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bHDIES on THE SQURRE 



PLANNING BOARD 




A BEAUTIFUL HANDMADE WRAP gives any Square dance cos¬ 
tume a complete look. A wrap need not be just “a 
sweater thrown over one’s shoulders.” It may, in¬ 
deed, be a sweater, but it might also be a cozy, warm cape 
(for wintertime), a light-weight, delicate stole (for warmer 
climes), a shawl or a poncho. When the home designer takes her needle in 
hand, a wrap can become a very special part of her wardrobe — perhaps first a 
basic white cover-up, then matching colors for different outfits. The fashions in 
this Handbook have, for the most part, been designed by square dancers who 
know what looks and feels best. The styles will never be out-of-date. 

Also included are instructions for petticoat totes and storage, practical 
purses for the lady and ties for the gentleman. 

Reprinted from Ladies on the Square, a monthly column of SQUARE 
DANCING Magazine, and published by The American Square Dance Society, 
this Handbook is dedicated to creative square dance ladies everywhere. 

- Becky Osgood 

Original needlepoint cover design by MaryBeile Robbins 


THE DOUBLE MOCK-CABLE CAPELET 

by Lee Woker, St Louis, Missouri 


T his capelet fits all sizes, hangs neatly and 
trimly and provides just the amount of 
shoulder warmth that feels comfortable over a 
square dance dress. 

The materials needed are: 3 4-oz. skeins 
Sayelle yarn; 1 size 13 circular knitting needle; 

1 pr. size 5 needles. The knitting directions 
follow. 

Using size 5 needles, cast on 63 stitches. 

Row 1: K2, ° P4, Kl, repeat from ending 

P4, K2. 

Row 2: (right side) P2, ° K4, PI, repeat 
from °, ending K4, P2. 

Row 3: Same as Row 1. 

Row 4: P2, " skip the next st, K the next st 

but do not take off left-hand needle, 
K the skipped st and transfer both 
st^ to right-hand needle, skip the next 
st, K the next st but do not take off 
needle, K the skipped st and take 
both sts off needle (double mock 


cable made), PI, repeat from ®, end¬ 
ing row with a double mock cable on 
next 4 sts, P2. 

Row 5: Change to circular needle. K2, " P4, 
increase 1 st in next, repeat from ® 
10 times more, P4, K2. 

Row 6; P2, ° K4, P2, repeat from ° across 

row. 

Row 7: K2, ° P4, K2, repeat from ° across 

row. 

Row 8: P2, ° work a double mock cable on 

next 4 sts (see row 4), P2, repeat 
from “ across row. 

Row 9; K2, ° P4, Kl, increase 1 st in next 

st, repeat from ° 10 times more, P4, 
K2. 

Row 10: P2, ° K4, P3, repeat from “ ending 
K4, P2. 

Row 11: K2, ° P4, K3, repeat from ° ending 
P4, K2. 

All photos, type, art and layout copyright 1986 by Bob 

Osgood, 462 North Robertson Boulevard, Los Angeles, 

California 90048-1799. Printed in U.S.A. 



Note how softly the cape falls 
over the shoulders, both the 
front and back view. Buttoned 
closed, it gives a bit more 
warmth. 


Row 12: P2, “ work a double mock cable on 
next 4 sts, P3, repeat from “ ending 
with a double mock cable on next 4 
sts, P2. 

Row 1.3: K2, ° P4, inc in next st, K2, repeat 
from “ 10 times more, P4, K2. 

Row 14: P2, ° K4, P4, repeat from ° ending 
K4, P2. 

Row 15: K2, “ P4, K4, repeat from ° ending 
P4, K2. 

Row 16: P2, ° work a mock cable on next 4 
sts, P4, repeat from ° ending with a 
double mock cable on next 4 sts, P2. 

Row 17: K2, “ P4, K3, inc. 1 st in next st, 
repeat from ° 10 times more, P4, K2. 

Row 18: P2, ° K4, P5, repeat from ° ending 
K4, P2. 

Row 19: K2, ° P4, P5, repeat from ° ending 
P4, K2. 

Row 20: P2, “ work a double mock cable on 
next 4 sts, P5, repeat from ° ending 
with a double mock cable on next 4 
sts, P2. 

Row 21: K2, ® P4, inc. 1 st in next st, K4, 
repeat from * 10 times more, P4, K2. 


Keep working in pattern, increasing on alter¬ 
nate ends of the stockinette pattern every 4th 
row (the row following double mock cable st). 
Refer to Rows 9, 13, 17, 21. 

Work pattern until desired length is reached, 
then bind off, knitting the K sts and purling 
the P sts. 

With a #0 steel crochet hook, work 5 rows 
of single crochet on left edge. On right edge 
work 5 rows of sc with evenly spaced button¬ 
holes on Rows 3 and 4. (5 or 6 buttonholes.) 

Fringe the capelet bottom with double 6" 
strands of Sayelle. 

This is an “easy-care” capelet as Sayelle is 
machine washable and dryable. 

After these instructions first appeared, tve 
received a great mindjer of requests for re¬ 
prints and several comments by people who 
had made the capelet. One says in part: “After 
making the capelet I lined it, and with the 
same lining I made a throw hood which comes 
in handy for a windy night. When not in use, 
it can either he turned in, or left out like a 
collar. I used a wind bonnet as a pattern.” 
(From Kay Buschman, Belmont, California.) 


THE RIPPLE CAPE 

by Dixie Schenke, Dunlap, Illinois 

T his very pretty, original design for a cro¬ 
cheted cape was dubbed the Ripple Cape 
by its creator. It just reaches one’s waist. 

Supplies: Crochet Hook Size J 
Three 4-oz. worsted or sayelle 

Directions: Ch 118, (working from neck) 
SC in 2nd st from hook, 1 SC in next st, 3 
SC in next 1 SC in each of next 2 st, “ skip 
2 sts, 1 SC in each of the next 2 sts, 3 SC in 
next st, 1 SC in each of next 2 sts, repeat 
from “ across ch ending to correspond, ch 1, 
turn. 

2nd row: Working in back loop of sts 


A slightly 
longer cape 
ending in 
fashionable 
points is 
modeled by 
Ann Manley. 



throughout dec 1 st (dec by inserting hook 
in st, pull yam through, insert hook in next st, 
pull yam through, YO and work off all loops 





at one time). SC in next SC, ® 3 SC in next 
SC, 1 SC in each of the next 2 SC, skip next 
2 SC, 1 SC in each of the next 2 SC, repeat 
from ° across row ending to correspond dec 
1 St at end of row, ch 1, turn. Repeat 2nd row 
throughout increasing in every 6 rows imtil 
there are 8 SC before and after center st of 
each point. (To increase, work in same man¬ 
ner but work 2 SC in SC before the center st 
of point, 3 SC in point and 2 SC in next SC 
after point.) 

A KNITTED CAPE 

hy Jeanne Thornburg, Ridgecrest, CA 

T his popular cape, modified by Jeanne, has 
been seen on square dance floors across 
the country. It will be an exquisite addition to 
your wardrobe. 

Materials; 8 oz. of 4 ply nylon or wool 
No. 10 needles, 2 long straight 
or one round 

No. 8 needles for finishing neck 
(It is simpler to knit this cape on a round 
needle as it is less bulky to carry around and 
to work with. You knit back and forth as you 
would with straight needles.) 

These directions are for a cape 14/2 inches 
long. For a longer cape, you may need two 
more ounces of yam. 

Note: For every row, begin and end with 
5 sts of seed st. Increase rows and seed st 
stripe always begin on riglit side, and the in¬ 
crease rows are directly before and directly 
after each seed st stripe. 

Beginning at the neck edge, cast on 63 sts. 
Work 3 rows seed stitch k 1, p 1, repeat to end 
of row, end with k 1). FIRST INCREASE ROW 
— Seed st 5, k 1, ® inc. I st by knitting in back 
of next stitch in row below, then k 3; repeat from 
* 17 times, end last repeat k 1, seed st 5. (81 sts) 
P 1 row, k 1 row, P 1 row (stockinette, beginning 
and ending each row with 5 seed sts). SECOND 
INCREASE ROW - Seed st 5, k 2, ^ inc. 1 st as 
before, k 4; repeat from ® 17 times, end last re¬ 
peat k 1, seed st 5. (99 sts) P 1 row (beginning 
and ending with 5 seed sts). Seed Stitch 
Stripe — Work 3 rows (a point to remember — 
your seed st stripe will always be correct if you 
have an odd number of stitches on your needles). 
P 1 row (beginning and ending with 5 seed sts). 
THIRD INCREASE ROW - Seed st 5, k 2, * inc. 
1 st as before, k 5; repeat from “ 17 times, end 
last repeat k 2, seed st 5. (117 sts) Work 5 rows 
stockinette st, starting with P row, and beginning 
and ending each row with 5 seed sts. FOURTH 


Neck Band: With right side of 1st row 
toward you, attach yam in 1st point, work 2 
SC in same space, 2 SC in each remaining 
point, CH 1 to turn each row. 2nd and 3rd 
rows: Working through both loops of sts work 
1 SC in each SC, cut yam. 


Work 5 rows of SC on each edge of front, 
spacing button holes on right side (in middle 
row). 



INCREASE ROW — Seed st 5, k 2, * inc. 1 st as 
before, k 6; repeat from “ 17 times, end last re¬ 
peat k 3, seed st 5. (135 sts) P 1 row (beginning 
and ending with 5 seed sts). Seed Stitch Stripe — 
Work 3 rows. P 1 row (beginning and ending 
with 5 seed sts. FIFTH INCREASE ROW - Seed 
st 5, k 3, ** inc. 1 st as before, k 7; repeat from ® 
17 times, end last repeat k 3, seed st 5. (153 sts) 
Work 5 rows stockinette st, starting with P row 
and beginning and ending each row with 5 seed 
sts. SIXTH INCREASE ROW - Seed st 5, k 4, “ 
inc. 1 st as before, k 8; repeat from “ 17 times, 
end last repeat k 3, seed st 5. (171 sts) P 1 row 
(beginning and ending with 5 seed sts). Seed 
Stitch Stripe — Work 3 rows. P 1 row (beginning 
and ending with 5 seed sts). SEVENTH IN¬ 
CREASE ROW — Seed st 5, k 4, ® inc. 1 st as 
before, k 9; repeat from ° 17 times, end last re¬ 
peat k 4, seed st 5. (189 sts) Work 7 rows stock¬ 
inette st, starting with P row, and beginning and 
ending each row with 5 seed sts. EIGHTH IN¬ 
CREASE ROW - Seed st 5, k 5, * inc. 1 st as 
before, k 10; repeat from ° 17 times, end last re¬ 
peat k 4, seed st 5. (207 sts). P 1 row (beginning 
and ending with 5 seed sts). Seed Stitch Stripe — 
Work 3 rows. P 1 row (beginning and ending with 
5 seed sts). NINTH INCREASE ROW - Seed st 
5, k 5; ® inc. 1 st as before, k 11; repeat from ® 
17 times, end last repeat k 5, seed st 5. (225 sts) 
Work 9 rows stockinette st, starting with P row, 
and beginning and ending each row with 5 seed 
sts. TENTH INCREASE ROW - Seed st 5, k 6, 
“ inc. 1 st as before, k 12; repeat from “ 17 times, 
end last repeat k 5, seed st 5. (243 sts) P 1 row 
(beginning and ending with 5 seed sts). Seed 
Stitch Stripe — Work 3 rows. P 1 row (beginning 
and ending with 5 seed sts). ELEVENTH IN- 



CREASE-ROW - Seed st 5, k 6, " inc. 1 st as 
before, k 13; repeat from * 17 times, end last re¬ 
peat k 6, seed st 5. (261 sts) Work 9 rows stock¬ 
inette st, starting with P row, and beginning and 
ending each row with 5 seed sts. TWELFTH 
INCREASE ROW - Seed st 5, k 6, * inc. 1 st as 
before, k 14; repeat from * 17 times, end last re¬ 
peat, K 7, seed st 5. (279 sts) P 1 row (beginning 
and ending with 5 seed sts). Seed Stitch Stripe — 
Work 3 rows. P 1 row (beginning and ending 
with 5 seed sts). THIRTEENTH INCREASE 
ROW — Seed st 5, k 7, “ inc. 1 st as before, k 
15; repeat from “ 17 times, end last repeat k 7, 


seed st 5. (297 sts) Work 9 rows stockinette st, 
starting with P row, and beginning and ending 
each row with 5 seed sts. Seed Stripe Border — 
Work 7 rows seed st, bind off loosely. Neck Fin¬ 
ishing — With No. 8 needles, pick up the 63 sts 
at neck and work 5 to 7 rows (depending on how 
wide you want) of seed st to form standup collar. 
Bind off. Neck Fastening — With No. 10 needles, 
cast on 3 sts. Work in seed st for approximately 
27 rows; bind off. Form this strip into a Figure 8; 
sew together. Sew two Hz in. round buttons at 
neck edge and loop knitted strip around to fasten 
neck. 


