Skip to main content

Full text of "Epitome"

See other formats

















































































































PUBLISHED APRIL, 1938 
Editor—Emily Stahr 

Bus. Mgr.—Bill Brown 
























TO THE PAST—A successful institu¬ 
tion is built only upon fine tradition. 
Those who have built this tradition 
around our school deserve more than 
tribute—they deserve assurance that we 
who have inherited it have bettered it 
and that those who are to come will bet¬ 
ter it still more—for this is growth. 



TO THE FUTURE—Here’s to those 


who, we knew, will cherish our school, 
foster her growth and preserve her tradi¬ 
tion in the coming years. 













































We who live in Hagersvown often fail 
to see the lovely scenes which are 
about us everywhere. Especially do the 
waterways present pictures of breath¬ 
taking loveliness, if we but take a 
moment to notice. 







in the summer behind this waterfall 
we should find busy Boys Scouts, hurry¬ 
ing to work and play, bubbling over 
with activity. Here we see autumn 
sunlight playing upon tumbling water. 


















yiL VJ/uWUfUXWYL 


CHARLES 

ROBERT 

CORY 


September 20, 1920 
January 16, 1934 








QojdwcdwfL 


r 


To you whose interest in 
our school prompts you to turn 
the pages which follow, per¬ 
haps finding there a memoir of 
your own school days, we pay 
tribute. 

To you, the students, alumni 
and friends of Hagerstown 
High School, we sincerely dedi¬ 
cate this, the 1938 Epitome. 


















J'lfmvificL 


The class of 1938 presents 
this yearbook in the hope that 
each time these pages are 
turned school memories will be 
enlivened and happy times will 
live again in thoughts and 
dreams. 









QvLjhdk. uhjd&A. 


ADMINISTRATION 

SENIORS 

UNDERCLASSMEN 

ATHLETICS 

LIFE 


FEATURES 
















(Jl&WfL 


We make life into beauty 
We make life into pain 
We are ourselves its sunshine 
We are ourselves its rain. 

For in divinest wisdom 
A path for each lies white 
And only as we view it 
Do we have day or night. 









(MminhJthicdiDtL 




























Mr. Stout, usually quiet but 
certainly doing his part as one 
of the guardians of our destiny, 
is the able president of our 
school board. 


Mr. Bland is unassuming, 
but faithful to those ideals 
which mean democratic school 
government. Mr. Bland is the 
township trustee and secretary 
of the board. 



■ 



Mr. Stahr is the treasurer of 
our school board. Public spirit, 
a yearning for progress, and a 
sense of justice typify him. 







THE SCHOOL BOARD 


The governing of a school is in¬ 
deed a task for any group of men. 
The success of a school board is in 
evidence every day, if the school 
demonstrates fine spirit, good schol¬ 
arship, and unity of school board, 
faculty and students. We can look 
■ proudly upon the modern method 

of government our school finds ef¬ 
fective—that of giving students 
freedom that they may learn re¬ 
straint—learn early in life to make 
adult decisions and so become good 
citizens. 


Page thirteen 



























above all his interest in peo¬ 
ple, give him the position, not 
only of superintendent, but 
counsellor and friend as well. 

Indiana University A.B. 
History and Political 
Science 

Columbia University M.A. 
School Administration and 
Supervision 

Page fourteen 


m 









JOE R. CRAW 



His abundance of energy and 
happiness, a sense of justice and 
sportmanship, an intense inter¬ 
est in humanity—all these 
qualities we find in our prin¬ 
cipal, Mr. Craw. 

Butler University A.B. 
and M.A. 

Botany—Education 


Page fifteen 



























Martha Castle 


Marfield Cain 


Bernice Hormel 


MISS MARTHA CASTLE 

History, Girls' Physical 
Education Director. 

DePauw University, Ball 
State Teachers' College 
A.B., Columbia University. 

Student discipline is the 
best insurance against 
scholastic failure. 


MR. MARFIELD CAIN 

History, Boys' Physical 
Education Director,Coach. 

Earlham College A.B., 
Butler University, Indiana 
University, Ball State 
Teachers' College, Central 
Normal. 

To win is fun, to play 
fairly is fine. 


MISS BERNICE HORMEL 

English, Public Speak¬ 
ing, Drama. 

Earlham College, Ball 
State Teachers' College 
A.B., University of Wis¬ 
consin. 

An instructor's duty 
goes far beyond the mere 
teaching of subject mat¬ 
ter. 


MISS ALIDA MORRIS 
English, Latin. 

Indiana State Teachers' 
College A.B., Columbia 
University, University of 
California. 

As indispensable as 
books to H.H.S. 




Alida Morris 


Virgil Heniser 


MR. VIRGIL HENISER 

Science, Mathematics. 

Ball State Teachers' 
College B.S., New York 
State Department of Pub¬ 
lic Health. 

To be happy we must 
learn to be healthy. 


MISS RUTH DUTRO 

Science, Machematics. 

Manchester College A. 
B., University of Chicago, 
Ball State Teachers' Col¬ 
lege, Yosemite School of 
Field National History, 
University of Michigan. 

Abundant energy, well 
directed, is a vital force. 


MR. FLORENCE B. LESTER 

Mathematics. 

Indiana University, Ball 
State Teachers' College 
A.B. 

Most often students 
learn more easily if the 
instructor presents his 
material with a studied 
lack of effort. 



Florence B. Lester 


Pa,qe sixteen 










Theodore Sedgwick 


MR. THEODORE 
SEDGWICK 

Industrial Arts, General 
Science. 

Purdue University B.S. 
A., Ball State Teachers' 
College. 

A good scoutmaster 
builds better men. 


MISS MAjORA KUNZ 

Art. 

Indiana University A.B., 
Indiana University Grad¬ 
uate Work. 

Art involves more than 
lines or colors, for per¬ 
sonalities are reflected 
most vividly in artistic 
ways. 


MISS ELIZABETH 
ACKERMAN 

Commercial. 

Ball State Teachers' 
College A.B. 

Many students will use 
the commercial subjects 
they have mastered under 
capable instruction as 
their future means of 
livlihood. 


MISS MARTHA YOUNG 

Vocational Home Eco¬ 
nomics. 

Ball State Teachers' 
College, Indiana State 
Teachers' College B.S., 
Purdue University. 

Adequate preparation in 
the field of Home Eco¬ 
nomics is as important as 
in more technical fields. 


Page seventeen 




Martha Young 


MR. WILLIAM SHIVELY 

Vocational Agriculture. 

Purdue University 
B.S.A., Purdue University 
Graduate Study. 

With the Future Farm¬ 
ers of today rests the 
agricultural progress of 
tomorrow. 


MR. JULES BREWER 

Director of School Music. 

Indiana University B.P. 
S.M., Indiana University 
M.A. 

Music gives students 
their greatest opportunity 
to work together in an 
inspirational way. 


MISS HELEN SMITH 
Clerk. 

A helpful school figure 
—perhaps not really ap¬ 
preciated. 




William Shively 


Jules Brewer 


Helen Smith 


Majora Kunz 


Elizabeth Ackerman 

























I 





Page eighteen 


- 








All smiles from all teachers 
—they like our new gym, 
too. 


Mary must be giving Mr. 
Craw a little friendly advice. 


Lying innocently on the desk 
top are those dealers of sad 
tidings, report cards. Espe¬ 
cially sad tidings on the last 
page where deportment 
grades can be found (if 
you’re interested). Of course, 
we all get A’s! 


“Bernie,” our faculty li¬ 
brarian seems to be sur¬ 
rounded by admirers. Could 
it be the books they’re so 
interested in? 


John and Jake evidently 
don’t believe in signs, but 
the next two pictures belie 
it. For they are certainly “in 
there pitching” to keep us 
comfortable. 




Mr. Cory, busy as usual. The 
telephone rings, there are 
three people waiting to talk 
to him, letters to be writ¬ 
ten, and the school must go 
on. Our sympathy, Sir. 


Mr. Lester is teaching the 
boys algebra. My, what at¬ 
tentive children! Bet they 
knew a picture was being 
taken. 




Page nineteen 














Jcuculh^ 


As students we perhaps do 
not fully appreciate a faculty 
of capable men and women. It 
is as we journey to other 
schools and see the many 
strained attitudes which exist 
between students and their in¬ 
structors that we come to feel 
deeply grateful for the modern, 
friendly, well educated, and 
versatile instructors who con¬ 
stitute our faculty. 


The senior class cherishes 
great friendship with the mem¬ 
bers of the faculty and thanks 
those members for their inter¬ 
est, co-operation, and guidance 
during the past school years. 


We indeed respect this fac¬ 
ulty, not because there has 
been any disciplinary demand 
for such respect, but because 
students always grant the com¬ 
pliment of their respect to 
those who deserve it. 


Page twenty 























SsmuA&u 


























THE SENIOR CLASS 


The senior class of 1938 has been 
unique in many ways. In short, we’re 
mighty proud of ourselves. We are proud 
to flaunt our successes before envying 
underclassmen and alumni, and remind 
them that the class of 1938 gave Hagers¬ 
town’s first prom, was the first class to 
give a play in the new gymnasium, par¬ 
ticipated in the operetta, “Chonita,” and 
pioneered the use of microphones in the 
speech department. We present what 
we believe to be the best Epitome pro¬ 
duced and leave H. H. S. challenging the 
Junior Class to equal our record. 







Most seniors feel the same anx¬ 
ieties around commencement time. 
After spending worried hours with 
the question, “Will I graduate?” 
the question suddenly becomes 
“When I graduate—what then?” 
And we are faced with the uncer¬ 
tainty of the future. But whatever 
lies in store for us, we can feel only 
gratitude for the happy years we 
have spent in H. H. S. 
















MARY ALLEN 

Dainty little girl with a sparkler on 
her left hand. P. S.— It is real. 


ELENORA ATKINSON 

Our seamstress who represented us at 
the State Fair School. 


JOHN BAKER 

The holy terror and professional 
baker. 


NORMA BEESON 

Big brown eyes. 


DONALD BEESON 

Strength and silence. 


JUNE BLACK 

Sweet sixteen at seventeen. 



Page twenty-four 














HERSCHEL BOWMAN 
Persistent plugger. 

BOB BROWER 

Cock of the walk. 

ROBERT BROWN 

That devil in his eye. 

BILLY BROWN 

The little boy with the big bass voice. 

HELEN BURGESS 

Meek and dainty. 



Page twenty-five 



















CLIFTON CHAMBERLIN 
Girl in every port. 


LLOYD CRAIG 

Stability and happiness. 


GEORGE CRULL 
Contentment. 


URMA LEE CRYE 
Sympathy. 

THELMA DENNIS 
Patience. 


DENZIL FOUTS 

Steadiness personified. 



Page twenty-six 













I 



WILMA FOUTZ 
Hearty smiles. 

THELMA FOWLER 
Demure. 

KEITH CLANCY 

Engaging smile. 

BOB CORDON 

Speed demon. 

LEAH FERN CRAY 

Happiness comes my way. 

DAVID HARVEY 

Cute and happy. 

§1 

| 

* 

I 






Page twenty-seven 




















LLOYD HILBERT 
Brower ditto. 


OLIVE HIMES 

Energetic and sure. 


WAYNE HOLCOMB 

Always five minutes early. 


JOHN HOOVER 

Dashing figure. 


HELEN INNIS 

Sweet and gracious. 


GEORGE MILLER 
Just George. 


Page twenty-eight 











■ 


BOB LaMAR 

Art and temperament. 


JUNE LaVELLE 

Ardent friend. 


HERBERT LESTER 

Good sportmanship. 


EVERETT LILLY 

Goldie Fern’s charmer. 


KENNETH McFARLAND 
Mischief. 


JOE KNOSE 

God’s gift to women. 

















RUBY NEEDLER 

Ardent worker. 


ANN PARSONS 

Spitfire and dreams. 

DELMAR PETTY 
Concentration. 


BUD PRESSEL 

Biggest rough houser. 



Page thirty 






















EUGENE RAFFE 
Even temper. 

ELIZABETH RAMEY 
Homemaker. 


MARGARET KRITSCH 

Winchester’s helpful addition. 


IRENE SHERRY 
Precision. 


MARILEEN SHULTZ 

Fire and smooth waters. 


CHARLES SMITH 
Handsome hero. 
















PAUL SMITH 

A class debater. 


JIM SPITLER 

Florida tramp—in worst with faculty. 


EMILY STAHR 

Versatile and popular. 


FRANCES STOMM 
Dependable. 


jUNE SULTEEN 

Personality plus boy friends. 


BETTIE TEETOR 

Cosmopolitan. 



Page thirty-two 













BETTY LOU THALLS 
Pleasantry. 

HAZEL THORNBURG 
Faculty drag. 


VIRGINIA TOWNSEND 
Good fun. 


INA WALTZ 

Poise and streamlined. 


. 


BILL WARFEL 

Good looking, temper and fight. 


RALPH WOOD 
Silence. 



Page thirty-three 








AROUND THE WORLD TRIP 


We take off “on the wings of the 
morning’ from the new Wartel air¬ 
port west of Hagerstown. Our pilot, 
Johnny Baker, and co-pilot, Charles 
Smith, have given the signal that 
we are about to take off. Among 
fellow passengers we find Mary Al¬ 
len, husband, and child on their way 
to visit Joe Knose and his harem of 
wives in Egypt. Lea (Cray) Franklin 
who is happily vacationing alone is 
on her way to New York. Our hostess 
is June Black. 


We have been in the air about 
four hours and are now passing over 
Pittsburg, Pa., where Lloyd Craig has 
established a cafeteria with the help 
of Eleanor Atkinson, Denzil Fouts 
and Wilma Foutz. 


9 


Also in N. Y. we find the School 
of Swing—Teachers: Shultz, dancing; 
Sherry, singing; Dennis, piano. 

We board a ship bound for Flori¬ 
da. Our captain, of all people, is 
David Harvey, and first mate, Del- 
mar Petty. As one of our entertainers 
on board we have Emily Stahr, violin¬ 
ist and soloist. 


New York!! Here we are on the 
“Brown and Brown” sight seeing bus. 
Driver, Poss Brown; guide, Billy 
brown. Billy has just pointed out to 
us the home of Bettie Teetor and 
husband. It has been rumored that 
they are having quite a time raising 
their five little huskies. 


We are now within sight of Spain. 
We have kept company on board 
with Keith Clancy, now a successful 
business man, and his wife, Virginia 
Townsend. Due to conditions result¬ 
ing from the revolt in Spain, we are 
escorted directly to the Hotel LaValle. 
Across the street we see our old 
friend, Paul Smith, speaking to the 
younger generation on “How to Pre¬ 
vent Wars”. As head of the recon¬ 
struction of Spain the name, Bob La 
Mar, appears. 


The boat is docking in Florida. 
On the dock waiting for us is Jim 
Spitler. He’s broke but oranges are 
plentiful. While we are traveling in 
Florida, we see June Sulteen and hus¬ 
band. Also we meet Helen Burgess 
and Mary Mohler developing the 
C. R.’s of Florida. 


Enroute through France we discov¬ 
er Miss Ina Waltz modeling in Paris. 
We just received word that Eugene 
Raffe is an undertaker, assisted by 
Ralph Wood, in London. 

Germany! Lloyd Hilbert and Clifton 
Chamberlin are making use of their 
excess wind by blowing up German 
Zeppelins. Margaret Kritsch is per¬ 
manently living here, where she has 
married into royalty. 


Page thirty-four 






WITH PARSONS AND BOGUE 


We have crossed the Mediterranean 
Sea and are going by caravan over 
the Sahara Desert. Our caravan guide 
is Bob Cordon. 

Congo, Africa! They inform us 
that Everett Lilly is civilizing the na¬ 
tives in the heart of the African 
jungle. We have met two other mis¬ 
sionaries, Frances Stomm and Eliza¬ 
beth Ramey. 


Italy! It has been our pleasure to 
renew our acquaintance with the 
Reverend Robert Brower, a true friend 
of Mussolini. Well, well, whom 
should we run into, but Betty Lou 
Thalls and Betty Monroe selling their 
own diet prescription to the fat 
Italian women! Olive Himes is study¬ 
ing voice in Venice. 


Have made a long trip from Africa 
and are now riding in a rickshaw in 
China. What’s all that shouting 
about? Well, look here, if it isn’t 
George Crull trying to sell bazookas 
to the Chinese. George told us he 
was rooming at the home of Urma 
Lee Crye and husband. 


