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oc 977.202 H12hab 1922 
Hagerstown High School 

(Hagerstown, Ind.) 
Ep i tome 



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Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

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E-Yearbook.com 



http://www.arcliive.org/details/epitomeyearbooko1922liage 



THE 






1922 




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3EVERLY YOUI# 



THE 1922 
EPITOME 

A picture book of the school life 

and activities of Hagerstown 

High School for school 

year 1921-22 



The EPITOME 



The Year Book of ' 

HAGERSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

Volume IV 



PUBLISHED BY A STAFF REPRESENTING 

HAGERSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

ANi:) 
SPONSORED BY THE SENIOR CLASS 



HAGERSTOWN, INDIANA 

AprilU^21_ 

H- 12. -^ 



r c 



7 8 8 15 4 4 



Allen County Public Library 

900 Webster Street 

PC Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 




'tAis-auBun 



OUR ALMA MATER 



2017000 

To our patriotic and faithful student 
body whom we think has made 
possible such a successful 
school year, we dedi- 
cate this volume of 
our year book 



\'\c;r 4 



T/ic KPITOME 



1922 




FOREWrjRD "~ 

We, the Senior class of 1922, realizing that we have reached a turning point in 
life's journe}', are putting forJi our hest efforts to make this year book thebest ever 
pulilishcd in any class of H. H. S. This book is merely a memoranda as the name 
implies, of the activities of the school year 1921-22, this being the last year we attend 
Hagerstown High School. The purpose of the book is to put before the public the 
happenings of this school year and a token of remem1)rance from this Senior class. 
All through our journey we have looked forward to this year and miw that we have 
almost reached the end of our high school career we are sorry to leave behind us our 
school-mates and faculty and go on in our journey to see what is in store for us. We 
have striven to make this book a fitting memorial to the past school year. We belie\e 
that we have succeeded in our efforts and hope that you will also think so. To the 
faithful faculty and student l)ody we owe much of the success of this vear book. 



1922 


The EPITOME 


I'Af.K 5 




On the 26th of .Vpril, 1921, the voters of Hagerstown and Jefferson township 
determined by an election to consolidate the schools of the town and the township 
under the statute of 1917. This act provides that such consolidated schools shall be 
under the control and management of a school board composed of three (3) school 
trustees, consisting of the township trustee and two (2) other members selected by the 
town board of trustees. One of these must lae a resident of the town and one must 
be a resident of the township outside of the town. 

The first board of the co'-isolidated schools is composed of Ralph Teetor, Presi- 
dent: Elmer Crull, Township Trustee, Secretary, and Clarence V'ornauf, Treasurer. 
They are proving themselves very efficient. Regular meetings are held bi-weeivly and 
several called meetings have been held. Since the State Board of Health has con- 
demned our high school building, the responsibility of constructing a new Junior-Senior 
high school Iniilding has fallen to their lot but we feel sure they will Ije equal to the 
occasion. 



Page 6 


The EPITOME 


1922 




Editor-in-Chief ' 

Asst. Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Asst. Advertising Manager 
Music Editor 
Social Editor 
Athletic Editor 
|uni(ir Class I'.ditor 
Sophomore Class Editor 
F"reshman Class Editor 
Staff Photographer 
Faculty Advisor 



Charles Replogle 

Herman Teetor 

Mark Pcckinpaugh 

Arnim Root 

Rcillin Stanley 

Aline Hower 

Helen Riggs 

Cecil Deardorff 

Keilh i'arldw 

Emma Jean Smith 

Garver Brown 

Alinnie ]\fanifold 

W. J. Stahr 




\\'. O. WISSLER, 

Superintendent, History. 

Earlham College, 
Indiana State Xormal, 
Wisconsin University. 



LOUISE WILLIS PENNING- 
TON, 

Spanish. 

Earlham College. 



\\'. I. STAHR, 

Prineipal. Seieiicc. 



.| Indiana L'niversity. 



LAURA McCRACKEN, 
Domestic Science. 
Central Normal College. 



WALTER M. PITTS, 
Mathematics 
Earlham College. 



ELIZABETH ROUNDS, 

Commercial. 

George Washington University. 

Earlham College. 





CLEMENT L. POSTON, 

English. 

W'alj.'ish College. 



FLOSSIE M. NEFF, 

M iisir Siipcn'isor. 

Aluncie Normal, 
Earlliani College. 



■J IVAN HANEN, 
Junior lliijli. 
^'i Indiana State Normal. 




CHARLES REPLOGLE. 

President '22, 
Epitome '22, 
\\ idespread '21, '12, 
Glee Club '22 
Basket Ball '22. 



ALINE HOWER. 

Vice President '22, 
Ej)itonie '22, 
Widespread '22, 
Glee Club '21, '22, 
Orchestra '19, '20, ' 
Board of Control '22. 



21, '22. 



iii:len riggs. 

St'cretary-Treasurcr '22, 
Epitome '21, '22, 
Glee Club '21, '22. 



HELEN BARRON. 
Glee Club '22. 



ARNIM ROOT. 

Epitome '22, 

Basket Ball '19, '20, '21, '22, 

Glee Club '21. 



SARA WARFEL. 
Widespread '22, 
Glee Club '21. 





DOROTHY BOOKOUT. 
Glee Club. 



MARK PECKIXBAUGPI. 

Epitome '22, 
Widespread "22, 
Glee Club '22. 



FERN STEWART. 
Glee Club '21, '22. 



ETOILE MARSHALL. 
Glee Club '21, '22. 



HAROLD WICHTERMAN. 

Basket Ball '19, '20, '21, '22. 
Glee Club '21, '22. 



MINNIE MANIFOLD. 

Epitome '22, 
Glee Club '21, '22. 





WALTER AIAIX. 

Widespread '21, 
Basket Ball '20, '21, 
Glee Club '21. 



CFXIL DEARDORFF. 

Epitome '22, 
Widespread '22, 
Glee Club '21, '22, 
Orchestra '20, '21, '22, 
Boys' Band '21, -21. 



VEARL HOOVER. 
Glee Club '21, '22. 




JESS SELLS. 

Epitome '22, 
Glee Club '21, '22. 



ROLLIN STANLEY. 

Epitome '22, 
Widespread '19, "21, 
Basket Ball '21, 22. 



The class of '22 boasts of having among its numbers four members who have com- 
pleted the four years' course in three. These are Walter Alain, Charles Replogle, Vearl 
Hoover and Cecil Deardorff. Walter Main, who is now at Defiance College in his fresh- 
man year, attended Central Normal College during the summer of 1921, after complet- 
ing his junior year with a very creditable record, and there carried enough subjects in 
the high school department to complete that part of his career. As the state doesn't 
issue diplomas except in the spring, Walter will graduate with tis. Charles Replogle also 
attended C. N. C. after completing his sophomore year. He carried enough work to 
justify his entering the senior class at the first of the term. \'earl Hoover and Cecil 
Deardorff, who were also among the sophomores, were under a private tutor during the 
summer vacation and, after taking the state examinations, proved themselves very 
worthy of entering their last year of academic school-life. All four have proven their 
ability to undertake the duties of a senior. 



Page 18 


The EPITOME 


1922 



SENK )R CLASS HISTORY. 

September 1. 1''18! Just four years have passed since tliis present Senior Class 
entered old H. H. S. as freshmen, numbering twenty-five, the largest freshmen class 
that had ever entered Hagerstown High School up to that time. Although we did 
nothing by which we can now distinguisli oursehes, we were a wide-awake bunch, were 
ahvays ready to support school activities and help make life in the school a success. 
During the year our class was organized. Ralph Waltz was elected president and Sara 
W'arfel, secretary-treasurer. During the vear four of our class-mates left us. 

Twenty of our number entered high school as sophomores, September, 1''19. < )ur 
former class president having left us, we elected Donald Teetor to till the vacancy, 
ihis year we began to take a more active part in school life. Our class basket ball team 
was victorious in the inter-class tournament and we were therefore permitted to have 
our class numerals placed on the perpetual trophv cup. < )ur class also gained the great- 
est number of points in the field day exercises at the close of the year. It was on 
field and class days that we earned our first money as a class, by selling refreshments. 

September, 1920, we again entered on our toilsome journey as juniors. Only four- 
teen of our number remained. The class officers, this year, were the same as those for 
thv- preceding year. Our class basket ball team again won in the inter-class tourney, 
and a second time '12 went on the trophy cup. In March we gave a class play, "The 
Gold Bug," which was quite a success. At the close of the school year, as is the cus- 
tom, we gave the Junior-Senior reception at Lightcroft. We, at this time, were begin- 
ning to see the size of the shoes we were to fill the next year. 

We entered on the last stretch of our journey as seniors, September, 1921, with a 
class roll of seventeen. This year all new class officers were elected. Charles Replogle 
was elected president. Aline Hower, vice-prsident, and Helen Riggs, secretary-treasurer. 

This year we have brought the Lyceum Course to this community. Encouraged 
by our success of the year before, on January 11 and 12, we gave another class play, 
"And Home Came Ted," for the benefit of this "Epitome" which we have striven to 
make the best annual ever put out liy any class of H. H. S. Eurthermore, we think 
we have succeeded in doing this. 

We, tluring our four years' course have seen the enrollment in the school grow 
from sixty to one hundred and fifty. 

Only eleven of the members of the freshman class of 1918 are members of the 
graduating class of 1922. Eleven have gone through the whole high-school course to- 
gether, while others came and went. 

We, as all Seniors, have had our trials and troubles, but we would gladly live it 
all ()\cr again. It is with much sorrow that we leave our teachers and the weather- 
beaten hall of education, our Alma Mater, and journey on through life's pathways. 



1922 


The EPITOME 


Page 19 



SENIOR CLASS WILL. 

We, the Seniors, collectively hereby bec^ueath the Juniors our old shoes and hope 
that they may fill them as successfully as we have. 

Individually, we will to the designated underclassmen our health, wealth and wis- 
dom, as follows : 

Harold Witcherman : His great ability to play basket ball to be divided equally be- 
tween Bill May and Carl Stohler. 

Charles Replogle : His large understanding (feet) to Smith Doughty and his old 
books to his "little" sister. 

Arnim Root : tlis good looking qualities and natural stubborness to his good friend, 
Charles Bunnell. 

Helen Barron: Charles Bunnell to Jo Foyst, and her charming features to go with 
it. 

Minnie Manifold: She hates to part with Cjordon Murray, but as she is leaving 
school she wills him to Thelma Chad wick hoping that she will take the best possible care 
of him. 

Rollin Stanley: His szvcct disposition and extra pair of eyes to Harvey Petty. He 
also says he wants Gordon Murray to take good care of Thelma Chadwick. 

Fern Stewart: Is a little bit undecided as to what she will will, but after some con- 
sideration she has decided that her wonderful warble should go to X'irginia White. 

Sara Warfel : Hates to do away with her good disposition but she has decided that 
it will do Guy Johnson more good than herself. 

Dorothy Bookout : Her vampish ways and her back seat on the west side to her 
succe:iSor in the Senior Class, Agnes Adrion. 

Jess Sells: His popularity with the girls to Herman Teetor and his Irish wit to 
Wilfred Knapp. 

Etoile Marshall: Her bobbed hair to Ellen Hoover and her faithfulness as a student 
to Helen Replogle. 

Aline Hower: Her charming ways to LaVerne Harter and her A's and B's to How- 
ard Marlatt. 

Helen Riggs : Her good looks and blond hair to Ruth Benbow with all due respect. 

Cecil Deardorff: His place in the orchestra to Bill May and his ability to com- 
plete the four years' course in three to Raymond Weber. 

Vearl Hoover: Hopes that his heir may be able to complete high school before 
he or she is able to vote. And his popularity with the student body to Harry Ulrich. 

Walter Main : His good-natured slang to Allen Harris and his desire to throw 
hash to George Wogoman. 

Mark Peckinpaugh : His ever-smiling face to Lloyd Byrket ; his well-worn chewing 
gum to Omar Davidson and his great power to annoy the teachers to Charles Forkner. 



Page 20 


The EPITOME 


19 22 



SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY. 

"Well, fertheluvamud," 1 muttered, with all the gall that was in me, "How many 
more of those blasted soap signs am 1 goin' to be required to look at?" 

I had read my newspaper from the headlines to the la.t word on the last page — 
until 1 could say every advertisement by heart, and backwards. I had chewed up four 
perfectly good ten-cent cigars; had tried to diversify myself by beating time on the 
window-sill, to the rythmic jaw action of the old maid across the aisle, who was chew- 
ing her gum, — gum that has lasted since we left Harpersburg Missouri. 

Scenery had Ijecome a thorn in my flesh rather than a source of pleasure to me, 
because for the last two days I had been fed nothing but scenery — and dining car soup 
— soup which, despite all my efforts, had a twice-daily habit of drizzling upon my vest, 
with every lurch of the coach. Scenery : I had looked at tall ;:cenery, short scenery, 
wide scenery, narrow scenery — oh, what's the use; anyway. I was tired of it. It had 
become to have a parallel eft'ect upon me to that which castor oil has upon a young-un. 
And now I was at the end of the proverbial rope, for every time I permitted my eyes 
to gaze out through the smoky windows, they invariably were blazed at by a huge sign-. 
board. I'll venture to >ay that out of 2.110 looks, I had encountered not less than 2,- 
100 of these bloomin' sign boards which proclaimed the marvelous merits of "Wichter- 
man's Dew-Drop Soap," — "a soap which works wonders with all the family — papa, 
mamma, and baby." 

I had tried pulling down the blinds to relieve myself from their hideous yellow glar- 
ing, — but no, they persisted in appearing in my mind's eye at regular intervals as a 
sort of after-image. Exasperated, I at length raised the blind, only to feel my hot 
blood surge to my face — for, as u ual, one of those pesky signs made its appearance, 
amid the clouds of smoke from the engine. 

Well, sufferin' woolyworms ; thund — I was interrupted at this point of my mum- 
bled vociferating by the gentleman in front of me. Turning around, he beamed a good- 
natured grin at me. It was the most pleasant thing I had seen since leaving Los An- 
geles — that grin. Something about it recalled past days to me, yet I could hardly make 
the proper connections. Its owner, after easing up on it somewhat, ventured that I had 
ridden a great distance. The rest came easy, for we were .^oon chatting away together. 
Reaching into his inside pocket, he drew forth a natty card-case, extracted a' card, and 
extended it to me. It read; "Charles Replogle, B. S'., Ph. D.," and in the lower right- 
hand corner; "Chemical Engineer." I thought I would surely lose my breath and my 
Adam's apple, I think, wore the pearl otT the aft side of my collar button before I 
could find substance to gasp; "Rep — Rep, — can I believe my eyes? Can it be you? Do 
you remember me?" I grabbed his hand and began to pump it so vigorously that he 



1922 


TAe EPITOME 


Paue 21 



undoubtedly began to think, from the expression on his visage that I had been robbed 
of my mental faculties. Rep, don't you remember me? It was tiien he did remember 
me — and for several minutes we kept the air thick with remini.-cences of old H. H. S. 

By means of a steady flow of questions, 1 managed to learn from Rep that he had 
given up active life as a chemical engineer and that he was now, only as a pastime, 
engaged in lecturing upon phases of his profession at various colleges and universities 
throughout the country. From his appearance one could readily conclude that he was 
leading a life of serenity and contentment — except for a few stray gray hairs which had 
manifested themrelves around the region of his ears. All five of his boys, excepting 
one, were attending college in preparation for following in his footsteps. 

Suddenly our attention was jerked from our conversation by a sight which the 
speeding train brought into our range of vision. I have never been an especial fancier 
of poultry; but I must confess that the sight which met my eyes made them take on 
the proportions of a saucer. 1 swear I have never seen so many chickens in my life, 
before or since — hundreds and hundreds of White Leghorn chickens, speckled over the 
velvety green landscape of an immense chicken farm. Neither of us spoke a word, but 
only gazed and drank in the sight. By the appearance of row upon row of spick and 
span chicken-houses, I judged we were about to pa s the capitol of this farm, ihe farm 
house. Just then the train made an abrupt curve to the left, letting u.s have a view of 
the engine, a few cars ahead. I noticed that the engineer was waving at someone but 
I gave it little heed 'till Rep seized my arm, pointing toward the large farm-house. At 
first I was unable to get the significance of his pointing. Then — like a bolt out of the 
blue came the second shock of my journey: for, standing on the rear porch of the hou e 
was the mistress of the poultry domain, airily waving her handkerchief at our engi- 
neer. We failed to make the fair-haired Helen B. see us, but we at le„st felt happier 
for havinf seen her again, e\en if onlv for an instant. 



Several hours later found Rep and I comfortably installed in our suite at the Dear- 
dorfif-Castoria Hotel. This hotel is the one at which I always put up when 1 am in 
Chicago. I prefer it because it is one of the most handsome and convenient in the city ; 
and also because it is the property and pet hobby of my friend, the great surgeon. Dr. 
Cecil Deardorfif, head surgeon at the famous Bleedmore Hospital. 

After I had completed my ablutions and had changed to my evening clothes, I de- 
scended to the lobby. As I stepped from the elevator, — bump ! I smashed directly into 
a gentleman who was entering. Both immediately started to beg the other's pardon. 
However, neither of us finished, for in the middle of our "excusing" we recognized 
each other. I had to blink my eyes to realize that the portly, prosperous-looking gentle- 



Page 22 


r/z^ EPITOME 


1922 



man in the broad sombrero whom I faced was none other than N'earl Hoover. 

Great guns. Vearl ! What kindly deal of fate brings you here? I pulled him over 
to one of the davenport- and we sat down. In fifteen mimites we had exchanged in- 
dividual histories dating back to 1922. He was, he informed me, making his annual 
\isit to Chicago, bringing a shiijment of his Montana steers to be sold at the stock 
yards. 