A C/^CT l/KIITTCPt /"ADC An unusual pattern is formed 

own I MNI I I LLt L-MfL by the dropped stitches. 


shared by Pat Walker, Seattle, WA 



Note how softly the 
cape falls over Pat’s 
shoulders. 


T hese instructions are from a 30-year old, 
out-of-print. Bear Brand instruction book. 
Pat cautions, “If the directions seem strange, 
just trust and follow them exactly. They do 
work.” 


Materials Needed 

2 skeins knitting worsted 

1 pair size 8, 14" needles 

Gauge 

Before starting to knit, check the following 
gauge to see how your knitting compares. Knit 
a 4-inch sample. If you have less stitches than 
shown, your work is too loose. If you have 
more stitches than shown in the gauge, the 
work is too tight and you might use larger 
needles. 

Before dropping sts, 9 sts = 2 inches; 13 
rows = 2 inches. 



After dropping sts, 12 sts = 4 inches; 13 
rows = 2 inches. 

Note: Stitches are dropped and raveled 
when knitting is finished. 

Directions 

Cast on 48 sts for left front edge. P 1 row, K 
1 row for 6 rows for purl rib. K 1 row, P 1 row 
for 6 rows for knit rib on right side. Repeat 
these 12 rows until there are 6 rows in the 30th 
purl rib; end at lower edge. Bind off purling as 
follows: Bind off 4 sts*, loosen loop on right 
needle, pass ball of yarn through loop and 
drop loop from needle. Draw loop up tightly 
thus binding off another st. Drop next 2 sts 
from left needle and ravel to cast-on row. 
Leave enough yarn to stretch across dropped 
sts and keep work flat. Bind off next 3 sts. 
Repeat from *. End last repeat, bind off 4 sts. 
Keep last loop on needle and' do not break 
yarn. There are 7 raveled stripes. 

Yoke — Pick up and K 3 sts on side edge of 
first purl rib for yoke. There are 4 sts, includ¬ 
ing loop on needle; YO*, skip next 6 rows of 
knit rib, pick up and K 3 sts in next purl rib; 
YO; repeat from *. End last repeat pick up and 
K 4 sts; 121 sts. P 1 row, K 1 row, P 1 row. 

Next row — K 4, * drop next st — the st 
over the YO, ravel it to pick-up row; do not 
allow extra yarn across dropped st; K 3. Re¬ 
peat from *, end last repeat, K 4; 92 sts. 


Dec. row — P 1, * P 2 tog., P 1. Repeat board, wrong side out. When dry, steam the 
from *, end last repeat, P2; 62 sts. other side. 

Neck casing — PI row, K 1 row for 7 rows. Hem bound-off edge of neck to 8th row 
for purl rib on right side. Bind off. below. Make twisted cord about 52" long; tie 

Finishing — Work blanket st on ends of knot in ends of cord and run through neck 
casing. Steam the cape lightly on the ironing casing. 


A DELICATE POINTED CAPE 



Lily wears this very short cape which bareiy reaches the waist. 


T he instructions for this charming, knitted 
cape were shared by our Canadian 
dancer-friend, Lily Dreger. A medium- 
weight Columbia Minerva Glimmerfluff yarn 
was used for the cape modeled here. 

Materials 

Two 4 oz. balls acrylic yarn 
#2 needles (Canada) or #13 (U.S.) 

Directions 
Cast on 52 stitches. 

Row 1; K 18 P 18 K 1 (Y.O.K. 2 tog) 7 times 
Y.O.K. 1 

Row 2: K 35 turn P 18 K 2 (Y.O.K. 2 tog) 7 
times Y.O.K. 1 


Row 3: K 36 turn P 18 K 3 (Y.O.K. 2 tog) 7 
times Y.O.K. 1 
Row 4: Knit across 

Row 5; K 40 (Y.O.K. 2 tog) 7 times Y.O.K. 1 
Row 6: K 18 P 20 turn K 23 (Y.O.K. 2 tog) 7 
times Y.O.K. 1 

Row 7: K 19 P 20 turn, knit across 
Row 8: Cast off 5 stitches K14P19K18 
These eight rows equal one point. Repeat for 
20 or 21 points depending on the size required. 
Single crochet fronts and necks, if desired. 
Button hole three loops on right side and sew 
button on left side. 


KNITTED MAJORCAN-STYLE BOLERO 

rewritten by Tommi Herrington, Potter Valley, California 


S QUARE DANCER and knitter-par-excellcnce, 
Tommi Herrington, deciphered and re¬ 
wrote these instructions which originally 
came from England. Then she knitted the 
sample bolero pictured here. 


Materials Needed 

6 oz 4-ply yard (Columbia, Minerva, Glim 
mer. Fluff, Roly Poly, Dazzle, etc.) 

1 pair Size 13 knitting needles 
1 pair Size 7 knitting needles 



A British bolero, knit¬ 
ted by Californian, 
Tommi Herrington, 
and modeled by 
Mary Belle Robbins. 


Directions 

Using #7 needles, cast on 74 sts. 

(A) Kl, PI for 6 rows. 

Change to #13 needles. 

(B) Kl, PI for 10 rows. Always knit 1st 
stitch in the regular way but all other knit 
stitches, knit into the stitch below to make a 
loose stitch. 

Change to #7 needles. 

(C) Knit 6 rows as per (A), increasing in 
every 7th st. in 1st row (84 sts). 

Change to #13 needles. 

(D) Knit 12 rows as per (B). 

Change to #7 needles. 

(E) Knit 6 rows as per (A), increasing in 
every 8th st. in 1st row (94 sts). 

Change to #13 needles. 

(F) Knit 14 rows as per (B). 

Change to #7 needles. 

(G) Knit 6 rows as per (A), increasing in 
every 10th stitch in 1st row (103 sts). 

Change to #13 needles. 

(H) Knit 16 rows as per (B). Bind off. 

Ties 

With #7 needles, right side facing you, pick 
up 41 sts. along the side of the garment. Al¬ 
ways knit first 4 sts. andlast4sts. of every row. 
Row 1: K4, P33, K4 

Row 2: K4, Kl, PI (7 times), K 2 tog., K 1, *K 2 
tog. in back of stitches, Kl, PI (7 times), K4 
(39 sts) 

*Always do second K2 tog. in back of sts. 
Row 3: K4, Kl, PI (7 times), P3, Kl, PI (7 
times), K 4 

Row 4: K4, Kl, PI (6 times), Kl, K2 tog., Kl, 
K2 tog., PI, Kl, PI (6 times), K4 (37 sts.) 
Row 5: K4, Kl, PI (6 times), Kl, P4, Kl, PI (6 
times), K4 


Row 6: K4, Kl, PI (6 times), K2 tog., Kl, K2 
tog., Kl, PI (6 times), K4, (35 sts.) 

Row 7: K4, Kl, PI (6 times), P3, Kl, PI (6 
times), K4 

Row 8: K4, Kl, PI (5 times), Kl, K2 tog., Kl, 
K2 tog., PI, Kl, PI (5 times), K4 (33 sts.) 
Row 9: K4, Kl, PI (5 times), Kl, P4, Kl, PI (5 
times), K4 

Row 10: K4, Kl, PI (5 times), K2 tog., Kl, K2 
tog., Kl, PI (5 times), K4 (31 sts.) 

Row 11: K4, Kl, PI (5 times), P3, Kl, PI (5 
times), K4 

Row 12: K4, Kl, PI (4 times), Kl, K2 tog., Kl, 
K2 tog., PI, Kl, PI (4 times), K4 (29 sts.) 
Row 13: K4, Kl, PI (4 times), Kl, P4, Kl, PI 
(4 times), K4 



Row 14: K4, Kl, PI (4 times), K2 tog., Kl, K2 
tog., Kl, PI (4 times), K4 (27 sts.) 

Row 15: K4, Kl, PI (4 times), P3, Kl, PI (4 
times), K4 

Row 16: K4, Kl, PI (3 times), Kl, K2tog., Kl, 
K2 tog., PI, Kl, PI (3 times), K4 (25 sts.) 
Row 17: K4, Kl, PI (3 times), Kl, P4, Kl, PI 
(3 times), K4 

Row 18: K4, Kl, PI (3 times), K2tog., Kl, K2 
tog., Kl, PI (3 times), K4 (23 sts.) 

Row 19: K4, Kl, PI (3 times), P3, Kl, PI (3 
times), K4 

Row 20: K4, Kl, PI (2 times), Kl, K2tog., Kl, 
K2 tog., PI, Kl, PI (2 times), K4 (21 sts.) 
Row 21: K4, Kl, PI (2 times), Kl, P4, Kl, PI 
(2 times), K4 

Row 22: K4, Kl, PI (2 times), K2 tog., Kl, K2 
tog., Kl, PI (2 times), K4 (19 sts.) 



Row 23: K4, Kl, PI (2 times), P3, Kl, PI (2 
times), K4 

Row24: K4, Kl, PI, Kl, K2 tog., Kl, K2tog., 
PI, Kl, PI, K4 (17 sts.) 

Row 25: K4, Kl, PI, Kl, P4, Kl, PI, K4 
Row 26: K4, Kl, PI, K2 tog., Kl, K2 tog., 
Kl, PI, K4 (15 sts.) 

Row 27: K4, Kl, PI, P3, Kl, PI, K4 
Row28: K4, Kl, K2 tog., Kl, K2 tog., PI, K4 
(13 sts.) 


Row 29: K4, Kl, P3, Kl, K4 

Row30: K4, K2 tog., Kl, K2 tog., K4 (11 sts.) 

Row 31: K4, P3, K4 (11 sts.) 

Row 32: Kll (11 sts.) 

Row 33: K4, P3, K4 (11 sts.) 

Repeat Rows 32 and 33 until desired length of 
ties. (40 rows) Knit every row for 8 rows. Bind 
off. 

Repeat on other side of garment for match¬ 
ing tie. 


CABLE-STITCH KNITTED CAPE 


by Barbara Lane, Estes Park, Colorado 

T his elbow-length cape is fairly warm. The 
pattern uses a variety of different cables 
and I suggest putting markers on your needles 
rather than counting each time. Here are the 
instructions in more detail than you might 
normally expect to find and I hope they will 
help you and you will enjoy wearing the cape. 

Materials 

4 4-oz. skeins knitting worsted weight yarn 
No. 10 circular needle 
No. 6 circular needle 

(Cable needle or double-pointed needle) 

Directions 

With No. 6 needle, cast on 73 sts. 

Row 1 - Slip first St as to purl, purl across. 

Row 2 - (right side) S11 st as to p, p 1, k 1, p 1, 

k 1 (front border), continue across ih seed st, 
end k1,p1,k1,p1,k1 (border). 

