Skip to main content

Full text of "Feather River project: investigation of alternative aqueduct routes to San Diego County"

See other formats


LIBRARY 

ySIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
PAVIS 



(L Ui 



'J 

IBSITX OF MUFOKNI* 
LIBRARY 

DAVIS 

COPY 2 



IP AM 2 3 MAY T gb!Jf^ ii R 
^1? MAY "StHrtt^ 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES '^^^ ^ ^ ^^^^ , 
DIVISION OF RESOURCES PLANNING ^'' 



BULLETIN No. 61 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



INVESTIGATION OF 



ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT ROUTES 
TO SAN DIEGO COUNTY 










GOODWIN J. KNIGHT 
Gtovemor 







0^3 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
DAVIS 

MAR 17 1^)58 
UBRARY 






HARVEY 0. BANKS 

Director of Water Resources 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

DIVISION OF RESOURCES PLANNING 



BULLETIN No. 61 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



INVESTIGATION OF 

ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT ROUTES 
TO SAN DIEGO COUNTY 



GOODWIN J. KNIGHT 

Governor 




HARVEY 0. BANKS 

Director of Water Resources 



' ^ , . j» Si. ' 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL ix 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT x 

ORGANIZATION, STATE WAI'ER BOARD xii 

ORGANIZATION, STATE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES xiii 

ENGINEERING ADVISORY CCMmTnEE xv 

CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION 1 

Authorization for I;<ivestigation 1 

Related Investigations and Reports 3 

The Featlier River Project. 3 

The California Water Plan 5 

Studies of Alternative Feather River Project Routes 

to Soatiiem California 7 

Other Related Investigations and Reports 9 

Objectives and Scope of I:ivestigatio:a and Report 11 

General Criteria Affecting Aqueduct Location 12 

Routes through Seui Berneirdino and Riverside Counties 13 

Objectives 1^+ 

Scope. ....... 13 

Area of invest igati on 17 

Local Activity Relative to Proposed Second San Diego Aqueduct 2k 

CHAPTER II. FUTURE LEMANBS FOR IMPORTED WATER 27 

Methods ejid Procedures, 28 

Classification of Lands for Water Service UO 

Methods and Procedures .......... k2 

Areas of Land Use Adaptability Classes kk 

Probable Ultimate Pattern of Land Use 5U 

1 



Page 

Unit Use of Water . 58 

Urban Use. . o ...... 36 

Agricultural Use 62 

Monthly Distribution of Annual Water Demands 6k 

Estimated Future Population 66 

Industrial eind Commercial Grovth . 66 

Procedvire for Estimating Future Population 71 

Military Popiilation. 75 

Future Agricxiltural Growth. . 76 

Principal Factors Affecting Growth of Irrigated Agricultvire . ... 76 

Market Potential for Irrigated Crops 77 

Costs of Land Development 80 

Payment Capacity for Irrigation Water 8I 

Estimated Rate of Growth of Irrigated Agric\ature 83 

Future Demands for Water. ........ 88 

Future Water Requirements. 88 

Safe Yield of Existing Water Supply Facilities 93 

Demands for Imported Water 9^ 

Design Demand for Additional Imported Water 101 

CHAPTER III. ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT ROUTES 103 

Methods and Procedures. 105 

Size and Capacity of Aqueducts for Prelimineury 

Route Comparisons 107 

Preliminary Design Criteria ...... 109 

CansLLs and Canal Appxurtenances 110 

Siphons .......... 112 

Cross Drainage Structvires 11^ 



11 



Page 

Timber Bridges II5 

Concrete Bridges II5 

Checks 116 

Turnouts II6 

Irrigation Pipe Crossings II6 

Utility Crossings II7 

Pipe Lines and Appurtenances II7 

Excavation and Backfill II8 

Air Release and Vacuum Valve Struct\ire8 II8 

Manhole and Blowoff Structures II9 

Turnout Structures II9 

Vent Structures 120 

Road and Highway Crossings 120 

Dams and Reservoirs 121 

Tunnels 121 

Rights of Way for Canal and Pipe Lines 122 

Unit Prices 122 

Storage Requirements 123 

Regulatory Storage 12U 

Emergency Storage 125 

Analyses of Alternative Aqueduct Routes 128 

Colorado River Aqueduct to Rainbow Pass 130 

"B" Line 133 

"E" Line 13^ 

Description of Route 135 

Construction Problems 136 

Operation of "E" Line 137 

Estimated Cost of "E" Line and Appurtenant Facilities ikh 

iii 



Page 

"S" Line ik6 

Description of Route l46 

Construction Problems. . ±k6 

Operation of "S" Line ikj 

Estimated Cost of "S" Line and Appurtenant Facilities 151 

"W" Line. I53 

Description of Route I53 

Construction Problems 153 

Operation of "W" Line 15U 

Estimated Cost of "W" Line and Appurtenant Facilities 156 

■: Summary Comparison of "E", "S", and "W" Lines 158 

Selection of Facilities for Initial Construction 16O 

Analysis of Staged Construction of the Aqueduct 161 

Canal Section l62 

Pipe Line Section 163 

Economic Comparison of Alternative Plans for 

Terminating Aqueduct Facilities 166 

Timing of Reservoir and Aqueduct Construction 171 

Summary of Facilities Selected for Initial Construction 172 

CHAPTER IV. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 177 

Conclusions 177 

Recommendations 161 



iv 



TABLES 



Table No. 



Page 



1 Gross Areas and Areas of Developable Lands In Subdivisions 

of the Water Service Area of the Proposed San Diego 

Aqueduct 3I 

2 State of California, Department of Water Resources, 

Standards for Classification of Lands for Water Service. . . ^5 

3 Classification of Agricultural Lands in San Diego County 

and Southwestern Riverside County 50 

k Classification of Urban Lands and Summary of Classification 

of Lands 52 

5 Probable Ultimate Pattern of Land Use in San Diego County 

and Southwestern Riverside Coijnty 56 

6 Estimated Future Areas of Irrigated Lands in the Service 

Area of the Proposed San Diego Aqueduct (Assuming a price 

for water of $15 per acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct). . 86 

7 Estimated Future Areas of Irrigated Lands in the Seirvice 

Area of the Proposed San Diego Aqueduct (Assuming a price 

for water of $40 per acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct). . 87 

8 Estimated Future Water Requirements of Irrigated Agriculture 

in Service Area of Proposed San Diego Aqueduct for the 
Year 2000 (Assuming a price for water of $15 per acre- 
foot delivered at the aqueduct) 89 

9 Estimated Future Water Requirements of Irrigated Agriculture 

in Service Area of Proposed San Diego Aqueduct for the 
Year 2000 (Assuming a price for water of $^0 per acre- 
foot delivered at the aqueduct) 90 

10 Estimated Annual Urban Water Requirements in the Service 

Area of Proposed San Diego Aqueduct for the Year 2000. ... 9I 

11 Estimated Annual Safe Yields of Local Water Supplies and 

Anniial Water Requirements in the Service Area of the 

Proposed San Diego Aqueduct (Ass\miing a price for water of 

$15 per acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct ) 95 

12 Estimated Annual Safe Yields of Local Water Supplies and 

Annual Water Requirements in the Service Area of the 

Proposed San Diego Aqueduct (Assuming a price for water of 

$U0 per acre -foot delivered at the aqueduct) 97 

13 Estimated Fut\ire Demands for Imported Water in the Service 

Area of the Proposed San Diego Aqueduct (Assuming a price 

for water of $15 per acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct). . 99 



TABLES 

Table Wo . Petge 

ik Estimated Future DeiDSiids for Imported Water in the Service 

Area of the Proposed San Eiego Aqueduct (Assijmiiig a price 
for water of $i^0 per aoi'e-foot delivered at the aqueduct). . ICX) 

15 Estimated Cost of "E" Line to Meet Demand for Imported 

Water to San Diego County in Yeai' 2000, Including Regu- 
latory Reseriroirs and Major Laterals and Appurtenant 
Facilities ..... 1^5 

16 Estimated Cost of "S" Line to Meet Eema:ad for Imported 

Water to San Diego County in Year 2000, Including Regu- 
latory HeservoirB and Major Laterals and Appurtenant 
Facilities 152 

17 Estimated Cost of "W" Line to Meet Dssaand for Imported 

Water to Ssjr\ Diego County in Year 2000, Includ.ing Regu- 
latory Reserti^oirs and Me.jor Laterals and Appurtenant 

18 Comparison of Estiinated Costs of Aqrueducts and Appvirtenant 

Storage and Conveyance ]?acilities for the "E", "S", and 

"W" Lines. .» ... .o ..,,... 158 



19 Capacities and Present Values of Costs for Combinations 

of Staged Pipe Line Construciio:^ of "W" Line, Between End 

of Canal Section aad Lower Cbay Reservoir 165 

20 Economic Comparison of Altsrimti ifv? Fla;as for Conveyance and 

Storage Facilities in the 'leriainal Reach of the Proposed 

San Diego Aq.ueduct ,. o ..... 169 

21 Summary of Estimated Cost of Initial Features of Proposed 

San Diego Aqu.educt from Saa Jacinto Tunnel to Proposed 
Mianewa-wa Reservoir Site, "W" Line 175 



PLASES 



Plate No. 



1 Location of Lnvestigational Area 

2 Major Existing Water Supply Facilities 

3 Subdivisions of Investigational. Area 

k Classification of Lands for Probable Ultimate Use 

(in two sheets) 



vi 



PLATES 
Plate No « 

5 Historical and Estimated Future Population of San Diego County 

6 Estimated Future Areas of Irrigated Lands in the San Diego 

Aqueduct Service Area 

7 Estimated Future Demands for Water in the San Diego Aqueduct 

Service Area 

8 Estimated Monthly Distribution of Demand for Water in Per Cent 

of Annual Demand in Year 2000 

9 Alternative Aqueduct Routes 

lOA Location of "E" Line and Appurtenant Facilities 

lOB Location of "S" Line and App\irtenant Facilities 

IOC Location of "W" Line and Appurtenant Facilities 

11 Typical Canal Sections 

12 Typical Siphons 

13 Diversion eind Metering Structures 

1^4- Typical Farm and Private Road Bridges 

15 Typical Coxmty and State Highway Bridges 

16 Typical Overchutes, Culverts and Irrigation Crossings 

17 Check Structure 

18 Canal Terminal Structure 

19 Miscellaneous Canal Structui-es 

20 Typical Pipe Line Structures and Trench Details 

21 Auld Valley Dam on Tucalota Creek 

22 Minnewava Dam on Jamul Creek 

23 General Profile of Proposed San Diego Aqueduct 
2k Plan and Profile (index Map and 15 Sheets) 

25 Schematic Diagram of Estimated Annual Water Deliveries from 

Existing San Diego Aqueduct and from Proposed "W" Line in the 
Year 198O 

26 Schematic Diagram of Estimated Annixal Water Deliveries from 

Existing San Diego Aqueduct and from Proposed "W" Line in the 
Year 2000 



APPENDIXES 

Appendix 

A Correspondence 

B Description of Facilities of the Proposed San Diego Aqueduct 
Selected for Initial Construction 

C Unit Prices Used for Detailed Cost Estimates of Proposed San 
Diego Aqueduct, "W" Line 

D Estimated Cost of Initial Features of Proposed San Diego Aqueduct 
from San Jacinto Tunnel to Minnewawa Reservoir, "W" Line 

E Description of Proposed Dams and Reservoirs Needed to Provide 

Regulatory and Emergency Storage on the Proposed aaad Existing 
San Diego Aqueducts 



viii 



March 1, 1957 



Honorable Goodwin J, Knight^ Governor^ and 
Members of the Legislature of the 
State of California 

Gentlemen s 

I have the honor to transmit herewith Bulletin No. 61 of the 
Department of Water Resources^ entitled "Feather River Project - Investigation 
of Alternative Aqueduct Routes to San Diego County", This investigation was 
authorized by the California Legislature of 1956^ in Item Ul9«5 of the Budget 
Act of 1956, which appropriated $200^000 for the work. 

Work on this investigation was initiated in May of 1956, by the 
Division of Water Resources, the predecessor agency of this Department, through 
a provision in the budget act which made funds available prior to the beginning 
of the fiscal year» In view of the ciritical water supply situation in San 
Diego County^ this investigation was conducted under an accelerated program in 
order to make available its findings at the earliest practicable date. 

Bulletin No. 6l contains estimates of the probable future growth of 
population and irrigated agriculture and attendant demands for water therefor 
in San Diego and southwestern Riverside Counties, and presents recommendations 
as to the location and capacity of a new aqueduct to serve imported water to 
this area in conjunction with the existing two^barreled San Iti-ego Aqueduct. 
The new aqueduct would convey presently surplus Colorado River water available 
to facilities of The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California near 
San Jacinto until Feather River Project water is available. 

We are informed that The Metropolitan Water District of Southern 
California, together with the San Diego County Water Authority, plan on 
taking immediate action to construct an aqueduct along the route recommended 
herein but to a smaller capacity. It is recommended that in view of the 
estimated future demands for water in the potential service area of the 
proposed San Diego Aqueduct, and the relatively small increment in cost, that 
immediate steps be taken to construct the proposed aqueduct to the larger 
capacity as determined in this report o 

Very truly yours, 

HARVEY 0. BANKS 
Director 



ACKN0WLEDGME2JT 

During the course of this investigation, valuable assistance and data 
were contributed by water service agencies in the investigational area. The 
Department of Water Resources gratefully acknowledges the cooperation of the 
following agencies; 

Bueno Colorado Municipal Water District 

California Water and Telephone Company 

Carlsbad Muaicipeil Water District 

City of Escondido 

City of Oceanside 

City of San Diego Water Department 

Eastern Wtoiicipal Water District 

Escondido Mutual Water Company 

Fallbrook Public Utility District 

Helix Irrigation District 

Lakesid.e Irrigation District 

Poway Municipal Water District 

Rainbow Municipal Water District 

Ramona Irrigation District 

Ramona Municipal Water District 

Rincon del Diablo Municipal Water District 

Rio San Diego Municipal Water District 

San Diego County Water Authority 

San Dieguito Irrigation District 

San Marcos County Water District 

Santa Fe Irrigation District 

South Bay Irrigation District 

Vail Ranch Company 

Valley Center Munieipal Water District 

Vista Irrigation District 

Special mention is also made of the helpftil cooperation of the follow- 
ing agencies in supplying data and maps utilized in the investigation: 

Boyle Engineering 

City of Los Angeles, Department of Water and Power 

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California 

Bureau of Reclamation, United States Depeartment of the Interior 

Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior 

Eleventh Naval District, United States Department of the Navy 



Valuable assistance and estimating data used In the Investigation 

were contributed by the following pipe manufactvirlng firms: 

American Pipe and Construction Compemy 
Consolidated Western Steel Corporation 
Kaiser Steel Corporation 
Southern Pipe and Casing Company 
United Concrete Pipe Corporation 



XI 



ORGANIZATION 
STATE WATER BOARD 



Clair A. Hill, Chairman, Redding 
A. Frew, Vice Chairman, KLng City 
Phil D. Swing, San Diego John T. Bunker, Gustine 

W. P. Rich, Marysvllle Everett L. Grubb, Riverside 
Kenneth Q. Volk, Los Angeles 



Sam R. Leedom, Administrative Assistant 



xii 



ORGANIZATICW 
STATE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

Harvey 0. Banks ................ Director 

Mo Jo Shelton . o . o »,. o ...... o.. o ..,.. . Deputy Director 

William Lo Barry. ...» ..,.., . Chief, Division of Resources Planning 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

Max Bookman o . .o. ... o .. o . .......... . District Engineer 

This Bulletin was prepared under the direction of 

Robert M. Edmonston ...».,,.... o. . Principal Hydra\alic Engineer 
Lucian J« Meyers. ...... ....... . Supervising Hydraulic Engineer 

Work on alternative aq^ueduct locations and capacities 

was conducted hy 

Kenneth G. Wilkes ...... o .... . Senior Hydraulic Engineer 

Hugo Jo Hanson. ..... Associate Civil Engineer 

assisted hy 

Yoshlo Higashi . o Assistamt Hydraulic Engineer 

John S. Akiyama . ............. . Junior Civil Engineer 

Patrick J. Deneher. o.. .... .......... . Junior Civil Engineer 

James T. Enright. ........... ....... . Junior Civil Engineer 

Jack D. Walker. ........ Junior Civil Engineer 

Studies of future demand for water were made by 

Roderick L. Hill. ..,...<,.............. Senior Economist 

Vernon E. VeLLantine .............. Associate Utilities Engineer 

assisted by 

Ronald C. Hightower .,..,,. o ....... . Assistant Civil Engineer 

Thomas N. Hushower. ........... • . Junior Civil Engineer 

William W, Barnes ............ ... Engineering Aid I 

Land classification surveys were conducted by 

John W. Shasaon ................ Land and Water Use Specialist 

Roy N. Haley. ..............•••• Associate Soil Technologist 

Glenn B. Sawyer .......... Assistant Soil Technologist 

Barry Brown ... Junior Soil Technologist 

Charles Ripple. .................. Jvmior Soil Technologist 

Fred Stumpf ...............••.•• Junior Soil Technologist 



xiii 



Preliminetry designs and estimates of cost 
were prepared by 



Francis J. Lawler = 
Edward E. Jackson . 
Arnold F. Nicolaus. 



Eijgeme A» Belongie. . . . 
HaJTold D. Unlando ,00. 
Conrad M. Vineyard. . . . 
Frank A. Williamson . . . 
David A. Blagg. . « . . . 



o o e 



assisted by 



» a o 



e o • 



. . Associate Civil Engineer 

. . Associate Civil Engineer 

Associate Hydraiilic Engineer 



. . Assistant Civil Engineer 
o . Assistant Civil Engineer 
. . Assistant Civil Engineer 
Assistant Hydraxxlic Engineer 
...... Engineering Aid I 



Classification of materials was conducted by 



John W. Marlette. . 
Glenn A. Brown. . . 

Clifford R, Farrell 
Charles F. Lough. , 
William Waisgerber. 



000 



o a o 



Associate Engineering Geologist 
Associate Engineering Geologist 
. . Assistant Engineering Geologist 
. . . Junior Engineering Geologist 
Jvinior Engineering Geologist 



000 



Harold P. Zablodil. . 
Lewis S. Good . . . . 
Eleanor Angus .... 
John P. Buchner, Jr. 
Richard P. Bellanger. 



Maps and plates were prepared by 



SOB 



9 







« o o a 



o o • 



o o 4 o « 



o o o a • o 



O A 

e 



. . . Senior Delineator 
. Senior Delineator 

Delineator 

...... Delineator 

. . . Engineering Aid I 



Consxiltant on Construction Problems euid 
Unit Prices of Construction Items 



Augustine H. Ayers. 



» • o o e 



..... Consultant Civil Engineer 



xiv 



EBfGINEERING AWISORY CCMMITTEE 

The Department of Water Resources appointed a committee of prominent 
igineers representing vater service agencies and entities interested in water 
ipply problens in the southern porti.oa of the State to advise the Depeurtanent 
. its alteriiative Feather River Project Aqueduct route studies. This Dapart- 
nt gratefully acknowledges the assistance aid advice generously contributed by 
e members of this committee during the ^ci;^a9 of this investigation. Members 
this Engineering Advisory 'S.-mmlttea are llBted as follows: 



Name 
. Louis K. Alexander 

. Paul Bailey 
. Kenneth Beck 
. Paul Beermann 
. Doyle F. Boen 



Title 

Vice Presldaat aad Ci.ief 
Engineer, Southe;.'az 
California Vater oompesy 

Engineer 



County S-iiryey^T 



Director, City of Saa 
Diego Water Department 

Chief SiLgineer' aai 
General MB^^ager, Eastern 
Municipal Water District 



. E« Fitzgerald Dibble Chief Engineer, San 

Berzu^dino Vallsy Maai° 
cipal Water 3'^Sisesv&tlo.:j 
District 



. Robert Bo Diemer 



General MEuzager saaS. Chief 
Engineer, The Metropolitan 
Water District of Southern 

California 



. George L. Henderson Vise President, Kern 

County Land Company 



Sponsorlig Agency 

Beard of Directors, West 

Be-Btn and Ce:itraLL Basin 
Municipal Water Districts 

Orange County Water 
District 

Board of Supervisors, 
SasL Luis Obispo County 

City Council, City of 
San Mego 

Board of Directors, 
Eastern Municipal Water 
District 

Board of Directors, San 
Bernardino Valley Muni= 
cij>al Water District 



Board of Directors, The 
Metropolitan Water 
District of Southam 
California 

Board of Directors, Kem 
County Farm Bureau and 
Board cf Supervisors, 
Kem County 



XV 



Name 



Mr. Julian Hinds 



Title 



Consulting Engineer 



Sponsoring Agency 

Board of Directors, 
United Water Conservation 
District 



Mr. Richard S. Holmgren 



Mr. Henry Karrer 



GenereQ. Manager and Chief 
Engineer, San Diego 
Covinty Water Authority 

Consixlting Engineer 



Board of Directors, 
Diego County Water 
Authority 



Seui 



Board of Directors, Kings 
River Water Conservation 
District 



Mr. Wallace C. Penfield Consulting Engineer 



Mr. William S. Peterson Grenereil Manager and Chief 

Engineer, Department of 
Water and Power, City of 
Los Angeles 



Board of Directors, 
Santa Barbara County 
Water Agency 

Board of Water and Power 
Commissioners, City of 
Los Angeles 



Mr. Brennan S. Thomas 



Mr. Albert A. Webb 



General Manager and Chief 
Engineer, City of Long 
Beach Water Department 

Consvilting Engineer 



Boeird of Water Commis- 
sioners, City of Long 
Beach 

Boea-d of Directors, 
Western Municipal Water 
District of Riverside 
County 



xvl 



CHAFTESR Ic ISTROroCTION 

San Diego Comity, one of the most rapidly developing areas in the 
nation, is presently faced with a critical watar probleai. The rapid growth of 
the Coiinty dviriag a severe drought, now in its thirteenth year, has resxilted in 
virtual depletion of local storage reseryes and nearly f»ill dependency on the 

two-harreled San Diego Aqueduct delivering Colorai1.o Eirer water from facilities 
of The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California near San Jacinto. 
This aq.ueduct is and has "been, for sosme tiaie past, operated almost continuously 
at full capacity. Only the occurrence of substantial runoff in local streams 
during the present winter season, to a^agment meager reserves of Colorado River 
water now in storage in local reservoirs, will prevent water shortages next year 
over much of San Diego County. Even islth the advent of a sequence of years of 
above ^normal precipitation BXid runoff, 8;?Jfe yield of existing water conservation 
facilities together with the supply of Colorado Elver water that can be obtained 
through the existing San Diego Aq.ueduct soon w5.11 be inadesj-'iate to meet the ever 
growing water needs of this area. 

Mthori a aj^j^fl^fj;;r__Inye8tig ation 

It was in r^scognition of this eritic&l situmtion in San Diego County 

that the Legislature in Itea fe9»5 of its Budget As\- c.f 1956 appropriated 

$200,000 for s-arwejB of alternative Feather RLver Project Aqueduct Routes to 

San Diego County. This itaa is quoted in ftO-l as follows; 

"lvl9.5-=Por surifsys, explorations, investigations, preparation 

of construction plans and specif icationsj sur-treys of, negc^ 
tiations for, and acquisitions of, rights of way, easements, 
and property, including oth>sr expenses in connection there- 
with, for the Feather Fiver Project, as authorized by 
Section 11S60 of the Water Cc«le and as modified by the 
report of the Division of Water Resources of February, 1955? 
entitled "Program for Financing and Constructing the Feather 
River Project," and as may be modified subsequently. Water 
Project Authority .............. 9^350,000 



=1- 



provided, that this appropriation shall remain available 
for expenditure \antil Jvme 30, 196O; provided further, that, 
notwithstanding any other provisions of law, the appropria- 
tion made by this item ms'.y be expended to reimburse the 
Division of Water Resources Revolving Fund for expenditiires 
incurred prior to July 1, 1956, which may be properly charge- 
able to this item; provided further, that $3,550,000 of this 
item shall be used only for engineering and exploration work, 
and for acquisition of reservoir sites for the Alameda-Contra 
Costa-Santa Clara-San Benito breinch aqueduct in Alameda, 
Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Benito Coijinties; provided 
further, that $500,000 of this item shall be used only for 
studies of alternative coastal aqueduct routes; provided 
further, that $200,000 o f this item shall be used only for 
studies of altei°native aqueduct routes to Sein Diego County ; 
provided fxirther, that $200,000 of this item shall be used 
only for location studies, stirveys, engineering and ex- 
ploration work for an aqueduct to service areas within west 
and south San Joaquin Valley, including Kern County. Any 
money in the Division of Water Resources Revolving Fund may 
be expended or encumbered for expenditure prior to July 1, 
1956, or subsequent thereto, for preparation of working 
drawings, designs, plans or specifications for the project 
described in this item as to which reimbxarsement of the 
fund therefor is authorized by this item." (Emphasis 
supplied. ) 

In addition, Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 19, which is quoted 

following, contains certain provisions relative to the studies of alternative 

aqueduct routes to San Diego County: 

"WHEREAS, The Division of Water Resources of the Department of 
Public Works has under consideration and study the selection of alter- 
nate aqueduct routes to San Diego County in connection with studies 

being made of the Feather River Project; now, therefore, be it 

"Resolved by the Senate of the State of (C aliforni a, the Assembly 
thereof concurring . That the Division of Water Resources is requested 
in connection with its study to consider possible routes for such an 
aqueduct through Seji Bernardino County and Riverside County and to 
report thereon to the Legislature at its 1957 Regular Session; and be 
it further 

" Resolved , 'Ihat the Secretary of the Senate send a copy of this 
resolution to the Division of Water Resources and to the Director of 
Public Works." 



-2- 



Related Inve stigation s and .Repoarbs 

The Investigation reported on herein is intimately related to prior 
investigational work of the former Division of Water Resources and other state 
water agencies on water problems and water reso^arce developments in the State and 
to other ciirrent work under way by the Department of Water Reeoiirces. Reports 
and data available from these investigations were utilized in the preparation of 
this report. Use was also made of pertinent material and data contained in 
reports of other agencies. 

The Feather River Project 

The Feather River Project, the initia.1 unit of The California Water 
Plan, was developed by the Division of Water Resources in 1951; in consideration 
of the impending need for additional water in the central and southern portions 
of the State, and also in recognition of the critical need for flood control on 
the Feather River. The project wa.s originally outlined by the Division of Water 
Resources in State Water ResoTzrces Board "Report on Feasibility of the Feather 
River Project and Sacramento-Sari Joaquin Delta Diversion Projects Proposed as 
Features of The Celifomia Water Plan", May, 1951 <■ Major vinits of the project 
included a miiltipurpose dam emd reserrcir on the Feather River near Oroville, 
a power plant at the dam, an afterbay dam and power plant, a Delta ross .; hannel, 
an electric power tremsirdssion syBtem, a conduit to transpoirt water from the 
Sacramento -San Joaquin Delta to Santa Clara and Alameda Counties, and a condiiit 
to transport water froa the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to the San Joaquin 
Valley and to southern California, The aqueduct to southern California was con- 
W template! as a "high line" route extending from the San Joaq\iin Valley in a 

tunnel through the Tehachapi Mountains at about elevation 3j300 feet. The aque- 
duct woiad then follow along the westerly side of the Antelope Valley, thence 



.^. 



throTigh auiother tionnel 5.n.to the SovAth Coastal Arse, near ths City of San 
Bernardino. Froa this point the aqi?.educt -would extend to the south In a serit 
of tunnels and siphons to a tersslniis in Seui Diego Coiinty at Eorsethief Canyon 
a tributary of Cottonwood Ci-eek;, at elevation 2/85^+ feeto 

The Feather River Project vas authorized by the Legislature in 1951 
by Chapter ikhl, Statntes of 1951 • This act also aiithorized and directed the 
Department of Public Works to conduct the necessary investigations, surveys aj 
studies, and preparation of plans a:icl specif icatio.is for the construction of 
the works authorized by the act and to subsiit the same to the Water Project 
Authority for its approval. 

Further studies of the Feather River Project were continued by the 
Division of Water Reso\irces until 1955.' at which time a report entitled "Prog: 
for Financing and Constructing the Feather River Project as the InitieO. Unit ( 
The California Water Plan", dated May, 1955; "''^.s subnitted to the Legislature 
It was concluded in this report that the project wr,s engineeringly and finan- 
cially feasible, and it was recfwrmeaded that the Legislatixre appropriate fxindi 
to Initiate its construction. This report recorameiided saodiflcations of the 
original plan inclvwfing the addition of the Sena. Luis Reservoir on the west si( 
of the San Joai3.ttln Velley. 

Tlie foregoing report of May, 1955.'= also included smalyses of alter- 
native aqueduct jro^ates to southern California including the afore-jaentioned 
"high line" route and modifications thereof consisting of power drops to poini 
of terroinus near Castaic and San Bema.rdi;).o, a long tunnel route at elevation 
1,870 feet from the San Joaquin Valley to the South Coastal Area, and a coasts 
route commencing in the vicinity of Devils Den in the Ssui Joaquin Valley and 
extending along the coastward side of the Coast Kange through San Lx'ls Obispo^ 
Santa Barbara, and leatixfa. CoimtieS; to a terainal reservoir near Castaic in 
Los Angeles County. 



