Skip to main content

Full text of "The Cape Ann shore"

See other formats













Vol. XXXIII 


July 21, 1928 





WOODLAND PATH 


Ravenwood Park, given to the city in 1897 
by Samuel Elwell Sawyer ~ 


eee oes VS r 
7 BTS) 


PUBLISHED BY 


The Cape Ann Publishing Co. 


GLOUCESTER, MASS. 





No. 3 


Price 10 Cents 











C.S. NAUSS_ (Established 1837) L. H. NAUSS 


L. B. Nauss & Sons 


“NAUSS LUMBER” 


LUMBER 

LIME 

CEMENT 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 


“Everything to Build Anything” 


Telephones 195-196-197 


RAILROAD AVE., 


GLOUCESTER, 









































They add a subtle touch 
of distinction to hospitality 


Resplendent, efficient electric 
appliances make entertaining 
so satisfying and convenient 


Drop into our store and see these wonderful 
aids to entertaining — electric percolator, electric 
coffee urn, electric waffle iron, electric toaster. 
We're glad to show them—whether you buy or not. 


GLOUCESTER ELECTRIC COMPANY 


Telephone Telephone 





























A Bigger and 
Better Jason’s 


HONEST GOODS—HONEST PRICES 
is the cause of 


OUR STEADY GROWTH. 


By adding the second floor we are able to ca- 
ter to your wants better than ever. 


DRESSES, COATS, MILLINERY, SHOES, HO- 
SIERY, UNDERWEAR, TOILET GOODS, 
LEATHER GOODS, CORSETS, DRA- 
PERIES, BATHING APPAREL. 


A convenient store to trade in. Nearly oppo- 
site the Post Office. 


A commodious and well arranged rest room 
has been provided, also a public telephone booth. 


JASONS DEPARTMENT STORE 


179-183 MAIN STREET, GLOUCESTER 



































NUOUUUSUUNOREGSUOORRCOUONODOUUONNOUED DO 


The Bigudestel Coal i 
& Lumber Co. 


Main Office: Duncan St., Gloucester 


Receiving coal pockets and lumber pier sheds oc- 
cupying three large wharves in Harbor Cove. Four 
acres of floor and dock space. 


This company, maintaining for years one of the 
largest coal distributing plants on the North Atlan- 
tic seaboard, has added a 


LUMBER AND BUILDING 
MATERIALS BRANCH 


The only concern on Cape Ann receiving lumber 
by sea and rail. 


One of the Largest Stocks of Eastern and Western 
Lumber, Finish, Millwork, Doors, Sashes, Blinds, 
Cement, etc., in This Section. 


DELIVERIES PROMPTLY MADE 


We have won an enviable reputation for promptness and re- 
liability of product in the coal business. The same principles 
that have brought this result will be employed in the conduct of 


our lumber department. 
TEL. 3060 
BRANCH OFFICES: 
Magnolia (Tel. 426); Manchester (Tel. 64, 650) 
Deliveries Anywhere in This Section of the County 




































@ 
"4 aaa euninan id gngungniiniteniigilgngnitggneimliguieuiimiani Gui euisutmniignhguiienianioliguiauiigieuiarnrenngromnieui grit eMC MMM mC nema Mn Cnn ee nce me Im In nL 
1896 THIRTY-SECOND YEAR 
For Sale at Oldest Established 
All Hotels and News Stands Summer Resort Weekly 


On the North Shore 
1896-1928 


On the North Shore 
Massachusetts 





A MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE SUMMER COLONY OF CAPE ANN 
AND THE NORTH SHORE : 


Covering Cape Ann, including Gloucester, Eastern Point, East Gloucester, Bass Rocks, Long Beach, Briar 
Neck, Lands End, Rockport, Pigeon Cove, The Annisquam River Territory, West Gloucester, Fernwood, Mag- 
nolia, Manchester and the Resort Section of Essex County. 


Manuscripts will be given every attention. We welcome communications from our readers. 


o 


New York representative, A. E. Dauphinee, 535 Fifth Avenue, Rooms 306—310. 


Published Weekly for 8 weeks during July and August by the CAPE ANN PUBLISHING CO., James R. Pringle, Con- 
ductor, Office 95 Main St., Gloucester, Mass. Price 75 cents the season on Cape Ann; $1.00 elsewhere. Tels. 412, 2967. 


“Entered as second-class matter July 16, 1920, at the post office at Gloucester, Mass., under the Act of 
Mareh 3, 1879. 





HOP UCIT UIE Met Ee DIT CU IRE ET een enn 





Special Contents July 21, 1928 


Vol. XXXITI—No. 3 


BOOKS acknowledges himself to be a zealous GOOD BOOKS VS. BAD BOOKS 
“These are the masters who instruct follower of truth, of happiness, of wis- “The book which degrades our intel- 
us without rod or ferule; without hard dom, of science, or, even of the faith, lect, destroys our faith in our kind and 
words and anger; without clothes or must of necessity make himself a lover in the eternal power which makes for 
money. If you approach them they are of books.”-—Richard de Bury, 1234, from righteousness, is an immoral book. The 
not asleep; if, investigating them they “Philobiblion,” an English book written book which stimulates thought, quickens 
eonceal nothing, but if you mistake a hundred years before the invention of our sense of humor, gives us a deeper 


them they never grumble; if you are ig- printing and, later, printed in 1474. insight into life, a finer sympathy with 
norant they cannot laugh at you. The men and women and a firmer belief in 
possession, therefore, of wisdom is more : their power to realize a divine ideal, is 
precious than all riches and nothing a moral book, though its subject matter 
that can be wished for is worthy to be have as wide a range as life itself.’’— 
compared with it. Whoever, therefore, Miss Corinne Bacon, New Haven, Conn. 


ZONING AND TRAFFIC LAWS “WYNGAERT’S HOECK’”’ 
Should Be Under State Supervision By James R. Pringle 
* New Amsterdam Dutch Made Map of 
Cape Ann and New England—lIts 
SECOND ENTRANCE TO CITY First Publication 


Ferry Street the Indicated Route 
MY LADY GOES SHOPPING 


POEM—“Thacher’s Island” See eee, 


By Dr. Thomas J. Partridge NEWS OF THE SUMMER COLONY 


From all the Points in the Cape Ann 


ART AND DRAMATIC gone 


North Shore and Little Theatres THE WEEK’S YACHTING 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928, 





local dealers. 





ZONING AND TRAFFIC LAWS 





Ordinance Regulating the Former 
Passed Last Winter Although Well 
Considered May Be Amended by 
Majority of the Municipal Council— 
State Should Take Over the Admin- 
istration of Both These Problems 





In the last days of December the 
Municipal Council passed a zoning or- 
dinance. A committee of citizens 
aided and abetted by an expert in 
such matters had devised and reported 
the plan. 

They recommended the obvious. No 
one familiar with the city and its 
needs would have had much difficulty 
in outlining such a plan in the rough, 
even after a cursory survey of a week 
or less. 


In the main it restricts business to 
the center of the city—manufacturing 
and commercial enterprises where al- 
ready established remaining—includ- 
ing the entire wharf frontage in the 
East Gloucester section. 

It debarred such business adven- 
tures as hot dog and similar stands in 
the residential sections except that it 
allowed those already established to 
remain. 

What is of vital interest to summer 
residents, the territory given over for 
summer residential purposes was ful- 
ly protected against further encroach- 
ment of undesirable enterprises such 
as have given offense and caused con- 
troversy in the past. It was well con- 
sidered and framed. 

According to its provisions the in- 
spector of buildings first passes on 
building permit applications. If any 
are dissatisfied with his decision they 
have recourse to a board of appeals— 
a committee of citizens outside the 
Municipal Council, seven in all, who 
have the power to reverse, if they de- 
sire, the verdict of the building inspec- 
tor. If any party is still dissatisfied 
he has a third recourse back to the 
Municipal Council, but if one member 
objects he is still barred. After that he 
may go to the courts. It would appear 
that these provisions are fairly ample 
safeguards. 

But back of all this is a joker which 
permits the nullification of these pre- 
vious decisions by a majority decision 
of the Municipal Council—a body of 


taxpayers and bear the burden. 


Think it over. 
community patriotism. 


Editorial and Special Articles 


To our Summer Residents—Patronize the Local Dealers—Don’t Deal with the Houses from Else- 
where, the Grocery and Provision, Laundry, Ice-cream and other 30-mile Deliveries. Why?, First, because 
you cannot be better served in price and quality, nor as good. 
did entrance and municipal privileges you enjoy are paid. for by the all the year round men who are 
They make possible the many things that make for your comfort. 
The out of town concerns pay no taxes, but are reaping the reward of the time, effort and money of 
An outlander delivery in front of your door ‘is evidence of a lack of 


five as now existing—because the 
council can amend this ordinance if 
they so desire. 

Already this has been done. 
activity more than politics, is the 
theory that self-preservation is the 
first law of nature more strongly ex- 
emplified. Politicians reason only in 
terms of votes, and where a hundred 
votes one way or the other may con- 
tinue him in office or relegate him to 
the discard he is apt to jump to the 
side which has the biggest voting guns 
to fire election day. No matter how 
competent an official or worthy a 
measure it has to walk the plank if 
political expediency so requires it. So 
it has proved in this case of the ordi- 
nance. It is India rubber elastic. 


Personally we do not think the sum- 
mer resident section is endangered 
under the present dispensation al- 
though the business area has been 
thrown into parts of the summer ter- 
ritory originally exempted by such 
process of amendment. With all its im- 
perfections, its adoption is a step for- 
ward, the principle having been recog- 
nized and that step forward was not 
achieved without effort. 

But The Shore is convinced that this 
zoning ordinance and the traffic reg- 
ulation ordinances to be effective, and 
saved from selfish and political caprice, 
should be either in the hands of a 
county or state board, preferably the 
latter, where once established, the per- 
sonal contact and pressure of interest- 
ed parties for their abrogation will be 
a matter of difficulty. Regardless of 
what may be said of home rule, which 
in many analyses is not the best rule, 
these two problems, in order to be effi- 
ciently met, must be removed from lo- 
cal influences. 


In no 


The parking ordinances passed for 
several years, police officials and in- 
terested citizens giving their time to 
their solution, have been openly disre- 
garded and abrogated. 


Since this was written we notice 
that the State officials are advocating 
a uniform system of traffic laws 
throughout the state. This at once 
commends itself as the only logical 
manner of dealing with this question, 
especially for the guidance of outside 
tourists who are mystified and con- 
fused by the many conflicting munici- 
pal rules governing the matter. By all 


Seeond, because the fine roads, the splen- 





THAT SECOND ENTRANCE 





Well Considered Report By County 
Engineer—Eight Possible Bridge- 
heads’ Indicated—That Following 
Old Upper Parish Road to Biskie Is- 
land Across River to Ferry Street 
West Feasible and Least Expensive 





Perhaps the outstanding highway 
or any improvement which forces it- 
self upon the attention of the real es- 
tate sojourning summer resident of 
Cape Ann is that of a second entrance 
to the city. 

In early colonial times the original 
entrance was by way of Essex to the 
West parish down Concord street across 
a causeway to Biskie, now Russ or An- 
nisquam Island, thence across the riv- 
er by ferry to Hodgkins’ landing, now 
Ferry street, which connects with 
Washington street at the Addison Gil- 
bert Hospital grounds. In those days 
the central part of the town was in 
that locality. 

After 1750 the center of things was 
transferred to the harbor and a short 
cut resulted by continuing down the 
parish to the seashore over what is 
now the Essex avenue causeway across 
the Cut or Blynman bridge, and just 
before the Revolution it became the 
principal and only thoroughfare into 
the town, the ferry being discontinued 
after a hundred years, always operat- 
ed by a Hodgkins. So much for that. 

The canal which the bridge spans 
has been frequently widened and 
dredged, making a short cut between 
Gloucester and Ipswich Bay, saving 15 
miles to the fishermen. Since the 
shore gill netting and other branches 
of the fishery have attained such im- 
portance in recent years, larger and 
larger draft craft avail themselves of 
this passage, the drawbridge spanning 
it being raised many times in the 
course of the day, seagoing craft hav- 
ing right of way through navigable 
waters. 

In this day of the multiplicity of 
the automobile this raising frequently 

(Continued on page 19) 








means turn them over to the state po- 
lice and have the job done in a work- 
manlike manner. As exemplified here 
for several years past parking regula- 
tions have been a farce. 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 3 





THACHER’S ISLAND 


BY DR. THOMAS J. PARTRIDGE 


Note—Dr. Partridge is a Gloucester boy re- 
siding in Greater Boston. ‘The poem was writ- 
ten when he was a young man. 





Hail ye stately columns on that rock-bound isle 

That cast your lurid warnings far out for 
many a mile. 

To warn the hardy mariner of the jagged rocks 
so dread, 

Who safely into 


harbor by your 
lights is led. 


brilliant 


How sad to part from, one who has proved a 
friend in need, 

Or wave adieu to loving ones| who come to sa 
God Speed. e 

Thud must the sturdy fisher feel as he leaves 
thee far astern 

Bound off for Georges stormy bank 


perhaps 
never to return. 


Majestic forms! you rear your lordly heads as 
if to emphasize 

The great and glorious good that’s done by thy 
two fiery eyes. 

And when the golden sun is hid by Bond’s 
rocky side 

You throw them far o’er the sea from Boone 
Island to Cape Cod. 


With what an anxious beating heart have 
fishers watched for thee, 

When almost home from the Grand Bank, or 
Fundy’s stormy sea. 

By signs, log, compass and by chart and reck- 
oning they knew, 

That Thacher’s welcome twin lights must soon 
come into view. 





Art and Dramatic 





THE NORTH SHORE THEATRE 


' Starting Sunday for four days 
it is our pleasure to present to 
the people of Cape Ann one of the 
finest pictures of this or any 
other year, “Ramona,” with Do- 
lores Del Rio. Hail Dolores Del 
Rio’s initial starring vehicle for 
United Artists. Coming as an un- 
known in her first picture—the 
Mexican beauty astounded the 
world in “Resurrection.” Since 
then, her every appearance has 
been a sensational triumph. In- 
genue, vampire, comedienne, tra- 
gedian—Dolores Del Rio _ has 
earned her right to greatness! 
The book is Helen Hunt Jackson’s 
perennial best-seller—now in its 
92nd edition! A tale of California 
in the days when gold was being 
filehed from the earth! When his- 
tory was being made! Hail the 
romance of the half-breed girl 
and her Indian lover. One of lit- 
erature’s supreme classics! “Ra- 
mona” is going to be a certain 
success! 

On the same bill we will pre- 
sent Walter Hagen, Johnny Har- 
ron and Gertrude Olmstead in the 
Tiffany production, “Green Grass 
Widows.” Fun and romance on 
the golf green, where Cupid sub- 
stitutes mashie and niblick for 
bow and arrow—and Walter Ha- 
gen gives up a game! 

On Thursday, Friday and Sat- 
urday it is our pleasure to pre- 
sent the great Paramount spe- 
cial feature, “The Street of Sin,“ 

(Continued on page 22) 


Witching as only mortals watch when they 
know the port is near, 

That holds within its sacred walls all they 
treasure dear. 

And when ati last their eye doth rest upon thy 
garnished domes, 

Then bubble up four English words—wife, chil- 
dren, rest and home. 








Ig == 


Ur 


i The atre) 


a 


See IMSS TEIN IAIN Ks 


Te nan FOREMOST DHOTOPIAYS 


UME 0ST SELECT FOLLOWING IN THE CHP 


EXCELLENT VENTILATION. 
ALWAYS 20 DEGREES COOLER THAN OUTSIDE. 


CONTINUOUS FROM 130 TO 1030 BM. 


Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday 


Dolores Del Rio in “RAMONA” 
An United Artists Picture. 
Walter Hagen in “GREEN GRASS 


WIDOWS.” 
A Tiffany Picture 


Sunday, 


Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
Emil Jannings in “THE STREET OF 
SIN” 


A Paramount Special 
Phyllis Haver and Stuart Holmes in 


“YOUR WIFE AND MINE” 











THE LITTLE THEATRE 





From Ibsen to light comedy is 
indeed a long stride, but accom- 
plished with the utmost dexter- 
ity by a troupe of players such 
as those at the Theatre on Rocky 
Neck. 

The three plays of Friday and 
Saturday evenings were light, hu- 
morous sketches of ordinary 
everyday life. Events such as 
might happen to any one, inci- 
dents which may have been in the 
lives of our nearest friends. Hu- 
man nature stories, all of them. 

“Myr. Sampson,” by Charles Lee 
is a tale of how two women give 
up their only chance for happi- 
ness because of the absurdity of 
convention, carried to the extreme. 
Frances McCune and Ruth Jeter 
admirably portrayed the charac- 
ters of the two spinsters, while 
Mr. Sampson, their boarder, was 
exceedingly well played by Rob- 
ert Wetzel. 

“The Dear ~Old ~Bhing,”” by 
Frank Mansur, who will long be 
remembered as “Pastor Manders” 
by Little Theatre goers, is a pa- 
thetically humorous sketch of a 
country father who arrives at the 
home of his city daughter-in-law 
on the eve of a gala event. What 
follows needs no comment. The 
play is mostly dialogue, and the 
lines are replete with meaning. 
The parts of Lucille, the daugh- 
ter-in-law, and Joe, her husband, 
were well executed by Margaret 
McCarty and Ted Osborne, while 
Alfred Child, Jr., played Dad 
Dunham, the country father. 


“Mary’s Lamb,” by Hubert Os- 
borne, has for its setting a cor- 
ner in a Broadway cabaret, for its 
characters, a pair of Greenwich 
Villagers and its plot, lamb stew. 
Scott Wilson and Peggy Leland 
were typical Villagers, true to 
form in every respect, and they 
were well supported by the other 
members of the cast. 

LAURA R. SMITH. 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928, 





“WYNGAERTS HOECK” 


New Amsterdamers Who Claimed Territory as Far North as Gulf of St. Lawrence 
Made a Map of ‘‘Nova Belgii’’ in 1630—Reproduced Here for the 
First Time, and a Distinct Addition to Local Historical Knowledge— 
Winegarden Harbor, The Dutchmen Named What is Now 
Gloucester—From Which Comes ‘‘ Wingaersheek’’— 

‘*Witte Bay,’’ Now Ipswich Bay 


YNGAERTS HOECK!! That 
was the Dutch name for 
Cape Ann. Add that pictur- 
esque title to those already 
applied to our city. 

