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DIXON EVENING TELEGRAPH 


Serving (lie Heart of Rock River Valley for More Than a Century 


Dial 2-1111 
Number 73 
103rd YEAR 
DIXON, ILLINOIS, SATURDAY, MARCH 27, 1954 
10 PAGES 
PRICE SIX CENTS 


Dixon 
Teacher Killed 


Voice of the People: 
Several weeks ago the city 


editor made an appeal in hi; 
column for public interest in 
Community Chest for Dixon 


May I outline some of the rea 


sons why the American Cancer So 
ciety, among other national organi 
zations which necessarily raisi 
funds, does not subscribe to this 
federated fund raising idea? 


First: Informed opinion holds 


that one big combined campaign 
will not raise the total amount of 
money that four or five separate 
drives will yield. The average 
giver will contribute only a cer- 
tain maximum amount at one 
given time no matter how many 
agencies are to benefit. Then, 
too, the workers are apt to lack 
the enthusiasm for a united ap- 
peal which they would normally 
(eel for their one favorite organ- 
ization. 
* * * 


Second: Group fund raising de 


nies the potential contributor any 
choice in giving. Most people are 
naturally more interested in the 
work of one organization than an 
other, often for personal reasons 
If the giver is forced to support all 
or none, a feeling of dissatisfaction 
might result. 


Third: Each organisation's 


campaign for funds- In accompa- 
nied by its own form of public 
education, a distinct IOM to each 
in the event of one,..coiiUtraiUty 
drive. 


» • * 


For these reasons the Illinois Di 


vision. Inc., American Cancer So- 
ciety, does not agree to accept 
money from a Community Chest 
aince it feels that by so doing the 
number of cancer'deaths would un- 
questionably increase. 


During April, designated by con- 


gress as Cancer Control Month, 
volunteer workers for the Ameri- 
can Cancer Society call upon peo- 
''ple to secure their contributions 


and to inform them about recog- 
nizing cancer's seven danger sig- 
nals. At this time national and lo- 
cal publicity through press, radio 
and television is a tremendous fac- 
tor in informing thousands of peo- 
ple otherwise unreached. 


Calling the attention of the in- 


dividual to signs of cancer in its 
early stages and the Importance 
of the time element in consulting 
one'* physician is undoubtedly 
the most effective weapon in 
•aving lives now. Fund raising 
and education go hand in hand. 
When one gives his money to 
help fight cancer, he feels he has 
a stake in the whole program of 
cancer control. 
In 1953, the American people con- 


tributed $18,000,000 as a nation, 
11,099,900, as residents of Illinois 
and $7,402.70 as Lee county resi- 
dents to the American Cancer So- 
ciety. These figures must prove 
that the society has many friends 
who believe in supporting through 
independent fund raising the three- 
fold program of research, educa- 
tion and service to cancer patients. 


Chairman, Lee County 
Chapter, American 
Society 


City Editor's Note: Community 


Chest dos not imply IOM of reve- 
nue for any fund-raising organ- 
ization or the desertion thereof. 
OrfMtestions set budgets Mid 
they are incorporated hi the sin- 
gle budget. Enthusiasm for one 
organization or another would 
surely balance itself and act for 
the'general benefit. The Cancer 
Society's education program cer- 
tainly could jo on unimpeded. 
This writer, and others, foresee 
a frowing dissatisfaction over 
the continuous clamor for fund* 
by more and more organization*. 
We ra^gest Community Chest M 
a clearing home, a traffic cop 
a* Jt were, for the many drive*. 
Should the Cancer Society, er 
any other organization; choo*e to 
operate outalde the cheat, It I* 
privileged to do *o. Public toler- 
ance of the fund-raising din will 
be the final judge. 


C. i. C, 


consider* achme/'a hostage" in 
the *emtor'» fight with the Army. 
ftchliM hat been the center of 


NBC EXEC. DIES 


CHICAGO <*- -Htrry C. Kopf, M, 


a rice president of the National 
Broadcasting Co. fine* 1M1 and 
general manager of the company1* 
television and radio stations in 
Chicago, died of. a heart attack , wealthy young, iNew Yorker, 
Friday night. 
"". 
I 


Sen. Ferguson Calls 
For Legislative Action 


DIfi TRENCHES—An airport once covered this area where soldiers 
have dug deep trenches as protection from bombing in Dien Bien, 
Indochina. As the battle mounted, French officials report the Reds 
suffered "appreciable'losses" when French bombers launched their 


biggest fire-bomb assault of the war 


Doctor Accused of Attempt 
To Kill Wife With Cyanide 


Feeds Her Capsules for Digestion; 
Analysis Reveals the Deadly Poison 


KANSAS CITY—(to—A prominent Kansas City obstetrician is charg- 


ed with trying to kill his wife by tricking her into taking deadly cyanide 
in a digestive capsule. 


A warrant charging Dr. Hugh 


G. Hamilton with attempted mur- 
der was served on him Friday in 
a hospital where he is recuperating 
from a leg fracture. Today is Ham- 
ilton's 49th birthday. 


No motive was disclosed. Prose- 


cutor Richard Phelps said the 
charge was based on information 
provided by Mrs. Martha Hamil- 
ton. He said cyanide was found in 
a capsule given her by her hus- 
band. 


A small bottle of cyanide cap- 


sules was found in a pair of Ham- 
ilton's trousers at the hospital. 


Phelps said that Mrs. Hamilton 


lad been taking digestive capsules 
for a number of years and had 
planned to purchase a new supply 
t>ef*,-e going to California earlier 
this year to visit relatives. He 
quoted her as saying her husband 
insisted on obtaining the capsules 
lor her and she decided, on reach- 
ing the West Coast, to have the 
medicine analyzed. 


Phelps said the analysis showed 


raqes of cyanide in the medicine. 


Hamilton is being kept under 24- 


hour guard in his hospital room. 


Dr. Hamilton d e n o u n c e d the 


charge as "fantastic and absurd," 
but declined to elaborate. 


Hughes Gets 
Contract for 
Culvert Job 


A contract was awarded Friday 


afternoon by the Dixon city coun- 
cil toy Frank Hughes, Dixon con- 
tractor, on his bid of $11,088.90 for 
tne construction of a culvert on 
Peoria avenue, about 45 feet from 
the intersection of Fourth avenue. 


The award was made during a 


special meeting of the council yes- 
terday in order to enable work on 
the culvert to begin as soon as 
possible. 


Peoria avenue has been blocked 


between Fourth and Fifth streets'. 


Other bids offered on the job 


included that of John R. Condi, 
Spring Valley, 111., $11,969.20; Val- 
ley Builders, Inc., Spring Valley, 
$11,840.60; Lindquist Construction 
Co., of Dixon, $12,464.75, and J. B: 
Hoyle, Dixon, $11,929.90. 


Construction costs will be paid 


from motor fuel tax fund*. 


Controversial Pvt Schine 
Ends MP Basic Training 


AUGUSTA, Ga.—<*)—With controversy still raging about him, Pvt. 


G. David Schine was to be graduated from a military police basic train- 
ing school at Camp Gordon today. 
. 
• 


The former committee investi- 


gator for Sen. Joseph McCarthy 
R-Wis) now may get 
another 


crack at entering the criminal in- 
'estigators school at Gordon, ac- 
aiding to Army Officials in Wash- 
ngton. He wa* refused admit- 
ance to the school while in train- 
ng, 


McCarthy has said that John G. 


Adams, assistant Army counsel, 


tv4i*,y *tnce the Army offi- 


cially charted that McCarthy tried 
to obtain tpecial privilege* for the 


Maj. Gen. W. H. 
Army 


provost marshal general, ha* Mid 
he denied Schine's application for 
a criminal investigators' course 
beginning May IT. But the general 
said Schine applied for a later 
course and action on this applica- 
tion is pending. 
. 


Maglin's statement came after 


the Washington Post and Times- 
Herald reported that the Army 
waived a length of service rule to 
accept Schine'* application 
for 


CID training. However, the paper 
•aid Friday that a tentative deci- 
sion to that effect was reversed 
After the White House intervened. 
The paper quoted Pentagon towc* 
M who were not named. 


President's 
Plan Lags 
In Congress 


Democrats Jeer 
At Inactivity; 
April 'Crucial' 


WASHINGTON — <£>> 


Se'n. Ferguson (R-Mich) call 
ed today for a speedup in ac 
tion on President Eisenhow 
er's legislative program in 
what he said will be the make 
or-break month of April. 


Democrats, meanwhile, gibed "a 


the Republican leadership forwha' 
they called failure to push through 
the President's proposals. 
- Ferguson said in an interview 
he will ask the Senate Republican 
Policy Committee, which he heads 
to consider next Tuesday a sched 
ule aimed at bringing to the Sen 
ate calendar in the next five weeks 
all of the bills covering the Presi 
dent's major recommendations. 


Must Move Faster 


"Unless we get these measures 


out of committee by May 1 anc 
on the calendar where they are 
ready for Senate action, I am 
afraid some of them just aren't 
going to get passed before our 
scheduled July 31 adjournment," 
he said. 


The Michigan senator said he 


thinks the present uproar over the 
controversy between Sen. McCar- 
thy (R-Wis) and Army officials is 
obscuring 
the Eisenhower pro- 


gram. 


In Omaha, Republican National 


Chairman Leonard W. Hall said 
Friday night the McCarthy-Army 
dispute "has done more harm than 
good." 


But he asserted the Eisenhower 


program is "now moving through 
Congress," and said it "is designed 
to keep us sound economically by 
building more industry, more jobs 
and a healthy agriculture." 


Program Is Issue 


Eisenhower has predicted that 


what- he calls his "dynamic, pro< 
gressive" program will be the 
principle issue in the November 
elections. 
. . 


Thus far the Senate has passed 


only the St. Lawrenoe Seaway bill 
and an excise tax measure not 
wholly pleasing to administration 
leaders, who had to accept more 
reductions in such levies than they 
would have liked. 
-The House has set a much fast- 
er pace but has not yet taken up 
measures involving the reciprocal 
trade program, social security ex- 
pansion, farm price supports and 
revision of the Taft-Hartley act. 


Democratic National Chairman 


Stephen A. Mitchell said in Gary, 
Ind., Friday night that because of 
the row between McCarthy and 
Army officials he doubts "if the 
average citizen even recalls that 
the President has a program." 


No Action 


"It is now 78 days since that 


so-called 'dynamic1 program was 
unveiled—and so far we see not a 
single piece of it enacted," Mitch- 
ell said in a speech. "We await 
action on agriculture, on for e i g n 
trade, on the St. Lawrence Sea- 
way, on Taft-Hartley, minimum 
wages, housing, social security, 
medical research, hospitals, high- 
ways, conservation, and all the 
rest," 
Hold Dixon Youth 
For Aggravated 
Assault, Battery 


T»i 
~ 


Charles Delph, 17, Dixon, was 


charged with aggravated assault 
and battery following his arrest to- 
day by Lee County Sheriff John 
Stouffer. 


Delph was picked up on a com- 


plaint signed by Lyle Taylor, Dix- 
on, who charged the teenager with 
striking him Friday night. 


According to authorities, Delph 


allegedly attacked Taylor for no 
apparent reason. 


Reports indicated the two men 


were out together Friday night 
when Delph suddenly turned on 
Taylor and struck him. 


Delph was released early this 


month from Vandalia, atau work 
farm. 


Franklin Grove Woman Meets Death 


GLEN'N F. HUFF, 16, Rochelle (kneeling, right), shows Lee County Chief Deputy Robert Burrs f sec- 
ond from right) the spot where the body of Mrs. Esther Cluts, 49, Franklin Grove, landed after a freak 
mishap today on Alt. Rt. 30, about six miles from Dixon. Mrs. Cluts drove the car pictured above. She 
was pronounced dead on arrival at KSB hospital. Huff was the driver of the other car involved in the 


accident 


Lack Counsel for 
McCarthy -Army 


Sen. Mundt May Be Forced 
To Delay Start of Probe 


WASHINGTON—Iffl—Finding a special counsel to handle senate in- 


vestigation of charges Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis) and high army officials 
have aimed at each other is proving to be a tougher job than some 
senators apparently had expected. 


Even Sen. Mundt (R-SD), who 


will preside at the televised public 
airing of the charges before the 
Senate investigations subcommit- 
tee, 
acknowledged that it now 


seems "less possible" that the 
hearings can get under way next 
week as he had hoped. 


McCarthy, the subcommittee's 


chairman, has agreefl to let Mundt 
run the hearings. 


Mundt and Sens. McClellan (D- 


Ark) and Jackson (D-Wash), plan- 
ned another round of effort today 
to line up for the job a lawyer who 
would qualify as neutral and cap- 
able, would command public con- 
fidence by his record — and would 
be willing to take on the job. 


The- three senators, serving as 


a 
s p e c i a l 
subcommittee to 


nominate the counsel, kept secret 
the names under consideration. 


There were indications they got 


a turn down Friday from another 
prospect. They previously had an- 
nounced that William J. Jameson, 
president of the' American Bar 
Assn. on the advice of its board 
of directors, had declined an in 
vitation to serve. 


Mundt had spoken during the day 


of having three candidates under 
serious consideration. 
He 
later 


mentioned only two, and declined 
to elaborate. Other sources, how- 
ever, said .the third man had said 
"no." 


Royal Tan 
Wins Grand 
National 


Bureau Reports 
Unemployment 
Is Declining . 


WASHINGTON (ff> — The Bureau 


of Employment Security reports a 
decline in unemployment — the 
number of those newly out of jobs 


oing down in 32 states and the 
District of Columbia, increasing 
only in 16 states. 


The government report made' 


>ublic Friday, covering the week 
ended March 13, said the number 


>f insured unemployed declined for 
. second straight week to 2,187,100. 
At the Feb. 27 peak, the total 


was 2,213,959. 


These figures do not include all 
he unemployed, since not all work- 
ers are covered by federal unem- 
>loyment insurance. 


The bureau said* its state report 


showed no large scale layoffs dur- 
ng the week of March 20, hut 
scattered layoffs mixed .with tome 
recalls. 
, 
" • • • • * 


It Mid also initial claim* filed 


by iiMured worker* dropped to 
2W.708, a decline of 1«,900 during 
the week ended March 20. 


This was the second time this 


year, the bureau said, that the 
volume of initial claim* feU Mow 


AINTREE, England Iff)— Royal 


Tan won the 108th running of the 
gruelling Grand National Steeple- 
chase today, in a close finish with 
Tudor Line. 


Irish Lizard was third. 
Royal Tan, owned by Joe Griffin, 


ran second to Nickel Coin in the 
1951 event. 


The w i n n e r was the second 


favorite at 8 to 1. Irish Lizard was 
7-1. 


Royal Tan, who had failed twice 


in this race previously, just got 
home by a neck in the 4-mile, 856 
yards test over 30 of the stiffest 
jumps in the world. Irish Lizard 
was 10 lengths back of the two 
leaders. 


A great crowd of some 250,000 


turned out. The skies were sunny 
early, 
but it 
turned 
overcast 


shortly before the field of 29 horses 
started. There was a 6 minute de- 
lay at the post. 


PUBLISHER DIES 


OTTAWA W>—Harry S. Southam, 


retired publisher of the Ottawa 
Citizen, died today after a lengthy 
illness. He was 78. 


Railroader 
Falls From 
Nelson Hotel 


Pekin Man Tumbles 
40 Feet, Fractures 
Spine, Pelvis Today 


NELSON —(Special)— A Chica- 


go and Northwestern railroad con- 
ductor suffered multiple injuries 
today when he fell from a third 
floor window in the Northwestern 
hotel here. 


Levi Shay, about 60. Pekin, was 


reported in fair condition in Ster- 
ling Community hospital. Hospital 
officials reported he received a 
fracture of the spine, a fractured 
pelvis, possible internal injuries, 
lacerations and shock. 


Shay fell about 40 feet from the 


window to the ground. Marvin. Reh- 
bein, manager of the hotel, report- 
ed Shay had checked into the hotel 
about 4:30 a.m. Shay fell from the 
window shortly after 6 a.m. 


Rehbein said both the inner win- 


dow and the storm window were 
broken in Shay's room. 


Federal Payroll 
Shows Decline 


WASHINGTON (/Pi—The number 


of federal jobholders declined 6,125 
in February as compared with the 
pi'eceding month, a Senate-House 
committee reported today. 


This xvas the 19th consecutive 


month the number of government 
workers decreased. 


The Joint Committee on Reduc- 


tion of Non-essential Federal Ex- 
penditures said theie were 2,340,- 
767 persons on the federal payroll 
in February as against 2,346,892 in 
January. 


In addition, it said 413.337 for- 


eign nationals were working for 
U. S. military agencies abroad last 
month. 
| 


Bank Depositors Asked to 
Accept Embezzlement Loss 


CLIO, Ala.—(fl—A creditors' committee sought unanimous agree- 


ment from depositors today to take a 10 to 15 per cent loss so a $75,000 
deficit in the Clio Merchants Exchange can be liquidated without a 
court fight. 


Eighty-six of an estimated 200 


customers of the unchartered, un- 
insured money exchange agreed on 
the settlement at a mass meeting 
Friday night, but another 40 or so 
took the prepared agreement con- 
tracts home. 


Mayor Empowered 


The creditors' committee, head- 


ed by 29-year-old 
Mayor Dan 


Easterling, was empowered to act 
on behalf of the townspeople and 
the defunct exchange provided all 
depositors are willing. 


One dissenting vote, however, 


would automatically void the pro- 
poced settlement because any dis- 
gruntled depositor could force the 
troubled affairs of the privately 
operated 
check-cashing 
agency 


into bankruptcy. 


AbMnt from the meeting in the 


high school auditorium was Royall 
Reynold*, 40-year-old president of 
the exchange whose 12-day dis- 
appearance earlier 
this 
month 


brought on an investigation which 
•Rowed the $75,000 shortage in hie 


He was in jail in Clayt&n, Ala., 


the county seat, on embezzlement 
charges. 


Explains Plan 


Mayor Easterling explained to 


the approximately 125 depositors 
who showed up last night that a 
court fight over the money would 
cause long delay in getting the 
money back to depositors and 
probably will result in a much 
smaller rebate. 


The mayor said the exchange 


president and his wife have al- 
ready deeded 
their 
fashionable 


brick home over to the depositors 
and cashed in $5,000 in bonds Fri- 
day. 


The ultimate repayment of IS or 


90 cents on the dollar is based on 
the agreement of other member* 
of the Reynold* family to give up 
some $33,000 in claims to their 
share of exchange deposits, plus 
the 72-year-old nearly blind fath- 
er s promise to put up 114,00* out 
of hi* pocket. 
, 


Esther Chits* 
Franklin. Is 
Crash Victim 


Auto Sideswiped 
By Passing Car 
On Alt. Rt. 30 


A 49-year-old proprietor of 


a Dixon music studio was 
killed at 8:45 a. m., today in 
an auto mishap on Alt. Rt. 30 
about three miles west of 
Franklin Grove. 


Mrs. 
Esther 
Gluts, 
Franklin 


Grove, operator of Cluts Music stu- 
dio, on Second street, just west of 
Galena avenue, was fatally in- 
jured on her way to work this 
morning. 


The accident occurred on Alt. Rt. 


30, near the farm of George Eh- 
men, St. 1, Franklin Grove. 


Forced Off Road 


According to Robert Burrs, Lee 


county chief deputy, the car driven 
by Mrs. Cluts apparently 
was 


forced off the road by another ve- 
hicle driven by Glenn F. Huff, 16, 
Rochelle. 


Burrs said both cars were head- 


ing west toward Dixon when the 
Huff car attempted to pass. As he 
drove alongside, the right front 
tire apparently blew. 


As a result, the Huff car swerved 


into the side of the car of Mrs. 
Cluts, shoving her vehicle off the 
right side of the road and into a 
culvert. 


The Cluts car bounded off the 


culvert and leaped about five feet 
into the air before it landed on its 
roof. Mrs. Cluts -landed beside the 
car which had bumped the Ehmen 
garage, about 50 yards from the 
Ehmen farm home. 


KSB hospital reported Mrs. Clut* 


dead on arrival. 


The Huff car was turned com- 


pletely around and came to a halt 
on the right road bank, approxi- 
mately 75 feet from the Cluts ma- 
chine. 


Huff was taken to the hospital 


for examination. 


The deceased Is the wife of 


Maurice Cluts, Franklin Grove, an 
employe of the Dierdorff Plumbing 
firm. Franklin Grove. 


Mr. Cluts was working when in- 


formed of tha accident. 


Burrs said he did not know yet 


whether any charges will be filed 
against Huff. 


The chief deputy said rcp'orts 


indicated the speeds of both cara 
weren't in excess of what could 
be considered reasonable and sale- 


Mrs. Cluts had lived in Franklin 


Grove more than 20 years. Sh« 
taught music in the Franklin Grove 
school before and after her mar- 
riage. She had operated her Dixon 
studio about one year. 


In addition to her husband, she 


is survived by three step-children, 
Mrs. 
Bernice 
Ventler. Ashton; 


Burnell Cluts, Kansas City, Kan., 
and Glenn Cluts, Elgin. 
Director of 
Budget Dodge 
Will Resign 


WASHINGTON I* — The White 


House t o d a y 
announced 
that 


Joseph 
M. Dodge is resigning 


April 15 as Director of the Budget 
to return to private business. 


Dodge will resume the post of 


board chairman of the Detroit 
Bank in Detroit. He has been on 
leave for that job. 


He has been Director of the 


Budget since the Eisenhower ad^ 
ministration took over in January, 
1951 


The White House said no suc- 


cessor has been chosen. Press 
Secretary James C. Hagerty told 
reporters that Dodge took the bud- 
get job in the first place with the 
understanding it would be tempo- 
rary. 


His letter of resignation was 


dated Feb. 26. The President, in a 
letter dated March 4, accepted the 
resignation "only with the great* 
*st reluctance." 


•Weather 


ILLINOIS- Increasing cloud- 


iness today. Somewhat warm- 
er. Showers developing south 
and west by evening. High 44 
to M north, 41 to M south. 


Friday ... W 


Lewteday ...... SI 
1«;*B a-M 
...... 
49 


Sunrise 5:52 a.m. 8un**t *:lt 


p.m.' 


iWSPAFER? 


Rpse Murtaugh ! 
Heads Drive 


AMBOY— Rose Murtaugh. Am- 


boy, has been appointed chanman 
of the American Cancer Societv 
dave for funds in Amboy town- 
•-. t> A Mtkoil meeting will be 
h"ld in Di\on Wednesday evening. 
Apiil 7, for chair.nen and woik- 
tis thioughout the county 


Volunteer workeis will be need- 


ed to solicit funds in the area. 
Miss Murtaugh plans to stait the 
drive with a social get-together, 
the time and piace to be announc- 
ed Anyone who can help in this 
diive is requested to contact Miss 
Mm laugh 


Mrs J H Hughes area chan- 


man of the society, repoits that 
Am boy has shown a real interest 
in the" \\oik of the society Five 
diffeient films pei taming to can- 
cer have been shown 
placards 


have been displayed in busmes* 


Lt. Reed Austin 
On Sea Maneuvers 


FAR EAST (FHTNC1— Among 


the men who recently made i 
familiarization cruise aboaid the 
light airciaft camei USS Saipan 
was Na\y Doctor Lt Reed Austin, 
son of Mr and Mrs E R Austin 
of 315 South Dixon av , Dixon 


Lt Austin is commanding officer 


of D Medical Company ot the 1st 
Medical battalion in Koiea. 


On this tempoiaiy duty assign- 


ment, the men observed flight op- 
erations conducted with Marine 
Attack Squadron 324 and s«w how 
a Navy fighting ship functions 


The Saipan returned to Pusan, 


Koi ea Feb 27 to off load the visit- 
ois who then returned to their 
permanent duty assignment 


The Saipan is a unit of the UN's 


naval forces 


The earner participated in the 


delivery of former pnsoners of 
v ar to Foi mosa from Korea dur- 
ing January 


houses and moie than 2iO cancer 
dicssings have been made bj \ol- 
unteei \\oiKeih in the Aniboj aiea, 
in lecent weeks 
Wo mail's Club 
Plans Meeting 


MT MORRIS — The Pine Cieck 


Womans club will hold its icgulai 
meeting Thuisdav afteinoon in the 
home of Mrs Gene Kump Mis 
Harold Schiei Mis Milton Beckei 
and Mis Ho\\aid Gainson will be 
assisting hostesses 


The piogiam on gaidens will be 


piesented bv Mis John Mumma 
The gioup also will elect officeis 
duiing this meeting 


Relief Corps 
Holds Party 


OREGON 
— Woman's 
Relief 


Corps held its Match bnthdav 
paitj Wednesday night in the hall 
Honoied guests were members ob- 
serving biithdavb this month Mcm- 
beis with Febiuaiy buthdavs weie 
hostesses 


A birthday cake was the center- 


piece of the bufret table 


GEM OF A KNOT- 
A giant tie with diamond pin 
falls almost to knees on this 
new two-piece white striped 
shantung dress shown by de- 
signer Jacques Path la Paris. 


Fete Mrs. Brown 
At Birthday Party 


POLO — Mis Cail Brown was 


•mipiised Wednesday evening when 
the following gioup arrived to 
help hei celebiate her buthdav 


Mr and Mis Dua.ne Ruth Shir- 


ley 
Karen and G'ene 
Sterling, 


Shirley Apple Rock Falls, Mr 
and Mrs Dewey Blown Mi and 
Mrs William Brown and Greg, Mr 
and Mrs Hemy Baumgaidt and 
Penny Jo Milledgeville and Mi 
and Mrs Cliff old Cartel 


Altar and Rosary 
Society Has Meet 


POLO—The Altar and Rosaiy so- 


ciety met in the parish hall Thurs- 
dav for dosseit, followed by the 
business meeting The hostesses 
weie Mrs Charles Cairoll, Mrs. 
Aithur OHaie, Mis. Henry Blum 
and Mis M J Najlon Plans were 
made for a smoigasbord dinner to 
be held Saturday evening, May 1, 
m the pansh hall 


Willing Workers 
Hokl Chili Supper 


POLO—Willing Workers class of 


Emmanuel EUB Sunday school 
met Thursday evening at the home 
of Mis Lvle Summers Thirteen 
membets enjojcd a chili supper, 
followed bv the business meeting 
and social hour 


The Dixon Evening Telegraph—Dixon, Illinois 
Page 2 
Saturday, March 27,1954 


Announce 8 Polling Places 
For Dist 271 School Vote 


ASHTON — (Specian-The board 


of education for Community Unit 
School District 271 has announced 
details of the school election to be 
held Apnl 10. 