The 1955 Legislature appropriated $250,000 to its Joint Cosnmittee on 
Water ProblofiS for an independent study of the project. This committee employed 
Bechtel Corporation to perform the study. The r3S^llts of the Bechtel Corpora- 
tion independent reviev of the project were reported to the Committee in "Report 
on Engineering, Economic and Financial Aspects of the Feather River Project", 
December 31^ 1955 • 

The Bechtel report found the project to be engineeringly and finan- 
cially feasible and recosmaended among other things, further studies of the 
" ... High Line route via Castaic Creek power development and terminating in 
San Fernando Valley." 

The Legislature of 1956, by the previously quoted budget item, appro- 
priated $9,350,000 for fvirther work on the project including about $1,100,000 
for studies of alternative aqueduct routes to southern California. 

The California Water Plan 

The xmprecedented development of Ceaifornia, with attendant increases 
in demands for water during World War II and the years immediately following, 
served to stimulate public concern over the State's water supply probl-sms. The 
California State Legislature, in recognition of the growing State-wide water 
problem, by Chapter IplH^ Statutes of 19^7 .» directed the State Water Resources 
Board to conduct an investigation of the water resources of California, desig- 
nated the "State-wids Water Resources Investigation". Funds were provided in 
the 19i^7-i^ budget for conmencsnent of the investigation and additional funds 
were provided through 1955 by subsequent Legislatiires . 

The "St&te--wlde Water Resources Investigation" was conducted under 
direction of the State Water Resources Board by the Division of Water Resources. 
Three bulletins have been published pursuant to this investigation. Bulletin 
No. 1, "Water Resotirces of California", was F«i'blished in 1951^ and contains a 



-s. 



compilation of data on precipitation, unimpaired stream runoff, flood flows a 
frequencies, and qimlity of water throughout the State. Bulletin No. 2, "Wat 
Utilization and Requirements of California", was published in June, 1955> and 
includes determinations of the present use of water throughout the State for 
consumptive purposes and presents forecasts of prohahle vLLtimate water requir 
ments based in general on the capabilities of the land to support further 
development. The third and concluding phase of the State-wide Water Resource 
Investigation was reported on in Bulletin No. 3> "Report on The California 
Water Plan", published in preliminary form in May, 1956. This bvilletin prese 
preliminary plans for the full practicable development of the water resources 
the State to meet the ultimate water needs therein insofar as possible. The 
bulletin describes plans for locail water resource development together with 
those works needed for the major transfers of water from the surplus areas of 
the north to the water deficient areas of the south, designated the Califomi 
Aqueduct System. 

As a result of the State-wide Water Resources Investigation, it was 
concluded that under conditions of ultimate development about 3^000,000 acre- 
feet of water annually must be delivered from northern California to the Sout: 
Coastal Area to satisfy ultimate water requirements therein. This quantity o: 
water would be in addition and supplemental to supplies obtained from maximum 
feasible local water resoiarce developments and imported supplies available fr 
the Mono-Owens Systeffi of the City of Los Angeles and through the Colorado Riv 
Aqueduct of The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in the 
amounts of about 320,000 and 1,212,000 acre-feet per annum less losses, 
respectively. 

With respect to the "San Diego Group", which includes San Diego 
County, a portion of southern Orange County, and southwestern Riverside Count; 
it is estimated in Bulletin No. 3 that on the order of 1,300,000 acre-feet of 



-6- 



imported water will ultimately be required, which amount is greater than the 
total planned ultimate capacity of the Colorado River Aqueduct. Under The 
California Water Plsm, the required supply of imported water would be delivered 
to this area by a high line aqueduct equivalent to the Feather River Project 
High Line route, previously described, by the existing San Diego Aqueduct, and 
by two additional aqueducts designated the Barona Aqueduct and the Second San 
Diego Aqueduct, all needed to accomplish delivery cf the previously stated 
ultimate requirements for imported water in the area. The latter three aque- 
ducts would extent southerly from the junction of an aqueduct, carrying 
northern California water, with the Colorado River Aqueduct of the Metropolitan 
Water District. At this junction water from northern California co\ild be 
merged with the Colorado River water, and water from either soxirce would be 
available for utilization in San Diego and southwestern Riverside Covinties, emd 
in the coastal plain areas of Los Angeles and Orange Counties. 

The Barona Aqueduct would extend to a terminus in the proposed Barona 
Reservoir, and from San Jacinto south to the reservoir would generally parallel 
the existing San Diego Aqueduct to the east, but with a hydraulic gradient 
about 200 feet higher. The alignment of the Second San Diego Aqueduct was 
taken generally as that set forth in a report by the San Diego County Water 
Authority, described hereinafter, with a terminus in Lower Otay Reservoir south 
of the City of San Diego. 

Studies of Alternative Feather River Project Routes to Southern California 

Included in appropriations for the Feather River Project in the 
Budget Act of 1956, was about $1,100,000 for work on aqueduct route studies for 
the Feather River Project generally south of Devils Den in the San Joaquin 
Valley. These studies have as their basic objective the determination of the 
most econcmical route or routes for delivering Feather River Project water into 



-7- 



southern California. Ab a basic premise In these studies^ It Is considered 
that the aqueduct shovild be constiructed in the most economical location that 
•will permit delivery of supplemental vrater to those areas of need that can 
afford to pay for project water end which are ready to contract for delivery 
emd uae of such water. In determination of the proper location for the aqueduc 
consideration must also be given to existing and proposed water supply facili- 
ties 80 that unnecessary duplication or overlap of such facilities will be 
prevented. 

The Department of Water Resources is presently actively engaged In 
these fiLLtemative route studies under an accelerated program designed for com- 
pletion of the studies and submission of a report to the Legislature thereon in 
1958' The studies in San Diego Cottnty reported upon herein constitute a portio 
of this over-all investigation. 

The alternative route studies include further detailed investigation 
of routes heading generally in the vicinity of Devils Den in the San Joaquin 
VsLLley and extending along the coast southerly to the South Coastal Area, 
Studies of canal alignments and capacities in the San Joaquin Valley and of 
crossings of the Tehachapl Mountains. Further investigation is being made of 
the feasibility of utilizing off-peak energy for pumping required eLLong con- 
sidered aqueduct routes, and of generating hydroelectric energy dvirlng periods 
of peak energy demand in connection with the crossings of the Tehachapl 
Mountains. Studies are also being made and estimates prepeired to determine the 
rate of increase in demand for water in the various component parts of the 
potential project service aurea in order to determine where and when project 
water will be needed in the southern California area and to select proper 
points of delivery for such water. 



other Related I nv estigations amd P.e -jcrt s 

In addition to the afor2-iaen.tioned comprehensive water resoiirces 
investigations conducted by the Departaient of Water Resources and its predecessor 
agency, the Division of Water Resources of the Departnent of Public Works, 
information and data contained in csjrtain other prior reports of the Division 
of Water Resources and in reports of other e^encies were fo'^nd to be of 
materifiil value in the conduct of this investigation. 

Of material assistance was the detailed planning work accomplished by 
the stsf f of the San Diego Oowity Watar Authority for the purpose of deter- 
mining the so-orce of supply, location, and csopacity for a second aqueduct to San 
Diego, the results of which invsstigatioa are presented in "Report on the Prob- 
able Extent of Authority Area, the Amount and Source of Additional Water Supply 
Req.ulrod, and the Syetaiii Recid.r«d to Efficiently Deliver Authority Water to 
the Afjencleo Ccxapyrising that Area", d;7,ti:5d Jj.>ic, 1955' This report was reviewed 
by a Board of ShftlnourB cofijcsed of Re.j/iiiond A. Hill, John S. Longvrell, and 
Carl R. RanJiLn, who pr«?sentad the reeiilts of their review in "Report on Water 
Supply for Probable Future Developments in the San Diego County Water 
Authority", dated £&pt<=caber 12, 195"? • '^.i-S latter repoi*t was also of great 
value to the Depar'iEient of Water Resources. 

The report of the San Diego County Water Authority concluded, ancng 
other itsms, that an aaueduct obtaining water from the facilities of The Metro- 
politan Water District of Southern California to the north should be con- 
structed to s. capacity of about 50C second-feet near the San Diego -Riverside 
County line, with an alignrient extending southerly, to the west of the exist- 
ing Seji Diego Aqueduct, to a point of tsrrcinus in Lower Otay Reservoir south of 
the City of San Diego. The Board of Engineers generally approved the location 
of the aqueduct but concluded that the capacity shovld be 200 second-feet. The 



report of the B'Xird c^f Engineers points out the limitation on availability of 
Colorado Hlvor water and the detrimental effects on its availability, which 
would result frowi construction of the Upper Colorado River Storage Project. 
The report also states that the most desirable point of delivery for Feather 
River Project water, from the standpoint of the San Diego County Water Authority, 
would be at the west portal of the Sam Jacinto Tunnel on the Colorado River 
Aqueduct . 

During the course of the investigation, studies were initiated by The 
Metropolitan Water District of Southern California on an aqueduct southerly 
from their facilities near San Jacinto to the San Diego Covmty line. Discus- 
sion with District officials and field data from a drilling program undertaken 
by the District were of material assistance to the Department of Water 
Resources . 

Set forth in the following tabulation are other reports containing 
valuable material and data utilised by the Department of Water Resources in 
connection with the preparation of this report: 

Board of Engineers, Caldwell, David H-, Hyde, Charles Oilman, and Rawn, A M. 
"Report on the Collection, Treatment and Disposal of the Sewage of 
San Diego County, California". September, 1952. 

Boyle Engineering. "Proposed Water System for the Poway Municipal Water 
District". April, 1954. 

Boyle Engineering. "Engineering Report to the Carlsbad Municipal Water 
District". June, 1955- 

Boyle Engineering. "Proposed Water System for the San Marcos County Water 
District". June, 1955. 

Boyle Engineering. "Engineering Report to the Valley Center Municipal 
Water District". July, 1955. 

Burkholder, J. L., General Manager and Chief Engineer. "Report on the Need 
and Feasibility of Increasing the Capacity of the San Diego Aqueduct". 
San Diego Co\anty Water Authority. June, 19i^8. 



.10- 



California State iDe?arte.s-;it of Public Worics, Civielon of Water Resources. 
"Saa Diego Cooaty Investigatio.i" . Billetia !fo. U8. 1935. 

California Stete Department of Public Works, Mvlsioa of Water Resources. 
"San Luis Key River Investigation". Bulletin Mo. k&k. 1936. 

California State Depe^cment of Public Wor?i:s, DivisloD. of Water Reao'orces. 
"Report on Water Supply of La Mesa, Lemon Grove, ead Spri;ig Valley 
Irrigation District in Saa Diego Coimty". April, 19'+7. 

California State D-epe.riasent of Ps-iblic Works, Division of Water Resoxirces. 
"San Dieguito and Sa.i Diego Rivers In-«estigation" . Bulletin No. S5. 
19^9. 

California State Depa:ri33e-xfc of Public Works, Division of Water Reso'irces. 
"Santa Margarita ?d.ver Investigation". B^iLletia Ko. 57. June, 1956. 

Helix Irrigation District. "Annual Reports". 1953 to 1955, inclusive. 

San Diego County Water Authority. 'Annual Reports". 19^6 to 1955, inclusive. 

State Council of DefeasQ. "Report No. 3 Sea Diego Region". March, 19*^3. 

United States Depar'Jxner'.t of tiie Interior, Bureau of Eeclaaaation. "Investi- 
gation De3ig;a emd Construction of the Sen Diego Aqueduct". 19^. 

United States Eepartnent of the Interior, BuiT'saii of Seclamation. "Report 
on Sa^ Diego Project, Metropolite^ CoJinectlon Ealargeseat". January, 
1951. 

United States Savy, Eleventh laval District. "San Diego Aqueduct Project". 
July, 19i^S. 

Vista Irrigation mstriot. "Annual B.fipoz'c and Fin^iicial Statement". 1955- 

Water Department,. G;^t/ of San Diego. •'A-a.ncSvl Report". 195'+"55« 

O'c^ectlves aad Scope of InTest igation and Report 

CcxBpliesice with the spirit a-id intent of the legislation authorizing 
the investigation of alterjiiitlve leather R'.Tcr Project A(5.aeduct Routes to San 
ft Diego Co:.inty necessit-^ited consideration of a^(2i2duct capacity and location con- 
sistent with the concarraat studj' of elterriative Feather River Project Aqueduct 
Routes to southeiBL California and the long-reuage objectives of The California 
Water Plan, and consideration of the rscogirLsed immediate critical water supply 
problem of the San Lisgo CDuaty area. The objectives and scope of this investi- 
gation were, th-erefore, designed to develop e, prjgraja of aqueduct construction 



-11- 



that would comply with all of the foregoing considerations and thereby provide 
for both the present and future water needs of the San Diego County area. 

General Criteria Affecting Aqueduct Location 

The need for additional water in the San Diego County area is urgent, 
requiring immediate action to effect construction of additional aqueduct capa- 
city at the earliest practicable date. At the present time there exists only 
one source of supplemental water for the San Diego Coionty area, the presently 
surplus Colorado River water available at facilities of The Metropolitan Water 
District of Southern California. 

On the basis of studies reported on herein, it is evident that, with 
provision for additional water, San Diego Coimty and adjacent areas will exhi- 
bit substantial growth in the immediate future which will severely tax supplies 
available from existing sources including the Colorado River. It is also shown 
herein that the area with the greatest immediate growth potential is in the 
lower-lying coastal section of the Cotmty. 

Further, it has been shown in State Water Resources Board Bulletin 
No. 3 that full satisfaction of the ultimate water requirements of the San 
Diego County area will require a physical connection between an aqueduct 
delivering northern California water and the Colorado River Aqueduct near San 
Jacinto, since these reqiiirements are In excess of the planned ultimate capa- 
city of the Colorado River Aqueduct. 

It is thus apparent that construction of the next aqueduct to San 
Diego County from a connection with facilities of the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict is logical not only with respect to the present critical situation but 
also with regard to the long range development of the area. Regardless of the 
route or routes finally selected for the Feather River Project leading from 



-12- 



northern California, the need for uuch water will bo in that portion of the Bar. 
Diego County area which could also be most readily served with Colorado River 
water . 

In view of the foregoing, it was concluded that an aqueduct, which 
would serve Feather River Project water to the County, must, in the interim 
until such water is available, be capable of conveying presently siirplus 
Colorado River water available at facilities of The Metropolitan Water District 
of Southern California near .;an Jacinto. This was adopted as a basic premise 
in this investigation. 

Routes through San Ber na rdino and Riverside Counties 

Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 19; previously quoted, directs that, 
in connection with studies of alternative aqueduct routes to San Diego County, 
possible routes for an aqueduct throvigh San Bernardino and Riverside Counties 
are to be considered and a report thereon is to be submitted to the Legislature 
in its 1957 session. In compliance with this request, the Department of Water 
Resources has under way studies of alternative routes through San Bernardino 
and Riverside Counties from various points of entry for the Feather River 
Project Aqueduct Into the South Coastal Area. 

As previously mentioned, over-all studies to determine the most 
economical aqueduct route or routes for the Feather River Project into the 
southern California area either by a coastal route or via a high line route or 
modifications thereof throiogh the Tehachapi Mountains are now under way. These 
studies are scheduled for completion in the spring of 1958; at which time a 
report will be submitted to the Legislature. 

On the basis of preliminary work conducted to this time, it is con- 
cluded that determination of the location of the Feather River Project Aqueduct 
through San Bernardino and Riverside Counties must necessarily await completion 



-13- 



of the foregoing studies since location of this portion of the aqueduct is 
inherently dependent on the choice of the route south of Devils Den in the Seui 
Joaquin Valley and upon determination of points of delivery for project water 
in the southern California area. 

Objectives 

In consideration of the factors discussed in the preceding sections 
8uad in accordance with the intent of legislative directive, the principeil 
objectives of this investigation may be summarized as follows: 

1. Determination of the most economical route for an aqueduct which 
covild serve Feather River Project water to the Sein Diego County area and, in 
the interim until such water is available, be utilized to deliver Colorado River 
water to the area. 

2o Determination of the most economical capacity for this aqueduct 
to provide for the water needs of Saa Diego Covinty and adjacent areas for a 
reasonable period in the future. 

3. Determination of the cost of an aqueduct and appurtenant facili-= 
ties consistent with (l) and (2). 

Acccsnplishment of the foregoing objectives necessitated consideration 
of the following factors; 

1. The magnitude and natvire of the futvjre demand for water in the 
potential service area of the aqueduct and the variation in such demand as may 
occvir with aqueduct location and price of water. In this connection, it was 
assvnned that water adequate in q\iantity and qviality to satisfy estimated futvire 
needs would be available to the aqueduct, which assimiption is consistent with 
the stated policy of Ihe Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and 
with the objective of The California Water Plan. 



=11^. 



r 



2. Provision of" maximum water service at minimum over-all cost 
requiring (a) comparison of the cost of alternative aqueduct routes giving 
proper consideration to cost of facilities necesseuy for regulation and convey- 
ance of water to the service areas, and (b) evaluation of these routes from the 
standpoint of maximum integration with existing water supply facilities to 
avoid unnecessary overlap and duplication of such facilities. 

Scope '^ 

The investigation of eiltemative Feather River Project Aqueduct 
Routes to San Diego County was initiated in May, 1956, thro\;igh a provision in 
the budget act which made funds available to the predecessor agency of the 
Department of Water Resotirces, the Division of Water Resources of the Department 
of Public Works, prior to the beginning of the fisceJ. year. Subsequent to 
creation of the Department of Water Resources on July 3) 1956, work was con- 
tinued by the Southern California District Office of that agency. 

As an initial step in the investigation, the attempt was made to 
prociire and einalyze all prior pertinent information and data. Of particular 
value were discussions held with officials of the San Diego County Water 
Authority, from whcm basic data relating to this agency's prior aqueduct 
studies were obtained. 

Prior to deteiiled work on aqueduct costs and alignments, a complete 
study was made of future development as it will affect future demand for water 
in the potential aqueduct service area. In this connection, for the potential 
aqueduct service area the following studies were initiated simultaneously: 
projections of probable future population growth; economic studies of the 
fut\ire of irrigated agriculture, industry, and commerce; field studies of land 
use potential with reference to adaptability of the land to crops and to urban 
and suburban developments; studies of the ability to pay for water by crops 



-15' 



climatically adapted to the area; and review of unit uses of water by urban, 
suburban, and agricultural entities. 

Personal contact was made by Department representatives with each 
major water service agency in the potential aqueduct service area to obtain the 
views of those experienced in water matters in the area on the potential for 
growth and increased water demand. These persons and entities were contacted at 
the initiation of the studies, during the course of the investigation, and sub- 
sequently after preliminary resvilts had been obtained. In many cases, the 
valuable advice of such persons and agencies resiilted in modification of 
preliminary values of future water demand. 

Layouts for the several aqueduct routes considered together with 
estimates of cost therefor were prepared utilizing available U.S.G.S. topo- 
graphic maps. These map studies were supplemented by field reconnaissance in 
order to refine selected alignments and to provide field data on materials 
classification and required structures. In certain instances where topographic 
coverage was deemed inadequate at critical structures, additional topography was 
obtained in the field. 

Operational studies were made to ascertain the proper balance between 
aqueduct capacity and the location and capacity of regulatory storage reser- 
voirs. These studies also considered the integrated operation of the existing 
San Diego Aqueduct and other systems serving the area with the new aqueduct. In 
this connection, the cost of major conveyance units from the aqueduct to serve 
areas of need was given consideration. 

Study VTas given to the economics of various sizes and types of 
aqueduct, including reinforced concrete and steel pipe line as well as canal 
section, and also to the economics of steiged construction of aqueduct facilities 
as demands for water dictated. 



-16- 



A detailed description of the investigation of alternative Feather 
River Project Aqueduct Routes to San Diego Covinty and the resiilts of the inves- 
tigation are hereinafter presented in the three ensviing chapters. Chapter II, 

i''ut\.u-e Demands for Imported Water", describes the studies of euad presents 
estimates for probable future growth of San Diego County and southvestem 
Riverside County, and the attendeint demands for imported water therein. 
Chapter III, "Alternative Aqueduct Routes", describes the methods and procedures 
used in making economic comparison of alternative aqueduct routes leading to San 
Diego County, the results of the comparison, and a description of the location 
and features and estimates of cost of aqueduct facilities selected for Immediate 
construction. Chapter IV, "Conclusions and Recommendations", contains conclu- 
sions and recommendations resulting from the investigation. Appended to the 
report are pertinent maps and graphical presentations of the results of the 
investigation, together with preliminary plans and profiles for the selected 
aqueduct route, and also typical preliminary designs of appurtenant aqueduct 
facilities, which were utilized in preparing the final cost estimate. 

Detailed data and calculations, too vol\iminous for publication, are 
available in the files of the Southern California District Office of the 
Depeurtment of Water Resources. 

Area of Investigation 

In accordance with the basic objectives of the investigation, the 
principeUL area reported upon herein is that which could feasibly be provided 
water service from an aqueduct originating at facilities of The Metropolitan 
Water District of Southern California, between San Jacinto and Lake Mathews, 
and extending therefrom to San Diego Covinty, and is hereinafter generally 
referred to as the potential aqueduct service area. This area comprises the 
southwesterly portion of Riverside County, generally south of the Colorado 
River Aqueduct, and that portion of coastal San Diego Covinty lying, for the 

-17- 



most part, below elevation 1,700 feet. This is the area now facing a critical 
water shortage and that which was foimd to have the greatest immediate develop- 
ment potential. 

In this investigation consideration was given to the possibility of 
development of water demands in the higher areas of San Diego and southwestern 
Riverside Counties lying above elevation 1,700 feet. Land classification 
surveys conducted during this and previous investigations indicate that there 
are irrigable and habitable lands in these higher areas. However, based upon 
preliminary engineering and economic studies, it was found that, because of 
their remoteness and elevation, these higher lajids could not economically be 
supplied with water at this time from an aqueduct diverting from the Colorado 
River Aqueduct. Such lands wo\ild in the future receive water service from the 
previously described "High Line Aqueduct" under The California Water Plan. 

The area investigated in Riverside County generally includes the 
southern portion of the San Jacinto Valley and the adjoining Ferris, Menifee, 
and Domenigoni Valleys, and the Temecvila and Pauba Valleys which drain to the 
Santa Margarita River. There are also some substantial areas of rolling hill 
land located north of Temecula Creek which are expected to have considerable 
economic importance in the future. Portions of this area, largely lands within 
Eastern Municipal Water District of Riverside County, presently support a 
highly developed agricxoltural economy. 

The area investigated in San Diego County consists in lajge part of 
mountain or hill lands interlain by relatively slender stream valleys. The 
coasted segment is characterized by rolling hills and mesa lands, a substantial 
part of which has already experienced intensive develojment of both urban and 
agricult\Aral nature. 

The location of the area investigated is shown on Plate 1, "Location 
of Investigational Area" . Also shown on Plate 1 are the locations of the 



-18- 



reatvires of the Feather River Project, as presently contemplated, anr. tfce 
facilities of the existing Colorado River Aqueduct of the Metropolitan Water 
)istrict . 

The climate in the San Diego Aqueduct service area is generally mild 
lear the coast, with relatively light precipitation. Proceeding inland, as 
jlevations increase, temperature variations become wider and precipitation 
jecomes heavier. Mean seasonal precipitation is approximately 10 inches near 
;he coast and in excess of kO inches at the highest inland elevations of the 
tributary watersheds. Precipitation occxirs principally in the winter months, 
d.th about 90 per cent of the seasonal total generally occurring dxiring the 
aonths from November through April. 

The principal streams draining the area include the San Jacinto, 
5anta Margarita, San L\iis Rey, San Dieguito, San Diego, Sweetwater, Otay, and 
[ia Juana Rivers. Runoff in these streams is subject to wide variation from 
season to season and, because of the nature of its origin in precipitation, 
3cc\irs almost entirely during the months from November through April, 
ft Included in the area are the densely populated San Diego Metropolitan 
flrea surrounding San Diego and Mission Bays and the less populous but rapidly 
srowing camntinities of Escondido, Oceanside, Carlsbad, Fallbrook, and Rainbow, 
rt is estimated that the pop\LLation of San Diego County increased frcm about 
550,000 in 1950 to more than 850,000 on January 1, 1957- About 700,000 of these 
people reside in the San Diego Metropolitan Area. The mild and equable climate 
in the area, of world-wide renown, has been and, it is believed, will continue 
to be a major factor in this rapid rate of population growth. 

Agriculture, principally the raising of subtropical fniits, has 
expanded rapidly in San Diego County during recent years. Although the citrus 
Industry in the South Coastal Area has declined in importance in recent years, 
the raising of avocados has expanded rapidly. The high monetary return from 
this crop permits payment of a relatively high rate for irrigation water. 

-19- 



Aircraft manufactiire and fishing are major industries in the area. 
The capital investment in plants and equipment for these industries has almost 
doubled since 1950. In addition the headquarters of the Eleventh Naval Dis- 
trict, including training, repair, air, supply, and radio facilities, are 
located in the San Diego Metropolitan Area, and Camp Pendleton, the largest 
Marine Corps base in the nation, is located near Oceanside. 

In studies for preparation of The California Water Plan, it was 
determined that more than 70 per cent of the nmoff of streams in San Diego 
County is controlled by existing surface and underground storage developments . 
The San Jacinto River, the only major stream in the Riverside County portion of 
the area, is essentially fully controlled. Because a high degree of control 
over runoff from most streams in the area is already being effected, further 
conservation of infrequent flood flows of these streams will necessitate con- 
struction of relatively large and expensive surface storage developments. 
Fijirther, the yields obtainable from such developments are small when compared 
with the futxire water requirements of the area. It was determined in the 
studies of The California Water Plan that the probable ultimate seasonal 
supplemental water requirements of San Diego County, southwestern Riverside 
County, and southern Orange County (San Diego Group), are about 1,300,000 acre- 
feet, whereas the considered maximum practicable additional yield from storage 
developments that could be constructed on the streams in the Ssm Diego Group 
would be about 60,000 acre-feet per season. It therefore becomes apparent 
that, in the future, additional development of local water supplies in San 
Diego County will be relatively insignificant and that additional facilities 
for importation of water from outside sources are vital to further development 
of the area. 

Water supplies for the present water-using entities in the San Diego 
Aqueduct service area are derived from existing surface storage developments. 



-20- 



from importations of Colorado River -firaiter througb. th= existing S&n Liego Aque- 
duct, and to a lesser eicteikt by primping from groiuad water etoreige. The safe 
seasonal yield of present water supply developmerit is about 11+8,000 acre-feet, 
of ^riiich amormt about ons-half is from siarface storage developments, with 
about ll«-l,000 acre-=feet per season beixig obtained through the existing San 
Diego Aqueduct. The existing facilities for development of surface water sup- 
plies emd for importatioa of Trater from outside sources are shiTwa on Plate 2 
entitled "Major Existlug Water Supply ?e,fiilitiea". 

The major storeige reservoirs ia the area are listed in the following 
tabvilation accompaaied by data on their '.capacities axA airea of water service: 



Water in 
Storeys storage 

capacity, or. l-l-JT 
in in 

Stream acre-feet acre-feet 



Reservoir 



Morena 


CottoEwood Creek 


50,200 


m 


Bsirrett 


Cottonwood Creek 


W-,8C0 


867 


Upper Otay 


Proctor V8j.ley Greek 


2,800 


&>38 


Lower Otay 


Otay River 


56,300 


it, 620 


Chollas 


Trib. Las Chollas Cr. 


310 


292 


El Capitan 


Saa Diegc River 


ll£,80fj 


6,1+53 


San Vicente 


San Vi^ezrte Creek 


90,200 


36,0''+5 


Murray 


Chapparel Gai*.yon 


6,000 


3:>^52 


Sutherland 


Sa::.ta Ysabel Creek 


29,700 


1,752 


Hodges 


Saa Dieguito River 


33,600 


2,071 


San Dieguito 


Trib. Esoo:a>21do Creek 


i,ia^ 


795 


Ciiyamaca 


Boulder Criaak 


.12,000 





Sweetwater 


S«reefr»B.t(».T Rix-er 


28,000 


5,615 


Loveland 


Sweetwater River 


25,r/x) 


l,5C0 


Henshaw 


San Luis Rey River 


19^,000 


2,027 


Vail 


TemeeniLa Creek 


50,000 


__6l9 



Area served 

City of SsuQ Diego 
City of San Diego 
City of Saa Diego 
City of San Diego 
City of San Diego 
City of Sea Diego 
City of Sa?. Diego 
City of Sam Diego 
City of San Diego 
City of Sau. Diego 
City of San Diego 
leiix Ir;rlgation 

Dlstri.2t 
Ch-tL!.a Vista, 

National City 
Chtila Viata, 

National City 
Vista, EsGondido 
Vail Ranch 



TOTALS 



736,810 66,885 



Water is import.sd to water service areas in Sem Diego and south- 
western Riverside Counties thro-ag.fe the ejcisti::^ facilities of the Colorado River 
Aqueduct aad the San Diego Aq,uedu?.t, both cf which are shown an Plate 2. 



-21' 



The initial features of the Colorsuio River Aq.ued.uct vere completed by 
The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in 19^1. The aqueduct 
consists of a series of pumping lifts and 2*4-2 miles of condiiit leading from Lake 
Havasu on the Colorado River, westward across the Colorado Desert, passing 
through the San Jacinto Mountains in San Jacinto Tunnel and terminating at Lake 
Mathews about 12 miles southwest of Riverside.. The aqueduct has an initial 
hydravolic grade line elevation of ^50 feet at the Coloreido River, a maximxmi 
grade line elevation of about 1,800 feet at Hayfield pump lift, and a grade line 
elevation of about 1,505 feet at the west portal of San Jacinto Tunnel. The 
initial facilities instatLled included only sufficient p\imping units and siphon 
barrels to make possible the conveyance of a continuous flow of about 600 
second-feet. During the past year, construction of additional works along the 
aqueduct have reportedly increased the capacity to about 1,000 second-feet. 

