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'l.L-i' 



CANADA 

DEPARTMENT OF MINES 

Hon. p. E. Blondin, Minister; R. G. McConneu., B.A., Dkputv Ministkk 

?'...- t^ 

^« \ MINES BRANCH v 

i EuGBWB Haangl, Ph.D., Director. *t '' 

f'"-^, ~ ] "— t^rl 






A GENERAL SUMMARY 



A 



MINERAL PRODUCTION 



or 



• • •' 

1 \ 


K': CANADA 





•» • 


,, •' During the Calendar Year 




» ■ 

* * 


1915 


< 


I " 




ci 



■-1 



I- ;■ JOHN McLErSH, B.A. 

CW/ o^^f« Division oj Mineral Resources and Statistics. 



•J 




OTTAWA 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING BUREAU 

1916 



No. 424. 




■\^- 



-t;l 



.?v-f- 







rVl! -^ 



, ""'i ■ 




CANADA 

DEPARTMENT OF MINES 

Hon. p. E. Blondin, Minister; R. G. M<("osnell, B.A , Hefuty Ministb*. 

MINES BRANCH 

EuiiENE Haanel, I'h.i>., Didector. 



A GENERAL SUMMARY 



MINERAL PRODUCTION 



OF 



CANADA 



During the Calendar Year 



1915 



JOHN McLEISH, B.A. 



Ckief o} tht Division 0/ Mineral Resources and StalisUes. 




OTTAWA 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING BUREAU 
1916 



No. 42-1. 



ADVANCE CHAPTER OF THE ANNUAL REPORT ON THE 

MINERAL PRODUCTION OF CANADA, DURING THE 

CALENDAR YEAR, 1915. 



(X)\TFATS 

I'.iuc 

Mintr.il priMliii ticni i.l ( .iri.iil.i in I'M! ,n:.| 1<M 5. . i.iniMr.iiiv i i.iblc .< 

I'ixiiori- an. I irnjioriT. (ncncr.il i.iMi-i g 

Mutallii: ()ri'> ami prndiicts J2 

NDii-nietallic i)r(Mluct> J5 

Strm liiral rn.ilfri,il> and rla\ ()r(Nhir-|- 21 

Frrnliutioii l)\ pri>\inii>, f'>l4 .irid 101, S 22 

Mine production 29 

Smelter production 36 



THE 



MINERAL PRODUCTION OF GAN4DA 



During the Calendar Year 
1915 



General Summary 

Thf ti-rm "mineral production" is so cuinpri-luiisiw that thire is a 
wide diviTKence in nutlicHls lioth in ilie cotnpilalion of (|iianiili<> of niimr.il 
prcKliicl-^, anil in the adoption of a lia-.!- *■ valuation. Such incthod> have 
been the subject of (Hm ussion in i)rivious i-ports which need not be repeated 
at this time. 

It was bi icily slate ! in our preliminary reiK)rl is-ued on March 1st, 
that the metal mining indu>try had in 1915, as a result of the (uiuand < reated 
by the war, shown the highest prtxluction e\er recordt'd and that the total 
value of the mineral production of Canada, had, notwith>tan(linK; the 
greatly decreased pnKluctioii of materials of construction, such as cement, 
clay and stone (|uarry priKluits, etc., shown a very large increase over the 
pro<luction of the previous year. 

Although military requirements aused restrictions to be placed up m 
the export of many mineral products, the mining industry suffered no seri 
loss in resiK'ct thereto. Pnxlucers were enabled in almost ever', instar 
to secure jH-rmits for exportation to api)rovcd destinations, the iesf\tion 
serving chiefly as a means to enable the government to control th ^ i.irketing 
outside of Canada of prcnlucts that might be useful •■ the enen.. 

The total value' of the metal and mineral p ' ttion in i^LS was 
$137,109,171. compared with 8128,863.075 in 1914. ai'd S145,0.U,812 in 
191,3, the latter being the highest i)roduction recorded. The increase in 
1915 over 1914 was thus 88.246,096, or 6 4 per cent, but the output is still 
less than that in 1913 by 88,525,641. 

The record of annual mineral prwluction in Canada since 1886, show.i 
in the following table, indicates the rapid growth which the mineral industry 
has made. 



' I.T prcfentlnR a total valuation of the mineral production A!i is hrrp K'ven. it shoulri b^ expUined thai ilie 
production of tiie metals copper, nold. K-ad, nirkel. and siivt-r is niven as far as pos'iit'I'" on the basi? of t^e quan- 
tities of metals rcfovereti in smelters, and tlie total uuantltiei in cacii ca.*r arc valued at the -ivcratio marltet 
price of tb- refined metal in a recojjniied piarltet. There is thus included in some cases the value* that have 
Accrued in the smelting or refining of metals outside of Canada. 



The total %-aliic of the production in 1886 was 810,221,255, or about 
S2.23 per capita. In tiii years the \aliie liad increaseti to 822,474,256, 
or 84.38 per capita, more than twice the total in 1886, and nearly twice the 
production per capita. The next ten years witnessed an ituTiase to 879,- 
286,697 in 1906, or 812.81 per ca|)ita. about .S.J times the production in 1896. 
l"rom 1906 to 191,^ the total production sliowed an increase of o\er 80 per 
cent with an increase of nearly 50 fier cent in product inn per capita. The 
decriasi' of 1914 has been more lliaii half made uj) by the increase of 1915. 



Annual Mineral Production in Canada since 1886. 





year. 


production. 


Value l)t-'r 
capita. 


18H6 ... 

1««7. . . 


Sin,i.>i.J.^5 
l().,i2l..Ml 

12, .118, 81)4 
14, 111). in 
Ih, ;(..(, .tl.l 
IX,'l7(i.()l(i 
Ki.d.M, ll.^ 
.!II.(|.V';,()K.> 
I'l.'l.U .I.IH 
J0,,=(t.1,<M7 
2>.-IH.>M< 

.lM,41J,4.tl 
4il..'i4.:i(i.'; 
(i4.4.Ml,877 


S 2 2t 

2 t.l 


1888 


2 . (>7 


WW.. . 
I8W... 
IK'M . . . 




2 '!<< 
i '>2 


189.?, 
I 




4 04 

.1 •!!* 


1 

1KSI'> 




4 US 
4 M 


1807... 
1898... 
I8«<). 




5 4') 
7,1.' 
'1,27 


lutXI... 




1.' 04 



\'t';(r \'alih' of \iiliie per 

prndii. tioii. liipita. 

I ! 

1001 ,:S65,707.0|I I $12 16 

1002 : M. •.il.SUi i 11. J5 

100.1 I (.1.740. .in 10.8.1 

1004 I 60,OS2.771 1 10.27 

100' i 60,O78,Ot>O i 11.40 

100,, i 70,2X(>,(i'i7 i 12 81 

1007 86,.S(i.i,202 l.< 7.1 

1O08 8.1,. 1.17. 101 1.1.16 

lOO'l ' 01,8.11,441 n 70 

1010 lOh. 82.1, (.2.1 14.0.1 

1011 101,220,01)1 14 42 

1012 1 1.1, OIK, 206 18 27 

lou 14.1, OU. 812 18.77 

1014 12S,.S(..1,07.1 15 Oft 

1011 117,100,171 



Tile (lel.iiled comparative >lalenunl lure pri'>enled shows the pro- 
duction of e.ich inijxirt.nil product diirint; the past two years, tile production 
which each contributes to the total production, aiul the inirci.^c or decrease 
as the case m,i\' be of llie production in 1915, as c(iin|)ared with th.it of 
1914. 

.■\lllion>;li the .s,r.iiul total .-allows a substantial increase it will lie noted 
that 28 items in the table show a decreased production a^^rej^ating 
812, ,^81, 915, whereas 29 items show increases a^KreKatint; 820,628,011, the 
net result bein^ an incn ase of 88,246,096. The principal increases were 
in the met lis and metalliferous ores and the ])rinciiial decreases in cement, 
clay and quarry |iroMucts. .Anionj; the non-met;dliferous ores there was 
comparati\'el\' little change, the total increases beiuif 81,'. 28,027 and the 
total decreases 81,821,685, or a net decrease of .S9.?,658. 

The total value of the metallic production in 1915 was 875,814,841, 
as against 85<>,.S86,619 in 1914, an increase of 816,428.222 or over 27 per 
cent. With a practically unlimited demand and hi^h prices there was an 
'increased production of all metals with the notable exception of silver in 
which there was a fallini; off both in price and production. Xotwithstandinj; 
these important increases however, it was only in the case of nickel and 
copper amoiiK the more important metals that the production in 1915 
excit'deil the maximum of jiri'vious years. 



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Metal prices varied within wide limits during the year but with the 
exception of silver the average price for most metals was higher than the 
average for many years. 

Metal Prices. 



Antimony (ordinaries) Per lb. 

Copper, New York , 

Lead 

, London , 

* Montreal* 

Nickel, New York 

Silver. Per oi 

Speller, , Per lb 

Tin, , 



1910. 



CU. 
7-386 

12-738 
4-446 
2-807 
3-246 

40-000 

53-486 
S-520 

34- 123 



1911. 



Cts- 

7-540 ' 
12-376 
4-420 
3-035 
3-480 i 
40-000 > 
53-304 : 

5-758 
42-281 i 



Ctt. 
7-760 

16341 
4-471 
3-895 
4-467 

40-000 

60-835 
6-943 

46-096 



Cts. 
7-520 

15-269 
4-370 
4-072 
4-659 

40-000 

.59-791 
5-648 

44-252 



1914. 



1915. 



Cts. 
8-763 

13-602 
3 862 
4-146 
4-479 

40-000 

54-811 

5-213 ; 

34-301 I 



Cti. 

.30-280 

17 275 

4-673 

4-979 

5-600 

45-000 

49-684 

13-230 

38-500 



•Quotations furnished by Messrs. Thomas Robertson & Company, Montreal, Que. 

The total value of the non-metalliferous production in 1915 was 
$61,294,330 as against 869,476,456 in 1914, a decrease of $8,182,126 or 
1 1 - 78 per rent. 

The decrease was most pronounced in the case of inuterials of construc- 
tion such as cement, clay prcxiucts, lime, stone quarry products, etc. The 
total value of the production of structural materials in 1915 was $17,920,759, 
as against $26,009,227 in 1914, a decrease of $8,088,468 or 311 per cent. 
Amongst the other products showing a falling off in production were coal, 
corundum, feldspar, grindstones, gypsum, mica and petroleum, whilst the 
principal products showing an increase wore arsenious oxide, asbestos, 
chromite, graphite, magnesite, pyrites, quartz, and salt. 

Coal is still the most important mineral product in Canada in point of 
value, having constituted 23-4 per cent of the total in 1915, The metals 
came next in importance with nickel contributing 14-9 per cent, copper 
13-8 per cent, gold 12-7 per cent, and silver 9-6 per cent. The production 
of cement mafle up 51 per cent of the total, clay products 2-9 per cent, 
stone quarries 3-1 per cent, natural gas 2-7 per cent, and asbestos 2-6 
per cent. 

The production of pig-iron given in the general table includes only 
thiit proportion of the output of Canadian bla i furnaces credited to Cana- 
dian ores. There is an important production of pig-iron from imported 
ores (shown in the footnotes of the general table, and in the chapter on iron 
antl steel) and the total value thereof in 1915 was exceeded only by the pro- 
duction of coal, gold, siKer, copper and nickel. There is also a large pro- 
duction of aluminium from imported ores, for which no value is included in 
the general table of production. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS. 
A very la-ge portion of the mineral production of Canada is exported 
for consumption or refining outside of Canada. On the other hand con- 
siderable quantities of mine products, chiefly those which have been re- 
lined or subjected to partial treatment, or in the form of manufactured goods 
ready for consumption, are imported. 



The total value of the exports of products of the mine, including direct 
mine products and manufactures thereof, in 1915 was 5124,157,761, com- 
pared with 875,533,305 in 1914. This value includes for 1915 mine prod- 
ucts to the value of S61,814>582 and manufactures valued at 862,343,179, 
as against mine products valued at 853,781,102, and manufactures valued 
at 821,752,203 in 1914. 

Practically the whole of the Canadian production of copper, nickel, 
and silver is exported, also a very large proportion of the production of gold, 
asbestos, and mica. There are, as well, considerable exports of coal. 
These products alone contribute about 93 per cent of the value of the 
mine products exported. Manufactured products exported consist chiefly 
of iron and steel goods, agricultural implements, aluminium, calcium car- 
bide, acetate of lime, fertilizers, and coke. 

The United States is the chief destination of Canada's mno exports, 
about 72 per cent having been exported to that country during the fiscal 
year 1914-1915, and about 25 per cent to the United Kingdom. 

The principal increases in exports of mine products in 1915 were in 
coal, copptT, gold, lead, nickel, antimony, and pyrites. The exports of 
manufactured mine products were almost three times the total of similar 
exports in 1914. 

The principal increases were in iron and steel gomls, the total value of 
iron and steel exports in 1915 being 848,268,148, as against 814,391,746 
in 1914. There were also, however, important increases in the export of 
aluminium, ferro-alloys, brass, and calcium carbide. 

A great variety of mineral products chiefly in a manufactured or semi- 
manufactured condition are annually imported into Canada, these imports 
having increased with great rapidity during the ten years preceding 1913. 
During the past two years, however, there has been a falling off of 19-4 
per cent. The tntal value of such imports during the calendar year 1915 
was 8146,323,500. as compared with imp<irts valued at 8181,675,667 in 
1914; 8259,299.745 in 1913; 8238.212,835 in 1912; 8181.773.708 in 1911. 
and 8147,305,012 in 1910. 

Of the total imports in 1915 about 835,000,000 was made up of the 
cruder forms of mineral products such as coal, diamonds unset and bort, 
iron ore, asphaltum, ores of metals, alumina, sand and gravel, etc., as against 
$46,000,000 for similar products in 1914. 

The imports of iron and steel in 1915 included in this table, (seepage 11), 
were valued at 874.308.983. as against 880,063,679 in 1914. Imports of 
the metals aluminium, antimony, copper, gold, silver, lead, platinuin, tin, 
and zinc, and manufactures thereof, and metallic alloys, reached a total 
value of over 817,000,000 as compared with a value of over 830,000,000 in 
1914; petroleum and products of, 87,979,264, as against 811,072,362 in 
1914; clays and clay products 82,998,465, as against 84,467,140. 



EXPORTS. 

Exports of the Products of the Mine and of Manufactures of Mine 
Products— Calendar Years 1914 and 1915. 




MiNE Phodi'cts 



Arsonir Lbs. 