Three members of the board will 


be elected for three-year terms. 
Donald Hav from Ogle county is a 
candidate for reelection Orville 
Englehart, who was appointed to 
the board in February from the 
Pawpaw area, is a candidate to 
succeed himself Harvey Trucken- 
biod of the Steward area does not 
seek icelection, and Jeff Kemper 
and Bernard Fuchs are candidates 
for his post Joe Henry is a candi- 
date for the Ogle county area 


Eight precincts have been estab- 


lished for the voting which will be 
held from noon to 7 p m The pre- 


cincts and the polling places are 
as follows1 


(D Ashton town hall. (2) Frank- 


lin Grove village hall (3) Lee Cen- 
ter school. (4) Compton school. (5) 
Pawpaw village hall. («) Steward 
village hall (7) We'st Brooklyn 
school (8) Frame Star school. 


A special election will be held at 


the same time on a $1,100,000 bond 
issue and Central high school build- 
ing program, and a $190 000 prop- 
osition for a new Franklin Giove 
elementary school. 


Absentee ballots may be secuied 


from Leland Blocher. secretary of 
the board of education, District 
271, Franklin Grove Applicaitons 
by mail must be recevied on or be- 
fore Apnl 5 Personal applications 
for absentee ballots must be made 
on or befoie April 7 


Cancer Society Official to 
Speak in Oregon Tuesday 


OREGON — Wallace W Tudor, 


chairman of the 1954 Cancer Cru- 
sade in Illinois, wall be the princi- 
pal speaker at the ralfv of the Ogle 
county chapter of the Amentan 
Cancer society Tuesday at 2 p m 
in the Veterans of Foreign Wais 
hall in Oregon 


Tudor, a mail order company 


executive, will spearhead the drive 
for funds to continue the society's 
program to fight cancer He was 
vice chairman of the society s 
communities division during the 
1953 campaign 


Other visitors fiom the society's 


Chicago office for the rally will be 
Dr John A Rogers, executive dir- 
ector, and Robert L Knt, cam- 
paign director for the Illinois divi- 
sion 


Harvey Long 
Mt 
Moms is 


campaign chairman for Ogle coun- 
t> 


All county campaign workers 


have been urged to attend the 
rally 


Although the average peison 
' eads at the rate of about 250 words 
a minute, some people can read at 
more than 700 words a minute. 


MAK 
PLANS 


TO ATTEND THE 


BETTE 
HOME SHOW 


DIXON ARMORY 


THURS.-FRI.-SAT 


APRIL 
1-2-3 


DOORS OPEN 6:15 P. 


Admission 
21e 


Fed. Tax 
4' 


Total 


Watch for Further Announcements 


N E W C A D E T B O S S 
— Lieut Gen. Blickshear M. 
Bryan, commander of the First 
Corps in Korea, has been 
named Superintendent of the 
f. S. Military Academy. 


Our New 
Neighbors 


AMBOY— Mi 
and Mrs. Earl 


Sensenig aie the parents of a 
daughter bom Thursday in the 
Amboy hospital 


OREGON—Mr and Mis Robeit 


Davis Mt Morns, are the parents 
of a son born Fiiday in Warmolts 
clinic 


Perfect Driving 
Didn't Pay for 
Forgery Suspect 


CLINTON Okla I*— A perfect 


driving perfoimant,e landed a foi- 
gery suspect in jail Friday 


William C Bloom, 28, faces a 


police and FBI quiz about $5 000 
worth of checks written on an 
Emeryville, Calif, bank 
which 


have bounced throughout the South- 
west. 


"He was driving so perfectly vve 


became suspicious of him " ar- 
testing officers said adding ' A 
guv doesn't usually drive that well 
unless he is trying to hide some- 
thing " 


Reports Needs 
Of Gifted ChUd 


By LILA HEUERMAN 
Oregon Correspondent 


OREGON—The Classroom Teachers association is the graft* roots 


of education, an aggiessive voice in the community for school needs, 
according to Di Eleanor Volberding, associate piofessor of education 
at Northern Illinois State Teachers college, who spoke Thursday night 
at a meeting of Oiegon Classioom Teachers association. 


Dr. Volbeiding S<IK' supervisors 


do not have the time to determine 
all school needs, while the teacheis 
are in a better position to know of 
school needs. 


The speaker has a B A. from 


Iowa State Teachers college and 
M A and Ph D fiom the Univer- 
sity of Chicago Since 1950 she has 
been associate piofessor in the 
education department at the De 
Kalb school 


The topic of her talk was "Cum 


culum for the Gifted Child " 


Skip Grades 


She said aveiage schools are not 


geaied for the child uith a high 


Special, 2 Days Only 
Friday & Saturday 


27" SYLVANIA 
With Hole Light 
'399" 


and Your Old Television 
WEBB'S TV 


522 Galena Axrnue 


Phone 4 8831 


Report United 
States Victory 
At Caracas 


CARACAS. Venezuela Iff)—A full- 


dress session of the 10th Intei- 
Ameucan tonfeience foimally ap- 
pioved Fudaj night the U S reso- 
lution calling foi collective action 
to keep communism out of the 
Westein Hemispheie 


Seventeen icpublics voted for the 


measure 
with only Guatemala 


voting against it Mexico and Ai- 
gentina abstained 


Passage of the resolution was a 


major diplomatic vicloiv for U S 
Secretatj of State John Foster 
Dulles, who extended his stay in 
Caiacas at the beginning of the 
conference to fight foi his anti- 
Red doctnne 


The overwhelming \ote of ap- 


pioval seived notice on Moscow 
that Red mfiltiation of the Amen- 
cas would be considered in the 
same light as a foieign invasion 
The resolution calls on the Westein 
Hemisphere republics to take steps 
tow aid collective action in case 
the 
<50\ ei eigntv of any membei 


nation is threatened by inteination- 
al communism 


Special Services 
Scheduled Sunday 
lu Oregon Church 


OREGON — St Paul s Lutheran 


chuich in Oregon will coopeiate 
with 40 000 other churches in U S 
rtnd Canada in ' One Great Hour 
of Shanng " Sunday 


The junior choir of 28 voices un- 


der dnection of Mrs Paul R Boll- 
man will sing at the morning seiv- 
ite 


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I 
FARMERS! 
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5 


E Yon get that extra crop insurance with GRO-COATED = 
I seed! Ask about our SPECIAL DISCOUNT! 
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f 


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1153 Grand Avenue, Galesburg — 904 East Kent, Streator 
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IQ, who can finish a year's work in 
one-fourth or one-half year Some 
schools, she reported, recognize the 
gifted child and allow skipping 
grades because the gifted child can 
accomplish the woik more quickly 
than the aveiage pupil. 


She pointed out that some school! 


allow a teacher to teach a foreign 
language or a science project to th« 
gifted pupil, special -classes may 
be foimed so that he will stay in 
his social age group, others form 
honor clubs 01 make arrangements 
for college credit for extra subjects 
cained in high school 


Basic Training 


Dr Volbeidmg emphasized that 


the gifted child should not miss th« 
basic training of school She said 
a gifted child can be recognized by 
individual intelligence tests, or by 
patents and teacheis' iccognition 
ot the child s ability The gifted- 
child is usually above average phy- 
sically mentally emotionally and 
spiritual!} she said 


In Euiope the speakei pointed 


out the Rifted child has been rec- 
ognised and allowed to advance ac- 
cording to his ability so that intel- 
ligent persons will be the leaders. 
Howevei 
in America 
she said, 


schooling has been for all people. 
Now we rcah/e that we must recog- 
nize and give the gifted child hss 
chance she said so we can hav« 
intelligent leadeiship 


Di Volbeidmg said the teacher 


foi the gifted child must be a good 
all aiound teachei, and must be 
well-adjusted and lealize that in 
some fields her pupil will excel 
her 


She warned there is a clanger of 


exploiting the gifted child by par- 
ents and teachers The pupil must 
have a varied runirulum so he can 
make the most of it she said. 
Polo Notes 


POLO — Mn Walter Suplnger 


was called to LiUhfield.Thursday 
by the death of Mrs 
Maurice 


Philips who died Wednesday 


Mi and Mis LoRov Long were 


recent dmnci Riiosts in the home 
of MM (§x)np s patents Mr. and 
Mi 5 John COTIIOV Dixon 


Mr 
and Mr* 
How aid Butk, 


Cedar Rapids la 
will be wcfk- 


end guest"; in the Harold Powell, 
lames Giibbms and Robcit Galor 
homes On Sunday Mis Cnbbins 
will entertain the proup at dinner 


Mi« Robei t Hodru k entertained 


hei ( a i d rltib Thinsclay evening. 


Roboit rinthier received high 
, Mis Robert Galot second 


high and Mis Elmer Cross, low 
sc 01 e 


Mrs Harrv WiiPboen was a bus* 
e^s visitor in Dixon Fiiday. 


MR. FARMER: 


"FOR SALE" 


and 


"NO TRESPASSING" 


SIGNS 


Available at 


B. F. SHAW PRINTING CO. 


Evening Telegraph Bldf. 


124 East First Street 


re comes 
Pattersons 
* * * 


. . . WITH THE SOLUTION 


TO YOUR HOG HOUSE PROBLEMS 


5' x T Single Colony 
Hog House as Shown 


Increase Hog Production 
by Providing Lew Cesl 


Adequate Homing 


SEE THEM ON 
DISPLAY TODAY 
AT OUR YARD! 


PATTERSON 


PHONE 52 


Franklin Grovt, Id. 


mm* 


SF4PFR1 
SF4PFR1 


Home Improvement, 
Plywood's Specialty 


Horn* woodwokera have 
long: 


been fond of plywood for its man; 
favorable 
characteristics. 
Chie: 


among them is its tendency to re 
gist warping and twisting. 


That fact, plus tfie added ad 


vantage that it is readily obtain 
able In much wider panels than 
natural lumber, and that it can be 
purchased with hardwood veneers 
that duplicate the finest grain 
patterns of natural Iumber,makes 
plywood a workshop "natural.1 
Its uses have lin.its, however, and 
natural Irmber is still essential to 
almost every kind of woodcraf 
project. 


The two general types of ply 


wood are Exterior and Interior 
Waterproof Douglas fir plywood is 
used for all exterior applications 
because its plies are bonded with 
synthetic resin, which stands up 
under extremes of weather. 


Interior plywoods range from 


Douglas fir, a softwood, for wal 
and ceiling panels, subfloors, stor 
age units and many types of fur 
niture, to hardwood-veneer types 
mentioned before. 


Highest grades of Exterior and 


Interior plywoods are made in 
widths of 2'2, 3, 3'i and 4 feel 
and lengths of from 5 to 12 feet 
Lower grades come in a shorter 
range of sizes. 


There are several grades and 


classifications of plywood adoptee 
by the Douglas Fir Plywood Asso 
ciation as standards for the in 
dustry. 


For instance, the highest grade 


of either Exterior or Interior fir 
plywood is called A-A, or "good 
two-sides." That means both sides 
•re sanded smooth and have high 
quality appearance. Plywood des 
ignated A-B is a common work 
shop^grade. It has one sound side 
suitable for fine finish, while the 
other side has small, tight knots 
or other slight imperfections. 


The lowest grade the handyman 


Is likely to use is the A-D grade 
for wall and ceiling paneling, anc 
other uses where only one face 
will show. Of course this grade 
costs less than either of the others 
mentioned. 


Thicknesses of plywood range 


from >•£ Inch for hardwood veneer 
construction to 1'* inches for 
Douglas fir Exterior grades. 


Hardwood 
plywood is 
graded 


differently from the Douglas fir 


Asphalt Roofing 
Versatile, Suits 
All Structures 


Buildings of all sizes, shapes, and 


purposes can be suitably roofed 
with at least one of the many dif- 
ferent types of asphalt roofing ma- 
terial. The asphalt roofing industry 
supplies 80 to 85 percent of all the 
roofing now required in the United 
Slates, according to the U. S. De- 
partment of Commerce. 


Asphalt shingles are the most 


widely used roofing material for 
homes. Their combination of wea- 
ther-resistance, 
color, 
economy, 


long life, and fire-resistance has 
led to their selection for about four- 
fifths of all new homes as well as 
for new roofs on older dwellings. 


Asphalt roll roofings are often 


selected for farm buildings and 
other service structures. Roll roof- 
Ing, like asphalt shingles, is pro- 
duced in numerous solid and blend 
«d colons. 


"Build-up" roofs are used for 


flat-roofed structures. A roof cf 
this kind is "manufactured" on 
the roof deck by applying several 
layers of felt, which are saturated 
and bonded together with liquid 
asphalt. 
Don't Stack China 


Never stack your good china cups 


if you want to keep them intact. 
Set them in neat rows. 


VIRGIL W. SHROCK 


Xamodtifng ond 


New Construction 


Residential or Commercial 


IMS Academy Sf. 
Ph. 2-4OT1 


C. W. WOISSNER 


Orator ft Builder 
Ph. t-OU 


PHILLIPS 66 


FUEL OIL 
t 


Far Prompt Oily 
•r Rural Wiiiry 


; PHONE 2-1351 


Dixon lee t 


Fuel Co. 


112 L River St. Mm* IN. 


The many varieties, sizes and textures of plywood make it ideally 


suited to the needs of the home woodcrafter. 


variety. Grade 1 is the highest and 
calls for close matching of grain 
and color of both sides. 
Very 


slight imperfections are allowed. 
Grade 4 Rejects is the lowest des- 
ignation and this type should be 
used only where it is entirely con- 
cealed. 


The most common and most 


readily available 
hardwood ply- 


woods 
are 
walnut, 
mahogany, 


oak, gum and birch. There are 
many others not quite so easy to 
obtain, and all have a wide variety 
of grain patterns. 


To the home woodcrafter or 


everyday handyman, hardwood-ve- 
neer plywoods have great appeal 
for making fine furniture, includ- 
ing cabinets and desks, television 
and radio cabinets, table tops, wall 
coverings and others. 
i 


There are other types of special 


plywoods, such as striated or tex- 
tured wall tiles, hardwood plywood 
planks, also for wall paneling, and 
plastic-faced plywoods for kitchen 
tables.' sink 
tops and 
similar 


treatments. Everything considered, 
plywood is a 
highly 
versatile, 


home-improvement product. 


Saturday, March 27, 1954 
PageS 


Changes in Home Building 
Pattern Trend, Reviewed 


Color Makes House Taller 


To make this ranch-style home look larger than it really is, the 


color designer relied on pastel roofing and siding in a blending color. 
Exterior colors, as indicated by numbers, are: The roof (1) is pastel 
nuset asphalt shingles. Sidewalls <2) are coral. Trim (3) is light 


and the accent color on the door (4) is peacock. 


For this small contemporary dwelling, the illusion-creating colors 


are: The roof (1) is brown asphalt roofing. Siding (2) is a blending 
ligbt brown. Trim (3> is off-white. The accent color (4) is willow. 


Your house will appear taller 


and wider than it actually is if 
you take advantage of the extra 
dimension of color. 


Light-color asphalt shingles are 


well suited to modem one-story 
houses because they draw the eye 
upward, emphasizing height and 
creating an impression of impor- 
tance. Because the roof usually is 
the largest unbroken area of a 
house, it is the key to the whole 
color plan. The roof color should 
be chosen first. 


The next step is to choose har- 


monizing siding, also in a light 
color. To emphasize the bright 
roofing and siding, doors should be 
in dark, contrasting hues. This 
gives much the same effect as 
wearing a dark tie with a light 
Colored suit. The illusion of great- 
er size will be increased if trim 
paint matches siding. 


DIXON 
WATER 


COMPANY 


* 
w 
* 


DIXON now hat 
approximately 


40 miles of water main 
400 FIRE HYDRANTS 


Linoleum Care 


Never take a shortcut by using 


abrasives to clean your kitchen 
linoleum. These "shortcuts" will 
prove costly because they'll wear 
out the linoleum. Use only mild 
soap and water.' 


See Us for Your 


Building Needs 


Lock Sets - Hinges 
Cabinet Hardware 
Sash Locks & Lifts 
MASSEY'S 


Act Hardware 


M Soltno 
Pk. 


Vote For 


CHARLES K. 
WILLETT 


Republican Member 


in the 


Illinois General Assembly 
35th Senatorial. District 


April 13. 1954 


Your vote wM be appreciated 


(Pol. Adv.) 


Significant changes in the home 


building pattern of America were 
forecast Thuisday as a segment of 
the booming prefabricated house 
manufacturing industiy held its 
national sales meeting in Dixon's 
Loveland Community house. 


The prefabricated home saleb- 


men are dealers for GBH-Way 
Homes, Inc.. of Walnut, 111. 


Keynote of the convention, the 


14th annual session of the Walnut 
firm's salesmen, was announced 
by Everett Mitchell, whose "It's a 
beautiful day in Chicago" has be- 
come a byword through 30 years of 
radio. But yesterday, E v e r e t t 
changed his familiar greeting to: 


"It's a beautiful day in Dixon!" 


Better Methods 


He complimented the piefabri- 


cated home building industry for 
working out better methods of 
making better homes available in 
America. 


"Today's piefabricated 
house. 


p r o d u c e d by organizations as 
yours, matches the best m conven- 
tional builcling," Mitchell said. 


"Most important, such building 


methods put high quality homes 
within reach of families who could 
not afford such houses. 


"In effect, you are selling much 


more than houses. You are doing 
a community service—because a 
good 
home means high living 


standards and fine family rela- 
tions." 


Preceding his t a l k , Mitchell 


showed colored slides which he 
and his wife took in their travels 
to foreign countries. He used them 
to show advantages America holds 
in things as housing and living 
standaicls. 


Keen Competition 


Master of ceremonies for the 


meeting, held in Dixon for the 
third successive year, was-rChfford 
M. Hill, president of the Walnut 
organization. 


Hill told house salesmen every 


one of them knows the era of k_een 
competition Is here. 


"Our 
shipments for January, 


February and March are practical- 


ly doubled over last year. Weather 
and quality and new features in 
our type of building have helped. 
Most of all. our inciease is a dem- 
onstration that a hard-hitting sales 
organization can get business when 
the chips are down." 


He said FHA and the VA *are 


helping to make building credit 
easier Another significant trend, 
he said, is toward larger houses. 
The three-bedroom house is much 
more popular now than formerly, 
and many families are asking for 
four bedrooms. 


Do It Yourself 


"And let's not overlook the very 


real and important appeal of 'Do it 
yourself.' because many families 
are pitching in and actually doing 
much of their own woik, in order 
to get a really nice house," Hill 
said. 


Other speakers from the Home- 


Way staff at Walnut included Wal- 
lace W Bass, vice president and 
purchasing agent; E:;L T. Jauch, 
engineer in planning and lesearch; 
George E. Gonigam, assistant en- 
gineer; Robert L. Myers, designer 
and advertising manager; Emmett 
R. Myers and Gene Johnson, sales 
supervisors, and Charles D. Hill, 
manager of the lumber and build- 
ing depaitment of Gonigan-Bass- 
Hill Co.. of Walnut. 


John W. Loots, treasurer and 


chief of the loan division of the 
Fidelity Life Insurance Co., was 
complimentary to the expansible 
house idea. 


Bob Pei ry of Dixon was a mem- 


ber of the panel of (talesmen who 
presented an entertaining series of 
right and wrong ways to handle 
prospects. 


Among the new features which 


were "unveiled" and discussed for 
the sales organization, a new and 
modem low-pitch roof line of 
houses was given top interest. Thi 
latest development of the Walnut 
research and 
planning division 


uses newly developed roof trusses 
for a house that is 24 feet wide, 
with 3-foot extended cornices. Indi- 
cations are that a large percentage 
of pi-oduction this season will be of 
this new line. 


Phone 3-8161 • DIXONJLL. 


Great Lakes Water Softener 


ONE VALVE CONTROL — 
Operating this unit is as simple 
os setting an alarm clock. Add 
the salt, set the easy-to-see and 
readily accessible single valve, 
and your automatic control 
takes ever the job of regenera- 
tion. Hydro-Mafic is automatic! 


AUTOMATIC CONTROL — 
Hydro-Mafic control eliminates 
once and for all the fuss and 
bother of watching and waiting 
while regenerating the old- 
fashioned, hand-operated soft- 
ener. Automatically, the con- 
trol starts and stops the rinse, 
and returns the unit to service, 
without attention. 
• Appropriate sices for cottage 


or mansion. 


• Eliminates the annoyance 


and high cast of rental 
service. 


• Supplies soft water constant 


ly, bath HOT and COLD. 


• Saves enavaji to pay for it- 


self in two years or lots. 


The Great Lakes HyaWMatk 
it the only watar softener in its 
price class which incorporates 
•II of these features. 
It is 


backed by aver 25 years of 
softener experience and carries 
M unqualified fwerenrec. 


KLEIN & HECKMAN, Inc. 


PLUMBING and HEATING 


Mount Trophies 
On Quickly Made 
Plyivood Plaque 


A plaque or rack of hardwood 


plywood will provide an ideal 
background for setting off a trophy 
on the den or game room wall. 


Plywood is well suited for this 


purpose because it is easily ob- 
tained, will not split, and is work- 
ed easily with ordinary tools by 
the home craftsman. The beautv 
of the genuine hardwood grain will 
make the prized object look all 
the more impressive. 


To mount a cup or a model, at- 


tach to the plaque a semi-circular 
stand made of the same type of 
plywood as the plaque. It can be 
supported by wood brackets. 


Many prized 
objects 
can be 


mounted on small dowels stained 
to match the plywood plaque. A 
Unique treatment is to inset small 
powerful permanent magnets into 
the hardwood plaque if the object 
to be mounted is of metal with a 
steel or iron base. The advantage 
of using magnets or dowels is 
that the mounted object can be 
plucked off its resting place for 
Quick use or to allow admiring 
friends to examine it rnore close- 
iy. 


Magnets can often be used with 


materails other than metal by in- 
setting in them a small 
steel 


spline, as might be done with the 
wood handle of an antique pistol. 
The pistol would be supported by 
two magnets, one at the barrel 
and one at the handle, opposite the 
spline, with a dowel through the 
trigger guard for added support. 


The plaque should be made of 


hardwood plywood which is at 
least -Vinch thick. If magnets are 
to be used, they should be lecess- 
ed -"-I inch. In that case, a piece of 
plywood si inch thick should be 
glued to tne plaque to provide 
backing. The edges of the plywood 
plaque should be beveled. Because 
the amount of wood involved will 
be small, the craftsman may wish 
to invest in one of the more un- 
usual hardwoods. In any case, an 
important pait of the job will be 
to give the hardwood a natural fin- 
ish so that the beauty of the gram 
may contrast with and enhance the 
prized object to be mounted. 


pHONI 3-1371 


Mildew Stains 


Mildew stains are difficult to re- 


move, but the best way to treat 
them Is to use hot suds, then mois- 
ten them with lemon juice and salt. 
Dry In the sun. if possible, and 
bleach with hydrogen peroxide if 
the stain is old. Be sure to rinse 
thoroughly. 


Save Wear, Tear 


To save wear and tear on your 


tablecloths, change 
the way in 


which you fold them each time. 
This prevents continued creasing 
in one place. 


DESIGNED KITCHENS 


0. SELGESTAD & SON 


209 E. First St. 


Phone 3-7371 


CONVENIENT 


TERMS 


GORAL BROS. 


brings you 


KENTILE 
FLOORS 
At low cost 


Guaranteed as long 


as you live 
in your home 


HOMEOWNflJCUUAMm 
IMMI.!«., «ilt r«»lK(. utfegt ,»„,,_ 
MJ ««Wl »K wun M .. m uy l»ttt I 
M«MMhnnirM...ton| 
' 


«tu»inqt cl yor Mm. rt,,. , 


I M *«rmtf *M«l««*r. Tka ntntMM I 
liin+Ha-ivJSZSZl 


Compart* Onfy ffentife offers 


valve lift* this: 


Uid in 
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my Ottign you with. 


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IM*> to walk m •> wen n it's Uid. 


w inMHt HI 0 p^ry»**FCMKt ItAlfM tfiu 


dirt . . . lUtmi like !>•«• with 


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AIK MR PHC OTIMATt 


KENTILE 


Biggest Garden Thrill Is 
Raising Plants From Seed 


A true dirt gardener, who grous her own flowers, shares a 


royal hobby centuries old. 


Amateur gardeners assert that 


their do-it-yourself hobby is not 
only the most widely practiced to- 
day, but the most ancient of all the 
avocations now followed in leisure 
hours by millions of Americans. 


They can cite history to prove 


that the fascination of growing 
your own plants has appealed to 
men since history began. Ancient 
rulers with armies of servants 
found pleasure in planning gardens 
and personally planting them. 


The Persian emperor Cyrus laid 


out a park in front of his palace at 
Sardis and proudly told Lysander, 
the Spartan, that his own hands 
had planted many of the trees. 


Not every garden owner today 


can make the same boast as Cy- 
rus. But garden club members will 
agree that the keenest thrill to be 
won from this hobby is experienced 
when a flower blooms on a plant 
which grew from a seed or bulb 
which you planted, like Cyrus, with 
your own hands. 


The difference between growing 


a garden and admiring t h o s e 
grown by others finds a parallel 
in athletic sports. No spectator can 
ever share completely the physical 
benefits and sense of achievement 
which the player enjoys. 


While its greatest rewards are 


in mental and physical health, 
gardening with your own hands m 
these times pays substantial mate- 
rial profits which the whole family 
can share. 


On a small plot most of the 


vegetables needed by the average 
family can be grown in fewer 
hours work than it would take to 


shop for them in the market. 


Decorative gardening not only 


rewards the gardener but adds 
substantially to the value of the 
home where it is piatticed. 


The social contacts which devel- 


op from activity in gatdenmg are 
not the least of its rewaids. The . 
rapid expansion of the gaiden club 
movement among both men and 
women is based upon the spread- 
ing interest m this hobbj. 


Many clubs requne that their 


members be "dirt gardeners" who 
plant things with tneir own hands. 
To qualify for membership m this 
fraternity, winter is an excellent 
time to begin. A seed box in a 
sunny window gives the best of 
all initiations to the practice of 
plant growing. Every tiny seedling 
can be seen as an individual, de- 
pendent on your care, and by 
watching its progress or decline, 
as you succeed or fail, lessons can 
be learned far more quickly than 
in the garden. 


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Editorials 


Authoritarian Efficiency Lies Only 


In Hiding Inefficiency 


Bv their nature, democracies muddle through. At times, 


their warmest advocates grow exasperated with the delays, 
the confusion, the inefficiencies and the backing and filling 
which mark the process of popular decision. 
In these moments, some people cast longing glances 


toward the authoritarian governments, where common re- 
port has it that dictation from the top produces a high de- 
gree of efficiency, of centralized action, without inordinate 


6 The phrase, "he made the trains run on time," heard 
so much in Mussolini's day, expressed quite well this some- 
what envious thought. Now, in Communist China, it is the 
Reds, who are making; the trains run on time. 


But in truth, this whole notion is an illusion which 


does not stand up under close inspection. A few examples 
from Nazi Germany, billed as the great colossus which did 
everything right, will reveal the fallacy in this outlook. 