During 1956, the Metropolitan Water District obtained authorization 
from the legislature and from the voters in the District for issuance of bonds 
in the amount of about $65,000,000 to finance the construction and installation 
of pumping and siphon facilities necessary to provide ultimate conveyance capa= 
city of the aqueduct of about 1,600 second -feet. The District proposes to 
complete this work in Jime, 196O, 

The existing San Diego Aqueduct was constructed with two barrels of 
approximately equal capacity. The first barrel was constrxicted by the United 
States Navy and completed in 19^7^ as an emergency measxu°e to provide water 
supplies made necessary by expansion of military and industrial installations 
and the attendant population increases resulting from World War II. The second 
barrel of the aqueduct was constructed by the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation and 
completed in 195^- Ownership and operation of the aqueduct were assumed by the 
San Diego Covinty Water Authority by contract with the United States ^ich pro- 
vides for repayment of the construction costs by the former agency with partial 



-22= 



assistance of the Metropolitan Water District. The conveysuice capacity of both 
barrels of the aqueduct under present operating conditions is in the order of 
195 second-feet. During the 12 -month period ending July 31 > 1956, the aqueduct 
conveyed a toteil of lUl,000 acre-feet or an average continuous discharge of 
19I4. second-feet. 

Surface storage developments constiructed on streams draining the San 
Diego County area have a nominal safe yield of about 66,000 acre -feet per 
season. During the cvirrent and continuing drought, presently in its thirteenth 
year, storage in these reservoirs has been so depleted that the safe yield 
thereof vlll not be restored without the occurrence of substantial local runoff. 
As shovm in a prior tabulation, the storage reserve on January 1, 1957 ^ was 
about 67*000 acre-feet or about 9 per cent of the total storage capacity avail- 
able, the leargest portion of \rtiich was imported Colorado River water. The 
existing Colorado River Aqueduct is presently satisfying the bulk of the water 
needs of the area. Without substantial augmentation of storage in the reser- 
voirs from local runoff, it is estimated that there will be a deficiency in 
water supply in the area of about 30,000 acre-feet d\iring 1957 • Even with 
restoration of the safe yields of the depleted reservoirs, anticipated rapid 
growth and attendant increase in water demand will so increase the water 
requirements in the San Diego Coixnty area, within two to three years, that the 
combined supply from the existing San Diego Aqueduct and loceLL sovirces will be 
insufficient to satisfy demand thereon. 

Responsible local agencies in the San Diego County area, recognizing 
this serious threat to their economy, are presently conducting an intensive 
campaign to conserve water. It is hoped by this campaign that the afore- 
mentioned water shortage which would be largely felt in the northern San Diego 
County agricultural areas, will be somewhat mitigated. 



-23- 



Local Activity Relative to 
Proposed Second San Diego Aq.ueduct 

Since the initiation of this investigation in May of 1956, by the 
Division of Water Resoiirces, certain actions relative to the financing and con- 
structing of a second aqueduct to convey Colorado River water to San Diego 
County have been initiated by interested local agencies. In this connection, 
the Department of Water Resources addressed a letter dated January 3; 1957^ to 
the Boards of Directors of The Metropolitan Water District of Southern 
CfiLLifomia and of the San Diego County Water Authority, requesting a statement 
of their Intentions regarding the financing and constructing of a second aque- 
duct to San Diego Covinty. The letter is enclosed in Appendix A of this report. 

Mr. Joseph Jensen, Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Metro- 

politeui Water District of Southern California, by letter dated January 2h, 

1957 > reproduced in Appendix A of this report, notified the Department of Water 

Resources of action of the Board of Directors with regard to construction of an 

aqueduct to San Diego County. The letter is quoted in part as follows: 

"Following its consideration on January 22, 1957^ the Board of 
Directors instructed me to inform you that it is the intention of 
this District to build an aqueduct to deliver additional water to 
the San Diego County Water Authority and that construction on it will 
begin within the present year. 

"Previously, on Januaxy 8, 1957 > yovir foregoing letter was 
referred to Mr. Robert B. Diemer, General Manager and Chief Engineer. 
His specific recommendations contemplate an aqueduct capable of 
delivering to San Diego County l80,000 acre feet of water a year, 
the first l6 miles from the point of diversion at the Colorado River 
aqueduct to Auld Valley to be open canal having a capacity of 500 
cfs and the remainder to be a pipe line having a capacity of 250 
cfs." 

Mr. Richard S. Holmgren, General Maneiger and Chief Engineer of the 

San Diego County Water Authority, by letter dated Janviary 29, 1957^ enclosed 

in Appendix A of this report, notified the Department of Water Resources of 

adoption of a statement of policy by the Authority's Board of Directors, 



-2k- 



attached to the foregoing letter, In irtilch the Board, "... urged the immediate 
construction of the Aqueduct by Metropolitaji Water District; and support for a 
"bond issue within the Authority area to finance the Authority's section of the 
Aqueduct." Mr. Holmgren's letter further notified the Department of Water 
Resoxirces of action of his Board of Directors directing him to, " ... proceed 
vlth preparation of engineering plans and specifications for the Second Aque- 
duct along the westerly route, as set forth in the State's alternate aqueduct 
route study, subject to such modifications as may be desirable in the light of 
fxirther engineering sttidies." 



-25- 



CHAPTER II. FUIURE DEMANDS FOR IMPORTED WATER 

In order to select the proper route and capacity for the proposed San 
Diego Aqueduct from economic and engineering standpoints, it was necessary to 
give consideration to the timing, location, and magnitude of future demands for 
ing)orted water in the potential aqueduct seinrLce area. A study was therefore 
made of the probable rate of increase in demand for water in San Diego and 
southwestern Riverside Counties, giving consideration to probable increases in 
population and irrigated agriculture and to factors influencing such growth. 
This chapter contains a description of this study and a summary of the results 
thereof . 

K In studies of future water demands, it was possible to take advantage 

of prior data compiled by the Ssin Diego County Water Authority in connection 
with preparation of the previously mentioned reports of the Authority and of 
its Board of Consulting Engineers. Use was also made of material and data 
contained in the afore -mentioned Bulletin No. 2 of the State Water Resources 
Board, and Bulletin No. 57 of the Division of Water Resources. 

W Personal contact by Depajrtment representatives was made with officials 

of each of the major water service agencies in the investigational area to ob- 
tain the opinion of those experienced in water matters of the potential for 

■ 

growth and increased water demand therein. These persons and entities were con- 
tacted at the initiation of the studies, during the course of the investigation, 
and subsequently after preliminary results had been obteiined. In many cases, 
the valuable advice of such persons and agencies resulted in modification of 
preliminary vaJ.ues of future water demand. 

T As previously stated, a basic premise in the studies of future water 

denands in the service area of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct was that water 
adequate in quantity and quality to satisfy future water needs therein would be 



-27- 



made available to existing and proposed import facilities. By this premise, it 
is assumed that growth and development in the potential water service area will 
not he inhibited by lack of a suitable water supply, but rather will be a 
function of other influencing conditions and factors, as hereinafter discussed. 

Ifethbds and Procedures 

The general procedure followed in estimating future demands for 
imported water in San Diego and southwestern Riverside Counties consisted of 
the following steps: 

1. An economic study of the area in order to evaluate the relation- 
ship of present levels of agricultural, commercial, and industrial development 
to the present magnitude and distribution of population and to the present 
extent of utilization of irrigable and habitable lands. 

2. Extension of the economic study to estimate the potential for 
future development of irrigated agriculture, commerce, and industry in the area. 
This study included a detailed field classification survey of lands in the area 
to determine their adaptability to and availability for the various uses 
associated with future agricultural and urban and suburban enterprise. 

3. Studies of present unit use of water by urban and suburban and 
agricultural developments in the investigational area and in comparable areas of 
the State and the nation aind preparation of estimates of future unit uses of 
water for such developments. 

h. Estimates of future population growth based on the economic fac- 
tors evaluated under Items 1 and 2 together with employment of standard statis- 
tical methods of population projection. 

5. Estimates of the areal extent of future irrigated agricultural 
lands based upon the afore -mentioned economic studies, with consideration given 
to the physical limitations of potential agricultural area by probable future 

-28- 



encroachment of urban and suburban development thereon, effects of ability to 
pay for water by climatically adapted crops, financing capacities of existing 
and proposed water service agencies, location of alternative aqueduct routes 
and costs of conveyance of water therefrom, and to other influencing factors. 

6. Estimates of future water requirements in the potential aqueduct 
service area for each alternative aqueduct route investigated based upon (l) 
estimates of unit uses of water, (2) probable future population and area of 
urban and suburban development, and, (3) probable future areas devoted to 
irrigated sigri culture. In this connection considei-ation was given to the 
firm water supplies available from local sources. 

Estimates of future water needs in the potential aqueduct service 
area were developed for a i+O-year period commencing in 1960 eind extending imtil 
the year 2000. The year I960 is considered the probable time of completion for 
a new aqueduct to be constructed to San Diego County. The kO-ye&T period was 
considered to be of sufficient length to provide a basis for estimating long- 
term trends in water using developments, and to pennit proper economic com- 
parison of several alternative plans of aqueduct construction, both as to 
location and capacity. The forty-year period was selected for the purposes of 
analyses and has no significance with regaard to the useful life of facilities 
hereinafter considered for construction nor with regard to the timing or avail- 
ability of future imported water supplies. 

For analytical purposes, all landi -^ ^^ 't was considered might 
receive water service from the existing or propose^ San Diego Aqueduct were 
segregated into 52 subareas, each of which was given individual study. 

As stated in Chapter I, it was concluded, after preliminary recon- 
naissance, that only that portion of the investigational area generally lying 
below elevation 1,700 feet could feasibly be served water from the proposed San 
Diego Aqueduct. Therefore, analyses of certain of the higher and more remote of 

-29- 



the 52 subareas were not carried to the degree of refinement given to those suh- 
areas considered to be within the potential aqueduct service area. 

The boundaries of the subareas were laid along the boundaries of 
presently organized local water service agencies wherever such agencies existed. 
The boundary locations of unorganized areas were adopted for study purposes on 
the basis of topographic features and geographical location of the lands, 
reflecting the physical problem of serving water thereto. An added influencing 
factor in selection of the subareas was their location relative to presently 
organized areas and the possibility of their eventual inclusion in such areas 
in order to take advantage of utilization of common water conveyance facilities. 
The foregoing subareas are listed by name and number in Table 1. The table also 
shows the gross area of each unit, the estimated areas of developable lands in 
each, and the approximate range of elevations of the lands contained therein. 
The estimated areas of developable lands in each subarea were derived from land 
classification surveys as reported in State Water Resources Board Bulletin No. 2, 
Division of Water Resources Bulletin No. 57, and the survey described hereinafter. 

The subareas designated in Table 1 by numbers are identical to those 
utilized by the San Diego County Water Authority in its previously mentioned 
study and report of 1955. The subareas designated by letters are additional 
subdivisions of the investigational area defined by the Department of Water 
Resources during this investigation. 



-30- 



TABLE 1 

GROSS AREAS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPABLE LANDS 

IN SUBDIVISIONS OF THE WATER SERVICE AREA 

OF THE PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 









Estimated 


Range of 


Subareas 




Gross : 


net areas of 


elevation. 






area, : 
in acres : 


developable 
leinds, in 


in feet 


: 




(U.S.G.S. 


Name : Number 




acres 


datum) 


Ssji Diego County- 










San Diego Metropolitan Area 




(225,000) 


(225,000) 


0-1,800 


Rio San Diego Municipal 










Water District 


5 


19,400 


19,400 


300-1,000 


Helix Irrigation District 


6 


30,000 


30,000 


300-1,400 


South Bay and National City- 


7 


17,100 


17,100 


0- 300 


San Diego 


12 


76,300 


76,300 


0- 800 


Otay Municipal Water District 


16 


60,000 


60,000 


100-1,800 


Imperial 


20 


14,700 


l4,700 


0- 400 


Near Miramar 


26 


7,500 


7,500 


100- 400 


Oceanside-Carlsbad Metro- 










politan Area 




(43,360) 


(34,820) 


0- 500 


Carlsbad Municipal Water District 


2 


20,630 


16,480 


0- 500 


Oceanside 


8 


8,210 


6,630 


0- 400 


Near Oceanside 


27 


14,520 


11,710 


0- 400 


Escondido Metropolitan Area 




(24,330) 


(19,860) 


600-1,500 


Escondido 


3 


1,940 


1,940 


600- 800 


Rincon del Diablo Municipal 










Water District 


11 


22,390 


17,920 


600-1,500 


Santa Fe-San Dieguito Area 




(24,090) 


(18,790) 


0- 300 


San Dieguito Irrigation District 


13 


4,560 


4,000 


0- 300 


Santa Fe Irrigation District 


14 


10,250 


8,390 


0- 300 


East of San Dieguito 


25 


9,280 


6,420 


0- 300 


Bueno Colorado Municipgil 










Water District 


1 


51,700 


36,210 


200-1,700 


Fallbrook 


k 


l6,i40 


8,280 


30c- 900 


Poway Municipal Water District 


9 


11,540 


7,140 


400-1,300 


Rainbow Municipal Water District 


10 


35,390 


22,200 


200-1,3.00 


Valley Center Municipal Water 










District 


15 


55,190 


23,530 


300-1,800 


Ramona Municipal Water District 


17 


23,100 


14,280 


1,300-1,700 


Pvajicho El Cajon 


l8 


16,510 


6,530 


1,000-3,000 


Pauma Valley 


19 


12,750 


5,770 


800-2,200 


North of Santa Fe 


2k 


9,530 


4,750 


100-1,000 


South of Lake Hodges 


28 


32,880 


13,040 


100- 800 


East of Del Mar 


29 


39,270 


22,820 


0-1,200 


Lo-wer Paioma Valley 


30 


25,290 


8,430 


200- 700 


Camp Pendleton* 




135,000 


62,000 


0-2,300 


Camp Elliott* 




38,000 


17,000 


300- 900 


Jamul 


A 


75,160 


17,780 


500-3,000 


Loveland 


B 


47,180 


8,590 


1,000-2,500 


Potrero 


C 


31,370 


6,530 


2,000-3,500 


Morena* 


D 


46,000 


9,000 


2,500-3,200 



■31- 



GROSS AEEAS AM) AREAS OF Di'ii'ELOFAELE LANDS 

IDS SUBDIVISIONS OF THE WATER SERVICE AESA 

OF THE PROPOSED SAH DIESO AQOESUCT 

(conti:iued.) 









: Estimated 


Range of 


Subareas 




Gross 


:net ai-eas of 


elevation, 






area, 
in acres 


: developable 
: lands, in 


in feet 




• 
• 


(U.S.G.S. 


Uame 


; Number 




: acres 


datum ^ 


San. Diego CovLat^ (contin-ued) 
Live Oak"^ 


E 


25,000 


9, COO 


3,000-4,000 


El Capitaa 


F 


.Ul,6lO 


13, '^70 


l,0O3'-4,000 


C-oyamaca®' 


a 


258,000 


500 


1,500-6,500 


Riacoii 


H 


33,,?80 


10,220 


400-1,700 


San Vicente 


I 


70,000 


13,890 


7CO"3,000 


South Sutherland 


J 


22,710 


6,350 


1,600-2,500 


Gue^ito 


K 


75,190 


19,7^0 


i,aoo-3,500 


Sutherland'* 


L 


75,OCiO 


20,000 


2,500^4,200 


Eeashaw* 


M 


69,00c 


11,000 


2,700-4,300 


Ague Tlbia^ 


^ 


3B.A7O 


1,320 


1,200-1,700 


Palosnar®- 





67, ''000 


7,000 


2,400-3,500 


Chihuahua®' 


P 


56,000 


3,000 


4,100-5,000 


lorfch of Peadleton^ 


W 


35^000 


4,600 


500-1,000 


Subtotals, Saa Diego County 




1,73s, 5i^0 


712,460 




South'wester'i Riverside^ Courjity 










Temecuia'*'' ' ' '"" 


Q 


24,120 


1,920 


500-2,200 


Vaii^ 


R 


77,850 


13,370 


1,00«>2,300 


Murrieta'^ 


S 


71,360 


22,330 


1, ox "1,800 


Cottonwood^ 


T 


83,510 


8.530 


l,60C?-2,800 


Anza^ 


U 


92,420 


13,340 


2,700-4,500 


Winchester South®" 


¥ 


_86pOOO 


6q^oe-o 


1,400-2,100 


Subtotals, South'westem 










Riverside County 




435,260 


119,490 




GRAFD TOTALS 




2,217,80*3 


831,950 





a. Data derived from State Water P^esou'i.'ces Bcafd Btilletia Ko. 2. 

b. Data derived frjra Division of Water Eesouirces Bvilletin Ho. 57 • 



-32- 



It will be noted in Table 1 that a number of subareas were combined 
into larger eireas designated. "Metropolitan Areas" in consideration of the proba- 
ble nature of future development, and since after preliminary study, it was 
concluded that the economic aspects and water supply problems of the individual 
subareas were so closely related that evaluation on an individual basis would 
be unnecessary. These metropolitan areas were designated San Diego, Oceanside- 
Carlsbad, Escondido, and Santa Fe-San Dieguito. The boxindaries of the fore- 
going subareas and metropolitan areas are delineated on Plate 3, entitled 
"Subdivisions of Investigational Area". 

A systematic analysis was made of each subdivision of the investi- 
gational area, which euialysis consisted of evaluation of eleven different 
factors which would affect the future growth and attendant demand for water 
therein. Data on these influencing factors were obtained from all available 
sources, including official records, published reports, personal interviews with 
officials of local, private, and governmental agencies, and field investigations 
and surveys by Department personnel. 

The factors studied for each subarea are listed and discussed as 
follows : 

1. Climatic Conditions - A mild, equable climate has played a major 
role in the development of the San Diego area. Large nimbers of people have been 
attracted to the area by the climate and certain industries have moved in to take 
advantage of the available labor force. The long frost -free periods in certain 
portions of the area are favorable for the production of valuable subtropical 
fruits and other specialty crops, which has led to the development of intensive 
irrigated agriculture where water is available. However, since all parts of the 
investigational area are not equally well adapted to production of these valuable 
crops, each subarea was analyzed individually with regard to this factor. 



-33- 



2. Transportation Facilities - For urban development, a basic road 
system is essential. Also, good main highways, rail facilities, ship docking 
facilities, and airports all aid in the development of commerce and industry, 
which in turn stimulates further urbaMzation. 

For agricultural development, a road system need not be as elaborate 
as in urbsin areas, and other types of treinsportation facilities essential to the 
urban community are not necessary to agricultural growth. However, as access 
must be provided into cultivated areas, existing roads enable development to 
occur more rapidly than if there were no such facilities. 

3. Present Level of Urban and Agricultural Development - The present 
level of development determines to a large extent the rate of immediate growth, 
but becomes less important with the passage of time. There are in existence, 
in any extensively developed urban or agricultural area, utilities, roads, 
schools, commercial establishments, and other facilities required for sejrvlcing 
the needs of such areas. As between two areas with the same development poten- 
tial, that area with the larger present economic base, with other Influencing 
factors being equal, will exhibit the most rapid immediate growth. However, 
over a period of years, economic pressures will force the initiation of develop- 
ment in virgin lands, at which time the existing level of urban or agricultural 
development would be of relatively less importance. 

Data obtained from field surveys, together with data appearing in 
State Water Resources Board Bulletin No. 2, were utilized to determine the 
relative levels of urban and agricultural developments in the various subareas, 
which determinations assisted in the projections of rate of growth for the 
immediate future. 

k. Present Water Supply Facilities - The existence of facilities for 
development of local water supplies and for conveyance and distribution of local 
and imported water supplies are significant factors in the rapidity of future 

-3h- 



agricultural and urban developnent with the importance of such facilities depend- 
ing upon their present degree of utilization and capacity provided therein for 
future expansion. This factor would have a decreasing effect vrt.th the passage 
of time as does the present level of urban and agricultural development. 

The existing water supply systems in each subarea were analyzed to 
determine the area served by such facilities, the capacities and present degree 
of utilization of such facilities and the possibilities of expansion inherent 
in their designs. These data were utilized, together with other factors, in 
estimating imraediate rates of growth, but it was considered that this factor 
would have a negligible effect after about 1970. 

5. Ability to finance Constr uction of Water Supply Facilities - The 
ability to finance construction of water supply facilities together with the 
factor discussed in Item No, 8, "Cost of Conveyance ajid Distribution Facilities" 
is basic to the evaluation of the probable growth rate of undeveloped areas. 
It is of lesser importance in highly developed areas with a large economic base 
euid attendant financial capacity. 

The present policy of the San Diego County Water Authority requires 
member agencies thereof to finance and construct all facilities for conveyance 
and distribution of water from the existing aqueduct to the individual service 
areas. In most instances, a general obligation bond issue is the only practical 
method of financing the construction o:? such facilities. Although the security 
for the bond issue, namely the value of lands to be developed, is generally 
relatively low until the development is accomplished, experience in the San 
Diego Coi.uity sirea, as well as other parts of California, demonstrates that 
financing problems in undeveloped areas can be solved. 

An8.1yses were made of those subareas with an apparent limited finan- 
cial capacity for water supply development to ascertain assessed valuations and 
the probable present bonding capacity therein. It is recognized that 

-35- 



determinations of bonding capacity cannot be accurately evaluated, however, 
these analyses when compared with the estimated capital costs of delivering 
water from the considered aqueduct routes served as a guide in projecting 
probable rates of growth in certain areas. 

6. Ability of Consumers to Pay for Water - Although to some extent 
influencing the amount of water used, the ability of consumers in urban and sub- 
urban areas to pay for water is not a major factor in the growth of such areas. 
This factor is, however, of prime importance in the development of irrigated 
agriculture along with the ability to finance construction of water supply 
facilities. The ability to pay for irrigation water is measured by the margin 
by which monetary returns from crops exceed all production, management, and 
marketing costs except the cost of water. A major consideration in the deter- 
mination of ability to pay for water by future agricultural development is the 
cost of undeveloped lajid and the attendant costs necessary to prepare the land 
for irrigation. The ability to pay was evaluated for various types of crops 
considered to be adaptable to growing conditions in each of the subareas. This 
factor is discussed in greater detail in an ensuing section of this report. 

7, Selling Price of Water - This factor is intimately related to the 
ability to pay for water. Charges for water have a major effect upon agricul- 
tural development but very little effect upon urban and suburban development, 
although a higher selling price for water usually will be a deterrent to loca- 
tion of industries with a high water usage. Since higher prices for water are 
usually found in water-short areas, public campaigns to conserve water, as well 
as the lnh3.biting effect of the price Itself, have usually had the effect of 
lowering the \anit use of water. 

The actual cost of additional imported water supplies delivered to 
consumers in the service area of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct would reflect 
the price charged for water at the main aqueduct and the annual costs of 

-36- 



conveyance., pumping; and distribution facilities required to effect water 
delivery to the customer. This price would therefore vary among the several sub- 
areas and within a given subarea depending on aqueduct location. 

The extent, if any, to which the selling price of agricultural water 
will be reduced by tax levies or by aid from urban and suburban water revenues 
will be a major factor in future development of irrigated agriculture. This 
selling price will depend therefore upon decisions of boards of directors of 
the vairious water service agencies involved and upon methods of service selected 
for the various subareas, and accordingly is not subject to finite determination 
at this time. 

In order to ascertain the effect of price of water on the estimated 
future demand therefor, these estimates of water requirements were prepared for 
each considered aqueduct route with two assiuned values for the cost of water 
delivered at the aqueduct. Water is presently sold to wholesaling agencies by 
the San Diego County Water Authority at a nominal price of $12 per acre-foot 
with some additional regulatory storage charges in certain instances. 

After consideration of local costs of conveyance and distribution of 
water incidental to providing delivery of water to the land, it appears that a 
price for water of $kO per acre-foot at the main aqueduct for any of four alter- 
native locations would result in a cost at the farmers' headgate which would 
generally approximate the estimated upper limit of ability to pay for water for 
the most lucrative types of agricultvire . For analytical purposes, in this 
investigation the selling price of water delivered at the aqueduct was assumed 
to have a lower value of $15 per acre -foot and an upper value of $to per acre- 
foot. 

In the studies hereinafter described, the costs of delivery of the 
water to the land from the considered alternative aqueduct locations were added 
to the assumed wholesale prices at the aqueduct to obtain a unit price to be 

-37- 



compared with estimates of ability to pay for water. In this manner, those 
factors of price of water and ability to pay were utilized in determining the 
probable future demand for water in the potential aqueduct service area. 

8. Cost of Cdnveyarice arid Distribution Facilities - This factor, as 
previously stated, is a basic consideration in projecting the rate of growth of 
water-using development, particularly of iirigated agilculture. Further, the 
effect of location of aqueduct on the growth of a given subarea is measured by 
the variance in cost of conveyance facilities from each considered route. 

For each of the subareas preliminary estimates of the cost of con- 
veyance and distribution facilities were prepared for each of the considered 
aqueduct routes. In this connection, reconnaissance -type estimated costs of 
construction and operation of the facilities were utilized. It should be noted 
that the estimates of cost so employed were only for the purpose of developing 
costs of delivery of water for comparison with estimates of ability to pay, and 
were not prepared to the same degree of refinement as those for facilities 
discussed in Chapter III of this report. Set forth in the following tabulation 
are unit costs used in the estimates. 

Construction costs of main conveyance facilities 
per acre -foot of maxilmuan annual conveyance capacity 

Item 

Materials 

Labor 

Engineering, supervision and contingencies 

Lajid - fee title and easements 

Totals $ 7.00 100 



Cost 
per mile 


Per cent 
of total 


$ 4.20 
1.40 
1.19 
0.21 


60 

20 

17 

3 



-38- 



$42.00 


70 


9.6o 


16 


6.00 


10 


2.it0 


k 



Construction costs of distribution facilities 
per acre -foot of maximum annual water delivery 

Per cent 
Item Cost of total 

Materials and labor 

Engineering, supervision and incidentals 
Reservoirs and appurtenances 
Purification and miscellaneous expenses 

Totals $60.00 100 

In certain of the higher and more remote subareas, estimated costs of 
conveyance and distribution systems were in excess of the present or probable 
future capacity of these areas for financing such works. Further, costs of 
water delivered to land greatly exceeded the estimated payment capacity of 
climatically adapted crops. Such areas were not considered to be within the 
potential aqueduct service area and were eliminated from further detailed 
consideration . 

Other less remote subareas which are presently undeveloped were found 
to have limited financing abilities that precluded the construction of distri- 
bution systems sufficient to serve all lands therein. However, in such areas, 
it appeared that, under a program of staged construction of distribution works, 
development of the areas would be possible. This factor was therefore taken 
into accoiint in estimating the rate of development which would occur in such areas. 

9. Industrial and Commercial Growth - The effect of industrial growth 
upon water demand csm be direct if the particular activity has a high water- 
using characteristic or indirect because of the growth of population and agri- 
culture which it might stimulate. Growth of industry in an area is dependent 
upon many of the factors previously itemized. Other factors are markets for 
products, availability of raw materials and a labor force, and a plentiful 
supply of water. This factor is discussed in greater detail in an ensuing 
section of this chapter. 



-39- 



10. Agricultural Growth - This factor is dependent upon many of the 
preceding items, particularly climate and cost of water. It was found that, 
based upon experience in this and other areas, where an adequate supply of water 
is made available at a cost within the upper limit of ability to pay for such 
water, the growth of irrigated agriculture has proceeded at a very rapid rate. 
This factor is also discussed in greater detail in an ensuing section of this 
chapter. 

11. Local Political Environment - In some cases this is of more 
importance in water supply development than any other single factor. For 
example, some areas, wherein financial feasibility of water development facili- 
ties is marginal, will implement construction of the needed vorks through intense 
local enthusiasm for such development. Conversely, in other areas where ample 
capacity to finance water supply facilities exists, programs for water develop- 
ment will fail or never be initiated due to local apathy or desire to limit 
growth of population or industry. This factor is, by its nature, nebulous and 
difficult of evaluation and further will change with time. Throughout the area 
of investigation, the need for additional water supply development is well 
recognized at every level of government and among the lay population. In general 
it may be stated that "local political environment" in this area is conducive to 
rapid prosecution of a program of additional water supply development. 

Classification of lands for Water Service 

The maximum limit to which irrigated agricultiire or urban and suburban 
areas can develop is basically dependent upon the areal extent of lands available 
for these uses. Field surveys were conducted to classify lands in the investi- 
gational area with respect to their adaptability for various water-using develop- 
ments. The pxjrpose of these surveys was to establish the ultimate potential for 
irrigated agriculture and urban and suburban development based on availability 

-i*0- 



of land, and to evaluate the suitability of available land for these uses on the 
basis of those influencing factors susceptible of identification. 

This survey was conducted generally throughout coastal San Diego 
County. Prior work of this nature done in connection with the preparation of 
State Water Resources Board Bulletin No. 2 was utilized within and adjacent to 
Eastern Municipal Water District of Riverside Covmty and for the higher lands in 
San Diego County. Results of a similar survey conducted by the Division of 
Water Resources in 1953 and I95U in connection with the Santa Margarita River 
investigation were employed in the Santa Margarita River watershed. 