For the Dutch settlers of 
New Amsterdam claimed 
the New England territory, surveyed 
and mapped it out from 1630 to 1650 
and named its many headlands and 
strategetic points in picturesque Hol- 
landese. 





20% (-) 


Sikes 


The Above is a Section of a Map Showing the Region 


the Dutch in 1630. 


Down as “‘Wyngaert’s Hoeck”’ 


The Hollanders Claimed All This Territory to the 
and ipswich Bay is 








Schuylers and other Dutch cognomens 
might feature the prominent of the old 
first families. 

In The Shore of June 10, 1926, we 
published an extract from the AMneid, 
Book I, headed ‘‘Wee-Go-See,”’ “‘Kros- 
sanes,” “Le Beauport,” ‘“Tragabigzan- 
da,” “Cape Anne,” “Fisherman’s 
Field,” “‘Gloucester.”’ After the last 
should be added “Wyngaerts Hoeck,”’ 
and then you have all the early titles 
than can be proved to have been be- 


preity aie 
eS ; \ 


by 


oe 


tongue” had declared the word Win- 
gaersheek was aboriginal and meant a 
place of profusion of grapes, etc. 

The name Wingaersheek as applied 
by various social and other organiza- 
tions to Cape Ann in the past hundred 
years is purely fanciful and there is 
not a scintilla of evidence for its use as 
an Indian name as will appear later on. 

Some 25 years ago the writer inter- 
viewed Sapiel Mitchell, leading man of 
the Passamaquoddies of Maine and an 


‘ Hake itch 
. 6 Malabarra bh sed eas p 





Gulf of St. Lawrence. 


from, Cape Cod to the Isles of Shoals, of Nova Belgii (New Holland), Made by 
What is Now Gloucester Harbor is Set 
“Witte Bay’’— From the Stokes Collection of Early Dutch Maps Recently Exhibited 


in the New York Publie Library. Photastat for The Shore Made Dy Courtesy of the Library Officials. Published Here for the First Time. 





And if the Dutch had stood up in 
their boots and backed up sturdy old 
Peter Stuyvesant, Hard Koppied 
Pete—‘Hard Headed Peter’—against 
the demands of the English, perchance 
instead of being named after England’s 
most inland seaport on the Severn, we 
might be Wyngaerts Hoeck today and 
Main street be the Bouerie and instead 
of the old Dorchester and Devon names 
of the first English settlers the Vans, 


stowed on the city or cape. 


“Wee-Go-See” aboriginal name for 
Cape Ann, it was explained was an 
Abenaki word (branch of the Algon- 
quins) meaning the place where we 
camped, a probable explanation of the 
word ‘“Wingaersheek.”’ 

Some weeks later we received a let- 
ter from a lady who expressed great 
surprise at this statement writing that 
a person “well versed in the Indian 


authority on the lore and legends of 
his race, in relation to the word Win- 
gaersheek. He stated that there is no 
such word in the Abenaki language 
(the tribe that occupied Cape Ann 
prior to its being wiped out by disease) 
the nearest being ‘“‘Wee-go-see,”’ mean- 
ing the place where we camped, which 
might, of course, be refined into the 
euphonious Wingaersheek. 

When Thorwald harbored in Kros- 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


5 


SS  —————_ 


sanes, on attempting to land he was 
ambushed by the Skrellings, as he 
called the Indians and mortally wound- 
ed. The Norsemen made a hasty re- 
treat to their boats and of course had 
no opportunity to ascertain anything 
in regard to the natives except that 
they were fierce fighters—the first who 
had driven the sea wolves from their 
shores. When Champlain came here 
in 1606 he tarried two days, made a 
map of the harbor and gave quite an 
account of the topographical aspect of 
the country and of his dealings with 
the Indians whom he interviewed, by 
means of an interpreter and although 











MAP OF GLOUCESTER HARBOR. '*LE BEAUPORT.'' 
B, Meadows 
(Salt Island.) G, Wigwams of the Savages. 


A, Place where their ship was anchored. 
Island. 


ord to authenticate the name Wingaer- 
sheek nor does it appear in print or 
writing until about 1800, two hundred 
years after the settlement. 


In Pringle’s History, page 16, occurs the 
following: ‘“Annisquam,” the designation of 
the northern section of the cape, first occurs 
in Wood’s map of 1634, and is spelled Ana- 
squam and in Josselyn’s “Account of Two 
Voyages in New England” in 1638, the spell- 
ing is “Wondosquam.” But in neither is the 
word “Wingaersheek” or any other designa- 
tion applied to the harbor and it is the opin- 
ion of Indian antiquarians that Anasquam or 
Wondosquam are Indian words, for which the 
annalist and the cartographer had good war- 
rant, for these explorers carried Indian in- 
terpreters familiar with the coast, and was the 





























C, Little Island. (Ten Pound Island.) D, Rocky Point. 
H, Little River and meadows. 


Indian term for the whole of what is now 
Cape Ann. Therefore, there is the best of 
warrant for the use of the word Annisquam 
or Wonasquam as may be preferred. And it 
is the only Indian designation for the Cape 
that has come down to us and only because 
of the research of these explorers noted. 

Various surmises have been made as to the 
origin of the word Wingaersheek. The In- 
dian words “winne” and “wonne” are said to 
mean something pleasant and the word 
“Squam” a breaking water beach, the combi- 
nation giving “a beautiful breaking water 
beach.” Plausible enough when the sur- 
roundings are taken into consideration. 

Hon. J. Hammond Trumbull, LL.D. (this was 
written in the early nineties) who is said to 
be the only person who can read Eliot’s In- 


(Continued on page 16) 


rN 


Drawn by Champlain in 1606 
(Eastern Point.) E, Rocky Neck. 
(Brook and marsh at Fresh Water Cove.) I, Brook (at Pavilion Beach.) L, Tongue of 


F, Little Rocky 


plain ground, where there are saffrons, nut-trees and vines. (On Eastern Point.) M, Where the Cape of Islands turn. (The creek at Little Good Harbor.) N, Little 


River. 


(Brook near Clay Cove.) O, Little Brook coming from meadows. 


P, A Brook. 


(At Oakes’ Cove, Rocky Neck.) Q, Troop of savages coming to surprise them. 


(At Rocky Neck.) R, Sand Beach. (Niles’ Beach.) The sea-coast. T, The Sieur de Poutrincourt in ambuscade with seven or eight arquebusiers. V, The Sieur de Cham- 


plain perceiving the savages. 


The figures probably denote the depth of water in metres. 


The Earliest Known Map of Gloucester—From Pringle’s History 


he gathered the names of the two chief- 
tains of the place, he says nothing re- 
garding their name for the place. (See 
Pringle’s History, page 10. 

When the Dorchester colony made 
the first permanent settlement in 1623 
there was not a solitary Indian on the 
soil Where Champlain 17 years be- 
fore found a settlement of some 500 
Indians none remained. Only great 
mounds of clamshells along the banks 
of what is now Squam River told of 
the former presence. In 1615-17 a 
pestilence thought to be small pox— 
the white man’s contribution—literally 
ran riot among the New England Indi- 
ans especially those near the seashore 
and where it was estimated there were 
some 30,000 in New England at the 
first coming of the white less than 300 
remained in Essex County. 

So there is absolutely nothing on rec- 













<3 Se es 7 
Fi ee ey ye Ww 
+ eater Np 
nec wah grates a 
eos) 

Sa 


a 





New Casino Opposite Norman’s Woe (Wreck of the Hesperus), Commanding the 
Finest View on the North Atlantic—Ample Parking Space. 


DANCING EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING 
With NEW YORK’S MOST FAMOUS ORCHESTRA 


For Reservations of Tables—Phone Magnolia 590 


A la carte 


~———. 











J. P. Del Monte, Proprietor and Manager 











=“ 


! 


i 

i = 

| ee 

i ct 

: Af 


Rar 





MAGNOLIA 
Y ALL THE LAWS of aver- 
ages and opposites we are due 
for a continued and uninter- 
rupted spell of clear and sun- 
| ny skies and by the same sign 
and token it may develop 
into a torrid period as the 
month swings into the Dogday season. 

Which will be all to the good for the 
August business, for when Old Sol 
steps on the gas and gives his heating 
plant the whole works, the heart of 
the hotel boniface rejoices and is ex- 
ceedingly glad. It’s an ill hot wave that 
doesn’t jack up the receipts in the 
cash register. 

Dr. and Mrs. Roy C. Avery of Nash- 
ville have joined their brother, Dr. O. 
W. Avery, at his summer home, 
“Stagemere,” Stage Fort terrace. Dr. 
Avery is on the faculty of Vanderbilt 
University in the School of Medicine 
and Bacteriology. 


The friends of Dr. and Mrs. Herbert 
Grove Dorsey, formerly of this city, 
now of Washington, will be pleased to 
learn that their son, Herbert Grove 
Dorsey, Jr., was one of three winners 
in the recent competition for entrants 
to the Detroit airplane model meet, re- 
ceiving a money prize in addition to a 
medal of merit. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Thebaud of Park 
avenue, New York and Morristown, N. 
J., have taken the Ryan house, ‘“‘Lady- 
cliffe,” at Freshwater Cove for the sea- 
son. 





The Oceanside 


Noted among the week’s guests at 
the Oceanside are: Mrs. Warren Noble, 
Miss Dorothy Noble, Detroit; Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Ballantyne and children, 
Mrs. James G. Bowen and daughter, 
Albany; Miss Catherine Bissell, De- 
troit; W. Bradford Allen, Miss E. L. 
Allen, Charleston, S. C.; Guest of Miss 
Elsie Crane, New York City. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Shoemaker, Phil- 
adelphia, who were visitors here 48 
years ago, have returned for this sea- 
son. 


A SHORT, SMOOTH MOTOR TRIP TO THE SHOPS OF 


MAGNOLIA 


ENJOY THE PASSING HOUR AND 
THE CAPE ANN BREEZE 


Mrs. J. B. Griffith, Miss Elsie Elliott, 
Hamilton, Ont?; Mri and “Mrsieie 
Whitin, Miss Ann Neil, Whitinsville, 
Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Fitzpatrick, 
Brooklyn; Mr. and Mrs. F. Harold 
Fitzpatrick, Fort Washington, L. I.; 
J. Little, Mrs. E. Cathaway, New York 
City. 

Here for usual summer visit, John 
M. Goodall, London, England. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Miller, 
land, returning for the season. 

Mrs. Ross W. Thompson’s Monday 
evening bridge parties are enjoyed ex-: 
ceedingly by the guests at the hotel. 

Among those who are preparing for 
the Oceanside tennis tournament in 
August are Kenneth Cooper of Glouces- 
ter, Mr. Baldwin and Mr. Sammis, and 
Mrs. Roudin. The tournament is in 
charge of Mrs. Wirbelauer, and Dr. W. 
R. P. Emerson. 

L. H. Warren is at the Oceanside 
desk for the second season, his genial- 
ity having been not a whit lessened 
during the winter months. 


Del Monte’s 


Entertaining at Del Monte’s Casino 
during the past week were: Mrs. Lloyd 
Nichols of Beverly Farms, party of 10; 
Mrs. Thomas Beals of Manchester. 
party of 8; Major Allston of the Brit- 
ish Embassy, party of 12; R. H. Mit- 
chell of Bass Rocks, party of 10; Mrs. 
Shields of Magnolia, party of 6; Frank 
Brewer of Bass Rocks, party of 12; 
Barney Plympton of Bass Rocks, party 
of 12; W. H. Potter of Beverly Farms, 
party of 6; Gray Foster of Magnolia, 
party of 6; John Amory of Beverly 
Farms, party of of 8; David Percival of 
Hamilton, party of 6; Geo. C. Vaughan 
cf Hamilton, party of 6; Joseph O’Con- 
nell of Manchester, party of 8; Ira 
(Bud) Brainerd of Magnolia, party of 
12; Robert Herrick, Jr.. of Manchester, 
party, of 20. 


Cleve- 


Mrs. J. Henry Lancashire has re- 
turned to her summer home, “Graf- 
tonwood,” at Manchester, from a trip 
to Michigan, where she visited around 
Alma and other places. 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


| TO MY LADY IN SEARCH OF THE DISTINCTIVE |-—4 





EASTERN POINT 





ACHTING is the chief diver- 
sion in these parts. The 
Club is at the high water 

| mark of its prosperity. Not 
to be afloat in this game 

hereabouts is to be somewhat 
out of it. 

Dr. Randall and Mrs. McIver of New 
York after an absence of several sea- 
sons have returned to their Eastern 
Point summer home for the season. 
Mrs. Mclver was formerly Joanna Dav- 
idge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Langdon (Gillette of 
New York have come to their Grape- 
vine road summer home for another 
season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Ervin of Bala, 
Penn., are again the occupants of the 
Merriam cottage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Grover of 
New York have arrived at ““Beach End” 
cottage. 

William W. Harmar and family of 
Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, make their 
summer home at “Our Retreat,” Ledge 
lane. 

The friends of Mrs. Frances E. Car- 
ter of Winchester, whose summer home 
is “Briar Patch” cottage, were pleased 
to welcome her after returning this 
week convalescent from a Boston hos- 
pital. Mrs. Carter is one of the out- 
standing woman skippers in the Sonder 
fleet and may soon be seen at her ac- 
customed place as helmsman in the 
races. 

Mr. and Mrs. 
Brookline have come to 
Moors” for another season. 

Mrs. William Sheafe of Boston makes 
“The Crossways” her summer home. 

Colburn Smith and family of West 
Newton have come to their summer 
cottage in Locust lane. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howland Twombly of 
Boston came in June to their summer 
home, “Bramble Ledge” cottage. 

Mrs. George E. Tener of Sewickley, 
Penn., is again at “Ardarra” at East- 
ern Point. 

Mrs. Waterman E. Taft of Arlington 


Charles H. Clark of 
“Bayberry 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 





arrived at “Balmaha” the last of June. 

Bancroft G. Davis and family of Bos- 
ton are at their summer house, Atlan- 
tic road. 


EAST GLOUCESTER 





Arrivals at the Hawthorne Inn: Mrs. 
A. B. Kaiser, Rochester; Mrs. A. C. 
Ducat, Washington; Charles B. Wheel- 


er, Buffalo; Mrs. A. A. Lane, Jr., East 
Orange; Miss Katherine Boese, New 
York; Robert M. Wernaer, Cambridge; 


Miss M. F. Hooper, Boston; Mrs. Hugh 
Bryan and son, Sherbourne, N. Y.; 
Mrs. William M. Hayden, The Misses 
Basshor, Baltimore; Leighton Calkins, 
S. D. Lounsberg, Plainfield, N. J.; 
Misses Caroline and Edith 8. Ticknor, 
Boston; Jean E. Hays, New York City; 
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. O’Keefe, Roches- 
ter; Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Miller, Bal- 
timore; Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Sargeant, 
Manchester, N. H.; Miss Graham 
Youll, New York; Mrs. N. B. Repper, 
Boston; Grace Adele Newell, New 
York City; Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Gilbert, 
Hartford; Miss M. E. Rumney, Ger- 
mantown, Pa.; Louise C. Field, New 
York; M. Lahan Allen, Caroline I. 
Blinn, Brooklyn; Mrs. George Cobble- 
stone, Brookline; Mrs. J. L. B. Ellis, 
Kiowa, Kan.; C. J. Dawson and family, 
Buffalo; Mrs. S. Carman Harriot and 
son, Mrs. H. Rutherford Gabay, New 
York City; Mrs. Nelson C. Savage, 
Elizabeth, N. J.; Mrs. F. V. Bonnaffon, 
Philadelphia; Mrs. Edith Johnston, 
Mrs. Francis G. Newlands, Alan Ladd 
Johnston, Washington; Mrs. W. O. 
Thompson, Brooklyn; C. Hunt Lewis, 


New York; Mrs. Oscar Leser, Balti- 
more; O. M. Howe, Belmont; Mrs. 
Grace Robbins, Meriam Thomason, 
New York; Emily C. Quinn, Chicopee; 
Esther Monroe, Toledo; Helen A. 
Dowsley, Chestnut Hill; Mrs. Charlotte 
Thaxter, Boston; Mrs. A. Keenan, 
Brooklyn; Mrs. A. Natanson, New 
York. 


Arrivals at the Rockaway: Mrs. W. 
B. VerSteeg, Mrs. G. C. Tandy and 
daughter, St. Louis; Elizabeth Hender- 
son, Oberlin; D. Dunn, Westerville, O.; 
Miss Margaret L. Joseph, Cleveland; 
Mrs. A. L. Stout, Mrs. Margaret Livin, 
Germantown; Miss Lois B. Smith, 
Phila.; June Hord, New York City; 
Elizabeth Cameron, Chapel Hill, N. C.; 
Mrs. Edwin C. Griffin, Ridgewood, L. 
I.; Mrs. Laura H. Sayre, East Orange; 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Shepard, Provi- 
dence; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Frost, 
Brookline; Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Cody, 
Miss Patricia Cody, Gardner. 


Arrivals at the Delphine: Mr. and 


Mrs. F. W. Lathem, Pasadena; Miss 
Jennie Wilds, Miss Lillian M. Wilds, 
Judson B. Wilds, New York City; Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert T. Tiffany, Balti- 
more; Lucy 8. Seaman, Staten Island; 
Mrs. 8. K. White, St. Louis; Helen D. 
Wells, Phila.; Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Hay- 
den, Eugene W. Hayden, Newtonville; 
Miss Golde Bamher, Miss Celia Bam- 
her, H. S. McCreary, Brookline; Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles W. Burt, Louise G. 
Geisel, Margaret C. Coleman, Kather- 
ine Hourihan, Springfield; Margaret F. 
Kruger, Rachel Johnson, Annie C. 
Johnson, Belmont. 

At the Hotel Fairview: Jannetta Y. 
Mellis, Florence I. Jones, Lillie Schel- 
ling, Mrs. B. M. Dudley, Brooklyn; 
Mrs. B. Below, Woodhaven, L. I.; Mrs. 
Wiliam Hamm, Jr., St. Paul; Mrs. W. 
C. Leonhard, Passaic; Miss Newbold, 
Phila.; Miss Caroline D. Norris, Miss 
Viola M. Davies, Towson, Md.; Mr. and 
Mrs. C. L. Maxey, Williamstown; Miss 
Marian E. White, Newton Highlands. 