After the war. when we could interrogate thousands of 


men who were involved in the German war effort, we learned 
•just how "efficient" Nazi rule really was. The fact was that 
k was a horribly bungling regime which kicked away an 
amazing number of opportunities to advance its cause of 
conquest. 
1 
* 
« 
** 


Two years after the great war began. Hitler still did not 


have arms production organized on a sensible basis. In 1942, 
with German legions expending 400 million rounds of bullets 
a month in Russia, the Nazis were producing just 115 million 
a month. 
As Theodore White reports, Hitler "flicked his war pro- 


duction about as the whim took him, ordering, canceling, 
guessing, exhorting, without reference to fact, figure or sta- 
tistic." The armed services ordered irrelevantly; priorities 
were a jumble. 


Another instance: Germanv lost a great battleship, the 


Scharnhorst, largely because German naval air reconnais- 
sance was so indifferent the ship's commander began duelling 
British ships without knowing a British battleship of supe- 
rior fire power was among them. 


One man, Herman Goering. was responsible for this loss. 


As boss of the air force, he was contemptuous of the navy 
and its need for air guidance. The German navy never got 
the air protection most navies have. 
« 
* 
» 


These errors grew out of government by dictate, by in- 


dividual whim. The democracies made mistakes in the war, 
too. 
And big ones. But the democracies had one saving 


grace. Their errors were subject to the corrective of criti- 
cism. 
« 
* 
* 


In lands where freedom rules, most decisions are put 


under public scrutiny, questioned, debated, hammered at, 
even reversed if need be. Thus, all the inefficiencies are ex- 
posed, and performance often seems worse than it is. 


In totalitarian countries, errors are suppressed and thus 


are compounded and magnified. To the world they offer a 
facade of perfection. But it is jerry-built, and conceals a 
host of weaknesses. 


No. we need not envy the authoritarian way. And though 


we dare not grow complacent about our defense, we ijeed not 
fear the authoritarians, either. 


we Associated Press it exclusively entitled to the use for repub- 


ication of all news credited to it or not otherwise credited to this paper 
and also the local news therein. All rights of republication of special 
dispatches herein are also reserved. 


The Dixon Evening Telegraph la a member of the Association of 


Newspaper Classified Advertising Managers, which includes leading 
tewspapers throughout the country and has for one of its aims the 
liminauon of 'fraudulent and misleading classified advertising. The 
members of the association endeavor to print only truthful classified 
advertisements and will appreciate having its attention called to any 
advertisement not conforming to the highest standards of honesty. 


Questions and 


Answers 


Q—Why do yellow lights keep in- 
ects away? 
A—Because they produce prac- 
ically no blue or ultraviolet rays, 
vhich is all insects can see. 
* * * 


Q—Who was the first person to 


videly spread the word Yankee? 


A—Jonathan Hastings, a farmer 


of Cambridge, Mass., used 
the 


A-ord in the early 1700's to express 
the idea of excellence. 
* * # 


Q—What people first emphasized 


he importance of the state over 
he individual? 
A—The Greeks. 


w 
* 
* 


Q—Who created 
the world-fa- 


mous character known as Jeeves? 


A—P. G. Wodehouse, English 


author of novels and short .stories. 
* * * 


Q—What type of barometer is 


considered the most accurate? 


A—The mercurial barometer. 
* * * 


Q—Where was the first discov- 


ery of gold in the New World? 
A—Costa Rica, by Sapnish ex- 


plorers. 
* * * 


Q—How many Nobel prizes are 


awarded annually? 


A—Five. 
* • • 


Q—Upon whose life Is Gertrude 


Atherton's novel, "The Conquer- 
or," based? 


A—Alexander Hamilton. 


Ruth Millett 


Couples Are 'Old Marriecls5 


When Petty Irritations Go 


They've finally settled down to 


mairiage when: 


Instead of worrying about his i 


safety and being indignant because 
he didn't telephone to say he would 
be late to dinner, she calmly turns 
the burners on the stove down to 
simmer and beats him to the eve- 
ning paper. 


Instead of giving her a lecture on 


the importance of keeping a check- 
book In a business-like manner, he 
just corrects her arithmetic and 
writes in the checks she forgot 
without even bothering to get mad. 


Instead of waiting for him to no- 


tice the new curtains and being 
hurt when he doesn't she marches 
him right in to look at them and 
tells HIM how much they help the 
looks of the room. 


Instead of trusting himself to 


remember such important dates as 
their wedding anniversary (he'll 
never forget the time he forgot) he 
makes a note of all such events on 
his office calendar. 
TRY TO SOOTHE HIS NERVES 


Instead of trying to get him to 


tell her what is wrong when he 


comes home in a grumpy mood 
she hurries dinner on the table 
tells the kids to walk easy, and re- 
minds him that it's the night of hi1 


favorite TV show. 


Instead of falling for that ques 


tion "How do you like my nev 
hat?" 'and giving her an honest an 
swer that will either cost hin 
money or put her on the defensive 
he glances at it and tells her t 
looks fine but then she'd look fine 
in anything. 


Instead of trusting to luck fo 


what she'll get for her birthday, shi 
starts in weeks ahead giving him 
hints—that he promptly forgets sh 
gave him the moment she says ii 
feigned surprise. "How did yo- 
EVER know this is what I want 
ed?" 


Instead of bristling when sh 


mentions the name of an old beau 
he pays her a. sudden complimen 
knowing she must be feeling th 
need of one. 


Instead of talking about 8,11 thi 


things they are going to do somi 
day they suddenly realize that TO 
DAY is the important day. 


The Mature Parent 


Youth's Long Dependence 
On Us Is Hard on Them, Too 


By MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE 


Last Christmas vacation 
Beth 


came home from college in an odd 
mood. In her recent holiday be- 
tween semesters, her mood was 
even odder. 


She took down an illuminated text 


of The Lord's Prayer that had been 
a childhood gift—and hung a Picas- 
so print in its plar-c "It's too holy j 
for me. mummy," she said. "SU< k 
it in the guest room, will you0" 


She criticized her mother's table 


cloths as "cultural relics." She 
attacked her fathers politics until 
he exploded, roaring. "If I have to 
pay $2000 a year to have you 
taught to call me reactionary, I'll 
find another way to invest my 
money!" 


As the final shock, she announced 


that she had reversed her decision 
to become a kindergarten teacher 
and would become an archeologist. 
. 
Her parents felt suddenly old and 


tired. For a moment her mother 
contemplated the vision of Beth in 
a tropical topee pulling statues out 
of ruins, then rose from her chair. 
"I'm going to bed," she said weak- 
ly. "I can't cope any more." 


Dr. George E. Gardner of Bos- 


ton's Judge Baker Guidance Cen- 
ter has spoken helpful words for 
these occasions. 


"My best advice in the face of 


this behavior," he says, "is the 
tried and true phrase of the men 
«C UM ancient cburcb. When bead 


by the unpredictable and seeming 
ly uncontrollable, they comfortec 
themselves and each other with th 
words, "It^will pass, It will pass.' ' 


My personal feeling is that i 


will pass when Beth has begun tc 
earn her own living. 


In the meantime, it's hard on 


her paients. To maintain a mutual 
ly self-respecting relationship with 
the grown child whom they finan 
dally support is not easy. As thei 
situation is duplicated for thou 
sands of other American parents 
perhaps it's time that its prob 
lems were brought out into the 
open. 


What's happening is that indus 


try and the professions are de 
mandmg more and more prolongec 
and specialized study from our 
young people. 


At ages when their grandparents 


were self-supporting parents and 
masters of their own homes, our 
young people are still in university 
classrooms. It's emotionally trying 
for them and for us. So long as 
their bills are paid by our energy 
their rejection of our values is no' 
easy to accept. 


The prolonged dependence con 


tains hurt for them, to. Much o: 
the time, their impatience with us 
it resentment at the years of finan 
cial apron-strings atill ahead of 


DIXON EVENING TELEGRAPH 


The Dixon Evening: Telegraph—Dixon, HHnoii 


EDITORIAL 


Member Associated Press with FnO Letsed Wire Servte* 


Established 1851—Dlxon, DUnoU 


Published by 


RF.ShawPrintimCo. 


Saturday. March 27,1954 


FEATURES 


Entered at the Postoffic* In the city of Dixon. Illinois, for transmis- 


sion throughout the mails as second class mail matter. 


By mail in Lee, Ogle, Bureau and Whiteslde counties, $100 per year; 


fi.60 six months; 12.76 three month*; 11.50 per month, except in com- 
munities where Telegraph carrier service it maintained. Elsewhere 
in Illinois and anywhere in the United States S18.00 per year; $7.00 six 
months, $4.00 three months: 91.75 per month. All rasil subscriptions 
Durable strictly in advance. 


In Dixon, by carrier, 36c per week or $!«..» par year, payable strictly 


In advance 


Single copy. 6 cents. 


The Doctor Says: 


Surgery Is Making Strides 
In Treating Varicose Veins 


Bv EDWIN P. JORDAN, M.D. 


It's Handy 


NORFOLK. Va. W— The Jack of 


All Trades of the navy is the Con- 
ecuh, once a combination raider 
and replenishment ship of Nazi 
Germany. 


Under United States jurisdiction 


it has been converted to do the 
combined work of a fleet oiler, 
ammunition ship, provision ship 
and stores-issue ship—all while 
under way. It is classed as the 
fastest ship (20 knots) among serv- 
ice fleet auxiliaries. 


By EDWIN P. JORDAN, M.D. 
Mrs. S. and several others of 


the hundreds of thousands or per- 
haps millions of sufferers from 
varicose veins have written me 
asking for a discussion of this sub- 
ject or of the ulcers resulting from 
them. It is an important problem 
indeed since so many suffer either 
from serious difficulties or at least 
in their appearance. 


Although varicose veins and 


varicose ulcers are primarily dis- 
eases of the middle and later 
years of life, • younger people are 
also sometimes troubled with these 
conditions. Occasionally they even 
seem to be a family ailment. 


r 
* 
* 


Standing too much, overweight, 


childbirth, 
chronic 
constipation, 


the wearing of tight bands around 
the legs or hips, all apparently 
contribute to the development of 
varicose veins. Hence, as in so 
many disorders of mankind, an 
ounce of prevention is worth a 
pound of cure. 


The veins near the surface of 


the body all have folds or valves 
which prevent the blood from flow- 
ing the wrong way. The pressure 
on the valves in the veins of the 
legs Is especially great and they 
are often broken. When this hap- 
pens the necessary support is less- 
ened and the vein becomes swol- 
len. It is these swollen blood ves- 
sels which are called varicose 
! veins. Swollen veins are unsightly, 
and women especially dread them 
for ifcis reason almost as much as 
because of the complications which 
they may produce. 
* • * 


People who have varicose veins 


are more likely to have swollen 
feet or ankles than those with 
normal veins. Also the poor cir- 
culation brought about by varicose 
vein*? can produce uclers. 
Such 


ulcers sometimes become enorm- 
ous and cause open sores. 


Several ways of treating van* 


cose veins and ulcers have had 
much success. The use of elastic 
bandages which support the widen- 
ed and enlarged varicose veins is. 
of course, an old remedy and 
helpful in many cases. 


I 
» 
* 
* 


I 
Varicose veins are often tied or 


I removed by surgery. Injections for 


j varicose veins have been used for 
| many years. Injections act by clos- 
ing the opening of the^ varicose 
vein entirely so that the blood 
must now through some other 
vein which is normal or lies deep- 
er in the tissue. At present, sur- 
gery seems to be becoming more 
popular as a treatment and in- 
jections less so. 


The treatment of ulcers is still 


difficult, though several methods 
are fairly successful. It in best to 
try to prevent serious swellings 
or ulcers by taking proper care of 
the varicose veins when they first 
appear. 


Barbs 


By HAL COCHRAN 


When you're a golfer it's a simple 


matter to hang an alibi on a hook. 
• • * 


A movie star went to court 


ever a masseur'* 
9*00 bill. 


Sounds as If she was rubbed the 
wrong way. 


« • • 


The littlefolks who wish they 


were grown-ups will want to be 
young again when they get their 
wish. 
• • • 


It's a tough break for the p*«»l 


mist when there's not enough 
trouble to go around. 


So They Say 


If the army asks me to pay for it 


($1,200 doghouse), I will gladly do 
so. 
> 


—Maj.-Gen. Roderick Allen. 


Any charge that I, at any time, 


urged anyone to go after the navy, 
air force or defense department in- 
stead of the army, and offered to 
furnish leads to plenty of dirt, is 
utterly untrue. 


—Army Secretary Stevens. 
* » * 


A period of nationwide drought 


similar to that which we had in the 
thirties could wipe out our reserves 
of wheat in less than a year. 
—James Patton, National Farmers 


Union president. 
* * * 


He (Senator McCarthy) dons his 


war paint. He goes into his war 
dance. He emits his war whoop. He 
goes forth to battle and proudly re- 
turns with the scalp of a pink army 
dentist. 
—Sen. Ralph Flanders (R., Vt). 
* * * 


I know I got these jobs because 


of the publicity. A dog could get 
them with headlines 
like that. 


Let's face it! 


—Julius LaRosa. 
* * • 


The United States has one great 


advantage in all negotiations with 
the Soviet Union. The things we 
want are the things that most peo- 
ple in the world want. 
—Rep. R. B. Chiperfield (R., 111.). 


» * • 


He (Stevenson) has a way of ex- 


pressing things that's in a class by 
itself. 


—Ex-President Truman. 


Today, as then 
(in Lincoln's 


time), there is need for positive 
acts of renswed recognition that 
faith is our surest strength, our 
greatest resource. 
—President Eisenhower. 
* * • 


They (Big Four conferees) will 


talk and talk and finally Molotov 
will say a final "nyet" and the 
misery in the East will continue. 
—Mrs. Elli Luther, Berlin 
fish 


market owner. 


One-Minute Reviews Describe 
New Books at Dixon Library 


Upper Room on Main Street, by 


Harold B. Walker. A collection of 
sermons by Dr. Walker, of the 
First Presbyterian church, Evans* 
ton. 


Fundamental* of Economics, by 


Paul Fleming Gemmill. A basic in* 
troduction to economics. 


80 Days to Better Spelling, by 


Norman Lewis. Learning to spell is 
a major problem for many people. 
This book will be a help, one they 
have often looked for. 


Bandoola, by James Williams. 


"Elephant Bill" continues his ac- 
count of the fabulous animals who 
are intelligent beasts of burden in 
the teak forests of India. Bandoola 
was one of these individual ele- 
phants with a long, interesting per- 
sonal history. 


All About Trailers, by John Gart- 


ner. "How to build, buy and travel 
in trailers." 


A Treasury of Railroad Folklore, 


ed. by A. B. Botkin. Railroads 
from the beginning have fascinated 
people and out of this fascination 
a rich and varied folklore has de- 
veloped. Botkin has edited other 
fine collections of American folk- 
lore; this one will especially inter- 
est men and boys. 


Forty Plus and Fancy Free, by 


Emily Ki.mbrough. In her • usual 
light-hftarted. amusing way Miss 
Kimbrougrh takes us on a jaunt 
through Italy. 


The American Revolution, 1775- 


1783, 
by John R. Alden. A brief, 


readable volume of Harper's New 
American Nation series. Dr. Alden 
concentrates much of his attention 
on the military campaigns of the 
Revolution. 


Triumph and Tragedy, by Wins- 


ton Churchill. Prime M i r i s t e r 
Churchill with this volume finish- 
ed his personal history of World 
War II. It includes his comments 
on the great, debatable conferences 
of the last year of the war. 


The Poor Man's Guide to Europe, 


by David Dodge. Going to Europe 
this summer on a slim pocketbook? 
This is the book for you. And if 
your purse isn't so flat, but you 
are thrifty by nature, it is still the 
book for you. 


Seven Years in Tibet, by Hein- 


rich Harrer. Not merely a travel 
book Heinrich Harrer's tells cf his 
life with the people before he be- 
came tutor for the Dalai Lama. 
The early pages are full of moun- 
tain climbing, incidental to his ar- 
rival in Tibet. 


The Twenty-Year Revolution, by 


Chesly Manly. Manly states clear- 
ly and emphatically the political 
and social views of conservative 
Americans on the period "from 
"Roosevelt to Eisenhower." 


Fire in the Ashe«, by Theodore 


H. White. According to this book 
there is hope for the future of Eur- 
ope. The regeneration of that con- 
tinent in the last six years as ob- 
served by an intelligent newspaper 
correspondent proves the fire isn't 
out. 
just smoldering under the 


world-wide problem.—communism. 
A very comforting book for Amer- 


A Saturday Night Historical Notebook 


Happy Birthday to Amboy... A Boom Town... Church Builders... A Town Named Bath 


By ROGER THOMPSON 
Telegraph Staff Writer 


In lieu of a large cake with 100 candles, we hereby 


extend our congratulations to Amboy and its residents 
on that community's 100th anniversary. 


It was 100 years ago today, March 27, 1854, that 


the town was surveyed, laid out and recognized as a com- 
munity. As Amboy, making plans for 
a centennial observance later this year, 
begins its second century, we'll go back 
to look into some df the town's "firsts." 


* 
* 
* 
* 


After the town was laid out, the first 


homes built were those of L. W. Bor- 
den, 
E. S. Reynolds and Dr. David 


Bainter. 


Amboy quickly became a boom town 


due to the Illinois Central railroad. In 
1855 large company shops were built, 
Ronr 


and by the spring of 1856 the population of Amboy was an 
estimated 1,000 persons. 
On July 31 the same year the 


Lee County Times reported (perhaps cver-enthusiastical- 
ly) "We have now between 2,000 and 3,000 inhabitants." 


The papers also said the town boasted two churches, 


about thirty stores, a steam planing mill, three hotels, 
twb livery stables and a host of other establishments. 


The first merchant was R. D. Peironett, and the sec- 


ond was Samuel Goldman. Josiah Little was third in 
1854 with a drug, hardware and grocery business. Wilcox 
& Wooster built a store the same year. The lumber was 
hauled from Mendota and the stone from Lee Center. 
G. H. Ambrose and Francis Little started the first bank 
in 1855. The railroad shops in their busiest time provided 
employment for 400 men. 


The first Amboy school was a two-story brick 


building erected in 1857, the name year the com* 
munity dropped the title of village and incor- 
porated fc» a city. 
The earliest religious group, designating itself "Church 


of Jesus Christ" was organized in Amboy, June 27, 185*. 
Catholics held their first meetings in the home of Michael 
Egan in 1854. A church was begun in 1857, but destroyed 
by fire before its completion. It was rebuilt and finished 
in 1859. 


Baptists held an organizational meeting March 24, 


1855. 
Their church was dedicated Sept. 13, 1857. The 


Methodists also built their first church in 1857, and had 
a Rev. Thayer for the first pastor. 


A Congregational church was organized June 17, ISM. 


The first regular minister was David We'rt. 
Its first 


church building was dedicated April 1, 1858. 


The Episcopal church was organized in the spring of 


1859. 
A Mr. Brodnax was the first rector. 


The Free Methodist Society was formed about 1*4, 


and its first regular pastor was a Rev. Miller. The so- 
ciety later merged with mud was replaced by the United 


The First Evangelical Lutheran church was organ- 
of the Illinois Central, was the first mayor of Amboy, 


ized by the Rev. William Angelberger of Franklin Grove 
rose to the rank of general in the Civil War and was 


on Jan. 30, 1870. 
killed in the service of his country. 


Amboy once was the home of an unusual court. 


A. C. Bardwell recounted its story in his history of Lee 
county. 


"Amboy once po<we*sed a court, the like ef 


which was nowhere else to be found in the county. 
Alonzo Kinyon, one of the ambitious men of the 
period, was a member of the Legislature in ISM, 
and procured the pawage of an act, approved, 
March llth of that year, establishing 'The Court 
of Common Pleas of the City of Amboy.' It was 
an effort to duplicate the Circuit Court. 
The 


judge and, clerk were to be elected and receive the 
game salaries as the Judge and Clerk of the Cir- 
cuit Court. 
The city marshal was given the 


power* of a sheriff, and the court wa» empowered 
to appoint a Master in Chancery. 
The act, as 


approved, gave the court chancery Jurisdiction, 
but another act was approved the same day tak- 
ing away thta power. Mr. Kinyon'* plan was car- 
ried into effect by hi* *wa election u Judge, and 
the tribunal became known an 'Kinyon'» Court.'. 
It accomplished the purpose of its creation until 
the Constitution if 1S7A went into effect and wiped 
it out. The records of she court were all destroyed 
in the fire of 1871." 


* 
• 
* 
* 


It is interesting to look at the list of famous names 


which in both large and small degrees were associated 
with early Amboy history. 


Abraham Lincoln—On his way to Freeport to debate 


with Stephen Douglas during the 1158 campaign for the 
Senate. Lincoln spoke in Amboy the previous day. 


U. 8. Grant—Who was to become the great com* 


mander for the Union 'in the Civil War and later Presi- 
dent. He visited Amboy frequently to buy hides for his 
Galena tannery. 


George B. Mcdellan—The man who later was to com* 


mand the Army of the Potomac in the Civil War. He was 
a civil engineer for the Illinois Central, and had head* 
quarters in Amboy during the building of the railroad. 


Carson, Plrie and Seen—The pioneer merchants who 


formed their first partnership in Amboy, and went on to 
build a great merchandising empire. 


Owen Lovejey—Brother of the abolitionist martyr. 


Elijah Lovejoy. crusading journalist of Alton. Owen wai 
a prominent abolitionist in his own right and served in 
the U. 8. House of Representatives. 


Augustus N. Dickens—Brother of famed novelist, 


Charles Dickens. Augustus was editor of the first Amboy 
newspaper, The Lee County Times. 
' 


Kebert G. lageraelV-The gnat agnostic, as a youth, 


worked In Amboy. His father was a Congregational min- 
ister serving the Lee Center area. 


M A 


We all think of the community as "Amboy," but it 


narrowly missed having a different name. 


An early report aays when the residents of the 


area got together to name the place, they chose 
"Bath." However, Lorenzo Wasson, who went to 
Dixon to report the name to the county commis- 
sioners, took It upon himself to change the name 
to "Amboy." 


* 
* 
* 
* 


What Dixon talked about: 


TEN YEARS AGO—1844 


Annual railroad tax payments to Lee county to In- 


crease by $54,241; for Ogle county by $54,274. Red Cross 
progress report shows $4,720.29 collected. 
Chamber of 


Commerce sees war combat films. Eruption of Mt. Ve- 
suvius destroys Italian village. 


* 
* 
* 
• 


25 YEARS AGO—192» 


Construction work begins on Peoria avenue bridge. 


High water slows work. Kansas City to Chicago mail 
plane crashes near Harmon. Pilot parachutes to safety. 


* 
* 
* 
« 


50 YEARS AGO—1804 


Phidian Art club and Daughters of American Revolu- 


tion hear A. C. Bardwell speak on Lafayette. Rock river 
at flood stage in Dixon. Heavy damage reported in Be- 
loit, Wit. Report Dixon public hospital is seriously over- 
crowded. Mrs. L. L. Woodworth, for whom Woodworth 
school was named, died. 
• 


* 
• 
* 
* 


100 YEARS AGO—1854 


"We are informed that Col. John Dement is about 


erecting in this place two buildings, to be each fifty 
by eighty feet in size, and four stories high; in which 
water-power it to be introduced, for manufacturing and 
mechanized purposes." 


* 
* 
• 
• 


From The Dixon Telegraph, March M, 1154. 


THE LONELY GRAVE 


Far away from the haunts of men, 


Where the willows wave; 


Far awa'y In the shady glen 


It an infant's grave. 


No footsteps break his quiet sleep- 


He rests alone— 


No parents come o'er his grave to weep 


No friend to mourn. 


' The roses blossom at his head, 


The violet at his feet; 


And all around the flowers shed 


Their perfume pure and sweet. 


MAOOIB 


leans who feel burdened with world 
leadership; it is 'a gift to the li- 
brary from the A. J. Pana family. 


* 
Recreation 


A Primer of Chess, by Jose Paul 


Capablanca. 


Contract Bridge Complete, by 


Ely Culbertson. 


Samm Photography; Approaches 


and Techniques With the Miniature 
Camera, by Jacob Dcschin. 


Fashion Drawing, by Hazel Ruth 


Doten. 


Model Railroad Book, by Warren 


F. Morgan. 


Antique Guntt and Their Current 


Prices, by Martin Rywell. 


More Fun In the Water, Games 


for Swimmers and Non-Swimmers, 
by Eidola Jean Bourgaize. 


How to Win at Tennis, by John 


A. Kramer. 


Fisherman's Encyclopedia, Out- 


door Life magazine. 


Fiction 


The King's Rangers, by John 


Brick. Covering practically the 
same period as "The Rifleman" 
by the same author this novel has 
a young Tory for a hero. It is good 
historical fiction with a dash of 
romance. 


Mid Watch, by Edward Ellsberg. 


Another novel of the U.S. navy, 
another court martial, this time in 
1908. 
Comd. Ellsberg has written 


many exciting books of various 
kinds of sea operations. 


Doctor at Sea, by Richard Gor- 


don. Sophisticated, humorous expe- 
riences of the ship's doctor on an 
ocean liner. 


Quiet Under the Sun, by Kevin 


Fitzgerald, Exciting, a m u s i n g 
cloak and dagger opus about a 
British government official "fram- 
ed" and rescued against a Spanish 
background. 


The Saving Grace, by McCready 


Huston. A story of old line Phila- 
delphia and New York reminiscent 
of "Kitty Foyle" with a John and 
Priscilla Alden flavor added, f 


Bless This House, by Norah 


Lofts. Three hundred years in th« 
history of a beautiful old English 
home and the people who lived 
there. 


Sayonara, by James A. Michen- 


er. A plea for a change of attitude 
by the U.S. armed forces toward 
fraternization and love. The story 
is a new version of Madame But- 
terfly with army officials and regu- 
lations as the villain. 


The Blue Chip, by Ysabcl Ren- 


nie. The title refers to an Arizona 
copper mine, and the story is a 
well-told version of a lucky strike 
and its effect on the families and 
the new town which developed. 


The Bright Sands, by Robert 


Lewis Taylor. Delightful comedy 
of Cape Cod and the Cape Codders. 
Yankee humor all the way. 


The Untidy Pilgrim, by Eugene 


Walter. An unassuming but enjoy- 
able story of a young Southerner's 
year in Mobile with the many 
characters he meets; some eccen- 
tric, some likable, some lovable. 


Mysteries 


Th* Case of the Fugitive NurnA, 


by Erie Stanley Gardner. 


Thieves' Hole, by David A. Ho- 


warth. 


Western* 


Bitter Sa«e, by Frank Gruber. 
Bigamy Jones, by Frank TolberL 


A farcical western about a lucky 
gun fighter who had 30 wives 
scattered through the southwest. 
Funny in the way Pecos Bill and 
Paul Bunyan are funny. 


U. S. Crews 
To Fly Planes 
To French 


WASHINGTON IT) — American 


crews will ferrry a new flock of 
B26 fighter-bombers to Indochina 
where French fliers will use them 
in round-the-clock bombardment of 
Red divisions besieging vital Dien 
Bien Phu. 