Certain portions of coastal San Diego County comprising lands within 
the military reser^/at^.ons at Camp Elliott and Camp Pendleton were not examined in 
the field in connection with this investigation, smd basic data relative to 
their future water requirements were developed by other means as hereinafter 
described. Further, that portion of the area designated the "San Diego 
Metropolitan Area" is considered to be potentially aji entirely urbanized area 
and was not examined in the field with respect to its land use axiaptability. 
This area during the chosen iiO-year period will contain irrigated agricultural 
land as it does at the present time. However, it is believed that the areal 
extent of such land will g„'adually decline with urban expansion. 

As previously stated, it was found after preliminary reconnaissance 
that certain of the higher and more remote portions of the investigational area, 
fTom an economic or financial standpoint, ccrald not be served with water from the 
proposed San Diego Aqueduct at this time. As a result, land classification 
surveys were not made in connection with this investigation in the Morena, Live 
Oak, Cuyamaca, Sutherland, Henshaw, Paloms.r, and Chihuahua subareas. Data on 
land classification in these latter areas hereinafter presented were derived 
fi^m naterial presented in State Water Resources Board Bulletin No. 2. 



-i+l- 



The term "ultimate" as employed herein is referred to in the same 
sense as in publications of the State Water Resources Board axid is defined as 
follows : 

"Ultimate - This is used in reference to conditions after em unspeci- 
fied but long period of years in the future when land use and water supply 
development will be at a maximum and essentially stabilized." 

Methods and Procedures 

All lands surveyed in the field were subdivided into various classes 
which reflected their suitability foi- production of different irrigated crops or 
for development of an urban or suburban nature. In all, 22 classes were 
employed,, l6 for irrigated agriculture, 5 for urban and. suburban lands, and 1 
for forest lands. 

For lands considered to have an agricultural potential, consideration 
was given to such physical characteristics as topography, soil depth, soil tex- 
ture, saline or alkaline conditions, high water table conditions, and the 
presence of rock. Climatic conditions, while not a factor in the actual physical 
classification of the lands, were very important in development of the probable 
ultimate crop pattern therefor. This was particularly true in the case of sub- 
tropical fruits which are very susceptible to frost damage. For the purpose of 
plaiining for conditions of full development Eind, as stated, to ascertain the maxi' 
mum limit of development, no consideration was given to those economic factors 
relating to production and marketing, which are variable among given areas ajid 
subject to considerable fluctuation over a period of years. Neither was the 
position of the lands relative to an immediately available water supply an 
influencing factor in the classification. However, both of these factors were 
given consideration in estimating the rate at which development could be expected 
to occur in the various areas. 

-k2- 



In delineating the areas adjudged to be potentially urban or sub- 
urban rather than agricultural, consideration was given to their proximity to 
presently developed urban areas which could be expected to expand, the salubrious 
climate neaur the seacoast which would stimulate residential and recreational 
development, and to leinds that would logically develop as \irban center in eireas 
of large irrigated agricultural potential. 

Areas classified as adaptable to urban and suburban use were sub- 
divided into several categories according to the type of development which 
could be expected to occur. These included: (l) intensively settled areas 
characterized by closely knit industrial, commercial, and residential develop- 
ment, (2) areas which probably would be primarily residential and which would 
contain those coinraercial establishments necessary to provide services to the 
resident population, (3) a combination agricultural and residential development 
which would include small acreages of agriculture together with residences, 
and (k) a low water -using type of development such as state and county parks, 
race tracks, etc. 

Field mapping of all lands was done on aerial photographs having a 
scale of approximately 1:20,000. The area was covered by car, and at times by 
walking, as completely as roads and trails permitted. Road cuts, pits, and 
auger borings were examined to determine the effective root depth and texture of 
the soils. Representative slopes throughout the area were measured with a cli- 
nometer. By consideration of these factors, as well as the presence of rock, 
saline or alkaline soil conditions, and high water table, the appropriate class 
for each parcel of agricultural land was determined and delineated on the aerial 
photographs. In mapping the urban areas, factors affecting the probable type of 
such development were noted and evaluated in the field, and the proper classifi- 
cation assigned thereto. In this connection, prevailing topographical conditions 
were assessed for purposes of estimating probable maximum population densities. 

-43- 



Table 2 sets forth the standards for classification of lands for water 
service of the State Department of Water Resources which were employed in this 
investigation. 

Areas of Land Use Adaptability Classes 

Results of the land classification survey, together with data obtained 
from the afore -mentioned prior su3rveys, indicate that, of a total of approxi- 
mately 2,330,000 acres in the investigational area, some 350,000 acres will 
probably eventually be urbanized and that about 510,000 acres are susceptible 
of intensive irrigated agricultural development. Of the remaining lands, about 
173^000 acres in military reservations were not classified, and approximately 
1,300,000 acres are not considered either irrigable or habitable. 

Of the irrigable lands in the San Margarita River watershed and in the 
remainder of Saji Diego County surveyed in connection with this investigation, 
approximately 68,000 acres, or about I8 per cent are valley lands. Irrigable 
hill lands in this area amount to about 318,000 acres. 

Most of the irrigable valley lands are found along the major streams 
of the area. Ntmierous smaller valleys and noncontiguous axeas of flat land, 
some of which are on the coastal terraces, also contribute to this acreage. 
Practical].y all of these irrigable valley lands are composed of Recent alluvial 
soils and for the most part are of excellent agricultural quality. The topo- 
graphy is generally smooth and flat, or smooth and gently sloping, and is suit- 
able for most types of irrigation practices. Textures vary from light to medium 
and there is ample effective root depth in nearly all cases. Some relatively 
small areas near the mouths of the streajns are affected by concentrations of 
harmful salts. Since most of these irrigable valley lands occupy the lowest 
elevations in the valleys, the frost hazard is very great and practically pre- 
cludes the production of subtropical fruits. These lands are best sxiited for the 

production of truck and field crops. 

-kk- 



I 

I 



TABLE 2 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

STANDARDS FOR CLASSIFICATION 
OF LMDS FOR WATER SERVICE 



Land : 

class: Characteristics 



V Smooth lying valley lands with slopes up to 6 per cent in general 
gradient, in reasonably large-sized bodies sloping in the same planej 
or slightly undulating lands which are less than k per cent in general 
gradient. The soils have medium to deep effective root zones, are 
permeable throughout, and free of salinity, alkalinity, rock, or 
other conditions limiting crop adaptability of the land. These lands 
are suitable for all climatically adapted crops. 

Vw Similar in all respects to Class V, except for the present condition 
of a high water table , which in effect limits the crop adaptability 
of these lands to pesttire crops. Drainage and a change in irrigation 
practice would be required to affect the crop adaptability. For the 
purpose of this investigation it was assumed that there will be no 
future change in use of these lainds. 

Vs Similar in all respects to Class V, except for the presence of saline 
and alkaline salts, which limits the present adaptability of these 
lajids to crops toleremt to such conditions. The presence of salts 
within the soil generally indicates poor drainage and a medium to high 
water table. Reclamation of these lands will involve drainage and the 
application of additional water over and above crop requirements in 
order to leach out the harmfxil salts. 

Vh Similar in all respects to Class V, except for having very heavy 

textures, which makes these lands best-suLted for the production of 
shallow-rooted crops such as rice and pasture. 

VI Similar in all respects to Class V, except for having a fairly coarse 
textures and low moisture holding capacities, which in general make 
these lands unsuited for t?rie production of shallow-rooted crops 
because of the frequency of irrigations reqiiired to supply the water 
needs of such crops. 

Vp Similar in all respects to Class V, except for depth of the effective 
root zone, which limits use of these lands to shallow-rooted crops, 
such as irrigated grain amd pasture. 

Vr Similar in all respects to Class V, except for the presence of rock 
on the surface or within the plow zone in sufficient quantity to 
prevent use of the land for c\ativated crops. These lands are suitable 
for irrigated pasture crops. 



45- 



BTATE 0? CALIFOMIA 
DEPARTMENT OF WAITBR RESOUHCES 

STANDARDS FOR CLASSIFICA^'ION 
OF LANDS FOR WATER SERVICE 

(continued) 



Land : 

class: Characteristics 



Vhs Similar in all rsspects to Class Y , except for the limitations set 

forth for Classes Vh and Vs, which makes these lands best suited for 
the production of shallow-rooted, salt-tolerant crops. 

Vis Similar in all respects to Class V, except for the limitations set 

forth for Classes VI and Vs, which makes these lands best suited for 
the production of deep-rooted, salt-tolerant crops. 

Vps Girailar in nil respects to Class V, except for the limitations set 

forth for classes Vp and Vs, which restrict the crop adaptability of 
these li,ncls to shall ow-rooted, salt-tolerant crops. 

Vpr Similar ia a.l i respects to Class V, except for the limitations set 

forth for Classes Vp and Vr, which restrict the crop adaptability of 
these lands to irrigated pasture. 

H Rolling and undulating lands with slopes up to a maximum of 20 per 
cent for rolling large-sized bodies sloping to the same plane; and 
grading dowrj; to a majciiiiura slope of less than 12 per cent for undulating 
lands. The soils are permeable, with medium to deep effective root 
zones, and are suitable for the production of all climatically adapted 
crops. The only liasiltation Is that imposed by topographic conditions, 
which affect the ease of irrigation and the amount of these lands that 
may ultimately lie developed for irrigation. 

KL Similar in all respects to Class E, except for having fairly coarse 
textures and low moisture holding capacities •vriaich in general makes 
these lands unsiiited for the production of shallow-rooted crops 
because of the freqxiency of irrigations required to supply the water 
needs of such crops. 

Hp Similar in all respects to Class H, except for depth of the effective 
root zone, •^•7?.':lch liojits use of these lands to shallow-rooted crops. 

Hr Similar in all respects to Class H. except for the presence of rock on 
the surface or "within the plow zone in sufficient quantity to restrict 
use of the lauid to noncultlvated crops. 

Hpr Similar in all respects to Class H, except for depth of the effective 
root aone and the presence of rock on the surface ox' within the root 
zone in sufficient qufjntity to restrict use of these lands to non- 
cultivated crops. 



Mj- 



STATE OF CALIJORNIA 
DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

STANDARDS FOR CLASSIFICATION 

OF LANDS FOR WATER SERVICE 

(continued) 



Land : 

class: Characteristics 



Ht Similar in all respects to Class H, except for topographic limitations. 
These lands have smooth slopes up to ^5 per cent in general gradient 
for large-sized bodies sloping in the same plane, and slopes up to 12 
per cent for rovigher and more xmdulating topography. These lands will 
probably never become as highly developed as other "H" classes of 
land, and axe best suited only for irrigated pasture. 

Htl Similar in all respects to Class Ht, except for having fairly coarse 
textures and low moisture holding capacities which in general makes 
these lands xmsuited for the production of shallow-rooted crops and 
presents a great erosion hazard. 

Htp Similar in all respects to Class Ht, except for depth of the effective 
root zone, which limits use of these lands to shallow-rooted crops. 

Htr Similar in all respects to Class Ht, except for the presence of rock 
on the surface or within the plow zone in sufficient quantity to 
restrict use of these lands to noncultivated crops. 

Htpr Similar in all respects to Class Ht, except for depth of the effective 
root zone and the presence of rook on the surface or within the root 
zone, which limits use of these lands to noncultivated shallow=rooted 
crops . 

U Intensively developed urban lands presently used for residential, 
ccmmercisLl, and industrial purposes. 

R Lands which are devoted primarily to presently developed residential 

areas, sind which eilso contain those commerciel establishments necessary 
to service them. 

RV Lands which are expected to be used for residential development, due 
primarily to their location near the coast or near intensively 
developed \irbeui areas. 

AR Combination agricultural and residential areas which consist of very 
small acreages of agrictiltural development together with residences. 

P Areas having a very low water use such as state and county parks, 
fairgrounds , etc . 

N Includes all lands which fail to meet the reqiiirements of the above 
classes. 



-hl^ 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

STANDARDS FOR CLASSIFICATION 

OF LANDS FOR WATER SERVICE 

(continued) 



Land : 

class: Characteristics 



Presently forested lands, or lands subject to forest management, which 
meet the requirements for irrigable land but which, because of climatic 
conditions and physiographic position, are better suited for timber 
production or some type of forest memagement program rather than for 
irrigated agriculture. 



■kd- 



Under the adopted classification standards, irrigable hill lands 
include those which fail to meet the requirements for irrigable valley lands 
with regard to topography, but which 8A*e suitable for irrigation development 
and for the production of certain crops with special irrigation practices. 
Since these lands are characterised by gently sloping or rolling to steeply 
sloping topography, air drainage is good and the frost hazard is minimized 
considerably. Hence, where soil depth and textures are favorable, they are 
highly valued for the production of subtropical fruits and off-season truck and 
flower crops. 

Only a very small portion of these irrigable hill lands are found on 
Recent alluvial soils. Near the coast they occupy the old coastal terraces and 
slightly farther inland consist of residual soils derived from sedimentary and 
metamorphic rocks. East^mrd from these areas are the residual soils derived 
from granitic rocks, which account for the greater part of the soils within the 
investigational sirea. Wiere climate permits, these granitic soils are by far 
the best suited of any in the area for the production of subtropical fruits, 
principally avocados. 

The results of the classixication survey for agricultiaral and urban 
lands are presented by cubareas in Tables 3 and k, r<ispectively. Irrigable 
valley lands, in-igable hill lands, urban lands, and military reservations 
within the investigational area are shown on Plate 4, entitled "Classification 
of Lands for Probable Ultimate Use" . 



-49- 



+» 



o o o 
<r\o3 CO 

CO t~^iH 

•\ ^ 

\£) r-i 


o 


o 

OO 


o o o 

UfNCO UN 
CTNtv, 

UN 


^858 

*H #-fl €N* ir\ 

OS OS •^ * 


o o o o o o o 

Cn O VC oB iH rt US 

es •. t^ oi A w Ci 

NO t~^ i-< \C ^O 'O Cn 

CM <H >-l CM 


O O O 


o 


o 
en 

CM 


O O o 
CN) 






O O O CD 
OOjd- rH 6 
Jl- OO iH IH 

«s 


O O O 

cnt^o 














i-Jm* 


O O O 


o 


I-l 


o o o 


S° 


o o 


o o o o 
<jN en cnoo 

CM 


o o o 

1-1 O UN 
O UN 

Ok 
CM 


o o o 

O rH rM 


o 


8 

ON 


3- "H 


CN 


O OO 
<N OO 


rt OO O UNOO Jl- UN 
UN^ CM O <N 17-1 t-^ 



iH J- Jd- t^ 



+■>' 



C\J 

cn 
o 



E- 



0) 



o o o 

OO fN. 

eg On 

•s «S 

CM en 

o o o 



o o 

r-i 



o 

r-l 


^l, 


o o o o 

CM CM UN J- 

iH cn^OVD 

*\ *. ^ 

O) M <N 


CM rH C^ 


35 

UN 
CM 


O 


s° 


o o 


§° 


J" ON ■M 
«s 
CM 


&8 

fKIvO 

•s Oi 
i-l r-l 


O 


o o 


o o 


o o 
en 

CM 


o o o o o 
envo j± 


O O 


o 


o o 

iH en 


o o 
<y NO 

en 


°-2 

CM r-i 
UN 


o o o o o o o 

UNr-< OO ONO CTNOO 

i-ljj- CM UNUMTN 

OS w <^ «s 

ONCO r-l on 


o 


°s 


o o 


°8 


O O O O O 

irl NO 


°^ 



> 






o o o 
en rt 

r-l rH 


o 


o 

CM 


o o o 
CM I-l en 

•s 

rM 


uNcn ono 

rM NO en NO 

•s <K 

r-( I-l 


o o o o o o o 

O UNUN^ iH enj- 
UNrH iH <M \0 CO 

•SO) OS ^ 

ri r-l CM Cn 


O o O 


o 


o 


o o o 


o o o o 


O O O O O O O 

So 



CO 

o 



o o o 

CM >^ NO 
UN(^CM 



o o o 

O <JN 

r-l NO 



o o o 

CM CM 



o o o 
cn r^ 



o o o 

CM O 

NO 



o o o o 



o o o o 

O OO 



o o o o 

CM OO 

J- 



o o o o 



o o o o o o o 



o o o o o o p 



a 



o o o o o o o 

CM NO OO ^3 tv 

en O CM o 



o o o o o o o 

CM 



o o o 


CD 


O 


o o o 


CO ON cn 




r-l 


cn en 


rH rH cn 




cn 


r-l en 



o o o o 



o o o o 
NO en r^ w 

r-l UNoO 



o o o o o o o 



o o o o o 
3^ Keno 



cn"^ 







-C -D 






rH -rl 

O 0' PI 

C e> 

c o ■>-■' 

O O c^ 

o c S 



■a 

o 

o ta EC 



ei) c 

Li o 

o d 

•j^ fcO 



Q O 
■i-» 
C 

cj 
W 

0) -rt +> 



+5 S) 
•rl n 



ho -H 



c to 



vl 



f3 




-50. 



goooooooooooooogool 

. - . .. .V 1^ .k a. <& o^ o. c^ o. uj 



O *-• CO CTN -JNOO 
I CM iH 



c^Soo CO jrt" o HI tH t^ c^.ijn^ 

^ ^ CM CM >H I 



OS 



CM 8 C^RSnoI 

t^C^VD irt (r4 Ol 

^ as ^ ^ ft oj^ 

CM CO <M CM 0\0l 



o 


8 


O 


t^ 


<x 




\r\ 


ON 


jt 


O 


<n 


\r\ 



o o o o 

Lr\ CM C^CO 



O O Q O 



o o o o o 

ITS t^f-4 C- J- 

ITN r^^ VO CM 

A Ot li^ 9k Ok 

CM c<>j- »-ija- 



o o o o 

I/NVD '7NCQ 
O CM lA ITS 



o 



o o o o o 



o o o o o 



8 



8 



o o o o 

CM j-<l Q CM 
CN rt O OO 

OS OS ft OS 



O O 2 S 



e o s 9 

C*N\o CO c**- 



o 
oo 



^ 



Q O O O 
CM O ^ <N 



§1.1^ 



o o < 

eovT < 






fe 



c 

I-t 



s 



ft 
c^ 

CO 

o 
ir> 
oo 



o 
CO 



o o Q o O 

VO VD JT CO CO 
;T ^VO CO ON 



O O O O O I 

ft ft I 

C»N C^ I 

O O O O O I 



O S 

CM O 

C^ O 

ft ft 

s * 



5 



o o o ^ 
iH <."M p-fl .; 



o 

NO 



■JN ir. lA «*N 

H K O 0-1 



O 
CM 
<M 



O 

CO 



o o o o o 



° a9 S. 

NO WNC^ C*N 

cAnO Jd- NO 

(\ ft ft 



O 

HI 



o o o o 
tfNc^ aN>o 

ONJi- (H 



o 



o 

iH 

UN 

ft 



o o o o o 

CM CO C^ 1-1 
<-4 CM >H 

ft ft 



t 



^ « 



Sv' 



o o o o 
1-1 o r^ UN 
r^ CM c^oo 



o o o o 

UN iH 



o o o o o 

CM NO U\UM~- 

O JH UN J- C^ 

ft p, ot t^ o. 

rM .-1 CM CM t^ 



c^ 



O 

CM 



O 

CO 

ft 



O O o o o 



o o o o o 

tvcrt CM ^ CN 

ft ft ft ft ft 
oH ON ON NO oH 



i^ 



o o o o 



o o o o o 



^ 



o o o o 

UN B-fl 
CM 


o 


o o o o 

UN CM 


o o o o 
j3- t^cjcvi 


1 


o o o o 


ir^ 


^ 


o o o o 

V.'H 8 



o 
CO 



o 

o 

ON 



O O O O o I 
o o o o o I 

O O O O O I 



o o q Q q 

1 i-t J I 



9. 



9. 8 



PN C^ 



K S *• 



o o o o 



o o o o o 



o 
oo 
o 



O O O Q O 
t^UNj 
CM ONrt 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o 



& I 



8i 

CNO 



iH 0\ 
> CM NO 



O O O O Q 

^ O JT OO 0\ 
UN t^JX C^ 0-8 

C OS ft 



5 

CM 



o o p o o 

CNvO O 0-4 0-4 

t^ ONi-l Ji- NO 

ft ft ft ft 

C>N0O CM UN 




O 

o 

o 



I 

3 




V< V> O 

•s 

•a t3 CN 

6 o t^ 



o a 



4 ^ o 



-51- 



o xi 

C ■H 

a> (, o iH 
m b ^ 

0) O (< -o 



li3 

in 
< 
6- 






(a 6- 

M 
Z CO 

o •< 






01 u 
CO (< 



O a) 



e I. 



4 4> 



.^ 3 o 



■a 

Hi 



* d 

I. 



r-l C 

at <« 

O L. 

E- 3 



S 



3 



O 

o 
o 



o o o 

C"\ r-l CM 
\D C4 ur\ 

O aost 



O O Q 



CT\ C^ 



O O 



o o o 

-I UNCO 
VCM CM 



\r; 



^ O CTN r-l 



OOQOOQOOOOOO 
— ■ ~ ~\OrHU>C^COt^<J\VOCOf^<_ _ 

.tOCSir-l»H<Hf^OO 



^___.-___ __ooooo 



\o >-* UM^ ^^vo CM ON IN 

irSr4>-IC^irNCMr-li — 



C^ C^CM t^^ O-VJ? « 



o o o 
3- t^vo 



o o o 


o o 


o o o 


c^cooo 


C^ 


tr\oo ir> 


OO f~- l-i 


CM 


o\t^ 



o o o 
t-^ cr\o 

C^ O r-t 



CM 



ONfv^ 






2 o 

ON UN 



o o o 

O l/SCN 
^ OO r-l 



o o o 

o 



o o o 

ON Jv, 

J- f-1 



o o o 


o o 


o o o 


er\o o 


t^ON 


ir\,H i-< 


t--.NO (H 


o t^ 


O OO CTN 



o o o 

CN CN 



o o o 

UNlH 
ITllH 





+• 


>> 


^ 






•P 


I. 


El 


r-: *» 


vi 


+> 




O 


C) 


lA 


I. 


rH .^ 




•rl 


< 


1^ 


■s 


PI 


u 


•n n 


c 


t. 


nl 


U 'H 


o 


0} 


+> 


.H a 


■H 


+» 


«-* 




+» 


It 


r-l 


3 .C 


St 






^; o 












r-l 


O 


o +> 


-rt 


9^ 


t. 


111 rJ 


» 


fl. 


■f 


«> la 


•H 




■H ■H 




O 


i^ 


M l. 


?> 


O .H 



al 
I. 

cJ W 






fel 



o o 



•4» 
O 



+> 



o o o 



o o o 

NO OO 
CM rH 



OOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOO 
Q UfSO lf\voC^Cr\^CHvqOt^ONt^voO O O 
^N^0Ot^\X)jd-NO0O C^i^CSIOONO OOO O O 

0\£>CMtv.UMr\t^UNC^irvOJ-CMNOCMt^NO 
IH CM l-l r-l rt UNc'SeM C^HI 



ooooooooooooooo 



OQOOOOQOOOOOOOOOO 
*\ O ^ O O^VD OVOt-^rHCNQCNCMt^OO 
•HrHCMUNCNOv^cOr-lr^ l/N^ O^ r< UN O O 

ON C*\ t^^ NOt^r-IVONOVO C*NO O r^QO ONON 
CMCMr-l «-ICMr-ICMrH 



r-IONO^OiHOO f^ONt^ no 

NO 0^ "N rH CM NO CM ON^ rH 

(H NO "H C<^ p-\ C^ UN CM 



Ooooooooooooooo 

ON O 



ooooooooooooooo 



ooooooooooooooo 

CM r-l O J <-l UNCO C^VO t^ VO 

r^r-IUNrHnCMCM 0O^ rH 

r-INOr^0^r^ f^ ST CM 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
r-l C^ 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
J>~t--. NO C^ 

.* CM CS rH 



+» 



*> +> 

n o 

•H -rH 

. '-^ '- 

V c vt 

fc. O -rl 

' : -n c_l 

+» 

o Id c 

+> to o 

■rl •rt VI 

3 «. +•; 



? -1 



g M (B » 3 d rt 

-3 -n 2 »H ; ; 

' CO K j: (J t. 

I -rf +> >, o t. 

O rH 3 K tf O. iJ 

«H o> o (d V e <i> 

I PC K 01 f/J O M Sa 



■CJ Ji M O 

•H 11 : ; 

10 rH ^ f4 

■ duo 

S CJ O il 



O •rl -rl 

U 'J 

+> 

« d 

i: o » 

O -H 

t) tJ C 

•rl C O 

^c^ o o 

C o c 



c3 



a o u 
+» fc g 

S-rt 1-1 a 
3 1/1 
CO OO ® 

AO Dn Vi 
•rl O 




-52- 



s i 

AS 



« 

o ^ 

c " 



•3 



II 






o o 

1-i o 
CO o 



^ 



ooooooooo 

OiHlO^. OOtvOOO 
Otv»-IOO.^OOC> 






fvQ OS 



ooooooooo 

«3». Cvltv,pOJ-000 



<o ir.e<i o o 



u o 4^ tfl 



^ evo o-ij- o u^oQ jS o c^ o. 



"I 



4 ft 



31 



o o o o 






OOOOQOOOOOO 
i^O^iiHl*vOOO0O— - 
UMr\<N(Hc-QO\0^ 



Ol 

o o ol 

O \D >3 O vol 
«-« jH CM N j-4 I 



O 



Z O 



S-8 

C 



I 



_ f 
O ■< 
M J 

Sfe 

to cd 
to 



g 



o 

ON 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o 



o 
5^ 



CM 



o 



o 

oo 



so 



o 



o 

ITS 



o o o o o ol 
CM «r»\fi •-« CM on 
a-* CO iT\ \r\^ o I 

01 », ft ft » ;J 

^ tv rt c^ w so] 

CM t^t^OO ONOOj 



I Q O < 



o o o 
\o u\<o . 

Gb Ok a« » n Of 

T<! iir>c?\t..e^cMl 



o 



U-1 

c^ 



o 

CM 



UN 



o 

CN 



a: 



o 
o 



s 



8 



o o o o o 



o o o O O Ol 

CM O Jt^ t~~"NO! 

t^ C^V> trt i-H O 

<^ Ok €k A e^ «U 

CM oo «M «M OSOl 

!•< c^A ii-» von 



O O O O O 
St CTN 



O O O O o 



o o o o o I o 



o o o o o I o 



o o o o o 3 o 



Q O O O O t O 
J ON I <7 



o 

o 

CO 

Cn 



o 
o 
o 

ON 
ON 
CM 



o 
o 



o 

o 

On 
o 

UN 



o 
o 

CO 

J- 



o 

o 



o 
o 



o 
o 

c^ 



o 

o 

CN 



o 
o 



o 

w 



c 

■8 



§ 



•fel 



^ 







■T) 6. 

gte- > S o •* * 



t 
i 



> 

s 



I 



"3 

+> 



s 

6- 



■< 



o o 
z z 

c c 
e • +> 

r-i r* v^ 
a-^ sH ^ 

■o n 0) 
Li a> o 

<« p ■»» 

o (. 4 
m 3 -P 

O (/J 
(D ffi 

o« S 

3 fci •rt 
O 9 B 

« -p » 
a> d 

OS S c 

o o en 
:^ S '^ 

O (0 

«! P (O 

+> .H O 

<^° & 

a B 

o o 
h b o 

^ ^ o 

Ok 

•a -o c^ 
> > t-l 

(. t; a 

« « 9 
TJ tJ TJ 

01 cd ,3 

a a u 



(4 X> O 



-53- 



Probable Ultimate Pattern of Land Use 

Experience in Calif omJi.a has shown that, even in the most intensively 
developed areas,, not all irrigable lands receive water every year. Since 
results of the survey of irrigable lands were in terms of gross areas, the net 
areas that might ultimately be ir3rf.gated in any one season were determined by 
the application of appropriate percentage factors. These factors account for 
the effects of size and shape of parcels of irrigable lands, productive capacity 
of the lands and probable crop rotation, inclusions of s m a l l areas of non- 
irrigable lands within the irrigable lands, and inclusions of other land uses 
incidental to agaricultural development such as roads, highways, and farm lots. 
The factors were largely based upon determinations previously mside in inten- 
sively developed irrigated areas of the State, and on knowledge of the 
characteristics of the Isoids and proposed developments in the areas \mder 
consideration. Tlie range in values for these factors is indicated in the 
following tabulation: 

Ratio of net to 
gross area, in per cent 
Factors 

Size and shape of land 
Inclusions of noirJ/rrigable lands 
Productive capacity and crop 

rcitatioR 
Rights of way 

Resultant Percentage 90 65 

Utilizing the data compiled from the sui-vey and giving consideration 

to present irrigated agricultural development, present and indicated future 

trends in crop type, climatic conditions, an.d information gained from local 

farm advisors and other qualified agricultural agencies within the area, the 

probable ultimate crop pattern was projected. 



.54» 



Maximum 


Minimum 


99 
99 


95 
9U 


97 
■95 


78 
-91 



Since avocados yield the highest net return of any ir:.'?.gated crop 
produced in the area, it was anticipated that they would occupy practically all 
the acreage where conditions are favorable for their production. Flowers and 
off-season truck crops probably would account for a considerable acreage in the 
valleys where the frost hazard is too gi^sat for avocados. In soine of the 
slightly colder areas, and on lands with heavier soils where lemons and limes 
produce reasonably well, it was considered that these crops would prevail. 