BEVERLY FARMS—MANCHESTER 
—IPSWICH 


Mr. and Mrs. Philip Stockton and 
their two children have closed their 
cottage “Highcliffe” and have left for 
their usual summer visit at Westport, 
N. Y., the estate of the late Charles 
Head. They expect to be away about 
six weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Tucker and 
daughter, Miss Marion Tucker, are reg- 
istered at the Ocean House at Watch 
Hill, R. L., their cottage being occupied 
by Mr. and Mrs. George T. Keys and 
family of Boston and East Pepperell. 

Mr. and Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 
who have spent several seasons past 
at West Manchester are at Bar Harbor, 
having the Saunders estate on Eagle 
Lake road. 





PYGMALION—STILLINGTON HALL 





Included in the cast of “Pygmalion” 
which Mr. Leslie Buswell will present 
at Stillington Hall, Freshwater Cove, 
July 23 to 28 at 8.380 P.M.: Mrs. Fitz- 
william Sargent, Mr. Leslie Buswell, 
Charles Hedley, Miss Gabrielle Ladd, 
Raymond O’Brien, Edison Rice and 
others. This George Bernard Shaw 
production will be under the direction 
of Vladimir Rossing. 


LANESVILLE 





Leslie J. Kewer and family of Dor- 
chester have arrived for the season at 
“The Ellyn,” Vulcan street, Lanesville. 





Maénolia ‘ 
Branch y 


Shop 


Presents 





b Nantucket 


\ 280 BOYLSTON STREET 


\ 

‘ 

Charming New 
Hats 








p-£A4Zs 


dl Fascinating 


LEE 


Mid Season j 
‘| Frocks ks 
4 i 
y Smart ‘ 





— > 


Coats 


Hyannis 


Palm HEY 


ues ae 


‘ Boston 


EAM s 


BOSTON 


Ss aR 


ROCKY NECK 


Mrs. O. M. Lewis and daughter, and 
Mrs. Lewis’ sister, Marie List, the ar- 
tist, are stopping in the Breckenridge 
cottage for the season. They occupied 
the Charles Osier cottage last summer. 

Mrs. Marion Dodd and son Donald 
Hazen of Summit, N. J., are spending 
the month of July with Miss Anita 
Embree. 


Miss Cecelia P. Simmons of Brook- 
lyn has arrived for the season. 

Alfred Childs of Pittsburg is stop- 
ping at Mrs. Hiram Varney’s. Mr. 
Childs is a student at the Gloucester 
School of the Little Theatre. 





BASS ROCKS 





OLFING continues to grow in 
popularity. More and more 
are taking up the ancient 
sport of kings and in point of 
actual participation it is by 
far the national game. 

Funny about golf! Back in 
the nineties some one introduced it in- 
to this country. Few knew how to pro- 
nounce the word and a very few on 
this side knew how to play the game. 

In that brief period it has grown in- 
to tremendous vogue. There is nothing 
to parallel it in the annals of sport. 

Another old English diversion the 
writer would like to see more popular 
hereabouts is archery. A_ splendid 
sport essentially that of a gentlewo- 
man or gentleman. The cost of an out- 
fit is moderate and many fields and 
closes are available hereabouts on 
which to place targets. 





William Scott Law, the professional. 


instructor at the Bass Rocks Golf Club, 
will deliver five ‘Practical Talks on 
Golf’ in the ballroom of the Hotel 
Thorwald at 8.30 in the evening of 
the following dates, the first having 
been delivered Wednesday on ‘The 
Fundamentals of the Golf Stroke;” Ju- 
ly 25, “Driver, Brassie and Spoon;” Au- 
OUST) ew LOS wNOSH lence onati Claman 
gust 8, “Mashie, Mashie Niblick and 
Niblick;” August 15, “Putter.” All 
strokes demonstrated by indoor prac- 
tise net. There is no admission charge. 

Mrs. Edward Ellis and family of 
Brookline have come to their Nautilus 
avenue cottage for the season. 

Mrs. Charles P. Smith and family of 
Auburndale are occupying their Beach 
road cottage. 

Matters social usually do not reach 
their full stride here before August 1, 
after which the _ indications are 
for a very busy season. The club house 
as usual will be the center of most of 
these functions. On the 12th, Mrs. Ar- 
thur C. Taber entertained eleven at 
bridge and tea. At the Woman’s com- 
mittees tea Saturday afternoon, Mrs. 
Charles H. and E. C. Wilson were host- 
esses. Refreshments were _ served. 


oo 


Mrs. Lyne of the Hawthorne Inn gave 

a tea for 20 Tuesday and Mrs. Laurence 

A. Brown gave a tea for eight. 
Thorwald guests for the current sea- 


shub, Mrs. S. P. Childs, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Haney, Mrs. F. M. Humphrey 
and nurse, Mrs. J. C. Slattery, New 
York City; Mricand’ Mnrsi*G.45.. Wihit- 
man and daughter, Rochester, N. Y.; 
W. G. Kronbach, Glow City, N. Y.; 
George A. Ross and family, Montreal; 
Miss Gilles, Ontario; Miss Mary R. 
Houle, Prince Edward Island; Mr. and 
Mrs. R. B. Heward, Mr. and Mrs. Wood- 
ward Martin, three children and nurse, 
Miss Helen McLean and nurse, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Henry Pope, Dr.: and Mrs. 
Fred J. Tees, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Walker and two children, Mr. and Mrs. 
A. J. Wood, Miss S. K. Wood, Miss 
Mary Suashan, Miss Brenda Chillas, 
Miss Lillian Lawrence, Montreal; Miss 





Irene Williams, Wallace Wickham, 
Mrs. Charles H. Baynes, Samuel 
Adams, Chicago; Miss Evans, High- 
land Park, Ill; Mr. and Mrs. Jason 


Paige, Jason Paige, Jr., Glencoe, IIl.; 
Charles F. Dow and daughter, Detroit; 
Mrs. Mark A. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter A. Decamp, Cincinnati; W. F. 
Donovan, Jr., and children, Toledo; 
Mrs. William C. Abile and son, Waco, 
Tex.; Mrs. Stacey K. Beebe, Denver; 
Harvey Mansfield, Miami; Mr. and 
Mrs. William H. Beauvelt, Palm 
Beach; Mr. and Mrs. W. F. McKinney, 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kennedy, Mr. 
and Mrs. John L. Powell, Washington; 
Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Smucker, W. A. 
Foster, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Flysher, 


Philadelphia; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Gardner and children, Pittsburgh; 
Mrs. C. G. Huntington, Mrs. Grover, 


Mrs. G. Lincoln, Hartford; Mr. ‘and 
Mrs. K. J. Ferguson and son, Boston; 
Mrs A. F. March, South Orange, N. J.; 
Mrs. Wilde, Miss Wilde, Miss Jackson, 
Brookline. 

At the Moorland Hotel: Mrs. W. R. 
Chollar, New York City; Miss Ellen A. 
Peck, Miss E. Jennie Peck, Bristol; 
Mrs. Helen, E. Beach, Mrs. C. H. Siller- 
man, Stratford; Mr. and Mrs. J. R. W. 

(Continued on page 16) 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 





END 





HE ROCKPORT COUNTRY 

CLUB is enjoying a success- 
ful season and more and more 
the social functions of this 
northernmost section of the 
North Shore centers in that 
institution. The season is 
well apace and next month will see ac- 
tivites at top speed what with tennis 
and golf. 

A pleasing incident recently was the 
presentation to the club of a large sized 
Ensign—the national colors — by Miss 
Anna McTaggart of Briar Neck and 
Worcester, which will be flown every 
day from the staff of the club house— 
surely a thoughtful and a patriotic gift 
appreciated by the membership. 

Oscar C. Stiles of Boston is occupy- 
ing the house at Land’s End purchased 
last season for a summer home. 

E. E. Babb and E. E. Babb, Jr. and 
families of Melrose are again occupy- 
ing their Land’s End cottage. 

Stedman Smith and family of 
Georgetown have come to their sum- 
mer home on Norwood’s Head for the 
season, 

Isaac Hall Babbitt is at Land’s End 
for the season. 

Mrs. M. J. Leonnan has opened the 
“Twin Light Tea Room,” Land’s End, 
for a new season. 

E. M. Anderson and family of Mal- 
den have a cottage in Briarstone road — 
this season. 

Dr. Edward J. Butler and family of 
Cambridge are enjoying the season in 
a cottage at Marmion Way. 

Mr. and Mrs. George G. Bass of 
Greenwich, Conn., have come to their 
Marmion Way Cottage “Rudder 
Grange” for another season. 

Old Marmion Way cottagers return- 
ing for another season are Harry Pear- 
sall and family. 

Charles T. Porter and family of Bos- 
ton are Land’s End summer cottagers 
this season. 

S. Gordon Stackpole of Boston and 
family have come to Bearskin Neck for 
a summer sojourn. 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 








William S. Packer and family of 
Winchester are returning to their 
Land’s End home for the summer. 

Francis §.' Smith and family of 
Worcester are old summer colonists 
who make their home during the heat- 
ed term at Land’s End. 

James Willing and family of Boston 
who for a number of seasons have had 
a cottage at Land’s End are again 
making their stay for the summer 
there. 

The summer cottage of Harold P. 
Waterhouse and family of Melrose is 
in Eden road, Land’s End. 

Judge Thomas D. McAnerney of 
Quincy and family are enjoying the 
season at a cottage in South street. 

Patterson McNutt the well known 
playwright of New York City and fam- 
ily are spending the season at Marmion 
way having taken a cottage for the 
season. 

Charles Mulcahy and family of 
Brookline are among the Marmion way 
cottage colony this season. 

W. G. Norris and family of Brook- 
line have taken a cottage at Land’s 
End for the season. 

J. J. T. Nichols and family of Bos- 
ton are numbered among the Land’s 
End cottagers this season. 

Arthur N. Clark and family of Som- 
erville are making a cottage in Marmi- 
on way their summer home. 

Benjamin W. Tupper and family of 
Boston are enjoying seashore life in a 
Marmion way cottage this season. 

Chester S. Patten and family of Mel- 
rose are for another season spending 
the summer here. Their cottage is in 
Marmion way. 

Among the Marmion way cottagers 
this season are A. G. Fitzgerald and 
family of Boston. 

E. R. P. Gibb and family of Boston 
are again enrolled among the Marmion 
way cottage sojourners. 

F. M. Holmes and family of Everett 
have a cottage on the Headlands for 
the season. 

D. H. H. Howard and family of Bos- 
ton have a cottage in Briarstone road, 
Land’s End for the summer. 

F. P. Blake and family of Worcester 
have the Small. cottage, Briarstone 
road, making a stay into September. 

George P. Hall and family of Worces- 
ter are again numbered among the 
Marmion way cottage colony. 

Isaac 8. Hall and family of Brockton 
are returning for another season to 
their Land’s End seashore home. 

The Howard B. Lovells of Boston 
have come for another season’s stay at 
their Marmion way cottage. 

Joseph F. Lockett and family of 


Dornblower & Uleeks 


ESTABLISHED 1888 


Members New York, Boston and Chicago Stock Exchanges 


Snbvestment Securities 


60 CONGRESS STREET, 
BOSTON 


Chicago Detroit Cleveland 


NEW YORK, 8 East 48th St. 
WASHINGTON, 1211 Conn. Ave. 
NEWPORT, R. I. 


Schmidt & Son, Inc. 


Importers of 


Silver and Sheffield Plate « Fine Porcelains 


MAGNOLIA 
Fine Wedding Presents a Specialty 


Providence 


Christmas Gifts held for December Delivery 


42 BROADWAY, 
NEW YORK 


Portland __ Pittsburgh 





BOSTON, 587 Boylston St. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
PASADENA, CAL. 


Telephone Magnolia 408 





Newton are again 
domiciled in their 
Marmion way cot- 
tage for the sum- 
mer. 

The Russell Nor- 
wood house on the 
Headlands is again 
the summer home 
of H.C. Hitchcock 
and family of Mal- 
den. 

Mr: and’ Mrs. 
Robert C. Heebner 
of Boston have 
opened their  cot- 
tage “Seawinds” on 
the Headlands for the season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. West of Au- 
burndale are again occupying ‘‘Breezy 
Gables,” Marmion way. 

Miss Helen Moseley and sister, Miss 
Pierce of Boston, are again occupying 
“Felseinheim,” their Marmion way cot- 
tage. The late John C. Moseley was 
one of the pioneer summer cottagers 
in this section. 

Richard C. Rothchild of New Ro- 
chelle, N. Y., is again the occupant 
of the Law cottage on the Headlands. 

Samuel Williston and family of Cam- 
bridge are included this season in the 
Marmion way cottagers. 








ORDERS FOR 


WILD BEACH PLUM JELLY 


Will be filled as early as possible after the new 
fruit crop has been gathered, if left at the .°. 


BEAGHSPEUM) JELLY PLAGE 


Rockport, Mass., Near Bearskin Neck 


Bayberry Candle Dipping and Pure Bayberry Candles 
ALSO 
A Wide Variety of Attract.ve Goods at Reasonable Prices. 


Affiliated with the famous 


BAYBERRY CANDLE PLACE AT CAPE COD 


Miss Grace Tigard of Wellesley has 
been appointed as recreational director 
at Rockport Lodge, Rockport, this sea- 
son. Miss Louise McDonald of Seattle, 
will be assistant recreation director. 
The lodge will open July 30. 

The Rockport Art Association held a 
summer dancing party at Murray Hall 
on Saturday evening July 14. 

Miss Dorothy Dean of Boston has 


‘opened her cottage on Curtis street, 


Pigeon Cove, for the summer months. 
Rev. and Mrs. Delmar Trout and 
family are at Seacroft Cottage, Land’s 
End, for the season. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stube of 
(Continued on page 12) 








MY LADY GOES SHOPPING 





No News of Jack—More Discussion 
Concerning the Mysterious Unknown 
—Shopping—The Stranger Speaks 





Consternation reigned our ordinarily 
peaceful little group on the Cape Ann 


Shore. A week had passed with no 
word of Jack. A week fraught with 
anxiety, vibrant with suspense. He 


had simply disappeared, leaving abso- 
lutely no trace, and we were powerless 
to act. 

Our first move, instigated by the 
less-excitable Chubby, had been an ef- 
fort to locate Jack’s car, which several 
of us had seen being driven down the 
Main street of Gloucester by a totally 
unknown man. Descriptions‘ of the 
thief varied too much to give credence 


to the ideas of any particular one of 
us; Marion thought he was a large 
man, Gay was sure he was extremely 
small. Jimmie remembered him as be- 
ing dark, I myself recalled distinctly 
the fair profile of the man in the car. 
And so it was useless to attempt the 
tracing, not to mention the identifica- 
tion of such a person, although each 
of us was sure he would recognize the 
man in a second encounter. 

“I think he’s kidnapped, and is be- 
ing held for ransom,” Marion declared. 
It was early afternoon, and the Clan 
was gathered on Marion’s porch for its 
customary conclave. Oblivious of Mar- 
ion’s very good porch furniture, which 
of course was cf the National House 
Furnishing Company, the band was 
grouped about the shady veranda 
steps, indulging only in the luxury of 
a mass of soft, vividly-hued cretonne 
cushions which had originated in the 
House of Patillo. 

“Then why,’ asked Peggy, resting 
languidly against a pillar and contem- 
plating thoughtfully the Paul Revere 
hand-wrought lantern above the door- 
way, “then why haven’t we heard any- 
thing from the kidnappers?” Which 
was a piece of logic not to be denied. 

“My theory,’ ventured Chubby 
from his official position at Peggy’s 
side, ‘is that Jack’s disappearance has 
much to do with our Man of Mystery. 
No direct communication, perhaps. 
That would be impossible. Neverthe- 
less, there is a connection and a baf- 
fling one.” 

“IT agree with Chubby,” remarked 
Doctor Landis from the edge of the 
group. “From my own personal and 
somewhat puzzled observations of the 
case, it seems highly probable. The on- 
ly one, in my opinion, who can throw 
light upon the matter, is the one who 
maintains complete and utter silence. 
His story, if he could talk, might be a 
revelation.” 





Here at Ovington’s are scores 
of prizes that pay fitting tribute 
to the deed without exacting un- 
due tribute from the exchequer. 


ANWANWA\I/@VI/ANI 








Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 





“Can’t you make him talk, Doc?” 
asked Jimmie. 

The doctor shook his head. “No sur- 
gery can alter that condition,” he re- 
plied. “The man is suffering from se- 
vere shock, similar to the shell-shock 
the soldiers received during the war, 
perhaps, which only time and his own 
nervous system can correct.” 

“But how soon will he become him- 
self, Doctor?” asked Marion. “Surely 
you have had similar cases before.” 

“Somewhat,” was the reply, “though 
this is by far the most interesting. 
And as to the duration of his ‘illness,’ 
I would not venture to guess. He may 
recover tomorrow, and then again, his 
recovery may require months. One can- 
not tell.” 

“Do you suppose,” asked Gay, half- 
fearfully, ‘‘do you suppose that some- 
body, somebody who wishes to hurt us, 
has been lurking about here for the 
past week, and accidentally heard Jack 
speak of identifying the bill-fold of 
Monsieur X?” 

“What bill-fold?” inquired Chubby 
and the Doctor simultaneously. And 
Peggy explained to them about finding 
the empty cod-fish skin wallet in the 
Unknown’s coat and Jack’s determi- 
nation to take it to Blanchard’s in 
hopes of finding a clue. 

“Possibly,” remarked the Doctor, at 
the end of Peggy’s recital, “but not 
probably. The evidence, as in all good 
detective stories, is too strong. I doubt 
very much if the bill-fold enters into 
the problem.” 

The men were more or less inclined 
to agree with the Doctor’s viewpoint, 
but the girls were loathe to give up so 
romantic, and to them, so undeniable 
a theory. 

“At any rate,” suggested Peggy, ris- 
ing, “‘let’s all drive over to town and 
settle the matter. We can easily find 
out if Jack went there at all a week 


99 





INH 


RIZES are there here at Ovington’s . 


prizes for doughty racket wielders .... 
prizes for mighty mashie manipulators .... 
prizes for the devotees of Whitehead and Work. 
Prizes for tilts and tournaments of every kind 
.. all of them fair and serviceable awards 
and all of them reasonable and sensibly priced. 