The Defense Department an- 


nounced Friday that 25 more B26S 
would be lent to the hard-pressed 
French, who are trying to repel 
Vietminh 
efforts 
to 
take 
the 


stronghold in time to give Red dip- 
lomats a talking point at April 
Asian 
peace talks in 
Geneva, 


Switzerland. 


The u. S. also is sending am- 


munition and defense supplies. Al- 
ready in action are 22 B26s and 
an undisclosed force of transports, 
some of which are piloted by ci- 
vilian volunteers from this coun- 
try. 
What's Right? 


When a hostess is having a 


small group of intimate friends in 
for coffee, a pleasant, .informal 
way of serving It to set up the 
coffee service and let each guest 
serve herself. That way conversa* 
tion isn't interrupted as much aa 
when the hostess it kept busy re- 
plenishing, cups and bringing 
cream and sugar to each guest. 


The easy way is often the pleas* 


ant way for everyone. 


Explaining why she liked a cer- 


tain girl a teen-ager summed it up 
with: "She always treats you the 
same—no matter 
who else 
14 


around." That's fine foundation for 
making' friend!. Nobody likea to be 
fawned on one day and ignored UM 
next. 


The friendly person who alway* 


treats you the wme has the kind of 
lor 


EWSPAPER 
iWSPAPERI 


IETY 
NEWS 


The Dixon Evening Telegraph—Dixon, Illinois 
Saturday, March 27, 1954 
Page 5 


Pretty Spring Bride 


MISS MARILYN ROBERTA ETN'VRE became the bride of William 
Albert Venohr, March 20. at St. Paul's Lutheran rhurch, Oregon. 
Her gown was of nylon tlille, with a frontpanel and bodice of deli- 
cate schiffli embroidery. Mr. and Mrs. Venohr are spending their 


honeymoon in New Orleans 


Marilyn Etnyre, 
Wi iam Venohr 
Wed in Oregon 


The mai nage of MKSS Marilyn 


Roberta Etnyre, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Etnjie of Oie- 
gon, and"William Albert Venohr of 
Sterling, Colo., took place at St. 
Paul's Lutheian chinch, Oiegoa, 
on March 20. 


The bndogioom is the ton of 


Mr. and Mrs. C. Venohr. 525 N. 
Third st , Sterling, Colo. 


The Rev. Paul K. Bollman, pas- 


tor of St. Paul's Lutheran chinch, 
performed the double ring: ceie- 
mony, in a candle-lit church dec- 
orated with white tulips, stocks 
and calla lilies. The organist was 
Mrs. Paul R. Bollman, Oregon, and 
William Divan, Orc-pon, was the 
•oloist at the wedding. 


The bude was given in niainage 


by her father. 


Miss Etnyie's diess was of nylon 


tulle, panelled with schiffli em- 
broideiy and styled with a wide V 
neckline and a bodice of ruched 
pleating. Her full skirt fell into a 
chapel train, and she wore a halo 
headdress of schiffli embroidery 
with a fingertip veil of silk illusion. 
The bridal flowcis were white hya- 
cinths and fleurs d'am our, which 
she earned with her white Bible. 


The maid of honor, Miss Sally 


Somner of Davenport, la., woie a 
ballerina length gown of mauve- 
pink polished cotton, with a white 
Venetian lace trim. Blue hyacinth 
flowerets formed her bouquet. 


Bridesmaids in attendance were 


Miss Jane Brooke, Oregon, and 
Mrs. O. W. Gu&hee jr., Denver, 
Colo. Their dresses matched that 
of the maid of honor's in style. 


The junior bridesmaid was Miss 


Susan Etnyre, a cousin of the 
bride. Her dress matched those of 
the bridal attendants, and she 
wore a wristlet of hyacinth .flower- 
ets and carried a basket of rose 
petals. 


The best man was Roger Etnyre, 


brother of the bride. Charles Hunt- 
er of Holland Park, Warren Brown 
of Sidney, Nebr., and Franklin 
Doke of Merino, Colo., acted as 
ushers at the ceremony. 


Tfce bride's mother wore a Dior, 


blw nylon organza ensemble, with 
matching hat, shoes and accesso- 
ries. Sweetheart roses made up her 
corsage. 


Mrs, Venohr wore a navy blue 


sheer dress with white accessories, 
and her corsage was of sweetheart 
roses. 


The wedding1 reception, Immedi- 


at#ly after the ceremony, took 
place at Maxson's Manor, Oregon. 
Mrs. Robert Etnyre, Mr». G. M. 
Etnyre jr., Miss Ann Engelbrecht, 


—TO— 


The Lady Who Sews 
tou have the right to expect 
"trouble-free" tervloe from the 
new ZIG ZAG newing machine 
Mil will nome day own. 
fHK SEWINO MACHINE CEN- 
TER, with year* of experience 
In handling precision machines, 
can assure yon of Jtwt that 
•ervlre • • • We recommend 
WAFF. 
SEWING MACHINE 


CENTER 
DIXON, III. 


Mis. John Ciowcll, Mis. Reed 
Johnson, Mrs Earl Ring and Miss 
Bolsy Elm-re assisted at the re- 
ception. 


The bride's going-away suit was 


a dust}' pink colui, and with it she 
wore a pink hat, and brown acces- 
sories. Her corsage was a brown 
orchid. 


The couple is spending their 


honeymoon in New Orleans. 


Marilyn wasj a student of Oregon 


high school and a giaduate of the 
University of Colorado. She is a 
member of the Chi Omega soror- 
ity. 


The bndegtoom was educated at 


Sterling high school, and he, too, 
is a graduate of the University of 
Coloiaclo. He is connected with the 
automobile business. 


Mr. and Mrs. William Venohr 


will make their home in Sterling, 
Colo. 


LADIES OF THE GAR 


Dixon Circle "No. 73, Ladies of 


the GAR are requested to meet 
Monday afternoon at 2 p.m., in the 
home of Mrs. Viola Strub, for an 
inspection practice. 


FOR MRS. OTIS 


Mrs. Harry Warner entertained 


Mrs. Goldie Otis of Cal., at a din- 
ner party on Thursday. 


Keep some cans of small sar- 


dines on your kitchen shelves; 
you'll find them handy for eve- 
ning snacks. Spread slices of toast 
with mayonnaise and sprinkle with 
grated Cheddar cheese; arrange 
some sardines on each slice; put 
these sardine snacks in a very 
hot oven for about five minutes. 
Serve at once. 


ONE CENT ON THE DOLLAR 


VALUATION ON YOUR 


F U R S 


Will Store Them Until Next Fall 


F O R M A N 


RestyUng and Repairing 


Insecticides Control 


u? 
* 


Summer Insect Pests 


By JUNE PILGRIM 


So many folks have asked the question of what to do with those 


pesky boxelder bugs. H. B. Petty sent me some answers recently. He 
is assistant professor of entomology with our extension service. 


Control, he says, begins by eliminating all seed-bearing boxelder 


trees. The bugs feed on boxelder seeds. They do 
not feed on food or cloth. Insecticides are the best 
practical control, and one should thoroughly spray 
the trunks and the ground around the seed-bearing 
boxelder trees. This is best done in late summer 
and early fall. Sides of a house might also be 
sprayed where the bugs cluster. 


Lindane of a ,5% spray will give a quick kill. 


One-half pint of 20% lindane concentrate in ZYa gal- 
lons of water will make a .6% lindane spray. 


Another material, dieldrin, used at .25% will also 


give good control. Make it by mixing ȣ pint of 20% 
June Pilgrim 


concentrate of dieldrin in 2 gallons of water. These materials should 
be applied to the sides of the house and foundation and a three-foot 
strip along the house where bugs are clustering. Applications may have 
to be repeated at one to two-week intervals. 


Lenten Meals 


Why not try some rolled stuffed 


fish fillets for those Lenten meals? 
Frozen fish fillets are easily se- 
cured these days. Prepare a herb 
butter by creaming \'3 cup butter 
with 3 tablespoons minced parsley, 
2 tablespoons minced onion, 1 tea- 
spoon grated lemon rind, *fc tea- 
spoon salt and a few dashes of 
pepper. 


Separate and cut a package of 


fillets to serving size portions. 
Place a tablespoonful of herb mix- 
ture on each fillet and spread. Roll 
the meat up like a jelly roll and 
fasten with toothpick. 


Place rolls in a well-greased 


baking dish. Dot the top of each 
fillet with remaining butter mix- 
ture. Bake in a 350 degree oven 
for 25 minutes. Remove the tooth- 
picks, garnish with lemon wedges 
and serve plain or with a tomato 
sauce. 


Use of Wax 


Some places where homemakers 


might consider the use of wax— 
which will make her future jobs 
easier (use paste type wax): 


1. Waxing rods in the clothes 


closet while you have put clothes 
out to air. Hangers will move more 
easily. 


2. Wax traverse rods—makes 


draperies easier to pull back and 
forth and they are less likely to 
stick. 


3. Wax the bottoms of tables and 


chair legs; they will move more 
easily and cause less marking on 
hard floorings. 


4. Wax ash trays. Ashes don't 


stick so badly to them. 


5. Wax the wastebasket (metal) 


so dust and dirt won't stick and 
collect on it. 


6. Waxing the telephone will 


keep it from collecting 
finger- 


prints. 


7. Wax painted or oilcloth cover- 


ed shelves in your cupboards. They 
will be easier to clean and dishes 
won't stick. 


8. Wax a wire clothes line and it 


will be protected against corrosion 
and be easier to wipe clean for 
each use. 


9. Wax window sills for extra 


protection from blown in moisture, 
dirt and soot that collects, particu- 
larly in an urban area. 


Use Pastry Canvas 


Piecrust and other soft doughs 


will be easy to handle with no 
sticking if you use a pastry canvas 
and a knit cover for your rolling 
pin. The trick is to rub the canvas 
and rolling pin cover full of flour 
and keep them that way while you 
are using them. 


With care, you will be abl* to 


use your canvas several times 
without washing. Scrape bits of 
dough and as much flour from the 
canvas as you can so that they 
won't becomt rancid. Then store 
the canvas in a plastic bag or 
wrapped in a clean dish towel. 


When you wash the canvas, 


brush it first, and then soak it in 
cold water. Wash it gently with a 
small brush and lots of hot' suds. 
After washing on both tides, i rinse 


For a Permanent 
that will not only b» beautiful, but 
lasting—visit th« 


VOGUE BEAUT* SALON 
Dixon National Bank Bldj. 


SEE YOUR FUTURE 


AT THE 


DIXON MERCHANTS • DIXON 


EVENING TELEGRAPH 


BETTER HOME SHOW 


Thrill to « previaw of what yt» m«y (*•*•!. SM flit 
l«ta>* Nome fmmlskliift and ••flieacts. Stt yrar w«y 
to • bettor, mere tortfre* lrf». 


April 1-2-3 
Dixon Armory 


DMM Opt* Nitoly 


5:1 S p. nit 


ML Tax 


ToUl 


it thoroughly but don't wring it. 
Smooth it out on a hard surface 
and it will dry free of wrinkles. 


You can easily make your own 


canvas and cover and save about 
half of what a ready-made 
set 


would cost. One and one-fourth 
yards of 8-12 ounce canvas and a. 
pair of white cotton stockings will 
make two sets. Nice to have two 
so one will he a spare—or give one 
to a fnend for a gift. 


Home Bureau IJotes 
, 


Monday, March 29, a series of 


cancer films will be shown during 
a special meeting conducted by 
Lee County Home Bureau organi- 
zation. The public, as well, as 
members, are welcome to attend 
this film showing at the Farm 
Bureau building in Amboy from 
1:30-3:30 p.m. 


Five different films on cancer— 


that are of particular interest to 
women—are being shown.' This 
meeting, the final one in a series, 
completes a special lesson conduct- 
ed on home nursing during the 
month of March. These sneetings 
were conducted by Mrs. Theresa 
McMahon of the Lee County Health 
department. 


On Tuesday. March 30, Lee coun- 


ty will be host to a district training 
school in 4-H foods work. Miss Er- 
ma Cottingham, 4-H foods special- 
ist, will be on hand \o assist 4-H 
leaders in both Lee and Ogle coun- 
ties with the new 1954 phases of 
these projects. The training school 
will be held in' Amboy at the Farm 
Bureau building from 10 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. 
• 


All of us who are Interested in 


hobbies should try to get over to 
the Rochelle high school this eve- 
ning or tomorrow. I've been told» 
that the Hobby Boosters are put 
ting on a real great show again 
from 1-9 p.m. Hobbies are wonder- 
ful for our Ijfealth and peace of 
mind. Let's all develop one or sev- 
eral. 


Fashion Magic 


THESE TWO YOUNGSTERS are modeling some of the children's 
clothes which will be seen "at the show, 'Fashion Magic.' to be pre- 
sented by Gamma Mu chapter of Beta Sigma Phi on April 2, at the 
Dixon high school auditorium. Susan Venier is wearing a delight- 
ful crisp, white nylon dress, with that full-skirted daintiness that 
gives a little girl that "all sugar and spice" look. It's easy to laun- 
der, toe, because it's made of nylon. Phih Slagle wears a neatly 
tailored suit, which is as practical as it's smart, because it, too, 


can be laundered 


Engagement 
Announced 


Mr. and Mrs Carleton Blunt of 


Winnetka have announced the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Fran- 
ces Laird Blunt to William Ernest 
Steinwedell II. The announcement 
was made at a family party when 
Miss Blunt and her fiance were at 
home for a brief period, from their 
classes at Stanford university. 


William Steinwedell is the son 


of the William Steinwedells of Win- 
netka, and formerly of Dixon. Wil- 
liam Steinwedell sr.. was the Gen- 
eral Manager of the Green River 
Ordinance Plant. His son is the 
grandson of Mrs Ralph M. Shaw of 
Chicago. 


Miss Blunt, granddaughter of the 


John E. Blunts of Evanston, made 
her debut in 1952 Her wedding date 
has been set for December. 


MINERAL BATHS 


ENJOY GOOD HEALTH 


Scientific Swedish Massage 


Improves the Function of the Skin 


Soothes the Nerves 


Stimulates Digestion, Circulation and Elimination 


Increases Intestinal Action 


Reduces Overweights-Builds Up Underweight 


aininfmnt on Tut»d».v» and Thnradajn. Have Installed new Overland 


Cabinet with (bower. ThU l> •omethlng new In the Hydrotherapy work. 


GEORGE ORTGIESEN 


HEALTH SYSTEM 


For Appointment Dial 4-0331 


ft Peori* Ave. 
— 
Upstairs 
— 
Dixon, Illinois 


Social Calendar 


Military Order of Lady Bugs to 


meet at 8 p.m. 


Dorothy Chapter 371, Order of 


Eastern Star, at the Masonic Tern 
pie, 7 p m . 


Ladies of the GAR, in the home 


of Mrs. Viola Strub, 2 p m. 


GREAT BOOKS 


Great Books club will not meet 


on Monday. The group meets on 
the first and third Mondays of the 
month, but as next Monday is the 
fifth in the month, members will 
not meet until April 5. 


Dixon Couple 
Married Friday 


Mrs. 
Courtney 
Cory, 
Dixon, 


daughter of Mis. B. A. Chncker, 
415 Second av., and Hal Roberts, 
also of Dixon, were married Fri- 
day afternoon in Gulfport, Miss. 
The ceremony was performed in 
St. Matthew's Lutheran church. 


Mrs. 
Roberts has one daughter, 


Diane. 
& 


After a week or so in the South. 


Mr. and Mrs. Roberts will be at 
their home on Plum Hollow Road, 
Oixon. 


St. Luke's Guild 


Members of St. Luke's Guild of 


St. Luke's Episcopal church met 
in the Guild hall Thursday evening, 
with Mrs. George Covert and Mrs. 
Gene Kishbaugh as hostesses. 


Mrs. 
Harlan Fraza presided at 


the meeting. 


Mrs. 
William Landt introduced 


Father Jones as the speaker for 
the meeting. 


Mrs. 
George Cooper presided at 


the refreshment table during the 
social hour which followed the 
meeting. 


PRESBYTERIAN GROUP 


Group II of the Presbyterian 


Woman's Association will meet on 
Thursday in the country home of 
Mrs. Joseph Crawford. Mrs. Bruce 
Whites is in charge of the refresh- 
ment committee and will be as- 
sisted by Mrs. Henry Dressell, 
Mrs. John F. Brown and Mrs. L. 
G. Yenerich. 


The program will be given by 


Mrs. Dorothy Raney. 


WCTU Meeting 


Mrs. Frederick Hobbs and Mr*, 


Frederick !,eef«'r si,, will be the 
hostesses to members and guest* 
of the Dixon WCTU at the Love- 
and Community House, April 2, 
with a dessert luncheon at 
1:30. 


The regular meeting will begin at 
2 p m . 


Mrs. Paul Kesselring will be in 


charge of devotions and Mrs. J. F. 
iindig will give the lesson study 
and highlights from "Union Sig- 
nal." 


Members are asked to bring old 


candles for the Korean 
project 


which the gioup has taken up. 
VIembers are also reminded to 
bnng baked goods for a silent auo 
.ion. 


Visitors are welcome at the meet- 


ng. 


o 


METHODIST CLASS 


The Woman's Bible class of the 


Methodist church met recently in 
the home of Mrs. Pauline Rife. A 
dessert luncheon was served by the 
hostess committee with Mrs. Paul 
Sodegren as chairman. 


Mrs. Sidney Bloomquist, program 


chairman showed slides taken on 
various vacation trips. 


IN MEXICO 


Mrs. Helen Roat of 729 E. Third 


St., Dixon, is vacationing in Mexi- 
co City. While in the Mexican cap- 
ital she is making the Hotel Prince 
her headquarters. 


PRACTICAL CLUB 


Mrs. C. C. Clausen will entertain 


the Practical club on Tuesday at a 
1:30 dessert luncheon. Members 
are asked to note the change in 
time of this meeting. 


BLANKENBERG PHOTOGRAPHERS AN- 
NOUNCE with pride the completion of their 
newest Studio at 109 Vi East First Street, Dixon, 
Illinois. 


With the purchase last fall of the Hintz Portrait 
Studio of Dixon, two of the outstanding names 
in photography were combined, Hintz-Blanken- 
berg. 


tinder this name Blankenberg Photographers will 
bring to Dixon and the surrounding territory all 
of the advantages of their, statewide organization. 
The high quality, lower prices and the additional 
services that are traditional with the Blankenberg 
name will be available. 


For twenty years, Blankenberg Photographers 
have been serving the territory around Dixon 
through the High Schools, while Mr. C. C. Hintz 
for 49 years has been serving the people of Dixon. 
Both a-re proud of this record and the combina- 
tion of Hintz-Blankenberg will now offer this 
territory exceptional photographic service. 


Open House will be held for the public in the 
••ar future. 


BLAMUVBBM 
PHOTOGRAPHIES 


Macomb, Illinois 


KLAWHRNBEKO 


BEER'S 


BREAD 


'I4KED FINE SINCE *69" 


GRACEY FUR SHOP 


III Beanepln An. North 
Ph. 1-7831 


• STORAGE 


• CLEANING 


• REMODELING 


Cub Pack 3 
Awards Given 


Cub Pack 311 met in South Cen- 


tral school auditorium on Tuesday 
evening. 


The entire pack took part in the 


opening flag ceremony. 


Paul Schmidt conducted a short 


business meeting. 


Awards Were presented to Steve 


McCrystal, Billy Thompson and 
Richard Stuart 
Don 7 was pre- 


sented with a new Den flag. 


After the meeting the parents 


inspected den projects of the past 
few months, which were displayed 
in the auditorium. 


SON HOME 


Sgt. George Tyler, son of Major 


and Mrs. Cal Tyler is visiting hi3 
parents until Monday, when he will 
report for duty at the Scott Field 
near Belleville, 111. 


SILVER WEDDING 


Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Bennett of 


Grand Detour will celebrate their 
silver anniversary on Sunday, with 
open house from 2 to 5 p.m., and 7 
to 9 p.m. 


RETURNS HOME 


Mrs. Goldie Otis will return Sun- 


day, to her home in California, 
after a visit spent here seeing 
many friends in her former, home. 


BIRTHDAY PARTY 


Mrs. F. G. Dimick, Mrs. Al Jenka 


and Mrs. Grover Moss will enter- 
tain with a birthday luncheon and 
cards, Tuesday, at the home of 
Mrs. Dimick in honor of Mrs. Z. 
W. Moss. 


AT YOUR GROCERS 


ee 


P O P C O R N 


"Guaranteed To Pep* 


A GLASS TOP 


Will 


Protect That 
NEW DESK 


Adds Beauty and Profecfs Fine Furniture 


PHONE 
4-0711 


204 


FIRST ST. 


Do you know what 1 llilLjt is? 


Well,—do you? A quick look at this assortment of fancy time pieces, 
rand you see that you have quite a choice. That's because each one of 
them is set at a different hour. 


i 
But it really doesn't matter whether it's 3 o'clock Central Standard 


Time out where you are, or 16 minutes to 6 p.m., on the first Tuesday 
after the Full Moon. Because anytime at a/I is the right tiihe, the COR* 
RECT time to start buying U. S. Savings Bonds regularly through 
systematic, automatic Payroll Savings. 


Savings Bonds grow in value with each tick of the clock. Time is really 


working for you when you have U, S. Savings Bonds stacked away, 
Baiting and ready. 
\ANYTIME is Payroll Savings Time., 


DIXON EVENING TELEGRAPH 


IN FW SPA PERI 
IN FW SPA PERI 


The Dixon Evening Telegraph 
Saturday, March 27,1954 
Page 6 


STOCKS 


The following listed on the New 
fork Stock Exchange. This sen-- 
ice is provided by the firm of Hul- 
burd, Warren & Chandler, Dixon. 


At 1 Prev. 
p.m. 
Cl. 
Allis Chalmers 
47% 47'i 
A m e r T & T . . . 
163 
162V2 
Anaconda Copper 
32% ' Sll- 
Beth Steel 
55'4 55" 


Boeing; Aircraft 
72V* 68% 
Borden 
58% 58% 
Borg Warner 
80% 80s* 


.1 I Case 
15V- 15*4 
Chrysler 
62],i 62>> 


Comw Edison 
391 s 39 " 
Deere & Co 
273i 273i 
DuPont 
113's lll^s 


Gen Elec 
101*; 101% 


Gen Foods 
58% 58?; 


Gen Motors 
64%. 641'. 
Goodyear 
61U 


111 Cent 
81% 
Int Han" 
2S'i 


Kaiser A!um 
26% 


Kenn Copper 
70% 
LaSalle Ext 
7 


Mont Ward 
60 
Nash Kelv 
14% 
N Y C 
23ii 


North Am Life 
1034 
Penn-R R 
....le1^ 
J C Penney 
78S4 
Raido Corp 
26 »l 
Sinclair 
39U 


Soconv .Vac 
39*1 
Std Irid 
76H 
Std N'J 
80' 


Swift 
43% 


United Fruit 
48% 48 
Westg Elec 
59U 58? 


Wichita Oil 
5 * 


Bonds 
N Y C S's-2013 
79% 


N Y C4iVs-2013 
72 
N Y C l's-1998 
66% 


Italian Reds 
Open Drive 
On Mrs. Luce 


ROME W— Italian Communists 


and 
their 
fellow-travelers have 


pushed 
their campaign 
against 


U.S. Ambassador Clare 
Boothe 


Luce with a formal demand in the 
Senate that the American woman 


6014 
8114 
28 Vs 
27 
70 


58'i 
14*i 
23% 
11U 
15% 
79U 
26% 
39 U 
39 U 
76% 
79% 


80 
72 
67 
Prev 


• Dow-Jones Av. Close 
Industrials 
299.08 up 2.68 296.40 
Rails 
99.47 up .11 99.30 


Utilities 
55.95 up .08 55.87 
Volume 
1.550,000 1,790,000 


Autos Collide 
Near Ashton 


ASHTON — (Special) — A two- 


car 
collision 
Friday 
afternoon 


caused an estimated $400 damages 
about 1'i miles north of Ashton. 


Drivers of the autos were Wesley 


Krug, Ashton. and Arthur Camp- 
bell, Logan, Utah. There were no 
injuries. 


State police reported damages to 


each car were about $200. 


Obituaries 


MRS. MINNIE E. MALL 


ASHTON —(Special)— Funeral 


•ervices for Mrs. Minnie E. Mall, 
79, Ashton, will be held Monday at 
2 p.m. in Evangelical church here 
with the Rev. Romaine Tenney of- 
ficiating. Burial will be in Ashton 
cemetery. , 


Mrs. Mall died unexpectedly in 


her home Friday. 


She was born in Bradford town- 


ship, Lee county, March 18, 1875, 
the daughter of Conrad and Mar- 
tha Rice Krug. She married John 
C. Mass March 8, 1895, in Brad- 
ford township. 


She is survived by two daugh- 


ters, Mrs. Irma Erbes and Mrs. 
Alice Burhenn, both of Franklin 
Grove; 
six grandchildren; 
ten 


great-grandchildren, and a sister, 
Mrs. Martha Mall, Ashton. 


Her husband and a daughter pre- 


ceded her in death. 


Mrs. Mall had lived in Ashton 14 


years. She was a member of Evan- 
gelical church. 


The body it in Gluts funeral 


home. 


envoy be declared persona non 
grata— not welcome in Italy. 


A group of Communist, left-wing 


Socialist and pro-Red independent 
senators made the request in a 
written interpolation for the Senate 
record 
Friday. The government 


must answer the interpolation, but 
it does not call for a vote. 


Heading the list of signers was 


Communist Sen. Ottavio Pastore, 
editor of the official Italian Com- 
munist party newspaper L'Unita, 
which has carried on a vitriolic 
editorial war against Mrs. Luce. 


The interpolation inquiries of the 


government "if they intend, as is 
necessary, to communicate to the 
government of the United States 
that Ambassador Luce no longer 
is persona grata because of her 
intervention in the internal affairs 
of our country ..." 


Declaring an envoy persona non 


grata automatically forces the gov- 
ernment of the country he repre- 
sents to recall him. 


The senators did not explain 


what they considered Mrs. Luce's 
"intervention." 
But 
Communist 


newspapers in the past few days 
have claimed it was Mrs. Luce's 
work that brought a recent an- 
nouncement by Premier 
Mario 


Scelba that his government will 
crack down on the Communists un- 
der new, tougher policies. 


Scelba can be expected to reject 


in the bluntest terms the leftist re- 
quest to get rid of Ambassador 
Luce. 


Personals 


Mrs. R. E. Erikson, Grand De- 


tour, who recently underwent a 
serious operation at the KSB hos- 
pital, is making a satisfactory con- 
valescence. 


Mrs. Bird of Northfield is visiting 


her daughter, Mrs. Vernon Jones, 
at St. Luke's rectory. 


Robert Rorer, who is attending 


Western Reserve Military academy 
in Cleveland, Ohio, is visiting his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Rorer, 
during spring vacation. 


The Misses Laura and Gracia 


Rogers have returned from a holi- 
day in Florida. 