After \"earl and I parted in the lobby, I ate my dinner and took a taxi for the 
Darkstone Theatre. I had purchased my ticket the first thing after my arrival in the 
city, for I feared that a delay would ruin my chances in getting one. For years I had 
been possessed of a craving to hear the noted Mme. Fern Stewart sing. This was to be 
my opportunity, so I was exceedingly gleeful over my good luck. 

Comfortably established in my orchestra seat, I settled to watch the crowd come in, 
I always like to go to the theatre early so that I can watch the people come in — it's 
great amusement. 

After I had been there about fifteen minutes I was attracted by a twittering among 
the occupants of the seats around me. Naturally I was curious to learn the source, so 
I questioned an old man in an adjacent seat. He bestowed a scornful look upon me. 
"Why, there is a great man just now entering that box over there." (directing with his 
forefinger. ) I hated to e.xpose my ignorance to a further degree, but my curiosity de- 
mantled that 1 ask who this betwittered great man was. I was informed that it was 
the Hon. Rollin Stanley, ex-state Senator and present advertising manager of the Sears- 
Roebuck Co. I whipped out my opera glasses to make closer scrutiny, and sure enough 
it was Rollin. Despite the side-burns, shiny pate, and the large family seated around 
him, it was without a doubt, Rollin. I wadded up my seat check, and tossed it at him 
in hope of attracting his attention. But no, he was too intent upon gazing behind the 
wings of the stage to notice the little wad which struck him on his nose. After a while 
I abandiined my attempts at attracting Rollin's attention and settled down in my seat 
to listen to the orchestra which had begun to play. 

The opera was a huge success. Mme. Stewart met and even passed far beyond all 
my expectations. Her fame is indeed rightfully earned. 

I lost no time in getting back to my room and to lied, for I had another gruelling 
day of travel liefore me. 

The next morning I departed upon the south-bound train. ( >nly a few miles haO 
put Chicago behind me when I was cradled to sleep in my seat by the rocking of the 
train. The late hours of the night before were telling upon me, and I slept like a 
hibernated bear. When I finally awoke I at once became conscious of the fact that the 
train was motionless. I could hear the engine hissing and poom-pooming as it replen- 
ished its boilers. There seemed to he an unusual commotion outside mv window, so I 



192^ 


The EPITOME 


Page 23 



drew myself up in my seat, that I mit;ht obtain a view of the outside and apprehend the 
source of the noise. I knew at a glance that we were in the Indianapolis Union depot. 
There had been somebody hurt and a curious, gaping throng was gathered around a 
small hospital cot, upon which lay a bandaged-up and gory wreck victim. Two internes 
stooped to carry the cot to the nearby ambulance, and as they did so, the nurse who 
had been bending over the cot, straightened up. I instantly recognized the figure in 
the starched nurse's garb as being Helen Riggs. She was shooing the crowd apart in 
order to make room for the cot to be carried to the ambulance. Just then the train 
lurched, crept out of the station, and we were on our way again. 

The last smoke-stack of the city had scarcely been left behind when I felt a tap 
upon my shoulder. I looked up: an immacul::te gentleman in a niftily-cut brown suit 
was beaming upon mc. Jess Sells! Great horned owls, Jess, whatcha doin' here? In 
only a question of a few minutes I found that Jess was all that his name implies — he 
"sells." Yea, he is a knight of the grip — and doing well, too: selling a little line of 
his own, a recently perfected device known as "The Sells Combination Eack-Scratcher 
and Lead Pencil." IXiring the remainder of our ride to Louisville, Jess proceeded to 
snow me under with his argumentative sales talk. In parting. I promised to tell our 
corner drug store man back home about the device, and to have him order some. 

The next morning I was able to accomplish my business in a shorter time than I 
had expected, so, upon meditation, I resolved to "see the sights." I chose to walk, and 
thereby save my nickels. Accordingly, I set out afoot in the direction of the river. I 
happened to recollect th^t I had promised my young-un to buy her some sheet music 
while I was gone, so I dropped into the "Mower Music Store," one of the finest in 
"Looa-vul," and purchased the promised number. Aline Hower? Yes, it's her store. 
Ch, of course her name isn't Hower any more, as it was deemed wiser not to change 
the name of the store, too. After a short and cheerful chat wi;h the proprietress, I 
ambled out and on down the street. 

My itinerary chanced to lead me past the county jail. I decided to wander in and 
casually look the place over, since I saw by the bulletin on the door that it was visi- 
tor's day. I amused myself by strolling about through the numerous cell-lined corri- 
dors for a while, and was preparing to take my leave when I chanced to encounter 
Revenue Officer Root. After exchanging a friendly salute he took my arm and led me 
off towards one of the corridors. "Something to show you," he told me. We climbed 
to the second floor and traversed a corridor bounded by the padded cells. Coming to 
a halt in front of especially strongly barred cell. Officer Root jerked his thumb toward 
the far corner of the dingy cage. Lo, and behold (le.'t my eyes deceived me), W. Alain. 
The culprit, reposing upon a soap-box, was engaged in perusing a copy of "The Police 
Gazette." He seemed loath to indulge in coversation, so Officer Root and I tarried but 



Page 24 


The EPITOiMK 


1 '; _• .' 



a short time. Aniini unfolded the story to me of how he had trailed Mr. Main and 
his cohorts all over the wilds of Kentucky in order to catch them, jail them, and ap- 
prehend the whereabouts of their mammoth rtill. The deed had been accomplished the 
week before, and the "Main Gang" in all probability would soon belong to the "Chain 
Gang." Root said he felt sure of this, because they were to be tried by Squire Peck- 
inpaugh. Squire Peckinpaugh had a reputation of being death upon moonshiners. Ar- 
nim hiformed me that he and the Hon. Mark had cleaned up close to fifteen thousand 
dollars in the last year from confiscated moon.hine liquor. 

That night, as I rolled into bed, I set my mind on arising earlv in the morning and 
taking a train for Lexington. I never have been much of a follower of the racetrack 
sport, but I thought, since I would not in probability meet with this opportunitv again 
of witnessing the great Lexington classics, that I would go. 

I need not go into detail in recounting my day at the races. I had a grand and 
glorious time. The pleasure of the day was topped out by my chance meeting of Dor- 
othy Bookout, Minnie Manifold, Sara Warfel and Etoile Marshall. Oh, yes, they all 
have dift'erent names now, but you wouldn't recognize them in their new names — there- 
fore 1 use the old ones. Sara, I understood, was there because her — her hul)b\- was. 
One of their horses was entered in the race. Dorothy ? Well, she was there for the 
same reason I was: She was in a neighboring town, and had decided to witness the 
races. You know, she is now demonstrator for the Wellas-Bess Cloak and Suit Com- 
pany of New York. ]\Iinnie was there as a guest of the Dandergilts at their week- 
end house-party. She seemed to lie in her usual high spirits, and was giving a gentle- 
man in a checkered suit the once-over, through her lorgnette, when I first noticed her. 

Etoile, I found lived at Pittsburg, and was the better-half of a prosperous steel 
magnate. I was introduced to the worthy gentleman later in the day. They extended 
a gracious invitation to me to take supper that evening with them, but I found it neces- 
sary to refuse, due to the fact that I had to leave on the 5 :45 west-bound train. 

Well, I got back home all right; and I swear, upon my Doan's Almanac, that be- 
fore nor since have I ever had as pleasureable a trip as that one. I never dreamed. 
\vhen I left, that my business trip would net me such an abundance of hap]5y meetings. 

However, "There's no place like home." 

By NICHOLSON DIMES. 



1922 


The EPITOME 


Page 25 



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?M.i: 26 


The EPITOME 


1922 



SENIOR SOCIAL NEWS. 

Although the Seniors ha\e been very busily engaged in hard work, we have found 
a little spare time for a few social activiti es. 

We started out the school activities by a wiener roast near Jacksonburg. It was 
an inter-class affair, chaperoned by Miss Rounds, Aliss Willis and Mr. Pitts. Every- 
nne enjoyed this one so much that in a few weeks we again assembled in the woods 
with plenty of wieners and mar hmallows for another good time. Owing to the seem- 
ing hungriness of some mysterious unknowns, we were unable to find (jur wieners 
when we had our fire ready for them, (^)h ! well, children \vill be children. 

We next turned our attention to a surprise party at the home of Sara Warfel. 
Mu ic. games and dancing were features of the evening. It was a success although 
Sara wasn't much surprised. 

The next number on our social calendar was the Hallowe'en social given at the 
school hou;e. The Seniors were in charge of the Social. Each class had a room where 
everyone was well entertained. One of the most interesting features of the evening 
was th fortune-telling. 

The Lyceum which was br(jught to Hagerstown this winter was a success so far as 
the entertainment was concerned. The financial part was not so successful. But even 
if we did not profit financially by it, we do not regret this time and work which we 
spent. The first numljer, the Sorority Singers, composed of vocal and instrumental 
numljers and reading, was well receix'ed. The second number was given November 15. 
It was a scientific lecture by Dr. Cady. The lecture was illustrated by pictures on the 
screen. This number was highly entertaining as well as instructive. It was very much 
appreciated by those interested in science. The third number of the Lyceum was com- 
posed of clay modeling, vocal and instrumental music and readings. It was a pleasing 
entertainment rendered by the Caveny Trio. The last number. The Apollo Saxophone 
Quartette, was splendid. It was composed of vocal and instrumental selections, both 
classical and popular. 

A few Juniors and Seniors indulged in a New Year's party at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Pitts. The party was not iM-oken up until nearly noon the next day, so we 
need no other ]!roof that they had a fine time. 

The Seniors gave a class play January 11 and 12. The name of it was "And 
Home Came Ted." h'rom the financial standpoint it was a great success. From the 
large attendance both Wednesday and Thursday nights we feel that our eft'orts were 
ver}- much appreciated. 

( )ne of the social events which we enjoy very much is the Junior-Senior recep- 
tion which is gi\-en for the Seniors every spring. We are looking forward to it with 
great expectations. 




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JUNIOR CLASS RI'TROSPKCT. 

Some time back in the clays which now seem the dark ages, forty-two genuine 
Freshmen, inckiding lean ones, fat ones, pretty ones, homely ones, — to make it short, 
all kinds but bad ones, came timidly up the steps of the dear ol<l II. 11. S. and enlisted 
for the duration. That was, we, the class of '23. We were, as I say, everything but 
bad, yet, there is a single adjective that will describe any one or all of us, that is, to 
be specific, Green. We do not deny it now, but at that time the present Seniors and 
some of the other upper classmen were seemingly were unjust. Indeed, at times it 
seemed to us that they should have been called instead. The Society For the Suppres- 
sion of Freshman Pride, but since we have attained a higher educational altitude, we 
have looked back on other "prodigies" and decided that the treatment we received 
was perfectly just. Like the traditional dog, every Sophomore has his day. 

To anyone other than ourselves there was very little happened in that memorable 
year, but we think that we did, at least a few, very significant things. Early in the 
year we called our first class-meeting and under the supervision of "Landy" v.e 
organized our class. As officers, we elected Ruth l'>enbow as president, (iordon Mur- 
ray as secretary and treasurer. As there has been no change in these it is quite evident 
that the meeting was a success. During the year we lost several members, namely, 
Virginia L'nthank, Pauline Shively, Forrest Hahn, Charles Smith and Norris Souders. 
Some of these have resumed their school work in other places. Agnes Adrion came into 
our class that year and has remained with us since. 

When we trooped in the next year as Sophomores we were in entirely dilTerent 
spirits for we had, in no way, forgotten that we were now the Suppression Society. 
But as other responsibilities, such as Geometry and irregular verbs, began to demand 
our attention we almost forgot our obligations to the recruits and as a consec|uence let 
them o(i er.sier than is generally expected. It is perhaps well that we did for this was 
the hardest year for the most of us. Again we lost a few of our members : Glen John- 
sonbau^h, Elmer Temple, Leona Petty, \larguerite Wadman, Florence Wine and George 
Cain left us. To compensate the loss we gained Blanche Petty, Douglas Pierce, Eva 
White, Crville Sherry, Edith McCracken and David Lilly. We succeeded in getting 
through the year without actually coming to blows with (leometry but many v.ondered 
at the success. 

When we came back this, the present year, we found Edith INIcCracken had moved 
away r.nd would no longer be a member of our class and school. By outiide work w'ith 
the intention of graduating with the Seniors we will lose Charles Replogle, Cecil Dear- 
dorff, and Vearl Hoover. Early in the fall we began to think of our future obliga- 
tions to the Seniors and gave a social. Later we gave a successful class vaudeville. 
The proceeds of both are to apply on the expenses of the Junior-Senior reception. We 
have contracted to manage the Lyceum for the next year. About Christmas we gave 
our pride a stimulant by buying our class pins, the best of school remembrances. 

We have in each year tried to do our best with our eventual problems and believe 
that we have done, at least, fairly well. We believe that the respect we have for the 
faculty and for our brother students is m.itual. The rest, of course, can be no more 
than hopes and prophecy. We hope that we may be able to serve the Seniors well in 
their last and best days at good old Hagerstown High School, — to entertain them at the 
reception, to assist their friends at the commencement and to be their waiters at the 
Alumni Banauet. We prophesy that we will l^e able to eciual their dignity and main- 
tain theirs or a better standard next year. , 

CLASS ROLL. 

Agnes Adrion Ruth Dutro Helen Replogle 

Claircie Benson Omar Davidson George Wogoman 

Ruth Eenbow Ruth Gladfelter Herman Teetor 

Charles Bunnell Allen Harris Garnet \'ores 

Rhoda Clin Russell Hayes David Lilly 

Eva White Guy Johnson Lloyd Bur'kett 

Thomas Cheesman Hazel Ratte Harry Ulrich 

Keith Farlow Douglas Pierce Blanch Petty 

Thehm. Chadwick Gordon Murray Harvey Petty 

Marv Dutro Wilfred Knap]-) 




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1922 


The EPITOME 


Page 31 



SOPHOMORE CLASS RETROSPECT. 



We entered H. H. S. as Freshmen in September ,1920, as green as anyone could 
be. We had all the classes laughing at us, but before a month had passed we had 
lost most of our greenness. 

There were fifty-three of us, which was the largest Freshman class ever entered 
in H. H. S. until this year. We soon held a meeting and elected Raymond Weber as 
president, Ellen Hoover as treasurer, and Dudley Cain as secretary, chose pink and 
white as our colors and sweet peas as the floowers. At the end of the school year 
we had lost only four members. 

In September, 1921, after a glorious vacation, we again climbed the worn stairs of 
our dear old H. H. S., as Sophomores. We elected Helen Scott as president, Ellen 
Hoover as secretary and treasurer, and chose maroon and old gold as our colors and 
American P>eauty roses as the class flowers. 

During the first semester Martha Wisehart left us and in the second semester 
George Thralls. At the opening of the se:ond semester we were very glad to enroll 
two new members, Howard Marlatt and Glen Johnsonbaugh, making our class as 
follows : ■ 



Raymond Weber 
Dudley Cain 
Olga Thalls 
Hazel Foulke 
Rudolph Kirby 
Helen Rhoades 
Lillie \^'ood 
Emma Jean Smith 
Carl Stabler 
Maurice Cromer 
Josephine Foyst 
Gretchen Gauntt 
Edith Conway 
Glen Johnsonbaugh 



Helen Scott 
Margaret Clampitt 
Jeanette Hoover 
Kenneth Downing 
Anna Rinehart 
Luther Dines 
Winnogene La Vehe 
Chester Phenis 
Wilbur May 
j\Iary Smith 
Mary Bland 
iWanda Ulrich 
Dimple Bookout 
Harold May 



Ellen Hoover 
Marfield Cain 
Edith Thalls 
La Verne Ilarter 
Marjorie Marlatt 
Ruth Wiseh:.rt 
Smith Doughty 
Ruth Moss 
Thelma McGrew 
Fern Swoveland 
Clarence Thompson 
Floyd Bell 
Howard Nhirlatt 
Barbara Hammer 



Although we have had a very success Til term, we are all looking forward to our 
Junior year, where more responsibilities will be placed upon our shoulders to test our 
strength. We are hoping to meet next year and have the same old class, but have a 
new school building in which to continue to pursue the Lamp of Knowledge. 




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1922 


The KPl'IOME 


Page 33 



FRESH iM AX CLASS RETROSPl-XT. 

On the 6th day of September, 1921, sixt)'-two boys and girls gathered in the as- 
sembly room of the old school building ready to Ijegin their career as High Sclioo' 
students. We have lost a few of our class-mates since then, liut we are still the largest 
class in the Hagerstown High School. As high school life was altogether new to us, 
we were a source of great amusement to our upper-classmen for a while, but when we 
became acquainted with our teachers, and got our classes arranged, we began to try 
to show old H. H. S. that although we were a little backwards we had the school 
spirit. 

After about three weeks of school our class met and elected for imr class i)res;dent. 
Elenor Wissler, for vice-president, Gordon Parsons, and for class secretary and treas- 
urer, Charles Forkner. We chose old rose and silver for our class colors and sweet 
peas for our class flowers. 

As the Freshman Class of 1921 is the largest class that has ever entered Hagers- 
town High School, it can easily be foreseen that with the school spirit the class is 
showing that we will not only be great in number but that we will also be great in 
deeds. We are very well represented in the different lines of school life, ha\ing mem- 
bers of the class represented in the Orches'ra, Second Basket Ball Team, Widespread 
Staff, Board of Control, and the H. H. S. Band. 