AslM?sto9 Tons 

Asbestos sand 

Chromite _ 

Coal 

Copper, fine in ore. etc Lbt. 

black or coarse and in pigs 

Feldspar, ma^ncsite and talc Tons 

f ".old $ 

Cypsiirn, crmlf Tons 

Lead, in ore, etc Lbs. 

Lead. piR. etc 

Mica , 

Mineral pigments „ 

Mineral water Gals. 

Mickel, in ore. etc Lbs. 

Oil. mineral, crude, etc Gals. 

Oil. refined 

Ores — 

.Antimony Tons 

("orimduin „ 

Iron „ 

^tanl;anes(• „ 

Other ores „ 

Phosphates , 

Platinum Ozs. 

PlumbaRO, crude ore. etc Cwt. 

Pyrites Tons 

Salt Cwt. 

Sand and gravel Tons 

Silver Ois. 

Stone. buildinK Tons 

n ornamental , 

, crushed „ 

n for manufacture of f;rindstoMe8 , 

Other products of the mine 



,1,751. 900 
HI, 081^ 
18, Wl 



t l,?2,.S67l 

2,2')8,64ft| 

108, .S4H 



1,42.1,126: 

68,8.t0.0.Sg 

6,S8I,.S64, 

(o) 18,072' 



.US, 8.10: 

246,100 

.'ilO,.S7Ji 

669,16,1 

3,554.9001 

2,287! 
46,528,127' 

3,922 



947 

135,451 

.10 

12,770 

247 

43 

18,375 

89,999 

9,527 

952,370 

28,020,089 

63,009 

231 

25, 130 

54 



3,880,175 

7.1.10,778 

008,201 

74,100 , 

15,242,200' 

404,234 

2,681 

19,. 507 

178,940 

22,311 

599 

5,149,427 

362 

826 



Total mine products. 



87,740 

.160.974; 

7.S0| 

782,437 

677| 

2.161 

50,528 

377,985^ 

5,229 

802,358, 

15.584,813 

46,198 

5,607 

18,153 

2941 

101,096'. 



4,636,40r 

84,584 

25,103' 

7,290 

',766,543 

81,417,063; 

21,292,5'.6, 

I 

292,2.14' 

1,845,100; 

2,066,929' 

879,631 i 

2,391,6001 

198; 

66,410,4421 

35,977| 

103,488 

1,149 

3391 

79,770; 

255! 

23,8161 

179 

2361 

5,254! 

137,598, 

8,893 

808.022 

27, 67:, 481 

35,804 

29,976 

42,716 

180 



53,781,102 . 



$ 174,190 

2,734,695 

157,410 

81,818 

5,40t.,058 

8,671,641 

3,788.715 

148.915 

16,528,143 

3 16,. 180 

40,273 

79,067 

2.16.124 

17.:63 

53 

7,. 194, 446 

1,789 

14,107 

82, "'JO 

17.798 

206,823 

6,855 

708,214 

1,860 

11,052 

12,009 

527,318 

5,836 

.180,549 

13,812,038 

28,910 

12,764 

24,4,53 

900 

53,106 



61,814,582 



(a) Feldspar only in 1914. 



Eiports of the Products of the Mine and of Manufactures of Mine 
Products— Calendar Years 1914 and 1915.— Coniinurd. 



Manufaciukks 

Acetate of lime Ljjg 

Add, lulphuric 

ARTicultural implemenu:— 

Ciiltivatori Vrt 

Drillt ■^°- 

Han » " 

HaiT »-er» and binrien " 

Hay ralcea " 

Mowing machines " 

Paru of : 

"<>"«''• : No. 

Reapers 

Seeders ' 

Threshing machines " 

All other ;..;; i 

Aluminium, in bars " q^^.^ 

. manufactures of * 

Asbestos, manufactures of 



Bricks. 



Calcium carbide I ha 

Cement ....'..". t 

Clay, manufactures of 

Coke ..;:!.■■ Tons 

Earthenware, and all manufactures of . . t 

Fertilizers ' ' 

Grindstones, manufactur.Kl " 

Gypsum and plaster ground " 

Iron and steel: — 

CastinKS. n.e.s % 

Ferro- silicon and ferro compounds '.'. Itoiis 

Gas buoys and parts of i 

Hardware, tools, etc 

. n.e.s ..'..'.'.' ' 

Machinery (Linotype machines) " 

H n.e.s 

g*-'™." ■•■■•■■ ■ • • 'Tom 

acrap iron and steel Cwt 

Sewing machines .. No 

Steel and manufactures of, all other . . t 

I'oves. No. 

Typewriters 

Vehicles:— ■ 

Automobiles 

parts of i 

Bicycles No. 

, parts of ( 

WaahinK machines 

Wire and wire nails Cwt 

Lime « ' 

Metals:— * 

Brass, old and scrap Cwt. 

Copper , 

Metallic shingles, etc. . . . { 

Metals, n.o.p ' ' 

Mineral and aerated waters (in bottles) .. ' 

Naphtha and gasoline Cals 

CMl, n.o.p 

Phosphorus !.'.!!!. .Lbs 

Pli-mbago, manufactures of 1 

Stone, building 

. ornamental " 

Tar I 

Tin, manufactures of I 

Total manufactures % 

Grand total ( 



1914. 



IVI.S. 



Quantity 



I6,0.'>i,255 
7, MS, 509 

6,030 
3,961 
6,252i 

19.474 
6,524 

21,457 



12,896 

3,919 

32 

1,965 



■45,108 



1,486 
IS. 447, 01/, 



67,838 



4,865 



14,198 

(08,107; 

2,109 



4,198 
3,055 



5,621 



193,255 



21,209 
19,871 



43,023 
455,867 
610,350 



Value . 



t 2X2. Ufi 
45,612 

146,668 
2.59,701 
92,556 
2,015,996 
196,519 
725, Ml 
712,414 
324., (49 

!,810 

799,307 

290,520 

7.364,907 

5,571 

94,538 

11,871 

470,387 

2,223 

26,866 

306,117 

9,336 

2,390,494 

24,113 

35,490 . 

24,218 . 
285,221 

21,009 . 

95,497 . 
190,763'. 
5,5621. 
344,689.. 
201,145 
446,337 

31,392 
2,931,9081. 

25,149: 
200,441' 



3,011,327 

384,428 

10,021 

3,973 

33,986] 

355,781 
16,927 

196,710 

231,710 

105.063 

.193,829 

1,768 

11,607 

104,179 

92,30.1 

72,718 

370 

1,752 

.36,710 

24,. 53 



Quanlity 



l<).(mi.«J0 
19,270,572 

5,957 
6,400 
4,459 
7,668 
l,75H 
5,031 



Value. 



$ -'OS, 748 
.'43,457 



14.923 

471 

2 

1,001 



186,808 



1,155 
102,017,471 



35,869 



9,238 



17,. 307 

1.787,155 
2,557 



166 
422 

81 
809 

40 
175 
519 
300 

?1 

568 

302 

3,333 

620 

125, 

9 

3.160, 

5 

25 

160 

11 

2.335 

35 



.602 

2 

.731 

141 
,289 
.912 
,379 
286 
105 

87 
401 
355 
726 
562 
003 
089 
950 
161 
202 
053 
281 
297 
334 
933 



1,271 

3,175 



13,4751 
•■li6! 



1,439,9,";0 



120,685 
41,616 



21,752,203 



75,533,305 



16,644 

1,247,376 

545,050 



113.714 

537,081 

2.017 

321,021 

401 ,053 

6,946 

53^.162 

231,551 

883,134 

.'0,479 

31,147,770 

18,563 

206,811 

6,756,395 

363,178 

4,692 

15,447 

20,334 

3,224,740 

15,617 

1,468,165 

616.553 

66,655 

878,258 

3,525 

4,540 

290.943 

77,476 

84,316 

660 

5,990 

37,331 

173,206 



62,343,179 



124,157,761 



10 
EXPORTS. 

Showing Destination of Mine Products during the Fiscal Years, 
1912-1913, 1913-1914, and 1914-1915. 



Dntlnatlon . 



British Empire. 



I'nited KinRdom 

Australia and Tasma.iia 

Bermuda 

British South Africa 

„ Guiana 

. India 

, E. Indiea, other 

, W. Indiet 

Gibraltrr 

Hong Kong 

Newfoundland and Labrador. 
New Zealand 



io!;-iJ. 

\'alue. 



Oil 14. 

Value . 



19I4-J5. 

Value . 



Total British Empire. 



Other Countries 



Alaska 

Argentina 

Austria-HunRary. 

Belgium 

Braiil 

China 

Cuba 

Denmark 

France 

French Africa . . . , 

Germany 

Greece 

HawaU 



Hayti. 

Holland 

Italy 

Japan 

Mexico 

Miquelon and St. Pierre. 

Norway 

Panama 

Philippines 

PortURal. 



Roumania 

Russia in Europe. 
Spain. 



Sweden. ..... 

United States. 
Uruguay 



% 12,066,622 t 16,027.128 

73,283l 92,457 

S,31.V 1.192 

33.41.^1 13,863 

37,983 23,3St 



t 12,219,937 
123,903 



■|. 



1.4,383 



3,343 



491,1211 
498,9891 

948 . 



1,0S8,229 
649,682 



I3,223,0S9| 17,869,243 



3i7,j2.V 

• 66,313 

32,474 

141,924 

54,760 

511,155 

8,852 

877 

114,370 

2,127 

172,966 



102,383 
19,206 
74,200 

258,180 



162,034 

19,253 

365 

167,974 



618,201 
200 



843 
27.529 
7,430 
54,976 
69,946 
47,093 



4,791 



42,541.751 
31.983 



Total other countries | 44,219,487 

Grand total ' 57,442,546 



185,158 
16,704 
32.626 



8,092 



612 

4,404 

1.552 

1,974 

213,254 

516,736 

130 



13.092,614 



243,231 

3,447 

37,124 

45,668 

3,159 

94,203 

1,461 

611 

91,857 



290.276 



26,262 



20,476 
100 



1,322 



87,207 

41,353 

69,483 

1,928 

36,519 

2,662 

3,891 

5,257 

633 



1401 
lOi 

isol 

39, 491, 127; 



2,678 

911 

345 

37,558,209 



41,169,809; 38,648,375 



59,039,054) 51,740,989 



11 

IMPORTS. 

Imports of Products of the Mine and Manufactures of Mine Products 
—Calendar Years 1913, 1914, and 1915. 



Producti. 



Alumina 

Alum, alum cake, and rhioralum. 

Aluminium and manufacture* 

Antimony regului 

Antimony salti 

Arsenic, onide and auliihide of . . .. 

Asbeitoi 

Ainhaltum 

Belli and KonRi 

Bismuth 

Blanc fixe and satin white 

Blast furnace ilaii 

Borax 



Bric't and tile ..[...'.........[., 

Brick, fire, of a kind not made in Canada, and n.o.p!. . '. i 

Bromine and bromide* i 



Burrstones 

Cement. Portland, and manufactures. 

Chalk, Cornwi>:; stone, feldsiar. fluorspar, etc... 

Clays 

Coal; anthracite, bituminous, slack, and run-of-mine. 

Coal tar ami loal iiiich 

Coke 

Coke, grouiiii for electric batteries. ........ 

Copper and manufactures of 

Cryolite. 



Crucibles, clay or plumbago 

Chloride of lime 

Cyanides of lotaisium. sodium, cyanogen, or cpd of bromine 

Diamonds, unset, and bort 

liarthenware 

Earths, crude 

Electric carbons 

Emery. 



Fertilizers, compound or manufactured. 

Flint, quartz, silex, etc 

Foundry facings 

Fullert earth 

^^8sil^. 



Ganni.'fter ....'.'.'.'.... 

Ciold and silver and manufactures of 

Graphite and manufactures of 

Grindstones ..'.'. 

Gypsum and plaster nf Paris .'...'.'. 

Hydrofluosilicic acid 

Iron and steel— Total. 191,). $145.226.97i 

1914, 80.063,679 

1915. 74.30S,983 

Pig-iron 

Ferro products and chrome steel 

'ngots. blooms, billets, puddled bars, etc. . 

Scrap iron and scrap steel 

Plates end sheets 

Tin plates and sheets 

Bars, rods, hoopcj, bands, etc 

Structural iron and steel 

TiiiU and connexions 

Pipes and fittings 

Npils and spikes 

Wire 

Forging castings and manufactures 

Other iron and steel products 

Iron ore 

Iron sand . 

Kainlte 

Lead and manufactures; litharge 

Lime. 



Lithographic stone. . . 
Manganese, oxide of. 




«'ij.(i44 

I'Mi.ftJIS 

7J2.2JS 

144. ')1K 

10. UO 

6.072 

1 68 . 894 

570, 29S 

4J . iUf 

9,IHI4 

59,471 

4,067 

164,180 

188.288 

8H.07I 

■ilO 

.114 

47,8(6 

loooii 

2r.096 

.',.>. 60.5 

151.377 

I.ii08,4r,| 

I 2 . 266 

t. 957. 770 

61. (12 

l(Ki,76l 

112,142 

<67,.U'J 

7(K),I54 

160,0111 

1,811 

40,6;t5 

206,732 

734,952 

54.4'M 

9,855 

12,321 

4,(KMJ 

2,462 

1.829.953 

45.117 

79. 39 1 

25. 81 J 

36,085 



624,200 

820,976 

1.2,0.687 

27,614 

7.647,560 

2.883,951 

5.829,088 

3,615,333 

379,218 

10,978 

86,876 

2,175,834 

1. •'32, 370 

46,804,298 

2,331,755 

3,263 

146 

2,482,916 

98,040 

1.316 

46.678 



12 
IMPORTS. 

Imports of Products of the Mine and Manufactures of Mine Products 
—Calendar Years 1913, 1914, and 1915.— Continued. 



ProducU. 


1913. 
Value. 


1914. 

Value. 


1915. 

\alue. 