Japan! The aroma of Helen Innis 
and Hazel Thornburg’s flower fields 
ascends to our nostrils. They are 
raising these rare flowers for an ex¬ 
quisite perfume. Hagerstown should 
be proud of having Herbert Lester 
at the Olympics as the U. S. basket¬ 
ball star. 

We are now enveloped by the 
magic of the South Seas—the Ha¬ 
waiian Islands! Ruby Needier and 
Norma Beeson are teaching the Ha¬ 
waiian Hula dancers how to do the 
Big Apple. 


Chicago! While waiting for a train 
to Hagerstown we are enjoying a 
lunch at the Miller-Hoover lunch 
room. 


We have crossed the Pacific and 
have landed in Mexico to learn that 
Herschel Bowman is the new presi¬ 
dent for the day. We sincerely hope 
he is more successful than the last 
president of Mexico, Don Beeson. 
His term lasted 48 hours. 

Journeying up the coast into Cali¬ 
fornia, we stop in Hollywood to see 
the preview of Thelma Fowler’s lat¬ 
est picture. 

Homeward bound by train! We 
stop in Oklahoma at the Holcomb 
ranch. Bud Pressel astride his horse 
is coming to meet us. We spend a 
pleasant evening around the fire lis¬ 
tening to Wayne play his guitar. 


“Back home again in Indiana.’’ 
Meeting us at the train is the class 
of ’39. 


Page thirty-five 




HO 

ROSCOPE 


NAMES 

HOBBY 

PET HATE 

ASPIRATION 

Allen 

Singing 

Operatic music 

Teacher 

Atkinson 

Embroidering 

Health class 

Home ec. teacher 

Baker 

Women 

Work 

Race driver 

Beeson, N. 

Chatting 

Boys 

Good spinster 

Beeson, D. 

Chewing Cum 

Bookkeeping 

Cold miner 

Black 

Scrapbooks 

Cats 

Eye, ear, and nose 


doctor 

Bogue 

Yell leader 

Redheads 

Kroger manager 

Bowman 

Reading 

Snakes 

Accountant 

Brower 

Radio 

Heniser 

Eligible bachelor 

Brown, R. 

Basketball 

English 

Clerk in Hay’s 
Market 

Brown, B. 

Ice skating 

Detention 

Student manager c 

1 U. 

Burgess 

Piano 

Washing dishes 

Stenographer 

Chamberlin 

Woodworking 

History 

Coach 

Craig 

Singing 

Studying economics 

, Farmer 

Crull 

Music 

Milking the cows 

Farmer 

Crye 

Dennis 

Sewing 

Piano 

Going to school 
Reading 

Stenographer 

To get married 

Fouts 

Reading 

Onions 

Boss of our ranch 

Foutz 

Whispering 

Physics 

Housewife 

Fowler 

Saving recipes 

Detention for 

Farmer’s wife 


hookey 


Clancy 

Reading 

Spinach 

President of C. 
Motors 

Cordon 

Sleeping in assembly Study 

Regal manager 

Cray 

Loafing in drug 


To go to school in 

store 

Men 

Cincinnati 

Harvey 

Sports 

Reading 

Mechanic 

Hilbert 

Bright remarks 

Sleep 

Preacher 

Himes 

To collect famous 


paintings 

Rainy weather 

Bookkeeper 

Holcomb 

Teasing Heniser Setting out signs 

Veterinary 


about future 

wife on rainy day 

Hoover 

Flirting with the 

Electrician 

girls 

Going to bed early 

1 nnis 

Reading 

Sewing 

Beautician 

Miller 

Playing ball—< 

Crye Competition 

Farmer 

LaMar 

Loafing in assembly Girl Scout of 

Editor of Exponent 


U. S. 40 



Page thirty-six 









HOROSCOPE 


NAMES 

HOBBY 

PET HATE 

ASPIRATION 

Knose 

Sailing 

One hand driving 

Architect 

Kritsch 

Art, pleasing people 

Washing dishes 

Nurse 

LaVelle 

Hiking 

Listening to Fred 
Al len 

Sea diver 

Lester 

Basketball 

Being kidded 

College 

Lilly 

Taking unexpected 

To get up in the 


Mohler 

pictures 

Newspaper 

morning 

Pop corn man 


clippings 

Mice and rats 

T ravel ler 

Monroe 

Spending money 

Economics 

Millionairess 

Needier 

Parsons 

Reading 

Fighting with the 

Farm 

Stenographer 


boy friend 

Washing dishes 

Raising peaches 

Petty 

Model airplanes 

Speech class 

Accountant 

Pressel 

Richmond 

Going to library 
without pass 

Bachelor till he gains 
the rights or 
knowledge to be 
otherwise. 

Raffe 

Running around with 



red-headed girls 

Bookkeeping 

Undertaker 

Sherry 

Singing 

My Timidity 

Private secretary 

Shultz 

Bicycling 

Work 

Newspaper reporter 

Smith, C. 

Swimming 

Women 

Aviator 

Smith, P. 

Writing essays 

Bob Brower 

Lawyer 

Spitler 

T ravelling 

To get up in 
morning 

Chemist 

Stahr 

Talking about 1. U. 

Turnips 

Old maid 

Stomm 

Sulteen 

Hitch hiking 
Sending letters to 

Inquisitive people 

Secretary 


Florida 

Missing school 

Nurse 

Teetor 

Dancing 

Catty women 

Somebody’s big 
moment 

Thalls 

Bundy 

Gossipers 

Happily married 

Thornburg 

Swimming 

Typing 

School teacher 

Townsend 

Waltz 

Shows 

Going places and 

Washing dishes 

Secretary 


doing things 

Teachers 

Getting a job 

Warfel 

Loafing 

Big mouthed pecpl 

e College 

Wood 

Walking to 

Millville 

Girls 

Mechanic 


Page thirty-seven 



■ 



V 

SENIOR PLAY 

The senior play, “Wings of the Morn¬ 
ing,” was the first dramatic presentation 
from the stage of the new gymnasium. 

The difficulty of the play and the adap¬ 
tation of voices to the gymnasium acous¬ 
tics made it necessary that every person 
connected in any way with production 
put forth his best efforts and give whole¬ 
hearted co-operation. A great deal of 
credit for the success of the play should 
go to Miss Bernice Hormel, coach of 
drama. 


Page thirty-eight 


■ 












■ . 






: : V ' J 


■•*r 2a n < v < c 





























SENIOR PLAY 


The senior play, "Wings of the Morn¬ 
ing," was the first dramatic presentation 
from the stage of the new gymnasium. 
The difficulty of the play and the adap¬ 
tation of voices to the gymnasium acous¬ 
tics made it necessary that every person 
connected in any way with production 
put forth his best efforts and give whole¬ 
hearted co-operation. A great deal of 
credit for the success of the play should 
go to Miss Bernice Hormel, coach of 
drama. 


Page thirty-eight 












00 

no 

On 


O 

ui 

Ul 

< 

U 

o 


LU 

Ul 

V, 

I- 

z 

LU 

< 

I— 

CO 


I- 

D 

Z 

< 


I- 

CO 

< 


Ol— *_• >> 

.E«2 c 2 

£ <D £ 
JO n £ _ 

«T « 2 — 

rJi M 

*ll= 

= o! 

^ CO 

c t> 0 — 

2-5 *; 

Sis 

I c>4E 

- 1 - 03 £ 


fO 

_c 


o 


to 

03 

03 

X 

4— 

E 

o 


</> 
; X 


O X 

° m 

X ro 
u “r 

X h- — 
0 ) 0-0 

± 2 * 0 . 

C .E XI 

"TOC 


* 

o 


e 

03 X 


03 
£ 

± *“ >• 

ol^ 

s ^ (D 
00 d) -C 
m s- v 

ns zz </> 
u <u 

:o= 

to 4- Q 

t3.E*t 

—. TO > 
<->*:£ 
Q> — 

•i 8 " 

S- “j *4- 

0 ) 3 o 

^ <u C 

SS .2 

fcfl CO 

v rj ° 

— V) 

NCO 

O 

a 

z!!.- c 

LU - 0> 
lO >.— 
LU t-X 

£i* 

01 03 

£ e5 

>-■5 > 

> r£ 

m .52 TO 
2 "O CJ 
LU TJ > 

—J "O TO 
_J C v*- 

< 1 ? 
^■o .2 
O c +; 

7 3 M 

2 Q Q 


X 

0 

c 

4 - 

03 

X 


03 

to 

4- 

to 

L— 

03 

03 

u 

u 

a 

E 

0 

03 


'c 

> 

03 

03 

to 

X 

4- 

5k 

c 

03 

03 

to • 
03 03 

X 

4- 

5 £ 

03 2 

03 

CT 

X 

•£ a 

03 


cn 

c 

o 


03 

x 


03 

E 

8 

X 

c 

03 

X 


03 

X 


ru 

a 

<u 

JO 




c 

^ v/ 


-a 03 

<U O <D 
CO >s _r 

<s> rfc 
0) 

</> 


X 

CO Q 


o 

a 


= > o 


03 

X 

CO 

10 

<u 


X) 

.2 

X 

C 

03 


_Q 

03 

X 

E 


03 

X 


cn 

c 


,g>§ 

X X 
U 
(D co 

■£ .£ 
_ c 

— 4- 

aT° 

CO (O 
03 CJ) 

U.E 


c 

D 


03 

a 


> 

<u 

k. 

03 

X 

o 

T> 


a a 

cn 

X 

c 

03 

c 
o 


C H- 


o 

X 

3 


cn 

03 


c 

03 
CL 

a 

_ 03 
—-X 


o 

‘c 

3 


03 

a . 
^ cn 

|.E 

k- CO 

k- £ 

2 a 

T5 > 

o E 

k- s 4— 

io O 

03 d) 
■° £ 

to X 


03 >. 
X 03 

** tj 

«- s 5 k 

o *- 

co 03 

to > 

03 d3 
U 

U 03 
3 X 
co +- 

n 

o a 


03 cn 

03 c 

3 U 

CT 3 

-S'g 
x a 

a) -o 
v c 
x ra 
o 5 ? 
■o .E 
— -o 


U 03 
03 03 
Q. lO 

a.P 

03 X) 

.E 00 

>s k. 

x u 

c o 

3 CT 

•- c 

§2 

03 

5! £ 

8.S 


to 

n 

03 
> 


>■ 

E 

° s 

X o 

co 

X 03 

c QJ 

03 CO 

X - 
c *V> 

ii 

C • 

3 o 

O 4- 


co 


CT 


2 > 

It 

^x 


03 

• CO 

111 co 

z Si 
o s 

LU o 

0> a - C 

OX ° 


O X 


n u 

03 

r- o 

5 

LU (3 
h- +- 

— 03 
X 


03 Cl 

S| 

XI ^ 

<u 0, 

>£ 
X _ 


X u. 
^*2 
o x 

C 
OJ 


U to 

Si 00 

o c 

S a 

o 8 

*■ 

§ o 

H-S 

-X i_ 
C 0) 
D X 

C co 
O 03 

CO 4- 
03 03 

03 C 
^ O 
d) X 

E c 

S -2 


c 

o 

to 

c 

lx 

4- 

< 


^ L " 
^ /-V 


o 

h- 


X ^ 
c fO 
< 2 


to 

k. 

o 

*E 

D 

.E > 

03 c 

O <u 

X o 


_ 0) 
(0 X 


0 7 - 'W w 

4—• —— 


5 

o 


03 

Cl 

0) 

u 

c 

s 

to 


X 

c 

03 

03 

.X 

>- 

o 


0) 

X 

<0 

c 

c 

< 


<0 

u 


X 

c 

03 


> 

o 

X 

c 

(0 

4— 

k. 

03 

u 

to 

H- 

o 

4- 

to 

03 

CO 

-X 

u 

to 

X 

03 

X 


o 

c 

03 

03 . 

Ill p 


a 

to 

X 

03 

-X 

03 


D 

o 


03 

0) X 
-X ■*- 

.y 03 
4 - w. 

— O 

— v 4— 

03 03 

X X 


X trt 

O c 
O 03 

^ E 

00 <J 


03 

-X 

to 

to 

X 

c 

o 

4- 

k. 

o 

5 

co 


to 

JO 

U 

10 

u 


o 

&■£ 

a k. 

to o 
x Q 
8 £ 
i_" >> 

03 f 

4- C_ 

»- O 

S c 

CL O 

03 U 
»- LU 

£ £ 

03 O 

C 


o 

o 

X 

u 


c 

o 


CO 

o 

a 


c 

o 

I 

X 

c 

to 

I 

03 

c 

o 

k_ 

03 

X 

to 

03 

> 

03 

03 


I* 

k_ 

*«- c 

U) O 


u) m 
<U " 
*■ 0) 
l_ U) 
<L> O 
^ O' 
ra 

CQ g 

C E 
X O 

O.Z 


£ 
o 

« 8 

.> LU 

01 O 

o 4- 

■*- 4- 

d) 03 

cn 

— o 

-O *• 

”5 ^ 

8 * 

^ 15 

(U TO 
j: v. 

3 1 

-D 

<u = 

<u 1 . 

— jC 

O TO 
4- 4- 

o.^ 
c >■ 

f £ 

>• LU 

TO T3 
M- C 

o ^ 

kT 

c o 

X 03 

t 

• # <o 

C d3 k_ 
(0 •— 
u ty 

C 03 X 
O CQ 
to 03 
03 V-X 

^ u ^ 
CQ S 

X CQ o 

to 
c 


<0 

3 

C 

03 

CT 

CO 

U 

*CO CO* 

i-'l 

a Q> 

cn Q 
c . 


CO 

> 

O 

X 


03 


c k- -X 
C 03 O 
o x o k. 
y o cq o 
c rx *r 

0 o T S 

>- 2 TO L^ 

S; -g.J" 


c 

TO 

£ 

X 

U) 

< 


5 « 

0 p 
a 

3 >- 


v> 3 

</> o 

>. ™ X 
t X *■ 
TO ™ ■*- 

1 i 

V- ^ * 

o k. — 
03 03 

k- CO to 

§ c £ 

fO 03 03 

M- X X 
C to CT 

— to c 

3 
O 


Q£ <0 
03 

o > 

4- 

— X 

.± 03 

cn c 

03 u 

— 03 
4- f- 
to 

to 4 * 
u 03 X 

03 k- 

> k- O 

> 4- k*_ 

03 4- i_ 

z 


03 

X 

to 


to 


c 

.2 > 
4 - 

•— i_ 

CO — 

O to 
a ll 


03 


U *> 
co - 

to 2 a 

~ 03 

r O k_ 

§ C X 

.2 o a 

.t X ^ 

8 .a a 

a x a 

(0 W) ,!2 

Z > x 

w ° « 

TO _Q J5 
U c 

TOCO 
> TO "O 
£ u 

J « 
o > 


TO 0) 

c o £ 

C 4- d3 
03 k- CC 
4- 03 

^ ^ 03 

u u = 
u D <U 

TO 10 X 

^ to 

ill 

J 2 < 

S £ 
+- c 
TO n) C 

^ X -2 

*- 7 : *- 
CD ^ O 

° "5 

> E -o 

I o« 

X -k 3 

TO y) Q" 

.H ^ - 
X 5 2 


• 03 

C 4- 

to 

a « 
5 o 

(J 

03 (0 

X 03 
CO >s 

X - 
- 1 X 

c g 

o 

a c 

d — 

CO 

CO to 
03 03 

x x 

o o» 

■° S 

0) ZZ 

I ^ 

£ ? 

*1 
CO O 
03 kL 

15 a 
■° >: 
4 - m 
03 —. 

CT — 1 


03 

X 


X x 

CT £ 

' E 03 

> C 

03 ° 

> 0) 
03 X 
u 4 ' 
03 d) 

X u 


03 

> 

O 

o 

I 


to 

03 

>* 

X 

3 


X 

c 

to 

03 

4 — 

JO 

to 

03 

a 

3 

4-* .t: 

— CO 

X — 
4 - ~ 


O .2 

z -1 

-J to 
X kO 
C ■“ 
to d 3 
V X 
— to 

2 c 

U _£ 

x" ^ 

o a 

U d3 
O *“ 

I o 

03 4- 

"E o3 

03 




4 - 

X 

k. 