GI Slayer 
Sentenced 
To Death 


TOKYO (ft— A Pennsylvania ser- 


geant who confessed he got "com- 
plete sexual satisfaction" out of 
strangling to death a pretty little 
American .girl was convicted to- 
day of premeditated murder and 
sentenced to die. 


M/Sgt. Maurice L. Schick, 29, 


World War II Purple Heart veter- 
an from Cannonsburg, Pa., stood 
stiff and erect, his face impassive, 
as he heard the verdict and sen- 
tence of a court-martial panel of 
three generals and four colonels. 


His Army-appointed defense aP 


torneys based their entire case on 
the contention Schick was insane 
when he strangled chubby, auburn 
haired Susan Rothschild, 9-year- 
old daughter of an American Army 
colonel, at the huge Army housing 
area south of here last Nov. 21. 


Supporting their contention that 


Schick was insane, the defense put 
two Japanese civilian psychiatrists 
on the 
stand. 
Both 
diagnosed 


Schick as schizophrenic. 


Schick's conviction and sentence 


is subject to three automatic re- 
views 
— by the commanding 


general here, the Military Board 
of Review in Washington, and the 
U. S. Court of Military Appeals, 
composed of three U. S. civilian 
judges. Before he can be executed, 
his case also must be reviewed by 
President Eisenhower, who can 
commute the sentence or reverse 
the court-martial. 


—Telegraph Photo 


ALSTIX L. WYMAN. right, candidate for Republican nomination for U. S. senator from Illinois, shades 
hands with George Nichols, Dixon. before taking off by helicopter for Aurora. Thursday afternoon. In 
the center is A. H. Nichols. Wyman. accompanied by Deneen Watson, Candidate for nomination be- 
fore he withdrew from the race to campaign for Wyman. was in Dixon longer than expected because 
of high winds which forced temporary grounding of the helicopter. 


French Plead 
For Time to 
Move Wounded 


HANOI, Indochina Cf) — The 


French today stepped up radio 
pleas for a brief cease fire to per- 
mit planes to move their wounded 
from Dien Bien Phu. 


But the Vietminh continued their 


constant bombardment of the be- 
sieged northwest Indochina for- 
tress. 


The French high command for- 


mally accused the Communist led 
rebels of flagrantly ignoring red 
crosses m a r k e d on transport 
planes flying mercy missions. 


French Commander 
in Chief 


Gen. Henri Navarre appealed per- 
sonally in a broadcast to Vietminh 
Commander Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap 
and gave assurances the red cross 
marked planes would be used only 
for carrying out wounded. 


The French kept up air attacks 


today on the Vietminh positions 
ringing Dien Bien Phu, and ground 
patrols thrust warily at the attack- 
ers. 
The Vietminh, meanwhile, 


brought in more fighting power 
and continued to dig an intricate 
trench system around Dien Bien 
Phu's barbed wire barricades. 


The French claimed to have de- 


stroyed a long string- of foxholes— 
some within 200 yards of the barb- 
ed wire barricades defending the 
fortress—arid killed 42 Vietminh 
soldiers. 


Will Dance Here 


Late Church 


Notices 


SYLVIA KENT, refreshing song 
and danace personality, will per- 
form Thursday night at the open- 
ing of the Dixon Better Homes 
Show in the armory. She will ap- 
pear 
along with 
the Arkansas 


Woodchooper, Hank the Clown, and 
the Happy Time Trio. The armory 
doors open at 6:15 p. m., with the 
first performance at 7 p. m., anc 


the second at 9 p. m. 


In Memoriam 


In loving memory of our 
father and husband, Philip 
C. Sofolo, who passed away 
four years Ago March 28th. 
Mrs. Anna Sofolo and Famil\ 


Honduron Hike 


Answer to Previous Puxzle 


ACROSS 


1 Honduran 


port 


5 
capital is 


Tegucigalpa 


8 Another port 


in Honduras 


12 Wolfhound 
13 Negative word 


DOWN 


1 High in 


stature 


2 Pen name of 


Charles Lamb 


3 Its -— is 


Mountainous 


4 Anoints 


49Minera, 


coast—-is 
« Danish seaport28 Comet's train 
springs 


500 miles lone * Hor*«'s ncck 30 Proportion 
50 Roof ,edge ' 


16 Born 
hairs 
31 Passa^ in theSl Toward the. 


17 Grafted f her \l°Tab" scraps 
brain 
sheltered sidt 
11Thcdl11 
32 Youths 
53 Smell 


19 Compass point35 Require 
54 Gaseous 


21 Knock 
41 Penetrates 
element 


23 Journey 
42 Scottish river 55 Organs of 


18 Big spoon 
20 Masculine 


appellation 


22 East (Fr.) 
t4Snort.n»Md 25Challen*« 
44 Assist 


fabric 
26 Famous 
45 Ridicule 


25 Dinner coune 
English scho0'47 Barter 


29 Danger 
33 Goddess of 


infatuation 


34 John (Gaelic) 
36 Indonesian of 


Mindanao 


37 Fish eggs 
38 Pastry 
39 Scatter 
40 Concluded 
J43 its 


! 
provide • 


' 
-epublican 
government 


46 Seine 
48 Expire 
49 Theater usher 
52 Mate bee 
56 Grow pallid 
51 High card 
CO Notion 
4U Asseverate 
<2 Period 
<3 PorUl 
64 Observe* 


hearing 


58 Heart 
59 Greek letter 


EV. UNITED BRETHREN 


Eldena 


C. Harding Veigel. "pastor 


Sunday, Worship, 9:30 a.m. 
Sunday school, 10:30 a.m. 
Youth Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. 
Youth Fellowship will meet at 


the Kingdom Church. 


Tuesday, Choir rehearsal, 7 p.m., 


at the church. 


Thursday, WSWS will meet at the 


home of Mrs. Archie Severson, 2 
p.m. 


All services on Sunday, April 4, 


will be conducted by a group of stu- 
dents from North Central College, 
Naperville. 


EV. UNITED BRETHREN 


Kingdom 


C. Harding Veigel, pastor 


Sunday, Sunday school, 10 a.m. 
Worship service, 11 a.m. 
Youth Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. 
Youth Fellowship will meet at the 


Kingdom Church. 


All services on Sunday, April 4, 


will be conducted by a group of 
students from North Central Col- 
lege, Naperville. 


One of our builders says that 


if they provide longer-term 
mortgages for low-priced houses 
it will be a race worth watching 
to see if the houses avoid fall- 
ing apart before the mortgages 
are paid off. 


KSB Hospital 


Admitted: Mrs. Constance Brink, 


Dixon; Edward 
Witzleb, Dixon; 


Mrs. Neva McHenry. Mt. Morris; 
Mrs. Olive Burns, Ashton; Mrs. 
Florence 
Stackpole, Polo; Miss 


Judy Legrier, Dixon: Wayne Den- 
nis,-Sterling; Mrs. Maude Hussey, 
Pranklih Grove; Mrs. Mildred Mil- 
ler, Dixon; Mrs. Henry Helfrich, 
Dixon. 


Discharged: Mrs. Margaret New- 


man, Rock Falls; Mrs. Mary Grif- 
fin, Dixon; Mrs. Artie Wicks, Men- 
dota; Mrs. Lena Snodgrass, Mt. 
Horris; George Reed, Rock Falls; 
Mrs. Ethel Davidson, Galesburg. 


Birth*: Mr. and Mrs. Harry Han- 
ey, Dixon, a son, March 27. 


Spain 
and 
Portugal 
produce 


most of the world's cork. 


TYPEWRITER 


SERVICE & REPAIR 
Edwards Book Start 


'"111 HratSfc 


JOB PRINTING 


STATIONERY 


NOTES for BUSINESSMEN: 


How to Profit from 


Look at your letterhead. 
Does its appearance speak 
well of yon? Is it clean and 
neat? Does it contain all 
the necessary information? 
Does it sell? Call ns today 
and have.our skilled men 
show yon how to profit. 


BETTER PRINTING 


B.F. SHAW 
Printing Co. 


Phone 3-1811 — 3-1821 


Truman Snipes 
At McCarthy's 
Investigations 


KANSAS CITY IB—Former Pres- 


ident Harry S. Truman said Fri- 
day he had heard that some "fool 
Americans" had been accused of 
spying in Siberia. He suggested 
in an obvious reference to Sen. 
McCarthy 
(R-Wis), 
that 
"that 


great investigator be permitted to 
go to work for Malenkov and find 
out what they were doing there." 


"He wouldn't be bothered by the 


Russians because they wouldn't ob- 
ject to his methods," Truman told 
400 visiting chemists. 


The former President addressed 


a luncheon session of the Ameri 
can Chemical Society's division of 
chemical marketing and 
econo- 


mics. The society is holding its 
125th meeting here. 


Truman went on to say he had 


heard that Dr. Linus Pauling of 
the California Institute of Tech- 
nology had been "charged 
with 


investigating red corpuscles." 


Pauling, a former president of 


the chemical society, was named 
by the House Un-American Activi- 
ties Committee three years ago 
as being active in what it termed 
a Communist "wide-world peace 
offensive." 


Pauling denied that he had ever 


been a Communist. Truman said 
the chemist had to go before a 
committee and explain what red 
corpuscles are, adding: 


"I suggest professor Pauling con- 


fine his investigations to white cor- 
puscles." 


Report Rain, 
Snow Over 
Wide Area 


By The AMOcUted PreM 


Light rain and snow fell over 


broad areas of the nation today but 
no severe stormy weather was re- 
ported. 


Rain waa general over the Pa- 


cific Northwest while snow fell 
over the Northern Rockies and 
Great Plains States! Rain was re- 
ported from northern Mississippi 
eastward into South Carolina while 
drizzle fell along the Texas coast 


Skies were clear from the Great 


Lakes to the North Atlantic States 


S from West Texas westward to 


California. 


A little warmer weather was re- 


ported, from the Central Rockies 
to the Plains States while there 
was some cooling1 from the Great 
Lakes southward to the Ohio Val- 
ley and Middle Atlantic Coast. 


It was summer-like weather over 


the Gulf Coast Friday with tem- 
peratures climbing to 90 in Flori- 
da. It also was mild along the 
Atlantic Coast. 
Bishop Oxnam 
Raps Velde 


WASHINGTON W) — Methodist 


Jishop G. Bromley Oxnam, renew- 
ng his criticism of the House Un- 
American 
Activities 
Committee, 


ms suggested "an investigation of 
he investigators." 
In a speech Friday night, Ox- 


nam asked these questions: 


"Is it true that five investigators 


raveled at public expense to II- 
mois to participate in the hearing 
f five witnesses? 
"Is it true that one of the in- 
estigators has been working in 
Ir. Velde's district allegedly aid- 
ig the hard-pressed Mr. Velde in 
is campaign for reelection?" 
Rep. Velde (R-I11) is chairman 
f the committee. 


JhitaSfTTT Lee 
Named Defendants 
Ill Dram Act Suit 


MORRISON — (Special) — The 


operators of three Whlteride coun- 
ty taverns were named as defend- 
ants in a $540,900 dram shop suit 
filed Friday in circuit court here. 


The suit was filed by Ruth 


Mickley, Prophetstown, for herself 
and her five children, all minors. 


The defendants are Ralph Teach 


of the Pico club, Tamplco; Arth 
and Marjorie Egert and Charles 
Schryyer of Seeley's tavern, Lyn- 
don, and Harley and Charles Ro- 
man of Roman's tavern, Prophets- 
town. 


Mrs. Mickley and her children 


each ask $13,000 from each of the 
defendants. 


The suit charges that Mickley, 


husband and father of the plain- 
tiffs, was a passenger in car driven 
by John Poulter, Prophetstown, on 
March 1, 1953. It says the Foulter 
car collided with another on Rt. 30 
near Rock Falls. 


Poulter suffered a fractured back 


and is partially paralyzed, accord- 
ing to the suit. The complaint says 
Poulter obtained liquor in the tav- 
erns operated by the defendants 
prior to the accident. 


REPORT 100 KILLED 


VIENNA, 
Austria I.W—Warsaw 


radio said today that a large num- 
ber of Polish coal miners—possibly 
as many as 100—had been killed 
in a major mine explosion at 
Chorzow, in Silesia. 


Ludwig van Beethoven, the com- 


poser was both nearsighted and 
very hard of hearing in his later 
years. 


Serve the Finest 


Vfother Turns in 
Soldier Son for 
lobbery Shooting 


CHICAGO UB—A mother brought 
er young soldier son from Cin- 
innati Friday night and turned 
im over to Chicago police after 
he said she learned he was in- 
olved in the robbery and shooting 


of a taxicab driver. 


Sgt. James McMahon said Pvt. 


John Lightner, 18, admitting rob- 
bing Melvin Nichols, 24, of $14 
after firing a shot at the cab driver 
last Wednesday morning. The bul- 
let grazed Nichols' forehead. • 


Police found a wallet in the cab 


and obtained Lightner's Cincinnati 
address. They noitfied his mother. 
McMahon said Mrs. Lightner told 
him her son has been AWOL from 
Fort Knox, Ky., and had returned 
to Cincinnati Wednesday night. 


Lightner was charged with rob- 


bery and with assault with intent 
to kill. He will appear in felony 
court Monday. 


Russians Agree 
o 


To Return Ships 


WASHINGTON «t— Thirty-eight 


motor torpedo boats and sub-chas- 
ers loaned to the Russians in World 
War II soon will be back in U. S. 
hands. 


The Russians agreed Friday to 


transfer the craft to U. S. repre- 
sentatives in Istanbul, Turkey, in 
May and June. 


They are a fraction of the 186 


naval craft the United States has 
been trying to reclaim from the 
Soviets more than five years. 


GI Charged 
With Murder 
In Germany 


FRANKFURT, Germany W>— An 


American soldier was charged with 
murder today in the quadruple 
slaying of two other GI's and their 
German girl friends. 


He was identified as Pfc. Abra- 


ham Thomas of Dooly county, 
Georgia. His age was not avail- 
able. 


A U. S. army spokesman said 


Thomas would be tried before a 
general court martial at Augsburg 
on April 5 on charges of premedi- 
tated murder. 


Thomas was arrested alter the 


bodies of Sgt. 1/c Lafayette Ben- 
nett, 28. of Kansas City, Kan., Cpl. 
Edward Peters, 32, of East Chica- 
go. Ind., and two German girls 
were found in a cottage Feb. 23 On 
the outskirts of Augsburg. 


Annie Lee Moss 
Returns to Job 
WASHINGTON UP) _ Mrs. Annie 
Lee Moss, who has sworn before 
Sen. 
McCarthy's subcommittee 


that she was never a Communist, 
can go back to her Army job, at 
least for a while. 


Mrs. Moss, a middle-aged Negro, 


was suspended after a 
former 


woman undercover agent for the 
FBI testified she knew a person 
with that name as a Communist. 
The witness, however, was unable 
to identify Mrs. Moss with this 
person. 


An Army spokesman said Fri- 


day Mrs. Moss would return to 
her civil service job Monday and 
remain at work while an Army 
loyalty board completes a review 
of the case. 


Auto Death 
Rate Drops 


Lee county had 17 motor trfffie 


deaths in 1953 and 24 in 1952. ac- 
cording to a report received today 
by. Gov. William G. Strattoa:from 
Edwin A. Rosenstone, director of 
Public Works and Buildings. 


Brown county, in west-central 


Illinois, was alone among tho 
stele's 102 counties to hay* no 
traffic deaths during 1953. 


In the preceding year, Putnam 


county was the only holder of the 
no-fatality record, but lost this dis- 
tinction for 1953 when one death 
occurred within its boundaries as 
a result of an automotive acci- 
dent. 


Counties in the vicinity of Lea 


county had the following number 
of fatalities for the two years: 


Whiteside, 16 in 1963, 17 in 1952; 


Winnebago, 38 in 1953, 32 in 1952; 
LaSalle, 46in 1953, '21 in 1952; 
Henry, 14 in 1353, 7 in 1952; Ogle, 
9 in 1953, 11 in 1952; DeKalb, J"4 in 
1953, 21 in 1952, and Bureau. 11 in 
1953, 14 in 1952. 


Rosenstone's survey showed sub- 


stantial death rate decreases- in 
seven counties including Coles, De- 
Kalb, Fulton, Knox, Livingston, 
Massac and Montgomery, 


A sizable upswing in the death 


toll occurred in eight other coun- 
ties. Christian, Clark, Hancock, 
Henry, Kane, LaSalle, Madison, 
and Randolph. 


Read 


WMtbrook Pccftr 
KM* tefrt •• Pstfffci 
Pag* 4—fvtry NlflM 


NOTICB 


If you aro interred in taking 


a correspondence course, consult 
th» LaSalle Extension university, 
41? South Dearborn afreet, Chica- 
go, HL 


This Is considered th* finest 


school of its kind ID tho United 
States. 


Many now aotod men and women 


nave taken this course by mail. 


Be/ore the Slow 


NOW is the time to guard your property 
dollars against loss to windstorm, tonutdo, 
explosion, hail... 
. 
- : ' 
• 


Ask us today for the Extended Coverage 
Endorsement which broadens your flrefev 
surance policy to cover against these aad 
other common perils. 
' 
• 
• 


Dixou Youth Fined 
$10 for Speeding 


Robert Allen Ragan, 19, Rt. 3, 


Dixon, was fined S10 and costs Fri- 
day 
after pleading guilty to 


Charge of speeding. 


He was arraigned before Dixon 


Justice of the P^are Lawrence 
Boos following his arrest by Dixon 
Police Officers Wilson and McCoy 
at Everett street and the Illinois 
Centra! railroad viaduct. 


Ragan admitted driving 40 miles 


an hour on the Peoria avenue 
bridge and on Everett street. 


Sterling Man 
Hurt Here in 
Freak Mishap 


A freak auto accident on Low.ell 


park road, north of Dixon, Friday 
afternoon landed a 27-year-old Ster- 
ling man in KSB hosp'ital. 


Wayne Dennis fell from the car 


he was driving when he attempted 
to recover a lighted cigarette. 


Dennis told Lee County Sheriff 


John Stouffer he was driving north 
on Lowell park road at about 8 
p.m. Friday and was just south of 
Seven Mile Branch creek when h« 
dropped the cigarette. 


He said it fell between the seat 


and the left door of the vehicle. 
Opening the door to locate it, h« 
toppled from the car to the pave- 
ment. 
• 


The vehicle continued on at least 


500 feet, missing numerous guard 
posts, finally coming to a stop in a 
ditch on the west side of the road 
after leveling two sections of a 
farmer's fence. 


Stouffer said there was no ap- 


parent damage to the car which 
was towed into Dixon. 


KSB 
hospital today reported 


Dennis in fair condition. X-rays 
have not been taken yet to deter- 
mine the extent of his injuries. 


Stouffer 
said Clayton 
Rhodes. 


Dixon, found Dennis and took him 
to the hospital. 


Nebraska has a larger percent- 


ape of its land in farms than any 
other state of the Union. 


Imported Grape 
luiiiienl 


KOSHER 
WINE 


F. X. Newcomer ft Co. 
INSURANCE 
BONDS 


REAL ESTATE LOANS 
Phone 4 l«l 
Dlxon, OJ. 


Sunday •• 7 p, m, 


Rodgers 


and 


Hammerstein 


freof Muskal Mo/ntflfe 


from Broadway Hit* 


with 


* JACK IINNY 


* ID SULLIVAN 


MARY MARTIN 
* IZIO PINZA 


Homt and Offlct Furniture 


IN A FLASH 


TELEGRAPH WANT ADS! 


Ih« waj to frttk* tapm pourtar to I* to admttM yow 
feraita* 
for MO* ta tfeo Ifefcfimpb Want Ads! BOMCU? 


.. t thoro Is ao qniekor way to ton a chair, a dotk, a tola 


That's why •• away doakn 


CALL 2.1111 


DIXON EVENING TELEGRAPH 


NEWSPAPER! 


Cubs Destined for Better Things This Year 


To Gamble 
On Rookies 
This Season 


Club Stronger as 
It Starts Journey 
Home; Kiner Ready 


10 Mesa, Ariz.—UP)~The Chi- 
cago Cubs have 
departed 


from this little Arizona town 
and the general feeling is that 
they are destined for better 
things this year in the Na- 
tional league. 


Matters couldn't have been murti 


.worse, what with the Cubs engaged 
..in a duel with Pittsburgh for the 


bottom rung last year and the 
Pirates finally nosing; them out tor 


-• th> unenvied honor. 


Things didn't look much brighter 


' when Manager 
Phil Cavarretta 


' brought his athletes into camp 
"' several weeks ago. The personnel 


looked about the same, and there 
was no delirious degree of en- 
thusiasm. 


Few Lectures 


In time. Cavarretta, a patient 


soul, finally delivered a few lec- 
tures. A brand new doubleplay 
combination began 
to 
function. 


Homer un hitter Ralph Kiner began 
to pound the ball a lot earlier than 
he generally does and some of the 
oldsters realize they had to snap 
to and play ball 


The results are still U> be deter- 


mined, but at least the Cubs have 
shaken loose from proven medio- 
crity and are gambling on new. if 
untested, players. 


Defense down the middle, which 


was a major concern, may have 


• been corrected. At least that is the 
hope in elevating two comparative 
l-ookies, Ernie Banks at shortstop 
'' and Gene Baker at second, to first 


team status, and inserting another 
rookie, Bobby Talbot, into center 
field. 


' 
All Impressive 


Banks, 22, purchased from the 


"Kansas City Monarchs: Baker, 28. 
"and Talbot, 26, from 
the Los 


Angeles Angels, played 10 or fewer 
"games with the Cubs last fall. This 
•pring. all have been impressive. 


Broken up in the combination of 


Shortstop Rov Smaller and second 
baseman Eddie Miksis. Smalley 
was traded for pitcher Dave Cole, 
plus cash, to Milwaukee. Miksis 
Is still with the Cubs, and can fill 
' lii if Banks or Baker falters. 


And what becomes of Frankle 


Baumholtz, the man who batted 


^".306 and ran himself ragged chas- 
' Ing flies between Kiner and Hank 


feauer? 


HP can take over any position 


In the outfield>t and this spring, 
•luring Sauer's customary 
slow 


Ktart at the plate, all but took over 
Hank's Job. 


Fondy At Finrt 


*- De« Fondy, a .309 hitter and an 
excellent fielder, is set a first, and 
Ransom 
Jackson, .285, an 
un- 


spectacular but valuable man, has 


' third 


< 
Iron-man Clyde McCullough and 


Joe Garagiola, a team stimulator, 


. are more than adequate in the 


catching department. 
' Cavarretta says his pitching on 


'paper does not appear formidable. 
But he thinks his hurlers will come 
around and do the job. That goes 
for Bob Rush. Warren Hacker, 
Paul Minner and reliefer* Turk 
Lown and Emory (Bubba) Church. 
Scortichini, Fiori 
TV Bout Tonight 


SYRACUSE Wl— Carmine Fiore. 


who likes to rush in and slug, and 
tricky Italo Scortichini, a cautious 
type, battle tonight In a 10-round 
fight that may make or break 
Fiore as a welterweight contender. 


-The fight calls for a 153-pound 


limit, heavy for Fiore and a bit 
light for the Italian welterweight 
champ, who has been fighting in 
this country as a middleweight. 


Both hop* for a crack at Carmen 


Basilio of Canastota. No. 1 con- 
tender for Kid Gavilan's welter- 
weight title. 


Fiore hasn't been beaten since 


hJi lost to Basilio here nearly a 
"gear ago. 
x^onight's ffg-ht will be televised 
nationally by ABC (8 p.m., CST). 


Senators Look Good Since 
Pitchers Rounded to Form 


By BEN OLAN 


Associated Press Sports Writer 


It was only a week ago that Manager Bucky Harris of the Wash- 


ington Senators said, "we won't look good until our pitchers round 
into form." 


That not-too-startling prediction 


looked mighty good today as the 
Senators 
found 
themselves the 


proud possessors of a five-game 
winning streak, due largely to the 
improved efforts of their mound 
corps. 


The Senators have come a long 


way since they opened their exhi- 
bition schedule with nine straight 
setbacks. And now that their pitch- 
ers are clicking, they look more 
and more like a club that will 
give the other American League 
teams a lot of trouble this season. 


Friday, 
righthanders F r a n k 


Shea and Sonny Dixon limited the 
Boston Red Sox to seven hits as 
Washington pounded out a convinc- 
ing 10-1 victory. 


The New York Yankees, seem- 


ingly getting ready in earnest for 
coming American League pennant 
race, defeated the Brooklyn Dodg 


Spear Fishing 
Season Opens 
Here May 1 


SPRINGFIELD. 111. — Illinois' 


1954 
fish spearing season opens 


April 1 in the central zone and 
May 1 in the northern zone. The 
season began March 15 in the 
southern zone. It will continue 
through September 1 in all zones. 


Spearing is legal from sunrise to 


sunset daily throughout the season. 


The 1954 season dates are an 


extension over last year's spearing 
season when the season lasted only 
15 days. Director Glen D. Palmer 
of the state department of conser- 
vation explained. The extension 
was made possible through revi- 
sion by th* 68th general assembly 
of the Illinois fish cpde, he said. 


No game fish may be taken by 


spear. Species which may be taken 
are carp, buffalo, suckers, gar and 
dogfish. 


Devices which may be legally 


used are spear, pitchfork, gig and 
bow and arrow. License required 
for fish spearing is the regular 
hook and line license. 


ers, their perennial October via 
tuns. 8-4, as they exploded for three 
homers, two doubles and a pair of 
triples. 


Veteran Jim Konstanty and rook- 


Buckr Harris 
Frank Shea 


Oregon Has Good Golf 
Prospects Nelson Says 


OREGON—(Special)—Believing he has the "finest group of boys 


tut th'is year I've had in a long time," Golf Coach John Nelson at Ore- 
gon is readying his team for the first match of a.nine-game schedule. 
1 Nelson reports that 14 boys have 
turned out for the sport including 
jiur varsity lettermen' and four 
Junior varsity lettermen. 


m Heading the group is Dave John* 
£>n. school champion last year for 
which he had his name engraved 
$) the golf plaque in the trophy 
4»se. 
»Dan Etnyre, also back this sea- 
£>n, was runner up in his'division 
if the annual Oregon junior open 
•urnament. Chuck Cleaver and 
(fumy Gleet round out the list of 
Mttermen. 
{Junior vanity lottsraom 
I 
* 


are John Beaty, Tim Sassaman, 
Don Morehouse and Richard Dick. 


Others out for the squad are: 


Ken Crawford, Robert Lacher, 
Heczie Simmons, Dick Ingraham, 
Owen Knutson and Wilbur Knutson. 


The tentative schedule: 


April 27—at RochelU. 


28—Dixon. 


May *-at Sterling Newman. 


5—Mt. Morris. 
8—Rockford District. 
10—Rochelle. 
13-at Dixon. 
17—Sterling Newman. 


ie Paul Penson combined to stop 
Detroit with five singles and give 
the Philadelphia Phillies a 6-2 tri- 
umph. Konstanty, 
the National 


League's most valuable player in 
1950, yielded four hits in the six 
innings he worked. Granny Ham- 
ner and Stan Jok hit homers for 
the Phillies. 