The members of the Freshman Clas., are : 



Richard Bohannon 
Freeda Benbow 
Louise Burgess 
James Barron 
Charles Burgess 
Dorothy Broomback 
Pauline Bolser 
Robert Carpenter 
Albert Cooms 
Katherine Johnson 
Hilda Jones 
Mable Hardwick 
Alta Hoover 
Clark Gordon 
\'irgil Hunt 
Ola Chamness 
Georgia Holiday 
Robert Endsley 



Charles Forkner 
Virginia Gilmore 
Mildred Gladfelter 
David Carpenter 
George Clampitt 
Edna Bernhardt 
Alary Rinehart 
Mary June Ramsey- 
Cyril Strickler 
Guy Scruggs 
Laurence Pitman 
Dorothy Porter 
Lucille Pierce 
Gordon Parsons 
Cra Murray 
Evelyn Kelly 
Marcella Pierce 
Jyle May 
Homer Laudig 



Pauline Kuhn 
Pauline Knapp 
Joseph Harlan 
Carver Brown 
Nannie Raft'e 
Josephine Small 
Willie \\'eaver 
Kenneth Thornburg 
X'irginia \Miite 
Lulu May Wood 
Lelan Yoke 
Hannah Woolard 
Elenor Wissler 
Ruth Replogle 
Clem Paul 
Jerome Reynolds 
Robert Werking 
Leonard Culey 




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1922 


The EPITOME 


Pacr 3 5 



THE JUNIOR UK, 1.1 RETRUSl'ECT. 

Several youngsters were seen wandering upstairs on that memorable first day of 
school among them Mr. Hanen. Doubtless, he decided that Hagerstown expected every 
person to find his place and fill it. At any rate, he came upon the alhimpcirtant Donald 
Martin whose good judgment told him that this might be the "new teacher," and not 
a Dalton township Freshman. Soon everybody rushed for their prospective seats and 
late comers were sorry to find that they sat up in front. 

We got under way to do as we pleased as long as we pleased to do as the teach- 
er wished, and sailed in fair seas until one of our number, Mr. John Mathers, was taken 
from us by sickness. 

At intervals more or less regular those "tests" came when we all were forced to 
admit we had our Waterloo. Thanksgiving came and Christmas with its horrible ex- 
ams, and the prophecy of the Book was fulfilled in one being taken and the other left. 

Community Hall echoed with the sound of our voices as W'icln' made a basket; 
and admirers and rooters saw our banners gleam at the tournament. 

Then came that change of program when Miss IMcCracken, whose i)atience was worn 
to a frazzle by those trying Freshies, came to ride us terribh- (if we didn't work). 

We Manual trained the planes, at least, Jean Stonecipher did, for he tried nine 
times in three weeks to find a plane that would work without pushing. We were sav- 
ing, too, of our elbow grease. 

We, the eights, welcomed the sevens to our presence and expect them to pass the 
good old fashioned Junior High Welcome to others for we aim to be regulars to those 
glorious Tuesday afternoon affairs when we come to the auditorium of our New Build- 
ing. 

Ye:, we've been treated fairly, reasonalily so? Still when you consider that a fel- 
low has those sleepy Indian Summer days, bad winter colds and spring fever and 
school together we really did deserve our good grades and can thus account for the 
good nature of Mr. Hanen. 

We are now about to try a new work, vacation, and we highly resohe that we 
shall make the Purple and Gold shine higher than ever before : that we will push the 
Cart of Progress harder and be to our next vear's teachers the well-nigh impossible, 
"model students." .^^^-^ 

2017000 



Page 36 


The EP"lTOME 


1922 



SOCIAL NOTES. 

The Freshmen, Hke the other classmen, have had few social activities. In the early 
fall the_v indulged in a weiner roast in a grove south of town. The ailair was chaper- 
oned by Aliss Rounds and Aliss Willis. As thi.s was a very enjoyable affair they next 
jjlanned a farewell party for Helen hleming. This party was well attended and every- 
one had a wonderful time. 

The Freshmen displayed their jjatriotism to the Seniors when they announced it 
their intention to give a box social. This box social was in the hands of the Freshmen 
but each class helped in the program. The box social was a success financially and we 
beliexe that everyone enjo_\ed the affair in spite of th? trick that the weather played 
on us. 

Although the .'>(iphomores have been very busy this year they have had a few min- 
utes to spend in social activities away from the weary hum-drum of school life. ( )ne 
of the most interesting features of thiC }ear was the Hallowe'en social given ])v the 
Seniors to which the Sojibomores contril)Ute(l a side-show composed of the "World's 
Fattest Lady," the "Bloodless Operation" and a world-wide famous Zoo and Museum. 

Everyone surely remembers the horns which were sold at the invitational tourney. 
The\' were quite a success so far as the noise was concerned. 

The Sophomores staged a one-act playlet at the Freshman box social. It was loud- 
ly applauded and everyone was surprised at the excellent actors and actresses who par- 
ticipated in this jilaylet, and were glad to find such talent in our midst. 

The class divided itself into two sections for a contest in selling "Epitomes." The 
side selling the most annuals was given a wonderful spread by the losers. 

The Juniors have had more to do in the way of school responsibility this year and 
have consequently had little time for social stunts. They gave a Vaudeville in the early 
part of February. This was dift'erent from anything ever given by any class hereto- 
fore, but we have heard that variety is the spice of life. The vaudeville was a financial 
success and the evening was a very enjoyable one for the audience and also those who 
participated in the vaudeville ( ?). 

When the Seniors gave the Hallowe'en social, the Juniors gave an entertainment 
in one of the rooms. Herman Teetor and Gordon Murray, in striking costumes, gave a 
musical i)rogram, which we know was well worth the admission fee, by the peals of 
laughter which came from the room. 

At the tournament the Juniors sold crackerjack. It wasn't \ery much of a success 
financially, but as they were excused from classes one afternoon to make the cracker- 
jack, they call it time well spent. 

The Junior Class has started a movemecial on the school ground. As is the usuai 
case, the weather was bad, but it was well attended and it was quite a success. 

The Junior Class has started a movement to bring the Lyceum Course to Hagers- 
town next year, so remember and buy your ticket and help them out. 



CALENDAR 



Sept. 5. — Opening and signing up 
Attendance 155. 

Sept. 6. — A few Freshies only 60 
enrolled. 

Sept. 7. — Program ti-y-ont ; few con- 
flicts. 

Sept. 9. — Freshman Initiation was 
C|nite f-f-funny because some thought 
they would just get a f-f-few licks but 
they got f-f -fooled. 

Sept. 12. — Lots of pep for Monday. 

Sept. 13. — Thomas Cheesn-.an's is vic- 
torious in his campaign for Glee Clul] 
Presidency. 

Sept. IS. — English I, \'irginia White- 
"Love doesn't mean anything in tennis." 

Sept. 16. — Beginning of Tennis Tour- 
nament. 

Sept. 19. — Quizzes are getting to be 
quite popular. 

Sept. 20.— "Stick to High School," 
by Mr. Wissler. 

Sept. 21. — A talk on Responsibility 
by Mr. Wiant, which was enjoyed very 
much b}' everyone. 

Sept. 22. — ^We were entertained the 
first hour bv Mr. Marshall from In- 
diana Central College of Indianapolis, 
with several selection from Merchant of 
Venice and a couple of selections of a 
comic nature. 

Sept. 23. — Physical Geography Class 
goes on a scoot to Abington. Lots of 
eats. 

Sept. 26. — Quizzes are getting more 
than popular — that is, with the teachers 
only. 

Sept. 27. — Douglas P. : "Did I sneeze 
on you Miss Rounds ? Te-he-hc-haw- 
he-he!" 

Sept. 28. — A'lembers elected for Board 
of Control. Representative from each 
class nominate members of the Wide- 
spread staff. 

Sept. 30. — Election of members of 
Widespread staff. Seniors were sliot, 
but by a l>;odak. 

Oct. 4. — First meeting of Widespread 
staff. 

Oct. 5. — Lyceum proposition giving a 
real boost 

Oct. 6. — Miss Willis : "We are en- 
joying the whistling solo very much, es- 
pecially from Juniors and Seniors." 



First months' report cards are given 
out. Some began C-ing things as C's. 

C)ct. 7. — The ^Earlhamites return to 
Earlham. Homesick, I guess. 

Oct. 9. — V. W : "We had a stag party 
the other night, too'' 

Oct. 10. — Basket-ball is Ijeginning to 
show up a little north of the school 
house. 

Oct. 11. — Celebration of Riley and 
Discovery Day at Music period. What 
kind of a drum is a bass drum, Laverne? 

(Jet. 12. — What makes Kieth so sweet 
that all the flies bother him ? 

Oct. 13. — Florse shoe toiu'nament 
starts. 

Oct. 14. — Say, Sara, let's go to Rich- 
mond to see that show. 

Oct. 17. — Bookkeeping class — BAH ! 
Say, Harvey, j'ou make a good calf. 

Oct. 18 — Omar Davidson tardy for 
the first time since yesterday. 

CJct. 19 — Some soft English for Sen- 
iors to-day. 

Oct. 20-21 — Vacation for two days. 
State Teachers' Association. 

Oct. 22 — Everybody sleepy. I won- 
der? Why Monday of course. 

C)ct. 23 — First L3'ceum number — a 
real success. 

Oct. 2^1 — Say, Harvey, 
Lyceum funnj' last night ? 
you get it any way ? 

Oct. 27 — Everybody oh ! so sleepy. 
Wonder why? Ask Guy what time it 
was — he knows. 

Oct. 28 — ■ Basket-ball game with 
Lewisville. Tough luck boys, but you 
got the real stuff in you. 

Oct. 29 — Hallowe'en social given by 
Seniors. We'll sure have to hand it to 
the Juniors, especially to the grand ;\lex- 
ican general and his large army. 

Oct. 31 — Everybody still talking bas- 
ket-ball. That's right — lot's of pep ! 

Nov. 1 — Miss Neif is still testing the 
boys' voices in the Glee Club. Allen, 
you have a wonderful voice. 

Nov. 2 — We get our first issue of the 
Widespread. Not much force but it 
will succeed. 

Nov. 4 — Everybody planning to go to 
Spiceland, even our band. 



wasn't the 
Where did 



Nov. 5— ]\Iiss • to :\Ir. Pitts: 

"Here's your hat and coat, what's your 
hiirr_\' ?" 

Xov. 7 — Aliss Rounds, standing with 
her finger on the button: "The bell's 
ringing." Not a sound can lie heard. 
Say, Miss Rounds, 3'ou have a good 
imagination. 

Nov. 8 — Armistice Day program en- 
joyed by ever}'one. 

Nov. 9 — Everybody think's they're 
going to be snowed under. Our first big 
snow. 

Nov. 10 — Mark: "You cannot make 
a perfect vacuum." Gordon, pointing 
toward Mark's head : "There's one." 

Nov. 11 — Armistice Day. Everybody 
staying home. I wonder why ? \Miy, 
no school, of course. 

Nov. 1-1 — Everybody gets their mug 
shot. 

Nov. 13 — Mis^ Rounds sure likes to 
grade pajiers. Sb.e gave another Book- 
keeping quiz. Some high grades. 

Nov 16 — Seniors have a class meet- 
ing. They decide to give a play. 

Nov. 17 — Some game with Kennard. 
We only beat them 44-8. 

Nov. 21 — Beginning of Community 
Hall. Hurray now for basket-ball. 

Nov. 22 — Xews that there will be no 
school Friday. 

Nov. 2-1 — We enter tourney at Foun- 
tain. Cambridge wins, but wait until 
we get another chance at them. 



Nov. 25 — We beat Middletov 



29 to 



19. You tell 'em we can beat them. 

Xov. 28 — First rehearsal of our play 
of "And Home Came Ted." 

Nov. 29 — \\'e play New Castle at 
New Castle. A real game. N. C. 18 — ■ 
H. S. 12. Best yet. ' 

Nov. 30 — \\t all get our mugs shot 
for annual. 

Dec. 2 — Poor Centerville. We beat 
them only 38-10. 

Dec. 3 — Juniors all looking forward 
to getting their class pins. 

Dec. 6 — Boys' Glee Club gets their 
mugs shot again. Somebody had their 
legs crossed the first time. 

Dec. 7 — Juniors planning to give a 
vaudeville. 

Dec. 8 — Play practice. 

Dec. 9 — Well, one more victim added 
to our list. Cambridge 17 — H. H. S. 25. 

Dec. 12 — Wichy getting quite popular 
.vith the girls. Oh say ! Freshies. 



and -Miss Willis 
to Christmas. I 

this Vs'eek-end — 

what makes Eva 



Dec. 13 — Third number of Lyceum — 
Caveny Company. 

Dec. 14 — Teacher: What is a radio 
station? 

Hazel F : A place where they make 
radium.. 

Dec. 15— Mr. Pitts 
are looking forward 
wonder why. 

Dec. 16 — X^o game 
weak-end, 

Dec. 19 — I wonder 
blush when she couies in the Commercial 
Room. 

Dec. 2C — A Christmas program was 
given. Enjo3'ed by everyone. Several 
visitors present. 

Dec. 21 — Flelen R. goes to Richmond 
to see Santa Claus. Did he say he 
would bring you something if you were 
a nice little girl ? 

Dec. 22 — Examinations seem to be 
quite popular to-day. 

Dec. 23 — Only one-half day of school. 

Dec. 25 — Mr. Pitts is married. 

Dec. 30 — One more v!Ctor\-. H H. S. 
38 — Kennard 7. 

Dec. 31— Knightstown 12— H. H. S. 
31. 

Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 — A New Year's 
party call on Air. Pitts and family. 

Jan. 2 — Back at school. Everyone 
still looks sleepy from Xew Year's. 
Dedication of community hall. 

Jan. 3 — ]\Iiss Willis not back on the 
job. Mrs. Pennington substituting. 

Jan. 4 — Miss Rounds also showing a 
diamond. I guess everyone has the 
fever. 

Jan. 5 — Centerville defeated. Center- 
ville 16 — Hagerstown 39. 

Jan. 6 — Economy meets their defeat. 

Jan 8 — We missed Harvey for sev- 
eral days. We couldn't see him for his 
mustache. 

Jan. 9 — Bill is calling himself a man. 
He also got a misplaced eyebrow. 

Jan. 10 — Seniors get off two days for 
dress rehearsal for the play. 

Jan. 12 — The play a real success. 

Jan. 13 — Airs. Pennington leaves. Re- 
ports are given out for the first sem- 
ester's work. 

Jan. 14— Defeated. H. H. S. 19— 
Knightstown 20. 

Jan. 16— Miss Billy Miller of Earl- 
ham College gave some readings before 
the general assembly. 



Jan. ]7 — Mr. Walter Ratliff, member 
of the Wayne County Historical Society 
tells pioneer stories. 

Jan. 18 — Chang'e of iirogram. 

Jan. 19 — Everyone looking forward 
to tournament. 

Jan. 20 — Juniors and Seniors get oft 
to get ready for tournament. 

Jan. 21 — ^Tovn-nament a big day. Hag- 
erstown victorious. 

Jan. 23 — Mr. Poston taking Mrs. 
Pennington's place. 

Jan. 24 — Miss Neff is ill. Mr. Shu- 
mate, evangelist, gives a few songs ac- 
companied by Mrs. Hovver on piano. 

Jan. 25 — Widespread staff meets and 
re-organized. 

Jan. 26 — General assembly — a resur- 
rection of the Widespread. Beany Ben- 
bow gets her first calling-down in high- 
school. 

Jan. 27 — ^Cambridge defeated once 
more. H. H. S. 21 — Cambridge 9. 

Jan. 30 — Miss Rounds and Miss Xeff 
back after illness. 

Jan. 31 — Senior class have a meeting. 
The following are discussed : Com- 
mencement, invitations, baccalaureate — 
where, when, which, how, why, etc. 

Feb. 1 — Annual proposition ])ut be- 
fore H. S. Subscription blanks are 
passed out. 

Feb. 2 — Secret conference held in 
hall. Wonder what it was all about. 
Ask Chester Phenis, I think he remem- 
bers. 

Feb. 3 — \\'ell, .Middletown, you're 
good, but not good enough for us. Hag- 
er.'-town 42 — Middletown 29. 

Feb. 4 — A real match. Pizton 11 — 
Hagerstown 10. 

Feb. 6 — Last niunber of Lyceum — 
Apollo Saxaphone Quartette. 

Feb. 7 — Juniors decide to bring Lyc- 
eum to town next year. 

Feb. 8 — Juniors give vaudeville. 

Feb. 9 — Some of the seniors must 
have T. B, Now, girls, I think you 
might ask us to go along. Who? I 
mean H. R. H. B. 

Feb. 10 — Did v.^e beat Spiceland? I 
say we did. Spiceland 13 — H. H. S. 22. 

Feb. 13 — Everyone looking forward 
to our game with New Castle. 

Feb. 14 — Miss Xefif gives a lecture on 
the types and evolution of American 
music. 



Feb. 15 — Eng. HI — Mr. Poston 
thinks some of his students are such 
wonderful readers. 

Feb. 16 — Some wish it would rain : 
our Civics is getting so dry. 

Feb. 17 — New Castle beats us but 
they sure had to go some. Only 37-30. 

Feb. 20 — Some students think Mr. 
Wissler would make a good dog-catcher. 
We might gi\-e him a trial any way. 

Feb. 21 — Sophomore class 1009f for 
the subscrijition of Epitome. 

Feb. 22-23 — The Junior vaudeville a 
real success. 

Feb. 24 — The bonds for our new 
school sold to-day. 

Feb. 25 — Freshman Box Social a 
success, but the l)Oxes more of a success. 

Eel). 27 — We have a real Widespread 
now. Financial conditions much better. 
Balance in treasurj- — $43.14. 

Feb. 28 — Charles B. has a new red 
devil as he figures he will have to be 
traveling between here and Parker soon. 

Mar. 1 — E\-eryone looking forward to 
the tournament. 