Row 3 - Repeat Row 2. 

Row 4 - Repeat Row 2. 

Row 5 - Repeat Row 2. 

Row 6 - Repeat Row 2. 

Row 7 - Repeat Row 2. 

Row 8 - Work front border in seed st as before 

(5 sts), p2, *k4, p 1, repeat from *, ending last 
11 sts with k 4, p 2, border (5 sts). 

Row 9 - In front border, si 1 as to p, p 1, k 1, 

yarn over, k 2 tog (buttonhole), k 2, *p 4, k 1, 
repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 10 - Border (as Row 2), p 2, *(skip the next 
st, k the next st, but do not take off left hand 
needle, k the skipped st and take both off left 
hand needle, skip the next st, going behind it, 
k the next st in normal way, k the skipped st 
and slip both off left hand needle) (twist out), p 
1, repeat from *, ending last 7 sts with p 2, and 
border (5 sts). 

Row 11 - Change to #10 needle and work bor¬ 
der, k 2, * p 4, (with right hand needle, pick up 
right side of st in row below next st, k that 


picked up st, then k next st as normal) (right 
increase), repeat from *, 10 times more, end¬ 
ing p 4, k 2, border (84 sts). 

Row 12 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 2, repeat from * 
across, ending border (5 sts). 

Row 13 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 2, repeat from * 
across, ending border (5 sts). 

Row 14 - Border, p 2, * (skip the next st, and 
going behind it, k the next st in the normal way, 
k the skipped st, and slip both off left hand 
needle, skip the next st, k the next st, leave on 
needle, and k the skipped st, take both off left 
hand needle) (twist in), p 2, repeat from * 
across, ending border (5 sts). 

Row 15 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 2, (with right hand 
needle, pick up left side of st in 2nd row below 
st just knitted, si the picked up st to left hand 
needle by inserting left hand needle between 
last 2 sts on right hand needle, and then into 
last st and slip off right hand needle, then k the 
picked up st as usual) (left Increase), repeat 
from *, 10 times more, ending p 4, k 2, border 
(95 sts). 

Row 16 - Border, p 2, * twist out on 4 sts, (see 
Row 10), p 3, repeat from *, ending twist out on 
4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row 17 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 3, repeat from *, 
ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 18 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 3, repeat from *, 
ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 19 -Border, k2, *p4, right increase in next 
st, (see Row 11), k 2, repeat from *, ending p 4, 
k 2, border (106 sts). 

Row 20 -Border, p 2, * twist in on 4 sts, (see Row 
14), p 4, repeat from *, ending twist in on 4 sts, 
p 2, border. 

Row 21 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 4, repeat from *, 
ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 22 - Border, p 2,*twist out on 4 sts, p 4, 
repeat from *, ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 23 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 4, left increase (see 
Row 15), repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, border 
(117 sts). 



Row 24 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 5, repeat from *, 
ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 25 - S11 as to p, p 1, k 1, yarn over, k 2 tog, 
(buttonhole), k 2, * p 4, k 5, repeat from *, 
ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 26 - Border, p 2, * twist in on 4 sts, p 5, 
repeat from *, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 27 - Border, k 2, * p 4, right increase, k 4, 
repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, border (128 sts). 

Row 28 - Border, p 2, * twist out on 4 sts, p 6, 
repeat from *, ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 29 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 6, repeat from *, 
ending p 4, k 2, border. 



Row 30 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 6, repeat from * 
ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 31 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 6, left increase, 
repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, border (139 sts). 

Row 32 - Border, p 2, * twist in on 4 sts, p 7, 
repeat from *, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 33 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 7, repeat from *, 
ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 34 - Border, p 2, * twist out on 4 sts, p 7, 
repeat from *, ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 35 - Border, k 2, * p 4, right increase, k 7, 
repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, border (150 sts). 


Row 36 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 8, repeat from * 
ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 37 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 8, repeat from *, 
ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 38 - Border, p 2, * twist in on 4 sts, p 8, 
repeat from *, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 39 - Border, k 2, * p 4, right increase, k 7, 
left increase, repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, 
border (172 sts). 

Row 40 - Border, p 2, * twist out on 4 sts, p 10, 
repeat from *, ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 41 - S11 as to p, p 1, k 1, yarn over, k 2 tog 
(buttonhole), k 2 * p 4, k 10, repeat from *, 
ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 42 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 10, repeat from *, 
ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 43 - Border, k 2, * p 4, right increase, p 8, k 

1, left increase, repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, 
border (194 sts). 

Row44 -Border, p2, ‘twist in on4sts, p2, k8, p 

2, repeat from *, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 45 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 2, p 8, k 2, repeat 
from *, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 46 - Border, p 2, ‘twist out on 4 sts, p 2, (si 2 
to dpn, hold in back, k 2, k 2 from dpn, si 2 to 
dpn, hold in front, k 2, k 2 from dpn) (reverse 
cable rib), p 2, repeat from ‘, ending twist out 
on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row 47 - Border, k 2, ‘ p 4, right increase, k 1, p 
8, k 2, left increase, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, 
k 2, border (216 sts). 

Row 48 - Border, p 2, ‘ k 4, p 3, k 8, p 3, repeat 
from ‘, ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 49 - Border, k 2, ‘ p 4, k 3, p 8, k 3, repeat 
from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 50 - Border, p 2, ‘ twist in on 4 sts, p 3, k 8, p 

3, repeat from ‘, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 51 - Border, k 2, ‘ p 4, right increase, k 2, p 
8, k 3, left increase, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, 
k 2, border (238 sts). 

Row 52 - Border, p 2, ‘ twist out on 4 sts, p 4, 
reverse cable rib on 8 sts (see Row 46), p 4, 
repeat from ‘, ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 53 - Border, k 2, ‘ p 4, k 4, p 8, k 4, repeat 
from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 54 - Border, p 2 ‘ k 4, p 4, k 8, p 4, repeat 
from ‘, ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 55 - Border, k 2, ‘ p 4, right increase, k 3, p 
8, k 4, left Increase, repeat from ‘ ending p 4, k 
2, border (260 sts). 

Row 56 - Border, p 2, ‘ twist in on 4 sts, p 5, k 8, p 
5, repeat from ‘, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 57 - SI 1 as to p, p 1, k 1, yarn over, k 2 
tog,(buttonhole), k 2, ‘ p 4, k 5, p 8, k 5, repeat 
from ‘ ending p 4, k 2, border. 


Row 58 - Border, p 2, * twist out on 4 sts, p 5, 
reverse cable rib on 8 sts, p 5, repeat from *, 
ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row 59 - Border, k 2, * p 4, right increase, k 4, p 
8, k 5, left increase, repeat from *, ending p 4, 
k 2, border (282 sts). 

Row 60 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 6, k 8, p 6, repeat 
from *, ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 61 - Border, k 2, * p 4, k 6, p 8, k 6,repeat 
from *, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 62 - Border, p 2, * twist in on 4 sts, p 6, k 8, p 
6, repeat from *, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 63 - Border, k 2, * p 4, right increase, k 5, p 
8, k 6, left increase, repeat from *, ending p 4, 
k 2, border (304 sts). 

Row 64 - Border, p 2 * twist out on 4 sts, p 7, 
reverse cable rib on 8 sts, p 7, repeat from *, 
ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row 65 - Border, k 2, *, p 4, k 7, p 8, k 7, repeat 
from *, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 66 - Border, p 2, * k 4, p 7, k 8, p 7, repeat 
from *, ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 67 - Border, k 2, * p 4, right increase, p 4, k 
2, p 8, k 2, p 4, k 1, left increase, repeat from 
*,ending p 4, k 2, border (326 sts). 

Row 68 -Border, p2, ‘twist in on 4 sts, p2, k4, p 
2, k 8, p 2, k 4, p 2, repeat from *, ending twist 
in on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row69 -Border, k2, *p4, k2, p4,k2, p8,k2, p 
4, k 2, repeat from *, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 70 - Border, p2, ‘twist out on 4 sts, p2 (sl2 
to dpn, hold in front, k 2, k 2 from dpn) (front 
cable), p 2, reverse cable rib on 8 sts, p 2, (si 2 
to dpn, hold in back, k 2, k 2 from dpn) (back 
cable), p 2, repeat from ‘, ending twist out on 4 
sts, p 2, border. 

Row 71 - Border, k2,‘p4,k2,p4,k2, p8,k2,p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 72 - Border, p2,‘k4,p2,k4,p2,k8,p2,k 
4, p 2, repeat from ‘, ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row 73 - SI 1 as to p, p 1, k 1, yarn over, k 2 
tog,(buttonhole), k2, *p4, k2, p4, k2, p8, k2, 
p 4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 74 - Border, p 2, ‘ twist in on 4 sts, p 2, front 
cable on 4 sts (see Row 70), p 2, k 8, p 2, back 
cable on 4 sts, (see Row 70), p 2, repeat from 
‘, ending twist in on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row75 -Border, k2, ‘p4, k2, p4, k2, p8,k2, p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 76 - Border, p2, ‘ twist out on 4 sts, p2, k4, 
p 2, reverse cable on 8 sts, p 2, k 4, p 2, repeat 
from ‘, ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row77 - Border, k 2, ‘p4, k2, p4, k2, p8, k2, p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 78 - Border, p 2, ‘ k 4, p 2, front cable on 4 
sts, p 2, k 8, p 2, back cable on 4 sts, p 2, 
repeat from ‘, ending k 4, p 2, border. 


Row79 - Border, k2,‘p4,k2, p4,k2,p8, k2,p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row80 - Border, p 2, ‘twist in on 4 sts, p2, k4, p 
2, k 8, p 2, k 4, p 2, repeat from ‘, ending twist 
in on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row 81 - Border, k2,‘p4,k2,p4,k2,p8,k2,p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 82 - Border, p 2, ‘ twist out on 4 sts, p 2, 
front cable on 4 sts, p 2, reverse cable rib on 8 
sts, p2, back cable on 4 sts, p 2, repeat from ‘, 
ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row83 - Border, k2, ‘ p4, k2, p4, k2, p8, k2, p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row84 - Border, p2,‘k4,p2, k4, p2,k8, p2, k 
4, p 2, repeat from ‘, ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row85 - Border, k2,‘p4,k2,p4,k2,p8, k2,p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row86 - Border, p 2, ‘twist in on 4 sts, p 2, front 
cable on 4 sts, p 2, k 8, p 2, back cable on 4 
sts, p 2, repeat from ‘, ending twist in on 4 sts, 
p 2, border. 

Row 87 - Border, k2, ‘p4,k2,p4,k2,p8, k2,p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 88 -Border, p 2, ‘twist out on 4 sts, p2, k4, 
p 2, reverse cable rib on 8 sts, p 2, k 4, p 2, 
repeat from ‘, ending twist out on 4 sts, p 2, 
border. 

Row 89 - Border, k 2, ‘ p 4, k 2, p 4, k 2, p 8, k 2, p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 90 - Border, p 2, ‘ k 4, p 2, front cable on 4 
sts, p 2, k 8, p 2, back cable on 4 sts, p 2, 
repeat from ‘, ending k 4, p 2, border. 

Row91 - Border, k2,‘p4, k2,p4, k2,p8, k2,p 
4, k 2, repeat from ‘, ending p 4, k 2, border. 

Row 92 - Border, p 2, ‘ twist in on 4 sts, p 2, k 4, p 
2, k 8, p 2, k 4, p 2, repeat from ‘, but on 5th 
repeat, increase 1 st in center of reverse cable 
pattern (right increase), then continue on with 
repeat and repeat from ‘ 5 times more, ending 
twist in on 4 sts, p 2, border. 

Row 93 - Border, ‘ p 1, k 1, repeat from ‘, 
including border, end k 1. 

Row 94 -Border, ‘ p 1, k1, repeat from‘, ending 
k 1. 