03 


03 

c 

>S 

X 

03 

X 

4-' 

4- 

X 

03 

X 

0 

c 

ra 

03 

co 

03 

X 

*u 

O 

4 - 


X 

03 

S 

4 - 

03 

CT 

C 

CT 

C 

X 

ra 

H- 

4- 

0) 

X 

c 


O 

4- 

03 

t3 

> 

0 

L— 

4- 


zz 

03 


4- 

O 

a 

'c 

CO 

03 

03 

J* 

03 

i 

03 

4- 

to 

c 


X 

4- 

X 

£ 

x“ 

L— 

O 


X 

03 



03 

J5 

X 

— 

co 

U 

03 


c 

0 

03 

X 


CT 

r 

O 

X 

a 

O 

CT 

0 

5k 

r— 

0 

> 


W d3 

? “S 


X ^ 


X 


O 5 

^ P 


X 3 

Q O 
.2 X 
X ^ 


<0 <0 
0) 


to 

£ 

o 

4- 

co 

03 

X 


c 

■« 0 

« 8 

a - E 

.!C ai 

x co 

« o 
to *- 

*- U) 

O £ 

*- o 
>- C 

5 -o 

TO 

X X 


o i2 

S. k. 

1 - .a 

03 

4-' 

0J CO 

CQ P 


Ji 

<u 

Z C 

TO TO 


*u 

k. 

o 

4- 

E 

3 

Q 

>S 

03 

k. 

X 

3 

< 


CT 

> 

c 

to 


03 

X 


£ X 

15 x 

to 03 

cn 

c X 

■“ o 

o 


co 

co 

JO 

U 

CO 

u 

CO 

>> 

X 

CL 


— ^ X 


03 
3 

CT „ 

O QQ 

“ - CQ 

03 


> 

03 03 

d) <0 
— 03 

C 

o 

k. 

CQ 


03 
03 
CO 

CO 

c ^ 

— CO 

> k- k- 

> 03 03 
wXt 


o 

X 


10 
C = 


to . 

4 - k_ 
C U 
.= X 

o 

a to 

a — 


cn 

.E x 

co x 

u ~ 

03 X 

X u 

CO k. 

Q3 03 
> X 

to 


03 

X 

o 

5 

c 

*03 

4 - 

k. 

03 

O 

03 

C 

4 - 

co 

03 

k_ 

03 

4 — 

C 


CO 

’> 

03 

Q 

03 

U 

03 

k- 

O 

I 


O co 

Q c 

at 

co 03 
X k. 
CT 
3 


o ■£ 

4- C 

y, § 
oo £ 

J? >■ 

U * 


u 


c -k: 

o u 


c 

<D TO 


o E — 


x 

o 

o 

CD 


0) -o 
I c 


o 

"D 

X 

TO 

CL 

CO 

03 


> 

X 

a 


E 

o 

k. 

*4- 

<0 


03 
to X 


03 

k_ 

o 

4— 

CO 


U 


03 

X 

co 


u; — cu c 

JO — — H- > 


8 a 


W -» k. 

D Z- 


tr x *- 
2 8 « 
I 8 -8 

I I a 


03 


a 

CO 

03 

£ 

O 

= 


c 

c 

to 

4- 

c 

cn 

03 

CT 

3 

03 

03 

D 

J 

0 

k_ 

3 

X 

u 

*03 

u. 

k_ 

u 


a 

O 

a 

OQ 

_>- 

CQ 

C 

JD 

c 

0 

4- 

H— 

u 

X 

> 

03 

CT 

k. 

O 

u 

TO 

P 

to 

£ 

“5 

N 

c 

m 

03 

I 

U 

0 

X 

03 

e> 

1— 

k. 

D 

X 

h 

03 

Q 


03 

> 

P 

to 

X 

CO 

03 

> 

03 

.2 

> 

u 

c 

03 


„ 03 e) 

£ J x 

— <u Z 

3 . X <u 

^ 1 - * 


m 03 

2 3 o> 

4— k~ *4- 

j) D O 

.. 03 4- 

2 x ^ 
o *" 

~ .£ y> 

~ X 

f 2 « 

— y) X 

TO ■** 

1- TO 
V) <U (U 

= X 3 

> y) ST 

> 0) 0) 

c > X 

O 7 *- 

-d -2 L - 
o >- x 

_ TO — 

c$ I 

9 X -O 

X TO ^ 

o a> ° 

oC —1 _ 1 


CO 

u 
£ 
■s § 

CO X 

•- u 
C 03 

-r - 

X o 

4 - 

c 

— d3 

8-1 

0) 

O 03 

4— 

- CO 


— O 

15 c 

03 to 

.2 IE 


CO 

03 

> 

03 

03 


C 

£ 

o 

k_ 

CQ 


03 

X 


X 

c 

03 


c 

03 

U 

o 

X 

£ 

03 

c 

o 

> 

c 

03 


“5 

x 

o 


X 

c 

o 

£ 

X 

.2 Z 
cc o 

M- V 

° io 

■5 0 

x <u 

TO -i£ 

5 2 


C 0) 
.2 8 

cl -£ 

0) 

U w 
X ~ 
0) •- 
CD 

0) 

X V 
*- X 


TO 

>> 

k_ 

03 

s 

o 


03 

X 


c 

03 


03 

U 


03 

X 


03 

> 

03 

_03 

> 

03 

X 


CT 

C 


> 

o 


E 

03 

X 

4- 

c 

o 

a 

D 

X 

c 

03 


C 

03 

tj 

4- 

03 

X 


c 

03 
CO 

2 x 

a £ 

>. o 

03 U - 
> O C 03 


f -= e) 


o 

I 

03 

c 

> 

03 


CO 

D 


03 

X 


TO E 

y> ^ 
TO > 

"2 6 
TO 
X 


I 8 

i| 

c < 

+- o 

TO ** 
8 .2 

c 

O CT 

k. »- 

D 

X | 

k- 

4 - y 

03 *0 

x —' 

4- k. 

^ r 
03 

03 — 
03 X 

1 * 
03 CO 
> 

O 

o _ 

Is 

if 


^ CO 

K X 

■tr c 

8 .2 

-X z 

§ a* 

CQ o 

■g - 

TO «> 
X to 
U d> 
£V -C 
“• L) 

O E 

.£ <u 

cd *: 


0) 

c 

o 

> 

c 

03 

> £ 

2 £ 

e> | 

IB 8 

03 ~ 

X o 

.2 U 

Q^ 03 

o £ 

4- 

4- 

> 03 


C — X 


O « 


o O 

I ^ 

CO 

CO ZZ 

f 'i 

u 


0) 
aO m 

To TO 
U CO 

4- v_ 

tO d3 
■4- JZ 

k. 

03 CO 
„ X 


03 

03 

D 

CJ 

03 


CO 
03 
> 

03 jQ 
03 




c 

c 


8 £ 
C TO 
V CD 
(U TO 

O 5 


03 03 


CO 

03 

O 

X 


03 

> 


CO 

03 


J5 > _P 


CO 

. (0 
c y 
2 ^ 
C 4f 

03 Z 


D 

CT 

03 

k. 

to 

03 

k. 

03 

X 


03 

X 


if £ 


03 

CO 

03 

X 

03 

X 

4- 

c 

o 

03 

u 

J2 

a 

to 

X 

03 

03 


03 

c 

03 

p 

LU 

k-* o 
03 +- 

-C c 

L+_ 03 

X 4- 

u 

CT ° 
C X 

> 8 


5k 

03 


X 

o 

CQ 

to 

03 

X 

’co 

03 

X 

03 

c 

o 

03 

E 

o 

to 


co 

X 

03 

03 

c 

o 

X 

£ 

03 

c 

o 

>> 

c 

03 


03 

£ 

03 

X 

5k 

C 

03 

4- 

03 

CT 


03 

o 

X 

03 

X 


03 03 1= 


CT 

c 


£ E 

^ P 


03 

5k 


O 

X 

£ 

03 

c 

o 

5k 

C 

03 


X 

u 

4- 

D 

I 


X 

c 

03 


03 X 


U 

X 03 


03 

X 

03 


X 

o 

CQ 


X 

X 

O 

CQ 


03 

T CT 

cn c 


03 
X 
u 

o x 


0 : 

X 

o 

e) 


o 

a 

a 

03 


03 

k_ 

o 
E 
o 

X 

a 

2 x 

CO * 


03 

X 


03 ' 

k. 

03 5k 
CT ^ 

1 1 
< 5k 

O 4- 
4- CO 

o = 

1 

0) 

ZZ X 
03 to 

■£ <2> 

03 c 

■s 2 
-S 2 

03 Q. 

o cn 

CO C 

2 <u 
c « 

To o 
- _l 

1 o 
o 


£ ^ 


03 

X 

to 

CT 

c 


S 8 

a-" 1 


- 03 

x °» 

CD C 


4- CT 


8 8 

03 ^ 

"8 2 

t I 


5k 


03 

> 

03 

03 


C -1 ^ ^ 03 

at- a, 5 5 Z 

“ i-R 


CQ -X 


03 
C 

o 

o Z 

52 ^ 

03 

a 


“ cn 


il o 


CO 
03 
5k 

_ 03 

11 : 03 s/ 


k. 

i TJ 
X k. 
03 

to r 
03 

> to 
03 = 
•2 ? 
03 k. 
O 03 

k_ — 

C T) 
O 

- 03 


8 £ 

"to -O 
(u c 
— <u 


<u ■*- 
>* - 

8 ’o> 

c E 
o ^ 
X c 

o 4/5 
X 03 


D 

X 

c 

v_ 

o 

X 


5k 

X 

X 

3 


C 

o 

a 

3 

4 - 

x 

CT 

3 

03 

U 

CT 

C 


> 

o 


to 

X 


X 

CO 

03 

c 

X 

LU 


<J O 


0 £ 
4- ^ 


CT 

03 

k- 

O 

E 

o 

X 

a 

o 

CO 

c 

*03 

4- 

k. 

03 

U 


5k 

O 

o 

X 

5k 

JU 

a 

o 


x 

03 

> 

*03 

U 

03 

u. 

CO 

03 

X 

0) 

X 


03 

X 


3 X 


03 

X 

u 


03 

X 


c 

o 


03 to 

c x 


5 * 

u. >• 

C 4 - 
o 03 
to Q. 


8| 

CD 5 


t x 

03 3 

cq a 


03 

a 


< Q 


03 

a 

03 

C 

03 

cn 

3 


03 

03 

X 

0 

03 

X 


03 

X 


c 

03 

X 

£ 


03 

X 

4-* 

TJ 

to 

03 


X 

03 

* 

o 


03 

X 

03 

X 

CO 

4- 

03 

X 

4- 

c 

o 


to 

03 


03 

X 


. to 

03 03 

= 5k 

> 03 

= 03 

5 £ 

• 4- 4_ 

03 03 to 

E L J5 

> 03 

= x y 

4 - X 

o ■*- 


o 

4- 

5k 

4 - 

k. 

03 

X 

CT 

D 

03 

Q 


5 

£ 


03 

'C 

03 

cn 

to 

c 

03 

E 

o 

o 

X 

u 

co 

03 

X 


to 

03 

4— 

o 

c 

c 

03 

£ 

x 

to 

03 


2 -8 

M- 03 

5k O) 

I -p 

« c 

>- S’ 

to > 

4- 03 

CO 

to 

j x 

CT •- 

E 

X 03 

“g 

03 


-C- CO CO JJ 

4- " 


> 

O 


CT 


03 o 

X > 
X 

u <*> 
■- 03 

CQ X 


8 J 

1 - u 
< 2 

■O T3 
S* o 
? o 

O CD 

to (O 
03 (0 

X X 

<D o 
X _C 

£ ^ 
c c 

(U TO 
u £ 
s 

0) 03 


0) 

X 


0) 

X 

*io 

4- 

X 

cn 


03 

X 


03 

X 

co 

cn 

c 


> 

o 


03 

X 

Q. 

u 

03 

c 

O k. 

4 - O 

1/1 >. 

to 03 

H 

x 
o 
CQ 


to 

X 

k. 

03 

CQ 


C 

_03 

< 

03 


03 

’> 

03 

X 

U 

c 

5 


k. c 

03 ZZ 

x o 

jo > 

k- 03 


d3^ 

x « 

to — 
03 o 

03 .E 

03 

— 5k 


< 

o 


a 

o 

_o 

X 

o 

o 

cn 


O q3 

^ x 


to ; 

03 _5 4 " 

E B u 

- C 3 


03 

to 

O 

X 


. TJ 

a ro 
3 x 

5 k k. 
03 03 

a x 


— tr x 


D 

X 

CO 

C • 
03 


03 (O 

5 7, 


to O to 

— 4-03 

J O) TO 
C Q) 

2ro 
-o a E 
8 .<n E 
x 1 - 2 
.tr I i/i 

£ •- y> 
10 a m 
_ 00 u 

5 £ TO 

<0 k_ L 

a —v li¬ 


ra 

o 

4- 

X 

to 

03 

X 

X 

0) 

k. 

c 

03 

4- 

k_ 

03 

u 

03 

CO 


X 

CT 

D 

O 


03 

X 


to 

X 

4- 

o 

c 


cn 

c . 
a 2 

03 X 
03 

a 


o 

o 

X 

03 

a 

03 


„ o 


2 a 


03 

03 

X 


X 

o 


X 

CT 

D 

O 

c 

03 

X 

co 


03 

U 


ra 

03 

CO 

k_ 

03 

X 


03 . 

03 <D 

03 TJ 

■° E 

~ 03 
03 X 
X 

H c 


ZI 03 
03 O 
CO Q 

C — 
— 03 

< -8 

cn 

o 


03 

x 


X 

03 


03 

X 


TZ £ 
£ 
cn 


£ ra x 

r- 4- 


3 4- 

>TJ 

£ g 

03 00 
CQ 4- 
03 
03 
CO 


03 


03 

« 

N P 
TO •- r 

I > -E 


3 

x 

CO 

X 

03 

X 


03 

X 


X 

c 

to 

4—* 

c 

03 

E 

to 

4— 

to 

03 

H 

x 

c 

to 


03 4- 
— D 

V. U 

C V 

E x 

- 03 


cn x 


o -o 

k.,2 

O t 

4- “ 

“3 t^3 

-J 1 1 


CT u 
03 


X k- O 


03 

03 


c 

03 

U 

o 

X 

£ 

03 

c 

o 

03 

E 

2 


03 


X 

03 03 


03 

X 


CO 


C 
03 

E 

3 

io u 

52 
.2 8 
3 o 


X £ 
CT X 

03 O 
X 4- 


> 

03 

X 

U 

03 

X 


o -g 

CT X 

c 
a 

03 
03 
-X 
-X 

o 
o 

X 


IE -c 

y) £ 
03 X 
> ^ 


§2 
a a 
a^_ 

03 TJ 

5 k (d 

X 

03 y 
X d) 

4- 

03 

: x 


cn 


r~ 03 


03 X — LU Q> 

— ^J — Q3 

qq a L- to 




































Ready for the prom. 

The Junior Class president says, 
“hello.” 

Not praying, girls! 

One Ginger, Thelma, two Junies, and 
one Stahr. 

Hookey today, Teetor? 

Denzil hovers over the three mus¬ 
keteers. 

Four of the “Ten Pretty Girls.” 

Niagara, Ruby, so soon? 

But can they swim? 

Norma plays bashful. 

Shultz, that hold is barred! 

Some more of our 


Prom. 




















P— naeaxurim*. 



Brower begins on his wild oats. 

No fair, Stahr! 

Brower (both hands on wheel). 

Come out from behind that hat, joe, 
we know you. 

Helen, that’s a radiator behind. 

Pup & Taylor. 

Chiny Lo Mary. 

Browers’ first pants. 

Eleanor’s all drethed up. 

Eleanor and family. 

Willy’s still at it. 




















JOKES 


“Are you George E. Crull?” asked 
a young man standing by the coat 
rack. “No” was the surprised reply. 

“Well I am,” came the snappy 
rejoiner, ’ “and that is his overcoat 

you are putting on.” 

* * v 

Edna: (office girl) I think you’re 
wanted on the phone, Heniser 

Heniser: Think? What good does it 

do you to think? 

Edna: Well, the voice on the other 
end of the wire said, “Is that you, 

you old idiot?” 

’ ♦*. 

V V ♦ 

Mr. Heniser: I dislike to face all 
of these bills. 

Mrs. Heniser (to be) : My dear, 
you don’t have to. All I want you 

to do is foot them. 