OVINGTON’S 


Lexington Avenue, - - Magnolia, Mass. 
Fifth Avenue, at 39th St., - New York 


IMATION: 





ANATATATAN 


Prizes in sterling and in plate, 
in glass and crystal, in bronze and 
fine wood—prizes doubly welcome 
for their beauty and utility. 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 





And so we set off again on a new pil- 
grimage, leaving the Doctor, who 
would not leave his patient, and Chub- 
by who decided to remain with him. 

“Though I would enjoy a frappe at 
Barker’s,’” he remarked ruefully, as 
we Re purted’ 

It was an exceedingly warm morn- 
ing, and the ocean breeze, as we drove 
along the shore, was delightful. We 
decided to let Gay and Jimmie make 
the inquiries about Jack, while the rest 
of us trooped off in all directions, each 
bent on his own particular shopping. 

Marion had heard that Arch-pre- 
server shoes could be bought at Arm- 
strong’s Shoe Store, and set o:f imme 
diately in that direction. Peggy wished 
to buy some novelty keepsakes for her 
friends at home, so went directly to 
Bott’s Leather Goods Store, where she 
always found lovely things in the fa- 
mous tanned cod-fish skin, while I, af- 
ter a cursory visit to the Gloucester 
National Bank, found myself wander- 
ing about Jason’s “bigger and better” 
Department Store. On the new second 
floor, I found a new rest room with the 
added advantage of a telephone pay 
station, which I thought a decided at- 
traction. Hurrying back after a linger- 
ing survey of the establishment, I met 
Marion just leaving Dorr’s Meat Mar- 
ket, and we hied us together to W. G. 
Brown in search of Hudnut. We found 
him there, in the elusive fragrance of 


SIS 


SO OFS O.F200 D2 0S0.VHTOVSVOTO SE 


(XIN KK AARKRARKAARAAKS | 
- i 7? aL” 
see nay 





a 


80 @ @ @.0:0'0'O 019'O O.0.0.0.0' 00:0 0.0 00.0.0. 8 00.6.0 0.0.6 O0.o' 6:6 0.000.000 088 00008 8PC0ES 


Table Damask 


Towelings 


soe 0'4'0'6,0,0 00 0.00.0. 00.0 00:0:0 0.00.06 0000 Cee e OOO OOOOOO 


Mr. RAYMOND BROWN 5 
Resident Manager Ne 
Telephone 459 Magnolia ? Xs 
— a: 


Fancy Table Linen 

Lace Dinner Cloths 

Bed Linen and Spreads 
Blankets and Comforters 
Bath Towels and Rugs 


Deauville, in the mysterious caarm of 
Du Barry ,and the romantic sweetness 
of his newest child, Le Debut. The 
compacts were dainty, and pleasing to 
the eye. Le Noir for Sophistication, 
Bleu for Romance, Blane for Gaiety, 
and Vert for Adventure. One wondered 
which to choose. 

Returning to the car, we were much 
chagrined to find that the others had 
been waiting a long time for us. Time 
passes so quickly in the midst of 
beauty. So long had we worshipped at 
her Shrine, in fact, there had been 
time for a tour of inspection of the 
Gorton Pew plant, a demonstration of 
L. E. Smith’s Maytag Washing Ma- 
chine, and a brief visit to Shepherd's 
Meat Market for supplies. 

“Tf you’d been a little longer,’ Jim- 
mie teased us, “there’d have been time 
for a movie at the North Shore Thea- 
tres? 

“Or at least some tea at Marshall & 
Marchant’s,” added Gay. “Don’t you 
love their cushioned booths and their 
shiny black table-tops ?” 

“And their food!” exclaimed Jimmie, 
rolling his eyes. 

“You’re worse than Chubby,” de- 
clared Peggy as he started the motor, 
“but tell us, did you find any news of 
Jack?” 

“Not a word,” was the reply. ‘No- 
body answering to Jack’s description 
has been in there at all. We’re barking 


‘ey 


® eS ose Cee ee 0. aS ‘ xx) ¢- ieee ees eee eee aE z 


“THE TROUSSEAU HOUSE OF AMERICA” 


Grande Maison de Blanc 


538-540 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 


MAGNOLIA, MASS. 


Handkerchiefs and Neckwear 
Lingerie and Negligees 
Infants’ and Children’s Wear 
Blouse and Top Dresses 
Sport Coats and Sweaters 
Purses and Bags 


Motor Rugs 


It is understood by our patrons that our Magnolia Prices are identical 


with those in our New York Shop 


Patrons will receive the personal attention of 


Ff. 60.00 0.0.0.0 0 0.0.0 5.00 0S 000000 0000S S0.0.00 00295000000 0.00 000 0000.0.000.0' 


11 


up the wrong tree in that direction, 
I’m afraid.” And we were forced to 
agree. 

Arriving at Magnolia, opinions dif- 
fered as to the course to be pursued. 
Marion insisted upon stopping first at 
Brigham’s Market in the _ square, 
where she made us all go in with her 
to see the inside of what she called “a 
splendid market.” And after that we 
were at variance again. Jimmie’ sug- 
gested that we return to Wetherell’s 
and ponder the matter over chocolate 
fudge sundaes, but his suggestion 
passed scornfully unnoticed. 

“Tm going to Richard Briggs’,” an- 
nounced Gay. “They’re going to deco- 
rate my living room, and I must make 
arrangements. Yesterday they broug Bt 
samples, and took measurements, and 
today I must get some little things 
myself. I saw the loveliest little nest of 
tables there last week; hand decorated, 
they were, with glass tops.” 

“I saw them, too,7 said Joan, “but 
I’m not in the mood for decorations to- 
day. Clothes are more to my taste.” 

“And mine,” put in Marion. ‘“Let’s 
to Manahan’s.” 

“MecMillan’s for me,” 
separated. . 

At McMillan’s I found the newest 
thing in a riding habit. The coat was 
of Shetland homespun, cut on long 
slender lines with ample accommoda- 

(Continued on page 18) 


said I, and we 





—s 





209200000000. 





oor 
be J™ 
CX OOK) 


Ns 
NE 


= 
2.0.0 


0.0.0 0:9.0.0.0.:00.0:0.0.6 0 0000.00.00: 


Pas 


8.992.009 F.9Ce CCUSCSEOO SESS SO 
Sr 


a ee 


gv 


Se 
ah 







9.2.0 6,0,.0. BOS 0° ® 1900 9.2'06 vee: 





12 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 





THE ROCKPORT SHORE 





(Continued from page 9) 
Orange, N. J., are at their cottage on 
Phillips avenue, Pigeon Cove. 

Dr. Leo Mayer and family of New 
York City are at the Dutton cottage on 
Marmion way for the summer. 

Professor A. V. Churchill of North- 
ampton is at the cottage off of Sum- 
mer street, Rockport, for the season. 

L. P. Kauffman of Boston has opened 
his Land’s End cottage for the sum- 
mer. 

Mrs. E. R. Mosley is at Pigeon Cove 
for the season. 

Mrs. Ella Noera of Boston has 
ofened her cottage on Burt avenue. 

Stuart Todd of Boston is at his Mar- 
mion way bungalow for the _ hot 
months. 

Thomas Todd of Concord has arrived 
at his cottage on Phillips avenue. 

H. A. Vincent is at his Atlantic 
avenue house for the summer. 

Galen J. Perrett of New York City 
is occupying his studio on Bearskin 
Neck, 

Miss M. Toutaine of New York is at 
her cottage on the Headlands for the 
summer. 

Madame M. J. Rondelle of New York 
has arrived at her Hale street cottage 
for the summer months. 

Miss Mabel Green of New York is 
summering at Hale street, Rockport. 

Miss Edith Lowell of New York 
City has opened her studio, the “Blue 
Gate,” on Main street for the season. 

Mrs. Harrison T. Cady has arrived 
at her Atlantic avenue studio for the 
summer months. 

Miss Ella Novak is at her studio on 
Granite street for the season. 

Maurice Hall Pancoast is at his 
Beach street studio. 

Aldro T. Hibbard of New York has 
arrived at his Hale street studio for 
another summer season. 


Richard A. Holberg of New York is 
in Rockport for the summer months. 
Mr. Holberg’s studio is on Hale street. 

John Buckley and family of Roslin- 


dale are stopping in Rockport for the 
season. 

Mrs. Tom Barnett of St. Louis, Mo., 
is at her Bearskin Neck studio for an- 
other season. 

Miss Bertha E. Mahony of the Book- 
shop for Children, Boston, is at Mount 
Airy cottage on Granite street for the 
season. 

A novel addition to Rockport this 
summer is the Old Tavern Tea Shop, 
run under the direction of Mr. Pierce, 
proprietor of the Granite Shore Inn. 
The color scheme of the double dining- 
room is black and dull gold, which is 
particularly effective in the low-stud- 
ded type of architecture, with the old- 
fashioned stair case at the end of the 
room. Miss Helen Stevens is in charge. 

Miss Louise Allaire of Brooklyn is 
staying at George F. Hodgkins’ house 
on Beach street for the summer. 

Mrs. H. H. Cheney of Ottawa is stay- 
ing with Miss Edith Lowell at the 
Blue Gate, Main street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Gruening of 
Portland, Me., have opened their home 
at Land’s End for the season. Mr. 
Gruening is well known in the news- 
paper and magazine world. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Norwood and 
family of Medford have arrived at 
their cottage in Mill lane for the sum- 
mer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Norton and 
two children of Cliftondale have ar- 
rived at their cottage on Bearskin 
Neck. 

Mrs. William McNulty of New York 
City has arrived at the Harbor View 
cottage on Bearskin Neck, which they 
have occupied for several seasons past. 

Professor Arthur B. Elson of Bos- 
ton has arrived at his home in Shet- 
land road. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Huff of Long 
Island City, N. Y., have arrived at Mr. 
Huff’s father’s home on Granite street. 

Dr. and Mrs. Eugene McGillion and 
family of Yonkers, N. Y., have ar- 
rived at their home on High street for 
the season. 

Dr. and Mrs. William Izzo of Tewks- 
bury are stopping with Mrs. John 
Lawson of Bearskin Neck. 


Turk’s Head Inn 


Among the week’s arrivals at Turk’s 
Head Inn are: 

Mr. and Mrs. J. 'E. Fuller, Mr. and 
Mrs. F. A. Knowlton, Worcester; Miss 
Julia Mathes, Birmingham; Mrs. Ber- 
tha K. Spooner, Oklahoma City; Mrs. 
CG. Hollister’ Mrs. D.C. Garvinwane 
children, Brooklyn; Mrs. L. F. Bissell 
and son, Rockville, Conn.; Dr. William 
A. E. Knight, Winchester; Mr. and 
Mrs. W. P. Richardson, Everett; Thom- 
as A. Dowd, Boston; Miss Oello Hous- 
ton, New York City; Miss Lee Thomas, 
Miss Dorothy Thomas, Lexington, Ky. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. H. Lancashirempes 
Manchester entertained Miss. Fritzi 
Scheff and Miss Cecelia Loftus recent- 
ly. Guests included Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert Lew Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. E. Law- 
rence White, Mrs. H. Staples Potter, 
Mr. Chapin, Miss Wright and D. P. 
Clark. 


Straitsmouth Inn 

Guests of the week at Straitsmouth 
Inn are: Mrs. G. E. Behr, Elsa Behr, 
Minna D. Behr, Brooklyn; Miss Louise 
Pagelsen, Detroit; Mr. and Mrs. Keith 
P. Snyder, 8S. O. Snyder, Miss Nancy 
Keith Snyder, Louisville; Miss Isabel 
King, Miss Louise King, Miss Dorothy 
M. Hugo, Cleveland; Miss Florence W. 
Swan, Portland; Thomas W. Dunbar, 
Martha Louise Dunbar, Chicago; Miss 
Lillian C. Rogers, Cambridge; Miss M. 
W. Daniels, Brookline; Mr. and Mrs. 
D. S. Vinal, Winchester; Dr ia. 
Hunt, Belmont; Fred P. Kehew, Leom- 
inster; Edward B. Dik, Needham. 

Arrivals at the Straitsmouth Inn— 
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Sanborn, Eleanor 
Sanborn, Willis Sanborn, Springfield; 
Miss C. E. White, Methuen; Harriet H. 
Stanley, Northampton; Mrs. Walter 
Kimball, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Powers, 
Miss Helen K. Powers, Brookline; C. 
Hardy, Miss Alice Woodman, Miss E]- 
eanor Ferguson, Boston; Mrs. Walter 8. 
Coolidge, Arlington; Mrs. J. R. Golds- 
berg, Watertown; Mrs. Jean deC. 
Brouilette, Cambridge; Rev. Wolcott 
Cutter, Charlestown; Miss Ruth L. 
Sawyer, Mrs. R. W. Thomson, Barbara 
Thomson, Lowell; R. W. Martin, Mrs. 
Kate Martin, N. M. Currier, Groveland. 





RICHARD BRIGGS, Inc. 


32 Newbury Street 
BOSTON, MASS. 


SUMMER SHOP 


New Colonnade Building at Magnolia 
CHINA AND GLASS MERCHANTS 








Established 1798 
W. B. TETAMORE 








Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


13 





Granite Shore Inn 


Recent visitors to the Granite Shore 
Inn are: Ernest K. Crie, Rockland; 
J. Lowenbein, F. Lowenbein, New York 
City; A. L. Shepard, Newark; Baltzar 
V. Glaten, Stockholm, Sweden; Mr. and 
Mrs. B. L. Rand, Boston; 


ton; Mr. and Mrs. Henry V. Carter, 
Auburndale; H. C. Murlless, M. M. 
Murless, Arthur T. Murless, Belmont; 


BJ 


Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Leland, Marlboro. 


LONG BEACH 





Mr. and Mrs. N. M. Gardner of Cam- 
bridge are at their Beach cottage for 
the summer months. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. L. Heath of Worces- 
ter are at Neptune cottage for the sea- 
son. 

At Sandpiper cottage are Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Johnson and son Edward 
of Woburn. Mr. Johnson is mayor of 
Woburn. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Martin of Quincy 
are at Hartsville cottage for the sum- 
mer. 

Mrs. J. M. Nelson of Gloucester is at 
the beach for the season. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Prior with their 
young children, Barbara and Weston, 
are at the beach for the hot season. 

Mrs. John Stark, Mrs. John A. Bur- 
gess, and Mrs. Elizabeth Hughes of 
Waltham are among the cottage occu- 
pants at Long Beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. V. Morse with their 


children, Margery and Virginia of 
Medford Hillside, are spending the 
summer with Mr. and Mrs. Hale of 


Gloucester at ‘“Halecrest” cottage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Baker with 
(Continued on page 16) 








Hazel H. i 
Chapin, Florence E. Young, Northamp- 





THE ANNISQUAM REGION 
N ITEM of more than ordinary 
interest is the sale of the 
Overlook Hotel to Morris Mas- 
sell of Gloucester, who buys 
for investment. The hotel 
was built some 30 years ago 
aid nee been operated by D. W. Syl- 
vester who retires from the business. 
Thus far it has not been opened and 
the probability is that it will not be 
this season. 

Miss L. C. Rulison, who has recent- 
ly returned from a2 winter in France is 
here for the summer at her Chester 
square cottage. 

Mrs. Mattie Wentworth and daugh- 
ters, Misses Olive and Elizabeth of 
Boston, are at their cottage for the 
season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dudley French and 
daughter, and Mrs. C. Allen of St. 
Louis are at the Coddington cottage 
on River road for the season. 

Miss Olga Lingard who has _ just 
opened Highland cottage for the sea- 
son, entertained at dinner Sunday Mr. 
Horace Frost of Brookline, Mr. and 
Mrs. Foster Damon of Providence and 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wigglesworth of 
Manchester and Dr. Barney of Boston. 

Mr. Anderson Dana Hodgdon of the 
American Diplomatic Corps in Wash- 
ington and family have taken the Syl- 
vester cottage off Cambridge avenue 
for the season. Mrs. Hodgdon was 
Clara Hunter Hyatt, a niece of Mrs. 
Alpheus Hyatt of Seven Acres. Their 
children are Anderson Dana Hodgdon, 
Jr. and Alpheus Hyatt Hodgdon. 

Beatrice D. Allen, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Claude Allen, Was gone to 
Westford, Conn., where she has en- 
rolled in a school of zesthetic dancing. 











THES 


McMillan, | McMillan, Inc.| 


Ladies’ Tailor 
51 LEXINGTON AVENUE 


Telephone 487 Magnolia 





RIDING HABITS 
SPORT CLOTHES i 
SUITS | 
COATS 
DRESSES 


207 NEWBURY STREET, BOSTON 


Kenmore 2565 


Agent for the Churchill 
Hand-Loom Fabrics 


—— 


ee 
OeOOOlOlololTooloeleeeeeeeeeeeee=@g_O0W_&euem™w 


James Girdler and family of Newton 
Center are among the recent comers to 
Squam, their cottage being on Norwood 
Heights. 

The E. D. Snyder family of Haver- 
ford, Pa., are occupying the Hawes 
cottage on Arlington street for the 
summer season. — 

Mr. and Mrs. Poore of Medford are 


(Continued on page 22) 














Gloucester Young Men’s Christian Association 


49 Years of Continuous Service on Cape Ann 


Serves the Youth of Cape Ann and the Visitors to its Shores. 


Annual Financial Canvass to continue its great work will run from July 23 to 30. 


$15,500 NEEDED FOR ITS MAINTENANCE FUND 


Your check mailed to Isaac Patch, Treasurer, will help to carry it on. 























14 





TO MY LADY IN°SEARCH OF THE )RACTIGAL 


RIGHT VALUES AND COMPLETE VARIETY ARE TO BE FOUND IN THE SHOPS OF 





EASTERN POINT—JULY 11 


Tern in Sonders, Kitmer in Tri- 
angles and Arethusa in Knock- 
abouts Win in Fine Southwest 
Sailing Breeze 


The three classes of the East- 
ern Point Yacht Club were fa- 
vored Wednesday afternoon by a 
fine southwest breeze. In the 
Sonder class the Tid III had the 
advantage at the start, but the 
Tern assumed the lead, gradual- 
ly lengthening it as the race pro- 
gressed. The interest centered in 
the tussle of Skeezix and Tid III 
for second place. The Skeezix had 
got into first position at the gas 
buoy on the homestretch, when 
the Tid III, by sharp work in jib- 


ing, gained a minute and the 
leading position, in which she fin- 
ished. 


