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39 


“The Father of His 
Country 


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PUBLISHED BY 


The Cape Ann Publi 





ishing Co. 


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COOLERATOR 


Why Is Ice Refrigeration Better and 
Cheaper than Electric Refrigeration? 











No. 1—No rapid drying 
out of foods! 








No. 2— Plenty of Ice! 





3— Washed and 
purified air! 


No. 








Reason No. 4—Ice is cheaper! 















5—Only Ice is 
trouble free! 





Plenty of Reason No. 


Crystal Clear 
Ice Cubes 
at all times 

















Cape Pond Ice Co. 


Office 105 1-2 Main St. Tel. 180 







































The Cape Ann Shore 
now in its 4lst season. 
Contains all the news of 
the Summer Colony. 
























On Sale 
at 
Local Newsstands 
Starting Station 








Office: 
101 Main Sereet 
Gloucester, Mass. 


















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MOTHER ANN 


Tip end of Eastern Point. Discovered in 1892 by 
Capt. mW. H -Thompson of Salem. 


~ 














Tescenecaoeatuetrasenne: 





1896—OLDEST 





——— EE 


ESTABLISHED SUMMER RESORT PUBLICATION ON THE NORTH SHORE—1936 


THE CAPE ANN SHORE 


Gloucester, Eastern Point, Bass Rocks, 


Long Beach, Briar Neck 


FORTY-FIRST 


SEASON 


Land’s End, ‘Rockport, Pigeon Cove, An- 
nisquam and River Territory, Fernwood, 


Magnolia, Manchester and Essex County. 


Sor 





Published Weekly, 8 times during July and August by the CAPE ANN PUBLISHING CO., James R. Pringle, 


Conductor, 95 Main Street, Gloucester. 


50 cents the season on Cape Ann; elsewhere, 75c. 


Tels. 412-W, 412-R. 


“Entered as second-class matter July 16, 1920, at post office, Gloucester, Mass., under Act of March 3, 1879.” 














EDITORIALS: 





Special Contents, July 10, 1936 


John Hays Hammond 
Whither? 


GOOD OLD TOWN OF ROCKPORT 


POEM: 


“The More Abundant Life’’ 
by Louise D. Chamberline 


—_—_—_—_— 


Gloucester, Cape Ann — First 
white man to visit its shores 
was Thorwald in 1004. Harbor 
called by Norsemen “‘Krossanes.” 
Gosnold landed here in 1602 and 
found the place had been used 
as a base by Portuguese fisher- 
men. In 1605 Champlain sailed 
by the Cape but did not land. 
The next year, September 1606, 
he entered the harbor which he 
named Le Beauport and made a 
map of it. Attacked by 200 In- 
dians and sailed away the next 
day. In 1614 Capt. John Smith 
named it Cape Ann after Anne 
of Denmark, mother of King 
Charles I. First permanent set- 
tlement of the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony in 1623. 


Stage Fort Park at westerly 
entrance of city. Site of settle- 
ment of Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, 1623-24. Tablet in com- 
memoration of that fact placed 
on face of large boulder. Conant, 
Half Moon and Stone beaches. 


Rafe’s Chasm and Norman’s 
Woe. Scene of “Wreck of the 
Hesperus.” At Magnolia, Hes- 


perus avenue. Fissure in solid 
rock cliff is 60 feet deep and 
12 feet wide. 


Mother Ann profile in Stone 
discovered in 1892 by Capt. 
William Thompson of Salem at 
tip end of Eastern Point. Dog 
Bar breakwater extends from 
a half mile long, completed in 
1904 and extends from this 
point. On Eastern Point are 


many of the show residences of 
: the North Shore. “The Ram- 














ART AND DRAMATIC 
Being a Review of Theatrical 
Topics and the Artist Colony 


MY LADY GOES SHOPPING 
By C. Anne Shore 


YACHTING OF THE WEEK 


NEWS FROM ALL SECTIONS OF 


THE SUMMER 


COLONY OF 


GREATER CAPE ANN “" 








POINTS OF INTEREST 


parts” occupies site of Fort 
Independence. 


Ten Pound Island in outer 
harbor; government fish hatch- 
ery thereon. Used as sheep pas- 
ture in early days. Five Pound 
Island in inner harbor; both so 
named for amounts in colonial 
money originally sold for. 


Thompson’s mountain, or Mt. 
Anne, West Gloucester, highest 
elevation on the Cape, 255 feet 
above sea level. Fine view rang- 
ing from Mt. Agamenticus on 
Maine coast to Wachusett Moun- 
tain, Bunker Hill Monument to 
Boston Bay. Tract given over 
as reservation in memory of 
Lawrence Minot; thickly wooded, 
favorite picnic resort; reached 
from New Way Lane. Nearby 
is Haskell’s pond, from which 
city’s water is secured. 


Ravenswood Park, natural for- 
est area extending from Fresh 
Water Cove to West Gloucester. 
Reached from Fresh Water Cove 
or the so-called Old Salem road, 
Western avenue. Mason Wal- 
ton’s cabin, “Hermit of Bond’s 
Hill,” on this road. Well worth 
frequenting. 

Beacon or Governor’s Hill, 
near center of city, from Wash- 
ington street. Small reservation 
at top from which a fine view 
may be obtained. 


Dogtown Commons, site of 
deserted Revolutionary settle- 
ment. Reached from Gee av: 
enue, Riverdale. Fine example 
of boulder deposits of glacial 
period. “Whale’s Jaw,” best 


known of these boulders, at 
edge of common. Rocking 
stone, etc., now taken over by 
the city as a water shed. 


Wharves skirting the water 
front, interesting as affording 
“close-up” of fish curing, etc. 


Babson House, opposite Ellery 
House, erected by Col. John 
Low about 1745. Old slave pens 
in attic. 


Main street, first known as 
Fore, afterwards as Front street. 
Principal business avenue. Laid 
out 1642. Middle street, para- 
lleling Main, contains many old 
colonial houses and the Judith 
Sargent house, the grounds of 
which, originally extending to 
Main street have been restored. 


On Middle street are the First 
Parish (Unitarian) Church, old- 
est in Gloucester; Independent 
Christian (Universalist) first 
Universalist society in America, 
church edifice erected 1805; St. 
John’s Episcopal Church, Trin- 
ity Congregational Church and 
the First Baptist Church. 


Sawyer Free Library and 
Reading Room, Middle street, 
adjoining Unitarian church. In- 
terior fine specimen of colonial 
woodwork. Originally home of 
Thomas Sanders, merchant. 

Old Town Hall Square, at 
junction of Middle and Wash- 
ington streets. Beautiful Ameri- 
can Legion Memorial building 
and monument on which was 
placed statue of Joan of Are by 
Anna Vaughn Hyatt. 


Fort Point, at western side 
of inner harbor, down Commer- 
cial street from Main, fortified 
in 1743. Now Italian quarter 
and rendezvous of fishermen of 
that nationality. 


Drives around the Cape: Up 
Washington street,’ through 
Riverdale, past Annisquam, Bay 
View, Lanesville into Pigeon 
Cove, Rockport and completing 
the circuit to Gloucester. Al- 
most a continuous ocean view, 
which was completed when 
the Bass Rocks-Land’s End 
stretch was completed. 

Beaches: Little Good Harbor 
and Long Beaches, between Bass 
Rocks and Land’s End, Rock- 
port. Wingaersheek Beach, 
West Gloucester, largest on 
Cape, two miles long, 600 feet 
deep at low tide; reached from 
Essex avenue, West Gloucester, 
down Concord street. 

Quarries at Bay View and 
Pigeon Cove, among largest in 
country, near main highway. 

Blynman canal, first cut in 
1642 by Rev. Richard Blynman, 
at Western entrance of city. 

Drives: “Little Heater,” 
Pac: Hole” at West Glouces- 
er. 

Old Salem road, first high- 
way from the town, blazed out 
in 1626, when part of the set- 
tlers went to Salem. Down Hes- 
perus avenue (discontinued in 
1892) to Salem. Name errone- 
ously applied to Old Pest House 


road, leading through Ravens- - 
wood park from Western ave. 5 











CapE ANN SHORE, July 10, 1936 





Gloucester has lost an eminent citizen. 
the many highlights of his career would be surplusage. 
Of the three imposing names of the nineteenth century 
those of Cecil Rhodes, Dr. Jameson and John Hays Ham- 
Having completed his active career 


mond will outstand. 


he chose Gloucester in which to spend his riper years. 
It is fitting that the end 
came here quietly and peacefully as the western sun was 
sinking on the clear, farther horizon of Gloucester bay. 
There was no moaning of the bar when his bark put forth 


loved the place and its people. 


on the last voyage. 





a si A i nt a tt a Ain i a i a i nn a a An i a tn in in tn tn i tn nn in tis i lin ts nt i a dl 


WHITHER? 





SINCE THE LAST issue of the 
Shore things have happened, epochal in 
their import. The groggy old world 
emerging from the Great War was just 
coming back on an even keel, having 
been knocked down until the crosstrees 
were buried in water, when another 
hurricane struck her squarely amid- 
ships and again thrust her on her beam 
ends and now the good ship wallows and 
strains to right herself and square away 
on a course of sanity. Excuse mixed 
metaphors—if you detect any. 


First that world stabilizer, King 
George died. Sig Mussolini had gone 
off on the African rampage. Sick at 
heart the King, dreading another World 
War drench of the kingdoms best blood 
sank beneath the terrific strain and was 
gathered to his fathers. Then came Ed- 
ward the Eighth and the opening days 
of his reign have not been auspicious. 
Anthony Eden bravely met the Roman 
challenge with England’s fleet. But 
Trafalgar has not been repeated. Sold 
out by the duplicity of Laval and Amer- 
ican sanctions—both political sides tak- 
ing no chances with the Italian vote in 
this critical Presidential year in New 
York—England has suffered the most 
humiliating discomfiture in its history. 
But there’s a saying that the English 
always lose every round but the last 
when she scores a knockout. Time will 
tell. 


Then Herr Hitler, seizing opportunity 
by ‘the forelock repeats the old Teutonic 
trick of making scraps of paper of 
treaties and boldly leaping the barrier 
takes possession of the Nomans’ land 
across the Rhine and calmly asks what 
are you going to do about it? 


Japan with its modern Genghis 
Khans is moving westward with terrific 
speed halted only by Russia. China is 
virtually gobbled up. Looking eastward 
the Nipponese, according to newspaper 
reports, are reported to have made over- 
tures to a South American power for a 


JOHN HAYS HAMMOND 


To recount 


He 


her time. 


cession of the Galapagos islands in ex- 
change for a nagreement to come to the 
defense of that power should an aggres- 
sor make such a course necessary. Gal- 
apagos a short distance from Panama. 
What power does Japan have in mind? 
For the Japanese hold that if America 
can decree and maintain a Munroe doc- 
trine for the western hemisphere what 
logical objection to her assuming the 
same suzerainty over Asia and Austral- 
sia? And why, indeed, when you come 
to analyize it? The only doubt about it 
is whether Japan can back up her pre- 
tensions with sufficient force to comply 
respect and acquiescence. More than 
ever this is the age of the Right of 
Might, tooth and claw. 


Nor is this virus of economic unrest 
confined to these major powers. Even 
Spain and Portugal which ten years ago 
were thought firmly anchored to the an- 
cient teachings, civic, economic and 
clerical, have completely revolutionized 
the old order of things. Down in Mex- 
ico the same state of affairs. Verily the 
world is upside down. 


The death of Kipling marks the pass- 
ing of the world’s greatest poet and lit- 
erary light of the century from 1850 on. 
He too—the Empire’s greatest exponent 
—went saddened to his death hastened 
by the debacle of his latest days. He 
sleeps beside the men who have made 
England great—in war, literature and 
science. It is fitting that justice should 
come to him, although posthumously. 





While there is no mistaking the omin- 
ous important of the big black clouds 
rolling steadily eastward from the Pa- 
cific front, the United States has not 
been embroiled. Fortunately the elder 
statesmen of all political parties are as 
one on the most important essential that 


America shall not become involved in 


any way in these foreign entanglements. 
Even our disarmament friends now per- 
ceive clearly that our salvation depends 
upon adequate naval and land defenses, 
mainly the former. 


In this country floods and droughts 
of a magnitude not witnessed in a cen- 


His was no lip service: The establishment of a Fish- 
erman’s Home for aged and penniless mariners; the gift 
of a Fisherman’s Rest at Beachbrook instead of an un- 
marked mound in the Potter’s field; the substantial dona- 
tions to the local hospital and charitable institutions and 


the numerous unrecorded deeds of kindness while he lived 
all evinced the depth, sincereity and measure of the man. 
And in this worthy work, sitting at his elbow was that 
devoted helpmate who ranks with the notable women of 
Their like may not pass our way again. 








tury have punished the Earth and wiped 
Huey Long, 
who strode the national terrain, a po- 
litical Colussus, has been wiped out—by 
the too common and ominous route of 
assassination—for this country. The 
Bonus legions, repulsed often but never 
ried every stronghold of their opponents 


out millions of property. 


defeated have, in a grand assault, car- 
and emerged victorious in attaining 
They are yet to be 
Going into war they 
Now they 
No welching will 


their objective. 
reckoned with. 
were promised everything. 


are going to cash in. 
be tolerated. 


The time has come for sober thinking 
and sane action in the halls of legisla- 
tion. Gen. Pershing voiced a warning 
at the graduation at West Point that it 
was only by adequate protective meas- 
ures could this country be insured 
against aggression. Let no one scoff at 
such warning. Smug in our notion that 
3000 miles of water on every frontier 
but the north protects us from inva- 
sion we have laughed such prophecies 
off—especially the inlanders. 


Time and space and deep sea water 
have been annihilated by modern inven- 
tion. Within a year the giant Zepps 
will make the Atlantic crossing in 30 
hours. One of these air frigates carry- 
ing tons of destructive matter and 
gasses, screened by an artificial clouds, 
can wipe out our largest cities in a 
night—Chicago as easily as New York. 
What might a fleet of a hundred of these 
do in one night? Then there is the per- 
fected subarine. It ravaged our New 
England coastline in the World War al- 
most within sight of Cape Ann. It can 
do so again and more effectually. The 
grim and sobering thought is thrust un- 
welcomely home that, will he, nil he, the 
time is not so far away when the United 
States must fight defensively, if not of- 
fensively, for its very existence. From 
the Pacific as well as the Atlantic. We 
might as well face this fact and prepare 
for it. 