Mar. 2 — Mr. Stahr talks about basket- 
ball and the team. Says the team is 
going faster than ever before. 

Mar. 3-4 — Tournament Friday and 
Saturday. Richmond defeated by Con- 
ners\'ille Saturday afternoon. Hagers- 
town plays in the finals with Conners- 
yille but is defeated. Hagerstown said 
to have played best and cleanest games 
at the sectional meet. 

Mar. 6 — Miss McCracken to Virginia 
G. : "You and Witchy are getting too 
sweet." 

Mar. 7 — Mr. Ra}', of Richmond, gave 
us a talk on the great men of America. 

Mar. 8 — Fine spring days. Every- 
body feeling fine. 

Mar. 9 — Six seniors with the spring 
fever and played hooky. Sugar water 
was running fine. 

Mar. 10 — Seniors have a class meet- 
ing and contract for the Madrigal Glee 
Club of Earlham. 

Mar. 13 — Sara W. looked quite 
happy. \\'e hear she has a new sister. 

Mar. 14 — We have a wirele.s pro- 
gram during the music period. 

Mar. 15 — Vacation in Physical Geog- 
raphy class once more. Teacher absent. 




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1922 


The EPl'IOMK 


Page 45 



COURSE OF STUDY 

Three courses of study are offered in our hig-h school. They may be designated 
as Academic, Practical Arts, and Commercial Courses. The Academic course leads to 
college entrance, the Practical Arts course gives an opportunity to emphasize Manual 
Arts, Etornestic Arts, and Agriculture and the Commercial Course offers an elementary 
business training. Pupils who expect to go to college are urged to learn the entrance 
requirements of the college which they expect to enter. Thiriy-two credits are required 
for graduation. 



GENERAL REQUIRExMENTS. ' "• 

(Major means three years and minor two years.) 

Academic high school subjects required of all : 

(1) One major consisting of English. 

(2) A second major selected from mathematics, foreign language, science or 
history ; or two minors selected from the same range of studies. 

(3) One year in each of the following subjects must be included in above, or 
taken as additional work : 

(a) Mathematics, one year. Either formal or applied mathematics. 

(b) Science, one year. 

(c) History, which may include civic^ one year. 



Page 46 


The EPITOME 


1922 



The following represents a suggestive group of 
offered : 



subjects in each year of the courses 



Academic 




Pr.\ctic.\l Arts 




Commercial 




Ninth Year 


Cr. 


Ninth Year 


Cr. 


Ninth )'ear 


Cr. 


English 


2 


English 


2 


English 


2 


Algebra 


2 


Algebrn 


2 


Algebra 


2 


Foreign Language 


2 


Foreign Language 


2 


Foreign Language 


2 


t Spanish or Latin ) 




( Spanish or Latin) 




(Spanish or Latin) 




General Science 


2 


General Science 


2 


General Science 


2 


or 




or 




or 




Manual Training 


2 


Manual Training 


2 


Manual Training 


■> 


or 




or 




or 




Domestic Science 


2 


Dome'tic Science 


7 


Domestic Science 


1 


Music 


H 


Music 


M 


Music 


% 


Tenth Year 


Cr. 


Tenth Year 


Cr. 


Tenth Year 


Cr. 


English 


2 


English 


2 


English 


2 


Geometry 


2 


Geometry 


2 


Geometry 


2 


Foreign Language 


2 


Foreign Language 


2 


Foreign Language 


2 


Early European History 2 


Early European History' 2 


Commercial Geog. 


1 


Music 


'A 


Adv! M. T. & Mechan- 




Typewriting 


1 






ical Draw. 


9 


Music 


Ya 






Adv. Dom. Science 


2 










Music 


% 






Eleventh Year 


Cr. 


Elei'enth Year 


Cr. 


Eleventh Year 


Cr. 


English 


2 


English 


2 


English 


2 


Adv. Algebra 


1 


Modern History 


-> 


Physics 


2 


Solid Geometry 


1 


Physical Geography 


2 


Com. Arithmetic 


2 


Foreign Language 


2 


Physics 


2 


Bookkeeping 


2 


]\Iodern History 


2 


Agriculture 


2 


Typewriting 


1 


Physical Geography. 


2 


Music 


H 


Stenography 


2 


Physics 


2 






Music 


Ya 


Music 


Ya 










T7velfth Year 


Cr. 


T7i'elfth Year 


Cr. 


Tzi'elfth Year 


Cr. 


English 


2 


English 


2 


English 


2 


U. S. History 


1 


U. S. History 


1 


U. S. History 


1 


Civics 


1 


Civics 


1 


Civics 


1 


Physics 


2 


Physics 


2 


Adv. T. W. 


1 


Physiology 


1 


Agriculture 


2 


Adv. Stenography 


2 


Com. Arithmetic 


2 


Com. Arithmetic 


2 


Com. Law 


1 


Music 


Va 


Music 


Vi 


Music 


Va 



1922 


The EPITOME 


Pace 47 




BOARD OF CONTROL. 

The Board of Control takes care of the High School money bag. All money com- 
ing from school activities is in charge of this organization. This Board is composed of 
six members, four from the student body, the principal, who is chairman, and another 
faculty representative who acts in the capacity of secretary and treasurer. 

As the size of our school has increased, the funds handled by the classes. Athletic 
Association and the many attendant activities, have grown in proportion, and keeping 
the dimes and charters on the correct side of the ledger has been a task. This work 
has been done in an excellent manner this year by Miss Rounds, our secretary, whose 
books show that upwards of $2,000.00 have passed through the hands of the board. 
The members of this, our first board of control, are : W. J- Stahr, President ; Eliza- 
beth Rounds, Secretary-Treasurer ; Aline Hower, Keith Farlow, Raymond \\'eber. Car- 
ver Brown. 



Page 48 


The EPITOME 


1922 



GRADUATES OF HIGH SCHOOL. 




1881. 




John M. Lontz 




*Charles W. Mann 




1882. 




* Frank Wimmer 




Frank Newcome 


*Granvilk- Allen 


1883. 




Etta Conrad ( Trent ) 




Phebe Knode (Taylor) 


Addie Mathews (Bowman) 




Eddy Mason 


MoUie Knode ( Hershberger) 


Clement Mason 


Ida Starr (Thornliurg) 


1884. 




Katie Pre bauCTh (Adams) 




Lizzie Elliott 


Sibyl Pitts (Pratt) 


1886. 




Pearl Clifton 




^^■Ella Follen 


Emma Mathews ( Ilr.iighman ) 


Anna Billing 


Otis Parsons 


1887. 




*Channing Rudy 




Clarkson D. W'issler 


Irvincf lUount 


1888. 





Terry Walker 

George Dutro 

Frank Zook 

Mary Etta Allen (Hayworth) 



Leora Kichol on (Teetor) 
Delia Teetrr (Rudy) 
Tina Replogle ( Keeyer) 

Clarence Purdy 
Hattie Ault 

*Florence Walker (Kidwell) 
Blanche Mathews (Lesh) 

John Foutz 
Lewis Ulrich 
Dayid Woollard 

Ina Ault (Canaday) 
Libbie Keever (Brown) 
*Maggie LTlrich (Dutro) 

Nellie Purdy (Watts) 
Aurora Cory 



1889. 

1890. 
1891. 
1892. 

1893. 

1894. 
1895. 



Clifford Canaday 

Harry Ault 

*Stella Fritz 

Katie Backinstoce (Copeland) 



Frank Mathevys 
*Katie Kinsey 
Kitura Parsons 
Ora Conrad 

Eya Thurston (Theme) 



Webster Peck 
Bertha Pitman 

Lewis Hoover 
*Lazarus Fletcher 

Josie Dayis (Werking) 
Lulu Deitch 



Mattie Davis (Roush) 
Moses Keever 



Maude Mathews 
Will O. Wissler 

Tames Knapp 

Belle Bunncl 

Grace \\'illiams (Stone) 

Daisy Davis (Spencer) 



1922 


The KPirOMK 


Paci; 49 



1896. 
*Marv Davis 
Clarence Hoover 

1897. 
Ada Waltz ( Feeley ) 
Florence Hoover ( Lsenberger) 
Allen Foutz 
Wilber Davis 

1898. 
[vitina Rudy (Sells) 
Adda Thurston ( Dintiworlh ) 
Pattie Allen ( Gohring ) 



Mabel Lontz ( Ulricli ) 
Blanche Coffman (Love) 

Joshua Allen 

Charles Ault 

Ivy Leone Chamness 

*]\Iary L. Hines (Murray) 

Elmer Lumpkin 



1899. 



1900. 



1901. 



Leslie Bookout 

*Gracie May Chamness (Thornburg) 

Hattie Carrie Cheesman ( Lamar ) 

Ora May Cheesman (Bear) 

*Emory Hoover 

Lolo Wimmer (Kellogg) 



1902 



Harvey Baldwin 
Ethel Davis ( Hodson ) 
Warren Dennis 
Edith Geisler 
Eva Hadley (Helton) 

Robert Allen 

Blanche Dennis (Worl) 

Clarence Foutz 

Leona Halderman 

Jesse Lester 

Ethel Lontz (Ulrich) 

LaNella Bavender (Life) 

Karl Cheesman 

Delia Hoover (Nicholson) 



1903. 



1904. 



1905. 



Louis E. Bookout 

Brown Burns 

Rebecca Madge Hadley (Cheesman) 

Alvin WooUard 

1906. 
Irene Evans Addington (Davis) 
Carrie E. Allen 
Carrie Beatrice Miller (Harry) 



Mannando Cory (McCabe) 
Lee Reynolds 

''■Fred Hines 
Richard Ressler 
Ralph Worl 



Howard Hunter 
Frank Ault 
Fred Horine 



Frank Alacy 



Jessie Sawer 

Elnora Strickk-r (Root) . 

Joseph I\I. Wissler 

Charles Woollard 

Eva May Woollard 

Martin Hoover 
Daisy Leavell ( Fox ) 
Josie Moore (Werking) 
Jessie Newcomb (Van Matre) 
Everett F. Wimmer 



Jyle Jones 

LeRov McConnaughey 

Charles Miller 

Harry Thalls 

Ray Weaver 

Lawrence Macy 
Lula Sherry (Scott) 
Effie Stewart ( Coryell ) 
Josephine Ulrich 
Henrv Weber 
Edith Woollard 

Llarry Mills 

lone Thornburg (Van W^ert) 

Iva Wimmer (Lyons) 

*Clarence E. Lewis 

Mabel Clair Teeter (Davis) 

Earl R. Stewart 



Walter Hugh Nicholson 
Carnion N. Sells 



Page 50 


The EPITOME 


1922 



1907. 



Earl Beeman 

Hazel L. Dennis (Carson) 

Ivan W. Billing 

Maisie M. Hadley ( Hutchen 

George Bowman 

Frank Brant 

Jesse Hilar 

Elma Kerr 

Fay Moore 

Dorothy Rheinegger ( Durbin 

Grace Thalls (Foiist) 

Fred Benson 

Nettie Brown 

Clyde Geisler 

Perry Hoover 

Ira Kendrick 

Iva Thalls (Johnson) 

Ruth Allen 
Mildred Cleveland 
Hugh Deardorff 
Lona Fleniming ( fJtte ) 
Leora McCullough (Waltz) 
Charlie Waltz 

Robert Bryson 
*Opal Hoover ( Hoel ) 
Eva Roller ( Burns) 

Gladys Barr 

Cecil Dennis 

Maud Keiser (Straugh) 

Delmar Mohler 

Stewart Smith 

Nell Thalls (Coombs) 

Ruth Brown ( Pressel) 
Russel Eilar 
*Marguerite Gwin 
Grace Kirby (Waltz) 
Ruth Johnsonbaugh { Foutz ) 
Minnie Roth 

Helen Root 

Nora Thalls (Haggerty) 

Fred Leavell 

Cash Foyst 

Vera Bookout (Mohler) 

Loring Eilar 



s) 
1908. 



) 
1909. 



1910. 



1911. 



1912. 



1913. 



1914. 



1915. 



Elsie Venner Thornburgh 
Howard D. Gwin 
Hazel I. Knapp (Siersdorfer) 
Harry E. Shultz 

Letha Bowman 

Charles Brown 

Ruth Gwinn (Jones) 

Lewis Kirby 

Myrtle Newcomb (Taylor) 

Ralph Teeter 

Edith Weber (Swain) 

Xellie Brant (Gates) 

Lulu Brown 

Ralph Hughes 

Annie Hadley (Howell) 

Sanuiel LaMar 



Mark Allen 

Sylvia Dennis ( Taylor) 

Vera Flemming (Hindman) 

Ira Kendrick 

By ram .Macy 



Irene Cordell (Stover) 
Edith Heiney 



Olive Bowman 
Florence Johnson (Mitten) 
Forest Macy 
Chester Peirce 
Lawrence Strickler 



Margaret Forkner (Anderson) 
Bertha Dilling 
Walker Kidwell 
Eva Hoover (Allen) 
Edrie Moore (Bryson) 



*Rhuie McPherson (Landrith) 
Grace Walker (Lapthrone) 
Lloyd Gwin 

Esther Porter 
Leona Sella ( Ford) 
Lothair Teetor 



1922 


The EPITOME 


Hace 51 



Mahlon Rhinehart 
WiUard Stahr 
Chester Keever 
Clemmy Miller 

Dewey Bookout 
Ruth Cromer 
Herbert Doerstler 
Grace McCullough 
Lawrence Mohler 
Everett Taylor 
William Waltz 

Robert B. Stewart 
Leslie G. Smith ■. ■ 

Velma Irene Allen 
J. Edwin Purple 
Macy O. Teetor 
Thelma E. Sells 
Walter V. Wichterman 

Opal Cox (Meade) 
Marjorie Bohannon 
Farver Endsley 
Robert Gray 
Elsie Hall 
Doyle Holiday 
Floyd Hunt 

Thelma Byrket 

Emmet Cordell 

Frank Farlow 

Harold Fowler 

Grace Johnsonbaugh 

Lucille Knorp (Crrpenter) 

Lucy Williams 

Harold Adams 
Hazel Adams 
Irene Ballenger 
Goldie Bee'on 
Ressie Clark 
Elsie Covalt 
Jesse Ulrich 

*Vellet Benbow 
Lola Duggins 
Mildred Hayes 
Louise Hower 
Bessie Jones 
George LeaVelle 
Dudley Lontz 



1916. 



1917. 



1918. 



1919. 



1920. 



1921, 



Marvel Woolard 
Norman Waltz 
Paul Werking 
Herbert Myers 

Mildred Northcott (Wilson) 

Clarence Sparks 

Maude Sparks 

John Sherry 

George Sherry 

Clara Weidman 

Alma Waltz (Sherry) 

Florence E. Logan 

(iilbert Foyst 

Charles E. Riggs 

Kate E. Duggins (Lilly) 

Ernest M. Pnllard 

Dexter Peckinpaugh 

Gladys Cromer (Parsons) 

Francis Keever (Weaver) 

Robert Petty 

Wilbur Petty 

Helen Pitts 

Reba Riggs 

Harry Shafer : . 

Jean Wichterman 

Mildred Lontz 
Wilbert Rinehart 
Porter Showalter 
William Small 
Clarence Stout 
Jesse Weaver 



Olive Dilling 
Byron Forkner 
Pauling Innis 
Mildred Marlatt 
Esther Pitts 
Eva Raffe 



Ruth McKinnon 
Eugene May 
Jesse Murray 
Estelle Purdy 
Jaunita Root 
Donald Teetor 
Blanche Temple 



* Deceased. 



Page 52 


The EPITOME 


1922 



FLIRTING. 

Flirting is a branch of human endeavor that is seldom neglected. It is current in 
all countries, and is most productive where civilization is most advanced. The in- 
gredients are few, one of each of both sexes are the only requirements. Environment, 
of course, should be considered, but the most successful flirtations are conducted with- 
out regard for outside infltiences. Flirting seldom interests a gang. It's just a matter 
between a couple, unless pairs predominate. It is the basis for that outside pastime of 
picking up a Jane. 

Flirtmg primarily obviate.- formality. It is usually done with the eyes. But it is 
never certani. A good-looking woman may roll her eves in the most flirtatious manner 
A\hen her chief concern is that someone hasstepped on her corn. The methods of inter- 
preting flirtations should be accurate. Bad judgment frequently results in discomfort. 
Also shoulders. And beckons. A nice, healthy beckon insures results. Many a man has 
flirted satisfactorily, and likewise, to his sorrow. The countv clerk has a record of all 
unsuccessful flirtations. 

Flirting is done at the seashore, the main drag, the broad highway, in the elevator 
or down in the old cherry orchard. It is a diversion until it becomes an obligation. A 
flirtatious man is soon divorced from his original declarations. Mirting with death is 
not so exciting as flirting with a woman, but it is much safer. Traveling men are good 
flirts. So are soldiers and sailors. Just now flirting is not so essential as it used to 
be. The automobile has stolen much of its kick. Where once it was necessary to go 
through all the nuds and winks and wreathed smiles that led up to a conversation that 
guaranteed victory, it is only required now that the Ijrakes be applied and the invitation 
offered, "Hop in, kid." 

Flirting is fun if carefully watched. It is expensive on a train where the diner is 
attached. Some flirt for ecstac)-. ( )thers for the thrills. It may be accomplished with 
the aid of a fan, a handkerchief, or anything else that hlls the occasion. .\ little flirt- 
ing is a dangerous thing, so is a lot of it. .Vnd flirting at all times is like publishing this 
annual — not everyone can be induced to subscribe. 

— Woodyard Kindling. 