V * V 

Spitler: Mother, will you please 

wash my face? 

Mother: Why can’t you? 

Spitler: I would have to get my 
hands wet and they don’t need 
washin’. 


A Hagerstown fan stopped Referee 
Jones after the Milton game. 

“Where is your dog?” he demanded. 

“Dog?” exclaimed Jones. “I have 
no dog.” 

“Well,” said the angry fan, 
“you’re the first blind man ^1 ever 
saw who didn t have a dog. 


Castle: Everett, give us an ex¬ 
ample of an indirect tax. 

Everett: Dog tax. 

Castle: Why do you call that an 


indirect tax? 

Everett: (brightly) 

dog doesn’t pay it. 


Because the 


When it comes to signing auto¬ 
graphs Clark Cable wouldn t have a 
chance with Bob Brower around. 


Everett Lilly: Does your mother-in- 
law ever compliment you? 

George: Only in the winter. 

Everett: What does she sav? 

George: George, start the fire, the 
coal is low. 

V ❖ V 

It seems that John Hoover and 
Am Dougherty could find a better 
alibi than that the car stalled. The 
girl’s father didn’t believe it either. 

* 

Thelma Dennis: (giving a demon¬ 
stration in speech class) Here, on 
this piece of paper I have a faint 
idea of a living room plan. 

Billy Brown: (After seeing the half 
sheet of composition paper) Yes, very 
faint. 

v *!* v 

Hersh Bowman: What did you say 
affected tides? 

Dutro: The moon. 

Herschel: Huh! That’s funny. It 
affects the untides in our community. 

♦> * 

Lester: (referring to Senior play) 

I knew that the people would get out 
of that mine shaft. 

Emily: What made you think that? 

Lester: Because they had advertised 
the play for the next night. 

.% * 

Baker: I’m all out of sorts; the doc¬ 
tor said the only way to cure my 
rheumatism was to stay away from 
all dampness. 

Bob: What’s so tough about that? 

Baker: You don’t know how silly 
it makes me feel to sit in an empty 
bath tub and go over myself with a 
vacuum cleaner. 

v v 

What is college bred, Mr. Cory? 

Mr. Cory: They make college bread 
from the flour of youth and the dough 
of old age. 


Page forty-two 

















Farmer Sherry. 

Brower and harem. 

Hilbert and windie (of car). 

Lloyd, hunting an Indian. 

Burgess and pals wading. 

Mr. Manifold, we betcha. 

Lilly, delving into the art of cookery. 
Lunch (and Lloyd) . 

They’d be a trio if they were singing. 
Our cock crows. 

Hilbert and body guards, (he doesn’t 
need ’em) . 

Lilly and his home demonstration. 
One in a hole. 

Four crazy people, and somebody 
took a picture. 

Ever smiling-ever ready. 

Good ol’ mountain music. 


Page forty-three 
















THE STAFF 

When a capable and enthusiastic group 
of students are willing to co-operate, the 
publication of a yearbook is a decided 
pleasure. This year’s members of the 
senior class, the staff, and the advisors 
worked together to picture for you the 
spirit, activities, and traditions of H. H. S. 
in the 1 938 Epitome. 


Page forty-four 










































ORS 

The experiences of the juniors are just 
beginning. They are on their way to take g 

over the throne of the seniors. We be¬ 
lieve they are ably qualified to assume 
leadership in all senior activities of the 
coming year. 


J U N 


Page forty-six 


hi 















SOPHOMORES 

The sophomores, characterized as 
small and insignificant, are seldom heard 
of, yet they play a very important part 
in our school life. 


Page forty-seven 






mmm 

tew 


















FRESHMEN 

Green, yet not too green, since our 
honor roll shows a goodly representation 
from this class. 


Page forty-eight 






















SEVENTH 

GRADE 

Sponsor—Morris 



EIGHTH 

GRADE 

Sponsor—Sedgwick 






















[ ** ...Jp 

w # mm? M * rill 4 



* • x&osfci 

aB 

ifc / . 



11 


m * -m . 




INI.~ jO 







ife aJ 



I i Tfr 

|f .a i 






% I W 3 

l > /•» . >?■ **.. 

. ^ipH 

A H 

jHEv S5 

f> ijjHwV ■ffit.VA* JnU, 



,*v :r®UB 





f * Jj 

feapV • f Al 

JFmaflU* i$gr t *&33 

- *£xlmjL 31 ...... Jgj 

., 41MP5L Pfl| 


O’ ■> 

» *r 1 

JV 

#1 § 

fA 

A 4 

Hi 

f ■& " J 


COMMUNITY 

SINGING 

When a group gathers together, the 
first thought often is of song. Bleachers 
such as the gymnasium affords, lend 
themselves very well to community sing¬ 
ing. Music, as a pleasure, may be ex¬ 
perienced through group singing. Hearts 
are nearer understanding when voices 
have sung together. 


Page fifty 
















CUhhJtic&u 









How grand to have a new gym! 
Even the sun plays upon her bleach¬ 
ers. 

Bogue and Ann are strutting their 
yells. Hagerstown must have won 
that game. 

The lone goal is waiting for its 
first ball, while below the second 
team is tipping and Weaver is mak¬ 
ing the first foul point. 

The ball going in the basket is the 
first team’s first foul goal by Knose. 

How glad we were to see the first 
tip off in the gym! 


Page fifty-two 

















MARFIELD CAIN 

Coach Cain, ending his 
tenth year as coach of 
the Tigers, has had one g 

of the most successful 
seasons of his career. 


MARTHA CASTLE 

Miss Castle, director of 
girls’ physical education 
for the past eight years, 
has done a great deal to 
make girls’ activities more 
interesting. 


The two athletic directors have indeed, 
a great task before them as the school 
year opens and the sport season begins 
to take shape. Miss Castle and Mr. Cain 
have been successful in formulating a 
well rounded program of athletics to 
meet the physical needs of the individual 
students. 


Page fifty-three 
























WELLS 


PETTY 



I 


{ 


m 


WARFEL 


PASS 


WILLIAMS 


KNOSE 


Page fifty-four 



TAYLOR 


LESTER 


HARVEY 


BOOKOUT 


* 


■ 


11 

























PLAYERS 

JOHN WELLS—CENTER 

Johnny’s height and ability to 
follow in shots should be an 
asset to next year’s squad. He 
is a sophomore. 

LAWRENCE PETTY—CENTER 

Petty’s height should be a big 
help to next year’s team. He 
has one more year with the 
team. 

ROBERT TAYLOR—FORWARD 

Bob will be with the team next 
year. His basket-eye, coupled 
with his defensive ability, makes 
him a valuable player. He was 
placed on the All-County Tour¬ 
ney Team. 

WILLIAM WARFEL—GUARD 

Bill, an accurate shot, with great 
defensive ability, will be lost 
to the team through graduation. 

His ability to start offensive 
plays and break up opposing 
team plays made him a valuable 
man on this year’s squad. His 
position will be difficult to fill. 

JAMES PASS—GUARD 

Jimmy, another junior who did 
not see much action with the 
team, will be on the squad next 
year. His fighting spirit and de¬ 
fensive ability should be valu¬ 
able to the team. 


Page fifty-five 


CHARLES WILLIAMS—FORWARD 

Boogs should develop into a 
valuable varsity man as he is 
only a sophomore. 

HERBERT LESTER—GUARD 

Herb, one of the best shots and 
dribblers the school has ever 
had and one who has made the 
All-County Tourney Team three 
out of four years in high school, 
will be a great loss to next 
year’s team. 

JOE MAX KNOSE—FORWARD 

Joe had a cool deliberate style 
of playing ball, both defensive 
and offensive. He was one of 
the best fighters on the team. 
His loss through graduation will 
be a blow to next year’s team. 

DAVID HARVEY—FORWARD 

Dave, a senior, did not have 
many opportunities to play this 
season, but when called upon, 
showed he could deliver the 
goods. 

RICHARD BOOKOUT—GUARD 

Booky, although not playing 
much with this year’s varsity, 
will see considerable action 
next year. His ability to get 
rebounds and to pass should be 
a great asset to next year’s 
team. Booky is a junior. 


i 













20 

20 

32 

18 

42 

27 

36 

25 

45 

15 

28 

27 


SEASON'S HIGHLIGHTS 


1937-1938 


UNION CITY at HAGERSTOWN 40 

The Tigers started the 1937-38 season by tapping the Union 
City Wildcats in the new gym with Wells scoring 13 points. 

ALEXANDRIA at HAGERSTOWN 24 

In a thrilling game that was tied several times, the Hagers¬ 
town Tigers finally came through on the long end of the score. 

HAGERSTOWN at NEW CASTLE 23 

With Warfel and Wells scoring 22 of 32 points the Tigers 
took the measure of the Trojans in a well fought game. 

CENTERVILLE at HAGERSTOWN 33 

Out for victory in this game, the Tigers battled on even terms 
in the first half but came back in the last half to win their 
first Big Fourteen Victory. 

HAGERSTOWN at FOUNTAIN CITY 17 

Traveling to Fountain City, the local lads won a sweeping vic¬ 
tory from the Little Giants with Lester scoring 14 points. 

KNICHTSTOWN at HAGERSTOWN 43 

The following night the Tigers chalked up victory number 6. 

HAGERSTOWN at LYNN 19 

Another victory added to their string as the Lynn Bulldogs 
were the victim in a hard-fought contest. 

BOSTON at HAGERSTOWN 42 

The Tigers proved too much for the Boston Terriers. 

HAGERSTOWN at CAMBRIDGE CITY 19 

Hitting their stride as in previous games, the team won vic¬ 
tory number 9 over one of their ancient rivals. 

ECONOMY at HAGERSTOWN 30 

The Cardinals put up a game fight for three quarters but the 
Tigers pulled away in the final quarters to win easily. 

WINCHESTER at HAGERSTOWN 33 

Playing a professional brand of ball the local boys took the 
measure of the Yellow Jackets in a hard-fought game. 

LIBERTY at HAGERSTOWN 32 

In one of the top games of the season, the Tigers won a well 
earned victory over the Scarlet Warriors, taking the lead in 
the Big Fourteen. 


fifty-six 











43 

SEASON'S HIGHLIGHTS 

HAGERSTOWN at WHITEWATER 

25 


25 

Off to a shaky start, the local boys settled down and won 
victory number 13 in an easy fashion. 

HAGERSTOWN at MILTON 

27 


22 

Bad passing and inability to hit from the free-throw line cost 
the Tigers their first loss of the season. 

HAGERSTOWN at PENDLETON 

27 


24 

Still feeling the effects of their first loss the team came out 
on the short end of the count for the second consecutive 
game after putting up a game fight. 

COUNTY TOURNEY AT CENTERVILLE 

HAGERSTOWN — CAMBRIDGE CITY 

22 


64 

HAGERSTOWN — WEBSTER 

29 | 


25 

HAGERSTOWN — CENTERVILLE 

1 1 ' 


33 

HAGERSTOWN — BOSTON 

19 


23 

Hitting their stride again the Tigers swept through the 
tournament in an easy fashion winning four games and win¬ 
ning their third County Championship in ten years. 

CAMBRIDGE CITY at HAGERSTOWN 

32 


28 

Winning their fourteenth game in 16 starts, the Tigers de¬ 
feated the Wampus Cats for the third time this season. 

HAGERSTOWN at CENTERVILLE 

24 


22 

Tigers clinch Big Fourteen Championship after a close battle. 

WILLIAMSBURG at HAGERSTOWN 

39 


13 

Hagerstown marks up another Big Fourteen victory at the 
expense of the Williamsburg Yellow Jackets. 

HAGERSTOWN at RICHMOND 

44 


26 

Tigers journeyed to Richmond to suffer a severe loss at the 
hands of the highly rated Red Devils. 

KENNARD at HAGERSTOWN 

34 


34 

Tigers brought the season to a close with a spirited win from 
the Henry County quintet. 

SECTIONAL TOURNEY 

HAGERSTOWN — WHITEWATER 

18 


36 

HAGERSTOWN — FOUNTAIN CITY 

18 


23 

HAGERSTOWN — (MORTON) RICHMOND 

42 

\ 


Page fifty-seven 









The Kittens improved remarkably as the season progressed, 
and a great deal of future basketball material can be found 
among their ranks. 


THE KITTEN’S RECORD FOR 1937-38 


Hagerstown 

20 

Union City 

25 

Hagerstown 

21 

Alexandria 

33 

Hagerstown 

13 

New Castle 

14 

Hagerstown 

22 

Centervi 1 le 

15 

Hagerstown 

45 

Fountain City 

10 

Hagerstown 

28 

Knightstown 

1 1 

Hagerstown 

12 

Lynn 

19 

Hagerstown 

22 

Boston 

2 

Hagerstown 

18 

Cambridge City 

14 

Hagerstown 

26 

Economy 

16 

Hagerstown 

20 

Winchester 

16 

Hagerstown 

20 

Liberty 

12 

Hagerstown 

27 

Whitewater 

9 

Hagerstown 

44 

Milton 

19 

Hagerstown 

19 

Pendleton 

12 

Hagerstown 

_ _ 25 

Cambridge City 

13 

Hagerstown 

10 

Centerville 

16 

Hagerstown 

30 

Williamsburg 

10 

Hagerstown 

16 

Richmond 

22 

Hagerstown 

24 

Kennard 

18 


■ 


Page fifty-eight 





























































Upon the yell leaders rests 
the responsibility of creating a 
sportsman like attitude and 
maintaining that attitude dur¬ 
ing all athletic encounters. Our 
three yell leaders Parsons, 
Bogue, and Smith have certain¬ 
ly done their utmost to further 
good sportmanship, and the 
sportsmanlike attitude of our 
school is one of which we can 
justly be proud. 






Bill Brown, team 
trainer, has been a great 
help to coach and play¬ 
ers alike. 
















BASEBALL FOR 1937 


Ending the 1937 fall campaign by tying for the Northern 
Division Baseball League, the Tigers were very successful on 
the baseball diamonds. Under the direction of Coach Cain, 
baseball should continue to be one of the high school’s major 
sports. 


Hagerstown 

RECORD FOR 

2 

FALL, 1937 

Whi tewater 

4 

Hagerstown 

10 

Fountain City 

4 

Hagerstown 

1 

Whitewater 

3 

Hagerstown 

3 

Economy 

4 

Hagerstown 

21 

Fountain City 

4 

Hagerstown 

8 

Williamsburg 

1 

Hagerstown 

1 

Cambridge City_ 

2 

Hagerstown 

7 

Williamsburg 

5 

Hagerstown 

6 

Economy 

3 


Northern Division ended in a three-way tie—Hagerstown, 
Economy and Whitewater. The tie will be played off this spring. 






















































This is just a good demon¬ 
stration of one of the many 
pep sessions held on the gym 
bleachers. 


On-lookers at a typical gym 
class. 


This door opens to one of 
the immaculate toilet rooms. 


A peek at the adequate 
shower rooms in the new gym. 


Bleacher beauties take the 
sun. 


Page sixty-one 


H 






















The following are parts of two letters received from princi¬ 
pals of outside schools during the basketball season: 


Principal Ellsworth of Pendleton— 

“Hagerstown is one of three best teams we have met. You 
should win your Sectional. 

I think I should say you had the best crowd from the 
standpoint of attitude and school spirit.” 


C. E. Charles of Webster— 

“Please accept Webster’s congratulations, not only be¬ 
cause Hagerstown won the county tourney, but because the 
Hagerstown fans as a whole, and the Hagerstown team gave 
ample demonstration of their worthiness of the honor. 

We were especially pleased at your student body s sports¬ 
manship in yelling for our players who were forced out. Our 
team appreciated the non-arrogant attitude of the boys from 
Hagerstown. In fact we should describe your conduct as gallant. 
And that is something to achieve in a school as large as Hagers¬ 
town. 

Our student body and our team join me in expressing this 
sentiment.” 


Page sixty-two 


















Ill 








BOARD OF CONTROL 



Money is an asset of life, and only by 
brilliant people can it be handled. The 
school’s organizations entrust their 
money to the board of control. 


Page sixty-four 















The questions “Why?” and “How?” probably have been 
asked more times in the history of the world than any others. 

The answers that men have found, the organized knowledge 
they have acquired by observation and reasoning, make up 
what we call the sciences. The truly scientific person never 
jumps at a conclusion. He works from his knowledge of the 
universal law of cause and effect. 