Cape ANN SHorgE, July 10, 1936 








“THE MORE ABUNDANT LIFE” 


For Grandpa 


ooh) 


Buck up, Grandpa, start to smile 
You’ll soon be living in great style 


When the Townsend Plan gets working, 
You’ll be every labor shirking. 
While we younger folks are busy, 


You can invest in a “‘tin-Lizzie.” 
Off to Revere you can go, 

There take part in every show. 
Play the horses and the dogs, 


Art and Dramatic 





The season opens auspiciously 
for the Gloucester Society of Art- 
ists which is one of the leading so- 
cieties of its kind in the country. 
The officers for the coming year, 
alert for its interests, comprises 
Oscar Anderson, president; Stanley 
Woodward, vice-president; Everett 
C. Forbes, treasurer, and Alida C. 
Anderson, secretary. The exhibi- 
tion committee for 1936 includes B. 
Manfred Thornberg, chairman; Os- 
car Anderson, Elsa Anschutz, Stan- 
ley Woodward and Raymond Car- 
ter, Charles E. Dennison of the 
committee, having passed on during 
the winter. 


Its galleries near the Hawthorne 


Inn are most commodious and ideal- 
ly located. The first exhibtion 


opened July 4 and will close Tues- 
day, August 8. Each exhibition 
will consist of paintings and sculp- 
ture in the large gallery; little pic- 
tures in the Little Picture gallery 
and prints and drawings in the 
Print room. 


The second exhibition will open 
Saturday, August 8 and close Sun- 
day, September 13. Last day for 
entry of work, August 8. Exhibit 
will be completely changed for the 
second exhibition. Work from out 
of town should be sent to Joseph 
A. Nunes, agent, Center st., Glou- 
cester, express charges and agent’s 
fee to be paid by the artists. The 
Society has issued a comprehensive 
circular which may be obtained by 
addressing the secretary, Alida C. 
Anderson, Box 8, Gloucester. 


6oO9 








Dress up in the best of togs — 

You'll be welcome in every direction, 

For you MUST spend your monthly pension — 
You’ll not have to worry or fret. 

Your Uncle Sam will see to that — 

Who wouldn’t be a carefree man — 

Hurrah for Doc Townsend and his Plan! 

Who wouldn’t welcome sixty and over 

Then, Grandpa, you’ll live in clover! 


— LOUISE D. CHAMBERLINE. 





BEARSKIN NECK (ROCKPORT) 
ART GALLERY 





Arthur C. Smith of Rockport and 
St. Petersburg, Fla., has opened his 
gallery for another season. 

Those who are “art hungry” may 
sup on good wholesome art without 
a cover charge and study the tech- 
nique of the paintings now on dis- 
play. 

Many distinguished artists who 
are either resident or summering 
at this picturesque town are repre- 
sented by some of their best work. 

Mr. Smith has made the rounds 
of the artists’ studios and picked 
out little gems to be displayed on 
the gallery walls. Many of the 
small paintings would brighten up 
a dark space in any home, and the 
most fastidious collectors would 
deem it an honor to own most any 
of the paintings. 

It would seem that the depres- 
sion has brought the artists down 
from painting mammoth canvases 
to the small size paintings which 
no doubt are nearer to what the 
public can pay for. Many of these 
are direct studies from nature and 
completed in one sitting, with all 
the freshness of the early morn- 
ing’s dew in them. 


Aldro T. Hibbard, N.A., tops the 
list of exhibitors. His small snow 
pictures of scenes in Vermont, ex- 
press so nicely the feeling of win- 
ter when all is snowy white. Hib- 
bard never disappoints his public 
with his masterful paintings. 


We also like Galen J. Perrett’s 
work, his marines are so colorful; 
they are rendered with precision, 
the swirl of the sea as it crashes 
over the rocks has a_ beautiful 
foamy qaulity which many of the 
painters of the sea do not seem to 
register. Stanley W. Woodward, 
a new arrival in the Rockport Art 
Colony, is classed with the best 
painters of the sea. His two ma- 
rines are sparkling. Local sea 


painters are Parker Perkins and 
Gilbert Margeson, who are also 
worshippers of the angry sea. 
They work the best while the waves 
dash high against the rocky shore. 

Our versatile Anthony Thieme 
can paint a pictorial subject which 
pleases the public taste, and, what 
would an exhibition be along the 
North Shore without the famous 
Motif No. 1? 


Marguerite Pearson has a lovely 
painting entitled “Playing the Me- 
lodeon,” a nice composition and is 
painted charmingly. 


Others who have good work on 
display are Emile Gruppe, Frank 
Rines, Grace Russell, M. Bennett- 
Brown, Raymond Carter, Joseph 
Higgins, Otis P. Cook, Jr., Mary 
W. Wagner, A. F. Jacobson, Yar- 
nell Abbott, and J. Eliot Enneking. 


The public is cordially invited to 
attend, and is open daily to Sep- 
tember 15. 

— NEMO. 


John Lonergan of New York City 
has been occupying one of the Sav- 
age studios during June. 

Yarnall Abbott of Philadelphia 
has arrived at his Main st. studio 
for a stay late into the season. 


The Misses Cora and Marie Guil- 
lion of Philadelphia are again 
domiciled at the studio in Dock sq. 
which they have occupied for sev- 
eral seasons. 

Frederick Lebrun, an artist with 
Mrs. Lebrun, have taken one of the 
Cleaves studios on Pigeon Hill for 
a stay into September. 


J. Eliot Enneking of Brookline 
and Rockport, is holding an exhibi- 
tion of his oil paintings at the Fire- 
side Studio, 7 Dock sq., Rockport, 
from July 6 to September 15, daily 


from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. except Sun- 
days. The public is cordially in- 


vited to attend the exhibition. 
There are many local scenes of 
Gloucester and Rockport to be 





shown, Connecticut 


also Mystic, 
and Kearsarge, New Hampshire. 
Among the paintings to be on 


display are as follows: “Moat 
Mountain,” “The Spirit of Spring,” 
“Motif No. 1,” “Gloucester Inner 
Harbor,” and many other paintings 
of interest. Mr. Enneking is also 
represented by his work at Rock- 
port Art Association, North Shore 
Arts Association, Gloucester So- 
ciety of Artists, Bearskin Neck 
Gallery, Barn Door and the Art 
Mart in Rockport. 





LITTLE VERSES 
We are gentlemen. 


That neither in our hearts, nor out: 
ward eyes, 


Envy the great, nor do the low despise. 
Abundance is a blessing to the wise: 
The use of riches in discretion lies; 


Learn this, ye men of wealth—a heavy 
purse 
In a fool's pocket is a heavy curse. 


cereere 


Not in the clamor of the crowded 


street— 

Not in the shouts and plaudits of the 
throng, 

But in ourselves are triumph and 
defeat. 


Cn 


The heights by great men reached and 
kept 
Were not attained by sudden flight, 
But they while their companions slept 
Were toiling upward in the night. 


ce ereer 


Our lives are albums written through 

With good or ill, with false or true; 

And as the blessed angels turn 

The pages of our years, 

God grant they read the good, with 
smiles, 

And blot the ill with tears. 





Carpe ANN Snore, July 10, 1936 





GOOD OLD TOWN OF ROCKPORT 


Extends Welcome Hand To Summer Residents --- Taxes Lowered $3.00 
For Current Year --- Fame As Summer and Permanent Home Grows 





ROCKPORT — BY J. ELIOT ENNEKING 








SS DODD ODDO Gn En tin ti tn tp ti tin tin tip tin tin ti tin tin ti in ti tin ti tin ti tia i tin i di di dis Ai di tii di tn tn i i tn i i i i ns nn i a a 


ROCKPORT SEEMS TO BE on the 
down grade — in the right way. The 
assessors announce that they have re- 
duced the rate of taxation from $36 
to $33 for the current season. This is 
the lowest since 1933 when the rate 
was $30. 

The descent has not been easy, but 
the manner in which it has been ac- 
complished may furnish an example to 
all communities, great and small. 

Originally all Cape Ann was the 
town of Gloucester, but in 1840 the 
northeastern section thought it best to 
get set off by itself, and the “harbor,” 
as Gloucester proper was known at the 
time, offered no protest. So in four 
years more the town may, in mid-Sum- 
mer, observe its centennial as a cor- 
porate entity if it so desires and it 
probably does. 

The principal occupation has in the 
long run been fishing. Lacking an in- 
closed harbor the main part of the 


populace either berthed their boats at 
Annisquam or sometimes at Little Good 
Harbor as circumstances placed them. 

However, its citizens energetically 
looked ahead to establishing manufac- 
turing. Accordingly a large cotton 
duck mill—to furnish sails for the Glou- 
cester fleet—was built, and a colony of 
skilled weavers brought over from Eng- 
land. This burned flat Dec. 9, 1883, 
and was never rebuilt. Smaller indus- 
tries, such as an organ factory, ising- 
glass, from fish sounds, and others came 
into existence, but the great boost ahead 
came after the Civil War when the 
demand for building material opened up 
the quarries, some 600 men being em- 
ployed in the most prosperous times. 
But strange to say in the most prosper- 
us era of the building trade, the 1920- 
30 decade, these quarries as a working 
concern practically went out of exist- 
ence. Since then no major occupation 
has come in to take its place. 


Augmented by the abnormal welfare 
costs, the citizens faced one of the most 
difficult problems of any in the state. 
They rallied and took stock. “What 
have we as an asset?” The observing 
made answer. ‘One of the most beau- 
tiful stretches of seashore for Summer 
and permanent homes in the state, the 
possibilities of which are _ scarcely 
scratched.” 


Welcomed Summer People 


For several years past, retired people, 
those with incomes, had discovered in 
Rockport just the ideal conditions of 
living they desired for the Autumn of 
life. ' 


Here was the answer, said the towns- 
people: “Let’s join hands with these 
people, make them welcome as neigh- 
bors, and induce them to bring in their 
friends.” And they went ahead along 
that line. 


The town for some years had an ad- 


Cape ANN SHORE, July 10, 1936 





visory committee which passed upon 
the articles involving expenditure of 
money proposed in the annual warrant 
which were pared down and its recom- 
mendations always followed in the 
main, 

This season the committee was vir- 
tually dominated by a Summer comer 
who had just become a permanent resi- 
dent. The motto was to pare down and 
get down to a_ pay-as-you-go system 
without stretching economy into parsi- 
mony. Its recommendations were adopt- 
ed without ado with the resultant de- 
crease in taxes. For example the po- 
lice wanted a cruising car with radio 
equipment. Granted it was a good 
thing but it must wait for a later date. 
And so down the line to a decrease of 
$3 per thousand. 


In the past five years the Summer 
resident interest in Rockport has grown 
steadily. More and more the little pitched 
roofed colonial bungalows known as 
Cape Cod houses but which are nu- 
merous and perhaps indigenous to Cape 
Ann have been purchased by those who, 
closing a business career, seek a town 
where conditions are quiet and to their 
liking. At present the ratio of Summer 
resident real estate valuation is as three 
to one for the permanents, about the 
same as in Gloucester. 


So, pointed in the direction of mak- 
ing their shore acres more desirable 
from every standpoint to the outsider 
who comes either for a Summer or 
permanent home, the citizens are bend- 
ing every effort to develop the bounti- 
ful excess of natural beauty which they 
have as an asset to its highest possi- 
bility, and it has taken occasion in this 
matter of the constituency of its ad- 
visory board, to show that this feeling 
is no empy gesture and they are not out 
“to soak the rich’ supposedly person 
who comes down for a Summer or per- 
manent home. 


In 1884 the people realizing that if 
a big seawall could be built their harbor 
would become one of the finest in the 
world put the project over. This work 
undertaken and about a third com- 
pleted was abandoned some 25 years 
ago by advice of the army engineers 
and a hard blow struck at the interests 
of the town. 


Yankee Town 


In consequence Rockport remains a 
typically “Yankee” town as regards 
population. The directory and town 
officials contain the names in increasing 
numbers of the descendants of early 
settlers. The opening of the stone 
quarries brought in more reecnt years 
large numbers of Swedish and later of 


the Finnish peoples—all literate to a 
high degree in their own languages and 
English also. They are not much given 
to office seeking but blend quietly into 
the productive activities of the town. 

Recently an effort was made to in- 
terest the national Government into 
completing the unfinished breakwater. 
The argument advanced—and with some 
plausibility—was that if so many mil- 
lions were to be spent on Quoddy, Sandy 
Bay breakwater was equally deserving 
if not more so. Some $5,000,000 would 
have completed the breakwater and giv- 
en employment for several years to ev- 
ery unemployed stone worker on the 
cape. 


The above mentioned summer resi- 
dents who officiated with such marked 
success was Mr. T. H. C. Gibb. 


ST. JOHN’S FAIR 


Beverly Farms 


Even though the exact nature of the 
St. John’s Church fair on Thursday, 
July 30, is to be a deep, dark secret 
right up until the last minute, the 
heads of the various tables and other 
features have just been revealed. The 
rummage table, which always has a 
crowd around it, is under the super- 
vision of Mrs. W. Galbraithe Mitchell 
of Beverly aFrms. This table has such 
a fascination for most people that it 
was found necessary to add a great 
many assistants. All the wonderful 
vegetables from North Shore gardens 
will be sold by a group of ladies with 
Mrs. Charles K. Cummings in charge. 
It seems very appropriate that Mrs. 
Russell Burrage should head the flow- 
er table. The ‘‘useful and fancy” ar- 
ticles table is another popular one 
and the Women’s Auxiliary, with 
Mrs. Bradford H. Burnham at the 
head, has charge of this. Mrs. Thomas 
Barbour will be at te chake and candy 
table, and Miss Eleanor Coolidge, 
with a group of friends, is to be debu- 
tante cigarette-and-balloon salesgirl. 

On that day every one might just as 
well plan to stay all day and lunch in 
the cafeteria which will be run by 
Mrs. Henry Lee; while still on the 
food subject lighter refreshments are 
to be served by the girls’ club of the 
church. One always finds a most 
unique and intriguing grab bag at this 
fair, and this year Miss Frances Fab- 
yan is in charge of it. Games for all 
the shore children and some that will 
even fascinate their elders, are to be 
sold by Mrs. Bayard Warren. 