^ 




^-^tS'^5ir'V/"-t*.'r/¥ 



1922 


The EPITOMK 


Pace 55 



ORCHESTRA ACTIVITIES 

Screechingf, squecking and scraping of Idows on violins, one tooter blowin' with 
all his might, instruments called clarinets playing notes that seemed to be read off the 
music, a big slide and a dip every one in awhile from a "slider" and the waving of 
arms and stick compose the High School Orchestra for this school year. 

This orchestra, with the addition of a trombone, clarinet and violin, over that of 
last }ear, is closing not only a Successful year, but a more than successful year of har- 
mony and discords. We feel that most of the credit for the harmony made by this musi- 
cal organization, belongs to our leader, Mr. W. J. Stahr. Although he had many other 
things to look after, Mr. Stahr always found time to give the orchestra its weekly 
dose. 

The orchestra's services were requested for many school affairs, such as the Senior 
Class Play, Junior Vaudeville, Parent-Teachers' Meeting, and for several Chorus 
A^-sembly periods, when special programs were given. We also played for Farmers In- 
stitute, afternoon and evening. Of course, we would rather have gone to school, but 
as this was not possible, we tried to enjoy ourselves, and I believe we succeeded. 
In December, we enjoyed a journey of exploration into the wilds of Millville, playing 
for "soup" as we expressed it. That is, soup was the main feature of the pay for this 
trip. We love to explore, even if it is only for soup, and with the coming commence- 
ment activities, we are looking forward to more exploration trips this spring. 

Some of the pieces learned this year were pieces that required much effort and 

practice, especially so our "Jonah'' the "Three Captains." This one piece of music 

has caused more "sinking feelings" than any other piece ever played. We have played 

safe in saying, in a very creditable manner, this piece several times, we believe we are 

as no one was seen leaving during the performance. 

The work in the orchestra has been a pleasure to the members and we hope has been 
a pleasure to the listeners as well. 

The members of the orchestra are: 

W. J. Stahr, Director - ' 

J'ioliiis Clarinets 

Aline Flower Gordon Murray 

Dorothy Deardorft' Homer Laudig 

Pauline Knapp 

Cornet Fhite 

Cecil Deardorff Herman Tcetor 

Wilber May 

Cello Trombone 

*- " Helen Replogle Stanley Murray 

Piano 
Ruth Benbow *' '■ ■ 



Page 56 


The EPITOME 


1922 




BAND ACTIVITIES 

Although handicapped by the loss of our esteemed leader, Mr. Gates, who accepted 
a position as Director of Music in Piqua, Ohio, we have kept the organization together, 
throughout the winter. The band was organized in 1920 by Mr. Gates. We started 
out as a twenty-piece band, but have dwindled to seventeen at present. C)ur chief aim 
and ambition was to go to Richmond to the basket-ball tourney in '21, but could not 
do this as we had not practiced enough. 

We played several places during the summer and fall. The band put on a series 
of out-door concerts during August and Seiitember, ]);iid for bv the merchants of Haters- 
town. 

The high spot in our career was reached when we played for the military funeral 
of "Buddy" Frazier. ' 

When our basket-ball team won the invitational tournament, held here, thev attri- 
buted their success, partially, to the "pep" instilled into them by the ban<l. We have 
also played for some of the other home games. 



1922 


The EPITOME 


l'A<,f; =.7 



CHORUS ASSEMBLIES 

From the first chorus assemljly held at the beginning of this school year, these 
music periods have been the source of the life and spirit of H. I-I. S. This music work 
has not only been of interest to those already interested in music, but it has cultivated in 
everyone a desire to learn and to appreciate music, teachers as well as pupils. 

Our first work \vas with songs in a music memory contest, that was being held in 
city schools at that time. This proved to be profitable work, as we were not onlv to 
learn the name of the song and composer but to be able to recognize it when heard. 
Our instruction is in part and union singing of many ditferent types of songs, as folk, 
patriotic, marches, i^opular, and art songs. 

§ever^l times, Miss Neff has used the Victrola to represent dififerent kinds of 
music, and in this way we were enabled to hear the most talented artists, where otherwise 
it would not have been our pleasure to hear selections of this nature. By this method, 
"The Types of Evolution of American Music" was illustrated. This lecture was com- 
posed of eleven different ages of American Music from the earliest forms of Indian 
music down to the music of today, each age being ilustrated by a Victrola record. 

On the different holidays of the school year special programs were held. Music, 
readings and talks were enjoyed by those not participating. The orchestra's services 
were requested, so with an eagerness to help the)' rendered several selections on the 
different occasions. The speakers for this year have proved to be exceptional! \- fine. 
Among those were: Mes^ers Strayer, Hartley, Chadwick, Ratliff', Brown, Stu(ly and 
Ray. On another occasion, JMiss Billy Miller entertained us with readings. 

Miss Neff' has brought to us music work of such type, that it is equal to and 
better than that found in many Universities. Our appreciation and interest for this 
work is unlimited, and we have tried to co-operate and work with Miss Neff as she 
strove to enlighten us in regards to this line of w'ork. 

This music work has not been for the purpose of making musicians of all of us, 
but to cultivate in us a desire to learn the better music, enable us to take part in chorus 
work, to teach us to become intelligent listeners to good music as heard in concerts, 
and to learn to really appreciate good music. 

We have been glad to have with us this year such a competent music instructor 
as Miss Neff for our work, and we feel that if any line of work has been a success, the 
music heads the list. 




O 

l-H 

O 



1922 


The EPITOME 


I'ai.e 59 



THE GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 



The Girls' Glee Club was organized under the super\ision of the music director, 
Miss Neff, at the beginning of this school year, with a number far exceeding that of 
last year. Fifty-six girls became members, with officers elected as follows : Ruth Ben- 
bow, president; Sara Warfel, vice-president: Josephine Foyst, secretary; Aline Hower, 
treasurer. ; 

The forty minutes devoted to the Club work each week, has been a period looked 
forward to from one Monday to the next. Miss Neff says the one trouble with our sing- 
ing is that we sing too loud and make too much noise. We have tried to use the soft 
pedal, but we are sure no one with such musical inspiration in them as we have had can 
lock up the music. Although working under this difficulty, we have tried, and hope 
all of our efforts have not been in vain. New books were purchased this year making 
our enthusiasm for singing still greater, as these books are much better than the old 
ones. 

( Hir public appearances have not been numerous, except for a Parent-Teachers' 
Meeting, a few ajjpearances before the High School Assemlily, tmd a concert to l)e held 
in the spring. 

Glee Club work is of great value to the pu])il, as it is a means by which a pupil 
may be drilled in part singing, the instructor ha\ing more time to help the indivifluals 
that desire and need help. 

Many girls enjoy singing much more than recitations, that they are very lucky to 
have at that hour. This partly accounts for our enlarged membership. 

The Club work has been profitable and although we do not have any promising 
McCormicks with us, who knows how many Galli-Curcis may develop from this musi- 
cal organization. 



Glee membership : 

Martha Allen 
Agnes Adrion 
Helen Barron 
Ruth Benbow 
Freeda Benbow 
Edna Bernhardt 
Mary Bland 
Dorothy Bookout 
Louise Burgess 
Rhoda Cain 
Margaret Clampitt 
Edith Conway 
Thelma Chadwick 
Mary Dutro 
Ruth Dutro 
Josephine Foyst 
Hazel Foulke 
Virginia Gilmore 
Dorothy Brumback 



Ruth Gladfelter 
Mildred Gladfelter 
Georgia Holaday 
Ellen Hoover 
Jeanette Hoover 
Barbara Hammer 
La Verne Harter 
Aline Hr)wer 
Hilda Jones 
Pauline Knapp 
Winnogene La Velle 
Minuie Manifold 
Tvlarjorie Marlatt 
Etoile Marshall 
Ruth Moss 
Marcella Pierce 
Lucile Pierce 
Dorothy Porter 
Mary June Ramsey 



Nannie Raffe 
Hazel Raffe 
Anna Rinehart 
Mary Rinehart 
Helen Rhoades 
Helen Riggs 
Ruth Rejilogle 
.Josephine Small 
Emma jean Smith 
Fern Stewart 
Fern Swoveland 
Olga Thalls 
Sara Warfel 
Virginia White 
Eleanor Wissler 
Lillie Wood 
Lula Wood 
Hannah Woolard 






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Charles Fork 
Allen Harris 
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Charles Burgess 
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Thomas Cheesiran 
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■J 




THE SQUAD 



1922 


The EPITOME 


PAfiF. 63 



THE SQUAD 

In the spring of '21, the prevaiHng opinion was that the team of '21-'22 would not 
be up to the standard set by the "Victory Fi\e," but Coach Bill told us otherwise. His 
prediction was fulfilled, as our present squad is the best one that ever represented Hagers- 
town High on a basket-ball floor. 

When it was about time to open our basket-ball season, we found that we were 
without a floor to play our schedule on. Our peppy coach got busy and built us a hall, 
though with a great deal of trouble. Meanwhile, the squad was without a hall to prac- 
tice in and only got to "feel the leather" at our scheduled games, which, of course, 
took place away from home. This easily accounted for our first few games, in which 
we were defeated. We took it gamely, however, but with a determination to retaliate in 
our return games, as our new hall would soon be completed. Starting with the accjuisi- 
tion of our new hall, the team began a string of victories, which rather surprised and 
pleased us. The team steadily got better, and reached the "peak" of their rise in ability 
about the time of the district tourney. At the height of this peak, a very superior brand 
of ball was displayed. 

The squad which represented H. H. S. at the district tourney, consisted of two 
veterans, three acquisitions of last year and three of this years' men. They all showed 
up well, playing in the finals against Conners\ille, who defeated the local squad 32 to 
10. This is not surprising when we think that Connersville is some twelve times as 
large as Hagerstown. However, we took first place in the comparative scoring for the 
entire tournament, the totals being, Hagerstown, 224; Opponents, 90. 

We will lose three members of the squad this vear, two by graduation and another 
leaving the city. The pros]iects for next year are rather gloomy at present, but if we 
are able to secure Coach Bill we are sure of putting a winning team on the floor. 



1922 


The EPITOME 


Page 65 



PERSONAL 

W.MAY: Playing his first year on the varsiety, "Bill" delivered in fine style at 
forward and promises to become a valuable asset to any team. Millville is his home 
port. 

STOHLER: This diminutive forward proved himself large in deeds. He has 
the speed and was a factor in each victory which our boys won. 

H. MAY. "Cocky" lived up to his title and could always be counted on for points. 
Centerville is going to get a real basket-ball player when they get this forward. 

DOUGHTY: Our big back guard proved to be a tower of strength in all depart- 
ments of the game. The low scores made by opponents are a testimonial of the work 
done by this good-natured giant. 

LILLY : This consistent player was our utility man. Much credit is due this cog 
in our machine for the splendid work performed. 

CAIN : Another big-little man who played his first \ ear on the varsity. .\t center, 
Cain proved his ability as a basket-ball player, handling the leather here in great form. 

HAYS : Sickne.-s seriously set our team back when it kept Hays out of our games. 
The few games in which he participated he played creditably in the floor guard position. 

All district center ; Medal for ;HfMfo/ attitude ARNIM ROOT: His deeds speak 
for them-elves. When Arnim leaves us we shall have remembrances of some of the 
best basket-ball playing ever seen in this district. 

HAROLD W: As captain of the fighting squad of '21-22. "Wichy" piloted his 
team in a manner which upheld the responsibility which he assumed. His shoes will be 
difficult to fill. 

STANLEY: Stanley was always on hand to do his part in keei)ing our squad in 
trim. He played a guard position. 

REPLOGLE : Replogle was our tenth man entered for the section tournament. 
We think he should have come out for the varsity at the beginning of the season. 



Page 66 


The EPITOME 


1922 



SCHEDULE AND SUMMARY, 1921-22 



TEAM 



DATE 



PLACE 



H. H. S. 



OPP. 



Lewisville 


Oct. 


28 


There 




21 


22 


Spiceland 


Nov. 


4 


There 




12 


18 


Mooreland 


Nov. 


11 


There 




11 


16 


Kennard 


Nov. 


18 


New C 


astle 


44 


8 


Middletown 


Nov. 


25 


There 




29 


22 


New Castle 


Nov. 


29 


There 




8 


12 


Centerville 


Dec. 


2 


There 




2,7 


10 


Kennard 


Dec. 


30 


Here 




56 


7 


Knightstown 


Dec. 


31 


Here 




31 


12 


Centerville 


Jan. 


6 


Here 




39 


9 


Economy 


Tan. 


7 


Here 




55 


14 


Cambridge City 


Ian. 


10 


Here 




25 


17 


Knightstown 


Jan. 


14 


There 




19 


20 


*Tiiurnament 


Jan. 


21 


Here 








Richmond 


Jan. 


24 


There 




16 


32 


Cambridge City 


Tan 


27 


There 




21 


9 


Middletown 


Feb. 


3 


Here. 




42 


29 


Lizton 


Feb. 


4 


There 




10 


11 


Spiceland 


Feb. 


10 


Here 




32 


13 


New Caslte 


Feb. 


17 


There 




30 


37 


Lewisville 


Feb. 


24 


Here 


Total 


56 


25 • 


(*) 
Modoc 


584 


341 










32 


2 


Centerville 










40 


14 


Fountain City 










21 


15 




DISTRICT 


TOURNAMENT 






Al(|uina 


Mar. 


3 


Richmond 


26 


10 


Williamsburg 


Mar. 


3 


Richmond 


84 


1 


Webster 


Mar. 


4 


Richmc 


nd 


50 


4 


Fountain City 


Mar. 


4 


Richmc 


nd 


34 


15 


Connersville 


Mar. 


4 


Richmond 


10 


32 



Grand Total 871 



434 



19 22 


The EPriOMK 


Pa..e 67 



HAGERSTOWN AT THK DISTRICT TOURXEY 

The aim and ambition of our basket-ball team, was to win the tournament at 
any cost. Towards the furtherance of this aim, the team had worked hard and faith- 
fully, since the completion of our new Conmiunity building. The chief reason, it must 
be said, was that it was the wish of the Hagerstown High School, as a whole, that 
Richmond might not cop the tournament on their own floor. 

Hagerstown played AIc|uina the first game of the tournament. It was an assured 
victor)' after the first few minutes of play. Alquina was a peppy little team and fought 
on, although tliey probably knew they were defeated. The game ended 26-10. 

The next game played was Friday night. Our opponent, Williamsburg. This 
team had just been organized a few weeks earlier and had played only one scheduled 
game, which was a defeat for them. The game was a very one-sided afTair, in fact it 
was little more than signal practice for the Hagerstown S(|uad. The first half ended 
55-1. The opinion was g!\'en on all sides that Hagerstown would play in the finals, 
however, we already knew that. The final score was 84-1. The highest score made 
in Indiana during the tournament. 

Saturday morning, the H. H. S. Sf|uad mixed with the Webster delegation. 
Webster had improved since they visited Hagerstown in '21 to play our second team. 
The game ended 50-4. 

The last game of the semi-finals was between Hagerstown and Fountain City. 
This was expected to be a fast game. Hagerstown got the jump on Fountain in the 
first half. The last half they just killed time. The score was 34-15. 

The finals took place Saturday. The local s(iuad ran up against Connersville. Both 
teams were worn out by hard games and the customary snap was gone. The game 
started rather fast. Connersville seemed to score in streaks. The second half ; 
our boys plaved a better game. The playing of M. Williams is to be commented on, 
he making 18 of their i2 points. Root secured most for the locals, but Connersville 
played such a good defensive game, it was impossible to get many. Doughty, also 
played a good game. We think we would have beaten Richmond, had we played them 
in the finals. As it was, we were beaten by the best High School team that ever played 
in Richmond. The final score was 32-10. 



Page 68 


The EPITOME 


1922 



HAGERSTOWN'S FIRST TOURNAMENT 

January 21, 1922, the first tourney Hagerstown ever had, in the line of inter-high- 
school-basket-ball, was held in the Community buiUHng. 

Eight teams were invited to play, as this would fill out the day nicely, making 
seven games. 

The boys were fed at the school building. The town turned out to see the teams 
play, and there were several out-of-town spsctators. 

The first game in the morning was between Huntsville and Fountain City. This 
was believed to be tlie best game of the tournament liy a good many j;eopIe. Although 
Fluntsville was defeated, it was by a low -core. They kept Fountain on their toes 
every minute of play. The finals score was 18-13. 

The next game was between New Libson and Economy. The I'lconomy lads showed 
their accustomed pep and dash and won with a score of 6-21. 

The third game was between Hagerstown and Modoc. It is needless to say that 
the locals won in a wal':-aw'iy. Score 32-2. 

The first game after dinner was the Centerville-Cambridge game. Centerville 
sprung a surprise and whipped the Cambridge City squad 26-16. 

The next game was when Fountain City mixed with Economy. The Ecoi'omy 
squad was out-played, but died hard, fighting every minute. The score was 24-12. 

The last game in the afternoon was played by Hagerstown-Centerville. The Cen- 
terville boys were out-classed. Good team work was displaved by the locals. 
Score 40-14. 

Hagerstown plaved Fountain City in the finals. It speaks well for H. H. S. when 
it is known that the much-tooted Hatfield did not come through with a single field goal. 
The game was rather slow as both teams had played two games previous. Score 21-15. 



Page 70 


The EPITOME 


1922 



SPEAKING OF INVENTIONS. 

Onlv my extreme friendship and affection for Izidore Alisando Dobbs influenced 
me to assist him pecuniarily in perfecting his last idea — the vibration disintegrator. Pre- 
vious experiences with Isidore had not been the sort that would lead a hard-headed 
business man to invest money in his plans, but there is something appealing and com- 
pelling alxiut Izidore that you cannot resist. He is a real inventor, but he invents 
things that are not ])ublic necessities, even if they are private successes. When' he 
devised his wireless telephone that could be carried about like a \ase, I took most of 
the stock, and felt good about it until somebody mixed up the planes of reasonance. It 
was natural that he should come to me with his vibration disintegrator. 