$ 12,226 
111 

109,493 

41,112 

4,667, 7'.H 

43,417 

249,192 

1,981 

198,519 

257,153 

8,512 

283,554 

894,989 

72,351 

37,546 

13,238,429 

16,070 

145,674 

414,165 

360,473 

r;,86i 

565,283 

81,797 

440,343 

235,474 

171,516 

998,993 

1,640,849 

1,645,320 

5,0.16 

638,970 

4,054 

10,706 

3,118,760 

151,. 180 

1,576,943 


t 16,429 

372 

97,449 

26,489 

2,868,464 

33,080 

238,612 

1,.500 

146,763 

199,327 

l',640 

278,064 

574,6'm 

57,527 

44,874 

11,072,362 

20,220 

79,614 

343,004 

177,168 

16,976 

540,881 

108,784 

224,759 

213,2.56 

1.18,415 

960,670 

1,252,869 

604,952 

5,517 

877,628 

7,149 

8,983 

2,023,329 

134,511 

1,210,652 


1 9,695 
73 


Mrrnchaum 




IS9,284 


Metallic alloyc— 

Babbitt mrtal 


16 700 






Britannia metal 


11 198 


(rerman silver, nickel, and nickel tilver 


274 706 


Type metal 




Mineral and bituminoui iubatancet 


123 726 


Mineral water, including aerated water 


126,569 


Nickel anode* 


Ochrei, etc 


284 749 


Ore" of niewla, n.o.p., cobalt ore 




Paraffin wax 


40,96S 




Petroleum and products of 


7 979 264 


Phosphate (fertilizer) 

Platinum and manufacture* of 


14,148 

84,087 


Potash and manufacture* of . ■ . . 


21 1 243 


Preciou* atone* 


132 


Pumice 


18 814 


Salt 


517 526 


Saltpetre 


279 692 






Slate and manufacture* of 


108,676 






Soda producU: barilla, bichromate, caustic, sal, and aalt cake. . . . 


858,. 164 
.5.19,173 


Soda, nitrate of 


1,0.50,648 


Sulphate of iron (copperas) 


5 , 302 


Sulphur and pho*phorui 


509 , 889 


Sulphuric add 




Talc 




Tin and manufacture* of (including tinware) 


1,634,796 


Whiting and prepared chalk 


109,551 


Zinc and manufacture* of 


2,775,358 








259,299,745 


181,675,667 


146,323,500 



MET>LLIC ORES AND PRODUCTS. 

Antimony. — There was a production of antimony ore in 1915 (all 
exported) of 1,341 tons valued at $81,283, and of refined antimony 59,440 
pounds valued at SI 1,888. There was no protluction during the three 
previous years. The imports of antimony or regulus thereof in 1915, 
were 1,962,1'"' 'wunds valued at $344,918, and of antimony salts 67,956 
pounds, va' at $10,320, or a total value of imports of $355,238. In 
1914 the i rts were anf" ' and regulus 648,516 pounds valued at 
$47,498, antimony salts 34 pounds, valued at $10,217, or a total 

value of ...ports of $57,715. 

Cobalt. — Metallic cobalt, cobalt oxide, cobalt sulphate and other 
cobalt salts and alloys are produced in Untario smelters. The production 



13 

In 1915 as metal or contained in coi)aIt oxide m ,tlicr salt wa> e<|ui\alent 
to 504,212 pounds of mhalt and \va> v.dtied at SSM^JW. This included 
211.610 pounds of metallic cobalt and ■J2.<,717 pounds of o)l,a!t oxifle and 
cobalt sulphate. In 1014 the producticn was rejH)rted as 899.027 [K.unds of 
cobalt oxide and 242,572 jKurnds of col.ilt contained in residues M.ld outside 
of Canada or equivalent to a total of «71,«9I pounds «)f cobalt. 

Copper— Thv pnxiuction of copinr crjntained in blister, ni.itte, or ore. 
which was practically all exported, was 100,785,15'' .unds in 1915, valued 
at $17,410,635, as compared with 75,735,960 [wu.kis in 191-1 valued at 
SIO.301,606. 

The exports of copjx-r -"n 1915 were reported as 106,891,179 pounds, 
valued at $13,076,909, as against exiH.rts in 1914 of 77..W8.723 pounds, 
valued at $8,270,689. The total imf)f)rts of copper in 1915 were v.dued at 
$3,957,770, and included crule and nianufacturwl c«)pper 19,497.500 
poinds, valued at $3,402,922, and other manufactures of copper \alued at 
$554,848. 

The total imjiorts of copper in 1914 were valued at $4,256,901. and 
included crude and "lanufactured copper, 26,2''0.815 pound; valued at 
$3,983,322, and other manufactures of copper, valued at $273,579. 

Cold— The total value if the production of gold in 1915wasSl8,977,901, 
rcpresentinK 918,056 fine ounces, as comparetl with $15,983,007. representinR 
773.178 fine ounces of metal in 1914. 

The Yukon placer production in 1915 was 229,803 fine ounces, valued 
at $4,750,450. 

Of the total production in 1915 about S5.524.476 were derived from 
alluvial workinRs; $8,909,170 in bullion from milling ores and $4,544,255 
from ores and concentrates sent to smelters. 

In 1914 about $5,687,501 were derived from alluvial workings; $6,051.- 
968 in bullion from milling ores, and $4,243,538 from ores and concentrates 
sent to smelters. 

The exports of gold-bearing dust, (jiiartz, nuggets, and gold in ore, etc., 
in 1915> were valued at 816,528,143, as against $15,242,200 in 1914. 

The ini|K)rts of gold bullion during tiie calendar year 1915 were $1,028,- 
405, of gold coin 819,910,229, and of manufactures of gold and silver 
$464,294. 

PiR- Iron.— The total prwiuction of pig-iron in Canadian blast fur- 
naces in 1915 was 913,775 tons valued at SI 1,374.199, of which it is estimated 
755,180 tons valued at 89,658,325 should be credited to imported ores, and 
158.575 tons, valued at 81.715,874 to domestic ores. In 1914 the total 
production was 783,164 tons, valued at $10,002,856, of which it is esti- 
mated that 687,420 tons, valued at 88.863,944, should be credited to im- 
ported ores, and 95,744 tons, valued at 81,138,912 to d. lestic ores. 



14 

The expnrtH of pig-iron in 1915 were 17,.W7 toni. valued at $2.11,551, 
and of fcrro-alloy^* 9,2.W tons, valued at $5.?7,081. or a icHal of 26.545 tf)nH. 
valued at $768.6.?2, an againitt total ex|K)rt» in 1914 of \')M^ tonn, valued at 
S486,.{66. 

The imports of pig-iron in 1915 were 47,482 ton«, va!ue«l at S624,2f)0; 
ferro-manxaneM', etr.. 13,758 tons, valued at $807,.112, as compare*! with 
imports in 1914 of pi^-iron 78.594 tons. v.ilue(l at $981,107; ferrr)-manKan- 
cse. etc.. 22.147 tons, valued at S549.485. and rharroal pin-inm 86 tons, 
valued at SI. 082. 

The total exix)rts of iron and steel and manufactures thereof, in 1915 
were valued at $48,268,148. as against S14,.W1,746 in 1914. The imports of 
iron and steel ,m<l manufactures thereof during the calendar year 1915 
were valued at S74,308,'y83, as compared with $80,063,679 during the cal- 
endar year 1914, 

Irnn Ore.— The total shipments of iron ore from Canadian mines in 
1915 were 398,112 tons, valued at $774,427, as compared with 244.854 
tons valued at $542,041 I 1914. The quantity of im|)orted iron ore used in 
Canadian blast furnaces in 1915 was aliout 1.314,957 tons, as compared 
with 1,324,326 tons of importetl ore usetl in 1914. 

Lrad.— The production of lead in 1915 was 46,316,450 pounds, valued 
at $2,593,721, as against 36,.«7,765 pounds, valued at $1,627,568 In 1914. 

The exports of lead in 1915 were pig leatl 2,066.92') Ofurnds. \alued at 
$7«,.067, lead in ore, etc., 1,845.100 pounds, valued at $40,273; the exports 
in 1914 were pig lead 510.573 pounds, valued at $19,.S07. and had in ore, 
etc., 246,100 ix)unds. valued at $2,681. The total value of the imjwrts of 
lead and manufactures of, in 1915 was $2,482,916, as compared with immrts 
in 1914, valued at $1,042,538. 

Molyh(i,iitim.~Tho prrKhiction of niolylidenite in 1915 was equivalent 
to 29.210 iK)unds of concenti.ite, x.iliied at $28.4.S0. as nmipared with a 
production in 1914 equivalent to 3.814 jKMmds of concentrate valued at 
$2,063. 

Xirkel.—Thi- pnHJiiction of nickel in 1915 inrludiiin "iekel (onl.iintd 
in nickel-copper matt.- and nickel reco\erc<l as metal or oxide, etc.. from 
the nickel-c( halt-silver ores of Cobalt, was 68,308,657 pounds valued at 
S20,492,.S97, which included 68,077.023 pounds contained in nickel-copper 
matte produced in the SiKJbury district and 231,634 pounds recovered in 
Canadian smelters in the treatment ol ores from Cobalt. During 1915 
there were smelted 1,272,283 tons of nickel-copper ores producing 67,703 
tons of matte as against 947.053 tons of ore producing 46,396 tons of matte 
m 1914, the nickel contents v)f the latter being 45,517.937 [lounds. Tiere 
were also pro<iuced in 1914. 392,512 poimds of nickel oxide. 

The exports of nickel contained in ore matte, etc., during 1915 v re 
66,410,442 iMJunds, valued at $7,394,440, being 13,747,991 pounds to 



15 

Gnat Brif.iin an.l S2.662,451 p<.un<l> in tlir IniJ.-.! State*. In 10|4 the 
.'XiK.rts wrn- A6.S2H,M7 [x.iin.ls v.iliu.l at $5.140. ».>7; Ix in^ ltl,2«)I,<)79 
IKuimIs I., C.Rat Urilain; .U),(H5.642 ik.uikN to thf Iniliti SiaU-. ami 220.. 
7()6 , ainds to other eoiintries. 

The imi)ort-< of nickel, nickel-silver, in inKot-. Ii.ir;.. sheets eti., in 
I9I5 were 7I()„U4 |H.inuls. valued at SI«>7,lft.S. ;.* asainst 61'>,H52 ihuuhN 
valuetl at 8155,427 in 1<>14. 

Silvrr. —Thv pHHliiction of silver contained in Inillion. or eslim itetl 
as recovered from mattes and or»s, etc.. ix(K)rli<l. was in l'>15. 2t>,f)25.<>fi() 
fine oimces. v.ilued .it vSl.?.228.842. as compared with 2« 44y.X2l line mmces 
valued at ^S15.59.^.6.n in 1914. 

The e.xjx)rts of silver contained in ores, malt.s, etc.. in 1915 were 
27.672,481 ounces, valiiwl at S1,<,8I2,(M8. .is again-i exi)orts of 28,020 089 
ounces, value.1 at SI5.584.813 in 1914. The imjiorts of silver Iniiion durinR 
the calendar year 1915 were value.l at S?37.254, as comr)ared with l.ullion 
imports of $629,279 in 1914. 

Zjmc— The shipments of xinc ore in 1915 were 14.895 tons, valued at 
S554.9.18, as compared with .shipments of 10,89.? tons. v.iJutd at $262,56,? 
in 1914. The total value of the imrK)rts of zinc and manufactures of zinc, 
in 1915 was S-,775..?58. as compared with imports, valued at $1,210,652 

in r :, 

\()\-MKT.\IJ.IC PRODICTS. 

.lfthinlil,:--.\ pr.Hluction of 220 tons, val .-d .it $2,420 was repirted 
in 1915, as compared with 119 tons value<l at Sl..?04 in 1914. 

Arse; -Smelter returns show a production in 1915 of 2.,?96 tons uf 
arsenious o.\.,le. valued at $147,830, as compared with a pr.Kluction in 1914 
of 1,737 ions, valued at $104,015. 

The exports of arsenic in 1915 were 2,318 tons, valued at $1/4.190. 
as against 1,876 tons, valued at $132,567 in 1914. The imrw)rts of sulp>'ide 
of arsenic in 1915 were I 71,993 [wunds. valued at vS5,4l5 as against 1 1.494 
pounds, valued at S7.'6 in 1914. The imports of arsenious oxide in 1915 
were 14,222 pounds v.iIued at $657. as against 5,0'.'' pounds, valued at 
$249 in 1914. 

/li6r5/o.v.— The shipments of asbestos in 1915 were 111,142 tons, valued 
at $3,553,166. and of astiestic 25.700 tons, valuwl at $21,819, as compared 
with shipments in 1914 of asbestos 06,542 tons, valued at $2,892,266, and 
of asbestic 21,031 tons, valued at $17,540. 

The shipments in 1915 consisted of 5.370 tons of crude asbestos, valued 
at $1,076,297, and 105.772 tons of mill stock valued at $2,476,869. The 
1914 shipments included 4.147-9 tnn-^ of crude asbestos, valuetl at $773,193, 
and 92,394 tons of mill stock, valued at $2,119,073. 



16 

Exports in 1915 were 84,584 tons, valued at $2,734,695, as against 
81.081 tons, valued at $2,298,646 in 1914. There were also exported in 
1915, 25,103 tons of asbestic sand, valued at $157,410. 

Imports of asbestos and manufactures of asbestos in 1915. were valued 
at 8168,894, and in 1914, 8282,053. 

arowj/c— Shipments in 1915 were reported as 12,341 tons, valued 
at 8179,540, as against 136 ions, valued at 81,210 in 19)4. 

The exports of chromite or chromic iron in 1915 were 7.290 tons 
valued at 881,838. 

Coal.— The production of coal in 1915 was 13,267,023 tons, valued at 
$32,111,182, as against 13,637,529 tons, valued at 833,471,801 in 1914. 

The exports of coal in 1915 were 1,766,543 tons, valued at 85 406 058 
as compared with 1,423,126 tons, valued at 83,880,175 in 1914. The total 
imports of coal in 1915 were 12,465,902 tons, valued at 828,345 605 as 
agamst imports in 1914 of 14,721,057 tons valued at vS39,801,498. 

The 1915 imports included 6.106,794 tons of bituminous round and run- 
of-mme coal, valued at 87,564,369; 4,072,192 tons of anthracite and anthra- 
cite dust, valued at 818,753,980; and 2,286,916 tons of bituminous slack, 
such as will pass through a f inch screen, valued at 82,027,256. The con- 
sumption of coal in 1915 was approximately 23,906.692 tons, as against 
26,852,323 tons in 1914. 

The 1914 imports included 7,776,415 tons of bituminous round and run- 
of-mine coal, valued at 814,954,321; 4.435,010 tons of anthracite and 
anthracite dust, valued at 821,241,924; and 2,509,632 tons of bituminous 
slack, such as will pass through a | inch screen, valued at $3,605,253. 