Books and more books will go like 
lightning with Mrs. Lyon Weyburn at 
the head of this department. The en- 


tertainment and “features” all the 
ideas for various costumes and out 
of the ordinary things, will be direct- 
ed by Mrs. Nathaniel S. Simpkins. 
Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr., has quite a 
job on her hands with the placing of 
posters and notices in all the stores in 
the vicinity, while at the head of the 
publicity department is Miss Elise 
Sortwell. 
Gardens 


Another reminder is that there are 
just a few more days to wait until the 
twenty of the North Shore’s most 
beautiful gardens are to be opened to 
the public by the ladies of the North 
Shore Garden Club, with Mrs. W. En- 
dicott Dexter as chairman. * This is 
really a rare opportunity that no lover 
of gardens and places can afford to 
miss. 


RECENT ARRIVALS 





Arrivals at The Turk’s Head Inn: Miss 
T. E. Hayes, Mrs. J. E. Jackson, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Sullivan, Miss Marie J. MacCorry, the 
Misses O’Meara, Boston; Miss Nightengale, 
New York; Miss J. C. Phetteplace, Providence; 
Miss M. F. Dodge, Brooklyn; Miss Mary 
Parker, Louisville; Mrs. William B. Law- 
rence, New York City; Mrs. James Barrett, 
Miss Florence Barrett, Hartford; Mrs. Wallace 
King, Mrs. Edward Shoemaker, H. W. Turn- 
bull, Baltimore. 

Straitsmouth Inn: Misses Margaret and 
Dorothy Jones, Miss Alice Skilton, Miss 
Harriet A. Osborne, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bart- 
lett, Cambridge; Mrs, Willis H. Sanborn, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Williams, Springfield; Miss 
Dorothy W..Calkins, Plainfield; Mrs. G. F. 
Pumpelly, Lexington; Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Wilkins and family, Miss Mildred Stone, Win- 
chester; Mrs. C. L. Little, Arlington; the 
Misses Eager, Grafton; Mrs. Grace C. Kemp- 
ton, Miss Rosalind Kempton, Boston; Miss 
Amy R. Merriam, Rocky Hill; Miss Ellen 
Brennan, Laconia; Miss Mary Eastwood, Miss 
Anne S. Jenks, Blanche C. Vose, Albany; Mrs. 
A, Shude, Exeter; the Misses Vallin, Detroit; 
Miss Shryock, Philadelphia; Mrs. C. L. Wight, 
Honolulu; Miss Elizabeth Chase, Miss Helen 
Browning, Mrs. Julia S. Carpenter, Provi- 
dence; Mrs. May Wilder Gunn, New York; 
Miss Isabella Wright, Mrs. Bixby, Chicago; 
Mr. and Mrs. William T. Covert, Philadelphia; 
Mrs. E. D. Barnum, Mrs. W. T. Hardy, Mrs. 
Austin Huntington, New York; Miss Mary 
Etta Sutherland, Scotland. 

Manning House: Mrs. S. K. Eaton, Boston; 
Miss Elizabeth Shine, Cambridge; Miss Char- 
lotte Johnson, Boston; Miss Margaret Murphy, 
Miss Ruth Gurley, Worcester; Mr. and Mrs. 
G. D. Butler, Holyoke; Miss Helen K. Way, 
Brookline; Mrs. A. H. McOwen, Philadelphia. 

Hotel Edward: Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Kelly 
and daughter, Boston; Mr. John A. Montgom- 
ery, Boston; Winthrop L. Carter, New Hamp- 
shire; Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Kuiper, Wiscon- 
sin; Mr. and Mrs: John Casey, Jr., Troy. 

Pancoast Manor: Mrs. James Cutler, 
Brookline; Mr. and Mrs. Kraushaw, New 
York; Mr. C. H. Archibald and party, Mon- 
treal; Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Marshall, Bronx- 
ville. 








‘NEVER HAS the North Shore, es- 
pecially Cape Ann, looked as fresh 
and vernal; in few seasons has it been 
equalled. While other sections have 
been searéd by the blistering sun this 
promonotory thrust into the ocean has 
been laved by gentle rains and 
drenched by sea-fog all of which have 
contributed to the most luxuriant 
growth seen in many a year. Old Eng- 
land has been somewhat noted for its 
spring fogs but it has nothing on the 
Cape Ann sector of New England, 
well named in this respect. This is 
especially noticeable to the incoming 
people who make this section their 
home and the change and the cool sea 
air has been most welcome. Especially 
have the conditions favored the trees 
which appear thriftier than ever. 
What a combination, sea and shore, 
broad expanses of ocean and mile on 
mile of virgin woodland—sixteen 
snow-driven beaches—Cape Ann lit- 
erally windswept and sea-washed on 
all sides of the compass. Its roads and 
drives and countryside. Destined to 
be the summer and permanent home 
of a hundred thousand people ere the 
sands of the next twenty-five years 
have rolled down the neck of time’s 
hour glass. Fortunate they who may 
enjoy its privileges. 





It is understood that Miss Ida G. 
Beal of Boston will not occupy ““Wood- 
side” in Norman avenue this season. 

Mrs. Frederick H. Button, who 
makes her winter home at the St. 
Regis, New York, has come to her cot- 
tage in Flume avenue for another sea- 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Farnum of 
Chicago, who have one of the finest 
residences in this locality, will not 
occupy the place this season but will 
spend the season at one of the moun- 
tain resorts in upper New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Haward 
of Wellesley Hills have taken Apple- 
tree cottage in Fuller street for 
another season. 

Perey V. Hill and family of Au- 
gusta, Me., have returned to their 


summer home, the former Bigelow 
house off Hesperus avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. McMillan 
whose winter residence is The Plaza, 
New York, were June arrivals at 
“Stonehurst,” Shore road. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Moses and 
family are again the occupants of 
“Rockwood” house in Hesperus ave. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. K. M. Rehn, Jr., of 
New York, whose family have been 
represented here for some forty years 
and have achieved note in the art 
world, have come to ‘‘Rehnwood” in 
Oakes avenue for the season. 


HOW many can tell the derivation 
of ‘Oakes’ avenue. A prominent na- 
tional name of the late 70’s? 

Mrs. Frederick C. Schaeffer of 
Haverford, Penn., who has been a 
summer resident here many years, 
died at her home during the winter. 
Her cottage, “The Four Winds,” will 
be occupied this season by Dr. Farlow 
of Boston. 

Another Magnolia mid-season resi- 
dent of many years who passed on 
during the winter was C. W. MacD. 
Smith of Germantown, Pa., and Park 
avenue, New York. His summer home 
was in Lexington avenue. 

Charles Wadsworth of Pelham 
Manor, N. Y., has purchased the Mar- 
garet Corlies ‘‘Att-Lea House” in 
Fuller street. He is the son of the late 
Rev. Dr. Charles Wadsworth who 
made his summer home in Magnolia 
for many years. 

Mrs. John Sharman Zinnser and 
family of Summit, N. J., are occupy- 
ing the ‘‘Wadsworth Cottage,’ Oakes 
field. She is the daughter of the late 
Dr. Wadsworth. 

Miss Mary Winslow of 525 Beacon 
street, Boston, who had the Thorn- 
berg cottage “Sunnyside” last sum- 
mer, will be in Europe this season. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Scammon of Bea- 
con street, Boston, has come to her 
summer house, corner Fuller street 
and Hesperus avenue. 

Mrs. Thompson S. Sampson and 
family of Farmington, Conn., is oc- 
cupying her home in Summer street. 

Penhallow cottage, Magnolia ave- 
nue, continues to be the summer home 
of Mrs. Charles 8. Penhallow of Bev- 
erly. 

Mrs. Stanley McCormick of 407 
Commonwealth ave., Boston, opened 
“Rockledge,” Shore road, for the sea- 
son early in June. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hoyle of 


CAPE ANN Snore, July 10, 1936 





MAGNOLIA AND THE COUNTYSIDE 


Wellesley Hills have come to ‘The 
Studio” for another season. 


Mrs. John Fremont Hill of 65 Com- 
monwealth avenue, Boston, and fam- 
ily are occupying ‘‘Twin Acres’”’ cot- 
tage, Hesperus avenue, their summer 
home for some years past. 


Mrs. Pierpont Dutcher of Mil- 
waukee, a summer resident of many 
years, here died during the winter. 
Her maiden name was Bull. Charles 
H. Bull, a Chicago banker of national 
note a generation ago, was among the 
early cottage builders in Magnolia. 


Mr. and Mrs. David B. Armstrong 
of Somerville have returned for the 
season to their Raymond street cot- 
tage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McG. 
Bundy and children of 42 Pinckney 
street, Boston, are established for the 
season in their Hesperus avenue sum- 
mer home. 


Mr. and Mrs. Fred Clement of Mel- 
rose have come to their cottage in 
Raymond street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grover J. Cronin and 
family of West Newton have returned 
to their Lexington avenue house for 
the summer. 

Dr. Mary D. Dakin of Beacon street, 
Boston, has opened “‘Afterglow” cot- 
tage in Fuller street and will remain 
during the season. 


Mrs. Mary E. Nash of Cambridge 
came down in June and opened her 
cottage in Chester square for the sea- 
son. 


THE ROCPORT SECTOR 


ROCKPORT IS LOOKING up in 
more respects than one—especially as 
a summer resident locality. The gov- 
ernment has recently recognized that 
fact by decreeing the erection of a 
$75,000 postoffice —to be erected, 
some say, on the site of the present 
quarters, but there is nothing definite 
in regard to that particular item. 
Yachting and artists is the theme song 
of this favorite section. 


Dr. Cora Holden and Miss Cove 
Holden of Cleveland have arrived for 
the summer at the Iron Balcony, 
Broadway. 

Miss Sophie Parker of Upper Iowa 
University, Fayette, Ia., is spending 
the summer with Mr. and Mrs. Fred- 
erick H. Tarr of Broadway. 

Dr. and Mrs. Eugene McGillion and 


Cape ANN SHoRE, July 10, 1936 





family of Yonkers, N. Y., have arrived 
at their summer home on High street 
for the summer. 


THE Fourth was celebrated with a 
dancing party at the Rockport Art 
Gallery. The hall was decorated in 
the symbolic red, white, and blue 
streamers and huge firecrackers. 


The highlight of the evening was a 
firecracker race by six young couples. 

The winning pair were Mrs. Zion 
of Boston and Parker Sorlien of Pitts- 
burgh. 


The judges included Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Bruno of Boston and George 
Young of Rockport. 


Guests were Mr. and Mrs. Sam 
Hershey, Mr. and Mrs. Earl F. San- 
born of Annisquam, Dr. and Mrs. Mil- 
ton Dexter and Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Dunn of Gloucester, Miss Jacqueline 
Butler of California, Miss Emma AIl- 
len, Minor and Albert Allen of New 
York, Mr. and Mrs. Aldro T. Hibbard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Bryant, Walter 
Kendall, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Recchia of Rockport. 


Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Longley and 
daughter Evelyn have returned to the 
Irving house, Bearskin Neck, after a 
winter spent at St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Miss Elizabeth Taylor has reopened 
her home on Dock square for the sea- 
son after spending the winter in Bos- 
ton. 


Walter M. Aikman, the artist, is at 
Fred M. Full’s house after spending 
the winter in Summerville, South Car- 
olina. 


Arthur L. Olson of the Coast Guard. 


station at Dolliver’s Neck, Gloucester, 
has taken the Story bungalow on 
Edgemere road. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Davis of 
Cleveland have arrived and they are 
occupying the Wentworth cottage, 
Marmion way. Their son Fred grad- 
uated from Admiral Farragut school, 
Tom’s River, N. J., in June. 

Mrs. Helen Merrill Parker of Cam- 
bridge is occupying the small Spiva- 
kowsky house on Main street for the 
season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stiles of Mel- 
rose are at their Land’s End home 
“Rocky Shores’”’ for the season. 

Miss Lucy E. Dewey of Cambridge 
has arrived at her summer home on 
Clark avenue for the season. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles S. Butler of 
Boston are at their home on The Head- 
lands for the season. 

Miss Edith Abbott of New York 
City has arrived for the season at her 
studio home on Atlantic avenue. Miss 


Hornblower & Werks 


ESTABLISHED 1888 


Members New York, Boston and Chicago Stock Exchanges 


Duvesiment Securities 


60 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON 


CHICAGO DETROIT CLEVELAND 


Abbott has spent several months in 
Bermuda because of ill health. 


Miss Constance B. Williston of Ded- 
ham has arrived at her summer home, 
12A Dock square, for the season. 


Mrs. Stuart Tod and son Giles of 
Boston have opened their home ‘The 
Spinney,’ Marmion way, for the sum- 
mer’s stay. 


Miss Jeanne Toutain of New York 
City has arrived at her home “L’ Abri’”’ 
on the Headlands for the season. 

Mrs. Mabel J. Hinckley of Brook- 
line is at her summer home ‘“‘Tregony 
Bow Lodge,’ Allen avenue, Land’s 
End, for the summer. 


Mr. and Mrs. Max Kuehne and son 
of New York City have arrived at their 
summer home on Marmion way for 
the season. Mr. and Mrs. Kuehne re- 
cently purchased the Dillway house 
on Marmion way which they have re- 
modeled putting in a large studio for 
Mr. Kuehne. 

Miss Marjorie Christopher of Dor- 
chester is at her summer home on 
Thacher road. 

Mrs. Paul A. Von Hohenschleyer of 
Washington has come to her summer 
home on Norwood avenue for the sea- 
son. 

Mrs. Mary Arey and Miss Isabel 
Arey of Salem have opened ‘“Rock- 


lawn” their summer house at Land’s 
End. 


Exhibition of Paintings 
by 
J. ELIOT ENNEKING 


Fireside Studio 
7 Dock Square, Rockport 


Daily 2:30 to 5:30 P.M. 
From July 6 to Sept. 15 
Except Sundays 





PROVIDENCE 


42 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 


PORTLAND PITTSBURGH 





Rev. and Mrs. George J. Russell 
have arrived at their summer house 
on Marmion Way. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Heebner of 
Boston came in June to their home on 
The Headlands. ., 

Mrs. William A. Pew and daughter, 
Miss Polly Pew of Salem, have ar- 
rived at their summer home “Fore- 
top,’”’ Land’s End, for the season. 