In the Triangles Kitmer and 
Triton fought it out all over the 
course, Kitmer finally getting the 
advantage, with the field strung 
out. In the Cape Cod class on an 
inside course, it was practically a 
runaway for Ronnie Swift in the 
Arethusa, Barbara Holdsworth be- 
ing runner-up, four minutes, 
lacking one second, astern. The 
summary: 


SONDER CLASS 


Name and Owner 
Tern, “J D; Cox, Jr; 1:29 326 


Tid III, Mrs. Groverman Ellis 1:33 :26 
Skeezix, Richard Woodbury 1:34:34 
Hevella, Jack Raymond 1:35 338 
Lady, William MacDonald 1385/:b4 
Shamrock, Isaac Patch, Jr. 1:36 :56 
Bandit, E. M. Williams 1:36 :37 
Bubbles, Elliot Frost 1:41:55 
TRIANGLE CLASS 
Kitmer 2d, M. Talbot 51:36 
Triton, Philip Tucker, Jr. 52:35 
Alito, Howard W. Brown 53:05 
Flirt, William D. Elwell 54:12 


Noname, Margaret Farrell 
Panope, Clarissa Jacobus 


CAPE COD KNOCKABOUT 


WM PRRRRR 
ee esee oe oe ae 

On 

a 

ao 


Arethusa, Ronnie Swift 25:16 
Wiki Wiki, Barbara Holdsworth 29:15 
Fontana, Emma Raymond 80:28 
Aeolus, S. D. Sleeper 31:24 


Mary Bess, William Russell, Jr. 
Kitmer, Meredith Boyce 

Swan, James L. Stuart, Jr. 
Sylph, F. Cunningham 

Lucky Duck, C. Wigglesworth 


EASTERN POINT—JULY 12 


BEER Ree Ep 
nN) 
i 
a 





Mrs. Ellis Again Sails Improved 
Tid to Victory—Philip Tucker, 
Jr’s., Trident Wins Close Race 
in Triangle Class 





The postponed race of June 23 
of the Eastern Point Yacht Club 
was sailed Thursday afternoon in 








GLOUCESTER 


ENJOY THE PASSING HOUR AND 
THE CAPE ANN BREEZE 





Coldest Sodas 


Cleanest Glasses | 


in Gloucester 


at Barker’s 


MOTHER ANN 
THE SILENT SENTINEL 

OF GLOUCESTER HABBOR 
SINCE TIME BEGAN. 


Rorker’s Soda Fountain has such a wide reputation for 
the richness and quality of its Ice-Cream Sodas, Frozen 
Whipped Cream, College Ices and Specialties, that peo- 
ple come for miles around to get sodas at this fountain. 


BARKER’S DRUG STORE, 134 Main Street 


Summer Residents of Cape Ann 


We Carry the Finest and Best Selected of Summer 
Footwear in This Locality. 


SPORT, GOLF, TENNIS and BEACH SHOES 


Buster Brown Shoes for Children and Adults, Arch 
Preserver and Florsheim Shoes for Men. Women’s full- 
fashioned Silk Hose at $1.49. Imported Deauville Sandals. 


Prices reasonable and to your liking. 









Registered Chiropodist and Foot Appliances 


Armstronge’s Busy Corner 


106 Main, Corner Center Street 
Established 30 Years...... | Established 2) ears og tree ne Connection 








Ruth 
C[he Most Interesting Place to Eat 
EXHIBITION OF PAINTINGS 


BY. 
CAPE ANN ARTISTS : ::: 


EMILE A. GRUPPE, Chairman Art Committee, 
42 Main Street, Rockport, Mass. 


DANCING -:- TEA 


Centre Street Gloucester, Mass. 
















SLD DADA DRD ADDI 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 








a light south-southwest breeze 
over a windward-leeward course, 
two classes participating. 

In the Sonders group the Lady 
stubbed her forefoot against a 
submerbed part of Black Bess 
Ledge near the starting line and 
was set back several minutes be- 
fore she was on her stride again. 

The handicap proved too much 
and she remained sternmost boat 
throughout. The Tid got a slight 
advantage at the send-off to the 
weather mark off Kettle Island, 
with the Tern the challenger. Tid 
gained steadily and the race re- 
solved itself into a one-two-three 
procession, with no change in po- 
sition at the close. 

The Triangles made a real race 
over the same course, Trident 
having a slight advantage. Com- 
ing into the homestretch back of 
the breakwater four leaders, spin- 
nakers to port, located a wind 
hauling westward and sailed neck- 
and-neck. It apparently was any- 
one’s race, but Trident’s skipper 
was equal to the job and eased 
over the line a winner. The sum- 
mary: 


TRIANGLES 


Name and Owner El Time 
Trident, Philip Tucker, Jr. 1:51:45 
Panope, Clarissa Jacobus 1:51:58 
Flirt, W. D. Elwell 1:52:15 
Triton, Dr. R. P. Cummins 1362517 
Noname, Miss Margaret Farrell 1:57:23 
Kitmer 8d, Max Talbot 1:57:26 


SONDER CLASS 
Tid III, Mrs. Groverman Ellis 
Tern, J. D. Cox, Jr. 
Hevella, Mrs. Raymond 


Leal eel oe ell ee oe ell ed 
Ear ne Scarce 
for) 
Ss 
o 


Skeezix, Charles Higgins 

Shamrock, Isaac Patch, Jr. 49:10 
Bubbles, Elliot Frost 49 346 
Bandit, E. M. Williams 50:29 


Lady, William McDonald 


EASTERN POINT, JULY 14, 
M. 


+i. 





Tid Continues to Show Value of 
Recent Changes Made in Hull 
—Panope in Triangles Comes to 
the Front 


A postponed race was sailed in 
the morning at Eastern Point in 
a moderate southerly breeze. As 
it was a regularly scheduled Sun- 
day race, hired sailing masters 
were not ’ debarred from standing 
a trick at the wheel and several 
availed themselves of the priv- 
ilege. 

It was a- windward-leeward 
race to the southerly mark. The 
Sonders were all mixed up at the 
start in their eagerness to get the 
best of the get-away, the result 
being that Tid, which had the 
vight of way, gave ground by 
courtesy to prevent a collision, 
being handicapped 30 seconds 
thereby. 

Skeezix took the lead on the 
departure for the southern mark, 
but when half the water had been 
left behind Tid ate out to weather 
into leading place, Skeezix being 
35 seconds astern and Lady 30 
seconds behind the Higgins ship. 

Rounding the weather mark, 
spinnakers were broken out to 
port and Lady and Skeezix fought 
it out for second place, the form- 
er passing Skeezix at the gas 
buoy on the home stretch. 

In the Triangle Class, Pano-72 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


15 





was to the good from gunfire to 
gunfire, Trident and Noname hay- 
ing it out for second place. The 
summary: 

SONDER CLASS 

Name and Owner 

Tid 3d, Mrs. Groverman Ellis i 
Lady, William McDonald il 
Skeezix, Charles Higgins ars) 
Shamrock, Isaac Patch, Jr. 1:40 345 
ern, 2.0), Cox, Jr: a! 
Bubbles, Elliot Frost 1 
Bandit, E. M. Williams 1 


TRIANGLE CLASS 
Panope, Clarissa Jacobus 1 
Trident, Philip M. Tucker, Jr. 1 
Noname, Miss Margaret Farrell 1:46:26 
Alito, Howard W. Brown ee 
Kitmer, M. Talbot at 
Triton, Dr. P. M. Cummins il 


PIPING BREEZE IN AFTER- 
NOON 








In Which Tern Carries off Honors 
in Sonders, Alito Scoring in 
Triangles and Wiki Wiki in 
Knockabouts 





For the afternoon events there 
was a splendid stiff breeze which 
strengthened steadily, providing 
fine racing both from the specta- 
tor and the contestant point of 
view. 

It was a triumph for the fresh 
water-bred sailors in the Sonder 
class for Jacob D. Cox, Jr., of 
Cleveland in the Tern and: Mrs. 
Groverman Ellis of Chicago in 
the Tid III, won first and second 
respectively in a _ sailorman’s 
breeze. 

The fleet got away well bunched 
for the weather mark off Kettle 
Island, the Tern appearing to as- 
similate the rough gomg with- 
out distress. On one short hitch 
off shore and a long hitch inside 
she reached the mark two min- 
utes to the good, Tid second boat. 

On the reach across Tid gained 
seven seconds. On the run home 
Skeezix was minus spinnaker but 
managed to cling to third place. 

The Triangles over the same 
course put up a pretty race. The 
squadron followed the same tac- 





OME in and see the new 
Johnsons, the world’s fast- 
est outboard motors. Take one 
with you on the running board 
of your car the next time you 
go to the lake. See how fast it 
will go. Johnson’s have given 
wings to water travel. 
There’s a model for every purse 
and purpose, $115.00 and up. 
Easy payments. 


PERKINS & CORLISS, Inc. 


DISTRIBUTORS 


1 Middle Street, Gloucester 
Tel. 200 


Johnson 


Outboard siz, Motors 


a gone a ee 








| Arthur E. Dorr Division 


First National Stores 


147 Main Street, - - Gloucester 


Here you may purchase under the one 
roof, the finest foods that the market 
affords 


Choice Steaks, Roasts and Casseroles, Cut 
from Heavy Steer Beef 


Genuine Spring Lamb for Chops and 
Roasts 


Fancy Milk Fed Native Veal 
Choice Milk Fed Chickens and Fowl 
Fresh, Salt and Smoked Fish 


A Most Complete Variety of Fruits 
and Vegetables 


And a Full Line of Groceries 


oe OOO eee ee eee OOOO eee” 


“Your Most Convenient Market” 


—~, 


Telephone Your Order and We Will Have It 
Ready When You Call 


Telephone 2760 











The Busy Bee 


The Finest Equipped Restaurant on the North Shore 


LOBSTERS---~ STEAKS-------CHOPS 
Food Cooked to Order 


Summer Residents—When in Town Dine Here 


74 Main Street 
TABLES FOR LADIES 


Gloucester 








THE ROCHAWAY 


AND COTTAGES 
At ROCKY NECK, EAST GLOUCESTER 
Right on the Water 
Commanding a Superb View of the Ocean 
Accommodates 400. 
W. A. PUBLICOVER, Proprietor 








A. P. STODDART & CO. 


Established 1876 


ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS 


Engine Repairing and Installing 
FULLY EQUIPPED MACHINE SHOP 
236 MAIN STREET GLOUCESTER, MASS. 














Fl loo 
a 


tics as the Sonders, a short and 
long hitch to weather, Alito tak- 
ing the lead, Kitmer a close sec- 
ond. Both sailed evenly on the 
reach to the Southern mark. With 
spinnakers to port all bowled 
along on the homeward leg at a 
merry pace, keeping as they were 
without change. 

The Cape Cod Knockabouts 
sailed an inside triangular course. 

Barbara Holdsworth of Boston 
in the Wiki Wiki again showed 
her ability, beating May Bess, 
sailed by W. E. Russell, Jr., of 
Chicago, and the Fontana, sailed 
by Emma Raymond of Cleveland, 
second and third, respectively. 

There was some confusion in 
this class owing to the fact that 
a buoy had been carried away and 
replaced by a substitute. The 
summary: 


SONDER CLASS 
Name and Owner E 
Tern, J. D. Cox, Jr. ie 

Tid III, Mrs. Groverman Ellis P28L27 
Skeezix, Charles Higgins 1 
Shamrock, Isaac Patch, Jr. 1 
Lady, William McDonald 1 
1 


Hevella, Jack Raymond 734 :39 

Bandit, E. M. Williams 1:37:12 

*Vim, Charles Ahlquist Disqualified 
TRIANGLES 


Alito, Howard W. Brown 
Kitmer II, M. Talbot 

Panope, Clarissa Jacobus 
Noname, Miss Margaret Farrell 
Trident, Philip M. Tucker, Jr. 
Flirt, W. D. Elwell 

Alamo, Andrew Winslow, Jr. 


CAPE COD KNOCKABOUTS 


Wiki Wiki, Barbara Holdsworth 1:17:48 
May Bess, W. E. Russell, Jr. 
Fontana, Emma Raymond 
Kitmer, Meredith Boyce 
Sylph, Francis Cunningham 
Old Ironsides, Jack Raymond 
Aeolus, Stephen D. Sleeper 
Arethusa, Leonard Ellis 
Swan, James L. Stuart, Jr. 


Me 
ms 
a 
> 
o 


Rp pee 
0 oe oe ae 

i) 

or 

oo 


Bemo, Charles Bratenahl 27:41 
Lucky Duck, Constance Wiggles- 
worth 1:32:00 





*Crossed line ahead of gun and con- 
tinued on course. 


ANNISQUAM, JULY 15—A.M. 


Harry Worcester Makes Double 


Win in the One Day—Jack 
Fricke Uses His Head and 
Wins—Light Sou’wester Pre- 
vails 





Two races were sailed at An- 
nisquam Sunday, one in the morn- 
ing having been postponed from 
Saturday afternoon. The after- 
noon race was the first of a se- 
ries of three special contests. The 
day was fine and the conditions 
favorable. 

The morning race was sailed in 
a light southwest wind. Harry 
Worcester in the Squab hit for 
the maximum, scoring two wins. 
In the forenoon event, the Bird 
boats were well bunched on the 
run to Plum Cove, Evelyn Wood- 
bury in the Oloof reaching that 
point first, and also the outer 
mark, with Albatross and Canvas 
Back in order. 

On the windward work, the 
Squab, fourth boat, showed her 
superiority, going into first place, 
and the skipper of the Tern, 
standing over to Essex, made a 
gain which landed him second po- 
sition, displacing Albatross and 
Oloof. 

In the Cat class, Jack Fricke 
in the Kitten played a lone hand 
and won. Kitty Cat, Catalena and 
Scratch were in the lead on the 
reaches. When the boats hauled 
on the wind, all save Fricke stood 
over to the Lanesville shore. He 
came about to port for Essex and, 
as luck would have it, ran into a 
fine vein of wind coming down 
the beach, which lifted him along 

(Continued on page 22) 





LONG BEACH 


(Continued from page 18) 
their young son, Robert, Jr., are spend- 
ing the summer at the beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester 8S. Tarr of Es- 
sex, with their children, Philip, Wilbur 
and Marie, are at the beach for the 
season. 

D. J. Handrahan of Waltham is at 
“Kumagen” cottage for the season. 

John Andrew Johnson, the well 
known insurance man of Gloucester, 
and family are at their beach cottage 
for the season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland Smith and fam- 
ily of Gloucester are at “Moorings” 
for the summer months. 

Arthur Ray and family of Woburn 
are occupying “By the Sea” for another 
season. 

E. W. Tutten of West Medford is en- 
joying the summer months at Clear 
View cottage. 








G. L. Huckins and family of Melrose 
are at the beach again this summer. 

Golden Rod Troop, Girl Scouts of 
Boston, have a cottage at the beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Emerson of 
Methuen are spending an enjoyable 
vacation at the beach. 


BASS ROCKS 
(Continued from page 8) 
Cutler, No. Wilbraham; Mr. and Mrs. 
John L. Bailey, Miss Isabel Martin 


. Bailey, Baltimore; Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 


liam M. Chester, Mrs. Norman M. 
Chester, New York City; Miss Marion 
M. Smith, Mrs. S. M. Smith, Milwau- 
kee; Mrs. Freda B. Flynn, Oklahoma 
City; Mrs. Walter Dreyfus, New York 
City; Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels, Mrs. 
S. C. Kendall, Worcester; Miss Mar- 
guerite G. Walton, Providence; Miss 
May R. Keith, Boston; Mr. and Mrs. 
W. Borden Fairfax, Brookline; Miss 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 





R. A. McMahon, Melrose; Miss A. M. 
Donovan, W. Roxbury; Miss Jeannette 
W. Ingersol, Cleveland; Mrs. G. P. 
Prout, Summit, N. J.; Miss O. Macfar- 
land, Mrs. F. S. Fisher, White Plains, 
Na 


“WYNGAERTS HOECK” 


(Continued from page 5) 
dian bible in the original, says the name is 
certainly derived from ‘‘Wanashaqueompsk,” 
“the top or extreme point of a rock,” and that 
is the probable fact. The rather uncouth Indi- 
an name was naturally cut down to a pro- 
nounceable mouthful as has been the case in 
all ages with the Angio-Saxons. It is the 
learned doctor who says that he has no doubt 
but whet the name belonged to the entire 
cape. That certainly ought to be authorita- 
tive—and should settle the point to the 

satisfaction of the historical student. 
During the latter part of April of 
this year the writer, while browsing 


about in the New York public library, 


-——_- 











All Work Guaranteed. 


Telephone 1811-M 











W.H. GRIDLEY, @pbolsterer 
94 WESTERN AVENUE 


FURNITURE OF ALL KINDS Repaired, Upholstered and Polished 


Prices Very Moderate. 
Let Me Estimate on Any Work You May Have. 

















Dog Owners, Attention! 


The following order providing for the restraining of dogs for a period 
of ninety (90) days is now in effect and a copy of the same is printed 


CITY OF GLOUCESTER 


In Municipal Council, June 26, 


herewith for the information of the generai public. 
: WHEREAS, 


BOARD OF HEALTH 
City of Gloucester. 
To the Municipal Council, 
Gloucester, Mass. 


Gentlemen :—At a meeting of the Board of Health this afternoon, it 
was voted to recommend ta your Honorable Body the enactment of an or- 
dinance, muzzling or restraining all dogs from running at large within 
This action the Boatrd 


the confines of Gloucester for a period of 99 days. 
deems urgent in view of existing number of rabies. 


Sincerely yours, 
(Signed) 


THEREFORE, in accordance with Section 167, of Chapter 140 of the 
é it is hereby. ordered that all dogs within the confines of 
the City of Gloucester shall be restrained from running at large for a pe- 


General Laws, 


riod of ninety days. 


Dogs may be exercised on leashes, but no dog shall at any time be al- 
lowed to run at large during such time as herein prescribed. 