Coke.— The quantity of oven coke made in 1915 was 1.200.766 tons 
the quantity sold or used was 1,170.473 tons, valued at 84.258.580 a, com- 
pared with l.Or 253 tons, made in 1914. and 1,023.860 tons sold or used, 
valued at 83.658,514. The quantity of coal charged to coke ovens in 1915 
was 1,856,393 tons, as compared with 1,541,913 tons in 1914. The exports 
of coke in 1915 were 35,869 tons, valued at $160,053, and in 1914 67 838 
tons, valued at 8306,117. ' '' 

The imports of coke in 1915 were 637,857 tons, valued at $1,608 464 
as compared with imports of 553,046 ions, valued at 81,585,259 in 1914. 

CoriDidnm.— The total sales of grain corundum in 1915 were 262 tons, 
valued at 833,138, as compared with sales of 548 tons, valued at 872 176 
in 1914. Kxports for 1915 were 339 tons, valued at $37,798, and in 1914 
947 tons, valued at 887,740. 

FeW5/>or.— Shipments of feldspar in 1915 were 14,559 tons, valued at 
$5^80I, as compared with 18,060 tons, valued at $70,824, in 1914. The 
exports arc not separately recorded in 1915. but in 1914 were 18,072 tons 
valued at $74,100. 



17 

Fluorspar.— No production has been reported during the past three 

i'mf, «?-"'''''''" ^."'■"''''' '" ^^'^ "'"'^ ^^'^20 tons of fluorspar and in 
iyi4, 7,843 tons. Imports of hydrofluosilicic acid were 1,117.874 pounds 
valued at §36,085, as against 1,384,087 pounds, valued at 841,576 in IQu! 

G>ap/»7e.-Shipnients of crude and milled graphite during 1915 totalled 
2,635 tons, valued at $124,223. as against 1,647 tons, valued at S107 ^03 
in 1914. The production of artificial graphite in 1915 was reported as 
^49 tons, as compared with 617 tons in 1914. 

Exports of plumbago in 1915 are reported as 263 tons, valued at $12 009 
and manufactures of plumbago, valued at $84,316. Exports in 1914 were' 
plumbago 919 tons, valued at $50,528, and manufactures of plumbago' 
valued at $72,718. FiUMiua),o, 

Imports of graphite in 1915 were valued at $151,878. and included- 
plumbago, not ground, $3,436; blacklead $6,084; plumbago gnjund and 
manufactures of, $35,597; and crucibles of clay or plumbago S 100 761 
Imports of graphite in 1914 were valued at $100,192, and include.l- plum- 
bago not ground $801, blacklead $6,798, plumbago ground and manufac- 
tures of, $42,680, and crucibles of clay or plumbago $49,913. 

Grindstones.— The production of grindstones, scythestones, and w..od 
pulpstones m 1915 was 2,580 tons, valued as $35,768, as compared with 
3,9/6 tons, valued at $54,504 in 1914. The exports in 1915 were- manu- 
factured grindstones, valued at $35,334; and stone for the manufacture of 
grindstones 180 tons, valued at $900. The exports in 1914 were • manufac- 
tured grindstones, valued at $24,113, and stone for the manufacture of 
grindstones 54 tons, valued at $294. 

«7o,I'^^ [""P""' °^ abrasives in 1915 included: grindstones. value<l at 
«79,391, burrstones $314, emery in bulk, crushed or ground $67 067- 
manufacturesofemery, carborundum, etc., $139,665; pumice stone S18 814- 
also iron sand $3,263; sandpaper $133,677; and artificial abrasives $28 921 ' 
The imports of abrasives in 1914 included: grindstones valued at $98 '872- 
burrstones $16; emery in bulk, crushed or ground $29,127; manufactures' 
of emery, carborundum, etc. $88,881; pumice stone $16,976; also iron 
sand, $13,743; sandpaper $138,415. 

Gypsum. -The total shipments of gypsum, crude and calcined, in 
J915 were 474,815 tons, valued at $854,929. as compared with shipments of 
516,880 tons, valued at SI. 156.507 in 1914. The tonnage of gvpsum mined 
or quarried in 1915 was 505,989, and the quantity calcined' 84,763 tons. 
In 1914, 579,841 tons of gypsum were mined or quarried and 138,212 tons 
calcined. 

The shipments in 1915 included: crude, lump 346.947 tons, valued at 
$375,815; crude crushed 48,735 tons, valued at $67,007; fine ground 6 455 
tons, valued at $22,767; and calcined gypsum 72,678 tons, valued at 
$389,340. The shipments in 1914 included: crude lump 351,729 tons. 



18 
valued at S400,S21. crude crushed 49.441 tons, valued at $61,686; fine 
vrdatS679.5"or'''"' " '''•''"' ^"' ^^'^'"^"^ ''''^"' ''''''' *°-' 

T>, ,o. 1 ^^^^'^^^' ^"^ gyP*^"'" g™"nd or calcined, valued at $80,933. 
The 1914 exports were: 345.830 tons of crude gypsun,, valued at S404.234. 
and gypsum ground or calcined, \alued at $35,490. 

The imports of gypsum in 1915 were valued at $25,819. including 
crude gypsum 1.799 tons valued at S7.734; ground gypsum 134 tons, valuctl' 
at W,253; and plaster of Pans 2,441 tons, valued at $15,832. 

The imports of gypsum in 1914 were valued at $75,031, and included: 

valued at $4,301 ; and plaster of Paris 7,739 tons, valued at $54,282. 

.t JI^T^f"7^^'T^"'' °^ magnesite in 1915 were 14.779 tons, valued 
at SI 6,584. and m 1914, 358 tons, valued at $2,240. Imports of magnesia 

lalu^d'amlSL' 19^ ^ ""^' " '''''• - ^-'--^ ''''''' --'- 

Mavganese.-Shipments of manganese in 1915 were reported as 201 
tons, valued at $9,360, as against 28 tons, valued at $1,120 in 1914 The 
exports m 1915 were 255 tons, valued at $6,855, as against 30 tons, valued 
IJZ' T 1 V\ ''^' '''' '""^^'^ '"'^'"'^^d 1.238 tons ;f man- 
|42.487°a ml "' ' ^' ^^""^^'^ ^'"^ ^'^^^ *°"^' ^^'"^^ ^* 

Mca.-The value of the mica production in 1915. as reported by mine 
operators, was S91.905. as compared with $109,061 in 1914. The exports 
of m.ca .n 1915 were 879,631 pounds, valued at S236,124, as against 669 163 
pounds, valued at $178,940 in 1914. gainst ooy.io.i 

n. J^JyT"^ PiS>nents.-Shipments of barytes in 1915 were 550 tons, valued 
a $6 875, as against 612 tons, valued at $6,169 in 1914. The production 
of ochres ,ron oxides, in 1915, was 6.248 tons, valued at $48,353. as com- 
pared with 5.890 tons, valued at $51,725 in 1914. 

The exports of iron oxides in 1915 were 1,196 tons, valued at $17,263 
as against 1,777 tons, valued at S22,311 in 1914. The imports in 1915 

^uZirr^^'^ "V""''^ ""^ '■"^ ^'^'""^^^ ^'2^0 '°"^' ^-^'"^d ^t $23,763, 
at <?26n oL '' ' ^'■'r°^ "'^'^'^•■^ ""^ ^"--"^ ^''••""^^ 2,452 tons, valued 

at S260.986 as compared with imports in 1914 comprising: ochres and 

d^fill7'"'f ^"d raw siennas 1,532 tons, valued at $33,197, and oxides, 
dry hllers, fireproof umbers, and burnt siennas 4,023 tons, valued at $244,867. 

Mif,eral Water—The value of the production of mineral water in 1915 
for which returns were received was $115,274. as compared with a value of 
• 101.U1 in 1914. The imports of mineral and aerated waters in 1915 



19 

were- valued at S126,S69, as against a value of $199,153 i;i 1914 The ex- 
ports in 1915 were valued at S3.578, as against Sl,367 in 1914. 

Natural Gas.— T\\c production of natural gas in 1915 was 20 124 
million cubic feet, valued at 53,706.035, as compared with 21,693 million 
cubic feet, valued at 83,484,727 in 1914. 

P^-a/.— Shipments of jieat for fuel purposes in 1915 were 300 tons 
valued at Sl.OaO. as compared with 685 tons, valued at S2,470 in 1914. 

Petroleum.— Th^i production of crude petroleum in 1915 was 215 464 
barrels or 7,541,230 gallons, valued at S300.572. as compared with 214*805 
barrels, or 7,518,168 gallons, valued at 8343,124 in 1914. 

Exports of refined oil in 1915 were 103,488 gallons, valued at 814 107 
and 2,922 gallons, valued at 8826 in 1914. There was an export in 1915 of 
naphtha and gasoline of 16.644 gallons, valued at $4,5^0: crude mineral 
oil 35,977 gallons, valued at $1,789, and also an export of other oils n e s 
CI 1,247.376 gallon- , valued at $290,943, which may have included pre' icts 
of petroleum. L>.ports in 1914 included: naphtha and gasoline, 43.023 
gallons, valued at $11,607, crude mineral oil 3,996 gallons, valued at $362 
an Iso an export of other oils n.e.s. of 455,867 gallons, valued at 

$lu-r,179. 

• ,nTc^ '"'1'''''"'^ °^ ^^^ ''"P"''^" ''f petroleum and petroleum products 
in 1915 was S8.047./81, as against a value of $11,174,763 in 1914. 

The total imports of petroleum oils, crude and refined, in 1915 were 
M^foV««'/«f ■' i''''"'"^, ^* «7'^79'264. The oil imports included, crude 
^ 70-, «;? ' f ^ f- y^'"^'' ^' S3,678,021, refined and illuminating oils, 
V.^afL.^^^i •' ".*^ ^' 5405,019; gasoline 28,030.972 gals., valued at 
S2.693.717; lubricating oils 4.547.179 gals., valued at $755,535, and other 
oils, products of petroleum 4,954,254 gals., valued at 8446,972 The oil 
imports in 1914 were: crude oil 195,207,210 gals., valued at S5.7S<"-1- 
refined and illuminating oils 12.833.065 gals., valued at $970,481- gasoline 
24396.401 gals., valued at $2,747,360; lubricating oils 5,767.676 gals 
va ued at $940,143. and other oils, products of petroleum 6,283.621 gals" 
valued at 8663,407. making a total of 244.487.973 gals., valued at $-072"- 
362. ' 

The imports of petroleum products in 1915 included 980,662 pounds of 
paraffin and paraffin wax candles, valued at $68,517. as compared with 
imports m 1914 of 1.594.236 pounds, valued at 8102.401. 

Phosphate.—Shxpments of phosphate or apatite in 1915 were 217 tons, 
valued at $2,502. as compared with 954 tons, valued at S7 275 in 1914' 
Exports in 1915 were reported as 179 tons, valued at 81,860, as against 

2o .'°"f';,?i"cn' '' ^?" '" ^'^^'^- '^^''' ^"^" '-»" '^'^P"'-^ "f phosphorus in 
1915 of 545,050 pounds, valued at 877.476, while in 1914, 610,350 pounds 
valued at $92,303 were exported. 



20 

a 820^20 h " r^"1 "^ phosphate rock (fertilizer) in 1914 wcr^ va ued 
1874 41 P'";^Ph";-"« 20,994 pound., valued at S6,760; acid pho ph" te 
1.874.486 pounds, valued a. .97.8.2; and manufactured fertiliLr:^ 

at S9?s''i90~'^''' production of pyrites in 1915 was 280.038 tons, value.! 
at S985.190. as compared with 228.314 tons, valued at S 744 508 n 1914 
The exports in 1915 were 137.598 tons, valued at SS27\;« 
ports of 89.999 tons, valued at S377.985 in 1914 Vte im, o;." fT'"'' "' 
or sulphur in 1915 were 30.182 ton^. valued 1^480, m.'r:;:^:;'4r95": 
tons, valued at {>870,868 in 1914. against 41.954 

Quartz.-The production of quartz in 1915 vvas reported as 127 ins 
ons. va ued at S205.153. as compared with a production n 1914 of 4* 48 

-sio.au^, and 3,83^ tons of flint, valued at §47,931. 

S280,7«. r„ ,9,4 .he'salc^tie .07 Oa^t^'v Lr:^'^"^^' "»,' 
value of packages used S278.897. -^3,648. and 

Exports of salt in 1915 were 889.300 pounds v-iued <;, s?a 

1914, 952.700 pounds, valued at <i^ 7?o tI .! ^- "^ ^''•^^^' """^ '" 

were valued .t S517 S2fi . i , , J ^ ^''*^' ™P°'''' °^ «^'^ '" ^915 
were valued at 5>jl/,526. and included: 34.481 tons, valued at SnS44fi 

r9?rim^ ?"'"= '"' ''f^'"' ^°"^' -'-^ -^ S382,080 duty fr! 'The 

it SI T?^S T' "'"":^ '' ^'''■'*^^' ^"^ '-'-'«'= 3 ,893 ^ons valued 
at^Sl.1.108. .subject to duty; and 108.753 tons, valued at S389.773! d"y 

pounds, valued atS34%2; cauSc od In ;a;k i^ of 2^^^^ ''''''' 

7.737,149 pounds, valued at §184,468 ^odl 6 S'S fmo """f" "^ "?'"' 

343,312; nitrate of soda or cubic „tre4^8tV2n '"'"7'^' 'f^'^' 

Sl.050.648; and sulphate of soda 30 970 2 ^ > T"'!"' '""'""^ ^' 

uipi.aie oi .soda JU.9/0,231 pounds, valued at §147,047. 

7a/c.— The production of talc in 191 S w.^ nss? f i j 

S40,S54 as against insns . "^ "' 'via was II.883 tons, valued at 
•oty,jr,t, as against 10,808 tons, va ued at S40 4IS in 101.1 t~ . t 



21 
STRUCTURAL MATERIALS AND CLAY PRODUCTS. 

I ?'""'t7oTi^ ^"*^' '^'^^ °^ "^""^"^ '" '^'5 ^^e^e 5.681.032 barrels 
toi/Vt'"'"'^''' '' '^^'"^^ ^'^^2,480 barrels, valued at $9,187,924 

m 1914. The exports of cement in 1915 were valued at $5,161 . as compared 

with exports valued at $2,223 in 1914. 

S7di?' 'TS' '," ^^^ '"''"'^''^= manufactures of cement, valued at 
vIlue2'atT40.4^6" '""""'* ^^'^^* hundredweight (28.190 barrels). 

The imports of cement in 1914 included: manufactures of cement, 
valued at $12,533; and Portland cement 343,076 hundredweight (98 022 
barrels), valued at $147,158. 

The consumption of Portland cement in Canada in 1915 was approxi- 
mately 5,/09.222 barrels, as compared with 7,270,502 barrels in 1914. 