Cape Ann Savings bank conveys to 
Hilma T. Bowman et al, of Rockport, 
land and buildings on Thacher road, 
59 by 70 feet; land in Gloucester, 
30.12 by 59 feet. 

The following Thurston-owned cot- 
tages are rented: 

The Cape Cod, Thurston place, 
Bearskin Neck,, to Miss Rae Samoff. 

Saltaire bungalow, Thurston place, 
to Miss E. H. Nattiford, Cambridge. 

Rear Crow’s Nest to Mrs. Samuel 
Emlen and daughters of Philadelphia. 

Members of the Rockport Woman’s 
club enjoyed an all-day outing recent- 
ly at the estates of Nicola D’Ascenzzo 
and Miss Ellen B. Laight at Folly 
Cove. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur N. Park of 
Belmont have opened their house on 
Marmion way for the season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Lockett and 
family of Newton are at their home 





Exhibition and Sale of 
PAINTINGS, ANTIQUES 
PEWTER and GLASS 


at THE BARN DOOR 


Next to the Blacksmith Shop 
ROCKPORT, MASS. 


June 28 to October 1 
Daily — 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 


\\= 


yr 
ea 
$ 


Cape ANN SuHore, July 10, 1936 





on Old Garden road. 

Charles Evans and family of Boston 
came to their summer home off Mar- 
mion way in June. 

Illustrations by Local Man 


H. Boylston Dummer of this town 
is the illustrator of the four books 
entitled, “Some Animals and Their 
Homes,” “Some Animals and Neigh- 
bors,’ “Plans and Animals,’ and 
“Our Earth and Its Life.” 

Leonard B. Buchanan of Woburn, 
a summer resident of Land’s End, has 
given $120 to the fire department for 
a fire alarm box on Eden road, which 
has been installed. 


ANNISQUAM 

AS IS THE custom the season began 
with the Fourth of July luncheon, 
yachting in the afternoon and dancing 
in the evening at the club house at 
which several hundred of the colon- 
ists foregathered in the usually neigh- 
borly fashion. The tempo at Squam 
has always been moderate and leisure- 
ly and continues so yachting being em- 
phasized. 

Arthur F. Bragdon and Miss Mary 
D. Bragdon from Quincy are at their 
Leonard street home for the season. 

Mrs. Harriet H. Mayer and her 
edaughter, Mrs. Katherine Cook from 
Princeton, N. J., have opened ‘Seven 
Acres” for the season. 

Joseph P. Cox and family from West 
Roxbury are at their Diamond Cove 
cottage. 

Mrs. Joseph Damon of Newton has 
opened her Cambridge avenue cottage 
and is here for the season. With her 
are her daughter, Mrs. J. W. Little- 
field and her brother, W. Pastorius 
also from Newton. 

Mrs. I. T. Cook of St. Louis is at 
her Leonard street home. 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul H. Means from 
Cambridge are at their cottage on 
Madam Goss hill. 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Searns and 
children from Winchester are at the 
Wiggin cottage, Leonard street, for 
the season. 

William V. Fawcett and family of 
Newton have returned to the “Old 





( ee 42 
6S ae 


Custom House,” River road, for the 
summer. 

Miss Gertrude Whittemore of Bos- 
ton has leased ‘‘Dyerholm” cottage 
for the season’s occupancy. 


Mr. and Mrs. Hollis French of 
Southboro have come to their summer 
house in Squam Rock road and have 
as guests, Mr. and Mrs. Alden F. Me- 
grew of Wisconsin. 

The Old Mill on the Causeway has 
new occupants this season, having 
been taken by Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Ells of Cambridge. With them are 
Bobby and Billy Cushman, Mrs. Ells’ 
sons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Bush and 
Miss Mary D. Bush of Brookline have 
returned to the “Bray” cottage, Sun- 
set Hill, for the season. 

Prof. and Mrs. J. W. Rankin of St. 
Louis have returned to the Lane cot- 
tage in Arlington street which they 
had last summer. 

Mrs. R. Pope of Concord has taken 
the Davis cottage, Pleasant Point, for 
a stay into the fall. 

Frank W. Hastings of Cambridge 
and family, one of the oldest in sum- 
mer residence here, are enjoying 
another season at “Shore Leave” cot- 
tage in River road. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ely of Boston 
came in June to their home, the colo- 
nial Moore house at the head of Lob- 
ster Cove. 

Dr. Phillips E. Osgood, rector of 
Emmanuel church, Boston, whose fam- 
ily have their summer home here, will 
be in Britain this summer having been 
chosen as one of the prominent 
preachers of this country to occupy 
pulpits in England and Scotland. 

Miss Anne Emery of Boston has 
come to ‘Bayberry Ledge” the home 
of the late Professor Charles H. Brad- 
ley, for the summer. Miss Adelaide 
Bradley, a senior at Vassar, has joined 
her family for a stay into July. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Felton of Bos- 
ton are occupying the Leonard street 
summer house. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving R. Merriam of 
Dorchester have come to their summer 


house, “Sunny Ledge,” for an extend- 
ed stay. 


From Brookline come Mr. and Mrs. 
Adolph Leeds, who are here for the 
season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude L. Allen of 
Melrose have opened their house on 
Wigwam Point. Mr. Allen is Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons 
of Massachusetts. 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Ship- 
pen of Boston, who spent the winter 
at Winter Park, Fla., are installed in 
their cottage in Arlington street for a 
stay well into the fall. 

Mrs. Eugene L. Howlett and Miss 
Ruth Howlett, Bostonians who have 
spent the winter in Florida, have 
opened ‘‘Appletrees” cottage for the 
season. 


Mr. and Mrs. James F. Armstrong 
of Holyoke have the Gray cottage, 
Cambridge avenue, for the summer. 

“Rockledge”? on Norwood Heights 
is this season’s summer home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert W. Rice of Boston. 


The family of Ralph H. Willard of 
Belmont have “Edgewise” cottage on 
Squam Rock road for the season. 

The H. D. H. Willams’ house in the 
Hermit Ledge section will be the home 
this season of Walter C. Wilson and 
family of Lowell. 

The Earle cottage is occupied this 
summer by Mrs. Harry C. Ware of 
Cambridge. 

The David Stevens family of Bos- 
ton have come to their Arlington street 
house for the summer. 

William H. Pear and family of 
Cambridge are again in occupancy of 
their summer house in the Rockholm 
district. 

Episcopal services will be held at 
Village hall as has been the custom 
for several years. In connection with 
this work a special meeting for chil- 
dren of six years and over will be held 
Thursday mornings at the summer 
home of Mrs. Blake Townsend, Adams 
Hill road. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Matz of Brook- 
line have come to the Davison bunga- 
low, Chester square, for another sea- 
son. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. D. Bloomberg of 





(Continued on page 12) 


Cape ANN SHORE, July 10, 1936 





MILADY GOES SHOPPING 


Gloucester, Mass. 
Dear Eloise: 


Since I last saw you, I have accepted 
a position as a private secretary to a 
broker, Mr. Marsh. He is a very con- 
servative sort of man, and rather easy 
to work for. I met Mrs. Marsh the 
other day, and she is the exact opposite. 
She told me her whole family history; 
also that of her daughter, Joan, had just 
been married and was on her honey- 
moon. She asked me if I liked swim- 
ming, boating, tennis, dancing and other 
sports, and when I said that I did, she 
thought I would make a good companion 
for her when she went to Gloucester for 
the summer—so here I am—a private 
secretary and a companion. 


Mr. Marsh has been away on a busi- 
ness trip, and I have been almost crazy 
trying to keep up with Mrs. Marsh. We 
just don our bathing suits and she de- 
cides that she wants to go horseback 
riding; then she changes her mind and 
suggests boating—one never knows 
what she is going to do next. 


When Mr. Marsh came back, he told 
us he had bought a house for his daugh- 
ter, Joan (the one who had just been 
married), and he thought it would be a 
good idea if we furnished it for her as 
a surprise. We had several weeks in 
which to do this as Joan and her hus- 
band had planned quite an extensive 
trip. 

However, we thought we had better 
start right away as Mr. Marsh always 
says ““Haste makes waste.” 

Mr. Marsh had already been to the 


\Cooperative Bank to borrow money to 


buy the house. (He always transaces 
business in this way.) He said he se- 
lected this bank because of its efficiency, 
and the facility of the payment plan. 

There were so many things to be done 
that we were in a turmoil as to where 
to begin. 

Then Mr. Marsh mentioned Horn- 
blower and Weeks and said he must 
send a telegram to them about some in- 
vestments he was to investigate. This 
meant nothing to me so I told him I 
would walk around down town and wait 
for him. 

I sauntered along Main street not 
missing a thing in any window, as you 
know how I adore window-shopping. 
Just then a bright-colored awning at- 
tracted my attention—a new store in 
Gloucester—The Mimi Shop. Being a 
woman, and you know what that means, 
I just had to go in and look around. 
They carry all the latest styles at the 
most reasonable prices—culottes, silk 
and cotton dresses, and even formal eve- 
ning gowns. For a minute, I forgot the 
poor bride and started to try on innu- 
merable dresses for myself. I finally 
found one that I just had to have, and 
of course I bought a pair of culottes— 
the most striking shade of blue—every- 
body’s wearing culottes, you know. 
They come in all different shades. 


When I came out of the Mimi Shop, 

I met Mr. Marsh, who had just been in 
the gas and electric companies to in- 
quire about having gas and electricity 
connected in the house. He said he had 
seen an Everhot Automatic Roaster in 
there that he was sure his daughter 
would like, and he wanted me to go in 
to look at it. Oh, Eloise, it was grand. 
It is designed for easy cooking at a sav- 
ing. In one operation, you can cook a 
complete meal, or any of your favorite 
dishes — meats, vegetables, biscuits, 
cakes, pies, pancakes, fried chicken, 
French toast—with complete assurance 
of satisfactory results. 

- Just place the food in the roaster, and 
you need pay no more attention to it. 
Thermostatic control automatically reg- 
ulates temperature; less watching is 


Lovely To Look At 


Ue eee 


GLOUCESTER 


AQ 


ST eee 


Delightful To Wear! 


MIMI’S 


SOLVES THE SECRET OF SMARTNESS AND ALLURE 
DRESSES AND ACESSORIES 


82 Main Street 


1] 


necessary. Meats baste themselves in 
their own juices. Full flavors and 
health-building mineral and juices are 
retained. I knew this was just the 
thing for Joan as I heard rumors that 
she is like her mother—she never could 
cook! 


Oh, yes, I almost forgot to tell you 
about Mrs. Marsh. She is really a dear, 
but I am afraid she is so busy doing a 
lot of things that she never gets to do 
one thing well. 

The other day she fell out of a speed 
boat going at top-speed and nearly broke 
her neck, but she thought it “Oh so 
thrilling!” because a handsome life- 
guard saved her. 


Now to get back to my shopping list; 
a refrigerator of some sort was inevi- 
table, so we went in to the Cape Pond 
Ice Co. to brouse around and there 
found just what we wanted, the Cooler- 
ator. These are very convenient as they 
need be re-iced only once every four to 
seven days, under ordinary conditions, 
and while re-icing it is not necessary to 
remove the old pieces—no defrosting— 
no mess on the floor. 

After hearing the salesman tell us 
about all the delicious foods that could 
be cooled in this Coolerator, my stomach 
began to feel a bit empty. I was 
tempted to suggest luncheon to Mr. 
Marsh, but he evidently had the same 
idea. We had heard a great deal about 
the Stage Coach Inn so we decided to 
try it. We found it located in Glouces- 
ter on the highway between Gloucester 
and Essex. This old Inn, built about 
1649, is one of the earliest in New Eng- 
land. Here, today, as in days of yore, 
may be found the heritage of State 
Coach days—Food—Rest—Good Cheer 
—and Hospitality, of which the Inn is 
so suggestive. 

After we left the Stage Coach Inn, 
feeling sufficiently replenished, Mr. 
Marsh noted that his finances were be- 
coming depleted, so we went to the Cape 
Ann National Bank to withdraw some 
money. 

Joan had bought some unpainted kit- 
chen furniture, and Mr. Marsh thought 
it would be a good idea if it were all 


iy 


eee 


MASS. 


PT 


12 


painted when she returned, so we went 
to L. E. Andrews to buy the paint. 
There was such an assortment of paints 
we were at a standstill. But, knowing, 
Joan liked bright colors, I suggested 
Ivory and red. Of course, Mr. Marsh 
not an expert on house furnishings, left 
the decision to me, so ivory and red it 
was. 

That was really all I meant to do in 
L. E. Andrews, as there was so much 
else to be done; but as I was walking 
out, I spied a breakfast set that would 
go perfectly with the furniture, and so 
inexpensively priced that I suggested to 
was up to me, so I took it. Mr. Marsh 
Mr. Marsh that we buy it. He said it 
is such a dear! 

As we were coming out of L. E. An- 
drews, as luck would have it, I put my 
hand in my pocket and found the list of 
articles that Maybelle, the cook, had 
told me to get in the First National 
Store. No wonder Maybelle sent me to 
the First National Store. They have 
almost everything and what they sell is 
of the best quality. But there was one 
thing that was lacking in our purchases 
and we would not be without them— 
Groton’s Ready-to-Fry Codfish Cakes. 
With my next letter, I will send you a 
carton of them to try—they’re delicious. 

I glanced at my watch and it was two 
forty-five—just time to make a deposit 
of part of my salary at the Gloucester 
National Bank. If I had kept all my 
money with me, I certainly would have 
spent it on the wonderful bargains and 
assortments in the Gloucester stores! 

We dashed home as I thought there 
might be some mail I would have time 
to answer before dinner. The first part 
of the mail was of not much importance 
to me, but I’ll say the last letter was. 
It informed me that Mr. Marsh had a 
son at college who would be home in two 
or three days. That surely is something 
to look forward to. 

Mrs. Marsh has the curlers caught in 
her hair and is screaming madly—I 
suppose I must go and set the captive 
free. 