AND FURTHER, Ordered that the Police Department stand instructed 


to enforce the provisions of this order. 
Adopted : 


(Signed) GILBERT H. RYAN, 
ALLEN F. GRANT, City Clerk. 


A true copy Attest: 


Section 168, Chapter 140, General Laws reads as follows: 

The Aldermen or selectmen may cause service, of such an order upon 
the owner or keeper of the dog by causing a certified copy thereof to be 
delivered to him; and if he refuses or neglects for twelve hours thereafter to 
muzzle or restrain such a dog as so requived, he shall be punished by a 


fine of not more than twenty-five dollars. 


Section 169, Chapter 140, General Laws reads as follows: 


A county, city or town officer who refuses or wilfully neglects to per- 
f duties imposed upon him by the provisions of this chapter relat- 
ing to dogs shall be punished by a fine of not more than one hundred 
dollars which shall be paid, except in Suffolk county, into the county treas- 

Whoever is aggrieved by such refusal or neglect may report the same 


form the 


ury. 

forthwith to the district attorney of his district. 
By order of the Municipal Council, 

June 29, 30, July 2, 3, 5 


PPPILLLLLELILLLLILLLLDOLE LL DDOL LOL DD ODOL DODD LO DODOOD L220 00002000009 


1928. 
the following communication has this day been received 
from the Board of Health of the City of Gloucester: 


JOHN A. RADCLIFFE, 


Ohe J. 


MEAT & GROCERY CO. 
141 Main Street, Gloucester 
ESTABLISHED 1876 


June 25, 1928. 


: The Saturday Public Markets 


51 Washington Street 
252 Main Street 


RETAIL GOODS AT WHOLESALE PRICES 


Washington St. Store Open Till 9.30 P.M. Friday 


E. W. RUSSELL CO., Wholesalers 


——~ 


iW iii 


C.Shepherd 





‘imiiiimiiiimiicim iii 


THE LARGEST, MOST SANITARY AND BEST 


Clerk. 


STOCKED DEPARTMENT GROCERY AND 
PROVISION STORE ON THE NORTH SHORE. 


Come here with your market basket, personally select your 
list of Fine Groceries, Meats, Poultry, and Game from depart- 
ment to department. 
the highest quality. 
store in Essex County. 


Everything from soup to nuts and of 
In the coolest and most commodious 
Plenty of zoom to shop comfortably. 


FISH DEPARTMENT 


We carry, Fresh from the Sea, the leading varieties 
of Salt Water Fish, Lobsters, Live 
and Boiled, Clams, etc. 


Deliveries to All Parts of the Cape 


LEADING NORTH SHORE 
PROVISION AND FISH DEALERS 


Telephones 112-113-114 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


17 





chanced on a loan display of the Stokes 
collection of old Dutch maps. The 
Dutch claimed and were prepared to 
assert their right to all territory from 
latitude 40 to 50, that is, roughly speak- 
ing, from New York Bay and including 
to the mouth of the River St. Law- 
rence. To clinch their claim they sent 
out a group of explorers and cartog- 
raphers to spy out and apportion the 
land and these did the work assigned 
them turning in from time to time 
some half dozen good maps of New 
Belgii—the phrasing was in Latin. On 
the foot notes of several was the state- 
ment that these maps had been based 
on previous surveys and errors cor- 
rected. 

It was very apparent to students of 
early exploration along the New 


England coast that these maps had 
been based very broadly on Captain 
John Smith’s exceedingly accurate map 
of 1614 and that the Dutch map mak- 















‘The Laird’s Lucky Number,” J. J. Bell 


Established 1893 





An ATTRACTIVE 


APPETIZING 





The Mew Savoy 


EUROPEAN PLAN 
Gloucester’s All-the-Year-Round Hotel. 


Just Completed. 


Superior Accommodations. Homie of Rotary. Won- 

derful Food. Modern. On Main Street, Below Post 

Office, Easterly. 

Broiled Live Lobsters Our Specialty. 
Service A La Carte. 


ARTHUR B. FRAZIER, Proprietor. 


GLOUCESTER SCHOOL OF THE LITTLE THEATRE 


‘Friday and Saturday, July 20 and 21 
“fle,” Eugene E, O'Neil 
“The Flattering Word,” George Kelley : 


FRIDAY and SATURDAY, JULY 20 and 21 
ADMISSION $1.00 § 


“A Delightful Place to Eat” 


APPEALING | 
ATMOSPHERE At 


RANSELLEAR TOWLE’S 


Successor to MARSHALL & MARCHANT 


118 MAIN ST., near Waiting Station, Gloucester 


Delicious Candies, Fresh Salted Nuts, and Tempting Luncheons 
for discriminating people in our tea room. 


We Invite You to Inspect Our Kitchen. 





ers had availed themselves liberally of 
that data. 

However they changed completely 
the designations, but in some few 
cases and especially at Cape Ann they 
note also Smith’s nomenclature. The 
land bordering the seacoast was por- 
tioned out into liberal manorial hold- 
ings as in New Amsterdam. On maps 
19, 26 and 29, the name of what is 
now Gloucester Harbor is set down as 
“Wyngaerts Hoeck” and, in brackets 
these words Anglais Cape Anne— 
Tragibigzanda and the designation of 
the three islands Thachers, Milk and 
Salt, set down as “Turcken Hoefden,”’ 
the Turk’s Head of Captain Smith in 
Dutch and also “Cape Anna,” so there 
can be no doubt about their use of 
Smith’s map as a basis. 

Ipswich Bay is set down as Witte 
Bay, probably from the appearance of 
the strand from Squam along the 
coast and the light color of the shoal 


Stillington Hall 










Tickets $3.00. 


MR. LESLIE BUSWELL WILL PRESENT 
“PYGMALION’’ 
A Play by George Bernard Shaw on JULY 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 
May be obtained from Miss Edith L. Atwater, 


at Stillington Hall, Telephone 3130 Gloucester, also at Brain- 
ard Lemon’s Magnolia Shop. 


water together with its appearance 
when ruffled by the wind, which is 
frequently the case. 

Now then Wyngaerts Hoeck, the 
Dutch name, may easily have been cor- 
rupted by early settlers to Wingaer- 
sheek, passed down by word of mouth 
and bobs up finally as the Indian name 
of Cape Ann or Gloucester. Now the 
chance coming across these maps un- 

(Continued on page 20) 


GREENWICH poet 


For BOYS and GIRLS 
ON NARRAGANSETT BAY 
Thorough College Preparation 
Business and Music Courses 
Accredited Certificate Privileges 

Capable Faculty 
Separate Junior School 

All Sports Gymnasium 

Moderate Rates Send for Cataloc 

A. T. SCHULMAIER 

EAST GREENWICH, R. I. 





EAST 


Est. 1802 


Box gl 





Gloucester, Mass. 


and 28, at 8.30 P.M. 





EXPERT PLANTING 









and Horticultural Advice 






NURSERIES AND GREENHOUSES 





POOLE’S ANTIQUE SHOP 
Bond’s Hill, Gloucester 


Choice Collection of Early American and 


We Do First-Class Upholstering, Cabinet Making, 
Refinishing and Reproducing to Order. 


We carry one of the largest assortments of Chintz, 
Printed Linens, Toile de Jouy, Tapestries 
and Cretonnes, in beautiful patterns. 






ELLIOTT C. ROGERS 


717 Washington Street - 
Phones 2600—1362-W 






- Annisquam 






Near Bridge 







30 Y/IEARS’ EXPERIENCE 











TEL. 1585-W 






English Antiques. 


















For Sixty Years 


THIS PHARMACY has been dispensing Reliable 


Drugs and Medicines 


to the people of Cape Ann. 


Have you ever given us an 


opportunity to prove to you our capabilities along the lines 


of EFFICIENCY and REAL SERVICE? 


We respectfully 


solicit a share of your patronage this present season. 


The Wetherell Pharmacy 


P. O. SQUARE 





MY LADY GOES SHOPPING 





(Continued from page 11) 
tion for the saddle. The judghpores 
were a fawn colored English military 
twill, their color matching the lighter 
color in the brown and fawn mixture 
of the coat. Needless to say, I pur- 
chased it. 

Crossing to Manahan’s, I found Mar- 
ion and Joan in the throes of trying on 
dresses. There was much fitting and 
promenading and looking in mirrors, 
which ended by each securing the 
“most adorable frock in the shop.” 

Marion’s was a tea gown of figured 
chiffon, a galaxy of colors on a white 
background, with the finely tucked 
skirt falling gracefully from the waist. 

Joan’s was a sports dress of pink 
crepe, a two-piece affair, both skirt 
and blouse finely tucked in a geomet- 
rical pattern. Belt and collar ended 
in a tie arrangement, giving a charm- 
ing youthful appearance to the whole. 

Returning to the car, we found that 
Gay and Peggy were still shopping, 
while Jimmie, having completed a very 
thorough and _ extensive tour of 
Schmidt’s and Ovington’s, had come 
off with what he termed Ovington’s 


THE L.E. SMITH CO. Inc. | 


“prize,” a hand-tooled leather box, 
topped with three identical white ele- 
phants carrying their trunks high, and 
containing material for the games of 
poker, pinochle, bridge and whist. 

Soon Gay and Peggy joined us, full 
of news of bridal trousseaux at the 
Grand Maison. The daintiest of 
towels, the finest of monogrammed lin- 
en sheets, the most luxurious of silken 
puffs, and the loveliest of table linen 
and lace. And Gay, whose own trous- 
seau had been purchased less than a 
year ago at the Grand Maison, wished 
she were a bride again. 

“Have you all seen the art exhibit 
at Ruth’s?”’ somebody asked on the 
way home. “There are some splendid 
paintings there by Cape Ann artists, 
and it is simply delightful to be able 
to enjoy them over a cup of tea, so to 
speak.” 

“There’s so much to do and see in 
Gloucester,” Gay remarked, “that it’s 
almost impossible to do and see it all, 
even in one whole summer. I thought 
I knew the town fairly well, but it was 
only last week that I learned about the 
Hermit of Bond’s Hill.” 

“There is some remarkanple history 
hereabouts,” Peggy told her. “Things 
have happened on this shore that are 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 








W. E. BLANCHARD 
Costume Petvelry 


125 Main Street, Gloucester 


NOVELTY SOUVENIRS, ETC. 


o nnnnceroccsrdesecccrtdbcccbvonvasvcceccer tem 


more thrilling than any novel, yet true 
as history.” 

“Like the Wreck of the Hesperus,” 
exclaimed Gay. ‘True or false, Long- 
fellow’s account is certainly vivid, and 
the very sight of Norman’s Woe is 
enough to make one shudder.” 

“Yet I never seem to notice any 
shuddering on Saturday evenings at 
Del Monte’s,”’ Jimmie teased fer. 

“That’s entirely different, of course,” 
was the retort. “And you knew what 
I meant, anyway.” 

After a flying visit to the Saturday 
Public Market for additional provi- 
sions, and a stop at L. E. Andrew’s: 
for some tools which Jimmie suddenly 
discovered he simply couldn’t do with-- 
out, we started back for the shore, all 
wondering, yet none quite daring to 
voice his thoughts, if any news of our 
absent member had been received 
while we were away. 

But if we had any secret hopes in 
our most secret hearts, they were 
doomed to disappointment, for an air 
of undisturbed tranquility prevailed. 
Chubby and the Doctor looked at us— 
inquiringly as we entered, but were. 
not disappointed at Jimmie’s “no 
news.” They had not expected any. 

As we sat there lost in thought, 





Hloucester Auto Bus Co. 


Exclusive Street Passenger Transportation on Cape Ann, 








Sole Cape Ann Agents for the 
Frigidaire, Modern Sanitary Iceless Refrigerator 


SILENT FLOW OIL BURNER FOR RANGES 


Maytag Washing Machine 
Chambers Fireless Gas Range 


Plumbing, Heating, Hardware, Lawn Mowers, 
Garden Hose, Kitchen Furnishings, Etc. 


221-223 Main St., 169 E Main St. 
GLOUCESTER 


Gloucester and East Gloucester, Annisquam, Lanesville, Pig- 
eon Cove, Rockport, West Gloucester, Essex, Magnolia, Man- 
chester. 


Starter’s Office 114 Main Street 
Information Telephone 2195 Telephone 1675 








g Shoe Hospital 


SHOES RENEWED BY 'THE 
ELWELL SYSTEM 
Skilled Workmen—First Quality Oak Leather Only Used 


4 CENTER STREET 
Just Around the Corner from Main Street Waiting Station 











————. - —___ 
oe SS 











| 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


19 





wondering what to do, all inwardly 
nervous, and all! feigning a great pla- 
cidity, we heard a sound inside. The 
sound of slippered feet coming down a 
staircase. 

The Doctor jumped up and ran in- 


side, and a moment later we heard 
voices. The Doctor’s voice, low and 
clear, and another, tremulous and 


frightened. We heard the doctor ex- 
plaining, soothing, reassuring, and 
gradually the tones of the other speak- 
er became more confident. Then the 
footsteps retreated, we heard the soft 
paddle of slippers returning up the 
stairs, accompanied by a strong, firm 
tread, and finally, silence again. 

Presently the doctor returned. 

“It has happened,” he told us. ‘He 
has recovered his senses, but he is still 
very weak. We will not disturb him to- 
day, but tomorrow—or very soon—- 
we shall have his story.” 


C. ANNE SHORE. 


THAT SECOND ENTRANCE 


(Continued from page 2) 
causes much delay and congestion, es- 
pecially at morning and night when 
delays entail much vexation and hard- 
ship and this trouble has been accen- 
tuated quite a number of times when 
the mechanism of the bridge goes 
wrong, as the best of mechanism will, 
or the electricity or the apparatus is 
in trouble. Last summer blockades for 
miles were caused by half hour and 
longer delays in midsummer. 

There is no other way of getting in 
or out of town and the situation be- 
came really acute. Had a fire occurred 
in the westerly section in one of sev- 
eral important points, the loss might 
have been most serious—without go- 
ing into specifications. 

Accordingly the municipal author- 
ities appealed to the County Commis- 
sioners and their Chief Engineer, R. 





Five Pound Island Railway 


KNOWLES & VANCE 


Boat Building, Engine Work In All Its 
Branches, Repairing, Painting, Etc., 
Under Expert Owner Direction. 


THE LARGEST AND SAFEST YACHT AND 
BOAT STORAGE ON CAPE ANN 


WINTER STORAGE. 


HARLEY A. VANCE, 
Mechanical Engineer 


eS 


BYRON W. KNOWLES, 
Shipbuilding Department 


R. Evans, has made a most exhaustive 
study of the problem and submitted 
one of the most satisfactory reports of 
the kind locally that we have seen for 
years. 

He showed how there were eight 
different locations for bridge heads 
across which a _ bridge might be 
thrown, six below the railroad bridge 
and two above. 

Among those indicated was that fol- 
lowing the ancient Concord street—- 
Biskie or Russ Island causeway, with 
a suspension bridge thrown across the 
river connecting with the mainland at 
Ferry street. This bridge was to have 
sufficient clearance to permit the 
smaller masted crafts, shore boats, 
yachts, etc., to pass, without recourse 
to draw raising. Of course any bridge 
must of necessity have a draw, al- 
though few tall sparred craft use the 
waterway. The draw raising by this 
plan would be infrequent. 

This, it is figured, was the least ex- 
pensive of any of the propositions, the 
bridge span being the narrowest of the 
other locations. 

We have always fancied this parti- 
cular settlement of this proposition 
which is bound to come some day not 
so far away, for the accidents to 
bridge mechanism are apt to occur 
when least looked for. First, it seems 
the most logical, giving the shortest 
approach to the city from the north 
and east and a short cut for the peo- 
ple in the northern and upper centrai 
parts of the city. It would develop 
properties in this section rapidly, for 
ward eight, in area, is equal to all the 
rest of the city combined—one of the 
finest high land summer locations im- 
aginable. It will be the short cut to 
Northern Massachusetts, New Hamp- 
shire and Maine points. 

An alternative plan above the River 
is for a crossing from the Clark’s Hill 
bridgehead, near the glue works, across 
the river to Wolf’s Hill. This gives a 


53 and 55 Washington Street 


longer span and would not afford the 
land development possibilities in the 
upper part of the parish that the first 
named would create. 

Of the several locations noted below 
the bridge, some closely parallelling the 
present structure, the steel bridge 
construction will be from three to four 
times longer than the uppermost plan 
and the cost of these will run over a 
million, according to the estimates, 
while the old ferry route it is estimat- 
ed will cost about $275,000, there be- 
ing no land damages, as in the case of 
all the other schemes mentioned. Also, 
most worthy of consideration, it is the 
only plan where land development pos- 
sibilities may recoup the cost. 

In some of these plans, private inter- 
ests only, rather than public benefits, 
as a whole, would accrue. It will be 
well when the time is ripe for the im- 
provement that both county and state 
officials have the controlling voice in 
this matter, as they are less liable to 
be influenced by selfish and local con- 
siderations. For that reason the state 
and county when working in conjunc- 
tion with cities absolutely refuse to be 
a party to road improvement unless 
they control the direction of the work 
and expenditures. 

Our interested summer residents, 
having influential connections with of- 
ficialdom, can do much to direct this 
great improvement into its most fea- 
sible channel. 


AN APOLOGY 


Our attention has been called to the 
fact that in last week’s dissertation on 
“Woman Suffrage,” an injustice was 
done by the omission of a paragraph 
concerning Mrs. Ferguson, sometime 
governor of Texas. We have no desire 
to ignore her and trust her admirers 
will accept this explanation and dis- 
claimer. 


EVERYTHING IN THE LINE OF 


HARDWARE = STOVES 


And Kitchen Furnishings 


L. E. 
117-121 Main Street 


ANDREWS & CO. 


Gloucester 


SAUNDERS 


Chanticleer Ice Cream 
A PAL FOR YOUR PALATE 


Tel. 485 





2C 


“WINGAERTS HOECK” 


(Continued from page 17) 
doubtedly fixes the origin of the name 
Wingaersheek. 

Wyngaerts is Dutch for Winegarden, 
and Hoeck, a hook or cove or harbor, 
and anglicized, the Dutch name of our 
harbor and city was “Winegarden har- 
DOL 

Of course this connoted the plen- 
teousness of grapes as described by 
Thorwald in his cruise to Vinland and 
noted by Champlain during his visit in 
1606 for there could be no wine garden 
without a plenteousness of grapes. 