Row 95 - Border, ‘ p 1, k 1, repeat from ‘, ending 
k 1. 

Row 96 - Border, ‘ p 1, k 1, repeat from ‘, ending 
k 1. 

Row 97 - Border, ‘ p 1, k 1, repeat from ‘, ending 
k 1. 

Row 98 - Border, ‘ p 1, k 1, repeat from ‘, ending 
k 1. 

Row 99 -Border, ‘p 1, k 1, repeat from ‘, ending 
k 1, 

Row 100 -Border, ‘p 1, k 1, repeat from ‘, ending 
k 1. 

Bind off in seed stitch (p 1, k 1). Fringe by 

knotting two 6" strands in each bind off stitch. 

Sew on buttons. 



A CABLE-YOKE CAPE 


by Deen Cummings, Santa Barbara, California 



Anna Lee Hetland wears this wonderfully warm cape, 
perfect for colder weather. The instructions given here 
do not call for arm slits, but these can be made by 
binding off (at the desired spot and length) alongside 
one of the cables. The fringe and crocheted trim can be 
the same color as the body of the cape, a deeper shade 
of the main color or a contrasting color. All work well. 


T his lovely knitted cape is warm, comfort¬ 
able and most attractive. The length may 
be adjusted, shorter or longer, to suit an indi¬ 
vidual. ■ I 

Materials 

8 skeins 4 oz 4-ply (use two strands as one) 

OR 

20 skeins 2 oz Jumbo yarn 
Size 10Va needles (9" straight for yoke; 36" circu¬ 
lar for body) Buttons 


Directions for Yoke 

Cast on 32 sts, placing markers thus: 
2*8*2*8*2*8*2 

Row 1 p2, k8, p2, k8, p2, k8, p2 

Row 2 k2, p8, k2, p8, k2, p8, k2 

Rows 3 & 5 repeat Row 1 

Rows 4 & 6 repeat Row 2 

Row 7 p2, cbl 8, p2, k8, p2, cbl 8, p2 

Row 8 (k2, p8) 3x, k2 

Row 9 (p2, k8) 3x, leave 2 sts on needle, turn 
Row 10 slip 1, p7, k2, (p8, k2) 2x 
Row 11 {p2, k8) 2x, p2, leave 10 sts on needle, 
turn 

Row 12 slip 1, k1, (p8, k2) 2x 

Row 13 p2, k8, p2, leave 20 sts on needle, turn 

Row 14 slip 1, k1, p8, k2 

Row 15 (p2, k8) 3x, p2 

Row 16 (k2, p8) 3x, k2 


Row 17 (p2, k8) 3x, leave 2 sts (same as Row 9) 
Row 18 slip 1, p7, k2, (p8, k2) 2x (same as 
Row 10) 

Row 19 p2, cbl 8, p2, k8, p2, leave 10 sts on 
needle, turn 

Row 20 slip 1, k1, (p8, k2) 2x (same as Row 12) 
Row 21 p2, k8, p2, leave 20 sts (same as Row 
13 ) 

Row 22 slip 1, k1, p8, k2 (same as Row 14) 
Row 23 (p2, k8) 3x, p2 (same as Row 15) 

Row 24 (k2, p8) 3x, k2 (same as Row 16) 

Row 25 (p2, k8) 3x, leave 2 sts (same as Row 9) 

Row 26 slip 1, p7, k2, (p8, k2) 2x (same as 
Row 10) 

Row 27 (p2, k8) 2x, p2, leave 10 sts (same as 
Row 11) 

Row 28 slip 1, k1, (p8, k2) 2x (same as Row 12) 
Row 29 p2, k8, p2, leave 20 sts (same as Row 
13) 

Row 30 slip 1, p8, k2 

Repeat Rows 7 thru 30 eight more times. 
Repeat Row 7. 

Repeat Rows 2 thru 6, making 228 rows total. 
Bind off. 


Directions for Body 

Pick up 228 sts along bottom edge of yoke 
placing markers thus: 2* (8*2*6*3*6*2*) 8x, then 
8*2. The sts *3* which are worked k1 ,p1 ,k1 will be 
referred to as seed st 3 (k1,p1,k1) after the last 
row. 

Row 1 (wrong side) (k2, p8, k2, p6, k1, pi, k1, p6) 
8x, end k2, p8, k2 

Row 2 (p2, cbl 8, p2, k6, s3, k6) 8x, end p2, cbl 8, 
P2 

Row 3 (k2, p8, k2, p6, s3, p6) 8x, end k2, p8, k2 
Row 4 (p2, k8, p2, kf&b next st, k5, s3, k4, kf&b 
next st, kl) 8x, end p2, k8, p2. K front & back of 
same st—(increase made) = 244 sts 
Row 5 (k2, p8, k2, seed 17—beg with p) 8x, end 
k2, p8, k2 

Row 6 (p2, k8, p2, seed 17) 8x, end p2, k8, p2 
Row 7 Repeat Row 5 
Row 8 Repeat Row 6 
Row 9 Repeat Row 5 

Row 10 (p2, k8, p2, k7, s3, k7) 8x, end p2, k8, p2 

Row 11 (k2, p8, k2, p7, s3, p7) 8x, end k2, p8, k2 

Row 12 Repeat Row 10 

Row 13 Repeat Row 11 

Row 14 (p2, cbl 8, p2, k7, s3, k7) 8x, end p2, cbl 

8, p2 

Row 15 (k2, p8, k2, p7, S3, p7) 8x, end k2, p8, k2) 
Row 16 (p2, k8, p2, kf&b of next, k6, s3, k5, kf&b 
next, kl) 8x, end p2, k8, p2 = 260 sts 
Row 17 (k2, p8, k2, seed 19— beg w k) 8x, end 
k2, p8, k2 



Continue in established pattern, increasing 
in first knit row after the cable row two more 
times (292 sts). Work thru the seventh band of 
seed stitches, 81 rows. Bind off. 

Starting at bottom edge of right front, sin¬ 
gle crochet around entire cape, adjusting size 
of neck in process. Do a second row of crochet 
on right front making button holes for as many 
buttons as desired, work shell stitch across 
neck and continue down left front with cro¬ 
chet. 

(Shell St: 4dc in 2nd st from hook,* sk 1dc, 4dc in 
next,* around neck, end with 4dc in last ch). 

Use double strand for fringe is using 4 ply. 
Single strand for Jumbo. 

If single strand of 4 oz. 4 ply is used, size 9 
needles are required. Follow same instruc¬ 


tions as above. 

For buttonhole row—instead of sc in ea sc, 
ch 1 and skip 1 sc, then continue sc in ea sc, 
etc. Or if using larger button ch 2 or 3 and skip 
2 or 3 sc, and continue sc in ea sc except where 
you need additional buttonholes. 

Cable Stitch 

A cable is usually worked on an even num¬ 
ber of sts (in this case, 8) with a few purl sts on 
either side (in this case, 2) to set it off. Work 
the row to the sts to be used for the cable (cbl 
8), slip half (4 sts) of the cable group sts onto a 
double pointed needle or cable holder; hold 
these sts in back of work. Knit the remaining 4 
sts of the cable group. Now knit the sts from 
the cable holder without twisting or turning 
any sts. Finish row as directed in pattern. 


QUAKER-STITCH CAPE 

by Dorothy M. Huckle, La Mesa, California 


T his beautiful cape was designed espe¬ 
cially for our readers by Dorothy Huckle. 
Dorothy is a square dance hobbyist but a pro¬ 
fessional knitter. 

Materials 

3 balls white Unger Roly Poly 
4 balls Columbia Minerva Civona white Baby 
Pomp (50 grams) 

Plastic markers 

(Note) Both yarns are knitted together throughout 
the cape. 

Size #11 circular needles 

Directions 

Cast on 56 stitches. Knit 3 rows in garter stitch. 
(Knit every row) 


Pattern for Cape 

Row 1 : (Right side) Knit 10 sts (collar), place 
marker. Knit 28 sts (body of cape), 
place marker. Lace Trim: Knit 1, * YO, 
K2tog; repeat from * across row, end 
with YO, K1. (There are now 19 sts. in 
Lace Trim Section.) 

Row 2: (Wrong side) Knit 19 stitches, purl 28 
stitches. Turn work. Do not work 10 
collar stitches. 

Row3 : Knit 28 sts; K2, *YO, K2tog, repeat from 
* across row, end with YO, K1. (20 sts) 

Row 4: Knit 20 stitches, purl 28 stitches. Turn 
work. Do not work 10 collar stitches. 














The tiny rolled collar and interesting pattern ending in 
diamonds create great interest in this cape. 

Row 5 ; Knit 28 sts, * YO, K2tog, repeat trom * 
across row, end with YO, K1. (21 sts) 

Row 6: Knit 21 stitches, purl 28 stitches, knit 10 
collar stitches. 

Row 7 : Knit 10 collar sts, purl 28 sts, K2, * YO, 
K2tog, repeat from * across row, end 
with YO, K1. (22 sts) 

KNITTED SLEEVES 

FOR CAPES 

by Barbara Lane, Estes Park, Colorado 

B arbara lane suggests these knitted sleeves 
be worn underneath a cape when cold 
weather sets in. The sleeves can be knitted in 
yarn to match or contrast with any square 
dance cape. 

Materials and Directions 

Size 5 double-pointed needles 
Size 6 double-pointed needles or 16" circular 
needle Size 6 

Worsted-weight knitting yarn 
Cast on 42 stitches with Size 5 needles. Add 
marker to indicate end of a row, and working 
around Kl, PI rib for 25 rows, increasing 1 
stitch last row (43 stitches). Change to Size 6 
needles and continue working around. Increase 
1 stitch at the beginning and end of row every 

Barbara models the sleeves, showing 
how they appear without the cape. 


Row 8: Knit 22 stitches, knit 28 stitches. Turn 
work. (Do not work 10 collar stitches.) 

Row 9 : Purl 28 sts, Kl, * YO, K2tog, repeat 
from * across row, end with YO, Kl. (23 
sts) 

Row 10: Knit 23 stitches, knit 28 stitches. Turn 
work. 

Row 11: Purl 28 sts, K2, * YO, K2tog, repeat 
from * across row, end with YO, Kl. (24 
sts) 

Row 12: Bind off 6 stitches (loosely). Knit 18 
stitches, knit 28 stitches, knit 10 collar 
stitches. 

Repeat 12 rows of pattern until desired length. 
Sample shown has 21 complete patterns. End 
with 3 rows of garter stitch over 56 stitches. Bind 
off loosely. 

Knit a 3 stitch cord as follows: Using a size 7 or 8 
double pointed needle, cast on 3 stitches. Knit 
these 3 stitches. Slip the 3 stitches to other end of 
needle and knit again. Repeat. You are knitting a 
small tube. Repeat for desired length and tie off. 
Cord is inserted in spaces between collar and 
body of cape. 







8th row, 10 times. Work 19 rows 
even or to desired length of sleeve. 
Bind off. Work 1 row single cro¬ 
chet over baby elastic made 
slightly smaller than arm mea¬ 
surement at top of sleeve. Fasten 
off. 


Yarn loops on each sleeve allow them 
to be slipped over a button at the neck 
of the cape for easy carrying or storage. 



CROCHETED SHAWL 

by Flo Peginan, Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

M eet A NEW square dance friend at a special 
dance and you’re apt to discover a new 
wrap. Such was the case with this lovely, full, 
soft shawl fashioned from the talented fingers 
of Flo Pegman. 

Materials Needed 

10 ounces Sport Yarn Crochet Hook size H 

Directions 

Starting at center, ch. .5, si. st. in 1st st. to 
form a ring. 

Ist Rnd.: Ch. 4, DC in ring. ch. 1, DC in 


ring. Repeat 7 more times, with a ch. 1 be¬ 
tween each DC. Total of 10 DC s in ring (Ch. 4 
at start of rnd, counts as Ist DC in ring). Ch. 4 
and turn. 