In the eireas not suited for avocado and citrus production, truck, 
field crops, deciduous fruits, and a limited acreage of alfalfa and pasture 
were projected as the probable ultimate crop pattern. 

As in the case of agricultural lands, those ar^as classed as poten- 
tially urbfiua contained inclusions of non-developable lands such as gullies, 
swamps, river beds, etc. Appropriate percentage factors, developed during the 
field survey, were applied to the gross urban areas to obtain the net habitable 
areas for purposes of estimating the probable ultimate pattern of urban land 
use. 

The nature of the various potential urban areas as related to topo- 
graphic characteristics, as well as geographical location and other pre-/iously 
mentioned factors, influenced the type of urban development projected for 
ultimate conditions. 

Presented in Table 5 is the probable ultJLmate pattern of land use for 
the area surveyed during this investigation. Attention is directed to the fact 
that the land use pattern shown in Table 5 is for probable "ultimate" conditions 
of development as previously defined. In a later section of this chapter, the 
methods used in determining crop pattern and future population for the to -year 
period herein considered will be described. Values for probable ultimate urban 
land use in Table 5 were used as a check on the reasonableness of the population 
projections. 

-55- 



ft, z 8 






4» 
® 
3 





r^' 


'.' 


* 


7i 


^3. 


c 


b 


Er> 


•»' 




r4 C 




f^i 




^& 


'* 


ra 




•g 




oi 




a. 


c 


rf 


13 


0) (H 


§ 


^ ,1 


H 


^ ^3 




»^ T3 C 


C 


3 C e> 


i! 




^ 


?« CO 




^ .. ft 


" 


" IH 




1 J 




^: -■! 




so -F 




o C 




as <» 




T3 


■* 


a> 




> 




^g 




C £ 




^1 




c 




M 


• a (i« 






<HI 




« 




&, 




a 




4" J 'X 




;S ,~t 




+> 3 




e o 




e- »< 




c 


- 


.. .? .. 




a 




t< 




to 




? 




s 




r-J 




.. "s 




" iH re 




aJ -TS 




A "J '^ 


a 


3 0.£ 


•Ci 


tn o o 


c 


!^' t. 


<« 


+• C 


r"^ '• 


m 


f-4 3 


00 -o 


rt o 


•a .«, 


& 3 


t, -o r'l 


i§i? 


If-fl o 


o c 


D 0) 


s< •< 


O Q 


° .. !t 


-H •<» 




i. 




^ 


•g g. 




? o 




io t. 




e o 


" 


ir" s 




,3 o 




cd b 




^•o '^• 










>. « 




a -ri 




fiS c, 


" 


.. .. 


<« 


o o 


•*• 




*< 


at -H K 


:^ 


J:g. 




'H 








Hi 




0> 




«- 




<d 




J3 




3 




w 



o 
o 
o 

•\ 
CM 



irv 

CM 
(M 



o o o 

CO t^NrH 
-S- VO t-- 



O O O 

r-i a\ir\ 

•V •* * 
t-l UN CM 



I 



* 



o 



§o o 
CTNC* 



o o o 

^f ^ OO 



O O O 

o 



o o o 
I-) oojf 
c>i C4 iH 



o 


o 


o o 


r> 


c^ 


CO c^ 


CM 


its 


C.1 lf\ 



^° 



o o o o 
^ «H! o va 
O J-^ P^ oo 



J- NO 



o o o 

C<A r-1 •-« 
OO \0 CM 



o 


o 


o o o 


OS 


irv 


OSts, 




cr\ 


^ rt 



o o o 



O O O 
t^VC VO 



o 
o 



o 



o 

CM 



O © O 
t-4 *voo 
CM O \0 



o o o 

\0 oo 



o o o 



o 

en oo 






o o o 



o o 

UN r-1 
CM CM 



o o 
en 



o 



o o o 


o 


O 


O O 


f-f tfNOO 


■3^ 


O 


t-.CM 


t^ 


VD cn 


•I fl^ ai 


•% 


0^ 


«v «» 


t~^CM ir\ 


OS 


O 


c^^-^ 




r-) 


CM 


i-< 



a 

n 
Id 



o 

u 



8°§ 

J- CO 


o 


o 
o 

CM 


ooo 


OOO 

o 

J- 


O 

o 


o 
o 
l-l 


o o 


OS i>> 


o 


O 
O 
SD 


OOO 

CM O O 

VONO 


OOO 

i5 5^« 


o 
so 
so 


1 


o o 



ooo 
oo\o w^ 

Osvo J*' 



o 

o 

CM 



o 

so 



OOO 
^ O 



OOO O 
en esoo oo 

Va> OS O 



O 

o 

CM 



ooo 
o 

CM 



o o 
o 



o o 

l-i CM 
oo vo 



o o 
o 

ON 





















o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o o 




o 


O 


c 


o 




o 


o O 






















o 




















o 






CM 


o 






















CM 












+» 








CM 






cn 


f-i 
■-I 


^ 


























+> 






o 

•M 








o 










•> -V -H 






















4 




o 






1. 








(. 










» O O 














fa 








o 




iH 


oi 




+> 








+> 
























c 
■ij 








-fe 




^ 


o e: 
u o 




19 


^1 






CD 






















d 












to 


< -rt 




Q 


•H 






a to 




t-t 






1 o 5 § 




S; 










> 








§ 




«4 


o-§ 




c +» 










s. 




b 

0) 




«> 










1 

^ 








■»> 






t,^ 




o ^ 


O 






o rt 




•H 




+^ 


■H g ■!» 




<( 
















^ 




e (o 












+> * 




O 




(ij 


'sit?s 




> 






1 

n 


i 








1-1 
o 




J3 +■• 


Bfe 




g 










•g 




> 


0. •rl Tt 

o o 1, ■>> -a 




t 






k 


e 








% 






IB HI 






s 






* i 




^ 


•f 

o 


11 § 


>l) i. tiO -f> « c 








(-< 




1 






1-1 


ii 




a 


a o 




t: = 


o 


«rl 




g.^ 






«4 


■V 


■e <» n bO d 

« 'ri ^H <r1 

s: a S b >, 




•H 




s 


n. 


1 










iH 


■¥> 




13 


u 






b 


b 


vH *? 


§ 


o 


o 




i 


oi 
o 




» 


i 


^ 


o 


•3& 


n 


o to 




•»» 

IS 










•P 
03 


o a) 




-, - . '^ «• 


M 




^ 




1 


•H 


'CS 


••-4 


t< 


<u 






•e -H 


•H 


a> 


o 


,r4 






+» 


c 


■rt 


S •*' 


o 




o 




f4 




IP 


r-1 


.S 


», ■•'< 


>? 


o 


•H 


c 


1 <i> 


b 


ra *< 


•H a 


•s 




o 


(B 


ia 


J O r^ 




-.H 


£ 


4» 


5^ 


•o 


O 


•»» 


g 


•o 


■o 


C -H 


C -H 


+» 


o 


o 




3 


•H O 




£ -H u 


o 


Q 




n 




«-t 


O 


<a 


IS 




•rt 


c 


o e 


Cc CI 


m 


■Sv 


o 


b 


o 


£ > 


* 




u 


, b 


lit 


t4 d ,< +» 






1-1 


U 




O 


^^ 


•rl 




[3 

01 


TI 


o 


o 3 




.r^ 




4^ 


(o 


6 


»> 


a> 


<d ■I' o 




"^s^-s g § 


|13 


i 


§ 


^ 


^ 


■a 


o 


O 


o 

iS 


*i 


t^ s 


C3 


IJ 


o 


^ 


r-t 


^•g 


5 


>-0 


t 


cms: 

O -H O 


CO 




w 




2 


a> 

8 


eg 
S 


o 




o 


s; 


o 


aJ 


01 






* 


■3 


§3 

0- oi 


Q 


? 


» 


ri 



-56- 



V* 

c o 



8 



M 

CO w 
3 03 



■< 1-1 



n 



£ 



I 3 



DO 



I * 






Si 






s 

c 

3 

Si 

c 
z 






c 

i 









■iul 

"> 2 g 

- 73 t. 

Si si 

5fe 



6- O 









(4 



R 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOQQ OOOOOO 
•-1CM iH iH i-liH t-IC4iH 



O O O O O Q 



OOOOOOOOOO OOOOOO 



oooooooo 
o 



oooooooo o oooo o 



o 


OOOOOO 

CM t^c->«-\iJ o 
c\c- PMr> cS o 


o 


o 


^ 


ON 


R 


<k 


%«•««• e 


•k 


% 


1"% 


rH CMN OO r\ O 


OS 


C>1 


c<^ 


l-l CM i-t\o 


1-1 


ir\ 


\x> 




■H 


t^ 


o 

CO 


OOOOOO 


R 


8 


OS 




•H 


iH 


■k 






•K 


M 






CN 


e^ 






C^ 


<^ 






cr» 


1 o 


o o o o o 


o 


O 


oo 






o 


vo 






t-~ 



oooooooo 
Ol c^ e^ a\ 
^v?^ OS 



oooooooo 

<'S 



o oooo 

iH 1-4 



o oooo 



ooooooooooooc 

t^CSp^*^ C^OSCTSC^O o^ ow 



ooooooooo 

.,._-._.- ._ _soOc<osir\{^oooiooo 

t^ t^ <<^ SSj*- t^irMTNo o9Sir\c<ooc^t^ooc<soo\i) 



usj- e>i 



cQoo ir> 



UNCO NO OS OS so 



o e^NO <^^ o fH rH r~ r\jt- 



oooooooo 
o o 



oooooooo 
u^cnc>^*v.floopt>KO 

«^ c^ e« « at Ck (\ 

o>jS- osc<^J3- «■^<^i 

8-1 7-1 



O O O O c o o 
o q o o J ^ 

O r^ c^\£) M OS 



oooooooo 
e<i o oo ^> t-: o oo p-1 
PS C4 w OS c^ <r\ t^ ji- 



8o o o o o o o 
o o o 

M CM c«Mrs 



O 
CO 

O 



o 

so 



_ _) Q O O O 

o oiF »-4 o oo 

C\\Q * SD so (H 
l-l CM C^ 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

PS 



o 



osi:»Mr\< 



oooo 
o o US© 

so OS CS OS 



oooo 

^ csw oo 
»^ so *^co 



oooo 
o o ^^o 

PSPSOl PS 



oooo 

O CM pt OS 






o 



o 

CM 



o 
eo 



s 



o 

CO 

<^ 

o 

o 



o 

5 



o 
o 



o 

OS 
PS 

o 

C4 



o o o o o 



o o o o o 



o o 



R« 



o 



o 

03 



o o <p o o o 
oo t^^ c^^ O 
CO PS «<l i-fs c^ o 

<x <^ <x % •» • 

f-e c^ CM CO c^ o 

fH CM pMSD 



o o o o o 



o o o o o 
t^ o 



§o o o o 
uso o o 

PS CS O OSOO 



o o o o o 
o irso o o 
j:f \0 CO t~~ Its 

«k ^ at 0^ 
US\0 rMj± 



o o c o o 

o o o o o 

CM C~ CM rH lis 

0% « ik •« 

r-l J- CM CM 



o o o o p 

CO O j3- C^ J 

<?SIM rH CO us 

•k «^ ak at 

PM»^C^US 



o 

PS 



>s^ 



o 
o 



o 
o 

US 



o 
o 



o 
o 

OO 



?^ 



c 
o 
us 



o o 
us o 

PS t^ 



o o 
us o 
o us 



R 






o 

c. 







1 

e g 






\S3 




hi 






9P 
a. 



•a 

c 
c 
a. 

o, 

9 

•o 

5 

iH 

• ^ cu 

CM us S 

a a O 

o o 

Z Z "2 

C !3 
^ t1 » 

•s -^ s 

a> 4) o 

r-i iH »< 

r-i r-5 +» 

3 :i < 

fc ?> B 

§ s s 



3 !: 



ce -p 
<> if 



^ 



B CO 

o 

as "C» 

a o 



8 ? 

•a -o 
> ^ 






M ja e 



-57- 



Unit Us e of Water 

Pre:5eated in this section is a description of methods end procedures 
used in deteruiining present and probable future units of water use for the 
various subdivisions of the investigations-1 area for both urban atad agricultural 
v-axposQS, together with a discussion of the monthly distribution of annual 
deiaai'ids for vr^ter therein. 

Urban Use 

The projection of futiUHS urbaii •■/ater usage -vre-s b&ped on estimates of 
populiition and per capita water consuription, since population W8.s talien as the 
xnf3a&v.re cf ixrbnn grovrth. 

In derivilng per capita Txater coiisumption figures, no conoiderfition 
was given to possible reuse of -crater app?J.ed for urban oonsunrption. Population 
centers are now and probalolj'- T'TLII be for many years to come concentrated alor^g 
the ocetm, ez'A se^re-ge therefrom is largely dischpjrged directly to the ocetin. 
Inland comr/iunities not now dischargir^ their seimge to the ocean are reL'itively 
amall, aad as they grow will probably construct ocean outfalls. 

In order to deterr-Tine trends in urba)i water use, analysis \ib.s made 
of available current and histo?rical './ater consumption records for cities in 
San Diego County, southern Ca3.ifornia;, and throughout the United States. The 
general conclusion reached as a result of this study was that per capita water 
consu-iption is e:ihibiting a definite increase. Definite determi?iation of the 
amoiint of any increase is difficult since (l) populations of cities during 
periods between census years are indefinite, (2) water consunrption figures 
usually do not include amoimts of water produced, delivered, and consumed by 
enti-iies other than the reporting agencies, and (3) significant atnoxonts of 
agricultural usage of wa.ter are occasionallir included in the statistics. 



-58- 



Howsver, in consideTratlon of all aval.lable data, it appears that per capita 
consxoniption has been increasing at a rate of about one per cent per year over 
that prevailing in the appropriate base period, usually in the 19^10' s. 

In this investigation and in prior investigations by the Division of 
Water Resources and other agencies, it was found that use of water in urban 
areas is also affected by climatic conditions, economic conditions, level and 
type of industrial development and, to some extent, by the price of water. Per 
capita use of water tends to increase with distance from the ocean, with 
relatively higher average tenrperatures, and with relatively lower average 
precipitation. With other factors being equal, including price of water, the 
comranjinity with the higher per capita income will usually exhibit the higher 
j>eT capita use of water « 

Recent technological sidvances in household appliances have also 
tended to increase the per capita use of water throughout the country. These 
include automatic laundry facilities, dishwashers, and garbage disposals. The 
trend toward individual home ownership, with lawns and shrubbery which, in 
California, require frequent watering throughout a good part of each year, has 
also contributed to the increase in use of water. Many of these factors are a 
result of the general higher level of income prevailing in this cotintry in 
recent years which has produced a higher standard of living. However, in view 
of imminent water shortages, certain cities, notably Sen Diego and Santa Barbara, 
have succeeded in maintaining a relatively low per capita use of water through 
public educational campaigns. It is believed that this low unit use of water 
is not only a result of efforts by individual citizens to reduce consumption 
but also the fact that industries having high water usage have not located in 
such communities. 

The following tabulation presents per capita water consumption for l8 
southern California cities and communities during 1955^ five of which cities are 

-59- 



located in San Diego County. These data were obtained from the 1955 Annual 

Reports oi' The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and the San 

DiCtjo County Water Authority, and from the cities themselves. 

Water consun^^tion 
in gallons per 
City or community capita per day 

Maheim 171 

Beverly Hills 260 

BurbanX 213 
El Cajon and La Mesa (Helix 

Irrigation District) 2l4 

Escondido 170 

Fuilerton 215 

Glendale 176 

Los Angeles l6l 

national City and Chula Vista l88 

Oceans ide 179 

Pp,sadeRa 215 

San 3ema::xLino 203 

San Diego 126 

San. Iferino 285 

Santa Aiia 123 

Sajita Barbsxa 150 

Santa ivfonicia 137 

Torrance 1^1 

It \rLll be noted from the fox'egoing tabulation that the per capita 
^•rs.ter consumption i.a the <• Ities of San Diego, El Cajon, La Mesp., National City, 
and ChuD-a Vista, all of which are located in the San Diego Jfetropolitan Area, 
varied from 126 to 2l4 gallons per day. For purposes of estiraating future water 
ccnsiunption in the San Diego ^fetropolitan Area, it we.s assumed that the overall 
per capita water consumption in this area would be approxins-tely l40 gallons per 
capita per day in i960, and that this rate of consumption would increase on a 
straight-line basis to I96 gallons per capita per day in the year 2000, which 
is an annual increase of l.k gallons per capita per day. This assiuned increase 
is considered to be consistent with the afore -mentioned trend of increase in per 
capita water consumption. 

For the Oceanside -Carlsbad ivfetropolitan Area and the Escondido 
Mstropolitan Area, per capita water consumption for the year i960 was assumed 

-60- 



to "be slightly higher than that indicated in the tabulation for 1955 for the 
respective cities. This assiimption is based on the fact that rural areas 
generally have a higher per capita consumption than do urban areas and each of 
these metropolitan areas contains a large rural population for vhich records of 
water use are not presently available. Values used for the yeetr i960 were I80 
gallons per capita per day for the Ocsanside -Carlsbad Metropolitan Area and 190 
gallons per capita per day for the Escondido Metropolitan Area. These values 
were increased l.U gallons per capita per day per year up to a naximum of 200 
gallons per capita per day. 

For each of the other subareas, where it was considei-ed that popula- 
tion growth would significantly contribute to water use, estimates of per capita 
water consumption were based on values developed for the Escondido and 
Oceanside -Carlsbad Metropolitan Areas. 

Presented in the following tabulation are the unit values of water 
use employed in the several subareas : 

Water consumption in gallons per 

capita per day 

Year Yeaj 
Subarea 

San Diego Metropolitan Area 

Oceanside =Carlsbad ffetropolitan Area 

Escondido Metropolitan Area 

Santa Fe-San Dieguito Area 

Bueno Colorado Municipal Water District I90 

Fallbrook 

Poway Municipal Water District 

Rainbow Municipal Water District 

Valley Center Municipal Water District 

Ramona Municipal Water District 

Rancho El Cajon 

East of Del ^fe.r 

El Capitan 

San Vicente 

On the basis of historical records of use by personnel at Camp 
Pendleton, particularly during the recent years, unit water requir.-;ments for mili- 
tary personnel at Camp Pendleton and Camp Elliott vere assumed to be 90 gallons 

per capita per day. 

-61- 



Year 


Year 


Yeer 


Year 


Year 


i960 


1970 


1980 


1990 


2000 


lUO 


I5U 


168 


182 


196 


180 


I9U 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


180 


19^ 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


J?00 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


PO-O 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 


190 


200 


200 


200 


200 



Agricultural Use 

For many years, the Division of Water Resources conducted extensive 
studies of the use of water by irrigated crops. In addition, many additional 
studies of this nature have been made by other agencies in California axid in 
the western United States. Included in these investigations were studies of 
use of water correlated to the influencing factors of climate, crop type, soil 
type, and method of irrigation. In connection with the preparation of State 
Water Resources Board Bulletin No. 2 £ind in special investigations in critical 
areas conducted by the State Water Resources Board, studies were made of con- 
svunptive use of water and amounts of water applied to irrigated crops throughout 
the State. For purposes of this investigation, units of water use for irrigated 
agriculture developed for Bulletin No. 2 were reviewed and compared with more 
recent available data recorded by water service agencies operating in the 
investigational area. Consultation \Ta.s held with officials of these water 
serv'-ice agencies and with individuals in the area and in certain instances, 
values of water use presented in Bulletin No. 2 were modified to reflect local 
conditions. In general, however. Bulletin No. 2 data were adopted as repre- 
sentative of use of water by irrigated crops in the investigational area. 

In studies of the Sem Diego County area for Bulletin No. 2, determina- 
tions of ultimate agricultural water requirements, that is, the amounts of water 
excluding precipitation needed to provide for use of ws,ter by irrigated crops 
and for all irrecoverable losses incidental to such use, were based upon the 
assumption that a certain proportion of the imconsumed residuvim of water applied 
for agricultural use would return to underlyj.ng ground water storage or to 
stream channels where it would be available for reuse. In connection with this 
investigation, lonits of applied water were talcen as the measure of agricultural 
water requirements thereby giving no credit to such reuse. By this assumption, 



-62- 



estimates for water requirements so derived would be on the high or conservBtive 
sideo This assumption is considered reasonable inasmuch as the units of irriga- 
tion water use so employed are relatively low as compared to other portions of 
the State, and it is probable that little return flow would be available for re- 
use. Further^ a large portion of the lands that would be semred from the pro- 
posed San Diego Aqueduct are located close to the ocean so that there is little 
opportvmity for downstream capture of return flow. Under full development 
conditions with irrigation of substantial so-eas of inland portions of the 
County, return flow would constitute a significant source of water supply as 
was assumed in Bulletin No, 2. 

Units of water use adopted for irrigated crops were varied in accord- 
ance with prevailing practice and reflect the difference in water application 
between the inland and coastal areas. For example, it was foiond that for citrus 
and avocados the annual depth of applied water varied from as little as one and 
a half acre -feet per acre near the coast to two and a half acre -feet per acre 
in the interior areas. 

As previously stated, studies of the probable future nature of 
irrigated agriculture in the potential aqueduct service area indicate that the 
crop pattern will largely consist of citrus and subtropical fruits and truck ajid 
field crops. Unit uses of water were determined for two general crop categories 
including citrus and subtropical fruits in one category and truck and field crops 
in the other, as shown in the following tabulation: 



-63- 



Units of water use in 
acre -feet per acre per year 



Subarea 

San Diego Metropolitan Area 

Ocsanside -Carlsbad Metropolitan Area 

Escondido Metropolitan Area 

Santa Fe-Sart Dieguito Area 

Bueiio Colorado Municipal Water District 

:Sall'brool5: 

?oway Municipal Water District 

Rsdnbow :Municipal Water District 

Valley Center Mmlcipal Water District 

Raiaona Municipal Water District 

Raneho El Cajoa 

Paujaia Valley 

.Horth of Santa Fe 

South of Lake Kod.ges 

East of Del Mar 

Lower Pauma Valley 

El Capitaxi. 

Rincon 

Sail Vicente 

Agua '.Pibia 

Caiiip Elliott 

C-aiiip Pendleton 

Temecula 

Vail 

Murrieta 

Winchester South 



Citrus and 




subtropical 


Truck and 


orchards 


"field crops 


1.9 


2.0 


1.5 


1.8 


2.5 


2.5 


1.7 


3.0 


1.5 


1.5 


2.0 


1.9 


1.5 


1.5 


2.5 


2.5 


2.0 


2.0 


2.3 


2.0 


2.3 


_=■=. 


2.0 


=_-. 


2.1 


..=„ 


2.3 


2A 


1.5 


1,5 


1.5 


2,0 


2.3 


2.3 


2.2 


2.3 


2.3 


2.3 


2.3 


2.0 



2,0 
2,0 



1.5 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 



Monthly Distribution of Annual V?ater Demands 

The monthly distribution of future annual water demands will vary 
appreciably for the various subareas herein considered, depending upon the 
relative magnitudes of future agricultural and urban water uses therein. 

Monthly demajad for iri'igation water may vary from little or none 
during winter months to more than 15 per cent of the seasonal total during a 
dry summer mionth. The monthly distribution of annual irrigation water demand 
varies with the crop, soil type, and distance from the coast. Urban water 
demands are substantially higher during summer months than during winter months 
but they exhibit greater uniformity throughout the season than those for 



~6h. 



irrigation. The following tabulation presents estimates of average monthly 
distribution of annual water demands for irrigated agriculture and for urban 
areas in the South Coastal Area as shown in State Water Resources Board Bulletin 
No. 2: 

Monthly demand in per cent 

of ajinual demand 

Irrj 
Month 



Irrigated 


Urban 


agriculture 


areas 


2.7 


6.4 


2.2 


6.k 


3.8 


7.0 


6.5 


8.0 


10.9 


9.1 


12.8 


9.8 


13.7 


10.8 


13.6 


10.6 


12.5 


9.6 


9.5 


8.U 


7.2 


7.3 


k.6 


6.6 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 100.0 100.0 

As previously indicated, future development in the various sub- 
divisions of the service area of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct is expected to 
be of both urban and agriculture nature. Therefore, it is expected that the 
monthly distribution of future water demands in the vsirious subareas will 
generally be a composite of the extreme values shown in the foregoing tabulation. 

The future monthly distribution of water demands for each of the sub- 
areas herein considered was estimated gener8,lly from experience records of water 
service agencies presently operating therein v^ere such records were available. 
Subareas having similar patterns of estimated future development with regard to 
the relative extent of agricultural and urbsm areas therein, giving consideration 
also to clianatic conditions, were divided into seven general groups. For each 
of these groups a pattern of monthly distribution was developed from the records 
of one or more water service eigencies which presently serve areas having land 
use patterns similar to those projected for the year 2000 for the areas 

-65- 



conipJ^ising the group. The data so developed are presented for each of the 
seven groups on Plate 8, entitled "Estimated Monthly Distribution of Demand for 
Water in Per Cent of Annual Demand in Year 2000" . 

Estimated Future Population 

The determination of future water requirements for urban and suburban 
lands was based upon estimates of future population growth. Probable future 
population growth was estimated by statistical projections tempered by studies 
of anticipated industrial and commercial growth of the area, and by lajid classi- 
fication stxidies previously described which defined the availability of land for 
urban expansion. Presented in this section is a discussion of the probable 
future of industry and commerce of the area and a description of the methods 
and procedures employed in and the results derived from studies of future popu- 
lation growth. 

Early in the course of this investigation, it was found that the rate 
of growth of population and \irban expansion was not influenced by aqueduct 
location. This resulted from the fact tlmt existing and potential urban areas 
in the County are located reasonably closa to each of the considered aqueduct 
routes, thereby minimizing t-ie problem of finsjicing construction of conveyance 
and distribution systems. Further, since the effect of selling price of water 
on rate of \irban expansion was not considered to be a deterring factor, the 
influence of aqueduct location in this regard could be neglected. 

Industrial and Commercial Growth 



Industrial and commercial groi-rth is not expected in itself to create 
major increases in demands for water in the service area of the proposed San 
Diego Aqueduct, but is expected to stimulate expansion of population. The 
industries presently operating in the area are generally associated with 

-66- 



electronics, aircraft manufacturing, missile manufacturing, and research, which 
in general are not high water using industries. This trend is expected to con- 
tinue in the future. 

The importance of a broad industrial base to population growth may be 
seen in nationwide statistics, Ti^ich indicate that every employed person supports 
about 2.6 persons including himself. When people are engaged in manufacturing 
or interstate commerce, their earnings become a source of revenue for locaJ. 
commerce and service industries, which in turn are able to support about an 
equal number of persons. On this basis, about 5.2 persons can be ad.equately 
supported by the earnings of each person obtaining income from outside the area. 
IiOcal businesses are also stimulated by industries and commercial enterprises 
through direct purchases of parts, supplies, and services. It is characteristic 
of industry and commerce that they build upon each other. 

It is, therefore, seen that industrial and commercial growth directly 
influences population growth. Further, the increase of population creates a 
demand for food which in turn stimulates the development of agriculture. 

During the period generally prior to 19^^ growth of industry and 
commerce in San Diego were hampered by the area's general remoteness with result- 
ant high transportation charges added to all imported raw materials and exported 
finished products, San Diego Coimty grew during this period, in spite of the 
absence of a broad industrial base, principally through the advantages it offered 
to retired persons. Subsequent to 19^0 with the advent of World War II, expan- 
sion of military facilities and associated industries substantially enlarged the 
economic base and population of the City of San Diego and its environs. During 
the late forties and early fifties, the continued growth of population in the 
San Diego area and in California has resulted in creation of markets for its 
goods within competitive shipping distances. 



-67- 



The presence of several large mill tar;/ insteillations, including the 
Elex'enth Naval District Headquar-iers., wi-ih a present staff of some 3 5;. 000 persons, 
and Canip Joseph E. Pendleton, the largest ^fe,rine Corps Installation in the nation 
with a present complement of about 50,000 personnel including one complete 
division, continues as an important facto:^ in influencing the type and extent of 
industry and commerce, and in turn, population In the San Diego area. 

Through consultation with informed people in the area^ information was 
obtained on contemplated new industry therein. Because of the difficulty of 
making finite projections of future industrial growth and of correlating such 
projections with estimates of population growth, it Tra,s not possible to utilize 
the information so obtained quantitatively. However, it was of great value in 
supporting statistical projections of population growth and attendant agricul- 
tiiral expansion. The information was also of value in resolving questions of 
relati-ii-e geographic location of future concentrations of population in the 
various parts of the area. 

Although San Diego County is not generally looked upon as a major 
industrial area, statistical da/ca indicate that during the past 15 yeai*s, there 
Irias been a rapid increase in industrial activity therein, particularly in the 
San Diego Jfetropolitan Area. Because of its strategic location from a national 
defense standpoint and because of the existence of several large military instal- 
lations, this expansion of industry reached a high peak during World War II. 
After a brief slump in activity following cessation of hostilities, a strong 
rally in industrial expansion occurred which has continued to the present time. 

The following tabulation shows the increase in numbers of employed 
persons in the San Diego Metropolitan Area engaged in manufacturing and indus- 
trial activities which market their products largely outside the area, and 
therefore may be considered to draw their income from outside sources. 



-68- 



Year Employed persons 

1940 24,500 

1950 34,750 

1956 56,250 

The previously mentioned personnel of the U. S. Navy and U. S. Hferine Corps 
bring the present total of persons receiving income from sources generally out- 
side of the County to about l4o,000. In addition to these are the retired 
persons who are continuing to move into the area because of its desirable climate 
and location and who bring into the area a substantial amount of income from out- 
side sources. 