So long, 





C. ANNE SHORE. 


ANNISQUAM 


(Continued from page 10) 
Chestnut Hill have taken the Ives 
house in Norwood Heights for the sea- 
son’s stay. 


ee ee eee en ee eke 








Care ANN SHorg, July 10, 1936 





Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Stone of Bel- 
mont are this season’s occupants of 
the Woodbury cottage at Diamond 
Cove. 


BASS ROCKS 





The opening of the Bass Rocks Golf 
Club on Sunday, June 28, was signal- 
ized by a most delightful party. As 
usual the Club has its affairs started off 
with a bang! There have been several 
luncheons with Mrs. John Nash, Mrs. 
Charles Wilson, Mrs. Victor Kauffman 
as hostesses and a special luncheon by 
the committee. The same capable com- 
mittee as last season will officiate. Miss 
Clara C. Gilbert is chairman of the 
ladies committee, with Mrs. John Nash 
treasurer and Mrs. John L. Barr secre- 
tary. Others on the committee are Mrs. 
Edward B. Sargent, Mrs. William D. 
Elwell, Mrs. John Newell, Mrs. Fran- 
cis A. Brewer, Mrs. C. Braxton Dal- 
lam, Miss Harriette Ellis, Mrs. Ray- 
mond S. Farr, Miss Amelia F. C. Jar- 
vie, Mrs. Victor Kauffman, Miss Emily 
McGuckin, Mrs. Charles R. Ogilby, Mrs. 
Arthur T. Safford, Miss Helen T. Shaw, 
Mrs. Fred A. Singleton, Mrs. James L. 
Stuart, Mrs. Edward C. Wilson, Mrs. 
Charles P. White, Mrs. Harry T. Har- 
mon, Mrs. John 8. Nash, Mrs. Horace 
F. Baker, Mrs. Frederick G. Boyce, Jr. 
and Mrs. Sterne. 

The Golf Club “Did the Fourth up 
right” with a dinner on Saturday eve- 
ning wtih the charming Mrs. Wilson 
and Mrs. Elwell as_ hostesses, after 
which there was a grand display of 
fireworks on the Green. 

The summer colony will regret to 
learn of the death of Almeda, wife of 
Lester A .Barr during the past winter. 
Her passing is a great loss to all who 
knew her. Mr. and Mrs. Barr of 
Washington have spent many summers 
at their beautiful home “Casa Del 
Mar.” 

Andrew N. Winslow Jr., and family 
of Boston are established in the Fleitz 
cottage for another season. 


“Felsensprung,” has been taken for 
the season by Harry G. Stoddard and 
family of Worcester. They have had 
this cottage for three seasons. 

Mrs. John McGaw Foster of Cam- 
bridge is again with us at her lovely 
home on Atlantic Road. 

The Misses Harriette and Kate Ellis 


of Brookline have returned to their 
home on Beach road for the season. 

The James W. Newells of Brookline 
are passing the summer at their cot- 
tage on Nautilus road. 


New comers to Cape Ann this season, 
are Mr. and Mrs. Charlton of Belmont. 
They are occupying the Newell cottage 
on Beach road. 

Another new-comer to Bass Rocks is 
Edward Cantor from Brighton. Mr. 
Cantor who is summering at the Conant 
cottage on Beach road, is a theatrical 
and radio worker. 

Mrs. Frederick A. Singleton of 
Brookline has come to the Singleton 
cottage, Atlantic road for another sea- 
son. 

Raymond L. Royce and family of 
Brookline are again at “Highcliffe 
Lodge” for the season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. Safford of 
Lowell have again returned to their 
cottage on Cape Ann for another sum- 
mer, 

Arriving at their summer house 
“Krossanes,” are Mr. and Mrs. George 
Fuller of Worcester. 

Philip Duprey and family of Wor- 
cester have returned to their summer 
house on Atlantic road. 

Sears B. Condit and family of Chest- 
nut street, Boston, are among the regu- 
lar Bass Rocks cottagers returning to 
their cottage, ‘“On-a-Ledge,”’ Page 
street. 

At their summer home is Francis A. 
Brewer and family of Brookline. 

Mrs. John F. Nash of Syracuse, who 
has come to Bass Rocks for many sea- 
sons, has returned to her cottage. 

At the corner of Brier and Souther 
roads is the cottage occupied by the 
William H. Taylors of the Bronx. 

Mrs. Robert W. Pogue is at her sum- 
mer estate. 

The Horace A. Bakers are occupy- 
ing the Bratenahl estate this season. 

Mr. Charles M. Davidson of Welles- 
ley Hills is summering at the Cooper 
cottage, Atlantic road. 

At the Dr. Broughton cottage, Way 
road, is Mrs. J. H. Sypher and daugh- 
ter of Washington. Last season Mrs. 
Sypher was at Eastern Point. 

Mr. Palmer Lloyd has the Souther 
cottage on Beach road, opposite the 
Golf Club. 

From Cincinnati comes Mrs. Edward 
B. Sargent to open her cottage “Clov- 
elly-by-the-Sea.” 


aa aaa aaa aaa aaa" Maa 


CHANTICLEER ICE CREAM 


DELIVERIES TO ALL PARTS OF THE CAPE Telephone 485 53 and 55 Washington Street - 


“A PAL FOR YOUR PALATE” 


Gloucester 


re eee REESE ESE RSE CORO OCG G SCS RSS ERR ee ee ee ee ee ee Eke he Ee ned nh En ged Ed eEe dened an tatatah tl 


CapE ANN SHorRE, July 10, 1936 








Gloucester Co-operative Bank 


85 Middle Street 


Specialists in Home Owning Mortgages. Fifty 
years of service to the home owners of Cape Ann 
is our passport for your consideration when in 
need of money for mortgages or repairs. 


always on sale. 


Assets 
$4,200,000 


Louis Fitch and family have opened 
the Chickering cottage, Atlantic ave. 

Mrs. Henry C. Carter of New York 
has opened her cottage in Beach road 
and Atlantic avenue for the season. 

The Steele cottage on Beach road is 
once again ocupied by Mr. John Shea 
and family. 

Mr. William H. Flippen and family 
of Dallas, Texas, are spending the sea- 
son at Lighthouse Lodge formerly the 
Club Neptune. 

The Reed cottage, Nautilus road has 
been taken for the season by the Wil- 
liam Masons. 

All the way from Cuba comes Mr. 
Maurice J. Leonard and family to a cot- 
tage on Beach road. 

“Bdgemoor” in Page street has again 
been opened by Mrs. Frederick C. Stoe- 
pel of Detroit. 

For the summer, have come Mrs. 
Pembroke Lea Thom and family of 
Baltimore to “Overledge.” 

The Misses Anna D. and Bertha D. 
Hubbell of Rochester, N. Y. have re- 
turned to their cottage. 

Dr. George M. Dorrance and family 
of Philadelphia are again the occupants 
of “Twin Light Manor” which they 
purchased last season. 


EAST GLOUCESTER 





WE—summer and permanent resi- 
dents alike—shall miss the cheery and 
friendly greeting of Piatt Andrew as 
he came through the town in the 
morning. Coming here as a boy he 
became merged into the life of this 
old New England seaport. Going forth 
to war—for human rights—and into 
the halls of Congress, cut off in his 
prime at the peak of his capacity at 
a time when men of such equipment 
are sorely needed at the helm of the 
ship of state. ‘‘Did ye ken John Peel?” 

Miss Marcia Taylor and mother of 
Boston, annual summer residents, 


Surplus and Guarantees Fund 
$323,711.03 


13 





L. E. ANDREWS & CO. 


Hardware, Heating and Plumbing 


Paints, 


Shares 


Kitchen Furnishings, 


Hardware of all descriptions. 
work, Yachting Hardware, Garden Hose, etc. 


’Phones 645 and 646 


Contractors 


Garden Tools, Prepared 


Vessel 


121 MAIN STREET, GLOUCESTER 


have arrived at their cottage on East 
Main street. 

Robert Voorhees of Fort Myers, 
Florida, has arrived for the season. 

Hildur C. Ahl of Boston has come 
to her cottage, Mt. Pleasant avenue, 
for the season. 

Herbert Turner, writer, and niece, 
Mildred Copperman, the artist, who 
have been spending the past three 
years in Europe, are at present in 
Spain. Mr. Turner and Miss Copper- 
man have spent several seasons in 
East Gloucester. 

Dr. E. A. Kalbfleisch of Boston has 
arrived for the season and has an 
apartment at Mrs. William Osler’s on 
Mt. Pleasant avenue. 

Dr. Clifton W. Harrington and fam- 
ily of Brookline, have arrived at ““Echo 
Lodge,” Ledge road. 


The Cape Ann Garden Club held 
its first meeting of the summer June 
25, at the home of Mrs. A. A. Hoeh- 
ling, Grape Vine road. Donald Wy- 
man of the Arnold Arboretum spoke 
on “Flowering Trees and Shrubs.” 

This club with a membership of one 
hundred and a substantial waiting list 
has a well earned reputation on the 
North Shore and among the federated 
garden clubs of the State. 

Mrs. Bratenahl has resigned as pres- 
ident, as she will not be in Gloucester 
this year, and Miss Eleanor H. Jones 
of Magnolia chosen in her place. 

Other officers are Mrs. James L. 
Stuart, recording secretary, Mrs. 
Harry H. Walker, corresponding sec- 
retary, Mrs. Geo. C. nAdrews, treas- 
urer, and Mrs. Francis A. Brewer, 
head of program. The exhibition com- 
mittee included Mrs. Norton, Mrs. 
Brown, Mrs. Max L. Talbot, and Mrs. 
Samuel H. Pillsbury. 

Members of the executive commit- 
tee (ex officio) are Mrs. Leslie Bus- 
well, Mrs. M. Anderson Case, Miss 
Louise Condit, Mrs. Guy Cunningham, 





(Opposite Waiting Station) 
——SILENT AUTOMATIC OIL BURNERS=— 





Miss Alice A. Scott, Mrs. Henry A. 
Wise, Mrs. Isaac S. Hall, Mrs. William 
H. Taylor and Mrs. Sherman Hol- 
comb. 

An interesting event is planned by 
the club for Thursday, August 23, 
when Mrs. Samuel H. Pillsbury and 
Mrs. Chester B. Humphrey will enter- 
tain the club members at Mrs. Hum- 
phrey’s home on Ledge road, East 
Gloucester. Mrs. Henry:A. Wise Wood 
will give an exhibition of her natural 
color-slides of Cape Ann and some of 
its gardens. 





EASTERN POINT 

All roads from the North shore sum- 
mer colony led to the baronial seashore 
home, “Blighty,” of Col. and Mrs. John 
Wing Prentiss on Independence day. 
For that is a red letter date in the 
colonel’s calendar and he observes that 
epochal anniversary in the ancient man- 
ner with the “ample hospitality of the 
forefathers as all true born Americans 
should. Several hundred were in at- 
tendance all wishing Col. and Mrs. 
Prentiss many happy returns of the 
day—and they meant it. They opened 
their home early in June after their 
return from a California vacation of 
several weeks. As usual they will re- 
main over the Christmas holidays. 

Mrs. Margaret Brady Farrell has 
arrived at her estate “Felsenmeer” at 
Grape Vine Cove. 

Mr. and Mrs. Romano will occupy 
the Pew cottage on Farrington ave- 
nue, Eastern Point, this season. 

Mrs. Jacob Leander Loose of Wash- 
ington, has arrived at “Sea Rocks” at 
Eastern Point, for the season. 








ROCKY NECK 





Mrs. Doreas Bartran of Philadel- 
phia and Miss Crebbs of Memphis, 
Tenn., are here in the Breckenridge 





(Continued on page 16) 


14 








Carr ANN Suore, July 10, 1936 


eee EE 


TO MY LADY IN SEARCH OF THE PRACTICAL 
RIGHT VALUES AND COMPLETE VARIETY ARE TO BE FOUND IN THE SHOPS OF 





YACHTING 





The yachting season for Cape 
Ann’s four clubs—the Annisquam, 
Eastern Point, Sandy Bay and Con- 
omo—promises to be fully up to the 
activties of the past five years. 
Eastern Point, besides its regular 
schedule on the water has branched 
out into some house and land activi- 
ties which promise to stimulate in- 
terest in this thriving organization. 

Annisquam the oldest organiza- 
tion on the Cape will as usual sail 
its Saturday and Sunday races and 
“in betweens” with the house com- 
mittee arranging the usual Satur- 
day night assemblies and enter- 
tainments. Its schedule begins 
July 4 and ends Labor Day. 


Sandy Bay, third in point of sen- 
iority, retains the atmosphere of 
the old Cape Ann and Gloucester 
elubs which in their beginnings 
were largely made up of permanent 
residents. 

At Rockport the membership 


composition is about fifty-fifty be- 
tween permanent and summer con- 


tingent. As a result at the cen- 
trally located clubhouse the club 
is kept going as an all-year social 
institution where the members 
foregather at all times thereby 
keeping alive the interest and in 
this way has somewhat an advan- 
tage over the others which fold up 
after the season to reopen in the 
midseason. 

The officers of Sandy Bay com- 
prise George A. Lowe, commodore; 
Homer Clark, vice-commodore; Jo- 
seph T. Higgins, secretary and 
treasurer; Joseph F. Lockett, chair- 
man of the house committee and 
Benton A. Story, chairman racing 
committee. The fixture is divided 
into two sections. The first ex- 
tends from June 21, races to be 
held Saturday and Sunday after- 
noons through July 26. The sec- 
ond series will begin August 1 and 
end September 6. 

Sandy Bay day will be held Au- 
gust 21 and will include an open 
regatta in which Conomo and New- 





GLOUCESTER 


ENJOY THE PASSING HOUR AND 
THE CAPE ANN BREEZE 


Gloucester Society of Artists. 


Incorporated 


THIRTY-SEVENTH 


Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture 


GALLERY 
EASTERN POINT ROAD, GLOUCESTER 


July 4 to August 4, Inclusive 
1936 


Hours: Week Days 10 to 6; Sundays 2 to 6. 


Gallery Phone 3842 








Cape Ann National Bank 


“THE SERVICE BANK” 


154 MAIN ST. GLOUCESTER 


All Branches of Banking 
at this location since 1855 


Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 











Everettq a Eivem® pume: 


Registered Optometrist 
Established 1902 


194 Main Street, 


Gloucester 


Gloucester Auto Bus Cn. 