Outfielder Gus Bell walloped an 


eighth inning two-run horner to 
lead Cincinnati to a 3-2 wm over 
the St. Louis Cardinals. Bell's blow 
came off Memo Luna, a lefthander 
the Cards bought from San Diego 
last winter for $100,000. Rookie 
Wally Moon drove in both of the 
Redbirds' runs with a single. 


Gene Conley and Ray Crone gave 


only one hit as the Milwaukee 
Braves hammered Atlanta 
11-0. 


The lone safety was struck by Nat 
Peeples, the Southern Association's 
first Negro player. Ed Mathews 
homered for the Braves.' 


Must Games Face 
NBA Semi-Finalists 


By The Associated Press 


The four teams participating in 


the semifinals of the NBA playoffs 
swing back into action today in 
"must" games for the Boston Cel- 
tics and Rochester Royals. 


The Celts appear to have the 


tougher assignment. They have to 
face a red hot Syracuse team, 
which has yet to lose a 1954 play- 
off game. The Nationals have won 
five straight since the regular sea- 
son ended, one of them a 109-94 
rout of Boston Thursday. 


Rochester, v i c t i m of an 89-7* 


trouncing by Minneapolis in the 
first game of the best-of-three 
semifinals, also must win today or 
face elimination. 


Both of today's games are after- 


noon affairs. The Rochester-Min- 
neapolis game will be nationally 
televised (Dumont, 3 p.m., GST). 


IVo Practice 


MT. PLEASANT, Mich. (fffr-No 


.spring football practice at Cen- 
tral Michigan college this year. 
Reason: No coaches available. 


Bill Kelly, head football coach, 


there'll be no 


all grid 
ta 


I 


OSU Swimmers Still in 
Lead After Konno Loss 
Jack Wardrop, 
Michigan, Wins 
220 Freestyle 
Swimmer Posts 
New NCAA Mark 
In Syracuse Pool 


SYRACUSE, N. Y. (£>-Odds.on 


Ohio State, despite a loss of Ford 
Konno to Michigan's record-break- 
ing Jack Wardrop. had a cozy lead 
today in the NCAA swimming 
championships. 


And the Buckeyes were loaded 


for bear in the closing event in 
the Syracuse University pool with 
three record holders and a classy 
diving team on the roster. 


Konno won the 1500-meter free- 


style in the opening competition 
Thursday, setting a new NCAA 
mark. But Wardrop edged him 
out in the 220 freestyle Friday 
night with a clocking of 2:05 to 
Konno's 2:05.3. 


New Record 


Wardrop's time set new intercoi 


legiate and NCAA records and bet- 
tered the listed world mark of 
2:05.2, but Konno clacked that one 
last month with 2:04.7. 


Ohio State collected 13 points 


Friday night in low board diving 
won by its Fletcher Gilders with 
441.10 points. Ohio State has 49 
points to Michigan's 36. Defending 
champion Yale has 19. 


Yoshi Oyakawa, who kept his 


NCAA 200-yard backstroke title by 
edging Larry Heim of Stanford m 
2:09.8, goes in the dorsal 100-yard 
today. He holds the listed world 
and NCAA records and has staked 
claim to a new world time and 
the American mark. 


Final* Tonight 


Dick Cleveland captured the 50- 


yard 
free-style 
from defending 


champion Don Hill of Michigan in 
0:22.3 and today, Cleveland goes 
in the 100-yard freestyle. 


He holds the world, American 


and Intercollegiate records in that 
event. 


Other events today included the 


100-yard breastroke. 150-yard in 
dividual medley and the 300-yard 
medley relay. Time trials are 
scheduled in the afternoon and 
finals at night. 
Big Question: 
Was Gavilan 
Using Evil Eye 


CHICAGO W>— Boxing insiders 


were wondering today if Kid Gavi- 
lan tried to put the old evil eye 
on Bobo Olson at an official cere- 
money Friday in the Illinois Ath- 
letic Commission office. 


Gavilan, the welterweight champ 


and Olson got a physical going 
over and instructions on Illinois 
boving rules. They also posed for 
pictures together in fighting togs. 


These were part of the formali- 


ties leading to their 15-round match 
in Chicago Stadium next Friday in 
which Olson's middleweight title is 
at stake. 


Eyes Staring 


All the time they were in the 


office, the Kid kept his eyes star- 
ing into Olson's. It seemed a take- 
off on the old fisheye. Whatever it 
was it apparently embarrassed Ol- 
son, who shifted his gaze several 
times, grinned, and once tapped 
Gavilan playfully in the stomach. 


Was this some sort of Cuban 


hex the Kid was trying on Olson? 


"Maybe," he grinned afterward. 


"What you think?" 


Several hours after the incident, 


Gavilan 
assured- reporters he 


wasn't interested In working any 
sort of "Cuban voodoo" on Olson. 


Look Harder 


"He gave me a dirty look," said 


the Kid. "I give him a dirty look 
back. 


"My dirty look harder than his. 


Just like these. He raised his 
fists." 


Anyway, the dirty looks had no 


immediate effect on either fighter. 
Both were pronounced in excellent 
physical condition for the fight, 
j 


Saturday, March 27, 1954 
Page 7 


BREAKS OWN RECORD — Ford 
Konno, Hawaiian swimmer from 
Ohio State university, broke his 
own NCAA meet record for 1952 in 
New York, when he won the 1500 
meter event in 18 minutes and 14.4 
seconds. His previous record was 


18 minutes and 15.B seconds 


Scholz Wins 
First Fight 
InlLS. Debut 
Gains Unanimous 
10 Round Verdict 
Over Al Andrews 


NEW YORK </P>—Gustav (Bubi) 


Scholz la no Marcel Cerdan but 
he'll do. 


The 23-year-old unbeaten Ger- 


man 
middleweight, latest of a 


horde of foreign fighters to invade 
our shores in the past year, made 
his American debut Friday night 
by winning a unanimous 10-round 
decision over spunky Al Andrews 
of Superior, Wis. 


A southpaw socker, the former 


Berlin cook floored the 23-year- 
old ex-GI in the fifth round with a 
left to the jaw and rocked Al m 
the seventh and tenth rounds with 
a rapid-fire bombardment. And- 
rews jumped up at one in the 
fifth but had to take the manda- 
tory eight count. The officials' 
votes for Scholz were 6-3-1, 6-3-1, 
and 7-2-1. The AP had it 6-3-1. 


Scholz was disappointed over his 


showing. 


"It was one of the worst fights 


I ever made," he said as well 
wishers mobbed him in his dress- 
ing room in Madison Square Gar- 
den. 


Wood River Coach 
Resigns Cage Post 


WOOD RIVER, 111. UP)— Charley 


Summers, 45, basketball and base- 
ball coach at Wood River high 
school for 20 years, resigned his 
basketball position this week be- 
cause of ill health. 


He will remain as baseball 


coach. 
f 


Summers began coaching basket- 


ball here in 1934 and led teams to 
the state championship tournament 
in 1939, 1942 and 1943. The 1939 
team finished third in the state 
meet. His 1942 team had the best 
record, 30-2. 


Training Camp Briefs 


By The Associated Press 


LAKELAND, Fla. 
lf> — The 


•trade" winds were blowing in the 
Detroit 
Tigers' spring 
training 


camp today. 


President Spoke Briggs and Gen- 


eral Manager Muddy Ruel were 
due back from a two-day talent 
hunt to bolster Bengal weak spots. 


The pair spent Thursday dicker- 


ng with Uie Boston Red Sox and 
Friday, while the Tigers were los- 
ing their 12th game of the exhibi- 
tion season, «-2, to Philadelphia, 
Briggs and Ruel were sounding out 
the New York Yankees. 


Beth doenaed to say who they 


were trying to get or what or how 
nuajr Tlf*» 


TAMPA, Fla. (fl — Rookie Tom 


Flanigan, 19, is very close to win- 
ning a permanent pitching job with 
the Chicago White Sox. 


The young southpaw has allowed 


only three earned runs in 12% 
innings and was especially ef- 
fective Thursday as the Sox lost 
to Washington 9-2. 


In going 4% innings, Flanigan 


retired ll batten in a row after 
cleaning up a mess left by Billy 
Pierce, the Sox ace southpaw. 


ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. 
W» — 


The Baltimore Orioles, sporting a 
12-5 spring exhibition record, ar- 
rived here today for the start of a 
12-day read trip with the Chicago 
Cubs. 


Dixon Enters 
Five in Meet 
At Oak Park 


CHICAGO-Five Dixon trackmen 


will be among the more than 1.000 
high school athletes representing 
nearly 50 schools today and to- 
night in the 24th annual Oak Park 
indoor relays. 


Entered from Dixon are: Kay 


Draper in the 50-yard dash, high 
jump and medley relay; Bill Smith 
in the medley relay? Lou Wiggin- 
ton and Art Gann in the relay and 
the mile run. and Clarence Busser 
in the pole vault. The team left 
this morning with Coach Art Bow- 
ers. 


The surburban host school is de- 


fending champion. 


Among other downstatc schools 


entered 
are 
Decatur, DeKalb, 


Monmouth, Mt. Carroll, Ottawa, 
Pekin and Peona Woodruff. 


Three Chicago-area schools, New 


Trier, Evanstcn and Bloom, are 
expected to give Oak Park a 
sharp tussle for the crown. 
East vs. West 
In Basketball 
Benefit Game 


NEW YORK W> — It will be East 


vs West tonight in the annual all- 
star basketball game for the bene- 
fit of the New York Herald Tribune 
Fresh Air Fund at Madison Square 
Garden. 


Fiank Selvy of Furman, who 


holds almost every collegiate rec- 
ord in the book, will team with 
6-9 Bob Pettit of Louisiana State 
for the first time. Togo Palazzi of 
Holy Cross, and Frank Ramsey 
and Lou Tsioropoulos of Kentucky 
also will be on the East starting 
team. 


For the Wp.st. the starters will 


be Bobby Mattick, Oklahoma A 
and M's 6-11 ace, Bob Matheny of 
California, Arnie Short of Okla- 
homa 
City 
and Indiana's Bob 


Leonard and Dick Farley. 


Howard Cann of New York Uni- 


versity is coach of the East squad 
and Ozzie Cowles of Minnesota di- 
rects the West team. 


The East holds a 4-3 edge in the 


seven-year series. 


Oklahoma A & M 
Grapplers Lead 


NORMAN, Okla. (,¥>— It appears 


only a sudden tornado can keep the 
Oklahoma Aggies from sweeping 
to their 17th NCAA wrestling title 
tonight. 


The Aggies entered 10 men in 


the 24th annual NCAA tournament, 
which opened here Friday and six 
moved into the semifinals sched- 
uled for today. The finals are to- 
night. 


Penn State, which gained the 


title last year to take the NCAA 
grappling crown out of the mid- 
lands for the first time, has little 
chance to hold on to the bauble. 
Only two members of the six-man 
team survived the opening rounds. 


Ten other schools also placed 


two men in the semifinals—Pitts- 
burgh, Michigan, Michigan State, 
Illinois, Lehigh, Navy, Oklahoma, 
Kansas State, Iowa and Colorado. 


_ MY LINE?—Enard 
is back as a contender 


for the heavyweight champion- 
ship. This is how the Cincinnati 
clouter looks sparring behind a 
new type rubberized mask end 
tadfrio and «U ita 


RECOGNIZE THE MAN in the high collar? Most of you probably 


won't, unless you were paying attention to the schools back around 
1899 and 1900. 


The man Is William G. TurnbuU, teacher in Latin and alge- 


bra, but more important to this column, he was the first high 
school coach at the Dixon high school. He handled football 
and track. 


HE CAME TO DIXON IX 1899 


from Monmouth and after one or 
two years, he went on to the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania at Phila- 
delphia to medical school. 
He 


later became a physician and took 
up practice in Philadelphia. 


Along with being a coach and 


teacher. 
Professor 
TurnbuU 


was a charter member of the 
first bowline alleys established 
in Dixon, the A. U. Thomas al- 
leys erected in 1900 on First 
street. 


* 
* 
* 


JIOJC.E 
GEORGE C. DIXON 


supplied us with the picture and 
the information on Prof. Turnbull 
and while looking through the old 
files to see if we couldn't find ad- 
ditional information, we learned 
that the judge was the cause of 
the suspension of football for one season. 


In 1903, it was decided to disband football when Judge Dixon 


was seriously Injured In a same with Rochelle. "That's some- 
thing I'd like very much to forget," the judge said. He was para- 
lyzed for many month* because of a broken back'. 


* 
* 
* 


THOSE YEARS, 1899-1902. were filled with many interesting thing* 


concerning Dixon football. In 1900, Dixon College set a world record 
which may still be standing as far as we know. 


The college team whipped DeKalb, 153-0. And that's not 


all. The game was railed in the second half before the score 
got too high. Also, touchdowns were only good for five points 
In stead of nit as today. Field goals were one point. Dlxoa 
made 27 touchdowns and 17 field goals. 
THE COLLEGE EVIDENTLY HAD A GREAT YEAR in 1900. They 


went to Chicago to play the University of Chicago and had the honor 
of scoring the first touchdown against the great team coached by the 
famed Amos Alonzo Stagg. Dixon lost, 23-5, but Stagg complimented 
the team as a great one. 


* 
¥ 
* 


Now back to 1954: 
AL MUSSELMAN AND LYLE SMITH, only senior members of the 


Rochelle basketball squad this year, were honored at a basketball ban- 
quet given for the Hubs recently. Musselman was awarded the Hall 
free throw award and Smith was presented the Hacker trophy for 
all-around excellence in athletics. Ron Hill was elected captain for the 
1954-55 season. 


* 
* 
* 
* 


COACH DON BARNHART reported that Dixon still needs a home 


game Sept. 17 to complete the 1954 football schedule. 
The 
game 


would replace the Amboy-Dixon game which has been dropped since 
Amboy went into the Illowa conference. 


* 
V 
* 


THE MORRIS DAILY HERALD sports writers continue to Insist 


that Ottawa Coach Gil Love will not be back with the Pirates next 
season. 
' 


They discount the fart that Love has bought a home In Ot- 


tawa by pointing out that a home ran be bonght and sold with- 
out much trouble. 
IT IS FURTHER CLAIMED that Love has received offers to move 


up to the college ranks in recent weeks. The Bullpen Gossip column 
goes on to point out that denials do not mean rejection as seen in the 
case of Forest (Forddy) Anderson leaving Bradley and going to Michi- 
gan State. Only three days before Anderson left, the column said, de- 
nials were plastered all over Peoria papers. 


As for UK. we'll just sit back and wait and see. 
As the 


man said, denials don't mean rejections. 


• 
+ 
* 


THE FACULTY ATHLETIC COMMITTEE of Beloit college will 


meet with faculty representatives of the Midwest collegiate athletia 
conference May 21 at Ripon college to discuss Beloit's possible 'future 
admission into the conference. 


Termed an "exploratory session" by Beloit officials, the 


meeting was authorized recently by conference officials follow- 
ing a request submitted fey Beloit to the conference last Novem- 
ber. By a league vote, Beloit was dropped from membership in 
the spring of 1951. 
IN THE EVENT BELOIT makes formal application for entry into 


the loop, the decision would rest with a conference committee com- 
posed of one faculty representative of each member school. A unani- 
mous vote would be necessary to admit Beloit to membership. 


Present members of the conference are Ripon and Law- 


rence In Wisconsin. Knox and Monmouth in Illinois, Carleton 
and St. Olaf in Minnesota and Coe, Grinell and Cornell In Iowa. 


Ease of Yanks Winning 6th 
Depends on Rest of League 


ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (B-Do you think the New York Yankee* 


can make it six pennants in a row? Manager Casey Stengel was asked. 


"If the league is improved, we'll 


have a very hard time winning it 
again." he replied. "M it hasn't 
improved, we'll have a very hard 
time not winning it." 


Stengel conceded that he has a 


lot of problems this year, "maybe 
more than in any other year since 
I've been manager." 


"First, we have to make up 


those 13 games we lost by sale of 
Vic Raschi. Second, we've got to 
build up a strong bench. Retire- 
ment of Johnny Mice and the re- 
call of Billy Martin to the army is 
bound to hurt. 


"My third problem is Mickey 


Mantle. Re's been taking it easy 
after his knee operation. How do 
I know if he'll be ready to open 
the season?" 


Stengel tees the Cleveland In- 


dians and Chicago White Sox as 
hl« chief threat*. He likes the 
Washington Senators to head the 


dtv*sa, follow* fej Ds» 


troit, Baltimore and Philadelphia. 


Stengel said his big five on the 


mound this season will be Alii* 
Reynolds. Harry Byrd, Ed Lopat, 
Eddie Ford and Jim McDonald. 
Adding to the strength, in addition 
to Bob Kuzava and Tom Morgan, 
is Johnny Sain who said he 
going to retire but changed hia 
mind. 


With the exception of Jerry CM* 


man at second, the infield will b* 
the same: Joe Collins at first, PhU 
Rizzuto at short and Oil Me* 
Dbugald at third. Reserves Include 
Andy Carey, Willie Miranda, Cddte 
Robinson and Frank Lega, it-year* 
old bonus baby: 


Yogi Berra, the league's Mo. t 


receiver, is backed op by Chart!* 
Siivera. 


Even with Mantle hobbled. Casey 


insists he has the best 
baseball with Hank Bi 
Woodllng and Inr Nona 


NEWSPAPER! 
NEWSPAPER 


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The Dixon Evening Telegraph 
Saturday, March 27,1954 
PageS 


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"You Can't Afford to Buy, and We Can't Afford 


to Sell You a BAD USED CAR" 


See These Great Cars Now: 


'Si PONTIAC Chieftain eight 


deluxe 4-door. 20,000 miles 
and a new set of Sieberling 
Safety tires add to the ter- 
rific value of this one. A 
spotless two-tone blue in 
excellent condition includ- 
ing hydramatic drive and 
all the extras. 


'52 DESOTO Custom Six 4- 


door. Here you will find 
low mileage and low price 
go hand in hand. A lovely 
soft green finish with ex- 
cellent tires, radio, heater, 
turn signals, seat covers, 
and tip-toematic transmis- 
sion. "TELL 'EM WICKEY 
SENT YOU." 


'51 OLDSMOBILE Rocket '88' 


—This is a Super "88", a 
locally owned well cared 
for car. When you give this 
one a home, you'll be do- 
ing yourself a favor. Ter- 
rific tires, excellent me- 
chanical condition, beauti- 
ful interior, and well equip- 
ped. Try it, you'll buy it. 


'51 PLYMOUTH Cranbrook 


club coupe. Low mileage, 
gorgeous finish, wonderful 
condition, and well equip- 
ped. If you want a Plym- 
outh, you can't afford to 
pass this one by. A cheap- 
er car priced to sell. 


'80 PONTIAC Streamliner 8 


4-door. A clean, well equip- 
ped, and ready to go car. 
Th« world famous PON- 
TIAC EIGHT is at your 
service with this car. By- 
dramatic to whisk you on 
your way and radio, heater, 
•eat covers and turn sig- 
nal* to make you more 
comfortable. Truly a 
••Goodwill" buy. 


'48 PONTIAC Streamliner 8 


deluxe 4-door sedan. A one- 
owner, 
beautifully cared 


for and lower priced used 
car. This is a solid, noise- 
free car with hydramatic 


and all the extras possible, 


A BLACK BEAUTY. 


OPEN EVENINGS TILL 8:00 P. M.—SATURDAYS 


TILL 9:00 and SUNDAY TILL 1:00 P. M. 
Terminal Pontiac, Inc. 


ACROSS FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 


DDCON 
ILL. 


AUTOMOTIVE 


Now! 


Us^d Cars 


Used Right! Priced Right! 


See them in our inside 


showroom 


1953 DODGE 8 Club Coupe 
1951 DODGE Sedan 
1950 DODGE Sedan 
1949 DODGE Sedan 
1951 PLYMOUTH Club 


Coupe 


1950 PLYMOUTH Club 


Coupe 


1948 PLYMOUTH Sedan 
1947 PLYMOUTH Coach 
1949I.H. C. 1-ton Pick-up. 


Newman 


MOTOR SALES CO. 


PHONE 2-0271 


OTTAWA and RIVER 


Dixon, Illinois 


Now Showing 


The New and Exciting 


1954 Willys 


Frank Perry 


Motors 


E. River Road 


Ride and Decide On A Trader 
Used Car 
Your Friendly "Olds Dealer 
TRADER MOTOR SALES 
212 Hennepin Ave. Phone 3-8881. 


'53 Hudson Hornet 4-dr. Hydroma 
ticfully 
equipped, very low 
mileage. Twin horsepower 