"I've got a new one," he told me, coming into may office and closing the door 
carefully. 

"What is it this time?" I asked him, looking curiously at the small black box he 
had under his left arm. "A pocket storage battery?" 

"No," he snift'ed. "I lea\'e such simple inventions to others. "Dukes, I've got 
the grandest nerve-saver and time-saver ever known.'' 

He placed the box on the table beside him and opened it. All that was vi-ible was 
a little moving needle that could be swung about in a circle upon a flat disc of steel 
and a black push button. Izidore cast a mysterious look at me and said : 

"Now please pay close attention to what I say." He turned the needle so that it 
pointed toward himself, then began: 

"I call this the — '' 

Elis lips continued to nnove, while he talked smilingly on, but not a sound could I 
hear. 

"Come, now, Izzy," I said crisply, "what sort of foolishness is this?" 

For answer he whirled the needle around until it pointed at me, and continued 
talking : 

" — so that, as you have seen, so long as the needle points toward the source of the 
sound you can hear nothing.'' 

"Did you com° her? to spring a joke on me?" T said — or tried to say. To my 
amazement, wdiile I moved my lips and tongue and formed words, not a syllable of 
them could I hear. 

"Do you grasp the idei?" Izzy asked. 

"I can't grasn anything," I re])lied — and again I talked without speaking. 

Dobbs pushed the button once more and shoved the needle back to zero. 

"Now, we can liei.r each other," he infornied me. 

"W'lnt kind of cr-^zines^ have you there," I inquired, feeling that he making me 
a victim .if a huge 'M'actical joke; and it is an unwi>e thing in an inventor to per- 
petuate practical jokes on a capitalist. 

"This," s-^id Dobb-, rising and resting his right hand on the little liox, — "this is 
the vibrator disintegrator.'' 

"All of which i' as char as mud to me," I retorted testily. 

Dobbs looked nain-^d and sat down. Patiently he explained: 

"Sound, you know, is caused by vibration. Vibration is everything. Vibration, 
up to a certain point, causes heat, to another certain point, -ound. Therefore, all we need 
do to avoid listening to sounil that disturb us is to break them up — disintegrate them, so 
to speak. Here is the solution." 

He patted the black box lovingly and went on : 
t "This new invention of mine sends an electrical discharge into sound vibrations and 
di-^sioates them, just as a ball from a cannon, fired into the heart of a cyclone or water- 
spout, will stop its progress. Do you begin to understand it?" 



1922 


The EPITOMK 


Pagr 71 



"Show me," I demanded. "My folks come from Sedalia, Missouri." 
"What sound do you want me to stoj) ?'' 
"The ticking of that clock." 

Dobbs solemnly pointed the needle at the clock and pres-ed the button. Instantly 
the ticking ceased. I arose and went to the clock. The pendulum was swaying back 
and forth as regularly as ever, but, though I put my ear to the face of the clock, I 
could not hear the ticking : I could not even hear the movement of the wheels. 

"Now listen," Dobbs said, pushing the button. At once the ticking was resumed. 

"It begins to look good to me," I con:eded. Dobbs beamed with pleasure, and 

took the box to the window. There he adjusted the needle toward the street and 

pressed the button. Immediately the roar of the traffic was stilled, save for a far 

away murmur. 

"Izzy," I cried, "_\our fortune — t)ur fortune — is made." 

With my trained commercial mind, I realized at once what a vast field there was 
for the vibration disintegrator. Swiftly I was planning a campaign of promotion for 
the invention, and could already vision profits rolling in. It was a matter of a few 
minutes for me to come to an agreement with Izzy, and, with a neat check as evidence 
of my good faith in his pocket, he arose, Duttoned his frock coat about his slender form, 
olaced his silk hat on his head, and went out to engage factory space. 

^^'e turned out half a dozen vibration disintegrators and then found where we would 
run against a snag. The problem would be how to convince the people that no home 
could be happy without a sound destroyer. When I talked with several of my friends 
about it they thought I was crazy : when I lured them to mv office and gave them actual 
demonstration of the marvelous working of the invention, they said it was all very fine, 
but how could it be used. At this point mv ma'ter min - took a fresh grip on the situ- 
ation, and I engaged the serx'ices of Herrington B. Ransom as promoter and demon- 
strator. To aid in circularizing and corres]5ondence, we also engaged Louisa Mae 
Rouke as stenographer and typist. There was where we — I — or some one of us made a 
mistake. The organiz-^tion would have been all right with Louisa Mae Rourke left 
out. Xot that I would l)e understood as saying a word against the young lady. She 
was all that she should be, in looks, manners and general personality. 

Izidore Dobbs is a scientist. A scientist is a man who tinkers with the unknown 
forces of nature. Dobb'^ could tell you to the fraction of a millionth part of an 
ounce how much attraction the planet Jupiter has for a lost golf ball. But the lost 
golf ball had about as much attraction for the ]>lanet Jupiter, as Izidore Doblis had for 
Louisa Mae Rourke. This, however, was an unknown fact to him. That is the 
trouble with a man \\ho knows all about arcs and tangents and sines and cosines, and 
planets and orbits and other such general information. He classes woman as he does 
any other manifestation of nature, when really the procession of the equinox is a dead 
standstill compared with the fickleness of woman. When I think of how Louisa l\Iae 
Rourke led me on — but that has nothing to do with this, and besides I have forgotten 
it. I have dismissed it from my mind, and when I dismiss anything from my mind, 
that settles it. 

The whole thing happened so suddenly that if you are looking for a long, drawn 
out romance, you are going to be disappointed. Harrington B. Rau'-om was a young 
man, who did not wait to act on impulse. Impulse was too slow for him. He acted 
and then let the impulse catch up, if it could. One morning he came into my private 
office. He leaned over familiarly and tapped me on the knee. 

"Say." he began, "have you noticed how the human negative pole is trying to win 
little bright-eyes?" 



Page 72 


The EPITOME 


1922 



I affected not to understand him, thou^^h I knew perfectly well that hy the "human 
negative pole" he referred to Dobhs and by "little bright-eyes" he n^eant Louisa Mae. 

"If you mean that Mr. Dobbs is showing more than a friendly interest in Miss 
Rourke," I said stiffly, "I may reply that I have observed it, and that, in my opinion, 
it is nothing that calls for levity and is something that needs not concern vou — or me." 

"Have it your own way," Ransom replied, unabashed. "Btit listen. I saw her 
first." 

With these oracular words he departed on his tour of promotion and demonstration. 
The country at that time was in the white heat of the political campaign, and the fervid 
oratory of one of the nominees was causing consternation in the ran'cs of the opposi- 
tion. I was surprised and pleased within the next fortnight to receive telegraphic orders 
for ten disintegrators, to be shipped to certain addresses at different places. After- 
ward I noted that the points to which the machines were to be shipped were cities where 
the nominee was billed to speak upon the issues of the day. However, had I noticed 
this, it would not have suggested anything particular to me. The machines were paid 
for in cash. 

Suddenly the country was thrown into a state of excitement by the news tint the 
nominee had suddenly lost his voice from speaking from the rear of a train at New 
Ross, Indiana. The strange part of it was .that he insisted that he had not lost his voice, 
and, stranger slill. was reported as being able to speak with perfect ease and fluency 
when he went back into his car. On the day when this occurred, I received a telegram 
from Ransom, confirming it. More news came out about the strange vocal paralysis that 
affected the statesman. .Vnd the next day, and the next brought news to the same 
eft'ect. Xo sooner would he face an audience and say : 

"}ilv fellow citizen"," then instantly all further sound froni his lips was silenced, 
and, after a few moments of feverish gesticulation, he wovld give it up and retire amiti 
the jeers and gibes of the audience. At length he was for:ed to return to his farm in 
Arizona to recuperate and public interest in his i>olitics waned perceptibly. 

Then Ran-om returned, jubilant, and told us all about it. .\lthough, to be sure, 
we had prettv well guessed the riddle by this time. 

Ransom remained about the office for a month, and I could "-ee that his constant 
hanging over Aliss Rourke's desk was distasteful to Dobbs. Even when Dobbs was 
not in, I mvself could see Ransom, self-con'ident and bras^-y, leaning over Miss Rourke 
telling her it was a shame anyone with such heavenly blue eyes should be compelled 
to use them looking at the ke-\-s of a clicking old typewriter, or that anyone with such 
marvellously beautiful hands should be forced to devote them to mental toil. 

This irkeil Dobbs. His idea of entertaining a lovelv young woman was to draw 
her into a di cussion of amperes and watts and spheres of radioactivity and similar 
airy badinabe. 

One morning Dobbs tiptoed into my office. His eye^ were glittering and his thin 
lips were comnressed, while his long, lank hair stuck out angrily about his head. 

"It's an outrage," he whispered. "This fellow Random is plying his cunning art 
upon that innocent young girl out there — and, Heaven only knows, he may deceive her 
into marrving him, I shudder to think of it." 

"You shudder?" I asl^ed gently. "She could do x^orse than marry Ransom." 

"Not much worse," Dobbs argued, "Besides I — er — I" 

"I thought as nnich," I responded, dryly. "\\'hat are you going to do about it?'' 

"Do? Why, I shall speak to her this very day." 



1922 


The KPITOME 


I'Ac.l " 



He waited until Random had gone out to see a fictitious prospective patron that he, 
Dobbs, had invented. Then Izidore A. Dobbs sidled over to Miss Louisa Mae Rourke 
and (I could not help seeing it, as my door was slightly ajar), after a few comments 
on the weather, whispered something that evidently surprised her very much. She 
shook her head, and then murmured a monosyllable that made Dobbs arise, hunch his 
shoulders, stick his hands deeper in his pockets, and retire to his v.'ork-room. 

This was an opportunity that I had b:en looking for, and I approached Aliss 
Rourke with a few kind words on the excellent way she was doing her work. I then 
led the conversation up to a certain to;nc, but just as I was about tu ask a certain ques- 
tion of some importance the door opened and Harrington B. Ransom came in. 1 re- 
turned to my office. I sat down and meditated. I was not the least bit jealous of 
Ransom. I had no enmity in my heart toward him, Init 1 knew perfectly well that his 
name would be missing from the payroll after that week. 

Ransom leaned over Miss Rourke's desk and looked down at her. She looked up 
at him. It was aggravating — such palpable neglect of the duties for which they were 
employed. I felt like going out and telling them so, lint did not care to l>e misunder- 
stood. Besides Dobbs saved me the trouble. Tie came cautiously into the room, a 
vibration disintegrator in his hand. Craftily he ])laced it on the table and pressed the 
button. It was apparent that he had the needle pointed at Louisa May and Harring- 
don, for instantly they looked at each other in confusion. Their Ii])s were moving, but 
they could not hear each other. Then Harringdon B. Ransom, with that decision and 
quickness of his which, I confess I have often envied, came around and wrote some- 
thing on the stenographer's pad on her desk. She read it, blushed, and hastily scrawled 
something beneath what he had written. 

Harringdon B. Ransom leaned away down ; she looked right up at him — and he 
kissed her. She got up from her chair, put on her hat, and they walked out — he with 
his arm about her waist. Dobbs and I reached her desk together and read what was 
on the pad. In Ransom's big hand was this : "Will you walk around the corner and 
marry me; I have the license?" 

In her gentle script was "Yes." 

"Good-bve, Dukes. Some day when I have recovered from this crushing blow, 
when my heart is whole again, I may return. LTntil then. Adieu." 

"But look here!" I called, "what about the vibration disintegrator? What about my 
investment? What about ?'' 

And then my words faded on my lips, for Izidore Alisando Dobbs had switched 
the needle to cover me. Leaving the little black box as a souvenir, he waved his hand 
in farewell and closed the door after him. 

—CLEMENT POSTON. 



Page 74 


The EPITOME 


1922 



SUE'S DIPLUArACY. 

Sue Turner was a girl who had the misfortune when only five vears old, of being 
left by her parents to the care of a man and woman by the name of Myers. Her 
father ha. I faithfully promised, upon leaving her with these people, that he would send 
them sufficient money every month to educate and clothe her. However, Sue never 
saw any of this money. Mrs. Myers always denied ever receiving any. Heretofore, 
these two middle-aged people had lived comfortably and selfi'lih- to themselves and 
they seemingly couldn't get used to Sue's happy, girlish way. Thex- thought she was 
silly and didn't know the value of anything. They dtult unjustly with Sue. She was 
made to do all of the disagreeable work aljout the place and Airs. Alyers formed the 
habit of forever complaining. 

One day she suddenly came into the kitchen where .Sue was resting for a moment. 
She had been reading, and Mrs. AJyers thought this above all other things absolutely 
worthless. She avowed that this was just ancither one of Sue's schemes to waste 
time. 

Sue jum|>ed U]) alertly and started nervously toward tlie door, but as usual she 
only received one of those terrible scoldings. 

As .Sue again took up her work she wondered wliy she couldn't go to school as 
other girls did. Things, however, had been the same for her for nearly six years, and 
she could think of no way of escaping to happier conditions. 

One day .Sue was given the disagreeable task of chopping wood. Airs. Alyers 
appeared on the scene and laid the law down to her. She said that she was going to 
town, and named more things for her to do by the time she returned than any human 
could think of douig. .Sue realized though just what would happen if everything 
wasn't done upon her return. 

As Sue was working away another girl appeared from the back of the wood-shed. 

"Oh, Shirley, aren't you afraid to come here?" asked Sue. Shirley was her best 
and only friend. "You know what she said she'd do to you if she caught you here 
again?" Shirley assured her that "she'd" never catch her. Shirley was another 
orphan girl, working for some people who weren't interested in her welfare at all. 
She was a very happy sort of a girl and had a wide range of thought. She and Sue 
had talked about leaving their ]jresent con''itions, but since they had no money and 
were somewhat afraid to make the start, they dropped the subject. 

Just as they were talking, Alark. the hired boy came sneaking up on the girls. He 
shouted, "Caught ye this time, ain't I?'' I'm gonna tell Ma, too. What'll she give 
you?" He disliked Sue and Shirlev and thinking he Vvould win Ala A'lyer's favor 
aimed to do all he could against the girls. He then disaDpeared, but a short time 
later he came back. He told Sue to go into the kitchen. She finally went. Having 



1922 


The KPITOME 


\'\(,z 75 



finished her wood, she aimed to start her churning. When she reached the door she 
sank back. Shirl'.'v ste]intd up to see what was wrong. Sue turned a wliite face to- 
wards Mark, ide had dehljerately taken all of the cream that was to have been used 
for her butter and emptied it all over the kitchen floor, had broken the churn and a 
few eggs. 

With a sob of fright she turned to Shirley. 

"Come, .Shirley!" she cried. "Let's gpt away." 

"Quick!" answered Shirley. ".She'll believe you did it!" 

And Sue, too frightened and tired to think, yielded to her fright and ran with 
Shirley into the woods. 

The}' ran through the woods, cut across fields, having no idea as to tb.eir where- 
abouts. Thev wanted to cross the state line, for then they knew they w^ould be safe. 
They kept up at a good gait till the sun coirmenced to go down, because Sue more 
than realized what would hapiien to her if she was ever caught. 

Soon thev saw a white sign which indicated the stace line. Once across, they sat 
down to rest. In the distance they saw a farm house. 

"]\Iaybe we could get something to eat at that house," said Sue, realizing it to be 
long jiast her supper hour. "Xothing like a-king," said Shirley. So they went U]) to 
the house. Being unable to find anybody at home, the girls went into the barn, crept 
upon the hav and were asleep in a short time. Being dead tired, thev woke up ratner 
late. 

The owner of the farm came out to feed the horses and was more than surprised 
to find these two pretty girls lying there asleep. As he stood there contemplating what 
should be done, they awoke. Of course they were startled, but seeing that the man 
had a kind, cheerful expression they began to feel more comfortable. The girls 
jumped up quickly and explained their circumstances. To their relief, the farmer intro- 
duced himself as Mr. Hoover, stating that he was well acquainted with "Pa" Mvers He 
made the girls go into the house, where Mrs. Hoover would get them something to eat. 
Mrs. Hoover and the girls became friends right away. They told her their story and 
she was greatly touched. Thinking that they had stayed with Air. and Mrs. Hoover 
long enough, thev decided to leave. Mrs. H^oover, having no children of her own, 
wanted the girls to stay with her, since they were so much company. She asked them 
to stay but they only replied that they would stay if she provided them with work. 
She assured them that they would have ]denty of work. For once the girls were 
happy. They were glad to have the opportunity to !i\e with such broad-minded and 
influential people. 

Thev were here perhaps a month when one day "Pa" Alyers appeared upon the 
scene, demanding .Sue. Air. Hoover did all the talking and kept him on the outside 
while the girls were peeping out of the windows. Naturally they were very much 



Page 76 


The EPITOME 


1922 



panic-stricken. However, Airs. Hoover comforted llie girls. To tlieir pleasure "Pa" 
Myers finally left. Mr. Hoover came rushing into the house with the expression of 
one who had just cracked a good joke. H; had spoken plainly to Mr. Myers, and at 
any rate he told him enough to scare or quiet him the rest of his life. 

Sue and Shirley grew up to be kind, loving girls. Everyone loved them and Mr. 
and Mrs. Hoover could not have become more attached to their own children. Thev 
sent the girls through the jiublic school and later to college. Sue majored in nursing 
and Shirley in music. 