Exclusive Street Passenger Transportation on Cape Ann, 
Gloucester and East Gloucester, Annisquam, Lanesville, 
Pigeon Cove, Rockport, West Gloucester, Essex, Magnolia, 
Manchester. 


Starter’s Office, 114 Main Street 
Information: Telephone 2195 — Telephone 1675 


buryport will participate. A race 
to the Isle of Shoals is being con- 
sidered at some time in July. John 
Higgins who officiated acceptably 
in the position last year will again 
serve as judge. 

A part of this schedule brings 
back happy memories of the far 
yesteryear when these Isle of 
Shoals races were on the cards of 
the old clubs. The writer partici- 
pated in a number, generally with 
Horatio Babson in his crack 30, the 
Mignon, one of the fastest boats on 
the coast. And speaking of New- 
buryport, its thriving club of those 
days was always on hand with a 
good representation on the big 
“days” on Cape Ann, with the Rodi- 
gras and Jacoby’s and others of 
the forefront yachtsmen of the fine 
old city by the Merrimac at the 
helm of their boats. Yachting in 
recent years, caused by changing 
conditions appears to have lost 
much of this democracy and neigh- 
borliness of the olden time which 
happily Sandy Bay seems to have 
retained. 


GLOUCESTER, June 27—EKast- 
ern Point Yacht Club inaugurated 
its 1936 racing program today with 
a fleet of 16 in the Triangle and 
Cape Cod Knockabout classes. 

After an hour’s postponement 
there was little air stirring when 
the boats were sent away, the Tri- 
angles to thewestern mark off Mag- 
nolia and return, and the little fel- 
lows over a harbor course. 

Injun got the jump, picked up a 
favoring breeze off the eastern 
shore and opened up on a thrash to 
windward as the air freshened 
from the southwest, finishing four 
minutes ahead of Scalene. 

Clipper overtook Tourareg on the 
winward leg, to take the Cape Cod 
Knockabout honors. The sum- 
mary: 

TRIANGLE CLASS 

Name and Owner 
Injun, Hastings Gamage. 1:53 
Sealene, Bobby Elwell... 
Triton, Frederick S. Bacon. 
Spray, Isaac Patch, Jv........ 
Caralcilla, Priscilla Wonson..............2: 
Cursor, William G. Brown, 8d 
Alito, Sylvester Cunningham.. 
Idol, Elizabeth Stewart.......cccsccne 2:11:0 

CAPE COD RNOCKARO EE 
Clipper, Jack Clay, 3d 1:26 
Touareg, Laurence A. Brown, Jr. 1:27:20 
Sylph, Ann W. Kimball 
Popeye, Carroll Wonson..... 
Mickey Mouse, Margaret Smith. 
Fontana, Katharine Ervin........... 


Lucky Wind, Priscilla Turchon.... 
Guerriere, Joan and Ann Raymond > 














INJUN WINS AGAIN 





GLOUCESTER, June 28—In the 
Eastern Point Yacht Club race to- 
day, Injun scored again while 
Three Star took a long-distance 
match race from the Midge II. 


Cape ANN SuHorg, July 10, 1936 





The fleet was sent over the out- 
side triangle in a moderate wester- 
ly and finished in a squall from the 
northwest. The summary: 


TRIANGLE CLASS 

Injun, Hastings Gamage 
Idol, Elizabeth Stewart 
Athlon, W. J. Little 
Cursor, W. G. Brown, 3d ; 
Wheenaw, Francis Brewster, Jr. 
Spray, Parker Whittemore 
Sealene, Bobby Elwell 
Alito, Francis Cunningham 20 
Caralcilla, Priscilla Wonson 2:06:58 

INTERNATIONAL STAR CLASS. 
Three Star, J. S. Raymond, Jr. 2:02:44 
Midge II, Isaac Patch, or. 2:07:10 


PNW WNKNNWnnre 
nm 
a“ 





ALLEGRA AND SANS SOUCI 
AMONG SANDY BAY VICTORS 





ROCKPORT, June 28 — Five 
classes were out for the Sandy Bay 
Yacht Club’s Sunday afternoon re- 
gatta. Winners were Allegra, Sans 
Souci, Jolo, John Buckley’s un- 
named O boat and Greenhorn. The 


summary: 
INTERNATIONAL STAR CLASS 


Name and Owner El Time 
Sans Souci, Homer Clark 2:00 :30 
Maidie III, Gifford Beal. 2:01:45 
Ara, H. G. Bradlee 2:04:30 
Comet, Henry Gowey 2:06:10 
Ibex, Max Kuehne...... Se ey 

TRIANGLE CLASS ron 
Allegra, Jerry Bruno... 759 215 
Menikoe, Tewksbury Brothers... 2:01:35 
Trident, Dr. Roy R. Wheeler #:06:05 


SANDY BAY 15-FOOTERS 


Jolo, Joseph F. Lockett, Jr. 2208 215 
Armajo, Arthur J. Hall 2:11:20 
Myrtice A, Lindley I. Dean 2:15:15 
Bobeno, Benton Story Withdrew 

CLASS O : 
No Name, John D. Buckley 1:56:25 
Big Dipper, Damon Carter 1:58:18 
Hardtack, Fred Davis 1:58:30 
Sea Maid, Edith Cooney 2:00:00 
Jibwah, J. Wain Baker. Withdrew 


PILOT CLASS 
Greenhorn, H. C. Tufts........... 1 13% 
Flash, Thomas Murphy, Jr. Le3 


“1c 


730 
225 


1240 





GAMAGE’S INJUN TOPS 
EASTERN POINT RIVALS 


GLOUCESTER, July 1—The 
Eastern Point Yacht Club inaug- 
urated its mid-week racing pro- 
gram this afternoon for R’s, Tri- 
angles, Stars and Cape Cod Knock- 
abouts, a fleet of 27 coming to the 
line. 

Fluky zephyrs from the south 


southwest prevailed. The sum- 
mary: 
CLASS R—20-RATERS ; 
Name and Owner El Time 
Popinjay, Jacob D. Cox, Jr. :54:20 
Mojala, Mrs. Frances M. Carter.....2:00:40 


TRIANGLE CLASS 
Injun, Hastings Gamage Pei 
Wheenaw, Francis A. Brewer, Jr. 2: 
Cursor, William G. Brown, 3d y 
Athlon, Harry H. Walker 
Kitmer II, Meredith Talbot 
Caralcilla, Priscilla Wonson 
Idol, Elizabeth Stewart....... 
Spray, Parker W. Whittemore 
Alito, Frank Cunningham 
Oriole, Kate Boyce 
Scalene, Mary Baker 


Saturn, Mrs. J. S. Raymond 
Three Stars, J. S. Raymond, Jr. 
Star of India, Elizabeth Ogilby 
Midge II, Isaac Patch, Jr. ; 
CAPE COD KNOCKABOUTS 
Popeye, Carroll Wonson 1:2 
Sylph, Ann W. Kimball 1 
Arethusa, Ronney Swift 1 
Tourareg, Lawrence A. Brown, Jr. 1: 
Mickey Mouse, Margaret Smith....1:¢ 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 





Lucky Wind, Priscilla Wonson 
Swan, Meriam Ervin 

Old Ironsides, Joan Raymond 
Fontana, Katharine Ervin 
Guerriere, Ann Raymond 
Clipper, Jack Clay, 3d 


:40 210 
Withdrew 


POPINJAY BEATS MOJALA 
IN EASTERN POINT RACE 


GLOUCESTER, July 4 — The 
wind this afternoon was from all 








Right Nearby 


is a First National Store that is 
ready and waiting to give you the 
same courteous service, the same 
saving prices on high quality foods 
that you have been accustomed to 
getting at home. The manager will 
welcome the opportunity to serve 


you, during your summer stay. 


FIRST NATIONAL 
STORES cINe 


57 WASHINGTON ST. 37 MAIN ST. 
ROCKPORT 





THE ROCKAWAY 


AND COTTAGES 
At ROCKY NECK, EAST GLOUCESTER 


Right on the Water 
Commanding a Superb View of the Ocean 


Accommodates 400 W. A. Publicover, Proprietor 








INSURE 


JOHNSON 


GLOUCESTER NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 
TELEPHONES 16 AND 67 








SUT 


Pringle’s History of Gloucester, 1892 


The Gloucester Tercentenary Book 


ALSO FOUR LOG BOOKS OF DEEP SEA 
VOYAGES 


FOR SALE AT 


BLANCHARD'S 


125 MAIN STREET GLOUCESTER 


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15 





points, hauling from northeast to 
west during the progress of the 
Eastern Yacht Club races. 

The Triangles and Stars were 
out of luck early in the game. Ma- 
rooned in the doldrums just abreast 
of Norman’s Woe, they were forced 
eventually to give up and return. 

The Knockabouts on the inside 
course were better favored and 
managed to catch an air that took 
them to the finish line just within 
the limit. Summary: 

20-RATERS CLASS 

Boat and Owner El Time 
Popinjay, Jacob D. Cox J@erecne.2 188 280 
Mojala, Mrs. Frances M. Cartev......2:34:17 

CAPE COD KNOCKABOUTS 
Clipper, Jack Clay 3d 
Arethusa, Mary Jane Ellis... aoe 4 
Lucky Wind, Priscilla Turchon......2:03:41 
Mickey Mouse, Margaret Smith......2:03:50 
Popeye, Carroll Wonson.... 


Sylph, Ann W. Kimball....... 
Old Ironsides, Joan Raymond. 











Lucky Duck, Nancy Poole... 

Guerrierre, Ann Raymond ..2 326320 
Swan, Merian Ervin. .Withdrew 
Fontana, Katharine Ervin. Withdrew 





Touareg, Laurence A. Brown Jr. Withdrew 


MAIDEE EASILY WINS STAR 
CLASS AT SANDY BAY, Y. C. 


ROCKPORT, July 4—Sandy Bay 
racing this afternoon was over a 
triangular course twice sailed, a 
light southwest wind holding 
throughout. 

Maidee won‘easily in the Stars. 
The Lockett boat Jolo handicapped 
by a poor start, slowly ran down 
the field and at the close of the 
first round was in the lead to the 
finish. The summary: 


INTERNATIONAL STAR CLASS 
Boat and Owner 
Maidie III, Gifford Beal... 
Eclipse, Guy Hale................ 
California, Currier Smith 
Comet, Harry Gowey.... 
Ara, H. G. Bradlee... 
Ibex, Max Kuehne ta sued 
TRIANGLE CLASS 
Allegra, Jerry Bruno... 
Menikoe, Tewksbury B Dacca 
Trident, Dr. Roy Wheelev..................... 2:12:10 
SANDY BAY 15-FOOTER 
















Jolo, Joseph F. Lockett Jr wan 22350 
Myrtice, A. Lindley I. Dean 23238315 
Armajo, Arthur J. Hall...... ae eeetlo 
Robeno, Benton C. Story... 2 284215 





CLASS O 

Big Dipper, Damon Cartev...... 

Hardtack, Fred Davis........ 
Sandboy, Reynolds Beal. 

Sea Maid, Edith Cooney... 

Jibwah, J. Wain Bakerv......... 

PILOT CLASS 

Flash, Thomas Murphy Jr. 

Greenhorn, H. C, Tufts......... 

Shirleydee, Tom Johnson... 


BOBOLINK AND ELL TAKE 
ANNISQUAM CLUB RACES 


GLOUCESTER, July 4—Donald 
Usher, in Bobolink, sailed through 
the fog first to win the Bird Class 
race at Annisquam Yacht Club this 
afternoon. Bill Cole’s Eel led the 
Fish Class home. 

Nearly 250 persons attended the 
welcome home dinner at the eclub- 
house tonight. The summary: 


FISH CLASS 
Name and Owner 

Eel, William B. Cole wove 545 287 
Shad, Dick Mechem ssiaeiale 
Barracuda Jr., John D. Worcester 1: 
Perch, Harry Griffin ; ay 
Mlackfish, Kirkham Cornwell... 
Sailfish, Paul Littlefield x 
Sea Horse, Barbara Mechem..... 
Kingfish, Robert Cushman... 
Pompano, Fred Cobb Jr 
Tarpon, John Lowe te 
Dolphin, W. D. Swan Jr. 
Jellyfish, John Tolmie ie 2 
Hippocampus Jr., Rosamond Riley 2:12:21 





(Continued on page 17) 


16 


Cape ANN SHORE, July 10, 1936 


— 


ROCKY NECK 





(Continued from page 14) 





apartment on Rocky Neck avenue for 
another season. 

Mrs. William Eaton of Wellesley 
has arrived at her studio on Rocky 
Neck avenue for the summer. 

Mrs. Dora McKissock of Manches- 
ter, N. H., has arrived at her studio 
for the season’s stay. 

Ralph Sayles of Boston has opened 
his cottage the “Sea Gull.” 

Professor Herbert Knissin of Rut- 
gers college, N. B., N. J., has arrived 
at his studio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell L. Mallman of 
Brookline have come to their studio 


for the summer. 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Fulton of 


Springfield have arrived at the ‘Old 
Antiques.” 

Benjamin Thompson and family of 
Medford are occupying their summer 
home, Wonson street. 

Miss Jean Chamberlain of Hotel Al- 
bert, New York, has arrived at her 
studio on Rocky Neck avenue for the 
season. 

Ralph McKay and family of Cam- 
bridge are returning to the Turner 
apartment on Rocky Neck avenue this 
season. 

Donald Perkins and family of Balti- 
more, have leased the Colby house, 
Wiley street. They have occupied the 
Wesllman cottage on Wonson street, 
the past two seasons. 

Mrs. Clarence Smith of Philadel- 
phia, has arrived at her cottage in 
Wiley street. 

Miss Edith Hobbs and Miss Luella 
Richardson, who have been spending 
the winter in West Palm Beach, Fla., 
returned in June to “The Red Chev- 
ron,” Rocky Neck avenue. 





BEARSKIN NECK 





Miss Irene Newman of New York 
City has arrived for the season and is 
staying as usual at Bearskin Neck. 