2nd Rnd.; 1 DC in Istch. space, ch. 1. In 
next ch. space put 1 DC ch. 1, 1 DC, ch 1 (this 
constitutes a GORE), Repeat gore st. 8 more 
times. (Remember to always put a ch. 1 be¬ 
tween each st.) This rnd. now has a total of 9 
gores. Ch. 4 and turn. 

3rd Rnd.; 1 DC in 1st ch. space (this is tlie 
Ist gore), ch. 1, *1 DC in nextch. space, ch. 1, 
and now the gore st. in next gore space, ch, 1,* 
— repeat from * to * to within last cli. space of 
rnd. (last space is a gore), and now end rnd. 
with a gore st., ch. 4 and turn. 



Flo Pegman models her shawl, showing 
how it drapes softly over her shoulders. 

Note the gores on this shawl. 



-7. ' "1 . 

1 


1 










P 







4th Rnd.: 1 DC in 1st ch. space (this is the 
1st gore), ch. 1, *1 DC in nextch. space, ch. 1, 
1 DC in ne.xt ch. space, and now the gore st, in 
next gore space, ch. 1 — repeat from * to * to 

within last cli. space of rnd. (last space is a 
gore), and now end rnd. with a gore st., ch. 4 
and turn. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Each rnd. will in- 


crea.se by 1 DC between each gore. 

Continue to increase in this manner until 
there are 29 DC s between each gore, or de¬ 
sired length. 

Outer Border: Start at corner. Work 7 tri¬ 
ple crochet in first space, ch. 1, skip 3 spaces. 
In fourth space do 7 triple crochet, ch. 1. 
Work this around the entire shawl. 


A REVERSIBLE SHAWL hy Nell Ehlen, Wichita Falls, Texas 


T HIS TRUNGULAR SHAWL is ajoy to make since 
the hook is size Q (I dub this, works 
Quickly), and uses only the single crochet 
stitch. A beginner as well as an experienced 
crocheter will find it very easy to make. 

By using two different colors of yarn, the 
shawl becomes reversable and thus can be 
worn with many square dance dresses. 
Choose your favorite colors to work with. The 
shawl shown with this article was made with 
one side yellow and one side orange. 

Because of its doubleness, the shawl has a 
great deal of warmth, yet still maintains a 
certain amount of openness. 

One word of caution: Be careful to crochet 
through only two loops (one of each color) and 
not three loops. 

Each row is cut and tied off. Because of this, 
the variations of color are endless. You can 
even use up your odds and ends of wool and 
make a shawl in a variety of interesting stripes. 

The same stitch and back-to-back design 
can be adapted for a variety of articles: af- 




Marilee Luff, cozy and warm, in Nell’s shawl. 


ghans, place mats, hot pads (use rug yarn for 
these) or cap and scarf sets. 

Materials Needed 

2 skeins of each color, 4 ply 4 oz. 

Size Q plastic hook (approximately size 12) 

Directions 

Row 1: (With color A) Chain, approxi¬ 
mately 60 inches, or whatever length you de¬ 
sire. Larger sizes would require top edge to be 
longer. Cut and tie. 

Row 2: (With Color B) Make a slip knot or 
loop and put on hook. Turn the chain and work 
from the end that was cut and tied off. Single 
crochet in each chain using only one loop of 




the chain. Cut and tie. Turn work. 

Row 3: Make slip knot each beginning of 
same color facing you. If color A is facing, use 
color A (as in this row). Single crochet in each 
loop crocheting through color A and one of 
color B. Pick up one loop of each color and 
crochet through with single crochet stitch. 
(See close up photo.) 

Row 4: Crochet all succeeding rows in same 
manner as row 3. 


Decrease or omit one stitch at beginning 
and end of every row after third row. If a larger 
size shawl is desired, it is advisable to alter¬ 
nate or skip a row between decreases. 

Fringe; Make fringe by wrapping yarn 
around cardboard. Cut along one edge. I sug¬ 
gest 6 inches for the fringe length but it can be 
adapted to your personal choice. Knot 3 
strands in every other stitch around the two 
lower edges. Steam or block the shawl. 


POPCORN-STITCH STOLE by Peg Hacking, Cape Coral, Florida 


T his fairly large, triangular shaped stole 
belies its size because it is so light-weight 
and comfortable around one’s shoulders. 

Materials Needed 

8 oz 4-ply yarn #13 needles 

Directions 

Cast on 6 sts. 

Row 1 — Kl, *(KI, PI, KI) into next st, P3 
tog. Repeat from * to last st (KI, PI, KI) 
Row 2 — Inc. I st. in first st. Purl to last st. 
KI. 

Row 3 — KI, *P3 tog., (KI, PI, KI) into 
next st. Repeat from * to last st (Kl, PI, Kl) 
Row 4 — Same as Row 2 
Repeat these 4 rows until straight edge 
measures 26”, ending with 4th row. 


This knitted shawl is soft appearing, comfortable to wear 
and stores or packs in a small space. 

Peg's shawl modeled by Gloria Franzen. 



Decrease as follows; 

Row 1 - Kl, *(K1, PI, Kl) P3 tog. Repeat 
from * to last 4 sts. P4 tog. 

Row 2 — Kl, Purl to last st. Kl 

Row 3 - Kl, *P3 tog. (Kl, PI, Kl). Repeat 
from * to last 4 sts. P4 tog. 

Row 4 — Same as Row 2 

Repeat these 4 rows until 6 sts. remain. 
Cast off. 

Fringe; Cut 10” strands. Use 4 for each 
knot. Tie 1 knot between each popcorn. 





GARTER-STITCH STOLE 

by Peg Hacking, Cape Coral, Florida 

F rom popcorn to garter stitch, here’s an¬ 
other stole from the nimble fingers of Peg 
Hacking. Her dance area calls fora cover up of 
minimal warmth and weight. 

Materials Needed 

Two 4 oz. skeins (2 or 3 ply) yarn 
#10*72 needles 

Directions 

Entire stole is worked in garter stitch. 
Cast on 4 sts. 

Row 1 — K2, slip a marker on needle, K2 
Row 2 — Knit 


Row 3 — Kl, increase 1 st., slip marker, 
increase 1 st., Kl 

Row 4 — Knit 

Row 5 — Increase 1 st. in first st.; increase 
each side of marker; increase 1 st. in last st. 

Put a marker on this side of work to indicate 
right side. 

Row 6 — Knit 

Repeat rows 5 and 6 until piece measures 
about 22 inches in center. 

Bind off loosely. 

To add a fringe, cut 10 inch strands of yarn. 
Use 4 strands for each knot. Tie 1 knot in every 
other stitch. 


A CROCHETED SHAWL 


by Eudora Spaur, Tacoma, Washington 




T his crocheted shawl was designed by the 
mother of square/round dancer and 
teacher, Peggy Ruehle. Bless all our mothers! 

Directions: 

ROW 1: Make a chain long enough to reach from 
the break in your wrist to the break in the other 
wrist, crossing behind your head (about 4 to 432 


The lightness and size of this stole 
make it easy to tuck into the corner 
of a suitcase to have when needed. 


feet). ROW 2: Skip 1 chain and then sc (single 
crochet) Irack in each stitch of chain. ROW .3: 
Chain 5 ; yarn over and dc (doulile crochet) in 
third stitch; chain 3 and dc in .3rd stitch. Repeat 
to end of row. ROW 4: Yarn over and dc in 4th 
stitch (top of post) 5 times in same stitch. This 
makes a shell. Sc in next post, then dc in next post 
5 times. Continue across row. ROW 5: Chain 5 ; 
sc in top (middle stitch of shell); chain 3 and dc 
in top of sc. Continue across row ending with sc 
in center of last shell. ROW 6: Same as row 3 
ending with dc in sc of last shell. ROW 7 : Yarn 


over ’and dc in top of post 5 times in same stitch. 
Sc in next post and continue across row. ROW 8; 
Same as row' 5 . Continue working rows 6, 7 and 
8 until desired length of shawl is reached. By 
turning in the top of each shell row' at the end of 
the rf)w, yon decrease. Add a row' of sc around 
stole to make a place to attach fringe. FRINGE: 
Use a piece of cardboard 6 inches wide and w'rap 
yarn around it as deep or hea\ y as you like. (Mrs. 
Spanr uses 5 strands.) Cut yarn and tie fringe 
around low'er edge of shawl. It takes almost one 
skein for the fringe. 


KNITTED DOLMAN SLEEVE SWEATER 

bij Deen Cummings, Santa Barbara, California 


T his attractive and comfortable jacket/ 
sweater is guaranteed to bring compli¬ 
ments from everyone. The snug, short waist 
and wide, loose dolman sleeves make it an 
ideal coverup for square dance dresses. How¬ 
ever, it is equally at home over pants. 

The instructions shown here are for a size 
12, small bust. Considerable size adjustment 
may be made by increasing the number of 
rows worked in the front border. Edges of the 
jacket should overlap (a double-breasted ef¬ 
fect) without undue stretching of the yarn. 



Note the attractive pattern worked into this sweater. 


This unusual pattern is not for the novice 
knitter. It is made in two sections (not the 
same size) and then knitted together. Each 
pattern starts on a sleeve. If you follow the 
directions exactly (don’t try to change them), 
it does work. Just take vour time. 

Materials 

4 4-oz skeins 4-ply yarn 
Size 7 circular needle 
4 (or 6) buttons 

Pattern One 

Row 1 (right side) k to marker, yo, slip marker, 
k2, slip marker, yo, k to end of row 


Row 2 p across all sts. 

(Always end Pattern One with Row 1) 

Pattern Two 

Row 1 (wrong side) k across all sts (no in¬ 
creases) 

Row 2 k across all sts 

Row 3 p2 tog., yo — repeat to marker, slip 
marker, p2, slip marker, yo, p2 tog. to end of 
row 

Row 4 k across all sts 
Row 5 k across all sts 

DIRECTIONS 

Cast on 30 sts 

Work 12 rows in double seed stitch (k2, p2) for 
cuff 

Row 13 (1st row of Pattern One) k 14, yo, place 
marker, k2, place marker, yo, k14 (32 sts) 
Row 14 p across 

Row 15 thru Row 27 continue in Pattern One 
(27th row = 46 sts = 8 increases) 

Row 28 thru 32 Pattern Two 
Row 33 thru 51 Pattern One (51st row - 66 sts 
= 10 increases) 

Row 52 thru 56 Pattern Two 
Row 57 thru 75 Pattern One (75th row = 86 sts 
= 10 increases) 

Row 76 thru 80 Pattern Two 
Row 81 thru 103 Pattern One (103rd row = 110 
sts = 12 increases) 

Row 104 thru 108 Pattern Two 
At end of 108th row add on 15 sts = 125 sts on 
needle 

Row 109 work 1st 12 sts in dbl seed, place 
marker, k57, yo, slip marker, k2, slip marker, 
yo, k to end, then add on 15 sts = 142 sts on 
needle 

Row 110 Work 1st 12 sts in dbl seed, place 
marker, p across to last marker on row, dbl 
seed next 12 sts 

Row 111 thru 133 Pattern One (keeping 12 sts 
in dbl seed at both ends of each row) (133rd row 
= 166 sts = 13 increases) 



Row 134 thru 138 Pattern Two (keeping dbl 
seed border as above) 

Place sts on holder (leave yarn attached). Section 
one is completed. 

With new skein, repeat Row 1 thru 138 
Row 139 Seed 12, k70, remove marker, k1 
(83 sts = V 2 the row) Place remaining 
83 sts on holder. 

Row 140 p71, dbl seed 12 
Row 141 dbl seed 12, k71 
Repeat above two rows thru 165th row (ending 
at neck edge) Place these sts on holder (leave 
yarn attached) 

Section two is completed. 