Clay Products.-The total value of the production of clay products in 
Canada m 1915 was $3,914,488, as compared with a total value of $6,871,957 
r -.n« 07^ imi '•'l,P/°'^"^*^ ^'""^ ^^'^^ valued at $2,673,048, as apainst 

tuolfl '" ^914. The value of sewerpipe production in 1915 was 
*>7y9.446, as compared with $1,104,499 in 1914. 

The only clay products exported ia 1915 were: 1,155,000 building 
bnck, valued at $9,089; manufactures of clay, valued at $25,202; and earth- 
enware, valued at $11,281. The exports in 1914 were 1,486,000 building 
bnck, valued at $11,871; manufactures of clay, valued at $26,866 and 
earthenware valued at $9,336. The total imports of clay products in' 1915 
were valued at $2,998,465, and included: brick and tile, valued at $1 301 - 
359; earthenware and chinaware, $1,460,010; and clays, valued at $237 096 

The total imports of clay products in 1914 were valued at $4 467140 
and included: brick and tile valued at $1,986,790; earthenware ' and 
chinaware $2,192,222; and clays valued at $288,128. 

Kaolin.-ln 1915 shipments of 1.300 tons, valued at $13,000 were 
TlO^OOO ^' ''"'"P'"'^'' "^'^^ shipments in 1914 of 1,000 tons, valued at 

Lime.— The total production of lime in 1915 was 5,047,244 bush«Is 

lfTf,LT^ -'''r/^^^u^' '^'"P^'''^ ^''^ ^■^28,582 bushels, valued a; 
51,360,628 in 1914. The exports of lime in 1915 were valued at $15 617 
as against exports valued at $16,927 in 1914. The imports of lime in 1915 
T«o f o/ ^'"'''^''' "^'"^"^ ^* ^^^'^^^^ ^"^ '" 1914. 3. ),829 barrels, valued 

,,n.™^*'"f ^nV*.-The total sales of s.nd-lime brick in 1915 were 
17 960,802, valued at $141,742, an average value of $7.89 per thousand 
The sales in 1914 were 70,650,030, valued at $609,515, an average value of 
*o.63 per thousand. 



22 

Slate.— The production of slale in 191 S wa« ^o7 
S2.039 and 1.075 squares, valued at S4.837 in 1914 ^''"'■"' ^"'""^ '' 

«4.954. and manuS^ctures ' sLe sTo s^r^lht-^' ''''''?• f^^^ '""^"^ 
were valued at S2n 2Sfi -.n i . .T^"" ^^^ imports of slate in 1914 

S59,444. pencils J.0.514, and manufactures of slate 

1915^^ M?44.99T'arclpar:;^ '^.^""'T '' """^ "^ •^" '^'"''^ '" 
The value of Lton^epclrmT^^^^^^ of S5.46_9.056 in 1914. 

and the total value if stone inlpj te/ n ' 9 rw:sT5"9Yn''' '" ''^'• 
miports valued at Sl.252,869 in 1914 " '^'^^*''^ «-^9,l/3. as against 
granite, valued at SI 52S SS \ \ ^'^'^ P^^uction in 1915 included: 
and sandstone S249 3,6 Then "• ^^'^^^.OSl. marble S158.027. 

at S2.176.602: H^ stone^^^^^ 1914 included: granite, valued 

S487.140. S2.672.781: marble $132,533. and sandstone 

sandt:u::t,tT9:7tr6lT5n/r"^"^ r^'^^- ^'^ p-'--- ^^ 

pared with a value If S2 3I0 n o/rM''"'' '' ^'''''''''' ^ -- 

in 1915 were 808.022 tons ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

tons, valued at S120.756. §380,549. and the imports 199.597 



PRODUCTION BY PROVINCES. 



issh^rs::^^:^;:;^ -t:th:firSr nTr- '''' -' ^^^^ 

in the several provinces andVhe ^t^er:^^^^^^ 

^Hrce years. Ontario continues is th^^r . ' ! ^ '"''" ^°' ^^^ P^^^ 
having a production of §61061287 or 4! \T ^""^"b"*^'- ^° ^he total, 
or 4M per cent of the tot;' i^' 9 '4 Bri ifh CoT ' K '"""^^^ ^^^'034.677. 
production of $28,689 425 or 20 9^« . ^o'^nibia was second, with a 

per cent of the^o Jl'fh; p^e^us^^^ar N?"T T''T'T' °' ''■' 
ance. had a production of S18 088 34? or 13 2 ' '^'JV'' '"^P^^^" 

1915, as against S17 584 6,9 nrtVV! . ^' '^''"^ °^ ^^"^ ^tal in 

in fourth 'place. hId'fpSeln'o ^l,?!" 2l;tT5 Z '''\ f.:''" 
occupied fifth nlace wifh a ^ ^ ^/'-"lAj^/i, or 8-5 per cent; Alberta 
Tu \.r , ' P ' ^"" ^ production of S9.909 147 nr 7 9 ,, 
The Yukon District, Manitoba. New Brunswick nnH^ 1. u ^' ''*'"*• 
in the order named. Brunswick, and Saskatchewan, follow 

Sydney and Sydney Mle, which T "'^"T" °' P'^*"" '"1 '"-'I « 
.■n.n o™ and h nofnaT a ,y j^^ W aTcL'adTn' ""''"" I""" '"""««' 



1 

I 



23 
.an F„„. which is .atlrLtu^Cr' "'""■'"'""• "' *'""'• 



Mi|^| IWueUonbyProvlnce,, »13. l„4, and IMS. 



Province . 



1913. 



Value of 
production. 



*Nova Scotia ..... 
New Ilrunswiclc. 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoh;! 

Sa,sliatclKwan 

Albtrta , . , ,, „, 

British Columbia :.:.: : !«■ »i'?f';' 

6.376,7J7 

Don.inmn,^. -__-^_____yj^£^^, 

* Include, a .1 production of lime fron, P, 



If, 376. 183 

l,IOi,At3 

I3,47.<,,S34 

■W. 1 67, 749 

i. 214, 446 

»XI,I42 




rince Edward Island in mi and lou 



2»nera^Production of Nova Scotia. 1914 and 1915. 



Product . 



Antimony ore 
Go'J ....... 

Barytcs 

Coal 

Grindstones... . 

Gypsum 

Manganese 

Tripolite 

Clay products. 

Lime 

Stone 

Other products. 

Total. 




__fJne^l^^tion^ew Brunswick, 1914 and 1915. 



s.oa8,3,; 
75. and in 



Product 




Antimony, refined 
Iron ore sold for export 

Coal 

Grindstones. ..... 

Gypsum.. 

Manganese ore.. 

Natural gas. . . 

Petroleum 

Clay producu. . . 

Lime 

Stone 

Other products. . 



24 



Mineral Production of Quebec, 1914 and 1915. 



Product. 



SSET; 



Vend 

Silver 

Zinc ore... 



.Lb*. 
.Ou. 
.Lbi. 
.Uu. 
.Toiu 



1914. 



Aabettoe and ubeMlc. 

Chromite 

Feldspar 

Graphite 

Magneaite 

Mica 

Mineral water 

Ochrei, iron oxides. . . 

Phoaphat)! 

Pyrites 

guaru 
erent 

Clay producu 

Kaolin 

Lime 

Slate 

Stone ',y. 

Other products 



..Gals. 
. Tons 



...Bis. 

. . . Tons 
. . . Bus. 
.Squares 



Total. 



Quantity. Valu*. 



4.201.497 
1.292 



S7.737 
9«9 

U:,S73 

136 

98 

2<1 

358 



3,890 

SS4 

117,698 

847 

2.846,061 

i,6u6 

1.767,935 

1,075 



I 371,488 
26,708 



31,646 
10.017 



t.909 

t 

2 

18 

2 

62 

16 

31, 

4, 

470, 

.331, 
.237, 

to, 

389 

4 

,286^ 

373, 



806 
,210 
.156 
,886 
240 
,794 
366 
725 
875 
792 
847 
601 
700| 

ooo: 

0641 

837 
078' 
8931 



1913. 



Quantity, i Value. 



4,197,482 

1,099 

40,401 

63,450 

300 

136,842 
12,341 

572 



75J 
14.779 



6.248 

200 

142,733 

778 

2.390.724 



1,300 

1,351,306 

397 



■|».«36,929| n.ei. 



t 725,115 

22,720 

2,262 

31,324 

16,500 

3,374,983 

179,543 

2,005 

5,431 

126,584 

50,390 

18,086 

48,353 

7,400 

370,940 

778 

2,812,797 

905.425 

13,000 

274,831 

2,039 

1,966,194 

267,373 



.273 



There wa, also in this Province an important producUon of aluminium from i 



imported oret. 



25 



Mineral Production of Ontario, 1914 and 1915. 




Product , 



>«I4. 



I«IS. 



Uuaniily. 



Value. Quantity. \a|„ 



''■n't/t ' '"""*"'' »"<* '" •'»'<'«. etc.) 



Lb«. 



J 



Iron ore, ioid for rxport 

ironj pig. (rom Canadian ot'e (a) . 

Molybdenite. ... . ' 

Nickel 

Nickel oiide.,.'. 

Silver 

ActinoUte 

Araenloui oxide .. 

Corundum. . 

Feldspar 

Graphite 

Gypium. . , 

Mica 

Mineral water. .'.','..', 

Natural gas (6) 

Peat 

Petroleum 

Phosphate 

Pyrite*. . . . 

Quaru 

Salt 

Talc ; ;;; 

Cement 

Clay products.. .! 

Lime 

Sand-Ume brick 

Stone 

Other products .....'.', 



.... Lbs. 

o«. 

■ . . . Tonn 

..'.'.Lb,. 



. 0J9. 

. .Tons 



M.cu!ft. 

Tons 

Bis. * 

Tons 



Bis. 

!Bus'. 
No. 



Total. 



IUiO.02- t sli.U'i .,04.212 



t .Vi6,iA« 



; ' 70, W., 

i", "48. 211 J,W7,Mft 

5V6J.V 124.45V 
«.744, l,U«,i(|2 



'CI (J) 
'«,.I6I.4A4 
40<l,,S7r 
H6,047 

2J,.?0(I 
*« t,657 



",7W.6')J 

I7J,I20 
l,7|],H74 
4,UH.I 
25,800 
20,4V2,S»7 



s56,/i1 t?n'..'?i'!l,&'t"r°o"5n87-'™" '" °"''ri° '" '■^' 

coba/^an'^j^n^i^'Jel''' l^]±ZJP^ 5"^" of Mine. 




(') Included under nickel. 



15 was 4W,500 tons, valued at |5.«10.624; in 1»U 
(') Included under cobalt, (rf, Included under 



26 



Mtaeral Production of Manitoba. 1914 and 1915. 



Pnxlii. t. 



1914. 



Quonilly. \-.lue. 



1«M. 



'JiMiiUly. 



\'tttu#. 



C»liir«l Kvpjura 
t-l«y proilucu 

Lime 

Cement 

!<uid-Uine brick 

Stone 

Other produclt. . . 



Total. 



Toiu 

Hui. 
HU. 
No, 



5J.4iJ 

'itti 167. 

19.iaO,M9l 



» M2,SM 

7J7,«4« 
M7,501 
361, «I2 
314. (Ml 



2.4U,489 



Mineral Production of Sariwtchewan. 1914 and 1915. 



io,nn 


1 H<»,72l 




''.1, 674 


Ml. 4.1] 


M.J72 


139., M< 


6i5.i69 


.71S.420 


31.121 




H3.464 




203.a6« 




t.3U.J«7 



Product . 



»l«. 



Quantity. Value, 



191.1, 



Coal 

Clay producti 

.Sand-lime brick 

Other producta. . . . 



.Tom 

.No," 



ToUl, 



232,299 

ii.ijoiooo 



t 374,243 

9«,J49 

17.700 

222,019 



*.>uantlty. 



240,10'' 
47J|6(IO 



Value. 



712,313 



t 363,246 

44,406 

4,075 

3H,206 

431,933 



Mineral Production of Alberta, 1914 and 1915. 



Gold 

Coal 

Natural gas. ". 

Cement 

Clay products. . 

Lime 

Sand-lime brick 

Stone 

Other producta. '. 

Total... 



Product. 



. Bus. 
..No. 



1914. 



191S. 



Quantity. 



Value. : Quantity, j Value. 



Ois. 

Tons 

.M.cu. ft. ! 
BU. 



48 t 992 

•I.MJ.OIS 9,350,392 



172.157 
641.395 

isoiisi 

'.4.S3.000 



.214,670 
1,212,342 
462,199 
58,321 
49,731 
60,272 
275,315 . 



12.684. 234 



, ,,„ •" » 4,026 
3.360.818( 8.283,079 



4,481,947 
233.648 



74,152| 
764.700l 



1,022,814 

415,009 

115,696 

14,445 

6,191 

I 890 

47,197 

9,909.347 



27 



Mineral Production of BritUh Columbia. 1914 and 1915. 



I'"»lui I 



1*14. 



togp,,a),.. 

P*Unum 

Silver 

Zinc on 

Coal 

8Mliwnl water. 
uarti 
ement 

Clay product!.. 

Llmr 

Stone 

Other product! 

Toul.. 



(«) Smelter recoveriei of copper. 



l.tM. 
()M. 

l.lx. 
.Uit. 

.Tom 

Ton* 

Ton» 
Hli. 

' Bui. ■ 



Uuantity. 



Value. 



iVIS. 

Ouanllty. j Value. 



4l.il'».MM,VW)6.6J« 

.w.28»,M5 i;6«;«j 

2,2J9.7»9| 6,990,174 
i,iJO 



i;.l,.l;6 Vft5|.iH« 



56. r . 

i7..,..(i. ^,h5i,lN4 
«,t.7,0M i.MI.IIA 

J.SW.JSi 1.771.65(1 

2.065,6IJ 6.455.041 
1.440 




Mineral Production of Yukon, 1914 and 1915. 




1915. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



5,l.«,216$ 92 111 
2M.17.1 4.758 M8 
HIO.OOO: 45 360 

"i.lHl 38,806 



•I 5,057,708 



2« 



1 

Si 



a' I 

i 



I 






s3f§l3S£. 