'49 Hudson 2-dr. Very clean 
'48 Hudson Super Six Club Coupe 
radio and heater 
'47 Oldsmobile "78". Hydromatic 
radio and heater. 
KELLEN MOTOR SALES 
732 N. Galena Ave. Phone 2-9701. 
~~~BOATS AND MOTORS 


FoT~SaleT: New 14-ft Chris Craft 
Sportsman 
boat. 
Never 
been 
used. Can be seen at 
Rollie 
Ommen Garage. 330 W. Everett. 


MOTORCYCLES 


1947 
Har 1 ey-Da vi dson 
Motorcycle 


415 First Avenue 
Dixon, 


AUTOMOTIVE-SERVICE 


rX-l~ul~i_<-i_J~i_r-LJ— i_r~i_t—i_l~i_r- _— _i~i — -— i i— i ~~ i—i i—i "• I 


Special 
Clutch service, all makes 
Larrv Santelman 
Garage 
Rear of Dixon Theater 


One of the best milk routes com- 
ing into Dixon. Low mileage, high 
income. Contact Bob Pomeroy. 
Phone 3-3803. 
For Sale: Grocery Store in small 
town. Good trading community, 
priced right. Low overhead. Write 
R. H. Viokrey. West Brooklyn or 
phone West Brooklyn No. 9. 
For Sale: Combination pool room 
and card room. Write Box 58 c/o 
Telegraph. 
Investments sure 
to 
pay off, 
Classified ads! To sell or rent any- 
thing — phone 2-1111. 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


Territory of Dixon and surround- 
ing area now open for reliable 
salesman or contractor to sell and 
construct complete line 'of MAR- 
TIN STEEL FARM BLDGS. Con- 
tact Steve Yiiga, District Repre- 
sentative, 203 S. Woodland Ave., 
Offlesby, Illinois. Phone 3-8372. 


%»"S«»'N*«%*-s^w«%^V1S*~w**-»«w''^'-«*^'^^ 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


**v-*S**-i-~^***^^*^r-^"^r^-i™^~*^~*^~*****r**^^*V~i.^^+^+^*. 
R & S RESALE CORPORATION 
Scrap Iron and Metals 
Phone 476 
Sterling. HI. 


CESSPOOLS, 
septic tanks and 
cisterns cleaned. Frank Kemp, 
Harriet Ave. Dial 4-3899. 


Cesspools, Septic Tanks 
and Cisterns Cleaned. 
Bob Hazelwood 
Dial 2-3282 
832 Chestnut Ave. 


Black dirt and fill dirt, road rock, 
basement excavating and back 
filling. Call 3-3126 Curt Bros.. 920 
N. Hcnnepin Ave. 


New and Used Furnaces 
Blowers and Oil Burners 
HOWELL HEATING SERVICE 
60T Seventh St. 
Phone 4-9021. 


Excavating 
and Grading of all kinds. 
Sewer and Drainage Ditches 
End Loaders and Truck Crane 
Service 
Murray E. Wentling 
Phone 3-8181 


TPA!NT?NG AND DECORATING 
"PAINTING INSIDE- AND OUT 
Expert paper hanging:. Wally's 
Painting: Service. 
Dial 3-4801. 


EMPLOYMENT 
FEMALE HELP 


Wanted: Housekeeper in modern 
country home. Write Box 61 c/'o 
Telegraph giving references- 
Experienced waitress - apply in 
person. Manhattan Cafe. 
Working mothers who need a re- 
liable home to leave their chil- 
dren in starting soon Southside, 
Day1 Nursery. Call 3-4602. 
General household help, full or 
part-time. Write Box 63 c/o Tele- 
graph. 
Notice • Avon Cosmetics has an ex- 
cellent earning opportunity for 
women. We have a. few openings 
in Dixon. Eldena and Grand De- 
tour Write P. O. Box 88. Dixon. 
Opening for capable woman in our 
modern bookkeeping department, 
five-day week, typing required. 
Wood 'Bros. Manufacturing Co. 
Phone 451 Oregon, HI. 


TRAVEL COUNSELOR 


AND SECRETARY 


Dixon branch, Chicago Motor 
Club. Opportunity to learn in- 
teresting profession with real 
future. Typing ability essential. 
Knowledge 
of general 
office 


work desirable. Necessary train- 
ing provided. Splendid opportu- 
nity for advancement and per- 
manency. 


See or Phone: 


MR. PEASLEY, Manager 


Dixon Branch 
PHONE 4-0631 


MALE HELP 


Wanted: General bake shop help 
for cleaning, full time. Apply in 
person. Phillip's Bake Shop. 
Wanted : Experienced married man 


on 200-acre grain and beef cattle 
farm. 
Must furnish good refer- 
ences Good wages and modern 
home. 
Write Box 62 c/o Tele- 


graph. 
Combination lubrication and me 
chanic needed at once. Apply in 
person. 
HARRISON MOTOR 


SALES. 
Wanted at once: Experienced mar- 
ried farm hand. Phone 155, Am- 
boy. Frances Smith. 


E^E^IENCEID^BUTCHER DE- 
SIRES EMPLOYMENT in Dixon. 
Call 4-5601. 
One Union rugloom, several throw 
rugs. Will weave your rugs for 
you too. Phone 3-6214. 


Bienvenidos At Mejor Negociante 


De Coches Usados En Dixon 


'53 BUICK Super 4-door. Fully equipped—whitewalls, 


tubeless tires. 


'53 PACKARD, automatic drive, new whitewall 


tires. EZ-eye glass, radio and heater. 


Week End Special $1,995 


'53 STUDEBAKER Commander V-8 4-door. Local one- 


owner with radio, heater and overdrive, $1,495. 


'52 HUDSON Wasp 2-dpor. Two-tone blue, radio and 


heater. 
» 


'52 BUICK Roadmaster 4-door. Power steering, EZ-eye 


glass, radio, heater, 23,000 miles. It's got that 
dynaflow. 


'50 BUICK Special 4-door. Medium green finish. Dyna- 


flow, radio and heater. Real nice. 


'49 PLYMOUTH Special deluxe club coupe, radio and 


heater. Only $595. 


'49'CHEVROLET Fleetline deluxe 2-door. .Radio and 


heater. 


'48 BUICK SEDANETTE 
'40 FORD 4-door. Real sharp. Motor overhauled, only 


$145. 


'42 BUICK 4-door, $95. 
'41 MERCURY Club, $95 


COME OVER AND SEE WHAT THE HEADING OF 


THIS AD SAYS 


ZEIEN BUICK 


DAY OR NIGHT 


106 E. Boyd St. 
Phone 2-0151 


Open Sunday Mornings 


EMPLOYMENT 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


Want work cleaning basements, 
garages, attics and yards. Call 
3-5102. Henry Svoboda. 
Mother with two small boys wants 
housekeeping in town or country. 
Call Sterling 3315. 


FARM SERVICES 


Live stock Hauling to Chicago 
Dick Shaffer, Hartford Insurance 
New Phone Number 


2-9251 


AMERICAN BREEDERS 
SERVICE 
technician 
— 
C. Crownhart. 
Route 1 Dixon. 
Phone 2-6342. 


Livestock hauling to Chicago. 
Walt Imfeld. Full insurance cov- 
erage. Phone 2-4601. 503 Upham 
Place. 


"•.--**~*^~^-+*~v-*f~~~~r^~~r*^~*^*r^f- 
FEED AND GRAIN 


BADGERTBRAND^SEEDS 
Red Clover, Alfalfa, Ladino clov- 
er, Timothy, white and yellow 
blossom sweet clover, lawn grass 
seeds.Rhodes Feed Service 
117 Peoria Ave. Dixon. Ph. 3-9381. 
Clinton 11 Lot 25 oats. Good germ- 
ination. Also baled straw. Phone 
3-2698 Dixon. Charles Hummel. 
Clinton No. 11 seed oats. State 
test germination 98ci. purity 98.23 
price $1.25 per bushel. Located 
Rocho's Farm, Amboy. 
FOR SALE: Seed oats. Certified 
Clinton 11 Lot 25. and Clinton 11 
Lot 25 Field Inspected. ATHER- 
TON GRAIN COMPANY. Walnut 
and Normandy. Illinois. 
Clover hav, wire tied, Clinton feed 
oats. Velvin Phillies, phone 238t 
Ohm 


Pioneer Hi-Bred seed corn, Hyline 
chickens. Frank W. Scholl, Rte. 
1. Until April 1st call 2-4367. 


WELDING and CUTTING 
blocks and heads. 
Johnie's Garage 
Phone 21 
-Lee Center. 111. 
MINNEAPOLIS-MOLINE- A VERY 
Repairs - Parts - Service 


Tractor and implement enamel, 


five colors, 10"o discount. 
PRICE'S WALLPAPER STORE 
Phone 2-0721. 
GENERAL MACHINE WORK 
Car and Tractor heads planed. 


WOLFORD WELDING 
812 Chicago Ave. 
Dixon, HI 


A WISE BUYER 
BUYS OUT OF SEASON 
Check our terms and prices on— 
corn pickers, balers, choppers, 
rakes, mowers and combines. 
DIXON ONE-STOP SERVICE 
104-116 Peoria Ave. Phone 4-1531. 


USED MACHINERY 
1 used broadcast seeder 
1 used grain drill 
1 1951 John Deere Model A de- 
luxe. 
Several 
good used plows and 
disks. 


NAYLOR & CO 
E. River Rd. 
Dixon, Til. 


For Sale: IHC disk blades. Priced 
reasonable. Phone 4-8481. 
Sears Roebuck 36-in. chain saw, 
4-year3 old. Priced for quick sale. 
Phone 2-3152. 
Hot water heater, wash tanks and 
milk can racks. New Rite-Way 
milker; some good used Rite-Way 
milkers, priced to sell. 
Clayton Rhodes Feed Service 
117 Peoria Ave. 
Phone 3-9381. 


NEW HOLLAND macmnery 


66 and 77 balers 
P.T.O. spreader on display 
C. W. Woessner 
Phone 2-7331 
Dixon. HI 


McCulloch 


Chain Saw Sales and Service 
Helle Lumber Co. 
Phone 430 
• 
Oregon. 111. 


LIVESTOCK FOR SALE 


Want to buy 30 good sized boar 
hogs. Call Loren Scholl. Polo 
6-2312. 
Registered 
Guernsey bulls. Sire 
Curtis Candy Butterfmger. Serv- 
iceable ag:e. M i l t o n Burkey, 
Franklin Grove. 
18 head grass cattle, steers and 
heifers, weight about 400 ibs. Ed 
Taubenheim, Franklin Grove. 


AUCTION 


MENDOTA SALE BARN 
Every Monday. 12 noon 
Modern Lunch Room. 
WEHMEYER BROS., Auctioneers 
Four first-calf Holstein heifers, 
freshening now. Dick Greenfield 
Jr. Phone Ash ton 89-2211. 
Herd young Angus cows and heif- 
ers. R. Oberschelp, 14 miles South 
of Dixon on Route 26, V2 mile 
east. 


ATTENTION WOOL PRODU- 
CERS: Legislation now before 
the Congress of the United States 
—if passed by April First? Sub- 
sidy payments will be made by 
the Government whether wool 
is sold and it will be a free 
market. Subsidies will be paid 
direct to the producer of wool. 
Anv reputable wool dealer can 
buy your wool and he and I 
will give you proper sales slips. 
Remember I am the oldest buy- 
er of wool direct from the farm 
to mill. You get top prices, also 
honest weight. You take your 
check with you, no promises, 
no shrinkage. You can bring in 
your wool anv day except Sun- 
day. I am home in the morning 
and evening. Call before you 
come. My son or I will come 
after your wool. J. Kaufman, 
Comptbn, HI. 


"FERTILIZER 


_ 
_ 
rf~W*W*--^*^*«*^^%^^*--rf^1*'^*^Trf--W-^«'-S*—W 


.Virginia • Carolina Fertlizer 
For corn, oats and soybeans. 
Lawn and garden fertilizers. 
Leave your order now for future 
delivery. 
Clayton Rhodes Feed Service 


117 Peoria Ave. Dixon. Ph. 3-9381, 


FOOD 


At CLEDON'S — assorted Bon 
Bons, creams, nuts, and fruit 
flavors, cream patties and fresh 
salted nuts. 


W^^^^W^k>W^^W^^lW^r%^nIMAb^U^^ 
UWN and GARDEN 


See our complete line of power 
mowers. Read our March 29th 
Ad. Dixon Lawn and Garden Sup- 


UWN ind GARDEN 


•>k^^^^^S^«^.^>^^u^vt^i^w*«w««>_^^yn^_^4^nv^N_^vx^ux^^^aXV^>X^ 


Grass Seed. $1.00 Ib. It must 
rrow or another bag free. 
Carry's Greenhouse 


1307 W. 4th St. 
Phone 3-5763 


Montgomery Ward Garden Dept. 
in Main Store basement NOW. 
See our complete line of Garden 
Tractors and accessories. Free 
Demonstrations. Montgomery 
Ward. Dixon, HI. 


Vaughn's Lawnseed, sunny and 
shady mixtures. The new Merlon 
Blue Grass. Peat Moss, small 
bags and large bales. Evergreens, 
Shade 
Trees. 
Shrubs. 
Roses, 
Fruit Trees, Berry Plants. Henry 
Lohse Nursery. 


Garden time is here. 
See us for garden spades, rakes, 
hoes, lawn brooms. 
MASSEY'S 


ACE HARDWARE 


The Time Is Right 


The Place is Right 


If it's fertilizer or grass 
seed for your lawn. 
Free use of our roller, 
spreaders, and soil are- 
ators. 


ZUEND'S 


GARDEN SHOP 


1102 N. Galena Ave. 


For the home garden, now the new 
Aliens Yardster. It plows, discs, 
and harrows in one operation. 
Also a 20-inch rotary mower at- 
tachment. Henrv Lohse Nursery. 


Grass seed, vifjoro, see our new 
1954 line of power mowers $59.95. 
Western Auto Store 
88 Galena Ave. 
Open Sun A.M. 


PERSONAL 


Are You 


Stripped 


of 


CASH? 


Then See Chuck 


• 
for 


Cash in a Flash 


$20 to $500 


Payments to Fit Your " 


Budget 


Stop in or Phone 
Chuck for a Loan. 
New Modern Offices 
Northern Illinois 


Corporation 


LOAN DIVISION 


2061/2 W. First St. 


Phone 3-1681 


Girl Roins: to beauty school would 
like ride home from Sterling to 
Dixon after 5 p.m. Telephone 
4-5924. 


MEN! 
Look better, feel better. 
at work at home. 
Ruth Brown Spencer corsetlere 
Dial 3-9331 


MONEY 


Loan in Minutes 


$20 


$IOO-$300 


Up to 
$500 


CASH LOANS 


Confidential 


SAME-DAY SERVICE 


Dixon's Oldest—Your 


COMMUNITY 


LOAN 


CORPORATION 


96 S. Galena Ave. 


Phone 4-1051 


A*kforlfr.NafIe,iffr. 


Tour message means money 
when you use Classified ads to 


^i+^*^i*^r+^*~r+^+^+~~v-t*~*r-*~-**-~ -m- -—- — -• — 
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 


^•_^-^Vs^-^V~^~-^v»S<~VV'^^«1«"~-.' 
RENT A BRAND NEW 
FULL 88 Not* WurUtnr piano. 
All rental applies on the purchase 


if you decide to buy. 
MILLER MUSIC STORK 
Dixon, Illinois 
Every Inch A Music .gtore 


Attractive antique walnut piano 


S25, oil finish, «i-height. Pay for 
moving. Phone 
4-S2Z1. WS *• 
Chamberlin. 


See and hear the 
ORGANO 
sensational piano-organ 
only $695.00 installed., 
WESTGORS 


Across from Wards 


»^-v.-w-S^"V—-»--*-—^•"—"<-•-•• 
PUBLIC SALE 


ROE'S CONSIGNMENT SALE 
At Sale Barn, 1 mile East of 


GHANA on Route 64 
Tuesday, March 30 at 18:30 
Usual run of dairy cows and heif- 
ers, 20 head of native Angu* feed- 
er cattle, weight 600 Ibs.. butch- 
er cattle, breeding bulls, veal 
calves, local feeder pig*. 50 head 
of pigs weighing 125 Ibs., Brood 
sows, sheep and lambs; poultry, 
Timothv and Clover seed. Manv 
other articles. Call Oregon 9355 
for truck. 
M. R. Ro% Auctioneer 


POULTRY 


Chicks! Chicks! Day-old and start- 
ed. Bred for highest egg produc- 
tion—fast growth and feathering. 
Your choice of Leghorns, White 
Rocks, Hampshires — White Egg 
Cross, cockerels or pallets 
Offi- 
cial contest blood-lines. Livabilitv 
guarantee. Order now so you will 
get them when wanted. Write, 
phone or come to see us. Stouf- 
fer Farm & Hatchery. Mt. Mor- 
ris. 
Local Rep: Rhodes 
Feed 
Store. 


For Sale: Baby Chicks 
from clean, good producing flocks. 
Special sale for three weeks for 
Del. Hamps and White Rocks. 
Also top cross varieties, all guar- 
anteed. Custom hatching wanted. 
Phone 217, Elsesser 
Hatchery, 
Ambov. 


High prices paid for poultry. 15 
years culling and picking up 
poultry on farms. Call 
< evenings 
preferred) or write Stanley Olson. 
Rochelle. Phone S27. 


Place vour chick order now. We 
specialize in White Rocks, White 
Leghorns, New Hampshire Reds. 
Our chicks do better because they 
are better. 
Dixon Hatcherv 
Phone 3-9941. 


Started Chicks 


4000 AAAA White Rocks 
400 AAAA White Rock pullets 
1000 AAAA White Rock cockerels 
800 AAAA New Hamp Reds 
700 AAAA Austra Whites 
500 AAA Barred Rocks 
200 AAA Legorra pullets 
Hatching March 18U> 


3000 AAAA White Rocks 
1000 AAAA White Leghorn pullets 
500 AAAA Austra White pullets 
400 AAA Legorra pullets 
400 AAAA Barred Rocks 
Hatches every Mon. and Thurs. 
MILLER HATCHERY 


Phone 46 
Lanark, 111. 


SWIFT & CO. CHICKS are brea 
for LIABILITY and high EGG 
PRODUCTION 
Ski-Hi 
Layers. 
Leghorn, White Rock. New Hamps 
and Golden Neck layers. 
Dixon Grain k Feed Co. 


Started Chicks 
Leghorns 
Austra Whites 
New Hamps 
White Rocks 
DeKalb Pullets 


Finest Quality Chicks 


Available 


Burman's Hatchery 
Polo, 111. 
Phone 6-1622 


RENTALS 


Sanders, edgers, oolishers, rollers 
and do-it-vourself equipment. 
Goral Bros. 


121 Galena Ave. 
Phone 2-9231. 


Several nice large office rooms 
over B. F. Shaw Printing Co. 
Three-room apartment with bath. 
Heat furnished. Phone 3-7989 from 
4-6 p.m. 
Newly decorated three-room strict- 
ly modern second floor furnished 
apartment. Private bath and en- 
trance. Heat furnished. No ob- 
jection to one small child. Phone 
4-2222. 
Mighty Little Want Ads — "Mar- 
ket - Place of Millions." 
Four-room and bath, unfurnished 
upper apartment. Private en- 
trance, Northside. References re- 
quired. Phone 3-5194. 
Large three-room upstairs apart- 
ment, private entrance, bath and 
big closet space. Close in. 322 8. 
Dement Ave. Phone 4-2506. 
Modern 3 or 4 room unfurnished 
upstairs apartment. Adult couple 
only. Heat and water furnished. 
Available April 1st. Phone 3-5311. 
3 room lower unfurnished apart- 
ment. Oil heat, hot water. 406 
Peoria Ave. 
Unfurnished apartment, newly dec- 
orated. Three rooms and sleeping 
porch, all utilities furnished. Call 
after 5 p.m. 10M West Third. St. 
The ideal and cozy apartment for 
two people. Stove, refrigerator, 
washing machine, dryer, heat and 
water furnished. Private en- 
trance. 823 E. Third. 
THREE-ROOM TRAILER, elec- 
tricity and water furnished. Ph. 
2-3661 after « p.m. 
Two room or three room furnished 
apartment. Phone 2-4252. 
Very nice 3-room furnished •pert- 
inent close In. Two adults only. 
Inquire at ttl 80. Hennepin Ave. 
Two «r three room furnished 
apartment, modern andariTate. 
Close in, available now. Fa. 4-MB1 
Apartment, unfurnished, dew tt 
Northside Private entrance, Jaw- 
dry facilities. Adulta only. Phone 
J-J6T1 or 8-aHl. 


Reliable 
cfiilclrffi 


" «r 


MM swan 
5»T?' 


CLASSIFIED 


Mt-MMllUII Cou«t— 1* Word* 


•••• 
t M 
i OAT .; 
S DAM 
• DATS 
....................... 
*70 


Aetuti wort nt** M p«r word 1 4ty: 
4« Mt VM« » tejri; M »« WOM « 
days. 


OLAMITttD DISPLAY : *0e eat. tola. 


— * Inch Minimum — 


CiMiiftM 
trtejUT 
IKut 
inelud* a 
mlslmua of on* IS PL h«*l and «•• 
II K. •ifBttur*. or it* *tulYt!Mt. 
> UM* «f • pt mltowM ptf lack. 


CASK WITH ORDEH 
M 


«l»UificttlOB»: 
-r 


F4MMM* — Want»d to R«nt 
Situation* Wanud 
. < 


BiulMM OtttrtosftlM 


CLASSIFIED DEADLINE 


thru Vtidar 
»:«0a. «L 


Saturday* 
»:00a. A. 


(All ClMiintd Diiplay Miut B* la tg 


16 lUautt* Prior t» t>*a4Un*> 
. 


Blind Adrtrtliemtat Chart* W* 


The Dixon 


Evening Telegraph 


Win B* roponiioi* for OB* 


Init^tton only. 


PHONE J-U11 


REPLIES 


At 10:00 a. m. today the 


following Telegraph Box- 
holders have replies in 
their boxes: 


30. 52. 57 


and may have by calling at 
office. 


No wax, no aching back, 
if you apply Glaxo plastic 
coating to linoleum. 
Eichler's Basement. 


Cushman Motor Scooter, good con- 
dition; al.«o hand-made saddle. 
411 Sherman Ave. or call 2-6644' 
Dixon. 
'"•' . 


1950 Chevrolet Deluxe 4-dr.; stair- 
way carpet, safe, toilet stools, 
24-in. bicycle, electric saw* and 
drills; new mattresses, cheat of 
drawers, tools. 
I. ZENTZ USED STORE 
: 
Route 30 
Rock Falls. 


Brittany Spaniel dor of good hunt- 
ing stock. Cheap. Call 3-74S3 after 
6 p.m. 


WANTED T(TBUr 


WANT bunk beds, complete, aim 
training chair. Call 3-3928. 
Want to buy row boat. Phone 
2-6752. 
Want to buy kid goats, 
before 
April 14. Call 9233 collect. Wil- 
liam Fritz. Oregon, 111. Rte. 1. 


WANTED 
Clean cotton rags 


No overalls - socks, etc. 
Bring to Press Room 
The Telegraph 


"PETS FOR~§AuT 
,*^xj."%»*%^^%-«w»*i^<.^'i-»"«'»-»^. _ 
_ 
_ 
_ 
_ 


A.K.C. registered Chihuahua, year 
old, for Stud service. Champion 
line. Phone 3-7837. 


FOR SALE 


1951 10-FT. O.E. REFRIGERATOR 
USED B-MONTHS. LIKE NEW, 
f295. PHONE 3-5022. 


China Closet, Breakfast Sets, 
Gas Stoves, Refrigerators. 
William's Used Furniture, Haldane 
6 miles North Polo. 


Rollaway bed, G. E. floor model 
radio, boy's 26-in. bicycle; also 
children's clothing. Phone 4-6282. 
USED T.V. Console, 12%-inch Cor- 
onado with booster $75.00. 211 
Monroe. Phone 2-5061. 
Spring Sale on building materials. 
Thick tab 3-in-l shingle any color. 
regular $7.98 now $6.99. Three tab 
hex. any color, now $6.65. 30-gaI. 
gas water heater $75.50, 20-gah 
gas water heater $63.50, 50-gal. 
electric water heater, fiber glass 
insulation $127.50. Several color* 
of siding on hand. Free estimates 
on birch cabinets. Call 2-1911 ask 
for Don Powell or Jack Boyle. 
Montgomery Ward. 


Singer Special 


Tour Sewing: Machine or Vac-, 
uum Cleaner oiled and adjusted 
for $8.95. Limited time only— 


Call 2-2376 


Dixon .or Write to 


RANDALL BOYD 


1825 Clark St. 


SINGER SALES * SERVICE 


Hotpoint automatic washer, Cold- 
•not refrigerator, Berkshire rta 
stove, Admiral 17-in. screea TV 
with aerial. All in very food con- 
dition. Call J-5141 for additional 
information, 
/ 


Factojy reconditioned oil burner*: 
2 William's automatic. 3 hirt- 
prtMure oil burners, i Winkler 
low pressure demonstrator. Brf- 
ant gas furnace air conditioner. 
square case. Display alumlnu* 
awnint*, various sites and colon, 
•frew for 
picture windows. 
"M"* .»5»thj» and Improvemeft 
O». 885 K. Galena Ave. Ph. 4- 
•!•«?*« ****«•• «Ffe tubs, 


NEWSPAPER! 
:1WSPAPER1 


SALE-HOUSEHOLD GOODS 


Only a Few 


1953 Norge 


REFRIGERATORS 


Drastically Reduced for 


Quick Sale 
Dixon 


Appliance Co. 


Stewart Warner and Emerson 


TV'a. 
$199.95 and up 
Webb'« TV 


522 Catena Ave. 
Phone 4-M31. 


^>»X-V^i^>^Ni^^^>^VJ^M^-^.'~S^N^<wl^M-^ 
SALE-REAL ESTATE 


Baton you buy any kom*. look 
into the Many Momewty Models 
with ftmturei *ytryon« likes. Al) 
§ize». Local build«r-d«aler. 
Bob P«rry 
franklin Grove Rd. 
ph. S-3242. 


SMALL FURNISHED HOUSE and 
acreage $3,200. Phone 3-2T34. 
For sale by owner: Three bedroom 
modern home, Northeast side. 
Price $9,500. Phone 4-2917. 


Northside home. 6 rooms on one 
floor. Gas heat, full basement. 
Will consider any offer. Ph. 2-3016 


BUY OF THE WEEK 
«-room house and garage on bus 
line, close to school. $1,000 down, 
balance at 
$65.00 per month. 
Quick possession. Price $8,800. 
H. E. GERDES, Realtor 


Office phone 4-9411 
Evenings phone 3-8587 and 4-2831. 
Choice building lot in 500 block on 
Van Buren Ave. All utilities are 
available. Lot size 50x140. This 
lot can be bought right if taken 
at once. Phone 3-5969. 


FOR SALE 


A REAL BUY 


4 bedroom modern home. Close to 
school, excellent condition. Well 
financed. Possession at once. 
11 ACRE TRACT CLOSE TO 
DIXON 
Has 4-room house and ottrr build- 
ings. Some seeded to alfalfa, well 
fenced. Priced to sell. Possession 
at once. 


.•> 
HESS AGENCY 
11? B. Third St. 
Phone 2-0201. 


House: Three rooms and bath, 
with H acres land, 7 miles from 
Dixon. Write Box 60 c/o Tele- 
traph. 
Mighty Littl* Want Ads — "Mar- 
ket - Place of Millions." 
••room house, 4 down—2 up, and 
bath; full basement, hot water 
heater, lot* of fruit. Lot 225 x 113. 
Modern 3-bedroom bungalow, oil 
heat, Southeast side. $11,500. 
6?» acres, 2 acres of asparagus, 
100 apple trees. John Deere trac- 
tor complete with plow and disc: 
machine shed, good well. Close to 
Dixon. Priced to sell. Well fi- 
nanced. 
• room house, > down, 2 large bed- 
rooms each with large closet, 1 
small bedroom with large closet. 
All tile bath. Single garage. This 
In in excellent repair, good loca- 
tion Northside. 
] Bpartment house, 5 room apart 
ment down, 3 rooms up. Private 
entrance, 
oil 
heat, 
insulated. 


Plumbing and wiring new. Sepa 
rate fuse boxes. Storm window: 
and screens, storm doors. Good 
location, close in Northside. 
Good building lots. North and 
South side. 
F. X. NEWCOMER ft CO. 
Phones 4-1821 
Evening F. M. Ideas 8-7172. 


S bedroom N. E. side home.'A-l 
condition, hot water heat, garage. 
Price 114,000. 
John W. King. Realtor 
Phone 2-4178 


NEW 3-bedroom ranch home on 
highway edge of Dixca. 
LARGE lot on highway. Very cloze 
in. 


A, J. TEDWALL AGENCY 
Phones 4-0671. 3-4821, 2-6271 


Let us show you one .of the sweet- 
est little horfies in town—beauti- 
ful gleaming woodwork and floors 
nearly' new, brick, two bedrooms 
full basement. Owner wants to 
leave town. 
ALDEN F. HUNTER, REALTOR 
106 River St. 
Phone 3-8221 


New modern three-bedroom ranch 
type bungalow, possession now 
Southeast side. Price $11,500. 
New modern 2-bedroore bungalow 
stairway in for additional rooms 
immediate possession. Northside 
location. Price $12,500. 
Modern 3-bedroom home, close in 
location. Northside, with garage 
Price $9,500. 
Will accept G. I 
loan. 
-KURD REAL ESTATE CO. 
First St. 
Phone 4-1511 


COMBINED HOME 
AND INVESTMENT 
3 bedrooms, living room, kitchen 
oil heat, top condition PLUS 3 
room apartment bringing good in 
eome. 
N«w 5-room brick home. 
North 


aide—One of the best in construe 
tion, character and style. All the 
new conveniences. Best location 
List Your Property With Us. 
Marg Kerz — 2-6431. 


CARL E. PLOWMAN, REALTOR 