What could be more interesting than to rediscover through 
courses in science, Cod’s laws by which the entire universe is 
controlled? 

Page sixty-five 



























H I - Y 

As one of the two religious organi¬ 
zations in school, the Hi-Y Club is at¬ 
tempting to raise the standards of high 
school boys. The purpose of the club is 
“To Create, Maintain and Extend 
Throughout the School and Community, 
High Standards of Christian Character”. 
Emphasis is placed on a fourfold life: 
Mind, Body, Spirit, and Service. 


Page sixty-six 

















GIRL RESERVE 

When one Girl Reserve was asked what she thought the 
Girl Reserve Movement was, she replied: “It is something that 
helps a girl grow to be.’’ By this she meant the development 
of a girl’s personality and character through an interest in some 
worth while activity, a desire to be of service and an eagerness to 
make her contribution to the world of which she finds herself 
a part. To be a Girl Reserve means that a girl tries to “grow 
to be’’ the finest person she can become in body, mind and 
spirit. 


Page sixty-seven 















CALENDAR 


SEPTEMBER 

3—First day of school. 9:00 o’clock 
—“Well, my friends, I trust you 
know for what occasion we are 
gathered here today.” Also 
heard around school—“Isn’t the 
new teacher cute?” 

7-11—Enrollment week and the 
usual taming of the “seventh 
graders”. 

1 3—Red Cross drive started. Had our 
first Exponnet staff meeting and 
our baseball game with White- 
water. Cot beat 2-4. Such luck! 

14—Seniors elected class officers. 

1 5—Beginning of Girl Reserve and 
Hi-Y membership drive. 

20—First group meeting to discuss 
new citizenship grading system 
—merits and demerits this year. 
Are you students ready to start 
apple-polishing? 

24—Reverend Pfeiffer gave a talk on 
“Study” at chapel. 

OCTOBER 

1—Chapel—Reverend Short gave an 
interesting talk on “Apprecia¬ 
tion.” Ann Parsons presented 
two dramatic readings. C. R. 
Cabinet was entertained by the 
Cambridge Cabinet at Dublin. 

6—Red Cross Council Meeting. C. 
R.’s had a picnic in Myer’s woods 
this evening, and Jesse Baker 
surely didn’t need any more ad¬ 
vertisement tonight! 

8—Reverend Werking talked in 
chapel on the subject “Thou 
Shalt Not Get By”—take care, 
Freshies! Betty Lou Thalls gave 
a reading. Those in the assembly 
listened to the world series. In¬ 
spired by the record of the Yan¬ 
kees, our boys beat Williams¬ 
burg 7-5. 

13—General G. R. and Hi-Y meet¬ 
ings. Mr. Craw talked to the G. 
R.s on “Character”. 

1 5—Reverend Shaffer for chapel this 
morning. 

18—Today we are doomed to be 
shot!—by Hirshburg. 

20— Whoopee! Last day of school this 
week on account of teacher’s in¬ 
stitute ! 

21— We seniors “watch the birdie” 
today and tomorrow. 

25—Gloom! Back to school after va¬ 
cation ! 

16—Reverend Deweerd gave a talk 
on “Life”. Tonight we dedicate 


our pride and glory, the new 
gym. 

27—Hirshburg still taking pictures— 
Seniors received their proofs 
(now don’t you think mine’s the 
cutest)—We also received the 
first fatal report cards. 

29—Flash! The H. H. S. students 
had their first pep session in 
their new gym today, and do we 
sound good! Had tryouts for yell 
leaders. 

NOVEMBER 

4— Red Cross presented an inter¬ 
esting chapel. Rosalie Smith gave 
an account of her trip to Wash¬ 
ington, and Mr. Raemaro Al¬ 
varez from Cuba gave a very 
good talk. Decided on yell lead¬ 
ers—Ann, Tula, and Bogue. 

5— Cast for senior play, “Wings of 
the Morning,” was chosen. 

10—G. R. girls presented the play 
“Birthday of the Infanta” at a 
general meeting today. Mrs. 
Chapman spoke at the Hi-Y 
meeting. 

1 1—Armistice Day! An impromptu 
chapel was presented. Martha 
Castle read the story written by 
the man who chose the unknown 
soldier. 

1 2—Chapel! Rowena Kiezer of New 
Lisbon played a few numbers on 
the accordion. Mr. Frank Cory 
spoke on “Education” and the 
cost of the gym. 

13—Senior carnival went off with a 
bang! Betty Lou Thalls and Bill 
Warfel were crowned queen and 
king. 

16—Hi-Y had their induction. 

18— G. R. had their initiation. First 
snowfall! 

19— Extra! The H. H. S. Tigers slid 
to New Castle and devoured the 
N. C. H. S. Trojans, 32-23. It 
was rumored that the New Cas¬ 
tle Trojans would like to meet 
us again—at the tourney! Had 
a chapel given by the Boy Scouts 
who attended the jamboree at 
Washington—and did Everett 
Lilly put ’em in the aisles. 

24—Whee! Last day of school. To¬ 
morrow we feast!—Thanksgiv¬ 
ing. 

29—Everyone is back, but looking 
just a little bit “droopy” after 
our four days of vacation. 


Page sixty-eight 









DECEMBER 

2—Chapel. J. R. Craw enlightened 
us on the new deportment sys¬ 
tem ! 

4—District meeting of teachers in 
our gym—Girls’ Glee Club sang. 

8— Hi-Y and C. R. had the dreaded 
“Impromptu Chapel”—and did 
they ever make some kids 
sweat! 

9— Mr. Chief Blue Sky, heap big In¬ 
jun, gave a talk at chapel today. 

13-14—After several weeks of hard 
work, our dramatically inclined 
seniors presented another hit— 
“Wings of the Morning.” Nice 
work. 

1 5—Hi-Y presented a chapel. Mr. 
Merle Carver gave an interesting 
talk. 

21— The annual C. R. Mother-Daugh¬ 
ter Banquet. The girls gave an 
original Christmas pageant, and 
Mr. jesse Eiler spoke on “Mod¬ 
ern Mother and Daughter Re¬ 
lationship”. 

22— Gloom prevails. Exams today and 
tomorrow. 

23— Last day of school this year! 
Sang Christmas carols in chapel. 
Merry Christmas, everybody! 

JANUARY 
3—Hello, 1938! 

5—Big business for the barbershops 
as the annual craze for convict 
haircuts takes over our boys. 
Heard around school in feminine 

voices, “_, I will not go 

out with you till your hair looks 
decent!” 

1 5—The once undefeated Tigers are 
the once defeated Tigers now. 
Milton upset our smooth record 
tonight by a score of 27-25. 

19—Juniors had a class meeting to¬ 
day. Probably the same old ques¬ 
tion, “To be or not to be—a 
Prom?” 

25— Mr. William White was here for 
chapel. He is organizing a First 
Aid Class for those interested. 

26— Just a word about the weather 
—the temperature is hovering 
around zero, and there is plenty 
of snow. We all expected it 
though—tourney time. 

27— Tryouts for dancers in the oper¬ 
etta today. It is our opinion that 
Mr. Brewer has his hands full. 

31—We had an old family gatherin’ 
this morning to show the boys 
our real appreciation to them for 
“bringing home the tourney ba¬ 
con”. 


FEBRUARY 

8—Hi-Y gave their annual Father 
and Son Banquet this evening. 
Dean Dirk of De Pauw Universi¬ 
ty was the speaker. Nice serv¬ 
ing by the Junior girls. 

11—Miss Farmer and Mr. Morgan, 
negative debating team from 
Knightstown, debated in chapel 
with our affirmative team, Loyd 
Hilbert and Margaret Stratton. 

15—Lots of drowsy students after 
two nights of this year’s min- 
istrel, “Hit It Up”. Debate team 
went to Knightstown. 

18—The Parkinson Trio took us 
6,000 years back into the de¬ 
velopment of musical instru¬ 
ments. 

21—Latest news in the realm of 
radio! The speech class is broad¬ 
casting in the gym! And by the 
way, what do you want to will? 

23— Juniors chose cast for their forth¬ 
coming play, “Full House”. 

24— Come on, shell out! It’s Epitome 
time! Gee! My doll is cuter than 
yours! (G. R. Kid Party). 

MARCH 

2— We were taken to the Anarctic 
regions by Jacques D’Albert, 
who went there with Admiral 
Byrd. 

3— The Tigers dined in style at the 
Richmond Leland. They deserve 
it—bless their hearts! 

1 3—Community heard Peace Program 
in the gym. 

24-25—Congratulations, Juniors! You 
gave swell performances in “Full 
House”. 

29—The grade school kiddies took 
us back to the days (not so far 
gone) when we thought it great 
fun to give a program. Spring 
program, sponsored b y Mr. 
Brewer. 

APRIL 

5—Girls Glee Club sang at Muncie. 
We’re really proud of this group. 

8—“Chonita,” our first operetta for 
some time, was a great success. 

1 5—All-school night. 

20—C. R. senior party. Unburden, 
girls! 

22—Prom Goodbye, juniors’ luck 
to you! 

24—Nearly at the end—Baccalaure¬ 
ate. 

27—Commencement—Goodbye, high 
school! 


Page sixty-nine 










GIRL'S GLEE CLUB 

The Girls’ Glee Club, under the direction of Jules Brewer, 
has made more public appearances this season, done better 
work and has had a better organization than ever before. The 
glee club sings principally a cappella. 



Page seventy 




































BOY'S GLEE CLUB 


Practicing team work and learning to 
blend voices together, has made the Boys’ 
Glee Club outstanding this year. The club 
has as its purpose instilling a true appre¬ 
ciation of higher musical values as well 
as cultivating the voices of the members 
and their ability to sing as a group. 


Page seventy-one 




























ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS 

There are two conceptions of music. 

One is music as an art; the other is music 
as a pleasure. The orchestra, better bal¬ 
anced instrumentally than in previous 
years, played for the operetta “Chonita”, 
commencement, senior and junior plays, 
and the Teachers’ Institute. The orches¬ 
tra plays first class symphonic music ex¬ 
clusively. 

How high do you think you can go? 
Can you go down this low? Following the 
piano up and down the scales with 
trembling voices—this is the chorus. 

■ Music is laughter and fear; it is joy and 

sorrow; it is life itself; it is a person call¬ 
ing to a person, a heart that seeks a 

heart. 


Page seventy-two 














LANGUAGE 


Greece passed her civilization to Rome, especially her cul¬ 
ture and legacy of myths. Rome left it to her heirs, Italy, France, 
Spain and Portugal, whose languages are still called “Romance”. 
As the centuries passed, these nations shared their inheritance 
with other countries of Europe. France in the Norman Conquest 
1066 A. D. gave England priceless gifts in the forms of language, 
literature, a part of that culture which she had received from 
the Romans centuries before. England has continued to spread 
that classical inheritance throughout the English speaking world, 
and thus those who live in the United States—even those pupils 
of the language classes of Hagerstown High School—have 
shared in this legacy of Greece and Rome. 

Let us take a trip to charming Old Mexico with her ro¬ 
mantic villages of dusty dreamy people. Let us enjoy her land¬ 
scapes with ancient monasteries and moss covered cathedrals. 
Let us be fascinated by her air of antiquity and her atmosphere 
of color. 

Pac/e seventy-three 

































k ‘WMm 


■ B^ v b i v 

W 

mm 

‘ I* *tZ 


V ° 1 





HOME ECONOMICS 


The field of home economics is today 
much broader than ever before. The 
home economics course holds as its pur¬ 
pose not only teaching girls the princi¬ 
pals of cooking and sewing, but also 
teaching them the principals involved in 
homemaking—which indeed needs much 
greater knowledge than mere cooking 
and sewing. The girls taking home eco¬ 
nomics have enjoyed their work and 
those who do not graduate will probably 
be back for more. 


Page seventy-four 






4 - H CLUB 

Membership in the 4-H Club is practical for a girl. It not 
only furnishes her with a knowledge of the home but turns 
summer vacation hours into hours of delightful education and 
interesting activity. 


HONORS 


Sarah Cartmell was County 
Grand Champion and placed 
in the 2nd division of clothing 
in the State. 


lolene Miller was County 
Grand Champion for 5th year 
sewing and exhibited in the 
State. She won a trip to the 
Purdue Round Up for being the 
County Health winner. 


Page seventy-five 


Eleanora Atkinson won a 
trip to Indianapolis to the In¬ 
diana State Fair School of 
Home Economics. 


Robert Woods was County 
Grand Champion in Baking II. 
He won second in the State. 






















4 - H CLUB WORK 1937 

“To Make The Best Better” 


Lawrence Handy, high in¬ 
dividual honors at Holstein 
Dairy Cattle judging contest at 
Muncie. 

Marshall Mohler, sweep- 
stakes in 4-H Club Class at 
Purdue egg show 1937. 

VOCATIONAL 

Marshall Mohler Sweep- 
stakes in High School class at 
Purdue Egg Show May 1937. 

Lawrence Lester Sweep- 
stakes in potatoes in County 
Show. 


Page seventy-six 


38 ribbons won at Wayne 
County 4-H Club Show. 14 
firsts. 

71 projects completed by 38 
members. 


AGRICULTURE 

judging Team — Raymond 
Woolard, Lloyd Hilbert, 
Charles Howell and Leslie Bur¬ 
gess, Wayne Co. Dairy Cattle 
judging Team to Purdue June 
1937. 







FUTURE FARMERS 

“Rural Leadership is the Outstanding Need of the Hour, 
It Will Continue to be the Greatest Need of the Future.” 


Lloyd Craig 

‘A Farm Shop On Every Farm” 


Page seventy-seven 


-Hi 















EXPONENT 


To the Exponent staff belongs the task of reporting all 
school news, typing it for publication, and presenting it to the 
printer —on time. The staff has gained valuable experience 
in the field of journalism, and the cooperation of all staff mem¬ 
bers has led to a practical school organization. 


Page seventy-eight 


m 







JUNIOR RED CROSS 


A volunteer council of thirty-five members was able to 
carry out several worth while projects and make interesting con¬ 
tacts abroad and at home. 


1. Foreign: 

a. Letter and stamps from 
Girls’ Primary Mission 
School, Bnsavangndi, 
I ndia. 

b. Portfolio from Nishiku- 
wana Junior Red Cross, 
Japan. 

2. National: 

a. Christmas gr e e t i n g 
from Cyprus Junior 
High School, Magna, 
Utah. 

b. Valentine and letter to 
Cyprus junior High 
School, Magna, Utah. 

c. Christmas kit to U. S. 
soldier in remote 
places. 

d. Contribution to Na¬ 
tional Children’s Fund. 

e. Braille booklet covers 
furnished by Art Class. 


3. State: 

a. Christmas favors for 
veterans’ hospital at 
Marion. 

4. County: 

a. Senior Red Cross Roll. 

b. Help on first aid tent. 

c. Help on County Con¬ 
vention programs. 

d. Member on program at 
convention. 

e. Disaster committee. 

5. At Home: 

a. Christmas cheer to two 
families. 

b. First aid kit to the 
school. 

c. Clean up brigade for 
the gymnasium. 

d. Selling pop corn at 
basketball games. 


Page seventy-nine 





























ART 

This day marks the end of a siege similar in many respects 

t0 ^OnSeptember 3rd, of the late year 1937 began skirmishes 

resembling those of the Marne and Verdun 

One was fought in the name of originality. Oh how some 
people like to do copy work. The battle cry was and is When 
a man works as an artist he invents new forms and new figures. 
An artist doesn't imitate works of nature or of otner men . 

Another struggle ensued in the name of the study o 
famous painters. The first mention of Giovanni Bellini, a re¬ 
nowned Venetian artist, brought forth scowls from the class. 
Other fine painters such as Hans Holbein, Peter Paul Rubens, 
Turner, and Rembrandt likewise suffered at the mercy of our 
fair generation. Yet now most are delighted to discover the re¬ 
productions of their famous paintings. 

A third battle surged in the name of notan or light and 
shade. The word “highlight” has almost become worn through 

Still another skirmish held as its goal a rich application and 

blending of colors. , , „ . _ + 

We hope we have fought a true fight and have made at 

least this class "safe for the aforesaid"—especially originality. 


Page eighty 





















BOY SCOUTS 

The Hagerstown Boy Scout troop is composed of thirty-four 
enthusiastic members. Under the leadership of Scoutmaster 
“Ted” Sedgwick these boys hold an important place in our com¬ 
munity life. Whenever there is something to be done, the 
scouts prove that they are, indeed, living up to the scout motto 
“Be Prepared”. 