The float at Front beach is at its 
usual summer location and the early 
season bathers are enjoying it as 
usual. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dawson-Watson of 


NICHOLS CANDY KITCHEN 
HOME MADE CANDIES TO SATISFY THE 
SWEETEST TOOTH 
Quality Candies At a Reasonable Price 
Come In and See It Made 
GLOUCESTER, MASS. 


46 MAIN ST. 


San Antonio, Texas, are at the studiocottages, Bearskin Neck for the sea- 


on Dock square they have occupied 
several seasons. 

Miss Hazel Kimball of New York, 
has returned for her second season in 
Rockport. She has taken the building 
in Dock square, formerly occupied by 
Parady’s fish market. 

Miss Helen P. Abbott of New York 
and Miss Mary McBride are at their 
home in Caleb’s lane. 

Michael Hintlian of Newton is occu- 
pying one of the George W. Harvey’s 
houses on Marmion way for the sea- 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Arms Fisher 
of Boston have arrived at their home 
off Eden road for the summer. 

Jean Davis of Cleveland has joined 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Davis, who are occupying the Went- 
worth cottage, Marmion way. 

Mrs. Francis Pierce and Miss Helen 
G. Moseley of Hotel Tudor, Boston, 
have arrived at their summer resi- 
dence, Marmion way. 


Miss Josephine Beesaw of Cleve- 
land is occupying the Woodbury cot- 
tage, Briarstone road. 

Mrs. James Seales and daughter of 
Hudson, O., have arrived for the sea- 
son at their home on the Headlands. 
Mr. Scales will join them later in the 
season. 

Mrs. Mera Beckler of Evanston, IIl., 
has arrived for the summer season 
occupying a cottage on York avenue 
off Marmion way. 

Completed Work 

The bas-relief which Richard Rec- 
chia has been making of Stuart Tod 
has been placed on the cross on the 
Tod lot at the Beach Grove cemetery. 
The work is a fine head of Mr. Tod 
and was made from pictures in Mr. 
Recchia’s possession. 

Mrs. Edith Akerly and daughter 
Telea and Stow Wengenroth of New 
York City have arrived at the Perri- 
gard studio, Dock square, for the sea- 
son. 

Ivar Rose has arrived for the sea- 
son at one of the Savage studios, 
Main street. This is his fourth season 
in Rockport. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert F. Jacobson 
of New York City, artists, are occupy- 
ing one of the Dr. William R. Irving 


85 MIDDLE STREET 








son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. McNulty 
of New York City have arrived at the 
Harbor View, Bearskin Neck, for the 
summer season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jon Corbino of New 
York City are stopping with Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Johnson, Jewett street. 
They have a studio in Haskins block 
for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Sturtevant 
and Mr. White of Springfield, who oc- 
cupy the last house on Bearskin Neck, 
have arrived for the season. Mr. Stur- 
tevant has recently recovered from an 
operation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fracker of 
Manchester, N. H., are established at 
their cottage on Bearskin Neck. 


LONG BEACH 





Mr. and Mrs. Albert Carey of Bel- 
mont are spending the season at their 
cottage the ‘‘Breakers.”’ 


“Umatella” is occupied for the sea- 
son by Mrs. Stephen Biddle and chil- 
dren, Joy, Stephen, and Nancy. They 
come from Cambridge. 

Dr. C. A. Bonner and family are 
spending their sixth season at their 
cottage. 


Mary, William, Alice with their 
parents Mr. and Mrs. Ryan, have come 
from Lowell to spend the summer at 
their cottage. 

From Gloucester come Mr. and 
Mrs. John B. Hale and daughter, Mrs. 
Lawrence Morss of Medford, and 
children. They have spent many sea- 
sons at their cottage. 

“Whip-poor-will” is again occupied 
by Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Harrison of 
Gloucester. 

At the Beach again this season is 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Johnson and 
daughter Miriam of Woburn. Their 
cottage is the Sandpiper. 

Mr. and Mrs. Angus D. Martin of © 
Quincy, their daughters, Ruth and 
Marjorie, and son Howard are occupy- 
ing the Hartsville cottage. 

Among those enjoying the season 
here are Mr. and Mrs. Richard Tutton 
of West Medford, parents of Mrs. 
Hirons. 


PLEASURE BOATS 
Sailing and Fishing Trips 

CAPABLE SEAMEN 

Power and Sail Boats For Hire 


BICKFORD BOAT LIVERY 
ROCKY NECK AVE. 


IN CHARGE 


EAST GLOUCESTER 
Telephone 1020 


Cape ANN SHoRE, July 10, 1936 17 


nn ee ee eeennnnnnEEEnEnEEEnI IRIE 
——————— 











. b faa) tie wl 2:16:56 ANNISQUAM Y. C. Jean and Dick, H. V. Farnsworth 2:04:50 
old Dah, Mins) Aasslane ee JOLO WIN AT ROCKPORT SUNDAY RACES JULY 5 Bobcat, Richard Hillccccssunmoe 2:09:10 
Shark II, Arthur Jamison 2: 35 ia fs Alice, Vincent Farnsworth... ssn She $20 
ra, Br Crawford 2:24:37 - ‘ Wind, Southest 
eta ig pony Ely. a Withdrew ROCKPORT, July 5—A light Epa y ah SNIPE CLASS 
southerly shifting all the way ; Coot, F. P. Richardson 2:02:35 
BIRD CLASS Name and Owner El Time Tip, C. iH. King... 2:00: 
round gave the five classes at Wren, Robert Lufkin. ?16:10 Duck, S. J. Fillebrown. 2:01:10 


Bobolink, Donald K. Usher 
Wren, Rose Lufkin 

Oriole, Lou and Bob Mechem 
Avis, Norman 

Canvasback 


: Bobolink, Donald K. Usher. 
Sandy Bay a reach around their amicus Pash Woodbury 


triangular courses this afternoon. Oriole, John and Robert Mechem 
A Avis, Norman Olson...... 
In all but one class the winner led Ganvasback, Robert G. Cox. 


from the start. Oloof, Evelyn Woodbury... 


mwnwmw we 


EASTERN POINT—MIDWEEK 





eee one aul Woodbury However, in the 15-footers, Bo- FISH BOATS REGULAR 
beno and Jolo became involved in a Blue Division 
luffing match at the end of the first Dab, David Dennison GLOUCESTER, July 3— 
rT = ; My 
STAR OF INDIA WINS round which resulted in Bobeno’s Eel Bill Cole. 


‘ A 5 Tarpon, John Lowe 
fouling Jolo and withdrawing. The Perch, Harry M. Griffin 
Sailfish, Paul D. Littlefield 


" summary: Kingfish, Robert Cushman 
GLOUCESTER, July 5—Three Dolshin, Bille swells ae 
classes started this afternoon at 


Twenty-nine boats, including two 
Sonders participated in the mid- 
week yacht racing Wednesday af- 






























E ; f tri ice TRIANGLE CLASS Red Division ternoon, a fair sou sou west breeze 
astern Point over a triangular Name and Owner El Time Blackfish, Kirkham Cornwell 1:20:00 ss 4 
course in a moderate but fluky Menikoe, Tewksbury Brothers.......2:27:54 Shad, Robert Mechem..... 1:29:01 prevailing. The summary: 
‘ Allegra, Jerry Bruno w.-2!32:08 Goldfish, Caroline Haviland 1 
southeast breeze. Trident, Dr. Roy Wheeler Withdrew Barracuda Jr., John Worcester.....1:34:2! CLASS R—20-RATERS 
INTERNATIONAL STAR CLASS Jellyfish, J. Tolmie............ 1:39:45 : 
The real contest of the day was Maidie III, Gifford Beal vonee2218208 Shark II, A. Jameson...... 1 Mojala, Mrs. Frances M. Carter.....1:51:59 
4 i : California, M. Currier Smith 2:26:28 Pompano, Fred Cobb 1 Popinjay, Jacob D. Cox, JT 1:52:07 
in the Star Class which was nip Kcelipse, Guy Hale w-2127:54 Hippocampus, R. Riley 1 
5 4 ‘ mona ce 120). : pe f LE CLASS 
and tuck between Mrs. Ogilby in [Tbex, Max Kuehne 2:30:26 Sculpin, Peter Ely . ee 
Ke Comet, Harry Gowey.. snore 2:31:25 Navarra, B. Crawford Disabled . aati x 
the St Pl ind: di Jack RB Aaa oe SG Brad 2:31:52 ’ Injun, Hastings Gamage... a 
e ar oO ndia an ac ay- SE he ated hea a eae Peg Sealene, Torrance Bakerv......... wed 209 219 
mond at the tiller of Saturn. At SANDY BAY 15-FOOTERS SSS ee Whee ae mee hre 
the close a sharp luffing match be- Jolo, Joseph F. Lockett, Jr............2:387:41 phate: William G. Br ged 
. Armajo, Arthur J. Hall........... 2:40 2238 COMON® POINT Y.-C. Caralciilla, Priscilla Wonson 212229 
tween the two into Quarry Cove Myrtice A, Lindley I. Dean...........2:42:00 BORO T Cen ce seinen Idol, Elbridge Mi Galeccmie 2:12:44 
failed to save the one needed sec- Bobeno, Benton C. Story Withdrew I Alito, Franklin Cunningham... 2:18:88 
andi tar the Raymond oat: The CLASS O Course Triangular, Wind Southeast Oriole; Kate: Boy C@.iicccncctincccnennarne 216 :15 
: Sandboy, Reynolds Beal..........ccc00.2 126134 SONDER CLASS 
summary: “eng Dipper, Damon Carte?................2228 357 ete div. 4 Ell 9104:00 
o Name, John Buckley. 2:29:02 5 Ti eonar fee ee Lo : 
CLASS R 20-RATERS Hardtack, Fred Davis..... 29:28 en en Ge Os perce Tid Ill, Ronney Swift. wna 104 285 
2 Marvis, Dick Hannah. 39:51 “whitefish, H. S. Richardson. INTERNATIONAL STAR CLASS 
Name and Owner El Time Jibwah, J. Wain Bakev............. SMR) Pyare. (eh 1, ibeanoe i Star of India, Isabel_Ogilby.........1 56:39 
Mojala, Mrs. Frances M. Carter.....2:18:25 Sea Maid, Edith Cooney S Withdraw pure ot Three Star, Pauline Raymond... 1:59:02 
Popinjay, Jacob D. Cox, Iierremu.2 219129 Midge II, Isaac Patchy, Iieeecccesss 2:01:37 
PILOT CLASS CAT CLASS & 
PM ANGLE CLASS Bkosnhorn, H.C. Tufts. iannupe ce 0beLS ee Bneby En Ka  SDENCElapngeerana sk CO OcO0. CAPE COD KNOCKABOUTS 
. * ee Flash, Thomas Murphy, Jr...............2:06:05 Kitten, Judith Herson Jarek sO 237 : Be 
Injun, Hastings Gamage 28:36 a 3 5106 >-nn de Clipper, Jack Clay, $d....-. 26:52 
Some mRobert Sydes 33:95 Shirleydee, Tom Johnson wouee2112:00 Mit Me, Lane and Richardson. 2:00:22 Popeye, Carrolle Wousou. 31:55 
Cursor, William G. Brown, 3d 2:88:53 : Touareg, Dorothy Brown 32:53 
Athlon, Harry H. Walker. :39:44 Arethusa, Harriet Swift. 88:40 


Alito, Franklin Cunningham 
Kitmer II, Meredith Talbot... 
Carelcilla, Priscilla Wonson 





Sylph, Ann W. Kimball 
Swan, Meriam Ervin... 


:41:01 A fp A. NUNES ° ART STORE Fontana, Katharine 











WVNYNYKYNYNYNNNWD 
; man 

o 

o 

wo 





1 
1 
1 
1 
Ls 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 





oe Eldridge C. Gale 2:44:21 A Mickey Mouse, Margaret Smi 42:29 
Wheenaw, Francis A. Brewer, Jr. 2:45:35 4 4 4 , Guerriere, Ann Raymond... 40:36 
Scalene, Torrance Baker.. 46:12 rtist Materials and Picture Framing Old Ironsides, Joan Raymond... 42:32 
Oriole, Kate Boyce......... wed 246 232 Oil Paintings and Frames Restored Lucky Duck, Nancy Poole 43:25 
INTERNATIONAL STAR CLASS Hand Carved Frames in Stock and Made to Order Lucky Wind, Priscilla Turchon.....1: 
Star of India, Elizabeth Ogilby....2:52:51 Painting and Decorating 
Saturn, Jonathan S. Raymond... PAGS Wat ay 6 CENTER STREET GLOUCESTER MASS 
Three Star, Jonathan S. Raymond . ? - 
1 ae eB 101255 Tel. 298 Branch at Rocky Neck ROCKPORT GOLF CLUB 
Midge II, Isaac Patch, “Ir. Sap eee ele ERP} July 11 and 12: Qualifying round, Havy 
Cup, sixteen low net to qualify. 
July 18 and 19: Qualifying round, 
Charles Evans Cup, sixteen low net to 


qualify. 
July 24 and 25: N.G.A. Open. 
July 26: Fewest Putts. 


Sta P August 1 and 2: Qualifying for Club 
Championship. 


August 8 and 9: Red and Blue team 


matches. 
nar August 15 and 16: Four ball, best ball, 
low gross and net. 


August 22: ° Best Selected Nine. 


