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PHOTOGRAPHED By SARONY. ENGRAVED BY T. JOHNSON, 
NIKOLA TESLA. 





FIG. 4. EXPERIMENT TO ILLUSTRATE THE TRANSMS 
SION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY THROUGH THE 
EARTH WITHOUT WIRE. 





FIG. 6. PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEW OF THE ESSENTIAL PARTS OF THE ELECTRICAL OSCILLATOR USED 
IN THE EXPERIMENTS DESCRIBED. 





FIG. 7. EXPERIMENT TO ILLUSTRATE AN INDUCTIVE EFFECT OF AN ELECTRICAL 
OSCILLATOR OF GREAT POWER. 


The photograph shows three ordinary incandescent lamps lighted to full candle-power by currents in- 
duced in a local loop consisting of a single wire forming a square of fifty feet each side, which includes the 
lamps, and which is at a distance of one hundred feet from the primary circuit energized by the oscillator. 
The loop likewise includes an electrical condenser, and is exactly attuned to the vibrations of the oscillator, 
which is worked at less than five per cent. of its total capacity. 





FIG. 5. PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEW OF COILS RESPONDING TO ELECTRICAL OSCILLATIONS. 


The picture shows a number of coils, differently attuned and responding to the vibrations transmitted to 
them through the earth from an electrical oscillator. The large coil on the right, discharging strongly, is tuned 
to the fundamental vibration, which is fifty thousand per second; the two larger vertical coils to twice that 
number; the smaller white wire coil to four times that number, and the remaining small coils to higher tones. 
The vibrations produced by the oscillator were so intense that they affected perceptibly a small coil tuned to the 
twenty-sixth higher tone. 

















NOTE TO Fig. 1.—This result is produced by the discharge of an electrical oscillator %iving twelve 
million volts. The electrical pressure, alternating one hundred thousand times per second, excites the 
normally inert nitrogen, causing it to combine with the oxygen. The flame-like discharge shown in the 
photograph measures sixty-five feet across. 


ATMOSPHERE. 


OF THE 


BURNING THE NITROGEN 


1. 


FIG. 








Se 


————— 


NS OF GREAT POWER. 


NG ELECTRICAL EXPLOSIO 


MENT TO ILLUSTRATE THE CAPACITY OF THE OSCILLATOR FOR PRODUCI 


TULL 


EXPERI 


FIG. 8. 





NOTE TO FIG. 8.—The coil, partly shown in the photograph, creates an alternative movement of electricity 
from the earth into a large reservoir and back at the rate of one hundred thousand alternations per second. 
The eS PES PRET are such that the reservoir is filled full and bursts at each alternation just at the moment 
when the electrical pressure reaches the maximum. The discharge escapes with a deafening noise, striking an 
unconnected coil twenty-two feet away, and creating such a commotion of electricity in the earth that sparks 
an inch long can be drawn from a water-main at a distance of three hundred feet from the laboratory. 





FIG. 9. EXPERIMENT TO ILLUSTRATE THE CAPACITY OF THE OSCILLATOR FOR CREATING 
A GREAT ELECTRICAL MOVEMENT. 


The ball shown in the photograph, covered with a polished metallic coating of twenty square feet of 
surface, represents a large reservoir of electricity, and the inverted tin pan underneath, with a sharp 
rim, a big opening through which the electricity can escape before filling the reservoir. The quantity 
of electricity set in movement is so great that, although most of it escapes through the rim of the 
pan or opening provided, the ball or reservoir is nevertheless alternately emptied and filled to over- 
flowing (as is evident from the discharge escaping on the top of the ball) one hundred and fifty thou- 
sund times per second. 


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FIG. 10. PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEW OF AN EXPERIMENT TO ILLUSTRATE AN EFFECT OF AN ELECTRICAL OSCILLATOR 
DELIVERING ENERGY AT A RATE OF SEVENTY-FIVE THOUSAND HORSE-POWER. 


The discharge, creating a strong draft owing to the heating of the air, is carried upward through the open 
roof of the building. The greatest width across is nearly seventy feet. The pressure is over twelve million 
volts, and the current alternates one hundred and thirty thousand times per second. 








FIG. 2, THE FIRST PRACTICAL TELAUTOMATON. 


A machive having all its bodily or translatory movements and the operations of the interior 
mechanism-controlled from a distance without wires. The crewless boat shown in the photograph 
contains its own motive power, propelling- and steering-machinery, and numerous other acces- 
sories, all-of which are controlled by transmitting from a distance, without wires, electrical oscil- 
lations to a circuit carried by the boat and adjusted to respond only to these oscillations,