Joining Section One to Section Two 
Place just completed part of Section Two 
(83 sts) and Ist 83 sts of Section One (opposite 
end from where yarn is still attached) with 
right sides together, holders parallel. Begin¬ 
ning at seed border edge, pick up one stitch 
alternately from each section until there are 
166 sts on needle. Using yarn still attached at 
neck edge of Section Two and treating 2 sts 
(one from each section) as 1 st, bind off all sts, 
being careful to use light tension to avoid a stiff 
seam. (Very important to nse light tension. 


Seam will be up middle of back but it will not 
show.) 

Front Border 

Starting at dbl seed border edge, pick up 83 
sts from Section Two holder (remove 1st 
marker, leave 2nd marker on needle). Pick up 
30 sts across back. Pick up 83 sts from Section 
One holder (leave marker at shoulder). = 196 
sts 

Using yarn still attached to Section One, 
work 82 sts in dbl seed, slip marker, p2, kf&b 
next st, p2, k2, p2, kf&b next st, p2, k2, p2, 
kf&b next st, p2, kf&b next st, p2, kf&b next 
st, p2, k2, p2, kf&b next st, p2 (6 sts added), 
slip marker, dbl seed remaining 82 sts = 202 
sts on needle. Work 20 more rows of dbl seed. 
Bind off loosely in dbl seed. 

Button Holes 

Since dbl seed border is quite stretchy, 
button holes may be made by poking a size 15 
needle (or a similar-sized object) through the 
border where button holes are desired. Split a 
strand of yard and button-hole stitch around 
these holes to hold their shape. 


KNITTED SHRUG hy Tommi Herringto 


n, Potter Valley, California 


W HERE WE LIVE, colder weather and some¬ 
times drafty halls have made this shrug 
very popular with the ladies. It keeps their 
arms and shoulders warm without being bulky 
and can be worn while dancing, if necessary, 
without being in the way. 



Materials Needed 

8 oz. knitting worsted (4 ply) 

1 oz. white angora (or Unger Fluffy or Dazzle 
Aire) 

#10 needles (or #10 circular needle) — Knit 
back and forth because of number of 
stitches 


Directions 

6" Collar: Cast on 140 stitches with worsted. 
(For larger sizes use 160 or 180 sts) 

Work in ribbing, K2, P2, for IV 2 ''. 

Tie in white angora and continue to work in 
ribbing, K2, P2, for 3". 

Break off white yarn and tie in (primary color) 
yarn. 


Angela Shaddock 
models Tommis 
shrug. 







Row 134 thru 138 Pattern Two (keeping dbl 
seed border as above) 

Place sts on holder (leave’ yarn attached). Section 
one is completed. 

With new skein, repeat Row 1 thru 138 
Row 139 Seed 12, k70, remove marker, k1 
(83 sts = Va the row) Place remaining 
83 sts on holder. 

Row 140 p71, dbl seed 12 
Row 141 dbl seed 12, k71 
Repeat above two rows thru 165th row (ending 
at neck edge) Place these sts on holder (leave 
yarn attached) 

Section two is completed. 

Joining Section One to Section Two 
Place just completed part of Section Two 
(83 sts) and 1st 83 sts of Section One (opposite 
end from where yarn is still attached) with 
right sides together, holders parallel. Begin¬ 
ning at seed border edge, pick up one stitch 
alternately from each section until there are 
166 sts on needle. Using yarn still attached at 
neck edge of Section Two and treating 2 sts 
(one from each section) as 1 st, bind off all sts, 
being careful to use light tension to avoid a stiff 
seam. (Very important to use light tension. 


Seam will be up middle of back but it will not 
show.) 

Front Border 

Starting at dbl seed border edge, pick up 83 
sts from Section Two holder (remove 1st 
marker, leave 2nd marker on needle). Pick up 
30 sts across back. Pick up 83 sts from Section 
One holder (leave marker at shoulder). = 196 
sts 

Using yarn still attached to Section One, 
work 82 sts in dbl seed, slip marker, p2, kf&b 
next St, p2, k2, p2, kf&b next st, p2, k2, p2, 
kf&b next st, p2, kf&b next st, p2, kf&b next 
st, p2, k2, p2, kf&b next st, p2 (6 sts added), 
slip marker, dbl seed remaining 82 sts = 202 
sts on needle. Work 20 more rows of dbl seed. 
Bind off loosely in dbl seed. 

Button Holes 

Since dbl seed border is quite stretchy, 
button holes may be made by poking a size 15 
needle (or a similar-sized object) through the 
border where button holes are desired. Split a 
strand of yard and button-hole stitch around 
these holes to hold their shape. 


KNITTED SHRUG hij Tommi Herrington, Potter Valley, California 


W HERE WE LIVE, Colder weather and some¬ 
times drafty halls have made this shrug 
very popular with the ladies. It keeps their 
arms and shoulders warm without being bulky 
and can be worn while dancing, if necessary, 
without being in the way. 



Materials Needed 

8 oz. knitting worsted (4 ply) 

1 oz. white angora (or Unger Fluffy or Dazzle 
Aire) 

#10 needles (or #10 circular needle) — Knit 
back and forth because of number of 
stitches 


Directions 

6” Collar: Cast on 140 stitches with worsted. 
(For larger sizes use 160 or 180 sts) 

Work in ribbing, K2, P2, for IV 2 ". 

Tie in white angora and continue to work in 
ribbing, K2, P2, for 3". 

Break off white yarn and tie in (primary color) 
yarn. 


Angela Shadduck 
models Tommi's 
shrug. 









Work in ribbing, K2, P2, for IV 2 ''. 

13" Sleeves: Knit 2 tog. across row, 70 sts (80 
or 90 for larger sizes). 

Cast on 40 sts at beg of each of next 2 rows. 
Knit first and last 4 sts in garter stitch. Work 
rest of row in ribbing — 150 sts (160 or 170 
for larger sizes). 

Pattern will be: K4, K2, P2 across row, K4. 

K4, K2, P2 across row, K4. 
Work in pattern 13" from last cast on stitches. 

SQUARE DANCE JACKET 

by Pat Walker, Seattle, Washington 

P AT MADE THIS attractive and easy-to-sew 
jacket from washable, black fake fur, lined 
with washable, black velvet. It is reversible, 
which makes it ideal for both square dancing 
and non-dancing evenings. 

Pat's Instructions 

To make your pattern, use 24" shelf-type 
paper, or use 18" paper, adding an additional 
strip along the side to make it 24" square. 
Follow the diagram shown here. This diagram is 
for the back pattern. The front is the same 


Bind off 40 sts at beginning of each of next 2 
rpws. 

6" Back: Work remaining stitches in ribbing 
for 6". Bind off in pattern loosely. Fold in 
Halt and sew or crochet together. The back 
(last 6") will be sewn on side of collar (first 
6 "). 

Block garment 

To wear, roll the collar back. Insert arms in 
sleeves and adjust collar on neck. 


except cut it 1^" lower at the neckline. This 
pattern will fit sizes 12-16. 

When cutting velvet or velveteen, be sure to 
lay the fabric with the pile side up. Place the 
pattern with pile running up. Sew with silk 
thread and stitch with pile, that is sew from the 
bottom up. 

If you want a collar, use a straight piece of 
fabric cut 2" wide. 

This pattern would also be lovely in wash¬ 
able white fake fur or in a spring color 
reversible with your favorite washable wool. 





SQUARE DANCE PONCHO 

by Rosalie Jerousak^ Berkley, Illinois 

E njoy the color, warmth and easy wear- 
ability of this full-circle crocheted pon¬ 
cho. In rainbow hues, it will go with any outfit. 

Materials Needed 

14 skeins (4 ply knitting yarn) of 14 different 

colors of your choice Short Row 4: 1 sc in next space, * ch 1, 1 sc in 

Size J crochet hook next space, repeat from * to last 3 sc, ch 1, 1 si 

St in next space, ch 1, turn. 

Repeat Rows 3 and 4 until last row has 1 sc, ch 
1 and 1 sc, ending at outer edge and drawing 
Color B through 2 loops of last sc, drop Color 
A, ch 2, turn. 

**Long Row: * 1 sc in next space, ch 1, 1 sc in 
next si St, ch 1, repeat from *, end 1 sc in 
turning cb; 48 spaces, ch 1, turn. Repeat Rows 
3 and 4, working until last row has 1 sc, ch 1 
and 1 sc, end at outer edge, drawing Color C 
through 2 loops of last sc, ch 2, turn. ** 
Repeat from ** to ** using your next 11 colors. 
Last Row; Using your last color, repeat the 
Long Row and then fasten off. 

Border: Join yarn at center edge, * ch 1, 1 sc in 
next space, repeat from * to corner, inc in 
Directions corner by working 1 sc and ch 1 in same place 

With Color A, ch 97. as last sc, work in pattern to next corner, inc as 

Row 1: 1 sc in 3rd ch from hook. *ch 1, skip 1 before, work in pattern on other edge to cen- 
ch, 1 sc in next ch, repeat from * across; 48 sc ter, ch 1, turn. Using up remaining colors in 
and 48 spaces, ch 2, turn. same color sequence as on the body of the 

Row 2: Skip first sc, 1 sc in next space, * ch 1, 1 poncho, continue to inc at corners and work to 
sc in next space, repeat from * to last sc, ch 1, si last 3 sc at end of each row, ch 1, turn. Con¬ 
st in turning ch, cn 1,’ turn. tinue in this way until only 2 colors remain. 

Row 3: 1 sc in first space, * ch 1, 1 sc in next With next 2 colors work all around to finish 
space, repeat from * across, end ch 1, 1 sc in edges at neck and across the center. Fasten 
turning ch, ch 2, turn. off. 

A BLANKET PONCHO by Marlene Gordon, San Fernando, California 

T his UNUSUAL poncho is warm, practical, at- Take the blanket and fold it lengthwise. Pin 

tractive, easy-to-make, inexpensive and yonr pattern at one end of the blanket and 
simple to launder. What more could you ask draw around it. Cut out the cur\'e, being care- 
for? The basic material is a twin-size thermal ful not to cut the folded edge as this fold 
blanket. makc's the shoulder line between the front and 

back of the poncho. Remove the pattern and 
Start bv making a semi-circular pattern out save it and the rest of the blanket for your 
of brown wrapping paper. Mark off a 41" next poncho. 

straight edge. At the middle of this line, draw To cut out the neckline, make a mark UP' 
a line at right angles 2.5" long. From the end down the front from the center of the folded 
of this 2.5" line, draw curves back to both edge and /I" down the back. Cut the front 
ends of the 41" line. This semi-circle will be neckline first making a gentle curse from the 
slightlv less than half of a full circle. 1 %" mark back to the shoulder line. Adjust the 






A color photo would show a variety of green, 
yellow, blue, lavendar, red and white pon¬ 
chos. Choosing a solid color trim or a two- 
toned trim gives a completely different look to 
the finished garment. 


hack of the neckline as needed. The M" mark 
is just an approximation. 

After the neck is cut out, cut the front of 
the poncho, being careful to cut down a 
straight line of the waffle weave from the cen¬ 
ter of the neck. DO NOT CROSS OVER THE 
WEAVE. If it does not seem straight, it will 
correct itself when you are working on it. 

With vour sewing machine, straight stitch 
around all edges of the poncho; then continue 
around a second time using vour zig-zag stitch. 
Turn back all edges M to 'A" except for the 
front which you will turn hack 1". Hand tack. 

Add three rows of single crochet stitching 
around the bottom edge of the poncho. Make 
the first row approximately M" deep. You may 
use one color for the crocheting or vou mav 


choose two contrasting colors, alternating the 
rows of color. 

With the same polyester yarn make a fringe. 
Cut each fringe 9" long and double it so there 
are four strands of yarn tied on each single 
crochet stitch at the bottom edge. 