Delphine Studio 


42 EASTERN POINT ROAD 
















Sportswear and 
Accessories 


TWEEDS AND YARNS 








aa August 23: Flag tournament. 
FOR SUITS, SKIRTS 4 mi August 80: Handicap vs. Par. 
AND SWEATERS : . August ir i Bose ball, best ball, low 
302 ESSEX AVENUE GLOUCESTER Sept. 6, 6 and 7: President's Cup, 86 
BUILT IN 1649 holes medal. 
rae EARLY AMERICAN TAVERN 
€ SPECIALIZING IN CHICKEN, STEAK piel 
GLOUCESTER BOOKSHOP AND LOBSTER DINNERS BUSY BEE 
65A MIDDLE STREET A 
ala hone’ 769_M Daily Luncheon TRY OUR Dae SPECIALS 
o 
LENDING LIBRARY ARRANGEMENTS MAY BE MADE FOR BRIDGE VISIT OUR NEW 
GREETING CARDS LUNCHEONS AND SPECIAL PARTIES B E 
EFFIE POOLE KEFFER, Proprietor USY BEE TAP ROOM 
BERNAT YARNS and rm Telephone Gloucester 320 Imported and Domestic Liquors 
KNITTING INSTRUCTION 88 MAIN ST. GLOUCESTER 




















MATSON STUDIO OF 
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOODY’S Summer Beauty Work 
DISTINCTIVE Gloucester’s Oldest Package Store ' 
PORTRAITS CHOICE IMPORTED - DOMESTIC LIQUORS the ip 
Sittings Made In the Home QUALITY - PRICE - SERVICE Facials - Manicuring 
By Appointment FREE DELIVERY SERVICE Special Scalp Treatment 
258 MAIN STREET 
a cnc Bt! Sot aea das GLOUCESTER, MASS. TEL. 2845 Rips rape Ress 











18 


a 


ROCKPORT C. C. 
Directors’ Cup—-July 4 
Qualifying Round—Daniel F. Harris 
Jr., 81-64; A. Richard Carlson, 77-65; 
Dr. Earle R. Andrews, 89-67; J. A. Sud- 


bay, 94-68; Capt. Loren A. Jacobs, 84- 
68; Leon D. Lothrop, 88-70; William 
Nelson, 78-70; Dr. Ronald P. Hallett, 91- 
71; Henry L. Marshall, 92-72; Dick Cole, 
80-72; Rex Bradlee, 90-72; Paul B. Oak- 
ley, 90-72; W. H. Moody, 98-72; S. G. 


H. Fitch, 94-72; Oliver Nelson, 85-72; 
R. C. Aggen, 92-72; Dr. W. F. Winches- 
ter, 99-73; Francis E. Smith, 86-73; J 
B. Wiling, 76-73; Fred Oliver, 100-74; O. 


C. Stiles, 90-74; Russell Tirrell, 84-74; 
Winslow S. Parkhurst, 101-75; Earl O. 
Phillips, 99-75; Leighton H. York, 84- 
76; Dr. Reginald Courant, 97-77; Dr. L. 
F. Coy, 86-78; Dr. Milton Dexter, 104- 


78: W. E. Pearson, 105-79; W. D. Stock- 
ly, 90-79; I. S. Hall, 100-80; Dr. W. J. 





CITY OF GLOUCESTER 





Attention is called to the following provisions of an 
ordinance governing Gloucester Harbor. Sec. 44(a). 


POWER BOATS — MUFFLERS 


(a) Power driven boats shall 
not exceed a speed of ten (10) 
miles per hour in the inner harbor, 
and for the purposes of determin- 
ing what is the inner harbor, same 


shall comprise all the waters of | 


Gloucester harbor lying northeast- 
erly of an imaginary line extend- 
ing from the spindle standing 
southwesterly of the Tarr & Won- 
son copper paint factory directly 
across to the Fort Wharf, or by 
whatever name said wharf may be 
called. 


(b) Boats with internal com- 
bustion engines shall be provided 
and equipped with a muffler or 
underwater exhause of a type or 
types approved by and used in 
conformity with the rules and reg- 
ulations authorized by the Com- 
missioner of Public Safety, so that 
the noise of the same shall not 
cause unreasonable annoyance to 
persons in the vicinity of said 
boats. 





LOBSTER POTS PROHIBITED 


(c) Lobster or fish pots and 
similar contrivances attached to 
the surface with a rope and buoy 
floating on the surface, shall not 
be set, established, or maintained 
in the channel of Annisquam River, 
nor in the channels of the princi- 
pal arms thereof, nor in the regu- 
larly used fairways in Gloucester 


/harbor and waters adjacent there- 
to, nor within the courses laid out 


for races maintained by the East- 
ern Point Yacht Club and the An- 
nisquam Yacht Club, nor anywhere 
else so as to unreasonably restrict 
the free use and navigation of 
said waters, unless a permit in 
writing is issued by the State De- 
partment of Public Works. 

Any violation of this section 
shall be punished by a fine of 
Twenty Dollars ($20) for each 
offence. 

ALLEN F. GRANT, Clerk, 
A true copy. Attest: 
ALLEN F. GRANT, City Clerk. 


a ee a aa 


FOR YOUR HEALTH’S SAKE 
EAT AT 


Mary’s Kitchen 
70 ROGERS STREET 


The Best Food at Popular Prices 
Wholesome 


Clean - Pure - 


The Only Place Serving Home 
Cooked Food and Pastry 


Superior Dye House 
441, MAIN STREET 


HIGH GRADE CLEANSING 
AND DYEING 


All Kinds Of Alterations 


MEN’S SUITS MADE 
TO ORDER 


ee 
—————————— | 


Samuel Bloomfield 


SUMMER 
REAL ESTATE 


Specializing in 


BASS ROCKS REALTY 


Office: 
53 Bass Ave., East Gloucester 


Tel. 1886 





Steele & Abbott Co. 


Inc. 


287 Main Street Tel. 148 
Paints Wall Paper 
Varnishes Window Glass 
Enamels Mirrors 


Wholesale and Retail 
“The North Shore Painters” 


Leen, 








Good Harbor Beach Inn 


Briar Neck, Gloucester, Mass. 
Ocean View and within one hun- 
dred feet of one of the best 
Bathing Beaches on the New 
England Coast. 


Edwin C. McIntire, 
Managing Proprietor. 





THURSTON’S TAXI 


Telephone 3500 


PACKARD and NASH 
Taxi and Auto Hire 


Opp. Boston & Maine Station 





Office Open Day and Night 


Telephone Connection 


WILLARD S. PIKE 


Funeral Director 


and Embalmer 


Shipping, Transfer and 


Crematory Work 


75 Washington St., Gloucester, Mass. 


FISHING TACKLE 


Motor Boat Supplies, Life Pre- 
servers, Oars, Fire Extin- 
guishers, Lights, Hooks, 
Lines, Rowlocks 


LOTHROP’S PATENT FOG 
HORN 
L. D. LOTHROP SONS 


66 Duncan St. Gloucester 








Powers, 93-80; Louis A. Rogers, 102-82; 
J. J. Jansen, 107-83; Dr. Ralph E. Cun- 
ningham, 109-83; Sumner D. York, 110- 
86; J. T. Day, 128-102. 
Medal Handicap Sweepstakes 
Daniel F. Harris, Jr., 81-64; A. Richard 


Carlson, 77-65; Capt. Loren A. Jacobs, 
84-68; Leon D. Lothrop, 88-70; Dr. 
Ronald P. Hallett, 91-71; J. E. Essen, 
98-72; Rex Bradlee, 90-72; Dick Cole, 
80-72: S. C. H. Fitch, 94-72; W. H. 
Moody, 98-72; Dr. W. F. Winchester, 
99-73: Francis E Smith, 86-73; O. C. 
Stiles, 90-74; Russell Tirrell, 84-74; J. 


D. Amero, 95-75; Leighton H. York, 84- 
76; Dr. Reginald Courant, 97-77; Dr. L. 
F. Coy, 86-78; W. E. Pearson, 95-79; 
Dr. W. J. Powers, 93-80. 








CITY OF GLOUCESTER 


In the year nineteen hundred and 
thirty-two, 
AN ORDINANCE 
providing for certain ISOLATED 
“STOP” signs. 


BE IT ORDAINED BY THE 
MUNICIPAL COUNCIL 


SECTION 1—Every driver of a 
vehicle, bus or other conveyance, 
approaching an intersecting way at 
which there exists facing him, an 
official sign, authorized by this 
Municipal Council, said sign hav- 
ing apart from this regulation, the 
written approval of the Depart- 
ment of Public Works of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, and 
bearing the word “STOP” shall 
before entering and _ proceeding 
through the intersection, bring 
such vehicle, bus or other convey- 
ance to a complete STOP at such 
line as may be clearly marked, or, 
if there is no line so marked, at 
a place between the said sign and 
the line of the street intersection. 

In the case of a line of two or 
more vehicles approaching such 
“STOP” sign, the drivers of the 
second and third vehicles in any 
group shall not be required to 
stop more than once at said desig- 
nated line or place or in the im- 
mediate vicinity. 


This ordinance shall not apply 
when the traffic is otherwise di- 
rected by a police officer or by any 
other lawful traffic regulating sign, 
signal or device. 


SECTION 2—In accordance with 
the foregoing, the Municipal Coun- 
cil hereby authorize the erection 
and maintenance of an _ official 
“STOP” sign or “stop” signs so* 
as to face: 


1—North and southbound drivers 





High Grade Shoe Repairing 
By Up-to-date Factory Methods 


Gloucester Shoe 
Repairing Co. 
A, Pascucci, Mgr. 
83 MAIN ST. GLOUCESTER 





Cape ANN SHore, July 10, 1936 


oo 


on Magnolia avenue at Western 
avenue. 


2—Northbound drivers on Cen- 
tennial avenue at Washington st. 
3—Southbound drivers on Cen- 
tennial avenue at Western avenue. 


4—Southbound drivers on Pros- 
pect street at Main street. 


SECTION 38—Any persons found 
guilty of violating any of the pro- 
visions of this ordinance shall be 
guilty of misdemeanor and may 
be punished by a fine not exceed- 
ing twenty dollars ($20.00) for 
each offence. 

SECTION 4—All acts or parts 
of acts inconsistent herewith are 
hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5 — This ordinance 
shall take effect and be in force 
on and after the expiration of ten 
(10) days from the date of its 
final passage. 

In Municipal Council, April 13, 
1932. 

Passed first and second read- 
ings and to be enrolled. 

ALLEN F. GRANT, City Clerk 

In Municipal Council, April 13, 
1932, Passed to be ordained. 

ALLEN F. GRANT, City Clerk 


CITY OF GLOUCESTER 





NOTICE 





No person shall set, maintain or 
increase a fire in the open air be- 
tween March 1st and December ist 
except by written permission of 
the Chief of the Fire Department 
or the Fire Warden. 

Persons wishing to burn rubbish, 
grass, etc., in the business or resi- 
dential sections of the city, i. e. 
within the limits established by 
the Eastern avenue School on East- 
ern avenue and the cut bridge on 
Western avenue and the Green on 
Washington street, should apply to 
the Chief of the Fire Department. 
Those wishing to burn rubbish, 
brush, grass, etc., in the outlying 
portions of the city, that is outside 
of the limits as here set forth, 
whose fire would be on or near 
any wood, brush or grasslands, 
should apply to the Fire Warden. 

Readers of this notice are cau- 
tioned to be extremely careful of 
matches, cigars and _ cigarettes 
while in or near any wood or 
brushland to prevent forest fires. 

HOMER R. MARCHANT, 
Chief of the Fire Department. 
ALBERT C. LA BELLE, 


Fire Warden. 





For CANDIES 


of better quality, for ice 
creams made on premises 
from heavy cream, and 
lunch served from a clean 
kitchen, go to 


Ransellear Towle 
No Liquors 
118 MAIN ST,. GLOUCESTER 












K 


GLOUCESTER NATIONAL BAN 


OF GLOUCESTER 


me 


This Bank Offers You Complete Banking Facilities er 7 





including oe | 
CHECKING ACCOUNTS SAVINGS ACCOUNTS _| 
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT a 
| OFFICERS TRUST DEPARTMENT r 
| ee Ganon, vive cnet SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 
ay Be tocrrich, Victudancs FOREIGN EXCHANGE : 


CHESTER L. CURTIS, Cashier 
W. RAYMOND ROBINSON, Ass’t Cashier 


TRAVELERS CHECKS CHRISTMAS CLU 


DEPOSITORY OF ; a 
CITY OF GLOUCESTER COUNTY OF ESSEX _ 
STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS — UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ee 


' we 


ACCOUNTS OF INDIVIDUALS AND FIRMS SOLICITED — 





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One of the steps in the preparation of codfish for the market. Drying and curing whole codfish at the Gorton-Pew Fishe 


You Are Cordially Invited — 









rf UR door is always open. And J j | j we put up a special combinati 
, | we are always glad to show | i 9 i j box. It is an attractive ca 
| visitors the fascinating proc- i q L § containing a popular assorti 
i esses employed in our plant. See ! j \ j of Gorton’s Sea Foods. Nea’ 
, how we take fish eas from ne { j i ! packed ready for shipment. Th 
Ey ocean and grepare them for the 4 ' S F il tasty and popular sea foods 
RY tables of America’s discriminating : 1 ea OO aml ] j introduce you to new delights 
a | housewives. There is no more ins { i . Me " fish eating. 
= teresting sight in all of quaint old 4 : GORTON’S CODFISH PY FN srry 
AY Pi tentac: £ Z ! j GoRTON’s READY-TO-FRY CODFISH i pape ate an Senenees 
18h j If it were only possible to trans- ! {| GoRTON’s FRESH MACKEREL IN ] residents. Visit us and see 
BY ' Shs snes & ane ares of | i Pei) Le ae eae i rourselrss how one 0 me 
ej 6s Gloucester back home—its roman- i i GORTON’S DEEP SEA ROE ; oldest and most interesti 
Ey i tic harbor, its curious old streets | | GORTON’S CODFISH IN CANS dustries operates. You ar 
Ed D4 and homes, its atmosphere of the { \ GORTON’S FINNAN HADDIE 7 dially invited. ; 
EA { sea. Although this is impossible \ Mu GORTON’S FLAKED FISH & hate: a 
py i you may have a reminder of pleas- ; | GORTON’S PPATIAN CLAM | Gorton-Pew : 
5 ant Gloucester days in sending to { i eae ake ae CLAM | GLOUCESTER, 
‘ FY { your home some of our delicious | CH ER , “ESTER, | 
i i ’ 


Zi 


ANS 


fish products. For this purpose 


CHOWD 
GORTON’S HADDOCK CHOWDER 












Founded in 1 349 ; 





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AMERICAN LEGION MEMORIAL IN OLD. TOWN HOUSE SQL 


Anna Vaughn Hyatt, (Mrs. Archer Huntington) sculptor. Its placing suggested by the late 
A. Piatt Andrew. This out-standing work was modeled at the studio of the sculptress at 
Annisquam. The horse was “Frank” of the Gloucester fire department. The original stands 
in Riverside Drive, New York. In addition to the replica here, there are two others — one 

Blois, France, and one in California. “ 


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