Since scouting and camping go hand in hand the boys’ 
scouting program includes camping trips. This year the trip 
went to Barbie Lake. Six boys represented the troop at the 
National Boy Scout Jamboree in Washington, D. C. where they 
camped with scouts from every state and many foreign coun¬ 
tries. 


Page eighty-one 



















THE COMMERCIAL 
DEPARTMENT 


Accuracy, neatness and speed—these important skills are 
just a basis for the training given students enrolled in the com- 
merical department. For these students are the stenographers, 
bookkeepers, and typists of the future, and must be equipped 
also with personality and a sense of responsibility if they are 
to gain success. 

The commerical department is growing—in size, as stu¬ 
dents learn the value of such training, and in quality of work 
produced as better methods and materials are discovered and 
put into use. 


Page eighty-two 











This group included twenty-five eighth grade boys, twenty- 
five freshmen and twenty-two advanced students. 

The classes moved into a larger shop this year. The stu¬ 
dents built tool rooms, the supply room, the paint room, work 
benches, a tool cabinet, and wired and set the machinery. 

They have room now for larger projects. Some of the larger 
projects made were a scorer’s bench and ticket booths for the 
gymnasium, steps for the chorus, a sail boat, hog house, and a 
house for pheasants for the Hagerstown Conservation Club. 
Some of the smaller projects were lathes, band saws, dividing 
head for a milling machine, emery wheel, stands, end tables, 
lamps, cookie cutters and boxes. 


Page eighty-three 















JUNIOR PLAY 

“A Full House”, a farce comedy in three acts, was presented 
by the Junior Class March 24 and 25. 

Coach—Bernice Hormel. 

The Junior class showed itself to be quite capable in the 
sentation of a most enjoyable play. The audience was receptive 
and the juniors should be proud of "A Full House”. 


Page eighty-four 


. 














DEBATE 


The Hagerstown debaters met the debaters of Knights- 
town Soldiers Home, Portland, Elwood, and North Vernon this 
year. They won four debates, lost two, and participated in four 
non-decision debates. The subject for debates was “Resolved: 
That Indiana Should Adopt an Unicarmeral Form of Legislation’’. 


Page eighty-five 















HONOR ROLL 


12 


Wm. Stout 

Emily Stahr 

5 :: 

: Jack Teetor 

Betty Teetor 

5 

Francis Wells 

Betty Lou Thalls 

5 

8 

Virginia Townsend 

3 

1 1 


Angeline Hayes 
Norma Mettart 

Harry Ashman 

5 

La Vora Rhinehart 

Reba Davis 

5 

Joanne Stahr 

Frank Waltz 

5 

Virginia Jordan 

10 

Wilbur Beeson 

5 

7 

Mary Cebhart 

5 

Martha Andrews 

Rosalie Smith 

4 

Sarah Cartmell 

Lucille Townsend 

5 

Vera Dilling 

9 


Shirley Pass 

Mac Harlan 

John Cartmell 

5 

Donald Brown 

W. Cory 

5 

Doris Jobe 

Ruth Lumpkin 

5 

Ceorganne Maddy 

Berneitha Shock 

4 

Rosemary Wilson 

"Numbers indicate 

times on 

the honor roll. 


5 

4 

4 


3 

5 

5 

3 

3 


5 

5 

3 

4 

5 
4 
4 

3 

4 


COUNTY LATIN CONTEST 

Division I 1. Charles Paddock 2. John Cartmell 

Division II 1. Lucille Townsend 2. Frank Waltz 

Jim Pass and Edwin Shields will be delegates to the Na¬ 
tional Hi-Y Congress at Berea, Kentucky, in June. 

Robert Brower was State President of the Indiana Older 
Boy’s Conference. He officiated broadcasts over W I R E in 
Indianapolis and Richmond. 

Jim Pass is President of the Eastern Indiana Older Boy’s 
Conference. 

Walter Cory is Representative of the fifth Hi-Y District 
Council. 

Rosalie Smith was a delegate of the Red Cross to Wash¬ 
ington in 1938. 

Lloyd Hilbert competed in June at Ames, Iowa, as winner 
of the Indiana Future Farmers speech contest. 

Bettie Smith was one of the three winners in the Federal 
Schools of Arts. 

Scouts who went to the Washington Jamboree were: Don 
Hall, Walter Cory, David Hunt, Jim Pass, Everett Lilly, and 
Jack Teetor. 


Page eighty-six 






























ALUMNI BANQUET 


The Alumni Banquet of 1937 was, indeed, unique. The 
members of each class from way back when “to ’37“ were in¬ 
vited to attend in their graduation clothes. 

And up there in the corner we see, huddled under that 
dainty parasol, Carrie Brower, Mr. Allen, Mrs. Immel, Dr. Ken¬ 
nedy and Miss Anna Mary Dilling. But Mrs. Bower, for va¬ 
riety’s sake, procures a new umbrella holder, Mr. Mark Allen. 
And then we see those four happy little angels (?) Lothair 
Teetor, Bob Bryson, Bill Stahr and Voyle Allen, and wonder 
how H. H. S. survived. 

Look, is that Robert Taylor signing Mrs. Davis’ autograph 
book? Anyway such popularity must be deserved. Here are 
sweet girl graduates passing in review. Edrie Bryson, Mrs. Tee- 
tor Mrs. Immel (and fan), Mrs. Allen and Mrs. Worl (that’s 
Mr. Worl holding up the background). Mid Wallace and Jane 
Alice Pressel look not so far removed from high school days. 


Page eighty-eight 













Mildred Zuttermuster and jo Davis are scenery for Voyle 
and Anne Belie. Ain’t they cute? Paul gets a little help and the 
result is especially fetching as we view him going. This bottle 
business would be embarrassing, but we’re all friends this eve¬ 
ning and alumni of H. H. S. 
















OUR RLhR MRTER 

BY UJ.STRHR 

/Ain?o, c on 5 p/Rirc 


V£R$E 


Ira - ter yoar pral*s$ \Je will siri^f. Ue'll father at your bW-dift^ 


to you tri- buTe drmjfYcur s&te am’ daughters loy- si stand t\ih for the 

A 


A a A A 


right and pstWi w-Thy foer>wn we will ^ht w/tti a>’l our m W- ■ 
CHORUS 


0h. / H. hi. - 5 . O&r Al -wa Wa - ter were Truth Thee &V AtiU. I.-an^n 


Syne-OhP#!f. 5. Tf)fe Gbld wd. fur pie Renjdi coloA Ljouxssnlwmc float Ipmullj 


9 ?z=s= 

fe K f 


s N 

s:—he— 


pi : -.~m . pt —• p> -d 


“h <* 

fl 

(j/)T right on ft 

> V 

ic Try - 

weVf n 

i the 

bai - r/e Tried al> J 

true and 



1 t-3-i: 


Wjj) rr 


you ft — H 



s . 




Paoe ninety 






























































































































































































"i 11111 a 11 • 11 ii 11111111 n 11 


1111111111 •i ii 111 ii i ii 1111111111111111111111 • 111111111111111 • 1111111111111111111 


II1111111111111111111111 III 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 •• 1 111' 11111 1' 'J 


Congratulations 
and Best Wishes to 
the Class of 1938 . . . 


Perfect Circle 
Piston Rings 
Piston Expanders 


THE PERFECT CIRCLE CO. 

General Offices: Hagerstown, Indiana 
Plants: Hagerstown, Newcastle, Tipton, Indiana, U. S. A. 

Toronto, Canada 


vT 111111 * *» 1 • 1111111111111111 * 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ' 11111111111111111111111111111511111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ' ^ 

Page ninety-one 


l 








Of Hagerstown’s new gymnasium-auditorium 
which is an important addition to our splendid 
school system! 


Quality Photo Finishing- and Enlarging 
Rytex Printed and Engraved Stationery 
Parker Pens and Pencils 
Gifts for Any Occasion 
Cameras and Supplies 
Portable Typewriters 
Fine Leather Goods 
Dennison Sundries 
Office Supplies 
Greeting Cards 


THE HAGERSTOWN EXPONENT 

Printers—Publishers—Stationers 

j Edwin V. O’Neel, Proprietor Telephone 257 

~i,i,iiiiiiii mu ■ i ...mi "inn """"""""""" 

Page ninety-two 














III111111111II111111II1111111111IIII111111111111111IIIIIII111111111111IIIIII11II1111111II11111 


11111111111 


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 11 I 11 I I I I I I I I 11 I I M * 


Nothing Takes the Place of Milk 


Since there is nothing that takes the 
place of milk in assuring health, bright 
eyesight, freedom from colds, as food for 
the nerves and to build and repair teeth, it 
is very important to give attention to the 
SOURCE OF OUR MILK SUPPLY for 
the family, so that we may have the 
necessary CONFIDENCE to use it freely 
as one of the most economical and neces¬ 
sary foods daily, both as a drink and in 
cookery. 



Better Cows 


Better Milk 


11 I 111111 I M III I I I I I I I I 1111 III I 11! I 111III II I I I I ! I I I II I I I I I I I 11 


Page ninety-three 


II I I I I I I 111111 111111111 1111 I I I I I I I I I I I 111111111111111 M 111111111111111111111 1111111 III 11 I 1111111111 I I 11 I 111111 I I I I I 11 11 I I I I I 11 1111 I I I 1111 11 I I I I I I M I 1111111 11III I 111 I I I 11 II I I I I I 111 1111 I I I 11 I I I I I I I I I I II1111111 I I I I I 111 I 11 I 11 M • I 










iiiiiiin 1111 him .ii i iiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii*ii«ii B iiii , * , * ,i iiiii*iiiiii , iiii* , «i , i**ii**i , *ii*iii**ii***iii 


1111 


111111111 min 11 iiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimin 


MARLATT’S SERVICE STATION 

GASOLINE 

MOTOR OIL And 

ACCESSORIES 

U. S. TIRES 


f,...mill.mi........ • 1111111111 ■ 1 .mi i in.""""""""""""""""""""""""" n ""'"i. . 

.....mi.mi...in.......inn...inn..... imimim.. 


ICE CREAM 


BUILDS SUPERIOR PEOPLE 



DAIRY STORES 


CAMBRIDGE CITY 

CONNERSVILLE RICHMOND 

NEW CASTLE LIBERTY 


El 1 111II1111111 11 11 1 I H 111111111111111111II111111111111111 11111111 I 11 11 11 111 111111 I 11 I I 11111 1111111 11111 1 1 


i m m 1111111 m m 1 1 111 m 1111111 m 111 1 11 r 11111 ii m 111111 1111 M 111111 11111 11 1 


. ■ 11 ■ i ■ 111 n 111.11 i 111 in 11111111111111 ii 1111111 11 "nun 

| FORREST CHEVROLET SALES 

| SALES SERVICE [ 

I 0. K.’d Used Cars l 

1 CLAUD FORREST j 

\ Proprietor = 

= Hagerstown, Indiana Phone 62 j 

HIH1111H•11II111H11111111 III 1111111111111.111111.11 III III III 111111 Ml 1111II1111 III 11111111 III 11111 III M 111 III 1111111111 III III 1111111111111111111II11111 III 11II111111111 

Page ninety-four 





• 111111111 ■ 11 . . • 111111111 ■ 111111111 . . i • 11 ■ 111 ■ I • 1111 a 11 - 7 ■ 1111............ ■ 11111111 ■ 11111111111111 • ....... • 111, 


1111111111111111 • 111 m m 11 ii 111 it 111 ii 111111 ii i u m 11111 ii 111111111111 a 1111 k 11 ii it 11111 ii m 111111111111111 i m 11111 m 11 ii m ii i ■ ■ 1111 • 111111111111111111111111 m ii 111 ii ii ii 1111 • 1111 *. 

INDIANA BUSINESS COLLEGE 

You Must Really Be Awake To Make Your Dreams Come 
True—Awake To Your Duties And Your 

Opportunities 

This State-Wide Institution is at your service 
Send for Bulletin 

RICHMOND BUSINESS COLLEGE 

RICHMOND INDIANA 

I II I I I I II I I I II I I I I Il(I I I I I I II I I II I I I II I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II II I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I II I I* I I I I I I I I I I I II I II I I I II I II I I I I I II I I I II II I I I I II I I II I I I I I I I II II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IiI I I I I II I I I I IiI I I I I I I II I I I I I I I ItI I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I C I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

RUSH DRUG STORE 

CANDY, CIGARS 

LUNCHEONETTE 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

PHONE 119 

• 1111 I I I I I I I I I 111 I I I I I I I■I■IM■I■MI■M >I I>11111 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I 111 II II I I I I I I I I I 111 I I I I I I I I I 11 11 I I I I I I I I I I 111111111 
: I 11 i 11 I I I I 11 llllll 1111 11II I llll II111 11111 I 111 11II1111 II I I I I IMI 11 I 11 II I I I I I I 11 I 11 1 118 MI I I 11 I I I I 11 III 11!11 11 11 I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I 111111 11 I I I III I II I I I 11 I I 11 I I III1111 I I III I 11llll111III 


L. S. GRAY 

Funeral Director and Embalmer 

PHONE 85 LADY ASSISTANT 

FLOWERS FOR ANY OCCASION 

Calls Answered Promptly Day or Night 


i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II II I I I I I I 9 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

1111111111111111111111 ii 11111111111111111111111 ii 11 ii 11111 ii 11111111111111111111 ii111111;11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111! 11 ■ 111' 


REGULAR MEALS 

EAT AT 

THE SERVICE CAFE 

STEAKS AND CHICKEN 


SHORT ORDERS 


By Appointment 

HOME MADE PIES 

Phone 103 


CHILI 

Perry and Main 


V I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I | I I | I | | | | | | | | | | | II | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | I | | II | | | | | | | | | | M I I I I II I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I l.t 


Page ninety-five 


111111111111111111 ■ 11 ii 111111111111111111111 ~ 7 11111111111111 n 111111 ii 1111111 ii in 11 in 111111111 ii ii 11111 a 1111 ■ - ~ in 111111111111111 n 1111 in 11111111111 















STAR NEON SIGN CO. 

MFG.—SALES—SERVICE 

Cambridge City, Ind. 

Phone 64 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

WAYNE TRUST COMPANY 

INDIANA 

CAMBRIDGE CIT\ 


A FULL LINE OF SPORT GOODS 
FOR ANY SPORT 
“IT PAYS TO PLAY” 


WHITEY KESSLER’S SPORT SHOP 

nrHMOND. INDIANA 


19 N NINTH ST. 


\ rr:::-—— 

I Personal Beauty Service | 

! Individual Problems Met in Our Individual Way j 

= 52 S. Plum | 

\ Phone 14 i 

I BERNICE’S BEAUTY SALON I 

1 BERNICE BEATTY, Prop. ] 


Indiana 


Hagerstown 


, 111111111 • 




I I I I I M M M • « I I n 


1111111111 ■ 11 1 11 


. 


1111111111 > 11111 


11111III••••I * 1 1 1 


Page ninety-six 





















111IIII111II11II111111111 


111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 n 


m 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 n 1111111 u 111111111111 11 I I I I I I I 1111111 

= Phone 6819 We Buy, Sell and Swap \ 

| WESSEL’S SWAP SHOP | 

e New and Good Used Furniture, Stoves j 

! And Other Merchandise i 

j 17-19 South Seventh St. \ 

l Wm. (Bill) Wessel South 5 and 10c Store E 

j Richmond, Indiana = 

r,,,,,,,,,,,,,in in.. *. miiiiii n 11111111111 mi i .*.**.. i.. 11......... 11. i.. iT 

ii 11111111111111111111111111111111111 n 1111 * 111 * i* * 11 * 11 * * * * 111 * * i * i * i • * 1111 * i * 111 * i * * * * 11111 * 111, * 1111 * i siii 11111111,111 ii 111111 ii ii ii 11111 ii 111111111 ii 111111111111 ini hi 11 mi us 

j COMPLIMENTS j 

| TO THE CLASS OF j 

| ’38 I 

I FROM A FRIEND | 

1111111111111111111111111111 ii 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 n 111111111111111111111111111111 n 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 * 111111111111111 iT 


l_l I I I I I I II 11111111111111111111111111111,11111111111 ■ 11 mi 1111111111111: c I I 2 11111 ■ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I M 

! FOR FINE TAILORING j 

| CLEANING And PRESSING j 

j SEE | 

JOHN THE TAILOR | 

| FREE DELIVERY PHONE 92 j 

11 I II I 11 I I I I 111111111111 11 I 111111 111 I I 111111 111111 111111 i I II I I I I I 11 I I 1111111 I 111 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I I 111 I 11 1111 I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I 111 II11 I,I I I 11 11 1111111 1111 11111111111111 I I I I I I 11 11iT 


WHEN IN RICHMOND 

Treat Yourself To that Fine Wayne Dairy 

Ice Cream 


DAIRY STORE AT 
So. 6th and A Sts. 