To make sleev'es, measure 22” from the front 
of the poncho and then measure 33" from the 
22" point. Bring these two points together and 
attach with one fringe tied into both crochet 
stitches. 

To fasten the poncho make 5 chain stitches 
twice near the top of the neck line for button 
loops. 

Your poncho is complete. When laundering 
is needed, just toss it in the washer and dryer. 
And remember, two ponchos from one blanket! 


EASY-TO-SEW CAPE by Natalie King, Eureka, California 


A re you tired of going to the square dances 
with your fluffy dress all wadded up under 
your street coat? Then try making a cape to 
wear with your square dance outfits. Capes are 
pretty, practical and easy to make. 

Cut a pattern first. Measure across your 
shoulders at the back and mark off on paper. 
Draw the shoulder line first and then finish by 
measuring down your arms as far as you wish 
the cape to come. 

Look for your cape material in the drapery 
yardage department. Nubby weaves, twills and 
textured fabrics are most effective. 

To line the cape, cut lining of contrasting or 
color-matched fabric from basic pattern. With 
right sides of cape and lining together, sew 
around all edges, leaving neck edge open. Turn, 
press and hand stitch neck edge. A print lining 
to match a skirt or dress is fun and a flannel 


lining gives extra warmth. 

If you do line your cape, remember to sew 
aU the trim on before attaching the lining. 
Choose heavy "curtain fringe,” ball fringe, orn¬ 
amental looping or wide ric racs and metallic 
tapes. Keep your trims rather heavy for good 
balance. Try a narrow self-ruffle, either double 

These two patterns are 
all you need to make 






or narrowly hemmed; or a double row of brass 
buttons marching down the front; or bands of 
hand embroidery or appliques. 

For closings you may use ready-made frogs. 


giant hooks and eyes (meant to show); link 
fastenings such as are used on coats; wide, sash¬ 
like ties that make pussy-cat bows or simply, a 
huge safety pin gilded or painted by you! 


THE CIRCLE CAPE 


shared by Dawn Draper, North Hollywood, California 


C APES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN POPULAR with la¬ 
dies, and the distaff side of square dancing 
is no exception. A very easy-to-make cape is a 
circle cape. Basically all that is required is to 
cut a fabric circle and make slits for your arms. 
How fancy your cape will be depends on the 
trim and/or material you select. 

For winter weather, wool fabric is a good 
choice. For summertime, a blended fabric 
will be enough to ward off any evening chill. 
When you choose a material which is attrac¬ 
tive on both sides, you eliminate an un¬ 
finished appearance. For a fairly long cape, 
buy 60" wide fabric. For a shorter cape, use 
45". The length of fabric should always equal 
the width. 

Directions 

Fold the square of fabric into quarters. Lay 
it flat, smoothing out all wrinkles. Cut a piece 
of string the length from the center comer of 
your folded material to the selvage edge. Pin 
one end of the string to the center comer. Tie 
or hold sewing chalk at the other end. Use this 
string as a compass to mark the cutting edge. 
(Perhaps you remember as a child tieing a 
piece of string to a pencil and, by holding one 
end of the string taut, you could draw a circle 
with the pencil. This is the same principle but 
you will draw only one fourth of a circle.) 
Cut through all four thicknesses of fabric. 
Open the fabric and lay out a complete 
circle of material. About 8" on either side of 
the center of the circle, mark two lines. These 
lines should be 13" long, 6W on either side of 
your fold line. These form the two arm slits in 
the cape. 

Finish off the armholes (like bound button 


|<-60" or 45"-*1 

F 


9 

o 

CD 


iL 

A simple cape for any season depending on the fabric. 

holes) by using the same fabric as your cape or 
with contrasting fabric of your choice. 

The outer edge of the cape may be left 
unfinished if you have used fabric which does 
not ravel, or you can bind it with bias strips, 
matching the fabric used on the armholes. 
Another idea is to trim it with a yarn fringe. If 
you use bias strips, you will need approxi¬ 
mately three times the fabric width plus 12 
additional inches. 

Easy to make, comfortable to wear and, of 
course, the cape can serve double duty over 
street wear as well as with your square dance 
costumes. You may just decide to make sev¬ 
eral for yourself and to gift your favorite 
square dance friends. 



ROUND PETTICOAT BAG Weatherford 


T his petticoat bag has become a mainstay of 
many dancers for more than a decade. 
You’ll enjoy having one. The bag is a full circle 
and can be used flat under a bed for storing 
petticoats, or folded in half and carried when 
traveling. The bag will hold from one to four 
petticoats depending on their fullness. 


Materials Needed 

2‘A yards of 45" fabric 
5 snap fasteners 

Directions 

To make a pattern, take pages from your 
newspaper which have a left-hand fold. Fold 
this half again across the paper so that you end 










with four sections which come together in a 
point at the upper left-hand corner. Make a 
compass with a pencil and a 22" piece of string 
(Remember how you did this in school?) and 
holding the end of the string firmly at the 
folded corners of the paper, draw a 22" one- 
quarter circle. Cut the pattern out. You will 
have a full circle. Fold in half for a half-circle 
pattern. 

Take your fabric and fold it together 
lengthwise with the selvedge edges together. 
Place the half circle pattern on the fold of 
material and cut. Unfold for one full circle. 

For the other side of the bag, place pattern 
on the remaining fabric with the straight side 
of the pattern by the selvedge edges. Allow 


IV 2 " of selvedge for snaps and center seams; 
cut. Hem center seams with a %" hem. 

Hem both sides of this piece, overlapping 
seams and stitch together 9" from each side to 
make opening. 

Place snap fasteners evenly across opening 
and snap together. You now have your second 
circle. 

Cut two 2''xl2" strips of fabric for the han¬ 
dles. Fold and stitch each piece. Fold each of 
these again and stitch to opposite sides of one 
circle so they will be on the outside of the bag 
when the two circles are stitched together. 

Pin the two circles together, wrong side 
out, and stitch. Turn bag right side out 
through the snap opening. 


DRAWSTRING PETTICOAT TOTE 

hy Lorraine Melrose, Walnut Creek, California 


M IX OR MATCH fabrics for this useful petti¬ 
coat tote or storer. Fabric is highly rec¬ 
ommended rather than plastics which do not 
breathe and tend to leave an odor. 


Cut out pieces according to Figure 1. Sew 
all but one side seam, making either a zig¬ 
zagged finish, French or flat-felled seams or 
use bias tape to finish. Finish small end of 
bag by hemming or using bias tape. Then sew 




around large opening. Attach to edge of large 
opening to form a casing for draw strings. 
Before hemming down the casing, make two 
buttonholes opposite each other on the bag 
itself for the drawstrings. 

To make the drawstrings use bias tape sewn 
shut, or make your own. Make two strings 
each long enough to go around the opening 
plus 8". Drawstrings will come out each side 
(see Figure 2). 


Casing 
(on inside) 



Buttonhoies 
for drawstrings 


PETTICOAT CARRIER by Abby Estes, Sedona, Arizona 



T his tote can be made from any type of 
fabric — cotton, dacron, sailcloth, denim, 
bedsheets, etc. Obviously using a drip-dry 
material will be easiest when considering 
laundering. Watch fabric stores for remnant 
sales as less than two yards of material are 
required. 

Materials required: 

1% yards of 36" material 
1 metal zipper 22" long 
Matching thread 

Directions: Cut 2 circles 18" in diameter 
side by side each lengthwise of material. Take 
the remaining material and cut one piece 36" 
wide and 25" long; then cut another 18" wide 
and 25" long. Stitch these two pieces together 


making one piece 54" wide and 25" long. 

Sew the zipper in the middle leaving a 1%" 
seam at each end. Sew in a circle at each end. 
(If desired, sew on the circles with the seams 
on the outside and then bind with a colorful 
bias binding.) Be sure to leave the zipper 
open before sewing in the second circle. 

Make the handle by cutting a strip of mate¬ 
rial 5" long and 2)^" wide. Fold lengthwise 
with the raw edges turned in and top stitch 
around. Sew the handle on either in the mid¬ 
dle of the carrier or at the end. 

Smaller, matching carriers can be made by 
adjusting the above instructions. An 8" circle 
with a 14" to 16" zipper will carry slippers 
and pantalettes, while a 5" circle with a 9" to 
10" zipper is just right for holding odds and 
ends. 

Cutting directions 

i-- y</s - 



AN IDEA FOR PETTICOAT STORAGE 

by Charlie and MaryBelle Robbins, Encino, California 

C HARLIE AND MARY BELLE ROBBINS of bedroom, they decided that one wall would 
Encino, California, active square and round make an excellent area to store several petti- 
dancers, recently faced up to the problem of coats, making them available and yet dust-free, 
petticoat storage and decided to handle it in an First, one clothes rod was lowered so that it 
efficient, attractive and out-of-the-way manner, hung just dress length above the floor. Then 
Taking a look at the walk-in closet off their starting approximately 2 inches above the rod. 





a '/4" plywood shelf was run the full length of 
the wall. A second shelf was added 11 inches 
above it and a third shelf another 11 inches 
above that. The shelves were 14" deep. 

Every 11 inches, Charlie nailed on a Va" x 
strip which had been groved 1/8". He suggests 


Square dance dresses hang directly below the petti¬ 
coats. This type of storage may be limited to just one bin 
or to several depending on the closet space available. 



that one-quarter round, grooved in the same 
manner, would also work. Slots of masonite (or 
you could use plywood) 1/8" thick were cut to 
fit and slid into each groove, making cubby¬ 
holes ll"x 14". In their closet, the Robbins 
were able to build about 16 cubbyholes on two 
shelves. The top shelf, a bit high for easy 
accessability, was left for hat storage. 

Careful sanding and painting completed the 
project. 

Each petticoat tucks into its own bin and it’s 
a quick decision to coordinate a petticoat with 
a dress when it’s time to dance. 


A SQUARE DANCE BOW TIE 

by Munich Dip-N-Divers, Munich, Germany 


T ies are an important accessory for the male 
square dancer. A man may prefer a scarf 
tie, a bolo tie or a bow tie. The latter, for 
square dancing, comes with “tails, ” as con¬ 
trasted with the regular type of bow tie. Bow 
ties may be purchased from a number of 
commercial outfits or they can be made by the 
home seamstress. They may be made in solid 
colors, two or more colors, and are especially 
attractive when made to match m’lady’s dress. 
Just a bit of leftover fabric is all that is needed. 
Fancy bow ties are often decorated with se¬ 
quins, jewels, embroidery, etc. 

Here are instructions for making a bow tie, 
as given in a past copy of the Munich Dip- 
N-Divers Newsletter. 


Materials Needed 

1 metal bow tie clip 
1 piece of fabric 10" long x 2 V 2 '' wide 
1 piece of fabric I 2 V 2 ” long x 2" wide 
1 piece of fabric 2" long x P/ 2 " wide 

Directions 

Fold the 10" piece of fabric in half, with 
right sides together. Stitch a V4” seam so that 
you end up with a long, narrow tube, 10” long 
by 1" wide. (A) 








Turn the tube right side out bv using a 
needle and thread as follows. Take a secure 
stitch on one of the open ends. Let the needle 
drop down through to the other end and gen¬ 
tly pull the thread and material through the 
tube until the tube is right side out with the 
seam on the inside. Press flat. Stitch the ends 
together. 

Fold the tube so that stitched ends are in 
center back. Take a piece of thread and wrap it 
around middle of the tube to make a bow. (B) 


B 

On the back, make two slits, one on either 
side of the middle. Slip the metal clip into 
these slits. (C) 



SLITS 


With the 12 * 72 " piece of fabric, make a sec¬ 
ond tube, following the procedure already 
given. This tube will end up being 12%” long 
by %" wide and will be used for the “tails.” 
Tuck in the raw ends of the tube and slip 
stitch. 