S ** 4 ** < •»! "4 <*) •»> 

»* *< »-* «" "t f*)' V V >" 

«» — - — 

ift ^ I- » -I ^ ^ « ,, 

iiiiiiiii 

X U-. M l7. t > ^ MM af M> 



•'? O ■■•*'.'*,•* '•» K ^ r^ X 'N ^ 9 t~« r^ 

S:lo.S35?,5 IxUps'iiS 



i 1 

1 


35.S3S5SS S;?f.2,-?3|'.:: 

«» — — — ^ 


New 

Brunswick. 


t 420,227 
439,060 
467,985 
607.129 
5.H0.495 
559,913 
559,035 
646,328 

664,467 
579,816 
657, 0J5 
581,942 
612,830 
771,0041 
1,102.613: 
1.014,570 
903.467 


Nova 

Scotia*, 


■C***0 — — — '^ W*i -rVrx'oTrCx" 


1 

u 


~S = :L'35'iS '-:' 5 Z = - -' -^^ •» " 



29 
MINK I'KODI ( Tl(>\. 

For a nunil.' „{ yt-arh pjist ihi^, IhvWum h.i. f.i<|,avnuri.l t.. ..htain 
mm cviTV m.tu. ..inrator in Canada, an ...nual rc-turn with r.-.jHrt to 
lalK)ur employ,-.!, waKt> paid, lonn.ii;.- an.l v.iliir ..f „r,> „r minrnls mined 
treated an.l ^hii.,H<l. ..n.l in tlu- ,,,>,..,( n.it.illir ..ns, tlu' .|uantitiis of metaN 
contanu-d m the- ores >hir.iH-d r.r treate.1. In the rase, however, of ^oid 
placer minmR and the |)r.Klnction of rn.d.. |KtroIeum. it has not a* yet 
k-cii foimd feasible tool.iain romi.leie nturns from theo,R.ratorsthe.nselvT«, 
so that in these eases while ., record of production is available, there is no 
record of the lalH)iir ••mployid, nor of the wases paid. 

Statistics coverinK ca.h of the past sis years are shown in ihe .iccom- 
panyinK tables. A.cor.linv; u, the reconis shown the total value of the 
mmeral prtHluction com[)i!e(l on tins b.isis w.is S115.I58 84S in 1915 o« 
against S114,.W,6.VS in 1914, 8126,444.201 in 191.1, S12()..<.P 9W, in 1912 
$91,876,084 in 1911. .>nd S92„501,244 in 19M.. ICxdudin,- pi.'uer an,! hy- 
draulic workings ami |H-lrol,.,im wells, th,. tot.d numlHr ,.f shipping mines 
clay works. f|uarri,s. etc., in 19I.S was 1,618 .is .igainsi 1,661 in 1914. and 
1,529 in 1913. The tot.il number ,.f men employed was 56,876 in 1915 

r,i'5i"!lf '**•";" '"^' •""' "'•"" '" '"'''• T'"' ""^'' ^v-'K- P^'i'l were 
S.?7./20,762 in 1915, as against S4.?.609,696 in 1914. and $50..V)8.602 in 191 J. 
The total number of nutalliferous mines shifiping in 1915 e.\clusive of 
placer and hydraulic workings was 205. as against IH7 in 1914. 
and 18.1 in 1913; number ,.f m,n employed in 1915, 12,698, as against II 994 
in 1914 and 12,4.17 in 191.1; wages pai,l Sll,805,919 in 1915, as against 
$11,669,854 in 1914. and SI 1.746.400 in 191.1; t,.ns of ore mine,! 6 1.18 ISO 
m 1915. as against 4.9'^7,(06 in 1914. am! 4,7.1o.288 in 191,1; tons of ore con- 
centrates, or metal shippt>d fr,.m mines 4,259,734 in 1915 as against 1 115 855 
in 1914. and 3.423,414 in 1913; total net value of shipments in, huling placer 
gold $53,864,518 m 1915, cmipared with $44,763,179 in 1914 and $47 170- 
740 in 1913. 

In non-metalliferous mining, exclusive of ston, ,|uarri.s, day works 
etc., ami not including i),tr,)leum wdls, there wen empl,)v,-d in 1915 an 
aver.ige of .10,.192 men e.irning in wages S20,257,126, as against 33.732 men 
e.irnmg in wages 822,058,526 in 1914, an<l 34,207 men ,.mployed and 
$25,732,148 wages paid in 1913. 

The manufacture of cenunl, cl.-,y i>r„ducls. aiul lime, and the quarrying 
of stone, etc.. employ,-,! in 1915 an average of 13,786 men earning in wages 
$5,657,717, as again^-t 21,129 men earning in wages $9,881,316 in 1914 
These opi-rations in 1913 engaged an average of 24.367 men earning $12,870.- 
054. 

It should )e noted that these records cover only active shipping 
mines and do not indude the labour employed in prospecting or in develop- 
ing new- propc•rtie^. nor is there include,] any record of the labour employed 



.^0 

i" the smelting an.l refining of ores, nor n blast furnace operations The 
values of the ores given herewith are in general those frnisborhy the 
operators. In certau, rases, however, where such values hav not been 
furnished, estimates have been made. 

md TilT 1^7 '•""".^''d'^'J t" the statement of ore shipments in 1915, 1914. 

shin '"/tt, " fr'""" '^' ''"^'"^'■^'^^ "f "^'^^^'^ "•"t'-'i"^^ '•" the ore 

.nv ni .' "■'"'■ 'n'""'"'' '^'' '"'"' ^I"--'"fit'- "f "i^-talH contained without 

any deductions or allowances being made for smelter or treatment losses 

omparison o this record of metal contents of ore shipments with ^ 

.cs of the pr,Kiu.-t:on of the nietals is not in all cases feasible because of the 

Irimlu"' '"" ^'"'"""'^ ^^"'" ^'^' "'"^ ^"" '^^ treatment at 

Mine Production, 1910. 



MF.TALLli KROl'S ORKS. 



Irnn ores 

MitliiiR Eolfi ores — 

Bullion shipped 

Concentratca 

SilviT-cobalt ores - 

Mine bullion s)iii)ix*c) 

Ore and concentrate 

Nickel-copjier ores 

Copper ores 

Silver-lead and zinc ores. .... 

<"op[MT->!old-sil/cr ores 

Shippinn mines not reportinR - 

Silver-lead 

C'opiHT-gold 

Placer mining — 

Yukon 

British Columbia '.'....'. 

Other provinces 



Total metallic 

Total non-nietallic 

Total structural material. 



Total.. 



No. of 
tnines 



Men 
employed. 



47 



191 



I'nder- 
Kround 



Sur- 
face. 



WaRes 
paid. 



Ores 



minerals 
mined . 



N'c. 

vn 



.'•2.1 

iik' 



07 
Ml 
4X7 



$ 

44.?, 908 



Metals. I 
ores, con- | 
centrales | Net value 

. '" ! of ship- 
mmorals , ments. 
shipped. ': 



Tons, 
MS , 768 



72.^i989r i.is.oii 



8.19 

2in 

2.'i9 



2,642.1,1.1, 274.780 

7I9,2.17| 6.'i2,.l")2 

10.'i,.166i S4 '2(1 

8.SO,4Ui ISoioToi 

1.872,242 l,9.'i8,.S<)l 



Tons. 

2.S'I,41X; 

i 
K,iX)7 



$ 

.'>74,J62 

6.S9,987 
.S6,S..140 



7.. I.";'),. IX 1 1 ,1,.W,s.8.t6 
22,698,(10(1:16.148 w) 
T.SiT.mw, . . 



17,604,,181| 



1'' ,S42,0,14 

.1-'i.ft27jl.S„144,470 

6.12,. 19 J I 2,609,568 

16.7111 172.162 

. .S8,4lsl 1,668,415 

l.')24.405| 7,888,306 



4,.S.SO,000 

540,000 

1,8,50 



2,978,0001.15,116,494 
U,8flO,989|,17,757,l58 
il9,627,,5«2 



192,501,244 



.^1 

Mine Production, 191 1. 



Mbtai-liferovs OHHs. 



Iron ores 

MillitiR RolH ores — 

Bullion shipped 

CoiirpntratPB 

Silver-cobalt ore? — 

Mine bullion shipped. , 

Ore and concentrate, . . 

Nickel-copper ores 

f'opper ores. . 

Silver-lead and zinc ores. 
Gold- copper-silver ores. . . 
Placer mining — 

Yukon 

British Columbia 

Other provinces 



Total metallic 

Total non-metallic 

Total structural materials 



\o. I,f 
mines 



Men 

employed. 



work. 



So. 



,'■ nior- Sui- 



v.. 

04* 



\V;mrs 

, -id. 



minerals 
milled. 



M.tals, 




nn-s. con- 




• Tiitr.ues 


Nt'l value 


nr 


of sliip- 


minrriils 


tlU-UlN. 


shipiH'd. 




Tons. 


S 



S Tons. 

I4'),4(,x 4.'I.IH .'10,141 ='2i.M'> 



M4,5S9| IIX,7,5h 



y.<);(, 



51 t,WI 
(•>> 1,211 



■1ft 1.794 1.448! 2.722,22« 

7 S5H 42Si KSO,8<)4 

2| 11') 67 

40| ,S2N 297 

221 l,49.>i| S6J 



I 



2.S4.2<)0 

612, .Sll 612.>;i| 

9K,0S4 66, OSS Ml 047 

XIK>,X62: 12(1, .12.1 4X,'660 

9.1J,JX5! 1,602.247 1,4X6,911 



1.10: 2,007,440 

25.<i.l9il4,4(K),24S 

2,4.SO,044 

247,.'i.S.S 

1,186,996 

7,727,696 



160 9,622 : 7,K.'i7..'i80i 3,19.^,3.10 2,4.11 188 
?o'™.? i'5'*S'*-'n".»'W. 468 12,247,348, 



19.004 
60,752 



«,S27,.'>08: '...... 22 



4,606,812 

426,000 

M,202 



34,760,.S13 
34,40S,i«)0 



•".154,508 I :,|.876 



Mine Production, 1912. 




Iron orea 
Mdling gold ore 
Bullion shipped 
ConcentratPs . . . 
-Silvc-r-fobalt ore.s— 
Mint; bullion ghipix'd 
Ore and concentrate 
Nickel-contwr ores... . 

Copper ores 

Silver-lead and jinc ores 
Gold-copper-flib'er ore.s. . 
Tungsten concentrates 
Placer mining — 

Yukon 

British Columbia 

Other provinces 

Total metalliferous 
Total non-metalliferouH 
Total Kructural materials 



278,1166 
6,114| 669.727 

1641 2, 899,, 160 

29,l(K)tl4.."i92,.'i<i9 

7.!7,726| 2,9.'i.l,.106 

60, 869 j ,S0K,99.1 

66,377 2,767,741 

244, 193,13, 11.1, 144 

Hi 7,840 

.1.576,49.1 

5.S5,.S(K) 

11,379 



10,113,,S78 4, 194, ,517 3,360,45146 457 421 
2.1,877,781 17,165,628'l5.548,.,8i;45,OSO,'674 
■'" ■ ■! 128,794,869 

*5. 502.479 :. ~\ \l20JiiT'. 



32 



Mine Production, 1913. 



METAl-LIFEROt's OHRS. 

I ron ores 

Milling gold ore — 
Bullion shipped 

Concentrates. ... 
Silver-cobalt ores — 

Mine bullion shipped 

Ore and concentrate 

Nickel-copijer ores 

t opper ores. ... } 

Silver-lead and zinc! 
ores 

Zinc products 

f-old-copper-silver oresj 
Placer miiniiD — 

Yukon... ..'.... 

British Columbia. 

Cither provinces. . . 

Total metalliferous. . 
Total non-metalliferous 
Total structural mate-' 
rial-? 




Mine Production 1913, Content of Shipments. 



Mdling gold ore — 
Bullion 

Concentrates 

Silver-cobalt ores — 

Mine bullion shipped. 

Ore and concentrate. 

Nickel-copper ores 

( opper ores 

Silver-lead zinc cies. ... . 

Zinc products 

GoldKTopper-silver ores. . 
t'lacer mining — 

Yukon 

British Columbia 



CK)ld. 



250,851 
46,059 



7J8 

207,486 

282.320 
24,671 



Silver. 



Nickel. 



Om. 



59.015 
33,898 



Lbs. 



Copper. 



I.bs. 



Total. 



814,024 





7,590,929 

21,862,174i....!;^'"i 

5l,203,667l27ioi6;7i9 



.56, 393 1. 

2,564,155 . 

143.459:. 

733,758{. 

63,522l, 



Uad. 



Lbs. 



Zinc. 



Lbs. 



2,354: iii^i'i? 



4,996,303 
60,090, 1801 



8071570 



33,096,303,51.203,607 92,099,646!J3,950,067" 



7,069i866 



7,069,800 



35 



Mine Production, 1914. 



Men employed. 
No. of 
mines - 

or I 

work). Under- 1 Sur- 
ground. face. 



Wages 
iwid. 



Metalliferous orks. j So. \ 

Iron ores J 

Milling gold ore — I 

Bullion shipped 

Concentrates, . . ij ' 

Silver-cobalt ores — 
Mine bullion shipiK-d. I 

.,.9"^. and concentrate '! io ' 

N ickel-copper ores „ 

Copper ores . 

Silver-lead and zinc ores. jl. 

Zinc products I 

Gold-copper-silver ores. in ' 

Placer mining — . 

Yukon ; j 

British Columbia I ' ' 

Other provinces '..'.'.'.'.',.' 1' 

Total metalliferous ' 77^: 

Toul non-melalliferoua.. 4S| 

Total structural materials . . 1 on 



1,6611 



No. 
508 



Ores 

or 

minerals 

mined. 



Metals, 
ores, con- 
centrates 

or 
minerals 
shipped. 



J I 

.164, 4 Kg 



Tons. 

I4.S,4IC) 



1,070 



1,206 3,60.^414 "7S4,iii 



Tons. 

..'44,XS4 

H 
6,')74 



1,412 

7,16 
Il.i 
.i«4 

"82.i 



1.R8J .1,207, 116 

I , 280 1 . fig ) . gg? 

tXO 177,721 

817 1,110.876 



3,'i4 

16.gl7 

g''g,908 

117,762 

70,207 

lim ■2;,S12:i4l 1,8.S7:788 t.w;vn 



7Vi,174 

l.(KI0,J61 

Ilg,2g2 

l.'<6,646 



(0) 



Net value 
of ship- 
nients. 



t 

■542.041 

6,101,46.1 
860,379 

.'5,66.S,006 
7.827,140 
.'i,')20,(X),1 
.02,6.17 
2.6.i2,802 
262,563 
V. 580. 537 

5,182,616 
565,000 
9«2 



\\''V, '.'.•n=L'?'^ 4.gg7,406 .1 . 1 IS.S.v'il 44 763 179 

66,855 



:4«. 600, 696 22,075.706 17.824, 162i 114, 23g, 635 



(o) Alberta production. 



Mine Production 1914, Content of Shipments. 