The increase in numbers of persons employed in local industry and 
commerce who, in general, have their primary sources of income within San Diego 
County is illustrated by the following tabulation: 
Industry 

Trade -wholesale and retail 

Service industries 

Construction 

Finance, insurance and real estate 

Transportation, communications and 

utilities 
Government (exclusive of naval and 

military, generally state and local) not avail. 

Totals 

Based on information obtained from officials of local Chambers of 
Commerce and banking and service organizations, there is every reason to believe 
that the foregoing growth of industry and commerce will continue into the future. 
In general, new industry in San Diego County consists of the maniafacturinj- of 
electronic equipment, instruments, and plastics, much of which is associated 
with aircraft manufacturing. These industries will be able to compete on the 
national market, in spite of the general remoteness of the area, because the 
products involved have high ratios of cost to weight \rtilch reduces the iiriportance 
of shipping costs. 

.69- 





Uvunber employed 


19^ 


1950 


1956 


21,280 
27,277 

5,724 
not avail. 


43,600 

40,350 

15,000 

7,300 


52,900 

47,800 

15,300 

9,700 


4,634 


9,550 


11,800 


not avail. 


25,550 


27,000 




141,350 


164,500 



The General Dynamics Corporation (Convair) operates an extensive 
ail-craft fabrication and assembly plant in the City of San Diego. It was 
recently announced that the foregoing coi'poration has been commissioned by the 
U. S. Department of Defense to man\u"acture the Intercontinental Ballistic 
Missile (Atlas). The corporation intends to construct a large plant for this 
purpose on the Kearney Mesa just north of the City of San Diego. The develop- 
ment will consist of a fabrication and assembly plant and also a research instal- 
lation. This facility will be a large factor in population growth in this area 
in the immediate future. 

It is also expected that San Diego will grow as a trade and shipping 
point for the Imperial Valley and portions of Arizona and Mexico due to the 
existing rail facilities between these points and San Diego's excellent harbor. 

The present and probable future regional breakdown in industry 
consists of heavy, heavy-light, and light industries located in San Diego, 
Chula Vista, National City, and points south, and Ksamey Mesa. Heavy-light 
industries also axe to be expected in Oceanside, Carlsbad., and some other coastal 
towns. Light industries will probably also be established in the previaasly 
discussed areas and in Helix Irrigation District. Other areas that may attract 
light 5.ndustry are Rio San Diego Municipal Water District, the City of Escondido, 
and San Marcos. Industrial development in these latter areas is expected to be 
limited because of the probability of restrictions aimed at minimizing the con- 
flict between environment ci~eated by heavy industry and good residential areas. 

Other portions of the investigational area axe not expected to experi- 
ence any appreciable industrial development. 

In summary, from the discussions and data contained in the foregoing 
sections, it may be generally concluded that the factors of industrial, commer- 
cial and agricultural expansion which have contributed heavily to the phenomenal 



-TO- 



population growth in San Diego County dviring recent times are expected to exert 
their expanding influence upon the population of the service area of the proposed 
San Diego Aqueduct for a continuing period in the future. Further, the desirable 
climate and location of the service area, which has probably been the most impor- 
tant single factor in the afore -mentioned population growth, will continue to 
attract retired persons and vacationers in increasing niunbers. 

Although the foregoing factors do not readily lend themselves to 
finite determinations of population increases, it is considered that the infor- 
mation hereinbefore developed adequately demonstrated the validity of estimating 
future population for the service area of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct by 
modified projection of the recent population trends. 

Procedure for Estimating Future Population 

Future population was estimated only for San Diego County and not for 
the portion of Riverside County included in the investigational area. It is 
believed that the effect of expansion of population upon the requirements for 
iniported water in this latter area during the chosen i*0-year period will be 
relatively insignificant as compared with the effect of agricultural expansion 
and attendant increased demands for irrigation water. 

The general procedure utilized consisted of first estimating the rate 
of growth of population for the entire State of California at ten-year intervals 
from i960 until year 2000, and then estimating population of San Diego County 
for the same intervals, expressed as percentages of the totals for the St&te. 

During the recently completed State-wide Water Resources Investigation, 
a study was conducted to estimate the ultimate population of the State. In this 
study, consideration was given to the availability of lands suitable for urban 
and suburban developments, and also to the availability of lands axiaptable for 
irrigated agriculture which would be required to produce the food and fiber 

-71- 



necessary to support a large population. Consideration was also given to factors 
of future industrial and agricultural development necessary to provide employment 
for a large population. On this basis, a probable ultimate population of 
if2jifl0,000 for the entire State of California was determined. 

Historical population data expressed in per cent of the estimated 
ultimate population were plotted against time on arithmetic probability paper, 
and projected until the year 2000. The historical and estimated populations of 
the State for five and ten year inten-'als until the year 2000, so derived, are 
shown in the following tabulation. Also shown, for comparative purposes, are 
estimates of future population of California made for "Report on the Collection, 
Treatment, and Disposal of the Sewage of San Diego County, California", by the 
San Diego County Sewerage Survey, and estiraa-tes prepared by California Chamber 
of Commerce, Stanford Research Institute, and the State of California Department 
of Finance. It will be noted that the projections during the period common to 
each are in relatively close agreement with the exception of that prepared for 
the San Diego County Sewerage Survey which indicated lower values throughout. 

Population of California 







San Diego 


California 




State of 




Department 


Coimty 


State 


Stanford 


California 




of Water 


Sewerage 


Chamber of 


Reseaxch 


Department 


Yeax 


Resources 


Survey 


Commerce 


Institute 


of Finance 


i960 


15,000,000 


12,800,000 


li^, 626, 000 


15,629,000 


15,^13,000 


1965 


17,100,000 




16,426,000 


18,059,000 


17,781,000 


1970 


19,100,000 


15,700,000 




20,696,000 




1975 


21,200,000 




20,500,000 


23,565,000 




1980 


23,300,000 


18,750,000 








1990 


27,^0,000 


21,875,000 








2000 


31,200,000 


25,000,000 








Ulti- 












mate 


i+2,U00,000 











The next step in the analysis vas to determine the percentage of the 
State's future population that would reside in San Diego County. The percentage 
of the population of California residing in San Diego Coimty has increased 
steadily in the past as evidenced by the following tabulation: 



-72. 



Population of 
San Diego County 





Population of 


Population of 


in 


per cent of 


Year 


California 


San Blego County 


California total 


1900 


1,^85,053 


35,090 




2.36 


1910 


2,377,5^9 


61,665 




2.60 


1920 


3,i+26,86l 


112,2if8 




3.28 


1930 


5,677,251 


209,659 




3.69 


19^ 


6,907,387 


289,3^^8 




U.18 


1950 


10,586,223 


556,808 




5.27 


1955 


13,000,000 


780,000 




6.00 



Assuming continuance of the trend of increasing percentage of the 
State's population residing in San Diego County indicated in the above tabulation, 
a percentage of 9*0 was derived for the yeaj 2000, with a straight -line increase 
assumed from 1955 "to 2000. This continuing increase appears reasonable in light 
of the foregoing discussion of "Industrial and Commercial Growth", and in con- 
sideration of the large undeveloped areas available in the County which are 
among the most desirable for residential development in the State. 

The percentages so obtained were applied to the previously developed 
estimates of State population for each decade until the year 2000. The resulting 
estimates of future population for San Diego County are shpwn in the following 
tabulation, together with estimates prepared in connection with the San Diego 
County Sewerage Survey and by the State Department of Finance: 



Projected population 





Department of 


Ssji 


Diego Coimty 


State Department 


Year 


Water Resources 
952,000 


Se\rer£.ge Survey 
925,000 


of Finance 


i960 


1,000,000 


1965 


l,li+5,000 




— 


1,200,000 


1970 


1,337,000 




1,625,000 




1980 


l,79if,000 




2,500,000 




1990 


2,288,000 




2,960,000 




2000 


2,810,000 




3,275,000 





The foregoing estimates of future population are shown graphically on 
Plate 5, entitled "Historical and Estimated Future Population for San Diego 
County" . 

-73- 



Having estimated the rate of growth in population in the County from 
the present time \mtil the year 2000, it was next necessary to distribute this 
population among those portions of the County considered susceptible of urban 
development. The location and areal extent of lands considered to have urban 
potential are tabulated in Table 5 and are delineated on Plate k, as previously 
stated. In distributing the future population and in estimating the rates of 
growth thereof in the several urban areas, consideration was given to those 
factors affecting density and character of urban development previously dis- 
cussed. In this connection, each of the areas was given individual analysis 
and separate projections prepared therefor. 

The San Diego County Sewerage Survey found that in 1951-52 about 85 
per cent of the population of the County resided in the San Diego Metropolitan 
Area. It was further estimated in that survey that by the year 2000, 80 per 
oent of the County's population would be in the San Diego Metropolitan Area. 
On the basis of studies conducted in connection with the current investigation, 
this estimate was deemed reasonable and adopted for use in this report. The 
remaining population of the Coijnty, varying from about I5 per cent in the year 
i960 to about 20 per cent in the year 2000, was apportioned to the remaining 
subareas of the County, based upon evaluation of previously discussed factors 
influencing urban and agricultural growth and giving consideration to land use 
adaptability. 

Set forth in the following tabulation are the estimated future popula- 
tions by decades for each of the metropolitan areas and for the renmining area 
of the County. Also shown are historical population data for the years I95O and 
1955 in the same areas. 



-7k- 







Oceans ide- 










San Diego 


Carlsbad 


Escondido 


Balance of 






^fetropolitan 


Metropolitan 


Metropolitan 


San Diego 




Year 


Area 


Area 


Area 


County 
71,348 


Totals 


1950 


455,700 


17,260 


12,500 


556,808 


1955 


651,900 


30,500 


20,000 


77,600 


780,000 


i960 


809,600 


34,800 


27,000 


80,600 


952,000 


1970 


1,123,000 


52,600 


42,000 


119,400 


1,337,000 


1980 


1,507,000 


70,600 


52,000 


l64,4oo 


1,794,000 


1990 


1,876,000 


109,000 


57,000 


246,000 


2,288,000 


2000 


2,21*0,000 


158,000 


60,000 


352,000 


2,810,000 


Military Population 











Although the present military population in San Diego County is 
included in the foregoing population estimates, consideration was not given 
therein to the probable increase in such population that would result with 
advent of a national emergency or war. In order to allow for such a contingency 
in estimates of future water requirements, consideration was given to full 
mobilization of Canip Pendleton and Camp Elliott. Maximum possible mobilization 
strength at Camp Pendleton is estimated to be 170,000 personnel, while that of 
Camp Elliott is estimated to be about 30,000. About 150,000 of this population 
would be in addition to that included in estimates previously quoted for the 
entire County, For purposes of estimating water requirements. Camp Elliott was 
assumed to be mobilized in I960, and Camp Pendleton was assumed to be fully 
mobilized in I98O, with straight-line increase in personnel between I960 and 
1980. 

In the event that mobilization does not occur, it is considered that 
utilization of lands in portions of the two military reservations for agricul- 
tural or urban uses under interim lease arrangements could result in demands 
for water equivalent to or greater than those estimated for military population 
under full mobilization conditions. Use is presently being made of portions of 
Camp Pendleton for agricultural purposes under such an axi''angement . As 



-75- 



discussed in an ensuing section, the;-e is increasing pressure for private develop- 
ment of lands in Camp Elliott for urban and agricultural purposes. 

It should "be further emphasized that with the advent of iTartiine con- 
ditions, estiinated rates of growth of nonmilitary population presented herein- 
before would also be substantially accelerated. 

Future Agricultural Growth 

It has been shown that, ultimately, irrigated agriculture could 
occupy a substantial portion of the land area of San Diego Coimty. Determination 
of the rate of growth of irrigated agricultural lands during the 40-year period 
from i960 to year 2000 was a primary consideration in this investigation since 
the potential irrigation use in the aqueduct service area will have a major 
effect in ascertaining the proper size and location of future facilities for 
imported water of the area. The rate of growth in irrigated agricultural land 
is inherently dependent on many of the factors previously discussed, including 
location and availability of suitable undeveloped land, markets for crops pro- 
duced, price of water, and the ability of responsible local agencies to finance 
conveyance and distribution systems. 

Presented in this section is a discussion of those principal factors 
affecting the growth of agriculture and assumptions made in connection with 
determining the rate at which this growth would occ\ir. 

Principal Factors Affecting Growi^h of Irrigated Agriculture 

In addition to the factor of ability of local agencies to finance water 
supply developments, there are three basic criteria requisite to the development 
of irrigable land. There must be a ma.rket for the crops produced; the crops pro- 
duced must have a payment capacity for irrigation water equal to or greater than 
the selling price of the available supply; and the Investment cost of acquiring 

-76- 



I 



land and preparing it for irrigation must not be beyond that which can be 
recovered by the investors with a reasonable return on the investment. These 
criteria are discussed in detail in the ensuing sections. 

tterket Potential for Irrigated Crops . By virtue of inherent climatic 
conditions, the general service area of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct is suited 
to a relatively wide variety of field and truck crops as well as to specializa- 
tion in subtropical fruits, certain vegetables, cut flowers, and nursery stock. 
The degree of economic advantage which has accrued to specialized crop produc- 
tion in this area in the past can be expected to stimulate future expansion of 
acreage in such crops if water is made available to climatically suited lands, 
providing market outlets are available. The latter of the foregoing factors is 
of particvilar importance because of the relatively large amounts of capital 
needed to develop specialized farm enterprises and, in the case of crops such 8,s 
cut flowers and certain truck crops, the relatively high cost of marketing 
specialty produce on a nation-wide scale. 

In terms of both acreage and net income, avocados constitute the most 
important crop in the general service area of the project. At present, California 
produces about 80 per cent of the nation's supply of this fruit, with the major 
portion of the State's output originating in San Diego Coiuity, which has 6o per 
cent of California's avocado acreage. The major portion of California's avocados 
are marketed through the Calavo Growers Association which has maintained an 
energetic sales campaign during most of its history. This has resulted in a per 
capita avocado consumption in California several times that of the nation as a 
whole. A continued aggressive national sales promotion campaign on the part of 
the Calavo Growers Association should result in increased national per capita 
consumption of avocados approaching that of California. This consideration, 
coupled with the present trend of growth in the nation's population, indicates 



-77- 



that markets can be found for increasing tonnages of avocados, with the majority 
of this market increase dra'vring upon production in San Diego County. 

Second ranking in importance aciong crops produced in the sei^rice area 
of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct are lemons. This crop, of which California 
is the only commercial producer, has been successfully marketed in generally 
increasing amounts over the past ^5 years. National lemon consumption may be 
expected to expand as population increases and, although San Diego County does 
not appear to have equal competitive advantage with the Santa Barbara-Ventura 
area, the latter area is approaching maximum use of the available lands adaptable 
to lemon production while in San Diego County lands suitable for lemon production 
are as yet not fully developed. It can be reasonably concluded, therefore, that 
markets will exist for increased lemon production which may occur in the San 
Diego Aqueduct seorvice area if i«3.ter is mside available. Since the economic out- 
look for lemons is not as favorable as for avocados j, it is to be expected that 
the latter will have first choice of the climatically suited lands while lemons 
will be planted where their tolerance of lower temperatures is a factor. Taken 
together, these two crops are expected to utilize virtual3.y all of the land 
which is siiited to citrus and subtropical fruit production. 

The three highest income truck and field ci^ops grown in the potential 
service area are late fall tomatoes, celery, and cut flowers. Late fall tomatoes 
are marketed during the winter when competition from other tomato-producing areas 
is limited. Until recently, most of this crop was marketed within California but 
increasing quantities are being shipped out of the State. This fact, coupled 
with the limited amount of land in other areas climatically suited to the pro- 
duction of late fall tomatoes, indicates that there will be an adequate market 
potential for any foreseeable increase in production of this crop. 

Celery, which is grown primarily in the Chula Vista area, is a high 
income and high production cost crop which is grown primarily for the eastern 

-78- 



market. San Diego County's harvest season is the same as that for the Florida 
celery crop, and it is not considered to have any competitive advantage over the 
latter area. However, it would appear that the increase in demand for food 
indicated by national population trends will be reflected in a substantial 
increase in demand for celery from San Diego County. 

The major cut flower producing areas in the State are located in the 
San Francisco Bay area, in Los Angeles County, and in the coastal area of San 
Diego County. It is the consensus among staff representatives of the State 
Department of Agriculture that the market for California's cut flowers can 
readily absorb a continuing expansion in production. This, coupled with an 
impending encroachment of urban development into present flower growing areas 
in Los Angeles County, indicates the strong likelihood that there will be a 
greater market potential for cut flowers from San Diego County in the future 
than at present. 

Another important specialty irrigated crop which is expected to have 
a substantial expansion is nursery stock. At the present time, the production 
of this commodity is a $100,000,000 industry in California. However, the supply 
is so fax behind demand that leaders in the industry foresee a need for a 50 per 
cent expansion in California nursery stock within the next decade. About 2h per 
cent of the present production in terms of value of the product originates in 
Los Angeles County, but the increasing pressure of encroachment of urban and 
suburban areas upon agricultural lands in that County is tending to push the 
industry southward into less congested areas. Water is the controlling element 
in this movement into San Diego County since there is a relative abundance of 
suitable Ismd. If siifficient water of the necessary quality is made available, 
it is expected that several thousand acres of interior valley land which experi- 
ence temperature variations that preclude the growing of other high value 
specialty crops will be devoted to nursery stock production. 

-79- 



other farm enterprisef:. which may be expected to utilise additional 
quantit:'.es of water include thorie associated with dairy products and poultry 
production, miscellaneous vegetab3.es, and frait and field crops for local con- 
sviraption or for export to the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area. The market poten- 
tial for such farm produce rests on a further population expansion in southern 
California. Based on historical records and current trends previously discussed, 
it appears that population will continue to expand at a rapid rate. This will 
result in a continuing increase in demand for local farm produce. The increase 
in demand can be partially satisfied by development of irrigated agriculture 
upon presently dry lands in the general seirvice area of the proposed San Diego 
Aqueduct. 

Costs of Land Developiaen-'; . In estimating future development of agri- 
cultural lands, considei'atiori wk.s given to the relative difficulty and expense 
involved in development of new land for agricultural use. Agricultural land 
upon "vblch aqueduct water will be used vai-ies greatly in the several subareas 
with respect to surface cover, slope, and other physical characteristics which 
have significant bear?Jig on irrigation development costs. Also, the nature of 
the crops to be grown, with regard to 'ohe investment in permanent plantings, as 
well as the requirement for specialized irrigation systems, have a considerable 
effect on land development costs and thei*efore upon the rapidity of their 
development . 

Some of the irrigable land for which new water service is contemplated 
has potential subdivision valiie. There is a tendency for this consideration to 
be reflected in present raw land values to auch an extent as to rule out com- 
mercial irrigation development, although pax-ii-time farm units or subixrban resi- 
dences could well be established on such land. 

Excluding potential subdivision considerations, but with recognition 
of variation in climate and other important factors aniong service areas, it is 

-80- 



estimated that on an average basis, current selling prices for irrigable, but 
presently undeveloped, agricultural land in the several subareas fall within 
the range of $250 to $1,000 per acre. Variation in land prices generally 
reflects income potential based on the crops which may be grown on a given piece 
of lando With inclusion of clearing and leveling costs, expenses associated 
with establishing and bringing orchards into bearing in appropriate cases, and 
provision for irrigation systems, developed land costs ranging from $600 per 
acre for field crops to $3^500 per acre for avocados were derived. 

These costs were compared with current market prices for developed 
lands within each of the subareas. Where costs of developing raw lands were 
below the market values of presently developed lands in any subarea, it was 
considered that agricultural growth therein would not be limited by this factor. 
Conversely, where such costs would exceed the selling price of developed lands 
of a comparable character, it was considered growth would be inhibited. 

Payment Capacity for Irrigation Water , Based on the foregoing discus- 
sion, it is concluded that there is reasonable expectation that an increased 
supply of agricultural produce resulting from project water service could be 
successfully marketed, within the scope of probable quantity relationships among 
comiiiodities . However, the element of economic selectivity is expected to play 
an important part, within the limits imposed by pertinent physical factors, in 
bringing about the crop pattern which would develop with the availability of 
project water. 

Economic selectivity as reflected by the type and size of a particular 
commercial farm unit is primarily a function of the income which the operator 
expects to receive. Income expectations arise from estimated future price and 
income relationships including, where irrigated agricultural development of new 
land is involved, consideration of the availability and probable cost of a water 



■81- 



supply. The cost of project water for a particular service area can be estimated 
in advance within limits. Therefore^ consideration of water cost compared with 
the expected share of farm income available for its payment is essential to 
proper application of the element of economic selectivity in projecting a future 
crop pattern. 

Payment capacity is derived through an analytical process patterned 
after the "farm efficiency" or "naanagement" studies of the University of 
California Extension Service. Gross crop inccaae is determined on the basis of 
conservative yield estimates (reflecting productive life in the case of perennial 
crops and future projection based on historical annual production records in the 
case of annual crops), and average local prices for the ten-year period 19^6-1955. 
Overhead^ cultural, and production costs other than payment for water and mana- 
gerial skill essential to successful operation of the farm enterprise, also 
reflecting this base pe}riod and appropriate to the crop eind locality under con- 
sideration, are likewise incorporated into the analysis. The resultant residual 
farm income is designated as pajnnent capacity for project water. However, pros- 
pective project water users may require a portion of this residual income for 
return to management in recognition of the significance of the profit motive 
within the framework of economic selectivity, with the balance being available to 
pay for project water service. Therefore, it can be concluded that payment capa- 
cities for irrigation water, as developed within the criteria set forth above, 
represent ceiling amotints which irrigators can pay for project water. 

Based on farm price -cost relationships prevailing during the period 
19^-1955 and estimated average long-term yields, follovring is the relationship 
between the existing irrigated crop pattern sind payment capacities: 



-82- 



Payment capacity per 
Crop acre -foot of vater 

Avocados (mature trees), late fall 
tomatoes, celery, cut flowers, and 
niirsery stock $100 or more 

Lemons, spring and early summer 

vegetables $70 to $99 

Table grapes, most deciduous fruit, 

and other vegetables $50 to $69 

Valencia oranges $Uo to $^9 

Miscellaneous fruit and vegetable crops $30 to $39 

Nuts and field crops $20 to $29 

It should be emphasized that the foregoing values for payment capacity 
are for water delivered to the farmer's headgate and include all direct and in- 
direct costs attributable to the conveyance of the water supply to the land. 
Prices for water quoted at the main aqueduct cannot be directly compared with 
the foregoing values. 

In estimating rates of agricultural growth, values of payment capacity 
for the various climatically adapted crops projected in the several subareas were 
compared with assumed costs of water at the aqueduct to which was added estimated 
costs of conveyance and distribution. In this manner, it was possible to deter- 
mine the limiting effect of price of water on irrigated agricultural development. 

Estimated Rate of Growth of Irrigated Agriculture 

Those presently undeveloped lands in each subarea which, as a result of 
the land classification studies, were considered to be susceptible of irrigated 
agricultural development, were analyzed on the basis of influencing factors dis- 
cussed under "Methods and Procedures" and in greater detail in the immediately 
preceding section. Particular attention was given to the costs of providing 
water searvice to these lands, the costs of preparing them for irrigation, and 

to payment capacity of climatically eidapted crops. 

-83- 



As has been iadioatedj estimates c"? irrigated agricultural development 
were prepared for two asaujued costs of water at the anueduct, $15 and $kO per 
acre -foot. Further, estimates of probab-le growth were prepared for each of the 
considered aqueduct routes in order to reflect the influence of aqueduct location 
on such growth in the potential aqueduct service area. 

On the basis of preliminary analysis it was concluded that there would 
be no apparent difference in the total demand for imported ira-ter in the potential 
aqueduct service area with a variation in aqueduct location. Although the growth 
in certain subareas would be increased or decreased by sizable percentages depend- 
ing upon aqueduct location, the over-all groirth was estimated to be equivalent 
because increases in some areas would bo compensated for by decreases in others. 

Accordingly, estimates of expajitf^ion of irrigated agricultural land and 
attendant demands for water therefor, were t9J?.en as determined for the "W" 
.line described hereinafter in CbB.pter III. 

On the basis of studies described hereinbefore, io was concluded that 
the only apparent deterrents to the rapid development of irrigated agriculture 
in the potential aqueduct service aree irill, with the availability of an adequate 
water supply, be the ability to pay for such water by cei-tain climatically adapted 
crops and the capacity of local a^enciec to finance necessary conveyance and 
distribution systems. It was, therefore, assumed that those agricultural areas 
meeting these economic and financial criteria would be in pi'-Dduction by the year 
2000. By this time it was estimated that froir. 103,000 to l63,000 acres of addi- 
tional land would be in productio:.i in southwestern Riverside and San Diego 
Counties, depending on the price of the water. This represents an increase of 
from 200 to 300 per cent over the 50,000 acres irrigated in southwestern Riverside 
and San Diego Counties in 1955-56. 

The presently irrigated area was estimated from field reconnaissance 
supplemented by data appearing in Bulletin No. 2. Values determined for present 



irrigated area were considered reasonable and consistent with the accuracy of 
other basic data available in this investigation, but were not of the accuracy 
which would be obtained from a detailed land use survey. 

The determination of the rate of development of irrigated agriculture 
for the period from i960 until the year 2000 was based generally upon the assump- 
tion that the foregoing Isinds would develop rapidly during the first ten years 
subsequent to aqueduct construction with a slower growth thereafter. Experience 
of water service agencies throughout Ca3JLfomia tends to support this assumption 
almost viniversally. Tables 6 and 7 siimmarize, by subareas, the estimated future 
areas of irrigated lands in the service area for ten-year intervals to the year 
2000 assuming prices for water delivered at the aqueduct of $15 and $^40 per acre- 
foot, respectively. The probable growth of irrigated agriculture in the poten- 
tial service area of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct for the two assumptions as 
to price at the aqueduct is depicted graphically on Plate 6, entitled "Estimated 
Future Areas of Irrigated Lands in the San Diego Aqueduct Service Area" , and 
summarized in the following tabulation: 





Area in 


acres 




Year 

i960 
1970 
1980 
1990 
2000 


Price of water 
$15 per acre -foot 

60,600 
102,900 
157>500 
192,100 
212,600 


Price of water 
$i+0 per acre -foot 

51,200 

64,800 

96,300 

127,900 

151,000 



-85- 



TABLE 6 



ESTIM/fflSD FUTURE AREAS OF IRBIilAiCED LMDS IN THE 
SEWICE AREA OF THE PROPOSED SAJf DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

(Assuming a price for ^/ater of $15 per 
acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct) 



: 




Areas in acD 


2S 




Subarea : 


Year : 


Year t 


Year 


: Year : 


Year 


t 


1S^60 : 


1970 : 


1980 ; 


: 1990 : 


2000 


San Diego County 












San Diego Metropolitan Area 


10,000 


7,30-0 


5,500 


3,600 


1,600 


Oceanside -Carlsbad 












Metropolitan Area 


6,000 


8,500 


12,000 


14,000 


15,000 


Escondido Metropolitan Area 


5,000 


6,000 


7,600 


9,000 


9,600 


Santa Fe-San Dieguito Area 


3,500 


1^,500 


7,000 


8,000 


9,400 


Bueno Colorado MunicipaJ. 












