agnes Ross of Grimsby. 
Kingcrafts Guild 

On Wednesday afternoon, 
Sept. 26, Kingcrafts Guild will 
resume activities with a general 
meeting at "Kingswold", the 
home of Lady Flavelle, the pre- 
sident. 



"-!.-■* 



Hare, included, Mr. J. Umchar.i, 
Mr. Win. Turner and Mr. Jen- 
nings. Mr. Uracy donated man- 
ual labor and a substantial mon- 
etary gift. 

Services Impressive 

The morning preacher v/as 
Rev. George W. Wood, Toronto, 
"The Prayer of Thanksgiving" 
was sung by the two-part choir 
and vocal solos were rendered 

by Mrs. KUiott McClure, singing 
My Cathedral, and Mrs. Harold 
Dickin of Weston, the daughter 
of Rev. Mr. Moddte, a gospel 

song. !' 

At the evening service, con- 
ducted by Mr. Moddle, Rev. A. 
C. Huston of Victoria Square "was 
guest preacher. "Sun of My 
Soul" by Edmund Turner was 
the anthem rendered by the 
choir, with the solo part taken 
by Miss Shirley Hare. Mrs. Fred 
Boys sang The Holy City.V : 

Woodstock Organ Loaned 

» 

A complimentary gesture' to 

the congregation of Temperance? 
villo vyas the loan of a new and 
modern organ by the Woodstock 
Organ Company. An English in- 
strument made by that company, 
it combines a two-manual key- 
board in one, and is rich in tone. 
The organ has been installed for 
the month of September during 
which time special services will 
be held. On Sunday, Sept. 23, 
Robertson Masonic Lodge will 
hold Divine Worship at the Tem- 
peranteville church. On Sun- 
day, Sept. 30 anniversary serv- 
ices will be observed. 

Among those present at Tem- 
peranceville services on Sunday, 
were Mr. and Mrs. Waiter Bovair 
of Aurora who had served this 
congregation must of their lives. 
Mr. Bovair, an honorary elder is 
92. Mrs. Bovair was the first 
president of the Woman's Auxil- 



remAin* raster of hi3 emotions. 
An -msit/ sri.iTt \i always a sorry' 
*p>f 1 v if. ffeiirir*?, he makes : M 
htttwjlt'-'iite fA'/f.? vulnerable to 
frlteje* -.. ■■'_.:-. ,\ ,;-■ . -.-:.:•- , r _: ; ; 
M.*. '-W/tri'V,*: is r« ipral speaker! 
itts ^i^*i : V?';M v<Mttbufaoi*-^f§ 
*tfi4 ':au st-itrf: hi* orjsumems with "^ 
Uitmte\n& -iiudttivf. ft ho* h«Je£lf 
talfl Xh:ti hft talk* to-> much. ' 
Mao/ tmri iklk a great deaV and 
*4/->'/ihifi£i;-; Whatever Mr. M 



FAMILY rVN NfOHT 

An evening of "Family Fun" 
is being planned by the Kiftsg 
Township Credit L'nion for Wetf- 
nosday, Sept. 12, at lb« "#fnro 4 m> 
ity r.UUrtnntl and t«e u-.n h}%h 
v/ay. ft is opt./i (/, a jj Cr^/bt 
Union rrjernbcfK "- and lh>ir fonv 
ilres, frhrfida and O.fcir ti"i%hf**i*. 

—that h, cvfryoiji* in the to//n» 
abip. 

The program which xtetU *l 
7 p.m. with nputU lur the young- 8*Jft*ffe l*y* thtrt h something 
stern, includes u; w*\nar t<&>A unit \ v ' *V 
corn boil, foiioy/ed by entertain- j Should Come. Back ;' 
merit. For those tsfti fully et ; * ! '*'*'* 5iv/ir,rfbj : retired : from .. 
quainter! ^iWjp^J-fnt^m^f4i^^^P^. 'ftftlyitiea.. ..to ; .devot^- 
the event; the'io/ft/fioriity ?iii \ ti . \ himxeif v> .what v/ai dear to .hfflfo' 
road runs y/«;st off th« f*\u <rift- • heart, namely, ink work of th&* 
cession roail, about midv/ay b£ t R^ir^tior* : banmxzsfon. -.■ He has> 
t.v/een King sfde/o^l ~m4 tfc« j ^«fl U&i tntitt priie ;' nourish ; aiMR? 
Aurora Kideroad. _!■-.. ■ .. «c^l . hu highest cxp'ictatioryfef 
— — i — ■■■ ■■ ■ ';/ '_ .- i ¥tr~in<\zt\ /ia a shoe-string, (and &f> 