One time while in nurse's training Sue was sent to the Myer's home to nurse a 
very diffipult case, ."^ue hardly realized where she was being taken. As she neared 
the place the scenes of her childhood appeared to her. Strange as it were, upon arriv- 
ing at the familiar place. Sue learned that Ma was in a very critical condition. Neither 
Mr. or Mrs. Myers recognized Sue. Sue decided not to make herself known for several 
days. Ma graduallv improved. She had fallen in love with her nurse and one day 
she asked Sue who she was, where she came from and many other questions, ."-^ue be- 
gan from the very beginning and told her the story of her life. Ma never so much 
as moved. Later Sue told her her name. Ma was indeed shocked and a litt'.e sad. 
Pa was unable to speak. They appeared to be happy fiM" her. They hated to see Sue 
leave, but they had everything planned as t) what they would do for her. 

In about a week Sue received a check for five thousand dollars and a note ex- 
plaining that this sum of money was hers and should have been hers long before this. 
Her father had sent it to the Myers as he hid promised until his death, for Sue's edu- 
cation. —RUTH BENBOW. 



"GOOD NIGHT" 

"Good night" is an idiom devised to ease the sweet sorrow of parting after dark. 
It may be interchanged with propriety by [)arties of the first and second piarts any 
time between dusk and dawn. This quaint nocturnal expression is perhaps the longest 
phrase in the English language. Romeo and Juliet took eight pages, India paper 
edition, to say the words. Lovers since time immemorial have been notorious as elab- 
orate Goodnighters. Ask Dad, he knows. Many a lovesick swain has missed the last 
car back and had to walk home because he tarried too long over his "good night." 
Many a "good night" has been interrupted by a milk-man yelling whoa to his prancing 
steeds. The term is generally acc(impanied by a kiss (soul), smile (relief or regret), 
tear, hug, or yawn. Bidding each other "good night" is a fine old English custom, and 
the only expression that seems impracticable to say with flowers. 



I') 12 


The EPITOME 


Page 77 



HOW TO PUT ON AN OVER-THE-HEAD SEIIRT. 

The job of putting on an over-the-head shirt is, without doubt, the most difficult 
task ever undertaken by any one member of the human race, and yet milHons have 
tried it. It can be done successfully and without assistance only by contortionists and 
by men of at least six months active service as enlisted men in the United States army. 
Few people who were civilians during the war realize what an important factor the 
over-the-head shirt was in army life, when more than three million men were in the 
service. Imagine, if you can, any army barracks, just after that hideous conglomera- 
tion of noises called "First Call" has sounded ; men frightened from fitful slumiier in 
iron cots, at the mere sight of which Theseus himself would have swooned, to grapple 
with the dreadful problem of putting on si.x yards of leggings and an over-the-head 
shirt in five minutes. When you rememljer that this tragedy occurred at 5 ;30 e\-ery 
morning of the war, it seems little wonder that the records of the VVar Department 
show that over fifty per cent, of the cases of both insanity and desertion in our army 
during the war were caused by the over-the-head shirt. 

After extensive investigation and experimentation, I feel fully qualified to sa}' that 
those members of our army who became insane, or who desertecl because of the over- 
the-head shirt were completely justified in ado]ting their respective courses of action. 
No one who has never worn the shirt can comprehend all that is involved in putting it 
on. A description of it is not necessary : U is probably a familiar object to everv ob- 
serving American. The only proper meth_;d to begin putting it on is to grasp it l;)y 
the tails, roll it into the semblance of a tea-ring, leaving the sleeves unrolled, and thrust 
the head through the opening in the center, allowing it to rest on the shoulders. This 
is done to prevent breaking the neck by entangling the head, as often happens when 
the shirt is not rolled. Next, the shoulders are to be thrown out of joint, and the 
hands and arms are thrust vertically mto the sleeves by a series of sinuous movements 
similar to those of the well-known oriental dancer. (In the case of unfortunate per- 
sons who cannot throw their shoulders out of joint, the shirt should be suspended 
from the ceiling by wires attached to the sleeves. However, this method is so difficult 
that it is advisable to become double-jointed.) After the arms have 1ieen put into the 
sleeves, and it is found impossible to lower them b.ecause of the tension of the shirt 
around the shoulders, the proper procedure is to shout for help, or, if you are alone, 
to lie down and wait for someone to come to your assistance. When the friend arrives, 
he completes the operation by pulling the tails down from the shoulders, which leaves' 
the shirt gracefully suspended from the frame of the tired but proud wearer. 

It is the opinion of the leading medical authorities of this country that the over- 
the-head shirt is destined to prove a boon to us. They freely make the assertion that 
it will cause the people of the United State- to become a race of physical giants, bv 
virtue of the astounding amount of exercise obtained in putting it on. The govern- 
ment has become so interested that it is now preparing to conduct an extensive cam- 
paign of propaganda, both to further the use of the over-the-head shirt in this cnuntrw 
and to prevent foreign powers from discovering its value. 

— ROADE DUST. 



Pa^e 78 


The EPITOME 


1922 



GHOSTS. 

In central Indiana there is a small town of three or four hundred people. In this 
town as in other small towns everyone knew everyone else's business. In the town was 
a general store where in the winter time the men sat around the stove .smoking and 
telling stories. On the outskirts of the town lived a family of negroes. These 
negroes, like the rest of their race, were of a superstitious nature. On a certain 
winter evening Pete, a negro boy, of about eighteen years went to town to spend the 
evening. It happened that between Pete's home and town there was a graveyard, and 
on the other side of the graveyard the homj of the Whitleys. There were two chil- 
dren, Bob, eighteen, and Mary, sixteen. On this night. Bob was also spending the even- 
ing in town at the general store, as was Pete. The men were sitting around the stove 
smoking and they began to tell ghost stories for Pete's special benefit, because they 
knew that he would Ije frightened all the way home. As the men were talking a 
thought struck Bob. He quietly arose from his chair and slipped through the door 
into the night. He hurried home and h:;d a few minutes conversation with his 
mother. A few- n^inutes later a figure wrapped in white was seen coming down the 
road toward the graveyard. In front of the gravej'ard there was a large tree. The 
figure crouched behind the tree and became still. The moon was shining brightlv and 
casting a sihery light over everything and making the graveyard look very wierd. 
After a while the sound of whistling could be h.eard in the distance and presently a 
figure wa,; seen coming down the road. In a few minutes Pete was recognized. He 
w^as walking briskly and whistling loudly — -perhaps to reassuri; himself. Pete came 
closer to the graveyard unsuspectingly. As he came opposite the tree a white figure 
arose slowly from behind it. Pete slowly turned his head in that direction and as he 
did so the ghost uttered an unearthly yell. Pete remained for a moment frozen to the 
ground. The hair on his head (which was curh') straighteend out and stood up on 
end. The chills ran slowly up and down his back. Then he too uttered a yell and 
started toward home at full speed with the ghost in hot pur;uit. But neither one was 
prepared for wdiat next happened. As thev came to the edge of the grave\^ard another 
spirit arose slowly. It stood for a niinut^ with its white robes flapping. Pete could 
hardly become more frightened but the effect on Bob can hardly be described. He 
was already running swiftly but he increased his speed. He discarded his robes and 
left them lying in the road. He also called to Pete to wait for him but that person 
instead of decreasing, increased his speed a^ much as possible. The ghost took up the 
pursuit and down the road all three went, one after the other. Finallv thev reached 
Bob's house. In the dcior tumbled Pete an.d Bob. The)' were entirely out of breath 
but gradually began to breathe more freely and think more clearly. Mary entered 
quietly. Bob looked at her suspiciously but said nothing. He never mentioned the 
episode but ever after th;it when ghosts were mentioned Mary smiled. 

THl-.T.MA CHADWICK. 



1922 


The EPITOME 


Page 79 



THE GIRL ON MY WRITING DESK. 

On my writincf desk here in my room is a i)icture. It is a picture of a girl — a 
very, very good looking girl. She is right in front of me while 1 am writing this, 1 
mean her picture is. Through the half darkness of the room (only the reading lamp 
is burning) she stands there smiling. In fact she is always smiling, it seems to be a 
sort of habit of hers. She seems to be strtrngely out of place here with the desk piled 
high with letters, the dififerent penants on the wall and what not. I have just looked 
up. She smiles. That sweet pathetic smile of hers. 

But it seems strange that her hair is done in such an old fashioned way. Why, 
no, not in the least. To be perfectly truthful about it, she posed for that picture and 
it was taken some eighteen years ago, SHE is mv mother. 

—HELEN BARRON. 



THE COMING. 

Arabella sat curled up among soft pillows in the big ba}' winddw peering anxiously 
out for the first glimpse of him. She wa becoming impatient, for he was already 
overdue. But with a confidence born of exerience, she knew he would appear at any 
moment. At last she saw him turn the corner far down the street, and her heart leaped 
within her. He was wearing the familiar blue suit, shabby, but neatly brushed ; he was 
carrying a leather bag. With hungry eyes she watched his lackadaisical approach. 
When he was quite near, she ran to the front door, and down the steps to meet him. 
Handing her a letter the postman bid her good-day and went on to the next house. 



READ 

OUR 

ADS 



AND 
PROFIT 
BY IT 



QUALITY 



SERVICE 



Printing 

Booklets V Programs 

School Animals 

Year Books -:- Stationery 

Engraving 

Weaaing Announcements 

Commencement Invitations 
Personal Cards 



UDSON^pOS. 

PRINTERS --"^ENGRAVERS 

1137 Main Street 

PKone 2 9 9 

ANDERSON, INDIANA 



Stanle}) 

Sells me Car 
Maxwell -- Chalmers 



New Castle 



rd like to be a Senior 

And among the Seniors stand 

With a fountain pen behind my ear 
And a thesis in my hand. 

I would not be an emperor 

I would not be a king. 

I'd rather be a Senior and never do a 
thing. 



He: "What were you doing last 
night ?" 

She : "Oh, hel]3ing dad around the 
house." 



He: "Drunk again?' 



YES, CUT IT OUT. 

Last fall an Indiana cit}1 school 
superintendent promoted a grade teacher 
to the English department of the high 
school. He vas discussing the work 
with her when she suddenly said : 



-, it's going to be so 



"Oh, A'Ir. — 
hard for me. You see. I've always 
used so much slang, and now when I 
teach English, I won't dare use any 
more.'' 

"Slang!" exclaimed the superintend- 
ent. "Well, believe me, Alice, you'll 
have to cut that out now." 



Kirb}? Garage 



Service and Satisfaction 



Call v?Ken in trouble 



Hagerstown 



Hagersto^^n 
Lumber Co. 

Ever3?ming for tne Builder 



HagerstoNvn 



R. B. Campbell, Mgr. Phone iq 



An Englisli III class was told to 
write an answer to an ad — judge the 
following : 

Dear Sir. I notice that _\or. have a 
vacancy for an organist and a music 
teacher, either lady or gentleman. Hav- 
ing been both, I beg to apply for a posi- 
tion. 



W'itchy (after game): "Did you 
take a shower?" 

Root: "No, is one missing?" 



Willy : "Teacher, what is the name 
for snoring?" 

Teacher: "Sheet music." 



H. P. Kunn 

Tinner, Roofer ana Sneet 
Metal Worker 



Eave Troughs and Conductors, Roof 
Painting, Furnaces and Furnace Re- 
pairing and Everything Pertaining to 
the Tinning Trade. 

HagerstovJn 



Special Announcement of tKe 

D. L. Cartmell Compart}? 

Hardware General Mercnandise 

Main and Perry, Hagersto^^n Phone 15 



We tOisK to call your attention to tne fact that we naxJe purcnased the stock of the H. J. 
Day firm and are doing a general hardware and merchandise business in the same location. 

To the lines carried h^ the H.J. Da>) firm v}e have added a neW and comp'.ere line of gen- 
eral hardware and from time to time will add other lines as market conditions warrant. 

We in^>ite you to HagerstoxCn, extending to you a cordial invitation to make our store your 
stopping place, whether 5'ou buy) or not. 

We want to call your attention to our special Friday and Saturday sales. We offer on these 
days different items of merchandise at prices that cannot be duplicated elsewhere. 



HEARTLESS. ' • 

I. She lost her ! She threw her heart away ! 

They watched her do it in blank dismay, 

But still, while they looked on. they rai.^ed no voice, 

Altho they marveled greatly at her choice. 

II. She lost her heart ! She threw her heart away ! 

The man, who siezed it, looked as blank as they. 
And then he smiled, as if in mockingf glee. 

For hearts — well, hearts that time were trumps yon see ! 



UP AGAIXST IT. 

"Some of these writers make me tired," said Smith. 

"What's the matter now?" asked Jones. 

"Why, on one page, this fellow says: 'Always tell the truth." and on the next page 
he says: 'Never liecome a slave of habit.'" 





To See Better 
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■ For 






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loN. 


Optometrist 

KJintK St. Richmond 


Anni\)ersaries 


^^H ^».z^ ■" m^/zMesisir^-- ^^H 


HK^^r^V ^^^ m ^/ aS^Sm 




Phone 3765 


J^^^^^^QUAL/ TY UE WCL CR ..^MMm^^J^ 



W'H INEZES. 

"Fares, please," mumbled the conductor to himself as he slid a few in his one way 
pocket. 

'i'll be alale to make both ends meet," puffed the butcher as he chased the cac 
down the alley. 

"You're playing with fire," purred the devil as she lit her first cigarette. 

"You're faded," yelled the gambler as he stumbled over a roll of old calico. 

"Holy smoke!" chirped the bird as he walL'hed the steeple burn. 

"My move," grumbled Pluto. 

"Great .'^cf)tt !" said the poet. 

"You're next," she coyly whispered to the stag. as she left the ballroom. 

. "Can vou beat it?" said the minister to the lad with a flrum. 



THE HOMK PAPI:K 



The local weekly iiiiiiers de.sorve bt'tter 
support thMu they receive in iiiiuiy cuimmmi- 
ties. .Some have not siieceeileil lieciuise of 
the policy or hick of policy of their man- 
agement, but our experience convinces us that 
the great majority of tlie papers devoted to 
the interests of tlie home conununity deserve 
hearty support. Tlie metropolitan daily will 
bring to one's door.step the news of the world 
seen through the .spectacles of the city edi- 
tor, but it is the editor who lives in the heart 
of the community wlio is able to reflect the 
sentiment of the local group. He alone is the 
true interpreter of events as they affect the 
small tiiwn and the coinitry inunediately sur- 
rounding it. He alone is able t" put the throb 
of real feeling into the obituaries of the men 
and women .among whom he has spent his 
life and with whom he has worked for the 
improvement and advancement of the old 
home town. These local papers deserve bet- 
ter than they generally get. During the war 
they ha\e had hard sleMiug — many of them 
— and now they have a pert'en^ right to come 
to the citizens of their locality asking real 
business support. Give it to them. If the 
local paper has the proper kind of encour- 
agement it can do more for the welfare of 
the town and the countryside than any other 
factor. Supiiort means more than merely 
subscribing. Patronize the advertising col- 
umns. Pretty soon you will find yourself 
becoming more interested in the community 
than you ever were before and you will find 
that it is a good place to stay rather than 
something to try to get .away from. Heli> the 
local i>aper and it will lielii you. 

— Ohio Farmer. 



Rill: "Johnny, sit clown in front." 
Johnny; "I can't." 

Collins: "Surveying a little?" 
Rollins: "No! Survevins; a lot." 



"Say, did you get your shirt back 
from the laundry' ?'' 



"Yes, but not the front.' 



KEYHOLE STUFF— POROSKXIT. 

"I saw Glailys get into her Chalmers 
last night." 

"Gee! 1 didn't know she wore them." 



He: "What sha].e is a kiss?" 

She: "I don't know." 

He: "Well, gi\e me one and we'll 
call it square." 



V ictrolas and Victor 
Records 

Eastman Films and Kodaks 

JeWelry 

Candies 

WKiteselrs 
Drug Store 

The Rexall Store 



niie First ^sJational Bank 



HagerstovJn 

Capital Stock 

Surplus ana Undiviaea Profits 



$50,000 
37,000 

Four per cent interest paid on all time deposits 

Bonds Bought and Sold 

We solicit your business 



LINES TO A WOODPECKER. 

I. What joy to hear upon the city street 

Tliy tap-tap-tapping mid the traffic's din. 
Giving to passers by reminder sweet. 

That cold is wane and warmeth is coming in. 

II. Industrious bird, how earnest thou to choose 
The city as a place to bore your nest? 
Didst come to tell us city folk the news. 

The joyous news of s]iring', that fills thy Ijreast? 

III. I do not see thee, bird of busy bill. 

But just to hear thy hammer cheers a chap; 
Indeed, o'er city noises, constant shrill, 
I marvel that I even hear thy tap. 



*Written by a deaf contributor on hearing a compression air riviter at work near 
his office window. 



.;CC 




StON RINGS 



The Indiana Piston Ring Co. 

Hagerstown, Indiana 



JUST AS WELL. 

Man: "What are you fishing for, 
Httle boy?" 

Boy: "Sharks." 

Man: "Rut there are no sharks in 
that little [)on(l." 

Boy- "Xo, nor notliing else, so I 
might just as well hsh for sharks." 



REST.AURANT j.VZZ. 

He: "What did yuu think of that 
piece the orchestra just played, dear?" 

She: "Wh\-. I didn't hear it. You 
know, uncle was taking his soup just 
then." 



Boston Store 

H. C Hasemeier & Co. 

Ury Goods 
Ready-to- Wear 

Only one price 

Spring Stock ^sfovJ Complete 



819-821 Main Street 



RicKtnond 



Gifts for Graduations 

BirtKda]ps Anniversaries Weddings 

Gifts fKat last 

Bracelt WatcKes Diamond Rings 
JexCelry 

Jenkins & Compan}) 

Jewelers, Gift Counselors 



726 Main St. 



RicK 



monc 



NOALADNESS. 