Ask Your Local Ice 
Cream Dealer For 
Wayne Dairy Ice Cream 


kllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll,IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIII,llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll f 


Page ninety-seven 
















.......... . . .. . . ■.. 


IIMMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII. 


IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIMIIIItllllllltllllllllllltllllMIIIIIIIIIIMIItlirilllll 


IIIHI1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIIIIUM 


IN RICHMOND . . . 

It’s Yigran’s 

“Where Smart Style Meets . . . _ 

Moderate Price’' 


VIGRAN’S LADIES’ SHOP 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE HENDERSON STORE 

SHOES, DRY GOODS, READY-TO-WEAR 
ALWAYS GOOD VALUES 

CAMBRIDGE CITY INDIANA 


DUKE RESTAURANT 

BEST OF FOODS 

1108 MULBERRY STREET 
MUNCIE INDIANA 

. ................ . . . 

, , in 11 in i in 1111111111111 * * • • • i * • in • • • • • • • •»• * • 11 • 11 * 1 * 111111 * 1111111 » 111111 * * * * * 1 * * 111 * 11 * 111 * 111111111 *' * * * * * * * * *' *' * * * * * * *" * * * * * *' *' * * * *' * *' * * i 

R. B. WORE 

Monarch Canned Foods 

; Full Line of Fine Meats 

! Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

j Headquarters for Dilling’s Candies 

| WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 

\ Independently Owned Phone 8 

in (i li 11 n ii in n hi i uni i iimm n ii 

Page ninety-eight 


11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 








I II I■■I II I I I III I■I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I•I I I I I I I I II I I I••I I I I I II I I I I I I “ II I I I I I I I>I I IMI I I I I I■I I I II I I I I I■I I I I I I I I I I I I■I•II I I I•I■a I I I I I|I I - Cl I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II U I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I■ I I I I I - ^1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 


Jl 111111111111111111111111111II11111111111111111II111II.1111111111111 


I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 


1111111111111111111111111 


11111111111111111 ■ 11111111111111111111 in 


HAGERSTOWN LUMBER CO. 

FOR YOUR LUMBER 
CALL OUR NUMBER 

C. P. LOCKE, Mgr. Phone 19 


111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 n 1111111111111111 m 1111111111111111:11 m ! 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 
11111111111111111111111111ii111111111111111 m 11111n1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111<111111111111111111111111111111 ■ 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 n 


KNAPP RADIO ELECTRIC SERVICE 


Radio Repairing and Battery Charging 


A Complete Line of Radio Tubes and Parts 

Contract Wiring 


298 South Elm St. 


Phone 197 


11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111M111iiii i ii11111ii1111111111111111111:1111111111111111111111111 ii 1111 ii 11 ii i ii i m 111111111111111111111111 ii 11111111111111111 |T 

111111■1111111ii 11111111111111iii*11n11111111111111111ii11111111111111ii11111111ii1111111111111*11111111111111111111111111111 *1111111n1111111111111 * 111111111111111 ii 1111111 iin 


REST IN PEACE FOR THE LIVING IS AFFORDED 
BY ADEQUATE INSURANCE 
Fire —■ Auto 

See HARRY R. THALLS 

Phone Office 95 House 2203 


11 I I I I I I I I I.I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I I I I I III ’ll I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I 11 11 I I I I I I I I.I I I I I I I I I.. I (M I ! III llllIIiiIII11 IiiI I I II 11III.I I I I I I 11 I.I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I If 

1111II111111111111111 I 11111111II1111 11 111111 I I 1111 ■ II111111 I I I 1111 9 111111111111 I 11111111 I 11 1111 I 1 I I I 11 911 ! Ml I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II11 11 I 111 I I I I I I I I I 11 I I 11111111 I I I I 1111111111 1111111_& 

GET YOUR FLOWERS FROM BECKER’S [ 

Your Nearest Florist = 

Phone 61. Cambridge Citv \ 

Reverse Charges = 

WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS { 

OTTO BECKER 

||11111111111111111111111111111 I 11111 I I 11111111111111 I 11 11 I I I I 11111111 M 111111111 11 I I 11111111111111 I I 111111 I I I M 11 i 111 I I I 11 I 11111111 I I I I I I I 111111111111111 111 11111111 1111111111111 iT 

Page ninety-nine 








.............. . Z < .mini.mum.Hit: ~ nmmmmm.mi...... . ............. 


HI .Ill HI Ilf III III III III III III III III III III 11 Ml III I III Ml I III III . Ill III III III III I .Ill III III III III III III I III III III I III III III III III III III III III III III III I III III III IIIIJ 

ROYAL TYPEWRITERS 

PORTABLE AND STANDARDS I 

All makes of = 

RECONDITIONED TYPEWRITERS \ 

All Makes Rented and Repaired \ 

LUGGAGE AND SMALL LEATHER GOODS \ 

TRUNKS — AUTO CASES \ 

WM. H. DUNING SONS INC. | 

102 S. MAIN ST. RICHMOND j 

Mill IIIII llll III lllllllllllllll llllllllllll || llllll || I || llll 11| 111| 11IIIIMII11| Mill | 111 || || I I Mllll 11 111111| III II11111II1111 llll llll lllllllll llllllllll lllllll 11 MI>I || I | IH 11 

Mil 1111II MMMMMMMMMMIMIMM II lllllll IIII1111IIII1111IIIIIIIIII1111 Mill IIMI I 11 11 1111 Mill II1111III11 I Mill I II 11111 Mill MMIMMIMM III I llllll III llllllll M IIMI 11 

FOR YOUR PROTECTION 

Pasteurized 

MILK 

CREAM 

BUTTERMILK 

COTTAGE CHEESE 

HAGERSTOWN DAIRY 

Phone 5598 

IIIIIIII11IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Mil IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1111 111 IM1111 111 I I II I I II I II 11 I II 1111IIIIMI I 11 I I I I I 11 I I I 111 I 11 II111II111111 I 11 11 11111 III1111II 111 11II1111 II 11 I 
IIIII IIII I II II II IIII II IIII IIII II I II II II II I I I II11 11JJ I I II I II I I I I I I I II M IIII I II I I I II I IIIIIIII I I.IIIIII I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I II II II I I II IIIIII IIIIII 111IIII II II II 

E. H. GILCREST INC. 

DODGE And PLYMOUTH MOTOR CARS 

DODGE TRUCKS 

General Repair Service 
Waverly and Diamond 016 

HAGERSTOWN INDIANA 

..Ml IIII MMIMMIMM 

.MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMIMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMI llllll IMMMIMM MMIMMIMM I lllllllll MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM 

CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF ’38 


HAGERSTOWN GRAIN CO. 

Phone 20 

HAGERSTOWN INDIANA 

I I I I II I IIII IIIIII IIIIII M I II I II II IIIIII IIII II II I II IIII II It IIII II II II II II II II I II II II II II II II I II II II II II II III II II II II II II II II II II II 

Page one hundred 


MMIMMIMMIMMIMMIMIIIIIII II MMIIIIIIIII llllll I I llllllll “ “l I I II II I I II I II II I I II IIII I M II II II II IIII II II II II IIIIII II II I I II I II II I“ I 111II IIIIII II I II II II II I II II II II I II III II II II II I 11 11IIII II I II II II I l! 







■111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 


>1111m111111111111m iii m11111111111111111111m11111111111m iiii m 111111ii1111ii111ii1111111111111111ii11111 m 111ii1111ii 111111111111 ii 11111111111111111 ii 11111111 m 1111111111111 n 

j COMPLIMENTS OF j 

TIVOLI RITZ 

| HUDSON INDIANA j 

| THEATERS | 

j RICHMOND INDIANA j 

Cl III I I I I 11 I I 11111111111111111 I 1111 I I I 111111111II11111 1111111111111111 M 1111 11111111 ! u 111111111 111 I 1111111 111 I I 11 11 I I I 111111 I I 111111111 1111111111 11 I 111111111111 111111111111 11111 IT 

111 1111 111 11 11 11111 I I 11 I I I I 11 I I I I I I I I I II I I I 11 I I III I I I II I I I I I I I I ICI I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 III 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II 


BARTEL, ROHE & ROSA CO. 

Everything for the Student 

PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS 

921 MAIN ST. PHONE 1916 

RICHMOND INDIANA 


I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Cl I I I I I I I I II I I I I I II I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I 
1 1111 1111 I I I 11 11 11 I 111111111111111 I I I 111111111 11 11 I I I 11 I 1111 I I I I I I 11 I I I I I 1111 I I I I I•111 11f1111II!I 11J11 1111111111 I 11 1111111111111111 111111111111111111111111111 11 I I 1111111 I 11 I II I I I M 

j COMPLIMENTS OF \ 

| GRAYSON’S DRESS SHOP j 

= Featuring a Popular Priced Line of Ladies’ = 

| DRESSES, COATS, LINGERIE ! 

[ Sportswear j 

| NINTH and MAIN RICHMOND, INDIANA { 

"i 11111111 • • 111111111 * 11111111 ii 1111 1 11 ii 1 1111111111111111 ii 1111 ii 11111 i 1111111111111; 1111 1 mi 11 11111111 m 11111 m 111111 ii 111 1 11 ii 11111 1 1111111111111' i! 1111111 ii 111111111111111111 iT 
it11111 ii 111ii1111m i ii 111111ii111111 ii 111111111ii iit 1111111111111111 m 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111ii 111111111111111 m 

J. A. HARCOURT 

D. C. 

CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH SERVICE 
Lady Assistant 

60 Harrison Street 
Phone 87 

HAGERSTOWN INDIANA 


11111111111111111111111ii 111111111111111111111111111111111111ni ii 11111ii11111111111111 ii 111111111111111111111ui ii1111111m 11u111111111111111111 m111111111111111111111111111111 ii 

Page one hundred one 


111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ii e 












JIIIIIIIIIMIIIMlIMUMMMIIIIIMIIIMIIIMIIIMIIMMIIMIIIIIIIMMIIIIi 


1111II11 Ml 11111111111111 * * I * I ■ * * * I* * * I * I * * * * 111111 * * 1 * 111111 * * * 11111111 * * 1111 * 11 * * * * 1 * 11 * 11 * * * * * * 'J 


CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 

193 8 


May the Coming Years Bring You the Happiness and 
Success That Your Efforts Deserve 

HARLAN’S STORE 


Cl I I I I I I I I II I I I I I II I II I II I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I II I I I II I III I I I I I M 1 I I I I I I I I I • I « I I •• I I I I I I I l 
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIimillllllllllllllllll 


... 

IIIIIHMIItlllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIII®'®ll ,l,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,l,,,,,,,,,, y 


DONALD E. McINTYRE 


“Complete Home Outfitter” 


FARMLAND AND HAGERSTOWN, INDIANA 


{ ANDRESS MARKET j 

j COMPLETE LINE OF . . . j 

I FRESH & SMOKED MEATS | 

| I. G. A. BRAND \ 

| GROCERIES, FRUITS, VEGETABLES \ 

l Free Delivery Phone 150 e 

= 1 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..............*.. 

Page one hundred two 












W. C. PIERCE’S GROCERY 


= Why Pay a High Price for Coffee \ 

\ TRY “SILVER SEA" j 

\ A HIGH GRADE COFFEE AT 25c PER LB. | 

I WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE j 

= Phone 13 = 

1111111111111 ■ i ■ 11111111111111111111 ■ 11111111111 ■ 111•11ii111111111111111111]11111111111111111111111111111»1111 ii i ■ 11 • i! 11111 ii 11111111111111111 ■ 11111111111111111 ii 111111 ■ 111111 a i iT 
in 11 a a i ■ an i a i • i ■ i a i a ■ ia ■ a 111 a a ■ 111 lllil i ■ ■ i a i ■ 11 • i • 111 ■ 1111 • 1111111111 m a ■ i a i m 11* ■ 1111111 n 11 ■ 11 ■ ii ■ in 11111 ■ • 11 ill 11 a • 1111 ■ ii 11 • • • 11 ■ ■ i ■ i ii ■ 11 ii ii ii ■ ■ ii ■ 11111 a ■■ ■ i ■ 111 • a 111 ■ m 

1 COMPLIMENTS OF THE | 

| RICHMOND LELAND HOTEL | 

| RICHMOND, INDIANA j 


RICHMOND’S NEWEST . . . 

INDIANA’S BEST 


PATRONIZE OUR 


\ Dining Room and Coffee Shop 1 

1 Special Banquets and Dinners j 

{ By Appointment j 

Ci 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 n a 11111111111111111111111111111111 ii 1111111111111 a 1111111111111 ii 11 n 1111 ■ 11 a 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ii 1111111111 iT 
ii 111111111111111111111111111 in 111111111 ii 11111111111111111 ii 11111111111111111111111 m 11111111111111111111 pi 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ii 111 ii 1111111111111 ii n 

j COMPLIMENTS OF I 

| RUTH’S BEAUTY SHOP | 

[ Owned, and Operated by j 

{ RUTH POWELL j 

| FOR APPOINTMENT CALL 16 j 

= Hagerstown 370 Main St. j 

1111111111111 ii ii 11 ii 1111111111111111111111111ii11111111111111ii•11111111ii1111111111111111111111111111111111 ii 

Page one hundred three 


1 1111111»11111 n 11111111111111111111111 


111111111111 














R. M. HAYS 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 
AND FRUITS, VEGETABLES 

FERNDALE 
CANNED FOODS 

We Deliver Phone 20o 

Hagerstown, Indiana 


HERFF-JONES 

COMPANY 

Carl Woodward, Agent 
Indianapolis 
Indiana 


< 


Manufacturers 
of Hagerstown 
High School 


Jewelry 


V. 


Designers 

and Manufacturers of Class Jewelry, Graduation 
Announcements, Cups, Medals and Trophies 


u 111111M 111111111 m 11111111■■ i a................ . i1II1111111111 


II I I I I 11 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I II II I I I I I II II I I I I 11 I I I I III 11 11 II I I I 111 11111111 M I I I 1111 I I I II I I I I 


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I M I I >> ■ I I I > I I I I I I I III I • I I I I II I I I I I I (I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 


111.I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I M I I I I II I I I I 


A 

N 

Y 


S 

I 

Z 

E 


S. A. JOHNSON 

JEWELER 

WATCHES, CLOCKS and JEWELRY 
Carefully Repaired 

MAIN ST. HAGERSTOWN 


A 

N 

Y 


M 

A 

K 

E 


Page one hundred four 


. ...mini- I...in. ..in. .mm. ..... I . ... ... ..... . 












1 111111111111111 ii 11111111111111111111111111 mi ii 11111111111111111111 ii 11111111111111111 m 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 m 1111111 m 111111111111111111111111 > *i 11 ii i ii 111 n 

| HARLAN WATKINS j 

| AUTHORIZED FORD DEALER | 

| 24 HOUR WRECKING SERVICE | 

| NIGHT CALLS 218 PHONE 42 { 

11 I I 1111 111 111111 11 I 1111111 111 11111 11 11111 111111111111 I I 11 I 111111111111111111111 I I 11111111II1111 111 I 1111111 11 I I ill 11 111111!11 11 I 1111111111111 11111111111111 III I I I 11111111111 III 111 iT 

n 111111111111111111111111»111111 • 11»1111111111 • 11111 ii 111 • 1111 m 111111111111111111111111111111 n 11111111 m 1111111 m 11111111111111111111111111111111 in 1111111 m 11111 in 111111111 

! COMPLIMENTS OF ! 