Milling gold ore — 

Bullion 

Concentrates.... 

Silver-cobalt ores- 
Mine bullion shipped. 

., .Ore and concentrate. . 

Nickel-copper ores. . 

Copper ores 

Silver-lead zinc ores.... 
Zinc products. 



Gpld-copper-silvcr ores, 
rlacer mim'ng — 

Yukon.... . 

BriUsh Columbia. . . 

Alberta 



Total. 



Gold 



Ozs. 



289,860 
38.717 



Nickel. , Copper. 



I-ead. 



Ozs. 



85.110 
64.218 



10.335.527 
15.523,608 



Lbs. 



Lbs. 



1,059 
334| 2,501 ,'82(i 

3-' 420 

182,7841 90 



,60,800,799 36, .100, .532! 
?••**(>; 6,450.899. 



247.753 
27.332 . 

481. 



50,527,1361! 



Zinc. 



Lbs. 


Lbs. 


isjii 









53,771.1261. 



9.101,460 



55,744i... 



787.887:29,755.777 60,800,799.96,522, 647j.50,542.27i:"97ior460 



34 



Mine Production, 1915. 




Antimony ore 
Molybdenite 
Iron ores. . . . 
MillinR gold ore — 

Bullion shipped.. 

Concentrates 

Silver-cobalt ores- 
Mine bullion shipped 
Ore and concentrate. 

Nickel-copper ores 
Copper ore. . . . 
Silver-lead and linc ores 

Zinc products 

Oold-copper-silver ores 
riacer minins — 

Yukon... 

British Columbia . 

Alberta 

Total metalliferous 
Total non-metalliferous 
Total structural materials 



Mine Production 1915 Content of Shipments. 



Antimony ore. 

MiUing gold ore-^ 

BulUon 

Concentrates. . 
Silver-cobalt ores- 
Mine bullion shipped 
X,. ..""<' concentrate. . 
Nickel-copper ores. . . 

Copper ores 

Silver-lead linc ores 

Zinc products 

Gold-copper-silver ores 
Placer mining — 
Yukon.... 
British Columbia. 
Alberta 



Total... 




1,151 1 64,955 
■•59' i, 637, 444 

•202;ii7l lll-Ml 
195 



'"'■'•'*P'''"''H"''"'"''i'^«^^^ ^'^:^^ II 



2JI,439 



1,080,196 



.<s 



h^Aimmm§ 



3 S S 2 2 ;? 2 2S S $ » "« s; ^ f- -» 



2 

■ 

o 

I 



f 



I 

"S 

S 



a 




.* S :^ ■ « -^ 3c *- " — ^7r. - 



2 



■^i 



o o 
E 



5 PSSr |3R!^^52s 







O -Oi/idoac -rii^ 



-(n'^'S*'^*'®'^* 



§ .' 
Z : 



.a 
■s 

a 
. o 

:l ■ 

."3 ! 
' '^ : 
:8 : 



C X O » »i ^ _ 


- - 


•r' 






s:5sss"=:: 


■c 




L 


1--- -■ c 


'u 


X 








^ 






1? 






- 












■3 


■ •".~:~;'"T 







Id 



: .'^J : 



.IlillslslllslLI 



3 

o 
H 



S b = 'S'5S " 



2e c 

is- 1 

•SB'S 

3 P = 



o o o ^S' 
see S 
■3 'S -S 



^ 1 






36 



SMELTKR PRODLCTION. 



Trail, 
Ltd.. 



Th.. ,„c|„„B co„,,„„i,, i„ „„ „,,„, ,^ ,^ 1,^^^ _ 
/I nimony Smeller:— 

New Brunswick Rl.tals. /.t.i.. f..ke (...,.. N H 
t^/'/'er Smelters:— 

Con^lKJateci Mining and Sn,eltin« Co. of Canada. L.d. 

^--ranby Consolidated Mining. Smdting and Power C 

(.rand forks and Anyox, B C" *■ "' 

"riti.sh Columbia Copper ^o I t,l r. , .. 

Tvee Conner r . ' '• ^'^'^Pnwood. B C 

Mond Nickel Co., Ltd.. Coniston. Ont. 
C anacban Copper Company, Copper Cliff, Ont 
Afa / Smelt en: — 

Coniagas Reduction Co., Ltd., Thorold, Ont 

S«„da,d S„eU,„,a„d Refi„i„g Co., Chippewa, 0„, 

Zinc Smelters:-— 

Klectro-Zinc Co., VVelland, Ont 

French Complex Ore Reduction Co. (E.xperimental). 
The antimony smelter at St. Georce N R ^.c • 
time only, while the zinc reduct.V^n h !; ' '" ^P^'^^ion for a .short 

experimental stage in so ^ar a " ^ . " ^'"'^' ^^^"'^'^'y beyond the 
Consolidated Mining an'sm It ngCrLr,"'^'"" '^ '^°"^*^^-^- ^he 
tion of about | ton of spelter pe day a'^d JV, T""; '"""^^ ^ P^^^"- 
and equipment of works to hfve a ca^ city ofT t""' V^^ ^'^'^ '^"''^'"^ 
The zmc refinery buildings include sZ^ "' ""^ 'P^'^*^'- ^^ day. 

ing. electrolyzing and mLZ^tnisZT" " '"'"^'"^' ^°^^*'""^- ''-'ach- 

ting plants, motor generator building, and trans- 



37 

plant at Welland. ()„,., has I ' ' ;" ' n , "■'''.'^' '^'""'''''•' ^'h- ^^inc 

plant forthe tr..at,nc.ntof.i„eore ■"'^"' """"'"^•'>' "' "("'P th. 

. The largest proportion of ;hc o 1 t U'Te.'V''' • 
•'^■sts as usual of the coppcr-uold .11 1/ "/J '.^ '''''"'"''" '915) con- 
fron, the Boundary (PhcK-nix tnd C Vl ^'''''^ roluml.ia. chiefly 

Island and Granby Ba "ci"; c' 7^7 ^ ^^^'^'"'' ^'"^' ^^'^^ (Texada 
<listrict. Ontario, contrh u «! Tbout T n '' ' 'TT """ '' "^^' ^"^"'-V 
balance hoin« lead ores and ott^o s';:;: • t^T^ -"-^- the' 
s.Iver-cobalt ores of Ontario treated .n.;! , ' ^"'"•'''"'^" '»"'' 'he 

ores treated by cyanide proce" a IrinlrT^r '^''' ""^' --■ 
. The quantities of the several dasse" ''"''"' '"/'"^ '■^™'-<'- 
eight years have been as follows _ *"■'' """''"'' ^'"'•'■"« '^^ past 



Tons of Ores Smelted, 1908-1915. 




I Copfior- 

ofs- «ilver 

ores. 



Totals. 



'•i''?.-IM 2, 218, .195 

1,'W.,.S2 2,68.?, 714 

I.S 7,9Sli 2.1W .S5,1 

2. f 2.116 .i, 005, 410 

2.I1V.7S4 J. 027 201 

W'?2'8' 2l«'52J' ^«'"';15S 
»v,.-.j(( 2,245,245 3.624,582 

MlvTr. c„|,,x.r ,„|,,|„„, .i,„| ,,„,i,^„, ' '' ■ ' ','•':'■ "< ■■■ lii»- K>>l<l, lino 

^s^i;r.^r;o.;;'--'S^^^^ 
-p-^ and cobai. a;,::^;r:) -- -^^^^^^^ 

The aggregate result^ of ^^^^ ^^Z'''''' ^"'^ .-«"■"«• 
marzed as shown in the next 7-. be ? nf '^'^^"'"S OP^'-^^'""^ may be sum- 
taken to represent the total pod' ion ronT ?^ "' ''^" '^^""^ ^^""^^ ^e 
-nee considerable c,uan,iticro " , " 1^'""^ ""^ '"'"«' '" Canada, 

ppe. and ,>,iu-r ores are still shipped to 



38 

othtT snu-ltcr> outside of Canada fr.r ^nw-h;., i . 

entire rm.verv of these- me " s in r .r. "' ""';." '^"^" "•"^^■^•"' '^e 

Smelter and Refinery Production in Canada. 



Rrfincd produrti produt«i. 



Calendar Yeara. 



toin 



loii. 



rrd""""" '-h.. I 

Silver "»»• I. I.1,2')K 15 

Lead.. , . " I'*', •''<■''»•' 19. n7K 

Copper .uiph,iie: : . : : '-*"• i"'?"''™^'.sis 

Cobalt mrtallir ■ l^'.-'iK, |<)7 

Cobalt oxide, . " I I 

Nickel oxide. .. . " ! I 154, 

Nickel, metallic. " i / 

Whitearsenic .':.': " '■-.■J^,-;- 

- j ■',003,467 4,194, 

Malic, blimcr coprK-r, and 
"Iher smelter products ohnincd ."n 
exported for refining. 



,370 

7ft«' 
050 

IH7, 



1912. 



I9I,J. 



1 

17.572 

I5.8Q.1 

«7 



,118 
217 
100 
110 



•'4ii .149,0.54 



209 4,090;768 



1.1.789 

37,92.1 

130 

«ftO, 
268, 



1914 



,977 
,709 11 
,043 36, 

5.13 

079 
.VI4 



11,088, 
096.86M2 
443. 706! 43 
l.<2.06«| 

'""9!b27 (1) 
•W2,SI2 (") 



3,384,249 3;474;322) 4, 



1915. 



.'9,440 
17.813 
.248.415 
-S18.618 
175,579 
211,610 
423,717 
272.025 
53,325 
792,637 



I'i illister copper. 

(<) Copper matte 

;:; '*'t''^'-™PPer mattp. 
(•) Cobalt material 



Tons. 


13 


918 


II 


119 


33 


01.1 




54 



Metala contained ■ 
relined smelter products. 



in above 



(",old. 
Silver. 



(Jm. 



Copper , ." 

.Vickel "'S- 



197. I8|; 
2.136.414! 



Tnns. 

10.7101 

11.320 

32,607 

630! 



175.189 
.''85.896 



ons. 


Tons. 


17,061 

6,727 

41.925 

642 


l.'5,270 

.S,I59 

47,1.50 

122 







Tons. ! 

13,238 
6,291 
46,396 
101 1 . 



Tons. 



22.263 

7,619 

67,703 



184,815 
686,171 



i37'58?'*?^f,'i''''»*«I*«.«".910 
|37,587.676 .14.098,744 44.841.542 






213,279 170,8181 182 051 
^ 934.601 1 873 400 855??^ 
io•|?^,'?^'"'•"^0'6 8«.679•4M 
49, 676, 772,45. 517.937 68 077 821 



carr>ing nickel and silver vain 



' as well as meuls of the platinum group. 



are ircatal in the smelKr, „l ,h.° r '"'"""" "' Tinlisitamins, Onlari,,, 
Cliff, and ,he Mo^Ttll'co^'^^Tc T' ?'""^"' '" "^""^ 



l^um^ J.U. p...... ..H.,..,lur«ieal pra.-.i,. involves .,,0 f..,Wi„, ,„„. 

'• '^"'-'"^ •'^---" .'rH-n heapsMo re.ov.. p... onhe sn.p,,^ 

"• Snu-hinK ip «..,..r-j..ck..,c.,l l.|..st furn.uv.. „, nn.ku-, . 1 

Uriulc mafic, mntiiniiur u ^ PHhUkc .. |,,w 

'■<-'> ai. .„; ,::::z:izr '■•"" '■"""'•^-"''•''"' > 

^^. •-'^< -. " .... .. nta.n.n, abou, 80 p.. .on, copp..: 

IV. Rffinini; ihi' r(iii\'i'rt..>- .,,... 

,.m. ,;:,;,;;""■■■'" " •"■■''■'-v,-.. ...,, 

..i...'''n!;r.. ;,i;':';'':?'r.'''~ '•"';■--■■'■> .-■, ,,,„. 

ror fi,K,. ,rc..,„,™,. "' ■" '"""«^' «• '■"■"■■I ^'^.'o -. In^l,,:, 

»T,l";.l'.'";:r,;:;"' ,t:",;.: :;;:"""'^ t-"- '•'- ^ - ■*..i.v ,,,„« 

-^.n, K^i;:';;^::;,;:; i^^^n,,:?'";,^;:-- »^' - ;•■• ^'v .. 

^;:rr:'^ ■ -■' -•■' 'v .. ^o ;/:::];;;:;sr: ;:;.' '■■■™ 

■iiHK of open,,;,,,,,, ,„ ,8,,. """ " ""■ '■■"■'•■•■»' I'" •»•" »in.c- .he l4i„- 

«■"> of B,»»„„, „,;,„,, ;,rl7„ *'■'•" ■;, ri""- «"« pr..l„ml 46.,..,6 
tons of nickel. "■ntaming 14.«« ions „f i„p|,., ,„„| jj .j^ 



40 



Statistic, of snuKor prrKJM.tion fr,„n these ort-s since the rommen.e. 
merit ol this industry are shown in the following fable:— 

Smelter Production of the Nlckel-Copper Ores of the Sudbury 

District. ' 

IN SHORT TONS. 



("alfndar \'r;ir. 



IMA 
lNft7, 
IHM*. 

\*m. 
\wa. 

IR9I. 
1M2. 
1XVJ. 
IHIM. 

lim.f. 

III9A. 

IR97. 

tl(9N. 

1894. 

1900. 

1901 

1902 



Ori- 

mlnnl. 



Ore 

"melted . 



.1,3071 
567 



44.990 

74,101 

iojiiii 

74,1.15 
94,9«>ft 
9.1,154 
12J,II20 
159,957 
196,420 
.115,69' 



2JJ , iw.ow 



1904 
1905 
1906 



0J3 

.'"ll.tXK 
277.7f.r> 



,iX? .14). «U 

ISS 4(l<),551 

J J ! "12. Ml 



1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



M7,72. 
I 784,697 
,1.(KHI..<64 
1,. 164, 048 



JO,000l. 

40,146' 

'72i5.i«l' 
57,022' 

96 ! (1,18 
Afl.6t8 
71,027 
96.i70 

121.924 . 

172,761 . 

25.V95H: 
211,847 
207,0.10 
118,470 
251,421 
140,059 
15<i,(l76 
.160.180 
4.i2,1.16 
,947 
■' 814 
.■ ,065 
.■^-'.^,40.1 
947,05.1 
1,272,28.11 



M»lte 

•lilpprd. 


1 

Value : 
maitp. 






.1.274 
l6,ii6 




9i42.5 
11,681 
10,188 
10,759 


t 766.422 

8<)fl,814 
416, .594 



Nickel I Copper 

content of content tif 

matte. m«tte 



1.1.968 . 