Phone 3-8521 
Phone 2-0381 


Get what you want by reading 
Want Ads! 
An amazing num 
her of sale-offers appear in Class! 
fi«d section. That's whore you ge 
help in a hurry. 


The 
t- 


Morning 


„ After... 
By "FRIDAY" 


Reynold!) Win 
» F»rdham 
ISO 


Cy Win«br*nncr 174 
Galen Flnnell 
173 


ottr Anderson 
'till Haws 


N«l» Hagerty 
Walt Ellin 
Geo. Mcrrlman 
Art Horton 
larl Splnden 
Bob Conley 
Al spinden 


HIGH AVEKAGKS 


166 
165 


189 
195 
104 


152 
148 


EKO 


Mrn 


Ed McGrath 
16S 


Clarenc* Morris 107 
Fred Page 
1<>8 


Hal 
Konzeri 
!<;:> 


Russ Handy 
-100 


170 
155 
147 
140 
110 


Jan* Fischer 
Frances Brewer 
Ev!« Hinds 
. 


Dottle Gorhara 
Belli* Knot 


This li I he flr»t time for the week's 


•ehedule to appear on Saturday, and we 


poso after belne used to Feeing It on 


Monday for to long someone In sure to 


lBs it today, but we hop* It will not be 


oo many. 


Open bowling at Lincoln Lanr* this aft- 


ernoon and evening and Suday will give 
h» L»f§ Kellers a chance to qualify for 
:he 
Blackhawk eliminations, 
which 
end 


Tuesday 
night. 


Tomorrow at 10 a. m. the remaining 


tight In the Recreation Blaekhawk cham- 
pionship take the alleys for the quarter- 
'Inals, the list being cut to four 
after 
tomorrow's bowling. 


H'KKK'S SCIIEDl LE 


HKCKEATION 


MONDAY, Ijullex League—8:15 p. m.: 


CHnes 
Royal 
Blue vs. . Amys 
Beauty 


Shop; 
Pabst 
Blue 
Ribbon 
vs. 
Peter 


Pipers; Kathryn Beards vs. Hal Rob' 
erts; Hollywood shop vs. 
Studebakcr 


Sales. 9 |>. m.: Wilcox Jewelry vs. Ames 
Furniture; KrzinKer Shoes vs. Fazzl TV; 
Walder & Rhodes vs. Btundts Apparel; 
Elmorettes vs. Mildred Ryans. 
UESDAY. Public l«*rvlce Co, League— 
8:30 p. m.: Dixon Line vs. Pin Collec- 
tors; Yard Birds vs. Luminaircs; Substa- 
tion vs. Sales Dept.; Garage vs. Serv- 
ice Dept. 8::tO |>. m.: Megawatts vs. 
Steamers: 
Wood 
Choppers 
vs. 
Peels; 


Tech Operallnc vs. Machine Shop; Gas 
Dept. vs., Killwinkles. 


WEDNESDAY, f:ia.«ie Ujagur—7 p. m.: 


Chapel 
Hill 
Memorial Park 
vs. 
Hill 


Bros.: Lawton Dairy vs. Dixon Hatch- 
ery; H. A. Roes vs. Consldlne Chevies; 
Chapel Hill Funeral Home vs. A mould 
Insurance. » t>, in-.: Chauffeurs Local vs. 
Vaile Clothiers; Cooks Flowers vs. Boyn- 
ton-Rlchnrds: Melvins v/. vuallty Clean- 
ers: James Billiards vs. nixon Klks. 


Tlll-|t*l)AV, Commerrlal I>»KUP—1 p. in.: 


Hey Bros. vs. Empire Sales; The Stables 
vs. Nusbaum Delivery: Fyr Fyters vs. 
Marshall Barbers; Venler Jewelry vs. 


Coca Cola. 9 p. m.: Rogers Prlntlnc vs. 


Freeman Shoes: Dixon Motors vs. West- 
ern Auto; Fnlstaff Beer vs. Red Whites 
Welders; T.lnyds vs. Shaw Printers. 


FRIDAY, Major IsAKlir—7 n. m.: Iiixnn 


Oil vs. Millers Chryslers; Andrews Cities 
.Service- vs. Kunnybrook: Dixon Recrea- 
tion vs. Walter Knacks; Zeicn Buicks 
vs. Belers Bread. 


FRIDAY, City Ixncue—» p. m.: Keller 


Motors vs. City Laundry; Waller Suits 
vs. Bulck Fireballs: Zentz r.uifers v.s. 
Woosung Lumbpr: Reuters Cities Serv- 
ice vs. Petes Tap. 


(Mi.NDAY: Shaw Lracur—S p. m. 
SUNDAY. 
Mixed 
I>-acti«—B:3O 
p. 
m. 


AmAieurn vs. Gophers: Sad Parks vs. 
Tumblers; 
Rabbits vs.'i .less Electric: 


Wheels vn. AcherB. 8:30 p. m.: Sharp- 
shooters v». Fyr Fyters: 5 Aces vs. Dix- 
ori Recreation; Pin Biys Pets Vs. Slone 
Rollers; 
Prairie 
Ramblers 
vs. 
Jensen 


Construction. 


KINCOI.N MXKS 


MONDAT, Classic Lrnxui-—7 i>. m.: Wlrth 


heating vs. 
Wltzleb PlumbinK; Wayne 


Feeds vs. Mns's Billiards; 
Naylor * 


Co. vii. Lloyds; Braman Ins. vs. Raynnr 
Mfif. Co.; W. H. HtronRS vs. Hank Hen- 
ry's. 
» p. m.: KrtiK Auctioneers vs. 


Mellotts; Chi. Ave. Groc. vs. Lincoln 
Lanes; 
Pete 
Millers vn. 
Club 
Cafe; 


Muske Inc., vs. James Billiards; Beiers 
Bakeri vs. Manhattnn Cafe. 


NOTICE~OF ELECTION 
FOR DIRECTOR OK THE 
SCHOOL JBOARD 
School District No. 15 Lee County, 
Illinois 


Notice is hereby given that on 
Saturday, the 10th day of April, 
1954, an election will be held in 
School District No. 15, County of 
Lee and State of Illinois, for the 
purpose of electing one SCHOOL 
DIRECTOR of said district, for the 
full term. 
For the purpose of this election 


the following precincts and polling; 
places are 
hereby established: 
Neil Willstead Res. 
The polls will be opened at 1 
o'clock P.M., and closed at 3 
o'clock P.M. of the same day. 
By order of the School Board Of 


said district. 
Dated this 22nd day of March, 


1954. 
John W. Ryan 
President 


Neil Willstead 
Clerk 


NOTICE OF CAUCUS 
Notice is hereby piven that a 
aucus is called for the nomination 


of candidates for the office of 
School Director at 12:45 o'clock 
P.M. on the same day and at the 
same place as the above election. 
John W. Ryan 
President 
Neil Willstead 
Clerk 
March 27, 1954 


ATTENTION VETERANS: TIRED 
PAYING RENT? See this attract- 
ive, all-modem 4 room bungalow 
Southeast side. Priced at $10,750 
If eligible for a G.I. Loan you can 
buy for $1,500 cash and $70 per 
month. Call today. DONALD B 
RAYMOND, BROKER. 


"TODAY'S SPECIAL" 
On the edge of town — 5 room 
modern hdme,»j?arage. 
Also three-room bungalow, * ap 
proximately \ acre of land. Al: 
this for $14,000. Early possession 
can be arranged. 
L. J. WELCH CO. 
Phone 3-8171 


The Dbton Evening Telegraph 


Saturday, March 27.1954 


Rage 9 


NOTICE OF ELECTION 
FOR DIRECTOR OF THE 
SCHOOL BOARD 
School District No. 8, Lee County, 
Illinois 


Notice is hereby Riven that on 
Saturday, the 10th day of April, 
IfiS'l. an election will be held at 
NELSON, in School District No. 8, 
County of Lee and State of Illinois, 
for the purpose of electing one 
School Director of said district for 
the full term. 
For the purpose of this election 


the following precincts and poll- 
ing: places are hereby established: 
The polls will be opened at 4:00 
o'clock P.M. and closed at 6:00 
o'clock P.M. of the same day. 
Bv order of the School Board of 
said district. 
Dated this 27th day of March, 


1954. 
A. S. Holaday 
President. 
I. F. Sawyer 
Clerk. 


NOTICE OF CAUCUS 
Notice is hereby given that a 


Caucus is called for the nomina- 
tion of candidates for the office of 
School Director at 3:30 o'clock 
P.M. on the same day and' at the 
same place as the above election. 
A. S. Holaday 
President. 
I. F. Sawyer 
Clerk. 


March 27, 1954 


TfKSIIAV. \>»rnui» taarue—7 p. m.: 


Prlphp & Pnna vs. Sportsmftns Tap; Ow- 
ens fipt. Gda. vs. Oallashers Kerv.; Shaf- 
fers Truckers vs. Bains Grocery; Chuck* 
St.indard 
Hcrv. 
vs. 
Rountl-L'p; 
Henry 


Pratt 2 vs. Cooties. !> p. m.: Hcyx Sher- 
bets vs. Henry Pratt I: Dixon Ire vs. 
Murphy* Market; A. & P. vs. VFW: Co- 
lubrrms-McKinnon vs. Fazzls: Hey Bros. 
vs. Rnytiors. 


WEDNESDAY. Ijiillrs I-caeue—«:I5 n. ">•'• 


Boycl Caskets vs. New Bridee Inn; Ray- 
noretles vs. Farsterettes; Walter Knacks 
vs. 
I.inroln Lanes; Lawton 
Dairy vs. 


Trelns; R. fc S. vs. Hollywood Shop. 


WEDNESDAY. Kn-nman (Slrtn IJM»»U»- 


II. m.: Cut Sole vs. Cutters: Sportsman 
Tap vs. XVatch Repairers; Bay Orocery 
vxs. USF&G; Corn Belt Chicks vs. Loaf- 
ers; rradles vs. Gerries Real Estate. 


THl!RSI>AY, Mm'* League—7 p. m.: Kel- 


len 
Motors vs. 
DOUKS Three 
Deuces'; 


lAf-TK 1 vs. Goral Bros.; .Taycees vs. 
Ready Mix; Scharpf Phosphate vs. IAHE 
2; Lindquists v». Freeman 8ho«a. 9 l>. 
m.: Medusa Cement 
v«. Jay Cumins; 


USFfcO vs. Wnlder * Rhodes; Enslnecrs 
vs. Krocers; Klein & Heekman vs. Bar- 
neys Exca.v.; Dixon One-Stop v«. Swiss- 
vllin Rpt. Gds. 


rillDAY, Chureh Ix-ntue—7 p. m.: St. 


Paul 1 vs. Christian 3: Immanutl 2 vs 
Presbyterian 1; 
Baptist 2 vs. 
Bethel 


Christian 1 vs. St. Paul 3;,.St. Paul 2 
vs. Christian 2. » p. m.: Nachusa vs 
St. Patrick 3; Dixon Brethren vs. St 
James; Immanuel 1 vs. Presbyterian 2 
Baptist 1 vs. Franklin Grove brethren 
St. Patrick 
'I vs. St. Patrick 2. 


SUNDAY, KRO Lc«iir—1 p. m.: Braves 


vs. 
Also Runs; 
Beginners vs. 
O«'ls 


Rebels vs. Jets? Recs. vs. Burrotalls 
Hi-Pressured vs. Oddn * Knds. 


NOTICE OF ELECTION 
FOR DIRECTOR OF THE 
SCHOOL BOARD* 
School District No. 2, Lee County, 
Illinois 
> 


Notice is hereby given that on 
Saturday, the 10th day of April, 
1954 an election will be held at 
SUGAR GROVE in School District 
No. 2, County of Lee and State of 
Illinois, for the purpose of electing 
one School Director of said district 
tor the full term. 
For the purpose of this election 


the following precincts and poll- 
ing places are hereby established: 
The polls will be opened at 12:00 
o'clock and Closed at 2:00 o'clock 
P.M. of the same day. 
By order of the School Board of 
said district. 
Dated this 26th day of March, 


1954. 
Edward A. Lawton 
President. 
Keith' Swarts 
Clerk. 


NOTICE OF CAUCUS 
Notice is hereby given that a 
Caucus is called for the nomina- 
tion of candidates for the office 
of School Director at'11:45 o'clock 
A.M. on the same day and at the 
same place as the above election. 
Edward A. Lawton 
President. 


Keith Swarts 
Clerk. 
March 27. 1954 


PROPOSAL 


TO SELL RKAL ESTATE 


Notice is hereby given that the 
City of Dixon proposes to sell to 
the highest and best bidder the 
following- described real estate, 
to-wit: 


The 
Easterly 
O n e-Hundred 


(100') Feet of Lot Number 
Four 
M i in Block Number 


Ninety-five (95,1, in the Town 
(now City) of Dixon. in the 
County of Lee. State of Illinois. 
Said proposal being: in pursuance 


of an- ordinance duly passed by 
the Council of the City of Dixon 
on the 16th day of March. 1954, 
and approved on the 16th day of 
March. 1954, by the Mayor of the 
said City of Dixon. 
The said above described prop- 
erty is located on the Northwest 
corner of 8th Street and Jefferson 
Avenue, in the City of Dixon, 111- 
nois, and had been used by the 
Citv as a stone quarry and is va- 
cant unimproved property. 


The said City of Dixon will re- 
ceive sealed bids for the purchase 
of said property and bids shall be 
opened at the regular meeting of 
the' said Council of the City of 
Dixon, to be held at the Citv Hall 
in the said City of Dixon. on the 
00^8 *B >S6I 'IPdV jo ./top ing 
o'clock P.M. and said bids shall 
be accepted only upon a vote of 
Three-Fourths of the members of 
such Citv Council, provided that 
the said Citv Council may, by .1 
majority vote, reject any or all 
bids. 
If purchaser desires Abstract of 
Title cost thereof must be assum- 
ed by purchaser. 
William V. Slothower 
Mayor. 


ATTEST: 
Wavne C. Smith. City Clerk 
Gerald Jones, Citv Attorney. 
March 20, 27. 1954 


LTI Abner 


TH' &AD THING ABOUT TH' 
SHMOOS WAS.THEV 
TOO GOOD FO' PEOPLE— 


-SO THEY WAS DECLARED 1 


- « * P E T R V E p 


-NOW.THAA'S NO SHMOOS 


LEPT IKJTH'VALLEV 
OPTH'SHMOON — 


Bugs Bunny 
Nicely Said 


LITTLE LIZ 


The only thing that keeps walk-, 


ing from becoming a lost art is the 
distance from the parking place 
to the-stores. 
• NU • 


They'll Do It Every Time 
kMM«. 
By Jimmy Hatlo 


IN A TRAIN OR BUS ON A WET, 


SUJSHV DAV- WHO PUTS HIM UP ON 
THE SEAT; /wurxy FEET AND ALL? 


AFTER MES HAD MIS 


OOESMT WAUTUTTIE E66LESBERR/ 


ON MER PURMPTURE 


TWERE-YOUCAW 
UPONTWATSEAT.BUT 


CAREFUL—HOLD 


With Major Hbople 
Our Boarding House 


I VJELCOM& AS AM 


^X-RAY5HOWIN6 


INrLlWi ff\i MttflNtHOliY ANUUw wrv)^ T*^*"*I^^ ^Ȥ AniOtl^ UW /"LIILIA /**) 
RJT IV& 3UST TO«ED MV CALORV- 
%CA TOfiW Sri *MC^ 
.'. 
jMWHlr46AMOf>tetMETlMCAN^^f^0®T*e™^ 


OM IWE crrv DUMP—AND i OWT RAcet 2^0^ afHir A 
4fr AJVENtLE Jl6£5 Or TMQ^ff fCA€S ^M »in»w IHH» IS^POI i f* 


IB ewxewsfti^ipii^/ISu?* 


Out Our Way 
By J. R. Williams 


JL 
' 1 DON'T KMOVW WHV, \ 
BUT EV/ER.V POULTICE ) 
OF PAINT PLASTER. / 
AWP PUTTY HAS TO 
HAVE PAPULES', POLES 
ANP BRU6HE5 PETEIPIEPJ/ 


AMP VOU CAW T >. 
PULL 'EM OUT AMP) 
YOU CAN'T GET / 
MORE THAN TWO J 
OF 'EM IW TH' 
) 


TEASH CAN.' 
[ * 


WHERE'LL WE N 
STACK TH'VWOOPy 


I'M HAPPY TOHAyf NOU 
US6 ANYOPMVMN6S. 
IP rrvMLL SPEED 


IM3LAOVA 
SAO THAT, OOC, 


9-TT 


Freckles and His Friends 
It'saStickup! 
By Merrill Blosaer 


THAT SOUNDS 
REASONABLE 


A 816 SOCIAL 


NISMT; SON i 


JurJe WOMT RIDE IM 
MY HEAP WITH WEE. 
NEW FORMAL, SO I'LL 
I'LL weep 
MONEY 
FOR TME 
SENlOfc 


POP/ 
TICKETS 
APE A 
BUCK. 


APIECE/ 


J GOTTA MAV6 ANOTHER 


FIVE FOR AM OBCHID/ 


, STEVE ?CMK<1P^ 


we our OP THAT POKER 
OAMC TONI6MT / 


Xv*>' 


Alley Oop 
Paging One Dinosaur 
By V. T. HamJiB 


HEARDASIJY 
SAY WE SAW 1M IIL smer 


tHAT WKf. 


YTWNK fM 
>s.A STEED LIKE 


RiSWN1 Mr LIFE SOIN'\ OL' OtNNY TO 
CVER INTO >OWA LAND I RIDE, I'D SAY 
TO BRING FOOZY BACK / VOU'D MAKE 


WHEOEHE'S HOLED 
UP._ I HAVENT 
5EEN1M IN 


NOONS/ 


OUT OP EXILE. EH? 


Ahhie an' Slate 
By Raebnnt Van Bum 


I'LL THINK IT OVER AND 
GIVS TOU MY ANSWER 
IN THE MORNING 


. HARLOW.' 


I...I GUESS THE THOUGHT OF 
BECKY SOINS TO ANOTHER TOWN 
TO LIVE POESNT EXACTLY 
ME DELIRIOUSLY 
HAPPY. POP. 


IT DON'T TAKE A BLARSTED 
MIND READER T'RSGER OUT 
YOU DON'T TAKE T THIS 
OFPER THEY'RE MAKIN' 


Tf BECKY, SLATS . 


Boots and Her Buddie* 
On Schedule 
By Edgar M&rtia 


Captain Easy 
Strange Message 
By Utlte Turnk* 


. f VCVLt FUJ1$K 


THE DECORXTtOMft ILL'30 AND-MIMA.' 


ITU. BE W FIRST 
\H6RE'S THE WNL 


CEM. BlKtHDM fMtTV! ) M«5. 
THE CHILPREM WHO'D B6CM 
IKMTER, TELL THfcWk 1 
6UPPCMVY TJkKf M 
TK PMtTV 


IJTDHEKROOtt. 


APPREMED WTH 
CUOWf MUNTBP 


Vie Flint 
Getting Warm 


Th« Dixon EVcning Telegraph 
Saturday, March 27,1954 
Page 10 


SATURDAY AFTERNOON 


1:00 WGN—News; B. Black 
WBBM—News 
WLS—Metropolitan Opera 
WMAQ—House of Music 
WJJD—News: R. Wayne 
WCFL—Sox vs. Phillies 
WIND—News; music 
WEAW-~Howard St. Parade 
1:15 WBBM—Paul Gibson 
1:25 WGN—Headline news 
1:30 WGN—Buddy Black 
WBBM—Paul Gibson 
1:55 WMAQ—News 
2:00 WGN—News; Big Spin 


WBBM—Josh Brady 
WMAQ—Road Show 
WJJD—News; Wax Shop 
WIND—News; Record Shop 


2:30 WGN—Big Spin 
3:00 WGN—News; Big Spin 


WBBM—Chicagoans 
WJJD—News; Review 
WIND—News; Record Shop 


3:30 WGN—Big Spin 
WIND—Cubs vs. Orioles 
WBBM—Josh Brady 
3:45 WBBM—Horse race 
4:00 WGN—News; Big Spin 


WBBM—Josh Brady 
WJJD—News;- Top Tunes 
WCFL—Bill O'Connor 


4:30 WGN—Collector's Corner 


WMAQ—Rio Rhythms 
WBBM—Symphonette 
WLS—Guest Star 
WCFL—News; music 


4:45 WLS—Here's to Vets 
5:00 WGN—News; Collector's 


Corner 
WMAQ—News 
WLS—Merry-Go-Round 
WBBM—Josh Brady 
WJJD—Supper Frolic 
WCFL—News; music 
5:15 WMAQ^-Carnival of Books 
B:30 WGN—Collector's Corner 
WBBM—Sports Roundup 
WMAQ—Case Dismissed 
WIND—Glenn Miller 


8:45 WBBM—News 
5:55 WGN—News 


EVENING 


6:00 WGN—H. -Earie. news 
WBBM—That's Rich 
WMAQ—Theater Royal 
WLS—News 
WIND—News: music 
WCFL—Bob Elson 
«:15 WGN—Walter Trohan 


WLS—St. James Methodist 
church 


«:30 WGN—Buddy Black 
WBBM—You're the Tops 
WMAQ—Big Preview 
WIND—Sports Review 
WLS—Country Junction 
6:55 WGN—C. Brown, news 
7:00 WGN—-20 Questions 
WBBM—Gunsmoke 
WCFL—Jim Mills 
WIND—News; Top Hit 


7:30 WGN—Unshackled 
WBBM—Gangbusters 
WIND—Sports news 
WLS—Hayloft Frolic 


8:00 WGN—The Songfellowc 
WBBM—Two for the Money 
WMAQ—Americana 
WLS—Barn Dance 
WIND—News: Dance party 
WCFL—Sat. Serenade 
8:30 WGN—Lombardoland 
WMAQ—Grand Ole Opry 
WBBM—Maury McGiU 
WLS—Hayloft Party 


R :45 WBBM—Preview 
fi :00 WGN—Theater of Air 
WMAQ—Fibber McGee 
WIND—News; Dance party 
WLS—Barn Dance party 
WCFL—Sat. Serenade 
»:15 WMAQ—Bob Hope 
9:30 WLS—News 
WBBM—Weather Roundup 
WMAQ—Country Tunes 
WIND—News; E. Hubbard 


9:35 WBBM—Maury McGill 
9:45 WLS—The Buccaneers 
WMAQ—Dude Ranch 
10:00 WGN—News; Senator*1 


Report 
WBBM—News 
WMAQ—News 
WLS—Barn Dance 
WIND—News: E. Hubbard 
WCFL—Sal. Serenade 
10:15 WBBM—Sports Roundup 


WMAQ—Bill Bailey 


10:20 WGN—Chicago, at Night 
WBBM—Dance orchestra 
WCFL—News: music 
10:30 WGN—H. Earle, news 
WBBM—DanCe orchestra 
WCFL—News; music 


10:35 WGN—Chicago at Night 
11:00 WGN—Chicago at Night 
WMAQ—Star Reporter 
WBBM—News 
WIND—News; Lombardo 
11:05 WBBM—Dance orchestra 
11:15 WMAQ—Jack Eigen 
11:30 WGN—Chicago at Night 


WIND—News; J. Mills 
WCFL—Operation Midnight 
11:55 WBBM—This I Believe 
12:00 WGN—Chicago at Night 
WBBM—Music till Dawn 
WIND—News; Nitewatch 
1:30 WMAQ—Chan 


TRY THIS 


ICE CREAM 


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TOPPED WITH 


SHREDDED 
COCOANUT 


M-m-m-m — So Testy/ 


B E L L R I N G E R - 
Ctearette server-lighter like a 
telephone, with a music box 
that plays when receiver is 
lifted, is shown at a Paris, 


France, department store. 


Army Lists No 
Moors But He's 
Drafted Anyway 


^ William Ar- 
BALTIMORE 


thur Wellington Bey, a "Moorish 
American," reluctantly submitted 
to army induction here Friday de- 
spite his listing as a Negro and 
even though the Moorish flag won't 
by flying next to the Stars and 
Stripes. 


The 21-year-old Wellington Bey 


didn't have much choice. 


He refused Induction last Mon- 


day after a sergeant listed him as 
a member of the negroid race. He 
contended he was a Moorish Amer- 
ican and would step forward only 
when listed as such. 


That threw the military for a bit 


of a loss because the induction 
form lists five races and "Moorish 
American" is not one of them. 
' Wellington Bey was arrested by 
the FBI and taken before U. S. 
Commissioner Ernest Volkart. 


Wellington Bey informed the 


commissioner he was reluctant to 
serve in the army unless the 
Moorish flag were flown next to 
the American. 


Commissioner Volkart suggested 


Wellington Bey accept induction 
despite the race classification and 
wtihout his own flag and said if 
the Defense department changed 
its'- rules and regulations to satisfy 
Moorish. Americans, Wellington 
Bey could adjust accordingly. 


GOP Chairman Hall Says 
Sen. McCarthy Does Harm 


OMAHA (ft—Chairman 
Leonard 


W. Hall of the Republican national 
committee says Sen. McCarthy (R- 
Wis) "has done more harm than 
good" in his trade of verbal blows 
with top army officials. 


As a result, said Hall, McCar- 


thy's "senate effectiveness-has di- 
minished in the past few weeks." 


Hall's statement in an interview 


Friday night came as one of the 
strongest criticisms of the Wiscon- 
sin senator yet put out by a high 
GOP official. Several weeks ago 
Hall described McCarthy as an as- 
set to the party. 


McCarthy, chairman of the sen- 


ate investigations subcommittee, 
could not be reached for immedi- 
ate comment. 


"Dispute Hurts" 


Asked about the McCarthy-army 


exchanges, Hall said "the dispute 
has hurt. Any dispute hurts." 


His comment came just before 


he talked about campaign strategy 
at a banquet gathering?1 of the Mid- 
west and Rocky Mountain Republi- 
can State Chairmen's Assn. 


"There is one person who al- 


ways speaks for our party," Hall 
said in his dinner speech, "and 
that is Dwight D. Eisenhower. 
Don't let anybody tell you that be- 
cause of quarrels in Washington 
that there is no unity and no lead- 
ership." 


The GOP national chairman told 


an enthusiastic audience that the 
big campaign issues this year 
would be the economic health of 
the nation and the "never ending'' 
battle with communism. 


On the first count, Hall declared 


"the 
Eisenhower administration 


program, now moving through con- 
gress, is designed to keep us sound 
economically by building more in- 
dustry, more jobs and a healthy 
agriculture." 


Truly American 


On the second, he said: 
"We have at long last developed 


a truly American foreign policy 
which meets the overseas Commu- 
nist threat head-on and lays' the 
responsibility where it belongs—in 
the laps of the Russians. Mean- 
while at home we have both the 


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willingness and the know-how for 
dealing with Communist inspired 
subversions." 


All the Republicans have to do 


to win in 1954. Hall said, is "do 
what we did in 1952—get out the 
vote." 
Radioactive 
Dust Found 
In Chicago 


CHICAGO I.?)—Radioactive dust, 


still completely harmless, drifted 
down on the Midwest after dust 
storms last week in the western 
plains, a scientist reported Fri- 
day. 


Radioactivity three times normal 


expectations was found in samples 
collected on Chicago's South Side 
by a team from the Armour Re- 
search Foundation of the Illinois 
Institute of Technology. 


Edward G. Fochtman, leader of 


the project, said the amount of 
radioactivity in a two square foot 
sample of dust at the period of 
highest 
concentration still was 


only one ten-thousandth of that 
given off from a wristwatch with 
luminous hands. 


Fochtman said scientists on the 


project, sponsored by the Midwest- 
ern Air Pollution Prevention Assn., 
"drew 
no conclusion" On the 


source of the radioactivity. He 
said radioactive particles from the 
United State's March 1 hydrogen 
explosion in the Pacific could con- 
taminate the dust. He added, how- 
ever, that this contamination would 
have been expected to reach the 
Midwest between March 8 and 11. 


Fochtman's dust project was not 


started until March 15. He said 
the high radioactivity appeared 
for a few hours on March 19 and 
then dropped off sharply in the 
dust samples that settled later. 


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NAMED COMMANDER- 
—Lieut Gen. Earle E. Partrldce 
has been nominated by Presi- 
dent Eisenhower as * four-star 
General and Commander of the 


Far East Air Forces. 


Phone Network 
To Carry Voice 
Of Billy Graham 


LONDON — American Evange- 


list Billy Graham 
will 
begin 


preaching over a network of 20 
British telephone lines next week 
because Harringay Arena cannot 
accommodate the crowds which 
wish to hear him. 


Graham is conducting his revival 


meetings nightly at the arena, but 
only 12,600 persons can sit in the 
great hall, which usually is the site 
of sporting events. 


Many persons have been turned 


away nightly from Harringay. To 
enable them to hear him, telephon- 
ic connections with many British 
cities are being arranged so that 
local clergymen can switch on 
Graham's sermons from Harringay 
for audiences in local halls. 


At the end of his fourth weej^ of 


his "Crusade in Greater London" 
Graham has spoken to almost 400,- 
000 persons. 


If interest continues the attend- 


ance figure at the end of the three 
months campaign will exceed a 
million. 


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CHICAGO—<^P)—Sixteen-year-old Arlene Goerner 


was taking a driving lesson Friday. She told police she 
swerved to avoid hitting a dog and smashed her car into 
the back of a station wagon. 


The station wagon plowed into some garbage cans 


and the cans hurtled against a wooden stairway of an 
apartment house. The stairway came tumbling down. 


Arthur Mankin, 33, eating his breakfast in his 


apartment on the second floor, came out the door to in- 
vestigate. His wife saw him suddenly disappear from 
view. 


Walking to a window, she saw him lying on the 


ground 20 feet below. He was taken to a hospital with 
a dislocated shoulder and cuts. 


It was Mankin's station wagon Miss Goerner had 


smashed. Police cited her for negligent driving and 
driving without a license. 


TONITE 


"Little Fugitive" 


and 


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STARTING SUNDAY 


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