The nomade, his nomadam and their 
nomadehioiselle, while nomadding one 
day were attacked by a nomad dog — 
they had never seen a nomadder dog. 
The situation was nomaddening. They 
feared thev would ha\e to quit their 
nomadding and go tu a nomadhouse. 
But they found another nomad with a 
nomad-stone that nomadhered to each 
of the nomad-dog's bites, and theii 
lan-.entations were changed to nomaa- 
rigals. Thev did not have to become 
nomadmen. 



Citizens 
State Ban 

Klew Castle 



We pay interest on Time 

Deposits and Savings 

Accounts 

All business at this bank is 
strictly confidential 



A LITTLE COTTON TALE. 

Kitty: "Really, I seldom cross ni\- 
feet in a street car." 

Katty . 'T seldom ever wear silk 
ones either." ■ 









- 


We cannot reverse 


the 


caler 


laar — yet v?e can keep the 


spirit of youtn - its 


hopes 


, its 


enthusiasm, its optimism - 


witn pKotographs. 








' 






^ ' 722 MAIN 5T RICHMOND. IND. 





Of](ice and ScKool 


Supplies 


E-Cery thing for the office and school room 


Wholesale or retail 


Bartle & Rone 


921 Main St. RicKmond 



TOUGH EH? 

"Say, waiter, is this an incubator 
chicken? It tastes Hke it." 

"I don't know, sir." 

"It must be. Any chicken that has 
l";ad a mother could never get as tough 
as this one." 

FRESH THING. 

"Are you familiar with the girls?" 
"I tried to be once with one, but she 
slapped my face." 

I(iX( )KAXCE IS nijss. 

Fir^t Henpeck: "Ain't these wives 

the limit? W'c husbands don't know 

anything at all and our wives know 
everything." 

Second Henpeck: "Nope, there is 
one thing my wife admits she doesn't 

kniiw." 

"What on earth is that?" 
"\\ by she married me." 



TOUGH. 

Blinks : "The undercrust to that 
chicken pie you brought me was terrible- 
tough." 

Waiter : "There wasn't any under- 
crust to that pie, sir, it was served on 
a paper plate and you have eaten it." 

WHY THE RUSH. 

Fan (late arrival, out of breath): 
"What's the .score?" 

Pan: "Nothing to nothing." 

Fan : "Good game, eh ?" 

Pan: "I don't know, it hasn't started 
yet." 

CAPON PURPOSE. 

We know a joke about why the 
chicken crossed the road. But we won't 
pullet. 



Be an American" 


is the wisK of tke 


Aiuerican Trust and 


Sa\)ings Bank 


Ricnmona 



All AccomplisJunent 



Just as the Graduate stands at llu tliRshnId of oreater op- 
portunities line to having acconiphshed the tasks assigned — ■ 

Tile .Modern Starr Made instruniepts are the acconiphsh- 
mcnt of over half a century of constant endeavor to Ijuild more 
perfect musical instruments. ■ . 

It will pay you to buy a musical instrument, direct from the 
manufacturer and then yuu will he assured of satisfaction. Starr 
Made Musical Instruments are onr own ]ir()duct, therefore we 
know that they will give you the satisfaction you desire — and, 
our terms of payment are very liberal. 

We will Ije glad to have you coiue in and look over our line. 
We would like to get acf|uainted. with you. 



The Starr Piano Company 

831-935 Main Street 
Richmond 



THEIR NOSE KNOWS. 

Slick: "How do you get so many 
girls?" 

Slicker: "Tjli ! I just sprinkle a 
little gasoline on mv handkerchief." 



SHINERS REMOVED. 

Ike: "Mike, you just ought to see 
my girl. You know -he has the most 
kissahle mouth and her teeth are like 
the little stars." 



ell .' 



Mike : 



'They come out every night, 



Tne Snappily Dressed 
Young Vlen 

are clotnea 03? 

Kenned}? Clothing 
Compan}? 

803 Main St. 
Richmona 



City Drug Store 

Complete Line Drugs, Jewelry, 
Paint and ScKool Supplies 

Don't forget the Electric Snop in connec- 
tion ■ft'itK tne Drug Store. Any kind 
of electric equipment sold 
ana repaired 

J. H. StonecipKer, Prop. 
Hagerstown 



SOME TRAVELING IS SLOW. 

As the car reached its destination an 
old man with a long white beard rose 
feebly from a corner seat and tottered 
toward the door. He was, however, 
stopped by the conductor, who said : 

"Your fare, please." 

"I paid my fare." 

"When, I don't remember it ?" 

"Why, I paid it when I got on the 
car." 

"Where did you get on?" 

"At Muncie." 

"That won't do ! \Mien I left Muncie 
there was only a little boy on the car." 

"Yes,'' answered the old man, "I 
know it, I was that little boy." 





Geo. 


G. Harlan 




Dry 


Goods 


ana Men's 


Furnishings 




THE STORE OF QUALITY 








PKone 283 




i- 




■y 


Hagerstown 


-• ■ ■ 





Owl Cafe 

The Home of good eats 
ana cola arinks 

H. W. Flood R. R. Hunt 
HagerstoNvn 



STICKING TO IT. 

Behold the porous plaster ! 

It's only a little thing, but before it 
will give up, a man man^- times it's size 
has to take off his shirt before he can 
make it go. 

Ber.old the automobile tire! 

It sticks around and ne\-er goes any- 
where except on or blow out once in a 
while. 

Behold the flea! 

Ask the dog who owns one. 

Behold the dress suit! 

Guess will never be able to shake 'em. 

Behold the hole in a doughnut ! 

It lemains the center of distraction 
and you can't swallow it, hide it or give 
it away. 



"Graduates— 

I Want You" 

That is ^wKat bussiness is sailing to you. Bus- 
iness is always calling for new recruits — >'oung 
men and women wKo are specifically prepared for 
business positions and ambitious to succeed. 

TKis is a scKool of specialization. When pou 
are ready, enter Kere, and your "pJnole time, 
tKougKt and energy) will be concentrated upon the 
subject of preparing for certain, definite, specific 
service in business. 

Our scKool ■Will be in session all summer. We 
never close. So. just as soon as you are readyJ, 
you could start Kere. You can make every day 
count. 

For "Budget of Information" snd full particulars, 
see, Write or telepnone 

W. L. STUMP, Manager 

Ricnmona Business 
College 

Colonial Building, /tK and Main 



HAD NOT MADE A CHOICE. 

Tl;ey had just completed the fifth 
(lance — three couples and some thirt\- 
odtl girls — and they had strolled out to 
the balcony to rest. He. just out of 
high-school, and she. out of high-school, 
also. 

"So." he said beginning the con\crsa- 
licn, "you are from Indiana?" 

"You're mighty right," she answered, 
"Hoosier girl?" 

He stamn^ered and stuttered: "Why- 
er-rcally — " he said, "that i I don't 
know — I mean I haven't decided vet, 
who." 



LOOKING FOR III.M. 

"Where's that infernal proofreader," 
shouted an irate man with blond in each 
eye. 

"He certain!}' would l)e right hard tci 
find now," said the editor uneasily. 
"What's he done this time?" 

"In that advertisement for mv valve- 
less motor he turned the second v into 
a u !" 



ALW^AYS LATE. 

Prof. "You're always late. It must 
run in your family." 

George W^. — "I guess it does, I under- 
stand an ancc'-tor of mine ran for the 
Mayflower and missed it." 



Wogaman's 
Restaurant 

for Luncn, Snort Orders 
Candy, Ice Cream, Cigars 

M. Wogaman 

HagerstoNvn 



: 'I'I'Oirij 



Qlie Merchants of New Castle 

wisn to congratulate tne Class of 1922, 
Hagersto\\^n Hign Scnool, for so success- 
fully completing meir course of study and 
also extend tneir best vv'isnes for continued 
success in whatever meir undertakings 
may be. 

Merchants Division 

ISJev? Castle CKairiDer 
of Commerce 



Visit tKe Model for 

FasKion Park ClotKes 


ISJusbaum's 


for men and young men 


ntie home of quality mercKan- 


Holeproof Hosiery 


dise at the lowest prices 


and 


Dry Goods 


Mannattan Shirts 


Millinery 


nhe Model 


Lee B. MusbaumCo. 


70Q-711 Main Street 


719-721 Main St. 


RicKmond 


RicKmond 



OVER THE PHONE. 
"I want you right away, this minute! Will you come?" 



"\\\.)n't }ou please come?" 



"Well, won't you promise me that you'll come tonight? I simply must 



"Oh, I don't know what 1 shall ever do without you! Can't you possibly come? 
I need you so !" 



else? " 



"Oh, I think it's just terrible, ha\ing to wait so. Tell me! Is there anybody 



"Oh, I was sure of it. I knew there nuist be without asking you.' 



''If you only would come to me! Won't you please? If you only could be made 
to realize the distress I am in — ■" 

(Editor's Xote. — The above is not a conversation between a discarded girl and the 
brute of a man she loves. It is merely one side of a telephone chat between a house- 
keeper and the nearest plumber during a severe cold snap.) 




'This model on sale at only $ioo 



Our New Big Store 

presents a furniture display of style, quality and 
economy combined to make it possible to Have 
attractive homes. We cordially invite you to visit 
our big store at any time go through our mam- 
moth stocks see for yourself why it is that people 
who want the best buy here. 

Visit our Brunswick shop. Hear the new Brunswick 
records. The Brunswick plays all makes of records. 



R 



SKop at 

ovixey 5 



Complete Home Furnishers 

Ricnmona 



Fred's 

Clothes 

Shop 

Fine Clothing ana 
Hats 

710 Main Street 

RicKmond 



UNDUE FAMILIARITY. 

Cop (angrily, to fair motorist): 
"The next time ye don't stop at me sig- 
nal, I'll pinch vc." 

Fair Motorist (coloring): "Sir, how 
dare vou ?" 



TO AVUID THE RUSH. 

"Last evening, sir, I distincth' saw my 
daughter sitting in your lap. What 
explanation can you make?" 

"I got here early, sir. — before the 
others." 



We are now in a position to re- 
grind cylinders for all makes of 
motors, and if desired, furnish pistons 


Elmer Crull 


for same. 




Prices furnished upon request. 


Farm Implements 


Teetor - Hartley 
Motor Corporation 


Phone 263 


Hagerstown 
Phone 22 


Hagerstown 



HOW ABOl'T IT? 



The man had just informed the PuUman agent thai he wanted a herth. 

"Upper or lower?" asked the agent. 

"What's the dilTerence?" 

"There's a difference of fifty cents in this case," re])lie(l the agent. "The lower is 
higher than the upper. The higher price is for the lower. If you want the lower you 
will have to go higher. We sell the ujiper lower than the lower. In other words, the 
higher the lower. Most people don't like the upper, although it's lower on account of 
being higher. When you occupy an upper you have to get up to go to bed and get 
down when you get up. You can have the lower, if you pay higher. The upper is 
lower because it is higher. If you are willing to go higher, it will he lower." But the 
poor man fainted. 



Dick 

MLcSKerler}; 


L S. Gray 


Staple ana Fancy 
Groceries 


Funeral Director 

PKone 285 


Phone 76 

Hagerstown 


" Hagerstown 



W. L. Fouts 

Milling Co, 

Manufacturers of 

Belle of Hagerstown 
Fancy Patent Flour 

Pnone 20 

Hagerstown 



LOOK IT UP. 

The word kiss is a noun, l)ut it is 
usually used as a coujunction. It is 
never declined and is more common 
than proper. It is never singulai and is 
always used in the plural, agreeing' v.'ith 
two. 



Durbin Grocer}) 

We pay nignest prines for produce ana give you tne 

best in our line 



Masonic Block 



THE ROAD TO PARADISE. 

"My darling," said a fond mother, who beliexed in appealing to children's tender 
feelings instead of punishing them, "If you are so naughty you will grieve mamma 
so that she will get ill and have to lie in bed in a dark room and may die and have 
to be taken to the ceemtery and be buried, and you — " 

The child had become more solemn, but an angelic smile overs]iread his face at 
his mother's last words, and, throwing his arms around her neck, he exclaimed: 
"Oh, mamma, may I sit beside the driver?" 



PIANISSIMO PERSUASION. 

First Enthusiast: "I sa)^ Muriel, have you ever tried listening to music with your 
eyes shut ?" 

Second Ditto: "And you, sir — have you ever tried listening to music with your 
mouth shut ? 



ANSWERED. 

"Wliat's the difference between ;'. man 
and a worm?" 

"No difference. Chickens get them 
both." 



BITING. 

"My," exclaimed Air. Clunibsay at the 
Sophomore dance, "this floor's awfully 
slippery. It's hard to keep on vonr 
feet." ' 

"Oh,'' replied the fair partner, sar- 
castically, "then you were really trying 
to keep on my feet ? I thought it was 
purely accidental." 



^sJe^^^s Stand 

H. Hoover, Prop. 

Candies, Cigars, Soft 

Drinks, Daily Papers, 

Periodicals, Etc. 

We appreciate ^^our patronage 



Ice Cr 



Cold Drinks 



1 ou are invited to 

Fisner's 
Restaurant 

City Building 

Hagerstown 



Good Music 
Day or Night 



Dance if 
You Wish 



COMMON OCCURRENCE. 

She : "John, your manners are 
awful ! I noticed that you dusted the 
chair at Mrs. Heep's before you sat 
down, and their little boy was watching 
you, too !" 

He: "Yes! And I was watching 
him! I am too old a fi h to be caught 
on a Ijent [jin !" 



MIS SHARE OF EDUCATION. 

The children were telling a visitor 
what they studied at school. 

"I" said the eldest, "get reading, 
spelling and definitions." 

"And what do }'ou get, my little 
man ?" said the visitor, addressing the 
littlest one, who had listened in a bored 
way while the others recited their lists. 

"Oh, I dets readin', spellin' and 
spankin'." 



Graduation Suits 

Nobby Sport Models 

in Tweeds ana all the new fabrics 

made by 

Hart, ScKaffner & Marx 

and 

Hickey Freeman Co. 

Loenr & Klute 

725 Main St. 
RicKmond 



THE OTHER WAY ABOUT. 

Prof, (giving exam.) ; "Does any 
i|Hc'st!on embarrass you? 

Bright Student: "Xot at all, sir. 
Not at all. The questions are quite 
clear. It's the answers that bother me." 



ONE HE MISSED. 

This (Jne: ".Shakespeare used every 
dramatic situation there is." 

That (3ne : 1 have searched his 
works carefully, but fail to find a pie 
throwing scene." 



Wm. A. Fox 


Dr. 

Fred W. LeaA)ell 


Funeral Director 


Dentist 

X-Ra}) Diagnosis 


Office Phone 24 
Residence and KJight Phone 83 


Consultation Hour 4 to 5 p. m. 




Phone 320 Suite 200 Mouch Bldg. 


New Castle 


Nex?^ Castle 



E. E. Root & Son 

Barber Snop 



Dr}) Cleaning and Pressing 



Baths 



Phones: 
Resiaence 50 Business 185 



Will It Hurt, 
Doctor? 

That's wriat they all ask when it 

becomes necessary to have their 

teeth extracted 

All kinds of Dentistr3) 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 



C. B. Harter 

Dentist 

Above First Kle.tional Bank 
Hagerstown 



REQUIESCAT IX PACE. 

She knew that she was drowning. Her whole Hfe flashed before her in that 
pecunar kaleidoscopic manner that she had often read was characteristic of those doomed 
to die. She had gone down into the cruel green water for the third time. Each moment 
the heavy under-current was carrying her further away from the pier from which she had 
fallen. She pictured her lifeless body cast upon the sands by the waves — the toll of 
the sea. She cotild see the holiday crowd, morljidly curious, gathered aljout her asking 
stupid Ciuestions. Suddenly she remembered with a flash of horror that there was a 
hole in the heel of one of her silk stockings. With extreme difficulty she kicked olif 
her slipper and removed the imperfect hosiery. Immediately she ceased struggling and 
sank peacefullv into her watery grave. 



General 
Trucking 

Long Distance Hauls a 
Specialty 



Tf^ansportiiig of Live Stock Will 
Receive Prompt Attention 



C. E. Woolard 

Phone 212 
Hagerstown 



^p 



m^ 



^fitav\^2 



y= 









77;g MOS/: 

Complete Book 

on Anjiuals 

■ Ever 

, Published Ca?i 

be Secured 

Absolutely 

Free 



T EXPLAINS to the business manager and editor 
hy the use ot illustrations and with the utmost 
simplicity proper methods to be used in laying out 
the dummv, grouping, designing, making panels, 
selecting proper photographs, selling advertising, 
selling Annuals to sav nothing of explaining thoroughly hundreds 
oftechnical problems that will confront the staff. 
This great book is only a part of the Stafford service. Our ex- 
perience gained in handling hundreds ot Annuals is at your com- 
mand ; your plans and problems will receive individual and care- 
ful attention. 

The staff of this publication for whom we furnished engravings 
will confirm these statements. 

Write to us as soon as you are elected and we will tell you how 
to secure a copy of "Engravings for College and School Publi- 
cations' ' free of charge. 

STAFFORD ENGRAVING COMPANY 



College and High School Annual Engravers 

SEVENTH ^HLOOR CENTURY BLDG. 



INDIANAPOLIS 



INDIANA 



1'a(;e 1(18 


The EPITOME 


1922 



AUTOGRAPHS 



1922 


The EPITOME 


I'AfJK 1119 



AUTOGRAPHS 



THE LAST WORD. 

It is done. 

This is the end. 

Maybe it might have been better. 

The book is done. 
We offer you this. 
It is not what we dreamed of. 

It is not all we planned it should be, 
We have tried, but Fate 
Said our trying was useless. 

We have labored with inexperience. 
We have dreamed in terms of things 
That we knew little of. 

This is the end. 
Our task is done. 
Deal kindly with it — 
Knowing we tried.