Water District 


8,000 


11,000 


15,000 


20,000 


23,000 


Fallbrook 


6,500 


7,000 


7,500 


6,500 


6,200 


Poway Mmoicipal Water District 


IvOOO 


1,900 


3,500 


4,500 


5,000 


Rainbow Municipal Water District 


3,000 


4,300 


7,600 


11,000- 


13,000 


Valley Center Mimicipal Water 












District 


1,800 


5,000 


10,000 


16,000 


18,000 


Ramona Municipal Water District 


600 


1,200 


2,5*50 


3,800 


4,700 


P.ani:ho EL Cajon 


500 


1,000 


1,400 


1,600 


1,800 


Pauffif. Valley 


2,50C' 


3,000 


4,000 


5,000 


5,500 


Worth of Santa Fe 


100 


500 


800 


1,400 


2,500 


South of Lake Hodges 


i,a)o 


1,500 


2,600 


3,800 


5,600 


East of Del Mar 


1,400 


2,5'^ 


4,000 


5,800 


7,000 


Lower Pauraa VaJ.ley 


1,500 


1,700 


2,8a) 


3,500 


4,500 


El Capitan 


500 


900 


1,300 


1,600 


1,700 


Rincon 


1,100 


IJW 


2,800 


3,600 


4,000 


San Vicente 


Boo 


1,400 


2,500 


3,100 


3,600 


Agua Tibia 








200 


500 


700 


Camp Elliott 

















Camp Pendleton 


1^000 















Subtotals, San Diego County 
Southwestern Riverside Coiintj 



TeraeciJla 

Vail 

Miirrieta 

Winchester South 

Subtotals, Southwestern 
Riverside County 

GRAND TOTALS 



55,800 70,900 100,600 126,300 l42,400 






3,000 

2,000 
27,000 



500 

7,400 
9,000 

40^000 



1,800 2,800 

8,000 8,400 

12,000 14,000 

44,000 45,000 



4,300 32,000 56.900 65,800 70,200 

60,600 102,900 157; 500 192,100 212,600 



-86- 



TABLE 7 



ESTIMATED FUTURE AREAS OF IRRIGATED LANDS IN THE 
SERVICE AREA OF THE PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

(Assuming a price for water of $^4^0 per 
acre -foot delivered at the aqueduct) 



;; 




Areas 


> in acres 




Subarea : " 


Year : 


Year : 


Year : 


Year : 


Year 


• 


i960 : 


1970 : 


1980 : 


1990 : 


2000 


>an Diego County- 






San Diego Metropolitan Area 


8,000 


4,600 


2,800 


1,800 


800 


Oceanside "Carlsbad 












Metropolitan Area 


5,000 


7,000 


9,000 


11,000 


12,000 


Escondido Metropolitan Area 


i^,500 


5,000 


5,500 


6,500 


7,000 


Santa Fe-Sem Dieguito Area 


3,000 


3,500 


5,000 


6,500 


7,500 


Bueno Colorado Municipal 












Water District 


7,000 


10,000 


13,000 


16,000 


19,000 


Fallbrook ''\i\li\^<'.i>.:nX-'. \n.i^Sy^.: 


6,000 


6,500 


7,000 


6,000 


5,000 


Poway M\inicipal Water District 


800 


1,500 


2,200 


2,800 


3,500 


Rainbow Mxmicipal Water District 


2,100 


4,500 


7,000 


8,500 


9,600 


Valley Center Municipal Water 












District 


1,000 


3,300 


6,800 


11,000 


13,000 


Ramona Municipal Water District 


600 


700 


1,000 


1,800 


3,200 


Rancho El Cajon 


IKX) 


700 


900 


1,100 


1,400 


Pauma Valley 


1,800 


2,200 


2,700 


3,000 


3,300 


North of Santa Fe 


100 


400 


600 


1,100 


2,000 


South of lAke Hodges 


500 


900 


1,500 


3,000 


4,000 


East of Del Mar 


1,U00 


2,000 


3,500 


4,500 


4,:;00 


Lower Pauma Valley 


1,500 


1,500 


2,000 


3,000 


3,500 


El Capitan 


500 


600 


700 


1,000 


1,300 


Rincon 


1,000 


1,300 


1,500 


2,200 


2,600 


San Vicente 


200 


700 


1,400 


1,900 


2,400 


Agua Tibia 











400 


600 


Camp ElliotiJ 

















Camp Pendleton 


1,000 















Subtotals, San Diego County 46,400 56,900 74,100 93,100 IC ' y::OQ 



iouthvestern Riverside County 
Temecula 
Vail 

Mvirrieta 
Winchester South 

Subtotals, Southwestern 
Riverside Covmty 

GRAND TOTALS 




1,800 
1,000 
2,000 

4,800 
51,200 



200 

1,800 3,200 

1,400 5,800 

4,700 13,000 



1,200 

3,600 

9,000 

21,000 



1,800 

4,000 

10,000 

29,000 



7,900 22,200 34,800 44,800 
64,800 96,300 127,900 151,000 



-87- 



Tat-Qxe Deiaaj.i ds T or Water 

The futiire requirements for urbsn and agricultural vater in the ser- 
vice area of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct were computed as the product of 
unit values of water use and projected population axid irrigated area, respec- 
tively, as previously developed. Tiie demands for additional imported water were 
obtained by deducting the safe yield of existf.ng water supply facilities from 
the computed water requirements. After arriving at estijnates of future demands 
for additional imported water on the two bases of price of such water, a future 
water demand was adopted for use in determining the proper capacity for the 
proposed. San Diego Aqueduct. 

Future Water Eequirements 

The foregoiiig sections have presented a description of the development 
of estimated future growth of irrigated firea and population to the year 2000 for 
the various subdivisions of the servi-^e area of the San Diego Aqueduct. Pre- 
sented in Tables 8 and 9, for each of the considered subrreas, a:re the estimated 
areas of irrigated lands, appropriate units of water use, end derived agricvil- 
tural water requirements for the year 2000, for prices of water delivered at 
the aqueduct of $15 and $4o per acre-foot, :.'espectively. Presented in Table 10 
for each subarea considered to have an urban potential, are estiniRtes of the 
population therein for the year 2000, the appropriate veJLue of per capita water 
consumption, and the dei'ived urban water requirement in the year 2000. 

Water requirements within Camp Pendleton and Caoirp Elliott military 
reservations posed a particular problem because of the uncertainty with regard 
to future use of lands therein. As previously stated, special provision was 
made for military population assuming full mobilization conditions at these 
Camps and computations of future urban x*ater demands presented in this chapter 



-88- 



TABLE 8 

ESTIMATED FUTURE WATER REQUIREMENTS OF 
IRRIGATED AGRICULTURE IN SERVICE AREA OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FOR THE YEAR 2000 

(Assuming a price for water of $15 per 
acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct) 



Subarea 



Subtropical 

orchards 

Net -.Units of 
irrigated: water 
area, in ruse, in 
acres : feet 



Truck and 
field crops 



•.Total annual 
Net : Units of: water 
irrigated: water : requirement , 
area, in :use, in :in acre-feet 



acres 



feet 



San Dies 



San Diego Metropolitan Area 

Oceanside=Carlsbad Metro- 
politan Area 

Escondido Metropolitan Area 

Santa Fe-San Dieguito Area 

Bueno Colorado Municipal Water 
District 

Fallbrook 

Poway Municipal Water District 

Rainbow Mxmicipal Water District 

Valley Center Municipal 
Water District 

Ramona Miinicipal Water District 

Rancho El Cajon 

Pauma Vedley 

North of Santa Fe 

South of Lake Hodges 

East of Del Mar 

Lower Pauma Valley 

El Capitan 

Rincon 

San Vicente 

Agua Tibia 

Camp Elliott 

Camp Pendleton 

Subtotals 



800 



1.9 



800 



2.0 



3,120 



10,000 


1.5 


5,000 


1.8 


24,000 


5,800 


2.5 


3,800 


2.5 


24,000 


7,500 


1.7 


1,900 


3.0 


l8,70C 


lU,000 


1.5 


9,000 


1.5 . 


34,500 


5,000 


2.0 


1,200 


1.9 


12,280 


3,500 


1.5 


1,500 


1-5 


7,500 


10,000 


2.5 


3,000 


2.5 


32,500 


13,500 


2.0 


ii,500 


2.0 


36,000 


3,600 


2.3 


1,100 


2.0 


io,5v-o 


2,000 


2.3 








4,600 


l<-,800 


2.0 








9,600 


2,500 


2.1 








5,250 


U,200 


2.3 


l,i^OO 


2.U 


13,020 


6,000 


1.5 


1,000 


1-5 


10,500 


U,000 


1.5 


500 


2.0 


7,000 


TOO 


2.3 


1,000 


2.3 


3,910 


3,000 


2.2 


1;000 


2.3 


8,900 


2,600 


2.3 


1,000 


2.3 


8,230 


400 


2.3 


300 


2.0 


1,520 

































103,900 



38,000 



275,680 



Southwestern Riverside Count;; 



Temecula 

Vail 

Murrieta 

Winchester South 

Subtotals 

GRAND TOTALS 





1,400 

1,000 



2,400 

106,300 





2.0 
2.0 




2,800 

7,000 

13,000 

45,000 




1.5 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 



4,200 

16,800 
27,000 
90,000 

138,0C'C 

413,680 



.89- 



ESTIMATED FimiRE WACISS RSQUIKEKEKTS OF 
IRRIGATED AGRICin.l'Uro BJ 33R?IC3 AREA OF 
PROPOSSD SM DISGO AQOIDUCT FOR THE YEAR 2000 

(Assuming a price for water of $40 per 
acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct) 



Subarea 



Subtropical 

orch ards 
'Net : Units of 
: irrigated: water 
:area, in :use, in 
acres : feet 



San Diego County 

San Diego Metropcliteji Area 800 

Oceanside-Carlsbad Metro- 
politan Area 

Escoudido Metropolitan Area 

Santa Fe-San Dieguito Area 

Bueno Colorado Mvmicipal Water 
District 

Fallbrook 

Poway Municipal Water District 

Rainbow *funicipal Water District 

Valley Center Municipal 
Water District 

Rsiaona Municipal Water District 

Rancho El Cajon 

Pauma Vallejr 

Wort-h of Santa Fe 

South of Lake Eodges 

East of Del Mar 

Lower Paiiraa Valley 

El Capitan 

Rincon 

San Vicente 

Agua Tibia 

Camp FJlliott 

Camp Pendleton 

Subtotals 96,100 



'I'T'.rck and 
field crops : Total anniial 
Net : Units of: water 
irrigated: water :req'uirement, 
area, in :use, in :in acre-feet 
acres : feet : 



1.9 











1,520 



8,500 


1.5 


3,500 


1.8 


19,050 


5,800 


2.5 


1,200 


2.5 


17,500 


7. 500 


l«7 








12,750 


4,000 


1.5 


5,000 


1.5 


28,500 


5,000 


2.0 








10, ow 


3,500 


1,5 








5,250 


9,600 


2.5 








24,000 


3,000 


2.0 








26,000 


2,400 


2.3 


800 


2.0 


7,120 


l,4oo 


2.3 








3,220 


4,500 


2.0 








9, WO 


2,000 


2.1 








4,200 


4,. 000 


2.3 








9,200 


4,500 


1.5 








6,750 


3,500 


1.5 








5-250 


700 


2.3 


600 


2.3 


2,990 


2,600 


2.2 








5,720 


2,400 


2.3 








5.52c 


400 


2.3 


200 


2.0 


1,320 

































11,300 



2o4,86o 



Southwestern Riverside 


Count j?^ 




1,400 

1,000 





2. 
2. 







1,800 

2,600 

9,000 

29,000 


1 

2 
2 
2 


.5 
.0 
.0 
.0 




Temecula 

Vail 

Murrieta 

Winchester South 




2,700 

8,000 
20,000 
58,000 


Subtotals 




2,400 






42,400 






88,700 


GRAND TOTALS 




93,500 






53,700 






293,560 



-90- 



TABLE 10 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL UP£AN WATER REQUIREMENTS 
IN THE SERVICE AREA OF PROPOSED SAN DIEGO 
AQUEDUCT FOR THE YEAR 2000 



3ubarea 



: Estimated : Estimated 

Estimated : units of : urban 

population : water use , : water 

in year : acre -feet : requirements 

2000 : per capita: acre-feet 

per year : per year 



San Diego Metropolitan Area 


2,2U0,000 


0.220 


492,800 


Oceanside-Carlsbeid Metropolitan 








Area 


158,000 


O.22U 


35,400 


Escondido Metropolitan Area 


60,000 


O.22U 


13,400 


Santa Fe-San Dieguito Area 


50,000 


0.22k 


11,200 


Bueno Colorado Municipal Water 








District 


60,000 


O.22U 


13,440 


Fallbrook 


30,000 


O.22U 


6,720 


Poway Municipal Water District 


30,000 


0.224 


6,720 


Rainbow Municipal Water District 


20,000 


0,224 


4,480 


Valley Center Municipal Water 








District 


30,000 


0.224 


6,720 


Ramona Municipal Water District 


10,000 


0.224 


2,240 


Rancho El Cajon 


5,000 


0.224 


1,120 


East of Del Mar 


50,000 


0.224 


11,200 


El Capitan 


i|,000 


0.224 


900 


San Vicente 


5,000 


0.224 


1,120 


Camp Elliott 


30,000 


0.101 


3,030 


Camp Pendleton 


170,000 


0.101 


17,170 



-91- 



reflect the water uses of such population. As also stated, it is believed that 
the v/ater demar.ds so developed would provide for irrigation of suitab].e lands 
in Camp Pendleton should the United States Government lease them or sell them 

outright . 

Camp Elliott is located adjacent to the heavily developed urban areas 
of the San Diego Metropolitan. Area,, ^zl6. contains large acreages of lands highly- 
desirable for urban or agricultural development. Should a large part of these 
lands be :-e].ea3ed to private development, the Tra,ter requirements for a Carap 
population under full mobilization would not be adequate to meet urban or 
agricultural water requirements on such lands. Therefore, it is hereinafter 
assumed that the Camp Elliott area would have aji additional annual water 
requirement in the year 2000 of 7,000 acre-feet, assuming water sold at the 
aqueduct for $15 per acre-foot, end 6,000 acre-feet, assuming a delivery price of 
$'40 per acre-foot. Thie estimf.ted irrigable area in Camp Elliott is about 17,000 
acres, which would require about 25,000 acre -feet per year if developed into 
irrigated agriculture. The amount of 3^000 acre-feet per year hereinafter esti- 
mated for the use by the Cejnp population under full mobilisiation conditions, and 
the foregoing additional exiounts make a total of 9,000 to 10,000 acre-feet which 
is siifficient water to irrigate about ko per cent of the foregoing irrigable area. 

The estimated growth in total water requirements in the potential 
aqueduct sei-vice area for both assumptions of price of water ai-e shown graphi- 
cally on Plate 7, entitled "Estimated Future Water Requirements of the San Diego 
Aqueduct Sei-vice Area" , are sui/iraari'^ed in the following tabulation, and are shown 
for the subareas by decades in Tables 11 end 12 for the two price assumptions : 



-92- 



Annual water requirement, in acre -feet 



I 





Water at $15 per 


Water at $40 per 


Year 


acre -foot 


acre -foot 


i960 


256,300 


233.300 


1970 


hh6,eoo 


359,700 


1980 


677,100 


5^9,1+00 


1990 


887,500 


751,000 


2000 


1,053,900 


932,900 



Safe Yield of Existing Water Supply Facilities 

The current drought period in San Diego Cotmty which has continued 
for 13 years, coupled with the recent unprecedented increases in water demands 
, in the axea, has necessitated overdraft of surface storage reser^res to the 
extent that the nominal safe yields of these facilities cannot presently be 
realized and will not be realized until substantial quantities of surface run- 
off occur o However, for the purposes of this report, the full safe yields of 
the local surface and underground water supplies were assumed to be available 
during the chosen Uo-year period. 

The aggregate safe annual yield of local water supply facilities in 
the potential aqueduct service area was estimated to be about 12^,000 acre -feet » 
Of this amount about 58,000 acre -feet per annum represents the yield of presently 
developed ground water storage capacity, and about 66,000 acre -feet per ann\;m is 
the nominal safe annual yield of surface storage developments. These estimates 
were primarily obtained from Bulletin NOo 2 snd other prior publications of the 
State Water Resources Board and Division of Water Resources » 

Should subsequent hydrologic conditions make it impossible to realize 
the assumed safe yields over the long-term period, demands for imported water 
will develop more rapidly than indicated in the following estiirates. Conversely, 
should additional conservation works be constructed in the chosen period;, esti- 
mated demands for imported water would be delayed. However, it should be noted 
that in Bulletin No. 3 of the State Water Resources Board, it was estimated 



I 



.93. 



that about 59,000 acre -feet annually represexits the maxiiiiuni practicable axidi- 
tional local yield that could be developed. 

In order to obtain estimates of saife yield for each of the subdivisions 
of the investigational area., it was necessary to prorate estimates of safe yield 
for larger areas as determined in the foregoing publications. The safe yields 
of local' water supplies for each subarea so estimated are shown in Tables 11 and 
'J2f along with other data. 

It will be noted in Tables 11 and 12 that the safe yields of local 
water supplies represent a rapidly decreasing percentage of the estimated future 
water requirements of the investigational area. For this reason the periods 
of relatively high or low local surface runoff in the area are expected to have 
a rapidly decreasing effect upon demaads for iniported water in the individual 
years . 

In addition to supplies available from local conservation facilities, 
as jfflKich as l^H^JjOO acre-feet of Colorado River water per year could be conveyed 
in the two barrels of the existing San Diego Aqueduct for use by members of 
the San Diego County Water Authority. It ■was herein assumed that the existing 
and proposed aqueducts would be jointly opejrated for the mutual benefit of the 
entire service area. 

Demands for Imported Water 

The estimated safe annual yields of local water supplies available to 
each subarea were deducted from estimates of future \ra,ter requirements therefor 
to obtain total demands for imported water. These demajids for each subai^a in 
the potential aqueduct service area for assumed prices of water at the aqueduct 
of $15 and $ijO per acre -foot are contained in Tables 13 and l**-, respectively. 



-94- 



TABLE 11 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL SAFE YIELDS OF LOCAL WATER 

SUPPLIES AND ANNUAL WATER REQUIREMENTS IN THE 

SERVICE AREA OF THE PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

(Assuming a price for water of $15 per 
acre -foot delivered at the aqueduct) 





Annual 














safe 




Annueil water requirements. 






yield, 

in 




in acre-feet 




Sutaxea 














acre- 


. Year 


; Year 


Year 


Year : 


Year 




feet 


i960 


: 1970 ■ 


1980 


1990 : 


2000 


San Diego County- 














San Diego Metropolitan 














Area 


59,800 


llfl,800 


209,800 


29^,800 


39^,800 


495,900 


Oceanside^Carlsbad 














Metropolitan Area 


7,200 


16,1^00 


25,200 


35,200 


J+8,200 


59,^0 


Escondido Metropolitan 














Area 


9,000 


12,800 


17,800 


25,000 


33,000 


37,itOO 


Santa Fe"=San Diegviito 














Area 


5,600 


8,1^00 


13,800 


19,600 


26,600 


29,900 


Bueno Colorado Municipal 














Water District 


9,000 


13,000 


21,000 


30,000 


U0,000 


47,900 


Fallbrook 


2,000 


10,500 


12,000 


15,000 


17,000 


19,000 


Poway Municipal Water 














District 


i^OO 


2,i^00 


4,800 


8,200 


11,400 


14,200 


Rainbow Municipal 














Water District 


1,200 


5,600 


11,200 


21,200 


30,200 


37,000 


Valley Center Municipal 














Water District 


800 


3,600 


11,800 


23,800 


34,800 


42,700 


Ramona Municipal Water 














District 


1,000 


1,000 


3,300 


6,600 


10,200 


12,700 


Rancho El Ca.jon 


i^OO 


1,700 


2,700 


3,900 


4,700 


5,700 


Pauma Valley 


2,000 


U,200 


6,100 


8,000 


9,200 


9,600 


North of Santa Fe 


100 


UOO 


1,200 


1,700 


2,900 


5,200 


South of Lake Hodges 


300 


2,100 


3,500 


5,900 


8,700 


13,000 


East of Del Mar 


3,000 


2,000 


5,600 


11,800 


16,000 


21,700 


Lower Pa\ana V«d.ley 


1,000 


Uoo 


I5UOO 


U,100 


6,000 


7,000 


El Capitan 


500 


500 


1,200 


2,100 


3,500 


4,800 


Rincon 


1,000 


1,200 


3,700 


6,100 


8,000 


8,900 


San Vicente 


i^OO 


1,600 


3,600 


6,200 


7,900 


9,4oo 


Agua Tibia 











500 


1,100 


1,500 


Camp Elliott* 





3,i^00 


5,000 


7,000 


9,000 


10,000 


Camp Pendleton 


6,000 


10,500 


iif,500 


19,000 


19,000 


17,200 


Subtotals, Sam 














Diego County 


110,700 


2ti3,500 


379,200 


555,700 


742,200 


910,100 



-95- 



ESTIMATED MFJAL. SAFE YISI;DS 0? LOCAL WATER 

SUPPLIES AND AMUAL WATER REQUIREMENTo IN THE 

SERVICE AREA OF THE PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

(continued) 

(Assianing a price for water of $15 per 
acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct) 



Subarea 



Annual 

Sfife 

yield, 

in 

acre- 

feet 



Ies.T 
i960 



Axinsial water requirements, 

in acre-feet 



Year 
1970 



Year 
1980 



Year 
1990 



Year 
2000 



Sotithvestem Riverside County 
Temecula 
Vail 

Murrieta 
Winchester South 






3pQ0Q 
5,000 
i^,000 





5,800 
7,800 

51^,000 



800 
ill-, 800 

21,800 
8U,000 



2,700 
15,800 
28,800 
88,000 



U,200 
16,800 
32,800 
90,000 



Subtotals, South- 
western Riverside 
Couftty 

GRAND TOTALS 



13,600 12,800 67,600 121,400 135,300 11*3,800 
124,300 256,300 446,800 677A00 877;.500 1,055,900 



■^-Includes allowance for agricultural water requirements of up to 7,000 acre- 
feet per yea!r in year 2000. 



.96. 



TABLE 12 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL SAFE YIELDS OF LOCAL WATER 

SUPPLIES AND ANNUAL WATER BJEQUIBEMENTS IN THE 

SERVICE AREA OF THE PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

(Assuming a price for vra.ter of $40 per 
acre -foot delivered at the aqueduct) 





; Annual 


o 












: safe 


; 


Annual water requirements, 






t yield, 
: in 


° 


in acre -feet 




Subarea 


° 


I 


^ 


: 


X 




t acre- 


; Year 


I Year 


: Year 


% Year 


', Year 




: feet 


; i960 


: 1970 


: 1980 


I 1990 


: 2000 


San Diego Co\inty 














San Diego Metropolitan 














Area 


59,800 


133,800 


199,800 


289,800 


389,800 


494,300 


Oceanside -Carlsbad 














Metropolitan Area 


7,200 


14,800 


22 p 200 


30,200 


U3,200 


54,500 


Escondido Metropolitan 














Area 


9,000 


11,900 


15,600 


21,000 


27,000 


30,900 


Santa Fe-San Dieguito 














Area 


5,6oo 


7,600 


11,800 


17,600 


22,600 


24,000 


Bueno Colorado Municipal 














Water District 


9,000 


12,200 


18,500 


26,000 


34,000 


41,900 


Fallbrook 


2,000 


9,500 


10,800 


13,000 


15,000 


16,700 


Poway Municipal Water 














District 


400 


2,000 


3,900 


6,900 


9,900 


12,000 


Rainbow Municipal 














Water District 


1,200 


4,4oo 


9,000 


16,200 


24,200 


28,500 


Valley Center Municipal 














Water District 


800 


2,600 


8,800 


17,800 


26,800 


32,700 


Ramona Municipal Water 














District 


1,000 


1,000 


1,200 


3,200 


5,300 


9,400 


Rancho El Cajon 


400 


1,600 


2,i»00 


3,000 


3,700 


4,300 


Pauma Valley 


2,000 


3,700 


5,500 


7,300 


8,600 


9,200 


North of Santa Fe 


100 


300 


800 


1,300 


2,300 


4,100 


South of Take Hodges 


300 


•300 


2,000 


.■s,400 


7,000 


9,300 


East of Del Jfer 


3,000 


1,800 


4,800 


11,100 


15,000 


18,000 


Lower Pauma Valley 


1,000 


300 


900 


2,300 


U,6oo 


5,500 


El Capitan 


500 


itOO 


1,000 


1,500 


2,800 


3,900 


Rincon 


1,000 


600 


1,700 


3,200 


4,900 


5,800 


San Vicente 


4oo 


700 


1,700 


3,600 


5,100 


6,600 


Agua Tibia 














800 


JL,300 


Camp Elliott* 





3,000 


^,500 


6,000 


8,000 


9,000 


Camp Pendleton 


6,000 


9,000 


13,000 


17,000 


17,000 


17,200 


Subtotals, San 














Diego County 


110,700 


222,000 


339,900 


501, Uoo 


677^600 


839,100 



-97- 



ESTIMMED mWJM. SMT: 'fISOS OF LOCAL ¥MEB 

SliPaiES MI-' A^T^oUAL MM-1?; KEQIJflBSMEIflS H THE 

SES7ICS ABEA m THE ESO^vSED SM MEOO Aq^mmiJT 

{Ai?.5'(ariiBg a p:ricc-! fcci' w&tar of $40 per 
acre-fwot deiiverisd at the aouedact) 



; 66e:fe :" M-wml water req-oirefflents, 
s jieM,, i __^ ia?. acre^feet 



Sul^arsa i i^i s ; ; ; i 
t- eers- i Yeax ; Year : J^mr : Year ; 
; feet ; I 96O ; 1970 t 1.93C' ; 1990 ' 2000 

Southves'tAerTA Ri versid.3 ComLty 

famecujla 300 1,800 2,700 

Vail 3.800 3,600 3p8» 7^300 7?80O 8,300 

Miirrieta 5,800 S^-JOC' 6,600 15,JfTO 21,8'OCs 25,800 

Winsfeester South Jj^^QOO \,,Q00 9 ^^00 g^OOQi 4£,000 $7^000 

Subtotals, So-atlJ.- 
weste^oiL Siverside 

iS'OTBfflty 13.»60)Q 11,300 19 .,800 W,000 T3p400 93>800 

GSMD TOTALS 124,30x0' 233.300 359>7C»0 549AOO 751>000 932,900 



*jCneludes allo"',iraaee f>jr agsflcultural water requir^sroents of up to 6,000 acre- 
feet per yesx :I.n yeas' i^;000» 



.98.= 



TABLE 13 

ESTIMATED FUTURE DEMANDS FOR IMPORTED WATER IN 
THE SERVICE AREA OF THE PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

(Assximing a price for water of $15 per 
acre -foot delivered at the aqueduct) 







Annual demand in acre -feet 




Subarea 


: Year 


: Year 


: Year 


: Year 


: Yeai" 




: i960 


: 1970 


: 1980 


: 1990 


: 2000 


San Diego County- 












San Diego Metropolitan Area 


82,000 


150,000 


235,000 


335,000 


436,100 


Oceanside -Carlsbad 












Metropolitan Area 


9,200 


18,000 


28,000 


41,000 


52,200 


Escondido Metropolitan Area 


3,800 


8,800 


16,000 


24,000 


28,400 


Santa Fe-San Dieguito Are©, 


2,800 


8,200 


14,000 


21,000 


24,300 


Bueno Colorado Municipal 












Water District 


4,000 


12,000 


21,000 


31,000 


38,900 


Fallbrook 


8,500 


10,000 


13,000 


15,000 


17,000 


Poway Municipal Water District 


2,000 


4, too 


7,800 


11,000 


13,800 


Rainbow Municipal Water District 


U,i+00 


10,000 


20,000 


29,000 


35,800 


Valley Center Municipal Water 












District 


2,800 


11,000 


23,000 


34,000 


41,900 


Ramona Municipal Water District 





2,300 


5,600 


9,200 


11,700 


Rancho El Cajon 


1,300 


2,300 


3,500 


4,300 


5,300 


Pauma Valley 


2,200 


4,100 


6,000 


7,200 


7,600 


North of Santa Fe 


300 


1,100 


1,600 


2,800 


5,100 


South of liELke Hodges 


1,800 


3,200 


5,600 


8,400 


12,700 


East of Del Mar 





2,600 


8,800 


13,000 


18,700 


Lower Pauma Valley 





400 


3,100 


5,000 


6,000 


El Capitan 





700 


1,600 


3,000 


4,300 


Rincon 


200 


2,700 


5,100 


7,000 


7,900 


San Vicente 


1,200 


3,200 


5,800 


7,500 


9,000 


Agua Tibia 








500 


1,100 


1,500 


Camp KlUott 


3,^0 


5,000 


7,000 


9,000 


10,000 


Camp Pendleton 


4,500 


8,500 


13,000 


13,000 


11,200 



Subtotals, San Diego County 134, 400 268,500 445,000 631,,500 799,400 



Southwestern Riverside Covmty 
Temecula 
Vail 

Murrieta 
Winchester South 

Subtotals, Southwestern 
Riverside County 

GRAND TOTALS 









800 


2,700 


4,200 





2,000 


11,000 


12,000 


1^,000 





2,000 


16,000 


23,000 


27,000 





50,000 


80,000 


84,000 


86,000 



54,000 107,800 121,700 130,200 
134,400 322,500 552,800 753,200 929,600 



-99- 



TABLE Ik 

ESTIMATED FUTURE DEMANDS FOR IMPORTED WATER II 
Tm SERVICE AREA OF THE PROPOSED SATJ DIEGO AQdEDyCT 

(Assuming a price for water of ^ko per 
acre-foot delivered at the aqueduct) 







Annual demand in acre -feet 




Subarea 


: Year 


: Year 


: Year 


: Year 


: Year 




: i960 


: 1970 


: 1980 


: 1990 


: 2000 


San Diego Co-unty 












San Diego Metropolitan Area 


7^^,000 


ito,ooo 


230,000 


330,000 


i^3^,500 


Oceanside -Carlsbad 












]>fetropolitan Area 


7,600 


15,000 


23,000 


36,000 


47,300 


Escondido Metropolitan Area 


2,900 


6,600 


12,000 


18,000 


21,900 


Santa Fe-San Bieguito Area 


2,000 


6,200 


12,000 


17,000 


l8,4oo 


Bueno Colorado Municipal 












Water District 


3,200 


9,500 


17,000 


25,000 


32,900 


Fallbrook 


7,500 


8,800 


11,000 


13,000 


li^,700 


Poway Municipal Water District 


1,600 


3,500 


6,500 


9,500 


11,600 


Rainbow Municipal Water Distilct 


3,200 


7,800 


15,000 


23,000 


27,300 


Valley Center Municipal Water 












District 


1,800 


8,000 


17,000 


26,000 


31,900 


Ramona Municipal Water District 





200 


2,200 


i*,300 


8, too 


Raricho El Cajon 


1,200 


2,000 


2,600 


3,300 


3,900 


Pa^juia Valley 


1,700 


3,500 


5,300 


6,600 


7,200 


Worth of Santa Fe 


200 


700 


1,200 


2,200 


U,000 


South of JjBize Hodges 


5OG 


1,700 


3.100 


6,700 


9,000 


East of Del IVIar 





1,800 


8,100 


12,000 


15,000 


Lower Pauma Valley 








1,300 


3,600 


4,500 


El Capitan 





500 


1,000 


2,300 


3,400 


Rincon 





700 


2,200 


3,900 


4,800 


San Vicente 


300 


1,300 


3,200 


i^,700 


6,200 


Agua Tibia 











800 


1,300 


Camp Elliott 


3,000 


i+,500 


6,000 


8,000 


9,000 


Camp Pendleton 


3,000 


7,000 


11,000 


11,000 


11,200 



Subtotals, San Diego County 113,700 229,300 390,700 566,900 728, too 

Southwestern Riverside County 
Temecula 
Vail 
Marrieta 
Winchester South 

Subtotals, Southwestern 

Riverside County 6,200 34,toO 59,800 80,200 

GRAND T0TAi£ 113,700 235,500 425,100 626,700 8o8,6oo 









300 


1,800 


2,700 








3,500 


4,000 


4,500 





800 


9,600 


16,000 


20,000 





5, too 


21,000 


38,000 


53,000 



-100- 



Estimated annual demands for additional imported water were computed 
by deducting the conveyance capacity of the existing aqueduct from requirements 
f for imported water, shown in Tables 13 and ik, and are tabulated below by 
decades for the entire service area: 



Annual demand for additional imported 
water in acre -feet 



Water at $15 


per 


Water at P*0 per 


acre -foot 




acre -foot 










181,000 




9^^,000 


i+11,300 




283,600 


611,700 




485,200 


788,100 




667,100 



I 



Year 

i960 
1970 
1980 
1990 
2000 



Design Demand for Additional Imported Water 

The inherent uncertainties relative to estimating demands for water in 
the potential service area of the San Diego Aqueduct necessitated employment of 
certain assumptions in preparing these estimates as previously described. A 
finite determination of the prices that will be charged for water from the aque- 
duct cannot be made at this time. Neither can it be predicted whether additional 
conservation works will be constructed in the area which as indicated would to 
some extent affect the demand for imported water » F\irther, the advent of a 
national emergency, or repetition of conditions prevailing during World War II 
in the San Diego area would greatly accelerate estimated rates of growth pre- 
sented herein. 