PAPER HANGERS AND 


STEELE & ABBOTT CO. 


‘The North Shore Painters ”’ 


Wall Papers and Paints 


Our Work is Done Promptly and Well 


287 Main Street, 


PURE 


Refrigerant. 
requires some moisture. 


Telephone 1358 


ICE 


Frozen Naturally in the Purest Ponds in New England 


Nothing to get out of order. 
To keep food juicy in a Refrigerator 
No mechanical-chemi- 
cal devices yet developed by man, regardless of 
how costly or intricate, equals ice as a safe, relia- 
ble, silent and economical cold maker. 


And this curiously corroborates 
the claim that the Krossanes of Thor- 
wald was Gloucester Harbor. Since 
the first presentation of that claim in 
Pringle’s History, historians have ac- 
cepted it as the outstanding probabil- 
ity. 

Historians are unanimous in agree- 
ment that the Kialarnes of Thorwald, 
the Keel Cape, from its shape was Cape 
Cod. Taking this as his point of de- 
parture Thorwald records in his log 
that he sailed north and came to the 
promontory across the bay which he 
named Krossanes. As the writer is 
very familiar with that stretch of seas, 


















PAINTERS 


Telephone 


Gloucester 






The Perfect 








Telephone 180 


CAPE POND ICE CO. 


GLOUCESTER 














Many Prominent 


a little fire in the 

















BULLDOG FURNACE 


Adds to their comfort on cold, damp mornings. 
Can you spend $138.50 more profitably? 


TIDEWATER ENGINEERING CO., Mfgrs. 


Tel. Gloucester 2323 





SUMMER RESIDENTS 


are surprised how much the instant response of 


Seashore and Country Combined. 





114 Mt. Pleasant St. 


TASTE— 
FLAVOR— 
ENJOYMENT— 


Served at our New Frigidaire Soda Fountain with 
Special Ice Cream and Cooling Drinks 


TROWBRIDGE, The Druggist 


THE NEW DRUG STORE 


159 MAIN STREET 


Turk’s Head Inn 


Land’s End—Oppeosite Thacher’s Island 
ROCKPORT =i 


The Finest View on the New England Coast. 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 





spending three autumns in that local- 
ity from Boone Island to Cape Cod 
waters, he became strongly convinced 
that Krossanes was Gloucester Harbor 
which now is generally accepted as the 
fact; 

As showing how inaccurate histori- 
cal lore comes into existence, the fol- 
lowing may be cited: A summer ho- — 
tel proprietor seeking a name for his 
hostelry chanced upon the chapter and 
thought the name a good one, hence 
the Hotel Thorwald. Since that time 
statement has been put into print and 
passed current that a skeleton, the 
body of Thorwald, was dug up near the 





SWINSON BROS. 
LANDSCAPE GARDENERS 


Road and Lawn Tennis Court Construction 


Local Agents for Sheep Manure and Fertilizer 
Blue Stone for Walks, Driveways and Lawn Tennis Purposes 


Advice and Estimate of Cost—Free 


EXPERT LAND DRAINING EXCAVATING, GRADING 


EAST GLOUCESTER 


































GLOUCESTER 


MASS. 
D. P. CLARK; Prop: 


Unexcelled Cuisine 


INSURANCE 


ALL KINDS 


STRONGEST COMPANIES 
JOHN A. JOHNSON 


Gloucester National Bank Bldg. 
Telephones 16 and 17 
Just off Custom House Square 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


21 





hotel. No one appears to have pre- 
served these historic bones. 

And now Wyngaerts Hoeck — no 
more in these Volsteadian days. 


CECELIA (“CISSIE”) LOFTUS 





The thing which impresses one most 
about “‘Cissie” Loftus is a subtle air of 
humor and good-humoredness. She 
seems to be secretly and privately 
amused by life and all that’s dn it. 
Smilingly, genial, she watches its prog- 
ress of events with a quizzical interest, 
a half-twinkle in her eye. She is ut- 
terly frank in her opinions, and abso- 
lutely sincere. 

“T love the movies,’ 
answer to my question. “Of course, 
there will always be the legitimate 
stage. It has periods of slumping like 
every other business, but nothing will 
ever take its place.” 

The Vitaphone movies are a “freak 
thing,” she says, which will go on for 
some time, perhaps. But they will not 
be permanent, nor will they take the 
place of the legitimate. The element of 
personal magnetism which is the glory 
of the play, and the individual, direct 
contact afforded by it, will never be 
superseded either by the silent drama, 
or the Vitaphone. 

The stage of the present day, Miss 
Loftus thinks, is very interesting. It 
has lost the qualities of drama that 
she personally loves, the lightness, the 

fragrance, the poetic romanticism of 
the days of her greatest triumphs, yet 
the modern drama has advantages. 

Miss Loftus is a great admirer of 
Shakespearean plays, though she con- 
siders her Marguerite in ‘Faust’ her 
finest performance. Another interest- 
ing play to her was Peter Pan, which 
she did in London. ; 

Herself the mother of a seventeen- 
year-old boy, Miss Loftus is an advo- 
cate of the younger generation. She 


3. 


she told me, in 





Tel. 452 Established Here 1890 


North Shore Dyeing and 
Cleansing Shop 


Cleansing, Dyeing, Pressing and 
Repairing 
Work called for and delivered 
Next Olympia Theatre 


245 Main St. 


Ocean view. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


JOHN J. McDONALD 
ELECTRICAL 


CONTRACTOR 
15 Washington St., 


Mass. 
Res. 447-R 


Gloucester 
Phone 473-W 





Wonasquam Lodge 


THE HOUSE OF COMFORT 


bathing. 
Excellent Table. 


ANNISQUAM, (GLouCESTER) MASS. 
FRANK H. SHUTE, Proprietor 


Office Open Day and Night. 


WILLARD S. PIKE 


Funeral Director 
and Embalmer 


Shipping, Transfer and 
Crematory Work 

75 Washington Street 

Gloucester 


admires the present day frankness and 
honesty, and looks for a splendid fu- 
ture for our youth. 

Miss Loftus is spending her vaca- 
tion with her young son at Turk’s 


Head Inn, Rockport. From there she 
plans to go to Stockbridge, Mass., to 
play in stock for a time. 

Laura R. Smith. 


DIES WHILE BATHING 


Grace Helfenstein, Daughter of Mary- 
land Bishop, Succumbs in Water— 
Had Come to Pigeon Cove Four Days 
Before 


Miss Grace Nelson Helfenstein, 30, 
only child of Rev. and Mrs. Edward T. 
Helfenstein of Baltimore, succumbed 
suddenly while swimming off Short 
Beach early last Monday afternoon. 
Rev. Dr. Helfenstein is the Episcopal 
Suffragan Bishop of Maryland. The 
Helfensteins have the Varney cottage 
at Pigeon Cove for the summer, and 
the young woman’s parents came to 
the beach to watch the daughter swim. 
She was an accomplished swimmer 
and they watched her dive, float and do 
other stunts. At length she floated, 
perfectly still on the surface. After 
a while there was no movement and 
the parents became alarmed and called 
to Harold McCarthy, who conducts a 
lunch cart nearby. 

McCarthy swam out and found the 
girl lifeless, her head submerged in 
water. He brought her to the shore 
and a call was rung on the fire alarm 
and the Coast Guard Station at Gap 
Cove notified. 

Patrolman Quinn responded and 
first-aid treatment was applied until 
the arrival of Dr. E. E. Cleaves. The 
Gloucester police ambulance was sum- 
moned and responded with the pul- 
motor. The physician worked on her 
for more than an hour before she was 





Safe Restored 





Clean sandy beach. 
Boating ani Fishing. 
Private Baths. 








Tel. 298-R 


Tel. Con. 


Mass. 70 Duncan St., 





J. A. NUNES : Art Store 


Artist Materials and Picture Framing 


Oil Paintings and Frames 


Hand Carved Frames in Stock 
and Made to Order 


Painting and Decorating 


6 Center Street, Gloucester, Mass. 
Branch at Rocky Neck 


FISHING TACKLE 


Motor Boat Supplies, Life Pre- 
servers, Oars, Fire Extin- 
guishers, Lights, Hooks, 

Lines, Rowlocks 


LOTHROP’S PATENT FOG 
HORN 


L. D. LOTHROP & SON 


Gloucester 





pronounced dead. Heart failure was 
assigned as the cause of death. The 
body was taken to Baltimore for inter- 
ment. 

This was the first visit of the Hel- 
fensteins to Cape Ann and they had 
arrived the Wednesday previous. Tues- 
day they accompanied the remains to ~ 
Baltimore. They will not return. 





DEATH OF MRS. JAMES C. HAWKS 


The death of Mrs. James C. Hawks 
of Buffalo, at her home, Wingaersheek 
Beach, last week, removes one of the 
best known and respected members of 
the summer colony. 

Mrs. Hawks came here some 35 years 
ago with her husband, the late James 
S. Hawks, a Michigan railroad presi- 
dent and executive, who with his broth- 
er, the late Edward C. Hawks, pur- 
chased the Willoughby Park tract and 
what is now called Wingaersheek 
Beach and since that time has spent 
her summers here. 

Mrs. Hawks, whose maiden name 
was Cook, was a fine representative of 
the Colonial people who settled Upper 
New York State and endeared herself 
to many. The keynote of her charac- 
ter was a fine altruism, embodied in 
the domesticity of the word neighbor- 
liness, always thoughtful and consider- 
ate of others and a true friend in every 
sense. 

This spirit was strikingly exemplified 
several years ago when she gave to the 
city the desirable tract of upland and 
strand known as Short Beach, Farm 
Point, opposite Annisquam village, as a 
public park and bathing beach and 
when it was pointed out to her that a 
boiling spring on the property was not 
included she at once had this tract add- 
ed to the gift. 

She leaves two sons, Russell and Ed- 
ward A. The body was taken to Buf- 
falo for interment in the family lot. 





GOOD HARBOR BEACH INN 


Briar Neck, Gloucester, Mass. 


Ocean View and within one hun- 
dred feet of one of the best 
Bathing Beaches on the New 
England Coast. 


Edwin C. McIntire, 
Managing Proprietor 










The Tavern 
at end of 
State Highway, Gloucester 
Lobster, Fish and 
SteaK Dinners 
W. H. SMITH, Prop. 
Telephone 1715-W 


Directly on water 





22 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


ee nel 


ANNISQUAM 


(Continued from page 13) 
spending the summer months at their 
cottage in Washington street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman C. Barnes of 
Peabody have arrived for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McEneaney and 
family have arrived at the Reid cot- 
tage for the remainder of the season. 

Arthur Wiley and family of Wake- 
field have arrived at Diamond Cove for 
the season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. Griffin of 
Roxbury are at the Griffin homestead 
on River road. 

Philip Davis and family of Concord 
have arrived for the season at their 
cottage in ’*Squam Rock road. 


WONASQUAM LODGE 


The guests were entertained Friday 
evening by a most interesting exhibi- 
tion of sleight of hand by the well 
known conjurer Bennett Springer. 

Miss Sue Craddock of Detroit, gave 
a luncheon to Mr. and Mrs. Norman G. 
Reinicker and family of Allentown, Pa. 

Mr. Harold F. Sessions of Chicago 
gave a birthday party to his mother 
at the Annisquam Yacht Club, Satur- 
day evening. The special favors added 
to the enjoyment of the occasion. In- 
cluded in the party were Mrs. North 
Storms and daughter Bobby of Chica- 
go, and Miss Jean Andrew, also of Chi- 
cago. 

Sessions, who is sailing the bird-boat 
Jay, one of the special classes at the 
Annisquam Yacht Club, has yachted 


a great deal on the Great Lakes and is 
enjoying to the full excellent opportu- 
nities afforded here for ocean sailing. 


Arrivals at the Wonasquam Lodge: Mrs. 
J. Allan Coad, Leonardtown, Md.; Mrs. A. 
Dana Hodgdon and children, Miss Peach, 
Washington; Miss Sue Craddock, John Wilson, 
Detroit; Mrs. North Storms, Bobbie Storms, 
Mrs. Frances Sharp Sessions, Harold Fred- 
erick Sessions, Chicago; Mrs. S. L. Pawsey, 
Belmont; Miss Ruth G. Bacon, Cambridge; 
Mrs. Martha J. Peirce, Ethel M. Peirce, Need- 
ham; Jerry Burke, J. Z. Berger, New York 
City; Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Learnard, Needham; 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman G. Reinicker, Donald 
A. Reinicker, Douglas A. Reinicker, Allen- 
town, Pa.; Mrs. Q. G. Tolmie, Nancy Jean 
Tolmie, John Tolmie, Miss Oliver, Montreal; 
Miss Jessie Todd, Brookline; Mrs. Stuart Wil- 
son, Detroit; Mrs. Elizabeth Bailey, Miss Jean 
Andrews, Chicago; Mrs. M. B. Cutting, Mr. 
Abel Cutting, Sudbury; Mr. and Mrs. Orger 
Cutting, Woburn; Mrs. S. EH. Lufkin, Green- 
field; Mrs. L. F. Bardwell, Mrs. T. Walker 
Barr, Mrs. George Leonard Fisher, N. Y. City; 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Smith, Holyoke; Mrs. 
G. E. Gameron, Miss W. McCullough, Toron- 
to. 








THE NORTH SHORE THEATRE 





(Continued from page 3) 
with the incomparable Emil Jan- 
nings at his very best. This is a 
drama of East Limehouse, Lon- 
don’s rapidly disappearing slum. 
It concerns the regeneration of a 
giant bruiser, “Basher Bill,” who 
rules the ugly district with his 
fists. His domestic life is shared 
by a girl of the streets. A Salva- 
tion Army lass comes into the 
neighborhood, seeking in her pity 
and piety to win back the souls 
of the slums. She is the instru- 
ment of the bruiser’s reform. 





On the same bill we will pre- 
sent Phyllis Haver, Stuart Holmes 
and Wallace MacDonald in “Your 
Wife and Mine.” This is not a 
highly emotional sex drama, it is 
far from that. It is broad, clean 
humor perfectly agreeable to all 
sorts and conditions of folks. All 
will find it very entertaining be- 
cause it was made for laughs and 
has nothing else. 


AT STILLINGTON HALL 


Mr. Leslie Buswell presents 
Julys235024,525, 26 ee manCm aoa 


Seo OMe ee Ves 
George Bernard Shaw. 


ANNISQUAM 


summary: 


BIRD BOATS 
Name and Owner 


Squab, Henry Worcester, 
Tern, J. 


Jr. 
Fletcher Woonson 
Albatross, W. E. Olson, 

Cloof, Evelyn Woodbury 

Canvas Back, D. Muzzey 

Avis, Norman Olson 


CAT BOATS 
Kitten, J. Fricke 
Fay, Bobby Bent 


Jr. 





The Hawthorne Jun and Cottages accommodates 400 


EASTERN POINT 
GEOMOM SLAG Y eerop: 


Che Moorlands, 


BASS ROCKS 
D. PARSONS, Prop 





Storage Vaults 


EVERY BANKING 
INSPECTION 


SERVICE 
INVITED 


CAPE ANN NATIONAL BANK 




















pens — D> 
3, = 
: — 





-ROBERTSHAW 


~ OVEN HEAT. 


“CONTR 





“GLENWOOD. 


ENJOY 


YOUR SUMMER 


WITH A 


New Glenwood 
Insulated Range 





““You can do it better 


with gas’”’. 


Gloucester Gas 


Light Co. 


96 MAIN ST. 


Tel. 570 


“Pygmalion,” 


JULY 15, A.M. 
(Continued from page 15) 
handsomely to the finish. 











by Catalena, Donald Gleason ab 
“ Puss-in-Boots, John Gleason 2 
Seratch, Francis Gleason 2 
Kitty Cat, C. Linderman Qs 
Copy Cat, W. Wesley Pear 2 

2 


Kittiwake, J. W. White, Jr. 


The 
ANNISQUAM, JULY 15—P.M. 
El Time Squab on Toast Again—Caterpil- 
1:83 :08 lar Wins in the Cat Class and 
iissiz9.- Charles Hill Sails Sail Fish to 
1:38 :20 Victory 
1:38 :30 
1:39 :20 
The afternoon race was a guess- 
1:56:05 img match. The greater part of 
1:56:55 the skippers guessed that the 


wind would continue light all day. - 
These turned some of their crew 
ashore to dispose of human bal- 
last and lighten ship. A few car- 
ried a full complement. 

The dope went well with the 
light craft on the two reaches. 
David Muzzey in Canvas Back ran 
away from the fleet as if they 
were anchored and was half a 
mile ahead of the second boat at 
the outer mark. 

As he rounded on the wind, 
however, the breeze began to pipe 
up, kicking up quite a chop, and 
Canvas Back kicked and flopped 
und shipped water. Then the 
heavy weather boats astern came 
into the picture, the Squab get- 
ting in the lead, cutting out Can- 
vas Back from what looked like 
a sure-thing victory. 

In the Cat class, Russell Smith 
in the Caterpillar won. In the 
Fish group, Perch had the upper 
hand until the last stage, when 
Charlie Hill in the Sail Fish, by 
clever handling on the wind, suc- 
ceeded in grabbing off first hon- 
ors. The summary: 


BIRD CLASS 


Name and Owner El Time 
Squab, Harry Worcester 1:25 385 
Tern, J. Fletcher Wonson 1:29:28 
Oloof, Evelyn Woodbury 1:30:42 
Albatross, W. E. Olson, Jr. 1:32:39 
Canvas Back, D. Muzzey 1:36:00 
Avis, Norman Olson 1:39:59 

CAT BOATS 
Caterpillar, R. Russell Smith 1:32 :02 
Copy Cat, W. Wesley Pear 1:32 :21 
Kitty Cat, Christine Linderman 1:33:02 
Cats Paw, Sherburne Wiggin 1:33:37 
TV’uss-in-Boots, Sidney Gleason 1:48:43 
Seratch, Donald Gleason 1:36:17 
Fay, Bobby Bent 1:36 :28 
Kitten, Jack Fricke 1:37:10 
Pussy Cat, S. French 1:87:46 
Purr, R. Huntsman 1:37:49 
Catalena, A. Ives 1:38 :55 
Kittiwake, J. W. White, Jr. 1:42:35 

FISH BOATS 
Sail Fish, Charles Hill 1:36 :37 
Perch, Harry Griffin 1:38 :30 
Shiner, C. Thompson 1:38 :32 





Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928, 


23 


CE AI TL eC TE OE OAT CD TCE TE ETT AAC LA CE LE eC NORIO Aenea. ns Wa, tnetein. mmm, 


Skip Jack, D. Morse 1:40:55 rYe 

Polly Wog, J. Meachem 1:42:05 ne pend, reach aoe Southern 
Sword Fish, Huntington Faxon 1:43:54 ™ark an a run ome. 