21. M6 

25;,iii 

1.1. 8J2 
10,154 
17,405 
20,310 
22,025 
21,210 
25,845 
15,033 
.'2,607 
41 .925 
47,150 
46,, 196 
67,703 



702.3411 
.076, .106! 
66 1, 8,19 [ 
327,448, 
686.469 
.193.1981 
019,814 
,628,011 
,289,182 
,9.10,989 
.913,012 
380,064 
945,593 
.103,102 
076,945 
189,031 
352,344 



9ao{ 

432' 

718i 

2,018, 

1,207 

1,991 

2,454 

1.944 

1.699 

1.999 

2.759 

2.872 

3.540 

4,5941 

5,347. 

6,2.53i 

5,274 

9,4.18 

10,745 

10,595 

9,572 

13,141 

18,616 

17,049 

22,421 

24,8,18 

22,759 

34,0.19 



1,500 

7) J 

651 

2,064 

1,102 

1,821 

2,604 

2,288 

1 , 584 

2,7,50 

4.187 

2,834 

3,364 

4,318 

3,553 

3.576 

2,455 

4,386 

5 , 264 

6.996 

7 , .501 

7.873 

9,610 

8,966 

11.116 

12.938 

14.448 

19.608 



S^lver.toppvT.NkM.Ar.nik Or«. -The first shipments of silver ores 
troni the ( nb.ilt district were made in 1904, and in 1906 the first works for 
the treatmen. of these ores in Canada were established by the C\inadian 
Copper Company, at Copper Clilf, ()„,. This plant was closed down 
however, in 191.S. Operations have !,een continuous at the plants of the 
C omasjas Reduction Company, at Thorold, and the Deloro Mining and 
Reduction Company, at Deloro, Ont., while during the past two years 
Metals Chemical C tmipany have operated a small plant at Welland. Ont 
In addition to the above there ' ave been in previous years intermittent 
operations at plants established at Kingston, Ont., fWIlia, iiui North 
Hay. The products recovered in the plants now operating, include- 
refined silver, arsemous t.xide. metallic arsenic, metallic cobalt, metallic 
nickel, cobalt oxide, nickel oxide, cobalt sulphate, nickel sulphate and 
cobalt alloys. 

The tonnage of ore treated in these smelters in 1915 was 7,526 tons as 
against 5,681 tons in 1914 antl 9,466 tons in 1910. The recoveries in 1915 
included: 9,885,986 fine ounces of silver in bullion; 4,792.6,U pounds of 



41 

ars.-ni..us oxi,le; 5()4,212 ,k.u„.I, ,.f o.ImI, a, n.Hal „r .•.,„,,.in..| in ...ImI, 
Mits. ...ul 2M,(,U ,H.u„.|s „( ni.k..| ... m....l nr .,.„,..in..l i„ ,.i. k, I >..!,,. 

W .SV„<-//,... Tlu. ka.l >nu.|„.r ..,„! nfnu r> ... Tr..!!, MC. ,.wnn| 
b> ... (,.„soI..I.,...| M„,i,„ ,„,, s,„..|,i,„ (•„„„,,„>, w.., ,l„. .„lv |..a,| 

l.u.lt l.> the North AnR-man S„uliin« (•..„.,,.,„v. ami , .■,m,,1.„.,| i„ ,91 > 
was oiKraltd in m.y \v<t rv,n .im,| i.lli. ihn.iinhnut 1<;14 ...ul 1015 

The Ira.l plant ,.., a.-huks .. ...u l.a,l ..rr.amplinK n.ill. \V..lKf r.us.- 
t^ furnacvs Hunt.nK- . M.lH.rl.in .onv..r...rs; f„ur I....! furnaa. with 

( ott d dust collcrtmK plan, ; ..In ,r..l> .i.- I.....I n.fin.ry, ,..,.| I.... ,„. „,..,„. 

The Ota capacty of the plant i.s ..bont 125 ..,.„ of refined lead ,Jr L 

In the k-ad rH.nc.ry th. l...llion Iron. th. s.ndtcr is cast into ancVk-s 
an<l r.-,lepos,tc.d dcrtrolyt.cally npon .-..tho-k- .l.-Hs of nr.„..d k...d 
he ril.ned k-ad is rast ...to pi^,, or n...n..l.,.t,ncd i.ito k..,! pip... n,,. 
shm..s l.om ,h.. tank roon, carry «okl. silv.r. .....i.nonv, ..rMoi.-. and .-oppc- 

I H. l.rst two ..rv rcrovcT..,! ..s .,,,.. ,nc.t..ls, ..„ I ,1... .-oppc.r ... .oppor 
sulphate. Antmuniy .s also recovered. ,|,ou«h not r.Kularlv. ..„d I Jr i.« 
metal IS manufactured. '"u ocar.nj. 

The annual production of ref,n..,| k..„|, (i,... ^okl ..nd siKvr, ..nd .oppcT 
sulphate has l)cen as follows:— ' ' 

^ Production of Refined Lead. Fine Gold, and Silver at Trail. 



Calendar Year. 



Retinnl { 

lead i Fine nold. Fine silver.! 



1W4 

1905 

IW6 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

I9J3 

1914 

1915 



I l.b,. 
i 7,.S19,440 
l,s,«n4,.vw 
in,47..n4 
26,M)7,4ft. 
.Jft.S4i).27) 

41,HI<i,614 
32.9S7,MW 
2.1,.S25.IIS(l 
37.<)()>l.4'«) 
.t'».6W.7Mi 
.16.44.1. ;w. 
4J..^m,61« 



Ojs. 
4,. 1 16 

N.'il}.' 
'),W) 
1(), I'll 

IS, 241 
t\,2'IH 
15.27(1 
t'.IlK 
II. '»7; 
11. ()!<.> 



0<9. 

5<I.4S|| 

1 .ll>'X..t-'.H 
1.26 I. K(W 
1.611,422 
1. ').'!(), Dig 

2.{Kl^.l)^)^ 
l.7')X,06() 
1.12V 6111 
l,mit,in)i) 
2,41.f,IH)2 

17. KH 2,162.4>.; 



Copiicr 

aulphate. 



lb-. 

Sh.lHKI 

77.17S 
Ml, lis 

<(7.;M 
20 1. t:'l 

5I.40.S 
16.1, 22» 
l«r.l«7 

K7,ni) 

l.«l.51.1 
152. OMI 
I7.S..S79 



Amongst the improvements at the lead plant duri.ij. the Company's 
hrst year ending September 30, are induded:— 

"Purchase of the rights to use the Cottrell patents and the build- 
ing and the extension of the Cottrell plants for the lead roasters and 
furnacc^-s. The saving from the use ol these plants is very great already 
and will be greater after .some alterations in the electrical ecpiipnient " 
An additional lead furnace with the necessarv flues and ex- 
tension to the furnace building." 

"An additional crane in the Huntingdon and Heberldn plant" 

VVash houses lor men working around the lead plant." 
"iN'ew lead sampling mill." 
"Rebuilding tank., and alterations to the lead retincry." 



42 

i:ol,I.S,hrr.C,,t,tur Ore. .,f lu,„.h iohmiuL l„„r .„,.,„.,• „„. K.t, 

unuu. of ,h.. (on,.,l„Ia,..l M , ,.„, snu-l-in^ .•o„.,u.n .r.....inK h.^ 

o ns .f IH. H.,„|..n. ....„.,. ..n,| ,.,1ut or.-, ... ,|,.. .|i-,ri, , ; ,1... C.ran.l I ..rkn 

plan .,f ,Iu. .r.nl.v C Ii,|,„...l Mi„i„,, s,,,. |„n, .,„.! ,.„,.., , . . . 

the. .rmm-.KKl pl.mt ..l ,h.- I5r,u,|, C.lunil.i.. (.,,,..., , ,,,„„, „.,,;,„' 

. u IV ,h.. low ,r.,.l.. ..r..> o, ,h.. Hou„,I.,n .iMri,,. „.. A.uo. . 

of .!..• ..r..„l.v ( o„.,ol„laU-l Company, .r.a.in. ,h. on. o, ,|,.. l,,'.,.,.,, 
( riTk mine, al Anvox aiul oili, i ..,a-i |,ro|Krti.. 

•'" th.. roa.t ,lu. Ty... CopiHT ( ..,„,.anvV furna. . a, l.a.hMnnI, ^^a> 
ullr ihroiiKlioiii till- y<-ar. 

Tlu- aK«rru....' |.ro,|„,.tion ol lln(i-l, ( .,|,„nl.ia . o,.,..., m,u 1,., , .lunnu 
llT pa>, four v.a... ,„. I.uln.« ,1,. toniun ...v^ (,vat-l. wa^- a. lollow.:- - 

Production of British Columbia Copper Smelters. 



Off -rii.ln-.l 
Slit* Iti-f proilih t* 

Milllr 
llll.'rr 
^'••'•>lli I'lH of Ml.ill,- .IT.. I l)|i«|,.r- 

<"i.i'r :. 



Ti.ii- .',,'1' iif. 

. . I. ".IK,"; 

'"" ' /«Mm' ri:'-'" ''"■'^1'' "-^."M 

'•'■ "••'•^•'"'j",<7o.i?,, ,„,ui;i..i ,.,.iM:,i,: 



.IIM.TU |,<a.> |ii; 



',1'" '.. "<l 



..MVM^ 



.'j,.'f.i 



7 m,/ W/,...-S,at.s.irsof ,|„. ,,ro.lu.,i„„or tl„. Trail snu-lfr i.ulu.l- 
.... 1-..1. .I... .opp,. an.l l..a.l furna..., I.av.. I..-..,, p.,,,i.„...l i„ „,.. | 

n.p..r.. of ,h.. ( ompany, .lu- f„ur..s sin.v lO,,,, ha,i,„ ,..,,„ ..^ ,,„.,.".""" 



Production of Trail Smelter 



\lKJAls,,,\rM>M, IWAIIK ,M, „, |,,,,^ 

t'Kimi I [. II. 
ri-ral Vi-ar. ,,r,. 

'•"''J- ! '^ilvr. ■ I..-...I .•.,,,„.,. 

'''""'■ ""• OIK. Ilw II, 

l""!' . . \t-\\-^ \\*-"'" -'.44... -I, -5 4! :,,;■,, 77 Vul'-la 

Total I8g4 to cluti- , .jTTv, ~, ,,,:,T~ - — ^ '-/ 

The Trail .-..pp,.,- >,n..lii„K plant nou in.lu.l,.s: f.vv furn u.> with , 
<la.ly c-apan.y of 3.000 tons of or... Thore wa. In.ing install:;;";:;- ,;:;!; 5! 



4.1 

"HW r.r.,ul> .•,.„.,.l..„.|. .. .unv.rt. r plan. .,M„„ri.|„« ,«.,(>..., r..||, ,v,m. 

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mil' 



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llif ( nmpaiiy'- topcri li.r 1«)1(| 

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piiiinds III hli-icr. 

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nia.n sm.hcT l.mlihnK, h^ «hi, h ar.. .hr..- . nnvriiT M,n„|.. Tl,,. ,.,i,„,.,h ,-. 
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m th. :Kr.,mpanyin, ...hl,-. ..r. .mnpiU-l |,-.mh ,1... CmuMnvV ,mna,.l 
published ripnrts. 



44 



Ores treated at Grand Forks and Anyox, during the twelve months 
ending June 30, 1915. monrns 



ORES OF 



Ore hrnelted. 
I Dry tons. 



Lbs. Cu. 

recovfrtNl 

per ton 

ore. 



M-talu rrcowred and »oId. 



Phusiiii Mines | 61 1 .(w; 

Anyox Minos j 462i,U0 

Both plants . 1,073,437 

roreiKn ores purcha.ied . . . . . 24,583 

Total I 1,098,020 



ln.|2 

34 SK 



CopiHT. 

Lbs. fine. 



<i,HS0,30i 
15,H9.S,7.S7 



Silver. 
Oz». fine. 



II'>,7.S2 
142,725 



<;old. 
IMS. fine. 



23,3155 
3,.S81 



892.853 1IX,404 ' 4,452 



26,638,912 



377,881 



31,388 



The following table shows the annual recoveries since 1901. 
Ores Smelted and Metals Recovered at Granby Smelters. 




Greenwood Smelter.— Thi, plant of the British Columbia Copper Com- 
pany, at Greenwood, B.C., includes three large furnaces, having a total 
daily capacity of from 2,400 to 2,500 tons, and a converter plant of 2 stands 
ana 7 shells with a capacity of about 3.i,00G pounds of blister copper per 

The last annual publishc^l report of the Canada Copper Corporation 
Ltd., which controls the British Columbia Copper Company, cover inu the 
year ending December 31 ,1915, contains tlie following references to smeltinu 
operations : — 



45 

..peri^^'v IS'"*"'?'' r"''"'""' "*■" ^'"'- ''"""« "- •-^-•l -f 
Has obtamed ,lue ,o rnnn.nj, a more refractors- .harge than nrn.erly 
The supply of ore availal.Ie only pern.i.teci ,he operation of one fZce." 

12. Su'.n''! ,'""""■', "^ -re sn,el,e,l .luring ,he peri„.| „,uler review was 
li^,^U tons, dry wcikIu, and consisted of:— 

C'oinpain ores. iij; iio. ., i • , 

f. ' ll-i,140 tons drv weight. 

» iistoni ores j ^ri 

22-'^'al'" """' '■'"""■"^"' ''■'''' "f «'^^' ^'•»''' 'l-ge and averaged 
The time of actual operation was 158 furnace davs ami the actml 

?3^r^: j;^.;'" "'"''^^^ *' '"^-^ "'^" •^'■^ ^'^'>- -^'^ -• ---Re wa«e of 
ThcTe were produce,! l.S5() tons of nutte. aurajjiuK 48'; co„,>er per 

kOKl per ton, 072 ozs. siKer per ton; and 0-2S0% copper. 
The balance of the analysis was as follows:— 
Silica, 38-5f^c; iron 23-5%, lime 20- 5^^;^. 
The production of metals amounted to:— 

l^;PP'^(^^^) 1.734.385 pounds 

P,7 23,002-62 ounces 

" 5,4170839 ounces.- 

Ladysmith Sn,elter.-This smelter which has not been operated since 
9 Its owned by the Tyee Copper Company, Ltd., and loca e,l at Lady 
m.th Vancouver ,sland, B.C-. The plant includes: two furnaces ^s " I, 
a total da, y capacty of 500 tons of ore. When in operation t e conne 
matte produced axeraged 40 43 per cent copper ^^