C. M. HOWARD AND SON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 


Cambridge City, Indiana 


PHONE 86 


i i • ii 1111 •• 1111111 • 11 ■ 1111 • 1111 a 11111111111111111111111111111111111 1 11111111 • 1111111 h 11111; ii 111 • 1111 ii 11111 ii ii 11 ii 111 ■ 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 
J.I * 111 • 1111 ii ii 111 ii 11111111111111111111111111111111 ■ 11111111111111 ii 111111111 • i • 111111 ii 11111 ii 11 ii 11 ii 1111111111111111111111111111 ii 11111111 • 1111111111111111111111111111111 • 11 ill 


L. CARTMELL 


A Community Store of Better Service 
HARDWARE 


RUGS 

HARNESS 

PLUMBING 

HAGERSTOWN 


LINOLEUM 
OIL COOK STOVES 

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
Phone 15 

INDIANA 


UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIillllllMIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIII 


Page one hundred five 
















BE READY TO ACT 

Money in the Bank Opens 
The Door to Independence and 
Opportunity 

UNION TRUST COMPANY 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
HAGERSTOWN INDIANA 


This shows two years work for 
No. 6, a hen bred, hatched, raised 
and trapnested on our farm 544 
large eggs. 


OMER F. SMITH j 

White Leghorn Farms. 
Hagerstown, Indiana. = 



DeLUXE CAFE 

The Home of Good Eats 
Try Us 

Home Made Pies 

Phone 231 


REGAL STORE 

Owned and Independently Operated by 
\ Mr. and Mrs. Allen Tarplee 

I MEATS 

\ Complete Line of 

j STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

= Your Patronage Always Appreciated 

II • 111111111111111 i HI 1 111111111 I 11111 11111 11 1111 ■ 11111111111 111 111 1111II II I 111111111111111111111111111.I I I I 11 I I 11 I 11 11111111111111 

Page one hundred six 






















11111111111ii1111111ii111111ii111111 a! 111 m 1111111 


[_■ 11111 i i i i i i i i t i i i ■■ 111111111111111111111111 •• I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I k 11 i i • i c i i i i 111 11 i i i i i i i i i 111 l 1111111 • 11 ■ 11 i i i i i i i i i i i • 11 1111111 11 11 ■ I II i ■ 111111111111 I II 11 11 • ii •• 11 ■ i ■ 11 11 

! HEASTON THE CLEANER 

8 Hour Cleaning Service : 

G. E. ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES j 

Refrigerators, Radios, Washers { 

Phone 130 = 

111111111111111••11111■111111111■1111111111111111111a11111111111111•111111111111111111111111■111111111111111 j 1111111111111111111111111■1111111111 ii 111111111111111111 • i a 1111111111 iT 
n1111 ii 111111111111111111a11111111111111111a a a a a1111111j■11111;aia1111a111aia111in a11111111111111111111111111a11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 a 

| SLACK AYES' BARBER SHOP 

j CROSLEY XERVAC TREATMENTS j 

j WORK DONE BY EXPERT BARBERS j 

j “WALLY” SEAGRAVES, PROP. j 

sl 111111■ 1111111111111111111111111111111 ii 11 ii 11 * 11 ■ 11 ■ 111 • I ■ 111111111111111 ■ 1111 ii 11111111111111111111111111111111111 H i * i ■ * * i * 111 * *i* *1111* *■■■* *i■11*111* * *i•11*111111111111111iT 
n a 11111111111111111 ii 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111 a 11111111 ii 11 a i a 11111111111111111111111111111 a i a a hi mi 1111111111111 a a i a a a a i a a a a 111 a a a i a a a 11 a a 1111111 a a 11 a 11 a i a 111 m 

= Congratulations Class of 1938 \ 

| PRISCILLA’S BEAUTY SHOP | 

= And e 

! SANITARY BARBER SHOP | 

e Phone 3 \ 

j Hagerstown Indiana = 

111 a a ■ 11 • 1111111111111111111111 ii 11111111111111111111 a 11111111111111 ii 111111 ■ 111 m 11 ii 111111 ii 11111111111 u 111 ii 111111111111111111111111111 ii 111111111 ■ 111111 r.’ 

n1111111111111111111111■1111111111 iiii1111111111■111111111111111111111111111111111ii1111ii111111111111ii1111111ii111111ii1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 

| COMPLIMENTS OF j 

| GODWIN’S VARIETY STORE | 

\ Phone 155 Hagerstown [ 

* ■ 1111111111111111 • 1111111111 a 111111 ii 11111111111111 * 11111 * 11 * 11 * i * 11 * * * * 11 * * i * * * * * 111 * 111111111 * i a * * 111 * * 11 * 11 * i * i * i n * * n n 111 * 11111 * 11 * 111111111 * * 11 * i * * * * 1111 * i * i * i * * * * n * * i * 11 f 

Page one hundred seven 









iimiiiiniMiiiiiinMiiiiiiimiiiiiinimiiniiiiiiiiimiii 


min...mini..... . . . .. 


THE WAYNE OIL COMPANY 

OFFERS YOU 

BETTER PRODUCTS 

—AT— 

LOWER PRICES 

403 Main St. 


Phone 140 


= ....... . . ... ... ,,m ". . 

null....... ■..... l > II ■ > ..IIIII1IIIIIII".II"".... . ......... : 


DRESSES 

MILLINERY 


SPECIALTY SHOP 

HOSIERY 

LINGERIES 

ACCESSORIES 


Hagerstown’s Most Complete Garage Service 

Battery Charging and Repairing Lubrication 

Tire Repairing and Vulcanizing Car Washing 

Purol Gasoline and Motor Oils Simonizing 

General Auto Repairing Polishing 

Call us for super Auto Service 

L. V. DRAKE & SON GARAGE 

348 Walnut St. Phone 48 Hagerstown 

...................... 

......"I"""..."Ml II .....".I" ... 

PAUL JONES 

MEN’S SHOP 

! Hyde Park Clothing—Wilson Bros. Haberdashery 
j Mallory Hats—Superba Neckwear 

\ 397 Main St. Hagerstown 

= . . ......... . . .. 

Page one hundred eight 















II111111111II11111111111111111111111111II1111111II111111II11111II11111i1111II11IIIII1111111111111II111111111111111111111IIIII111111111111111111111111II11111111111111111111111111111 


j BERTSCH & CO., INC. j 

j Sheet and Plate Metal Working Machinery \ 

l Congratulations 1938 \ 

\ Cambridge City Indiana \ 

u 111111111111111111111111111111 11111111111111111111II11111 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 M 11111111 111 I 111 11 I 11 11111111111 IIII ill 111 1111 11 11 11 1111111 111111111111111111111 f? 
n 111 ii 1111111111111111111111111111111 • ■ 111 ■ 11 ii 111111111111 • 11111111111 ■ 11111111111111111 ■ 1111111111 ■ 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ■ 11111 ■ 1111111111111111111111111111 n 

| COMPLIMENTS OF THE ] 

| GRAND THEATER | 

e Cambridge City, Indiana = 

j ANGELO CHIARENZA j 

e Manager = 

11111111111111111111111M111111111111111 ■ ■ 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111M1111111111111111 m 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 r? 

llllll 11111 III III llllll 111II111111111111 111111IIII11111111 I 11II11111111111111IIIII1111 M 11111111111111IIIMIIII11II111II111111 lllll III III! III11II11111II llll II111111II111II1111IIIII 


SCOTT & BRIGHT 

| IGA STORE | 

| General Merchandise j 

j Quality and Service j 

e Phone 6018 e 

j Jacksonburg Indiana j 

U 1111 I I 1111111111111111111111 111111111 11 111 11111 1111111 I 11 III 111111111 I I I 1111111111 11 I I I I I I I I 11 I 111111 1111 111 Ml I 11 i I I I I 11 11 11111 111 I I 11 111111111111111111111111111111II111111111 ft 
11111 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 111 111 I I 111111111 11 I 11 I I I I I I II 111 11 i I 11 I I I I I 11 I I I I(I I I IlI I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I 111 I 111!11111 11 I I I I I I I I 11 I 1111 I I I I I I 11111 I I 111111 111 11 11 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II 

j SAVE I 

! TIME and ENERGY I 


EXTENSION TELEPHONES 
COST BUT A FEW CENTS A DAY 

CITIZENS TELEPHONE CO. 


1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II II I I I I ! I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

Page one hundred nine 




' ..mu linn.mil..>.. 


....-....... . ....... 


THE 

ALPHA CHI CHAPTER OF PSI IOTA XI 

CONGRATULATES 
THE CLASS OF 
1938 


I I I I II I I I I I I M > I I ■ I I I I I I M I I I I I 

' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I I I • I • I 1 1 1 1 


.... 

, 1 miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMi".i"."..i“"""""""" l " ,,, " l,ll,lll,,,,M . 


... 

■.. 111 ■ 111 ■ ...... ... 111. > i * i 


BEST WISHES 

TO THE CLASS OF ’38 

BAKER FERTILIZER CO. 


r.m.iiiii........ 

........ I ................ ... ■ ■ ..... 


...sum...mill ii 11 ii i inn i ii 11 ............ • 11 

11 m 111111111111111111111111 • i • • • i * ...........11111 in i 11 


“SINGER’S” 


MALTED-MILK BREAD 

For Every Meal 


f.n.M. ..............in................... 


I | I I I I I I II I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I * I * I * * * I 1 I * I 1 I 1 1 " 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' * ' ' ' ' ' * * ' 


Page one hundred ten 











I!1111■ 11 I I I I I I I II II11 111 11111 I I I I I I I I 11 II I I I 1111 I I II II 11111 11 II I - ~ II111111111111111111111111111111111 I 11 1111111111111111111111 I■IM ~ 11 I I I I I I I 11111 1111 1111 I 11 1111111 11 • I 111 I I I I I 111 11 I I 


; 111111111111111 m 11111 M 11111111111111 ii 11111 ii 11111111 m 1111111 m 111111 ii 11111111111111111111111111111111 m 1111111111111111111111 M 11111111111 ii 11111111111111111111111111111 ii m t 

THE CAMBRIDGE LUMBER COMPANY j 

Congratulates the Seniors of Hagerstown. We \ 

know they are worthy products of the finest = 

little town in the state. e 


The Cambridge Lumber Company 

Of Cambridge City 

. Fred A. Hines, Mgr. 


. ii111 ii 1111111111 it 11 m ii ii 1111111111111111111111 m 11111111111 

11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 is 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 mi ii 111111111111111 mi 11111111111111111111111 n 111111111111111111111111111 m 

Home Cooked Meals Sandwiches Short Orders e 

AYDELOTTE & DU GRANRUT | 

CAFE | 

RICHMOND, INDIANA j 

1031 EAST MAIN ST. “EVERY BITE A DELIGHT’* j 

(On U. S. 40) | 

111111111111111111111111111111 ii 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 J 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 s 111111111 ii m 1111111 ii 1111111111111111111111111 ii 11111111111 i 
in 11111111111111 111111111111111111111 * * 111111 ii 111 * 111 • 11 * i • 11111111 * i * 1111 * 11 • 1111111111111111111111 ii 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ■ 11111111»1111 hi 11111 ■ ■ ii 1111111 \ 

IMMEL INSURANCE AGENCY 

ALL KINDS OF INSURANCE 

OFFICE 141 HOME 134 

I 1 II I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I | I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I I I I I)I I I I I II I 1 I I I III I I I I I I I II I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I 9 11 I I 1 I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I■ I 
n ii i ii 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111■11■ie1111 ii1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ii ■1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 • i * i * 1 s 

| COMPLIMENTS OF I 

| ATKINSON FUNERAL HOME j 

e Phone 250 Lady = 

e Hagerstown Attendant e 

Ci 1111111111111111111 * i • 111 * * * 11 * * 11111 * * * 11 * * i * * * * * * 111111111111111 * * * * i * 11 * * * * * 1111111 * * * * * * * 1111111 * * * * 1111111 * * i * * * 11 * * i * 111 * i * i * 11 * 11 * * 11 * i * i * * * * * * 11 * * * * * i * 111 * i * * 11 * * i m i il lT 

Page one hundred eleven 


11111 ii 131111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 









:...innininnin .mill inn......."inn...""""""""""iinin 


,,,,.. mill linn ... miiiii hum 11 1 * * * * mu m • m * * • • ■ m * * * 


11111 mi m i m 11 



OUR SINCERE BEST WISH TO THE 


ENTIRE GRADUATING CLASS 

OF 1938 







| Courtesy of the Retail Division ol the \ 
\ Newcastle Community Council. j 

, 1 ,, 11 in inn.nnnnnnnnnninni """ 

Page one hundred twelve 














111111111111111111111111III■111111111111111111II111II11II1111111111IIII111111111111111111111111111111111111111II11IIII111111111111111II1111111III • 111111111111111II • 11111 • 1111111 ■ 11111111111II11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 • 11111111111111111111111111111111 III 1I•••» 


I I 11 I I I > I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I 


I I I I I I I II 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IIII I(I II I II I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I II I I II I I III II I II I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I II I II II I II I I I I II I I I I 111 


CONGRATULATIONS 

SENIORS 

OF THE CLASS OF 1938 


We extend you every good wish 


for a happy and successful life. 


The Studio of 

ROY HIRSHBURG 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 


I 


I I I I I I I I 11II11 I I I I I I I I I I I I ‘ ! I I 11 II 1111 I 111 I I I I I I I I I I II I 11 1 II I I I I I 11 I II I I I IIII I I I I I I I 111 I 111111 11 111 I 111 I I I I I I I I 111 1 

Page one hundred thirteen 


1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111ii1111ii1111111111111111• 11111111 n 11111111111; 111111111111 ii 11111111111111111111 iir.111111 1111111 m 11111111111111111111111111111■ 1111ii 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 • 111•• i • 11 • 11• t • 11111 a 11a i• ■ ■ a 111 a a• ■ 





ALUMNI 


SENIORS OF 1936 


Harold Allen 
Carl Beeson 
Robert Beeson 
Herman Bookout 
Betty Brown 

Marie Chamberlin Bowman 

Allen Coryell 

Herman Cromis 

Edward Dale 

Omar Dumford 

Elizabeth Ellis 

Harriette Fosnight 

Effie Foulke Beech 

Ruth Foutz Johnson 

Mary Alice Harlan 

Paul Earl Harris 

Mildred Hilbert Shellenbarger 

Marion Hoel 

Robert Hogue 

Garner Johnson 

Carlos Jordan 

Thelma Keeling 

Florence Keever 

Ruth Kinsinger 

Donald Lamar 


Helen Lightner 
Della May Medsker 
Virginia Miller 
Clara Rose Myers 
Richard Oler 
Dorothy Cebhart Oler 
Pauline Ramey 
Marjorie Reed 
Joe Roberts 
Rosanna Roth 
Jack Scott 
Marjorie Shafer 
Eugene Shultz 
James Smith 
Mabel Jane Smith 
Evelyn Strickler 
S. L. Surber 
Bernard Taylor 
Austin Troth 
Helen Waltz 
Lloyd Weaver 
Alberta Williams 
Sarah Wisehart 
Walter Woodward 
Fred Woollard 


SENIORS OF 1937 


Josinah Allen 
Thelma Bland 
Leslie Burgess 
Charles Clements 
Omar Cummins 
Juanita Chapman 
Florence Cordell 
Ethel Mae Crull 
John Drischel 
Mildred L. Dennis 
Mary Catherine Dennis 
Bette Davis 
Virgil Davenport 
Maurice Daugherty 
Dorothy Dale 
Charles Hall 
Charles Howell 
Hubert Hinshaw 
Ruth Harcourt 


Lawrence Handy 
Marjorie Haisley 
Charles Knapp 
June Murray 
William Murray 
Ernest Miller 
Mavier McConnaughey 
Blanche Paddock 
Eleanor Romine 
Paul Reed 
Ruby Steward 
William Symons 
Rita Smith 
Horace Shields 
Mildred Strickler Crull 
Mary Talbert 
Frederick Wood 
David Wisehart 
Fern Weimer 


Page one hundred fourteen 










v* Established l8gj 


F or centuries astronomers have 
looked into the skies searching 
for new worlds, constellations and 
stars. Aside from their interesting 
research work, they have learned 
much that is of practical scientific 
value. 

Similarly, in the field of student 
publications, the Indianapolis En¬ 
graving Company searches con¬ 
stantly for new ideas, plans and 
methods that will assist year-book 
staffs to publish successfully books 
characteristic of their school and 
community. The results of these 
efforts are gratifying. 

The Annual Planning and Design¬ 
ing Department welcomes your 
inquiries for further information. 


Indianapolis Engraving Company 


Department of Annual Planning and Designing 


INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 


Page one hundred fifteen 

























Page one hundred sixteen