Goldfish, J. Bloomergh 1:45 15 Mrs. Ellis in Tid was _ well 
Flying Fish, Albert Hale 1:46:49 ylaced at the start, but Demon 
Guppy, Bettie Bradley Ls29d5 - . . ae . 

Poor Fish, Dave Baxter 1:50:32 and Skeezix Just edged into a 
Drum, Eddie Simmons 1:50:34 Slight lead and between these 


three it was a great battle all the 
way. 

The Triangles sailed their usu- 
al close race. Trident, getting an 
advantage, proved best on all 
points of sailing. The Elwell boat, 





SUNDAY SONDER SKIPPERS, 
JULY 15 


Ben Colby Pilots Demon to Close- 





ly Contested Win—Trident in Flirt, was nearest contender. The 
Triangles Hangs up Another SUmmary: 
First SONDER CLASS 
Name and Skippers El Time 
. : Demon, Ben Colby 1:58 :20 
Over at Eastern Point Sunday Skeezix, Charles Wheeler 1:58:3 
afternoon it was a skippers race Tern, J. D. Cox,-Jr. 1358 :55 
and Ben Colby jumped aboard the sori vier. _MeDonald ite. bade 
J : . 1 :) rs. Groverman Iillis as : 
Sonder Demon and succeeded in pevella, Jack Raymond 2:08 :22 
making her live up to her name Bandit, R. M. Williams 2:07 :29 
as far as sailing goes. The breeze Bubbles, Hlliott Frost 2:09 :20 
was a fresh sou’wester and the TRIANGLES 
course triangular, a beat to Ket- Trident, Philip M. Tucker, Jr. 2:08 :01 

















Established 1872 


‘“*The Better Market’’ 


FRESH 
MEATS 
POULTRY 
VEGETABLES 
GROCERIES 
FRUITS 









MAXIMUM QUALITY Tel. Magnolia 427-428 


HOURLY DELIVERIES TO 

















Stage Fert Park | 


/Ca Cape Ann Day August 13-16 : 


Exhibition Under Large Tent of 


Gloucester Fisheries from 1623 to the Present — Unique 
and Unparalleled—-Also Most | xclusive Midway 
Diversions.—Band. Concerts—Fireworks 










Under Direction of Municipality 
CHARLES HOMER BARRETT, General Chairman 






















THE PATTILLO STORE 







THE FINEST LINE OF SUMMER FURNITURE, SCREENS, 
MATTRESSES, RUGS, ETC., ON THE NORTH SHORE. UP- 
AOLSTERING DONE BY SKILLED WORKMAN 












Fine Assortment of Vudor Shades for the Piazza 


Cc. F. TOMPKINS CO. 
67 MIDDLE STREET GLOUCESTER 











ALFRED BRIGHAM COMPANY  ccrperated 1914 





EXCELLENT PARKING FACILITIES FOR MOTORISTS 







Flirt, W. D. Elwell 2:09:04 
Alamo, Andrew Winslow, Jr. 2311-18 
Kitmer 2d, M. Talbot 2:12:19 
Triton, Dr. R. P. Cummins, withdrew, 


fouled buoy at start. 


NORTH SHORE ARTS ELECTS 





At the annual meeting of the 
North Shore Arts Association 
the following officers were re- 
elected: Arthur B. Grover, Pres- 
ident; Col. John W. Prentiss, 
Horace §S. Bean, Vice-Presidents; 
Frederick L. Stoddard, Sec.-Treas. 

Albro Hibbard, Oscar Ander- 
son, Louise Allen Atkins, Kath- 
vyn Cherry, George Sloane, Mrs. 
Henry Wise Wood and Mrs. Simp- 
son Lyle were elected trustees for 
three years. The excellence of the 
present exhibition caused such 
unstinted praise and enthusiasm 
that three members of the Asso- 
ciation offered prizes of $100, 

(Continued on page 24) 


















Cole Square, Magnolia 


Fall Line of 
Fancy Glass Goods 
Table Waters 


Huntley & 
Palmer’s 
Crackers 


Battle Creek Foods 


EVERYTHING FOR THE TABLE 


MINIMUM PRICE 


Manchester, Beverly Farms, Pride’s Crossing, Wenham 
Twice Daily to Hamilton, Marblehead, Topsfield, Ipswich, Eastern Point, Gloucester 


CITY OF GLOUCESTER 





NOTICE 





No person shall set, maintain or in- 
crease a fire in the open air between 
March list and December Ist except by 
written permission of the Chief of the 
Fire Department or the Fire Warden. 

Persons wishing to burn rubbish, 
grass, etc., in the business or residential 
sections of the city, i. e. within the lim- 
its established by the Eastern avenue 
School om Eastern avenue and the cut 
bridge on Western avenue, and _ the 
Green on Washington street, should ap- 
ply to the Chief of the Fire Department. 
Those wishing to burn rubbish, brush, 
grass, etc., in the outlying portions of 
the city, that is outside of the limits as 
here set forth, whose fire would be on 
or near any wood, brush or grasslands. 
should apply to the Fire Warden. 

Readers of this notice are cautioned 
to be extremely careful of matches, 
cigars and cigarettes while in or near 
any wood or brushland to prevent for- 
est fires. 

HOMER R. MARCHANT, 


Chief of the Fire Department. 


HARLAND W. DANN, 
Fire Warden. 























Fverett A. Flye 


REGISTERED 
Optometrist 
Optician ew 

156 Main St., Gloucester 


Cape Ann National 
Bank Building 


Telephone 577-W 
Established over 25 years 















PIANO TUNING 


Thirty-five Years’ Experience 


RALPH HAZEL 


Mail and Telephone Orders 
Given Prompt and Careful 
Attention 
26 Beacon St., Gloucester 
Tel. 1080 




































Magnolia Real Estate 


SEA SHORE ESTATES 


JONATHAN MAY 


Shore Road, Magnolia, Mass. 


Tel. Magnolia 426-R. 








: Cottages, Bungalows, Shops 
| 


——? Of Oe OC OC 20 C0 0< 209 > 0S 0 0 C D0 D0 Oe OS 





Cor 





GPO 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 


9S 0 TC 0S 0 C0 C0 C0 0 0 0 OC OOOO 








= 


The North Shore 


Furniture Co. 
161-163 Main St.; cor. Parsons St. 


Qpp. Cape Ann National Bank 
GLOUCESTER 


fn Our New Three- Stacy 
Building We Carry a Full 
Line of 
Cottage and Lawn Furniture 
Hammocks, Refrigerators, 
Mattings and Carpetings, Etc. 


We Deliver to all Sections 
of the North Shore. Tel. 94, 


: Po>o—p0c— 0 eS So SEM E SO So Soo 


24 


NORTH SHORE ARTS ELECTS 





(Continued from page 23) 
each from the floor. Mrs. Isabel 
N. McHenry of Philadelphia, a 
patron member, for the best 
painting of a marine; Mrs. Mary 
F. R. Clay, an artist member, for 
the best painting of still life and 
Arthur B. Grover for the best 
work in sculpture. 

These prizes, with the two 
Milton C. Davis prizes for figure 
and Jandscape and the Emily Val- 
entine etching prize, gives six 
prizes to be awarded next year. 
This undoubtedly will stimulate 
the interest of the artists and the 
public. 


WILSON LOW MAN AT BASS 
ROCKS 





In a sweepstakes match best se- 
lected 15 holes minus ‘three-quar- 
ter handicap at the Bass Rocks 
links Saturday, E. S. Wilson was 
low man with a net of 57. The 
scores: 

E. S. Wilson, 66—57; J. Sullivan, 69— 
58; Edward Rotan, 63—58; Fred Holds- 
worth, 69—58; H. C. Talbot, 72—458; 
Andrew Fuller, 62—59; C. H. Nauss, 74 
—60; F. Jelleffe, 76—60; Harold Strong, 
68—61; J. ©. Critchley, 72—61;_ C. 
Safford, 74—62; R. C. Farr, 78—62; Reg- 
inald Loftus, 68—63; Ehes W. Merchant, 
81—63; C. H. Parsons, 838—63; L. : 
, 72—63; S. G. Boyce, 82—65; H. C. 
Talbot, 78—67. 

In the qualifying round for the 
Raymond P. Farr cup best 16 to 
qualify, the scores were: 


E. C. Wilson, 84—72; Edward Rotan, 
79—73; Fred Holdsworth, 89--74; H. C. 
Talbot, 92—74; Andrew Fuller, ?9—%5; 
J. Sullivan, 89—75; F. Jelliffe, 96—75; 
C. Critchlege, 90—76; Reginald Loftus, 
84—78; R. P. Farr, 99—78; Charles S. 
Nauss, 97—79; Ehes W. Merchant, 103— 
79; C. H. Parsons, 107—80; L. Brown, 
; C. Safford, 98—82; F. G. Boyce, 


ROCKPORT COUNTRY CLUB 





Saturday, July i4—Results in 
Qualifying Round For Navy 
Cup 





Results in the qualifying round 
for the Navy cup, best 16 to qual- 
ify. This round will be concluded 
Saturday. The scores: 


George P. Sargent, 79—74; Capt. W. 
S. Pye, U. S. N., 90—76; A. Hawkes, 
U. S. N., 100—76; James Guiler, Jr., 88 
—717; Arthur Flynn, 89—77; Howard 
Lovell, 883—78; Daniel Reardon, 88—78; 
Francis Smith, 91—79; Robert Smith, 
91—79; Harry Hitchcock, 92—80; J. H. 
Simpson, U. S. N., 109—81; Ensign H. 
Plander, U. S. N., 110—82; Louis A. 
101—85; John Lyons, 99—86; James 
Fay, 98—90; Thomas R. P. Grubb, 113 
—90. 








CLIFF LOVEWELL 


AND HIS 


Society Orchestra 


OF BOSTON 
Open for engagements on the 
North Shore 


Summer phone, Rockport 488-2 


Cape Ann Shore, July 21, 1928. 


err ee EE LET LL LE 


PARKING REGULATIONS 
CITY OF GLOUCESTER 








Notice to Automobilists 

Attention is called to the fol- 
lowing extracts from an ordinance 
governing automobile traffic 
passed June 6, 1924. 

Section One. During the months 
of June, July, August and Sep- 
tember the following traffic reg- 
ulations shall be effective for ve- 
hicles: 

1. Short street to be a one- 
way street, travel only in norther- 
ly direction, from Main to Middle 
street. 

2. Hancock street from Middle 
to Main one-way only, southerly 
direction. 

No automobile or other vehicle 
shall be parked on Main street, 
from its intersection with Wash- 
ington and Commercial streets, to 
its intersection with Hast Main 
street in a diagonal position. All 
vehicles shall be parked with the 
right side to the curb. 

3. No parking from crossing to 
Pleasant street on Main street in 
front of Post Office. 























PORCH CHAIRS 
BEDSTEADS 
HAMMOCKS 
OIL STOVES 

REFRIGERATORS, Etc. 











FINEST, LARGEST AND LIGHTEST FURNITURE HEADQUAR- 
TERS THIS SIDE OF BOSTON 


NATIONAL HOUSE FURNISHING CO. 


Have just ocgupied their new block, corner Main and Elm Streets, Glouces- 
ter, just below the Post Office. 


On display, one of the finest and 
best selected stocks for summer cot- 
tages, direct from the factory, ever as- 
sembled on Cape Ann. Joseph Kerr, Prop. 


\ 















Specially Selected for 
Summer Needs 





Goods delivered to all 





parts of Cape Ann, 
Magnolia and Man- 
chester. 










aul 
iA 







| é 
A 

































































































































For the Bungal ow 






Inspection Solicited 


LANTERNSMITH SHOP, 20 


Genuine Hand Wrought Paul Revere Lanterns 





RUA: 


or Summer Cottage 


Old Colonial Tin Wall 
Sconces, authentically re- 
produced, wired for elec- 
tricity. Interesting de- 
signs, fixtures with the 


old atmosphere. Entirely 
hand-made. Antique fin- 
ish. 


LAWRENCE J. McGINN 


(Member Arts and Crafts 
Society of Boston & New 
York.) 

Telephone 805-J 


Main Street, Gloucester 


True Souvenirs of Old Gloucester 


USEFUL LEATHER NOVELTIES 
Made from 
TANNED CODFISH SKINS 


Durable— Rich— Different 
EVERYTHING FOR THE TRAVELLER 


BOTT BROS. .2 The Leather Shop 


145 Main Street. (A New Location) 


4, No parking eastern side of 
School street from Middle to Ma- 
son street. 

5. No parking Main street 
southern side from Strand The- 
atre to Boynton Way. 

6. No parking northerly side 
Middle street, School to Washing- 
ton. 

7. No parking either 
Elm street, Main to Federal. 

8. Parking only on east side of 
Duncan street from Fishermen’s 
Institute to Rogers street. 

9. No parking on east side of 
Chestnut street. 

10. Crossings marked by white 
lines are Safety Zones. 

11. Any owner or operator of 
a vehicle shall when requested by 
a member of the Police Depart- 
ment move said vehicle from any 
place where it may be standing. 

12. Nautilus road a one-way 
street in a southerly direction be- 
tween Bass avenue and Bass Rocks 
road. 

No vehicle shall be parked on 
Middle street on either side of 
said street from Pleasant street 
to Dale avenue. 

Vehicles shall be parked on the 
Western side of Dale avenue, only 
in a diagonal direction with right 
rear wheel against curb. 

13. No automobile or other ve- 
hicle shall be parked within 15 feet 
of any hydrant on any street in 
the City of Gloucester. 

Free parking in rear of Police 
Station. 

Traffic lights in operation Main 
street, foot Commercial, P. O, 
Square; Prospect street, near M. 
E. Church. 


WILLIAM B. CORLISS, 
City Marshal. 


side 


| Straitsmouth 
# Inn 2 


DIRECTLY ON THE OCEAN 
Rockport, Mass. 







WILLIAM T. MORTON 


Society Stationery 
Greeting Cards 


Gift Shop 


6 Pleasant St., Gloucester, Mass. 
PHONE 1100 






































Oldest Bank in Massachusetts. Fifth Oldest in the Nation 






ESTABLISHED IN 1796 


GLOUCESTER 
NATIONAL BANK 









Opposite Post Office Square, Main Street 
- - - Where - - - 


Individual Courtesy, Efficiency and Co-operation 
Are Inherent Qualities 







Personal, Business, or Savings Accounts 
Cordially Solicited 


A STRONG BANK OF DEPENDABLE SERVICE 













One of the steps in the preparation of codfish for the market. Drying and curing whole codfish at the Gorton-Pew Fisherie3 


You Are Cordially Invited— 


we put up a special combination 
box. It is an attractive carton 
containing a popular assortment 
of Gorten’s Sea Foods. Neatly 
packed ready for shipment. These 
tasty and popular sea foods will 
introduce you to new delights in 
fish eating. 

The same offer is extended to 


UR door is always open. And we 


are always glad to show vis- —_ ® 
itors the fascinating processes 
employed in our plant. See how 
we take fish fresh from the ocean 

and prepare them for the tables S F d F il 
of America’s discriminating house- €a OO ami Ly 
wives. There is no more in- 


teresting sight in all of quaint old SORTON Bek epee 


GORTON’S READY-TO-FRY COD FISH 


COLL OL OL LOL LO LL LOI LOD IL DO DL SL PL OP LOS LLP Ce 


Gloucester. CAKES all-year-round and summer-time 
If it were only possible to trans- GORTON’S FRESH MACKEREL IN residents. Visit us and see for 

port some of the charm. of CANS yeurselves how one of America’s 

Gloucester back home—its roman- CO ioas SG SNe oldest and most interesting in- 

tic harbor, its curious old streets GORTON’S CODFISH IN CANS custries operates. You are cor- 

and homes, its atmosphere of the GORTON’S FINNAN HADDIE dially invited. 

sea. Although this is impossible CORTON'S FLAKED Fish . . 

you may have a reminder of pleas- GORTON’S ee CLAM Gorton-Pew Fisheries 

ant Gloucester days in sending to x ; F 

your home some of our delicious GORTON’S CHOWDER os GLOUCESTER, MASS. 

fish products. For this purpose GORTON’S HADDOCK CHOW®ER $ Founded in 1849 
































TUTTE eR TOS CST ATT 





HUUUPSAO CANATUAN SUTTON ATTN 











nel Se temateanen 


= 


icon eT SE TE 
f, 


AE LT ET ae a ee ST a = EP 


a = epee 


1885 - 1928 


THE BOSTON STORE 


WILLIAM G. BROWN COMPANY, Gloucester, Mass.iy 


The Largest Store of the North Shore Covering a City Block from PLEASANT, MAIN and ELM STREETS 
29 Departments. Largest Dry Goods Floor Space East of Boston. POST OFFICE SQUARE 


The Department Store of Service where Summer Shopping is made pleasant. 
In Gloucester on the North Shore you will find this store a well appointed, pleasant store i 
which to do your shopping on a warm summer’s day. 


It will be a pleasure and also afford you great satisfaction in knowing that you can come here 
and select quality merchandise at lowest possible prices. 


ATWATER KENT 
RADIOS 


Largest Line on Cape Ann 
Expert Installation 


PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 


Trade in Gloucester at the 
Big Store of the North Shore 







ANNOUNCING 
the 
OPENING! 


One of The North Shore’s Finest 
BEAUTY SHOPS 


4 Booths —2 Bobher Chairs 
2 Manicure Tables 


Marcel Waving 
Shampooing 
Manicuring 

Facials 

French Curling 
Hair Dyeing 
Hair Tinting 

Permanent Waving 
Hair Dressing 
Hair Bobbing and La- 
dies’ and Children’s 

Hair Cutting by 

Experts.