Hold the “tails” under the bow and wrap 
with a piece of thread to secure in place. 

Take the small 2" piece of fabric and fold 
the raw edges into the middle. Press so that 
the right side is out. Wrap this piece of fabric 
round the center of the tie, covering the 
center back of the clip as well. Turn the raw 
edges under and hand stitch securely in back. 
This holds everything in place. 

Voila — your bow tie! 




THE SCARF TIE 


by Lorraine Melrose, Walnut Creek, California 


S urprise your dancing partner by sewing 
him a scarf tie. These ties, worn in the early 
days of square dancing, enjoy a resurgence of 
popularity every few seasons. 



Draft a paper pattern as shown in Figure 
#1. You will need approximately 20" of 45" 


material. The tie is made on the bias and may 
be pieced in the middle which saves yardage. 



Hemming: Use small hemmer foot. One 
method of producing a nice hem is to start at 
Point A and hem halfway along Side 1. Then 
start at Point B and hem along Side 2 to Point 


A. Next finish Side 1 to Point B. This helps 
to finish the two points more neatly. Round 
the two comers (x) for greater ease of sew¬ 
ing. See Figure #2. 


die. Next stitch a section approximately 3%” 
in length in center to hold folds. See Figure #4. 

F!QURE^3 


Folds: Number of folds vary, from 3 to 7. 
Finished width after folding should be ap¬ 
proximately K". For 7 folds see Figure #3. 
Start with outer edge, folding in. Do C; then 
do D; then fold the two together in the mid- 


r' 

\ 

v_ 


FieuRe*-4 

- 3 ^:^" 

_\_ 

\ 

_ _ 

_ \ _ 


I 

i 


~\ 

\ 



CROCHET A WESTERN TIE by Loretta McAvoy, Belvidere, Illinois 


T ired of your square dance ties? Want 
something a httle different? Perhaps you 
men can talk the little woman into fashioning 
a crocheted western tie — unique, neat and 
easy to wear. Point out to her that this is the 
way she goes about it. 

Using cotton metallic knit Cro-Sheen, these 
are the directions for the overall pattern. Chain 
nine, skip first stitch and single crochet in next 
stitch; double crochet in same stitch. Skip next 
stitch then single crochet and double crochet 
in next stitch until completed across. When 
you get to the end of each row, chain one and 
turn. Repeat each row the same for desired 
length. Make two separate pieces. One is for 
the bow, 9" long. One is for the tail, 12H" long. 
This is worked back and forth. 

For the centerpiece of the tie, chain twenty, 
then skip first single crochet and single crochet 
in each stitch across, chaining one at the end 

Proper Care 

Attention given to proper storage, han¬ 
dling and washing of petticoats will extend 
their use as well as their attractiveness. 
Shake out petticoats regularly. Use the fluff 
mode of your dryer (with no heat) to re¬ 
move dust and keep them lively. Wash in 
cold or lukewarm water using a liquid de¬ 
tergent. Do not twist or wring but gently 
press out excess water. Fold petticoats over 
a shower rod or clothesline, pinning in sev¬ 
eral places to distribute the weight evenly 
while they dry. 


of each row to turn. Repeat each row until it 
measures M" wide. It will be about 2" long. 

To assemble, press each of the three pieces 
after tucking in crocheted ends. Put “iron-on” 
tape on the back side of the bow to keep its 
shape. 

Fold the ends together and whip together 
with sewing thread. Use the same color “iron- 
on” tape as knit Cro-Sheen thread used in cro¬ 
cheting the tie. Find center, then fold sides to¬ 
gether at center and whip together with a 
couple of stitches. Decorate the front side of 
the bow and the tail with ric rac as you wish. 
The centerpiece is the same for plain or fancy tie. 

Take the bow piece in one hand and wrap 
some heavy thread around it several times, 
pulling the thread tight. Tie knot and clip end 
of thread. Next sew tie clip on the back side 
of the bow. Take the tail and hold it next to 
the bow and wrap thread, at center of bow and 
tail, around both together. Clip thread. Now 
you are ready to wrap the centerpiece over the 
bow and tail and whip the ends together on 
the back side. 

That’s it for a plain tie. If you want to be a 
little more fancy use gold or silver ric rac on 
the bow and tail by sewing each on by hand 
and picking up the points of ric rac. Press be¬ 
fore assembling and use a warm iron with a 
brown paper bag over it so as not to discolor 
the metallic ric rac. If you use ric rac cut two 
small pieces of “iron-on tape” with rounded 
comers and press on the back side to cover the 
ends neatly. This will “tie up” the job nicely. 











fit the neck with the hook and eye at the center flat sinnet with square knots on two center 
back. Remove, position and pin to working strands, beginning directly below the hook and 
surface. Fold over excess portion of strands, eye. Tie an overhand knot on each end close to 
Using free ends as working strands, tie a 1" long sinnet. Trim ends. 


SAFETY-PIN BOLO TIES shared by Jim Spence, Sunland, California 


A NUMBER OF CRAFT and hobbv companies 
have kits on the market for making bolo 
ties (as well as other jewelry) involving the 
ingenious use of wire, beads and/or safety 
pins. From a distance (and not always too 
distant) it is easy to mistake these ties for ones 
made with stones and, on occasion, for some 
which feature genuine turquoi.se. 

A number of clever men and ladies have 
come up with their own patterns for bolos and 
with a bit of experimenting, no doidrt many of 
our readers also will emulate the more expen¬ 
sive jewelry, or, check your local hobby shop 
for one of the various kits available. 

The Horseshoe 

Regretfully black and white photography 
does not do justice to the color in this particu¬ 
lar tie which uses silver safety pins, 3/4" long, 
and silver and turquoi.se-colored beads. One 
silver bead and three turquoise beads are 
threaded onto each safety pin, before it is 
closed. Narrow wire is threaded through the 
caps of the safety pins as well as a second wire 
run through the opposite end of the pins. 
With the pins held in the shape desired (this 
time a horseshoe), the wires are twisted to¬ 
gether and tightened. The resulting decora¬ 
tion is attached to a leather tie. 



The Sunburst 

This tie is made of safety pins and black and 
silver beads. Three beads (one silver and two 
black) are threaded onto each pin. The neck¬ 
lace part of the bolo is made by alternating a 
horizontal pin with three vertical pins; then a 
horizontal pin and two patterns of two vertical 
pins. The horizontal pins do not contain any 
beads. 



Detail 


The circular dangle at the bottom of the 
bolo is made of 15 safety pins (strung with 
beads) interspersed with one circle of large 
silver beads strung on wire at the perimeter. 
The small coil end of the pins is also held in 
place with wire. Three sets of beaded pins 
hang at the lower edge of the sunburst. 


Attention, Men! 

If Rosie Greer can knit and do needlework, 
so can you. Some very fine handicraft work has 
been done by the male side of square dancing. 
Beautifully designed costumes, knitted 
sweaters, fine beadwork and so on have been 
produced by gentlemen. The safety-pin ties 
shown above were a craft project of round 
dance teacher, Jim Spence. So don’t feel that 
this Handbook is limited only to the ladies. 




A DRAWSTRING BAG by Colleen Bender, Walnut Creek, California 


A bac to match a square dance dress that 
takes little material and is easy to make. 
An extra 24" of fabric is all you’ll need. 

Materials Needed 

12" X 24" piece of fabric 
24" or longer cording or tape 

Directions 

Take the 12" x 24" piece of fabric and fold 
it in half across the 12" width, thus forming a 
piece 12" x 12". (See Figure a.) 


24" 

Figure a I 


Starting at the top, stitch down 5}i" on 
each side leaving a %" opening for the draw¬ 
string. Continue the seam below the opening 
to the bottom. (See Figure b.) 



Press the seams open. Press %" under on 
the open end. Turn this open end under 3" 
more and stitch into place. 

Stitch another row above the first 

stitching being careful to have the %!" opening 
within the two lines of stitching. 

Insert cording or tape into the casing 
formed by the %" opening (or use ribbon, 
string, yam, etc.). Be sure to knot or fasten 
the ends of the drawstring together so they 
won’t slip through. 



A CROCHETED BAG by Jessie Mullen, Olympia, Washington 


A n attractive and lightweight purse large 
enough to carry your necessities but small 
enough to slip over a coat hanger or wall hook 
at your club dance. 

Directions 

Cut the center from the top of a 1 lb. plastic 
magarine container, leaving a ring. Be sure 
you do not cut the ring. You will need two 
plastic lids for each handbag. Use 4-play yarn 
and a G or H crochet hook. 

Fill the ring with single crochet; don’t 
break the thread. Crochet 1 SC, 1 DC for 30 
stitches (on ring SC), turn and repeat for 14 
rows. Break thread. 

Make an identical piece; then crochet the 



two sections together, leaving 6 rows open at 
each side of the rings for an easy opening. 

For a smaller version of the purse, use the 
top of a 14 lb. margarine container (again you 




will need two lids) and put on 20 to 22 stitches 
and 10 to 12 rows. If you finish with a SC, the 
next row begins with a DC. This smaller ver¬ 
sion makes a happy gift for a little daughter or 
granddaughter. 

Bags may be color-matched to any or all of 


your square dance dresses and would make 
most-appreciated and useful gifts for square 
dance friends. The purse shown here fits eas¬ 
ily into a 10"xll" plastic freezer bag to store 
in a drawer or pack in a suitcase and keep it 
dust free. 


SHOE TOTES 


shared by Aggie Reid, Puyallup, Washington 


A disguiseI What appears to be a miniature 
pair of pantaloons in actuality is a hiding 

E lace for square dance slippers. This tote may 
e carried to a dance or used in a suitcase to 
separate the shoes from other clothing. Each 
tote will hold at least two pairs of dancing 
slippers plus a pair of hose tucked into each 
pocket. They sew up in a jifly. You’ll enjoy 
having one and they make dandy gifts for 
square dance friends. 

Materials Needed 

Two pieces of fabric measuring 14" x 15" 
each 

One piece of fabric, 4" x 15" 

Two pieces of fabric each 5" square 
Trim, thread, snaps 

Directions 

Fold one pant leg, i.e. one 14" x 15" piece 
of fabric, in half lengthwise. Turn and sew 



Shoes disappear 
into each pant 
leg. 


Looking like a 
miniature pair of 
pants, the shoe 
totes are not 
much bigger than 
a pair of slippers. 


across one end and up the side halfway. Re¬ 
peat for the second piece of similar fabric. Sew 
the two legs together on one side from the 
halfway mark to the top. 

Turn and sew f4" seams on both sides of the 
openings from crotch to waist. 

Fold the 4" x 15" piece of fabric in half 
lengthwise and sew one side to leg pieces, 
pleating in the legs to measure 14*72" at the 
waist. Turn and sew other side down, finish¬ 
ing the waistband. 

Cut two pockets from the two 5" pieces of 
fabric, shaping them as desired. Turn in Vt" or 
*/4" seams on all sides and topstitch to front of 
pant legs. 

Close waistband with snaps at the back. 
Trim as desired. Fabric can be mixed or 
matched in color and pattern. A good way to 
use up scrap material. 



The Frosting on the Cake 

We might consider wraps worn over square dance dresses as the “frosting on the cake. ” They 
top off our costume and give it a truly finished appearance to and from the dance. However let’s 
never overlook what we wear underneath. Proper and attractive costuming—how we dress—is 
an important partner to how we dance. Both done to the best of our ability will allow us to enjoy 
this wonderful recreation to the fullest. What we wear tabs us as square dancers to the general 
population. It also is a key to newcomers to the activity suggesting how they should dress. Are 
we giving the best impression possible? Expensive costuming does not always mean good 
costuming. A look in one’s own mirror will let a person know if she has selected a dress suited to 
her figure and coloring. Check the length. Does it flatter you? Will the dress dance well? Enjoy 
looking beautiful in your square dance clothing and have fun dancing!