T. F. SWINIILK j Wr<iwed shv; string at that), it^ 

*r** *e "i'rf -'**/'* 1 : - ! Wftr^fciKP extend : into thousands) 
(Continued from f^g ft jj, j^^^ri ita&Oy'. ,1931, fc^: 

rnission is becoming a subject of; been %i b<:st yea?/- :". .£?£ 

increasing discussion In AuronJ f^'Ple are s^ying^ that Tort>}.- 
the last of which, it may .■ truly, be] sfcfcild rfilum in .'the Mr#& wm??-] 
forecast, has not yet been heard.] ei!,- y/h*;r^ h« . 'ir*def>W»ding of'' 
He was also appoints! '$ mzR\S\ ^d^^ldt^f^^M^A %1J0£ 

ber of the recreation commission, \ energy" wsuld fcfe - of iHa' gre^te^^:* 

an organization of which he wm\ assiabnne.to '$&$${£ at \hh tam*-^ 
principal founder and which has j There, is n?/ office ir< 'th^ ■i*s*afisg'~, 
become recognized as one of the! council which he coiiH ' && 'vi^ 
most active and beneficial wel-J cessfully iilU R«"wViwW '&&&&*-&, 



fare movements in Aurora; To 

this organization Mr. Swindle has 
given unstinted service, both by 
head and hand; Large numbers 
of Aurora children have been public interest. n<i*. is't^i is^r^st;. : 



g<KM| stay n: n: s gwt>j^A&^^^ 
.-. Thftre is or.e . thir-g i\*;& -..li&M 
would -be- nobody 'i.- t^S. 'twk, 
would, dr> v;hst he ca-jli ift'.tSas 1 



made happy through the work he 

has carried out on their behalf. 
What Manner of Man? 

What manner of man is Tom 
Swindle? His outstanding char- 
acteristic could be described as 
aggressiveness. He hates slipshod 
work/ If a thing has to he done 
he believes in getting on with 

it without any shilly-shallying. 
Where shilly-shallying exists Tom 

Swindle's tongue is apt to get 
sharp. Such outspokenness is re- 
sented by the shilly-shaUyers. 
Having regularly attended the 



of cliques. ;•; A hlzU: fcri "cf. S$f*' : . 

tery-v/aiiidfi'i Wni hU haa»f,-'5W'': 
aU these re 
good - Iccal ■ 






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much needed; $ss h*'-«5 ■ '$m :■ tmfy . 



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decide to come h%ck 

election in XovsTiiier. 

ahakeup that aV'^s&asJy r,rjx-^c^\f} 

Tom Swindle -ws.uli &£'%&&&&& 
in office. .»..V*T7 '.•./■-•.'•- 



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BLUE IS THE HCK v 

! Come in shd see 2fe?£wig&% ^""Jyy, 
hibition Blue sult^-iza. ^o^Mt. .^ 
color for this fiH. \.3&\3i£*s* : 5 



»v 



iary. 

Rev. G. W. Wood and his wife, j ora recreat 
Toronto, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Dick- I have been able to 
ey and their son of Whitchurch, 
were guests of Mrs. Elliott Mc- 
Clure for the day. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clifford Rumble, Toronto, form- 
er members of the congregation 
spent the day with their parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rumble, 



bi-monthly meetings of the Aur- J Newmarket, phone H^'TfihMi^I 

:at*.on commission, we -■-••._•-_> _.,.-.. .. i.^w . § 



Oak Ridges, while -their sons, 
Ron and Don, stayed with their 
cousin, Gerald Jennings. Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Clift of King were 
guests qi Mr. and Mrs. S.. Can- 
ning. 



wa-ch Tom 
Swindle at close quarters. He 
has always impressed us as an 
essentially warm-hearted man 
whose bark is worse than his bite. 
Of course he can ''bite" when 
that is the only course left. But 
he ''bites'* in a manner of almost 
pleasant decorum. Where most 
men would lose their temper, 
Tom Swindle remains cool and 
collected. He may be inwardly 
ruffled, but he shows no outward 
sign of it. We admire a man who 



HOODS 

KID 

, PILLS 



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Test-Drhe" ihe # 31 Ford and listen to its famous /« . 

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♦ miiOQStATtC DRIVE optional at extra cost. Comvntfonat | 

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TEST-DRIVE it for 



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