As shown in the previous section, there would be a difference ia the 
demand for water from the proposed San Diego Aqueduct in the order of about 
15 per cent, based upon the two selling prices for water delivered therefrom 
assumed herein for analytical purposes. It is also shown that with a lower 
price for water, the development of demand for additional imported water will 
be more rapid than with a higher price. 

-101- 



In order to provide a basis for selection of the proper aqueduct 
capacity, it was deemed reasonable to assume that the actual demand for addi- 
tional imported water in the year 2000 would be approximately midway between 
the values derived for the two assumed selling prices therefor. The value of 
72i+,000 acre -feet per annum in the year 2000 was therefore adopted for design 
purposes which amount is equivalent to a continuous flow of 1,000 second -feet. 

Set forth in the following tabulation are the water demands by decades 
up to the year 2000 which served as the basis for the following analyses of 
alternative aqueduct routes to San Diego County: 







Acre -feet 


Year 


Second-feet 


per year 


i960 








1970 


231 


167,000 


1980 


ii85 


351*000 


1990 


7^3 


538,000 


2000 


1,000 


724,000 



■102- 



CHAPTER III. ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT ROUTES 

Upon initiation of preliminary studies for an aqueduct to convey 
i'eather River Project water to San Diego County, the Department of Water 
Resources vas able to draw upon the experience of the past several years of the 
)ivision of Water Resources in its work for the State Water Resovirces Board on 
studies for The California Water Plan and upon prior investigational work con- 
lucted for the Feather River Project, In connection with these two studies, 
prelimineury investigations, paper locations, and reconnaissance type estimates 
3f cost were made for n\anerous aqueduct routes leading to San Diego County, 
[n addition, of great value was the work done by the San Diego County Water 
\.uthority and presented in "Report on the Probable Extent of Authority Area, 
bhe Amount and Source of Addltioneil Water Supply Required, and the System 
Required to Efficiently Deliver Authority Water to the Agencies Ccanprising that 
IVrea", dated June, 1955^ together with "Report on Water Supply for Probable 
Futxire Developments in the San Diego County Water Authority", prepared by a 
Board of Engineers composed of Raymond A. Hill, John S. Longwell, and Carl R. 
Rankin, dated September 12, 1955. 

During the coxirse of the investigation, The Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict of Southern California initiated a study of an aqueduct from the vicinity 
of San Jacinto south to S€ua Diego County. Studies of that eigency were also of 
materisil assistance to the Department of Water Resources. 

As stated, an initial premise in the studies of alternative aqueduct 
routes to San Diego Coxinty was that this aqueduct would, until Feather Kiver 
Project water were made available in the South Coastal Area, be capable of con- 
veying to the aqueduct service area presently surplus Colorado River •s'ater 
available at facilities of The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California 
near San Jacinto. From the eif ore -mentioned studies and from preliminary work 



-103- 



conducted during the current investigation, it was concluded that the aqueduct 
shotiLd head at some point between the westerly portal of the San Jacinto Tunnel 
of the Colorado River Aqueduct and Lake Mathews. Several possible routes head.- 
ing southerly toward the Temecula River-Rainbow Pass area were considered 
worthy of investigation. 

South of the Temecula River-Rainbow Pass area, it was concluded early 
in the investigation that fo^or general routes, which satisfied the initial 
premise of com'-eyance of Colorado River water in the interim vmtil Feather 
River Project water would "be available, shoxild be given study. These align- 
ments are delineated on Plate 9, entitled "Alternative Aqueduct Routes", ajad 
are described as follows: (l) the Barona, or "B" line, which would follow an 
alignment easterly of the existing San Diego Aqueduct and at a higher elevation 
to a terminus in the proposed Barona Reservoir near the existing San Vicente 
Reservoir. This line is similar to that described in State Water Resources 
Board Bulletin lo. 3, but would require a pump lift of about 200 feet from the 
hydrau).ic gradient of the Metropolitan Water District facilities; (2) a line 
parallel to the existing San Diego Aqueduct and extending south of the City of 
San Diego, designated the "E" line; (3) a line generally following the align- 
ment studied by the San Diego County Water Authority and described in its afore- 
mentioned report, designated the "S" line; and {h) a line, designated the "W" 
line, further to the west but with a hydraulic gradient comparable to that of 
the "S" line. 

The alignments of these fouj.- routes generally traverse most of the 
coastal area of San Diego Coxmty wherein demands for water are expected to 
develop over the next kO years as determined in Chapter II. In consideration 
of the premise that the aqueduct should be capable of interim conveyance of 
presently surplus Colorado River water, it was concluded that the foregoing 
alignments generally comprise all of the feasible routes that fall within the 
scope of this investigation. 

-IQii- 



Intensive study was given to each of the foregoing routes to evaluate 
the costs and accomplishments thereof. Described in this chapter are methods 
and procedvires utilized in comparing the routes and estimating costs therefor; 
a description of each route together with the results of the investigation 
thereof; a comparison of the costs and accomplishments of the routes; and an 
economic analysis of staged construction of the route selected as being superior 
to the others. 

Methods and Procedures 

Proper economic comparison of the four aqueduct routes studied, neces- 
sitated consideration of the cost not only of the aqueduct proper but also of 
serving and regulating water in areas of need in the potential aqueduct service 
area. In this manner, the over-sdl capital costs of delivery of water at 
strategic locations in the potential, water service area of the aqueduct were 
taken into account in evaluating the merits of one route as compared with the 
others . 

In making the economic comparison of the aqueduct routes studied, 
including appurtenant storage and conveyance facilities, cost estimates were 
carried only to the degree of refinement necessary for a proper comparison of 
the costs of each of the alternative routes. The costs of certain items con- 
sidered to be common to each of the routes were not included. Therefore, the 
estimated costs presented later in this chapter for comparative purposes do not 
conpletely reflect the actual cost of construction. It should be noted that 
estimated costs hereinafter presented in the various comparisons of alternative 
aqueduct routes, as well as in the analysis of staged construction of the 
features of the aqueduct route hereinafter selected as being superior to other 
routes studied, are all of a preliminary nature. These preliminary estimates 
were prepared from reconnaissance layouts on U. S. Geologicsil Sur^rey quadrangles 



-105- 



supplemented by only general field examination of the routes studied auid sites 
utilized. Unit prices were of a preliminary nature and in many cases consisted 
of weiglited average costs from experience on similar projects. 

Econcanic comparison of the aqueduct routes was made on the basis of 
these preliminary capital costs, including a 10 per cent allowance for admin- 
istration and engineering and 15 per cent for contingencies. Also included was 
interest during one -half of the estimated construction period at k per cent per 
annvim. In those instances ■vd:iere proper economic comparison necessitated con- 
sideration of the cost of pumping water, the present veilue of futuxre annual 
pumping charges, assuming an interest rate of 3-1/2 per cent, was included. 

A detailed cost estimate was prepared for the features hereinafter 
selected for initial construction. This cost estimate was prepared from 
detailed layouts of the features on U. S. Geological Survey quadrangles at a 
scale of 1 inch equals 2,000 feet and with contour intervals of 20 and 25 feet. 
These map layouts were supplemented by field reconnaissance of the entire line 
and, in the instance of certain structures, additional site topography was 
obtained by survey crews in the field. Unit prices of construction items were 
determined from recent bid data on similar projects and from data furnished by 
pipe and equipment meiauf acturers . Pi'ices utilized are considered representative 
of those prevailing in the fall of 1956. 

Design features of plans upon which the foregoing detailed cost esti- 
mate was based are necessarily of a preliminary nature and primarily for cost 
estimating purposes. More detailed investigation, which would be required in 
order to prepare consti'uction plans and specifications, might result in designs 
differing in detail from those presented in this report. However, it is believed 
that such chajiges would not result in sig:aif leant modifications in estimated 
costs. 



-io6. 



It will be noted that no subsurface drilling was done at the various 
dam sites or along the aqueduct route with the exception of the drilling per- 
formed by The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California edong a portion 
of the canal section. 

The Department of Water Resources during this investigation retained 
the services of Mr, A« H= Ayers, Consul temt Civil Engineer, who reviewed the 
adopted vinit prices for excavation, backfill, and structural concrete, and 
advised the Department on construction methods and procedures for cost esti- 
mating pvirposes. 



I 



The economic comparison of the considered alternative routes was 
based on a size of aqueduct that wo^Ild supply the probable demand for imported 
water in San Diego and southwestern Riverside Counties in the year 2000 herein- 
before developed in Chapter II. This resulted in a design capacity of about 
1,000 second-feet for each aqueduct at its point of take-off from facilities of 
the Metropolitan Water District. For each alternative aqueduct location, it 
was assumed that this discharge would be conveyed in a single conduit extending 
to a chosen tenninal point in San Diego County. In each case, the capacity of 
aqueduct was diminished as it proceeded southward in accordance with the esti- 
mated demand thereon, as developed in Chapter II. Although it was recognized 
that further detailed analysis would be necessary for selection of the proper 
initial capacity of the selected aqueduct route, it is believed that the -Jhosen 
capacity provides an adequate basis for c<aiparison of the accomplishmeats and 
costs of the four considered routes for purposes of making a selection of the 
proper route. 

It was as Slimed that in the year 2000 the supply of water available to 
the aqueduct would be on a continuous flow basis, and, as a result, at that 



-107- 



time about 150,000 acre-feet of storage capacity wo'ild be required to regiilate 
coatiirious flow in the e^tisting eiad pj.-oposid aq.ueduct8 to rionthly irrigation 
aad urban demand schedules. The required am.ount of storage capacity was based 
upon monthly demand schedules developed in Chapter II. The assiimptioa that 
the aq.ueduct would receive water on a continuous flow basis is considered 
reasonable from the standpoint of ease of operation of the system supplying 
water thereto and, since on the basis of preliminary examination it was con- 
sidered that regulatory storage capacity could be constructed in the Sain Diego 
Aqueduct service area at substantially lesser cost than providing excess capa- 
city for peaking pui'poses In the Feather Pdver Pro^lect Aqueduct. Further, the 
Colorado Riirer Aqueduct east of Leike Mat'iews is designed for continuous flow 
operation. 

Several factors affected the selection of type and size of aqueduct 
to convey the design dlschexge. TLiase factors included the location and eleva- 
tion of nat\iral control points, elevation of delivery points for aq.ueduct water 
giving consideration to pumping that would be required, and the elevation of 
available sites for regulatory or teriminal storage. 

For each of the considered routes, comparative analyses were made of 
economic size and hydraulic gradient giving consideration to the foregoing 
factors. Due consideration vas also given to the required size and general 
location of major laterals to the various subareas described in Chapter II from 
each aqueduct and to the locations of regulatory storage capacity. Thus, for 
each of the considered aqueduct routes, it was possible to determine the proper 
distribution of the reqxiired regulatory storage capacity in its relationship to 
size of the main aqueduct and major laterals therefrom. 

After preliminary study, it was concluded that adequate comparison of 
the accomplishments and costs of ee.cfc of the routes would be obtained by assviming 



-108- 



Lower Otay Reservoir as a point of terminus with a terminal hydraulic grade 
line elevation in the aqueduct of about 550 feet. 

As hereinafter described, subsequent economic analyses of terminal 
facilities were made to compajre the advanteiges of Lower Otay Resejrvoir with an 
alternative terminal reservoir site located immediately upstream and herein 
designated Minnewawa Reservoir . It was found, however, that conclusions reached 
as to the relative merits of the different routes would not have been affected 
had the alternative Minnewawa site been taken as the terminal point in the 
comparative analyses « 

As previously stated, it was considered that the existing San Diego 
Aqueduct, with a capacity of about 195 second=feet, would be operated as an 
integrated unit with the new aqueduct. Therefore, for each of the routes con- 
sidered, the most economical plem of serving water to San Diego and south- 
western Riverside Coimties was developed, ■»rtiich, in certain instances, dictated 
delivery of water from the existing aqueduct to lands not now receiving water 
service therefrom. 



Preliminary designs of aqueducts smd appurtenant structures, as 
stated, were primarily for cost estimating purposes. Designs were developed to 
sufficient detail to permit preparation of a sound estimate of cost and to 
provide assurance of engineering feasibility. Typical designs upon which esti- 
mates of cost were based are delineated on Plates 11 through 20 and are dis- 
cussed in this section. 

As stated previously, cost estimates prepared during this investiga- 
tion included; (a) those estimates prepared on preliminary bases for purposes 
of economic comparison of alternative routes, utilizing weighted unit prices 
and based upon designs carried only to sufficient degree of detail to establish 



=109= 



engineering feasibility; Cbj a detailed estima-te of the capital costs of facil=- 
ities hereinafter selected for iaitiai construction. The following design 
criteria vere utilized in the preparation of both of the foregoing types of cost 
estimates . 

As hereinafter discussed, it was decided that the area traversed by 
the northern reach of aqueduct generally between the point of take-off from the 
Colorado River Aqueduct suad the Temecala River axe& is favorably adapted to 
ceuial construction. From the Temecula River area southward, it was found that 
the general topography dictated the use of pipe line for the aqueduct constanic- 
tion. There are presented folloviag desiga criteria for both canal and pipe 
line sections of the aqueduct. 



The largest sisagle imflueaciag factor in the design of canal sections 
was the limitation of allowabls head Iobb dictated by the elevation of avail- 
able regulatory storeige sites and the controlling elevations of csjrtain natural 
topographic features along the aqueduct routes. 

All canals studied were assumed to have unreinforced concrete linings. 
Cross sectional requiremeats were deterndned after establishment of the 
limiting slope utilizing a Manning's "a" value of O.OII+ with side slopes of 
1.5:1 throughout. Althoiagh it is recognised that in certain areas steeper side 
slopes co'old be safely constructed, the esonooiics of canal construction dictate 
employment of a uniform section insofar as possible. 

In those areas, where it appeared that hydrostatic pressure would 
develop under canal linings, underdrains were provided. Contraction of the 
lining was provided for by transverse grooved joints at 12-foot intervauLs and 
longitudinal Joints near the toe of each side slope filled with appropriate 
filler material. 



=11C- 



Canal alignments were laid out on available U. S. Geological Survey 
7=1/2 minute quadrangles at a scale of 1 inch equals 2,000 feet with contour 
intervals of 20 feeto In all cases, field examination of a reconnaissance 
nature was made to confirm or adjust alignments selected by map studies. The 
quadrangles were enlarged to a scale of 1 inch equals 1,000 feet and the center 
line of the canal was plotted thereon. Having fixed the section as described, 
the selected alignment was that •vrtiich wotild achieve the minimum ccmbined cost 
for excavation and embanlanent. For each prevailing transverse slope, an 
optimum depth of cut was determined. When the canal section was in level 
co\mtry, the optimum depth was found to be such that the water surface was 
approximately one foot above natural ground. With transverse slopes of 30 per 
cent the water svirface was approximately ^.0 feet above groimd surface at the 
cut line. These water surface elevations, therefore, would permit gravity 
diversion to irrigation users adjacent to the cfitnal. Geologic examination was 
made to determine probable excavation conditions. 

In locating the canal center line, a minimum radius of curvature of 
200 feet was assumed, which value meets the requirements for minimvim radius in 
the operation of canal lining machinery. Points of intersection for the curves 
were so located as to best fit the terrain, and tsmgents were drawn to these 
points of intersection. Distances were scaled between points of intersection 
and curve distances computed. From these data the center line stationing was 
carried forward. 

Economic studies were made for areas of deep cut to determine the 
advanteige of rerouting the canal around such areas particularly where rock cut 
would be encountered. In computing all estimates a shri nk age factor of 15 per 
cent was employed in embankment requirements. 

Borrow in earth section was assumed to be taken directly from canal 
right of way. In areas of rock excavation, needed embankment would generadly 



-111- 



necessitate proc\irement of borrow material from adjacent acceptable borrow 
areas. Tjrpicsil canal sections are shown on Plate 11, entitled "Typical Canal 
Sections". 

At the point of diversion frcaa San Jacinto tunnel portal, the ceuial 
section of the aqueduct route, hereinafter selected as the most econcxnical, 
would have headworks facilities coasistiug of a short tunnel intersecting the 
existing tunnel, a flume, a siphon, sind a metering structure. These structures 
are described in detail in Appendix B and sire illustrated on Plate 13^ entitled 
"Diversion and Metering Sti*uctures" . At the point ^ere the foregoing caneil 
section would terminate and the flow would enter the pipe line comprising the 
southern portion of the proposed aqueduct, a canal terminaQ. structiire would be 
provided. This structure is described in detail in Appendix B and shown on 
Plate 18, entitled "Canal Terminal Structxire". 

The canal section of the selected aqueduct route would have a modified 
cross section at one of the points where it would cross the existing San Diego 
Aqueduct and would be eqtoipped with sand trap facilities just prior to entering 
the pipe line. These canal structures are 3ho"«3n on Plate 19, entitled "Miscel- 
laneous Canal Structures". 

Siphons . Throughout the canal alignments, crossing of existing 
facilities such as the existing San Diego Aqueduct and large drainage channels 
were accomplished by the use of siphons. The two types of siphons employed 
were box 8uid circuleur, both of reinforced concrete construction. Box siphons 
were used where the maximum head was 35 feet or less and circular siphons \rtiere 
the maxim\mi head was over 35 feet. 

Box siphons would be of two-barreled reinforced concrete type having 
dimensions of 8 feet by 10 feet for each barrel. Circular siphons were single 
bsirrels having a diameter of 10 feet and would be constructed either of precast 



"•IJL2- 



or monolithic reinforced concrete pipe. Friction losses through siphons were 
determined by the Manning formula using "n" values of 0.0l4 for concrete box 
siphons, 0.0115 for precast concrete pipe, and 0.012 for monolithic concrete 
pipe. Inlet and outlet transitions were designed to hold head losses to a 
minimum. Actual energy losses in the transitions were not computed but the 
lengths of the transitions were selected to give angles of convergence and 
divergence of water surface consistent with the head losses assumed. Losses 
equal to one-tenth of the difference in velocity head at inlets and two-tenths 
of the difference at the outlets were assumed, in addition to friction losses. 
Typical siphon and transition sections sjre shown on Plate 12, entitled "Typical 
Siphons". 

Preliminary designs of siphon structures to obtain required quanti- 
ties of steel suad concrete were based upon similar structures now under 
construction by the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation on its Putah South Canal 
Project. Box sections were assianed to be rigid frame structures designed to 
withstand a head of about 35 feet. External forces considered were a \aniform 
vertical load, and a uniform and triangular lateral load. In addition for 
siphons under highways and railroads, impact loading was assumed. 

Prices for monolithic and precast reinforced concrete pipe obtained 
from pipe manufacturers were based upon a preliminaiy design, assuming sin 
allowable unit stress in reinforcing steel for internal pressure equal to 
13,500 pounds per square inch, autid for combined internal and external loads, 
20,000 pounds per square inch. Reinforced concrete pipe was used for heads up 
to 100 feet. Reinforced concrete cylinder pipe was used throughout for heads 
above 100 feet with a minimum 12 -gauge steel cylinder. Total area of steel was 
apportioned on the basis of 60 per cent to the cylinder and inside cage and kO 
per cent to the outside cage. 



-113- 



CrossDrainagra Strv'.qtri;es . Cross toainage alojog cs^al aligniaeats 
wouJ.d not be per-^viitted. to eatsr the ct^aaJ.. Acbais3io:i of s;icli ws.ter could cause 
damage to tie stnict'jre, woiLld iiaterially increase maiatenancs costs since this 
water would carry substantial bedloadS;, and wovild offer the threat of pollution 
and contamination of the water supply. The type of drainage structure used for 
design purposes vras dependent upon the estimated quantity of tributary discharge 
and on the grade of the carial invert e.t the point of crossing. In the case of 
larger streams, generally those with an &jaticipated peak discharge of 1,500 
second-feet or greater, dvj:ing a flood with a frec^uency of once in one hundred 
years, the flow of the canal was carried \mder the stream in a siphon. For 
anticipated discharges of 1,500 second-feet or less, either an overchute or 
culvert structxire would be provided. 

Probable drainage discharge was determined by the method derived in 
the report "Hydrology of Western Riverside Coiaaty, Calif oi-nia" , by H. C. 
Troxell, U. S. Geological Suxvey., October, 1948. 

'vjhenever anticipated discharge was less than kO second -feat, an 
econcanic analysis dictated a pipe overchute. This strvictuxe would be of welded 
steel pipe, designed for a minimum velocity within the pipe of 15 feet per 
second. Flared inlet and outlet tra-asitions were provided. Where overchutes 
were dictated and flows were e(;.ual to or greater than 40 second-feet, rectangu- 
lar concrete structures were provided. Traini;ag dikes woiO.d be constructed to 
guide r-jnoff to the inlet transition section of the overchute. Flared inlet 
and outlet sections were provided with a rectejigular section designed for a 
minimum velocity of 10 feet per second. 

For the larger concrete cvercLutes, a center pier wo\ild be provided 
in the canal for added support, and cross struts constructed to support side- 
weQ-ls of the overchute. Energy dissipators woxiid be provided at the discharge 



^U.k- 



end of overchutes and would consist of concrete "dragon teeth" In the Invert. 
In addition, riprap voiild be provided downstream from the structure to reduce 
erosion. In the structiiral design of the rectangvilar overchute sections, it 
was assumed that they wovild have fixed end conditions at one end and would be 
simply supported at the other. 

Typical designs of overchutes, culverts, smd irrigation crossings 
are shown on Plate l6, entitled "Typical Overchutes, Culverts and Irrigation 
Crossings". 

Timber Bridges . Timber bridges were provided at all farm roads and 
other private road crossings, secondary county roads, and at inteiTnediate 
points irtiere large holdings woxild be severed by the canal. These bridges were 
designed for H-10 loading with a roadway width of l6 feet. The bridges were 
located so as to cross the csmal at right angles to the center line insofar as 
possible. It was assumed that select Douglas fir of structural grade would be 
used with the following unit stresses; bending, 1,600 pounds per square inch; 
compression parsLLlel to the greiln, 1,200 po\inds per sqviare inch; bearing, 3^5 
pounds per square inch; shear, 100 pounds per square inch. Typical designs of 
timber, farm, and private road bridges are shown on Plate ik, entitled "TypicEd 
Farm and Private Road Bridges". 

Concrete Bridges . Concrete bridges were used for all state highway 
and most county road crossings. Where the ceaaal suLlgnment could not be 
adjusted to a right angle crossing with these roadways, skew tj'pe bridges with 
a minimxffli skew angle of 75 degrees with the canal center line were used. A 
minimum roadway width of 40 feet from curb to curb was assumed for all state 
highway bridges with 26 feet curb to curb width for aJ.1 county road bridges. 
For computation of steel and concrete reqxiirements, H-20S l6-hh loading, set 
forth in the American Association of State Highway Officials Standard Specifi- 
cations for Highway Bridges, was adopted. Bridges would consist of two simple 

"115- 



spams supported on reijoforced concrete abutments with a reinforced concrete 
pier located at the canal csriter line. Spans were of flat slab cojistruction. 
Typical designs of concrete county and state highway road bridges are shown on 
Plate 15, entitled "Typical County and State Highway Bridges". 

Checks . Check structures were provided where recniired to effect 
water delivery to adjacent lands d^aring periods of low flow in the cansJ.. The 
canal section was mdeaed at check structures so that waterira,y openings of the 
checks were approximately that of the canal cross section. Checks were equipped 
with single radial gates 16 feet in width and with additional openings on either 
side of the gate where flow wovild be regulated with stop planks. Friction 
losses through the checks were assumed to be equal to the head loss in a com- 
parable reach of canal section. Raising and lowering of the radial gates would 
be accomplished by hoist cables wo^Ind on motor operated drvmis located on the 
decks above the gates. A typical check structure is shown on Plate 17, entitled 
"Check Structure". 

Turnouts . Tui'nout structures were provided to effect deliveries of 
water to areas suLong the canal alignment. T!ie turnout structure woxild consist 
of a reinforced concrete pipe placed under the caaaJ. embankment, with its 
invert at the same elevation as the canaJL invert. At the point of turnout, the 
caneil embankment would be slotted to accommodate a vertical concrete headwall 
and vertical slide gate at the inlet of the concrete pipe. A typical ttirnout 
structure is shown on Plate 19, entitled "Miscellaneous Canal Structures". 

Irrigation Pipe Crossin gs. Existing irrigation pipe lines were 
carried over the canal in a single span. For purposes of cost estimates, it was 
assumed that those known crossings, for the most part within the bovindaries of 
the Eastern Mimicipal Water District, wo'xLd be l8-inch pipes. These crossings 



•116- 



would be similar to those of the pipe overchute previously described and shown 
on Plate l6, entitled "Typical. Overchutes, Cxilverts and Irrigation Crossings". 

Utility Crossings . Where the canal wovild cross existing utilities 
such as power and telephone lines, alteration of these facilities to provide 
proper clearance over the canal embankments would generally be reqxxired. A 
detailed estimate of the cost of acccxnplishing this at each individual crossing 
was not made. An estimate was made of the cost of work and materials involved 
in a typical crossing, and this cost was multiplied by the nimiber of crossings 
involved. 

Pipe Lines and Appurtenar.ces 

As hereinafter described, south of the Temecvila River area and to the 
terminal point of the vau'ious alternative routes considered in this investiga- 
tion, the aqueducts would be pipe lines flowing under pressure with sections of 
both steel suad reinforced concrete pipe. For purposes of the estimates, rein- 
forced concrete pipe with double rubber gasket joints was used for heads up to 
100 feet and lock joint concrete cylinder pipe for heads generally up to 200 
feet. Where the hydrostatic head was greater than 200 feet, it was generally 
assumed that welded steel pipe would be employed. Departures from these 
criteria were made where relatively small lengths of pipe were involved. 

Preliminary design criteria for concrete pipe were those previously 
described \mder "Siphons". Friction losses were computed using a Manning's "n" 
of 0.0115. Exterior loading was based on Marston's formtila for 90 degree 
bedding nonprojected, with the assumption of exterior cover of 10 feet. 

Steel pipe was assumed to have an interior cement mortar lining and 
an exterior coating of reinforced cement mortar. It was assumed that all steel 
pipe would have a Tnininrnm plate thickness of 7/l6 inch, which would be required 



-117- 



to keep pipe deifleotion vltMi two per cent lander cover loads of 10 feet. It 
was p.ssuiffied that steel plata coafoirjiag to specification P.-2k^ of the American 
Society for Testing sAate^rlels vovO.d. be utilised ia fabrication of the pipe, 
although it is recognized that vjadex' certain cond'itions of high head a high 
strength low alloy steel niight merit consideration dxxring final design c Esti- 
mates contained herein were not based on the use of the latter material. Fric- 
tion losses for steel pipe were also based on the use of Manning's fonuula with 
a "n" of 0.0115. Typical pipe line structures and trench details are sho^m on 
Plate 20, entitled "Typical Pipe Line Structures and Trench Details". 

Eiccavatioa and Backfil_l . Estimat>?d guaxitities of trench excavation 
for the pipe lines were determined from the profile assuming a mnidum cover of 
three feet. In order to ijdnimi'ie sharp verticaj. cui'vature and unnecessary 
surmrlts in the pipe grade, cuts in coiapon ms-terial up to 20 feet in depth were 
made where horizontal distances were atout 300 feet or less and lesser depths 
and lengths of cuts were made in rocJi depeMing upon the estiiuatsd cost thereof. 

A reconnaissance geologic ©"accination vras roade over the several 
routes in order to classify materials with respect to cost of excavation. 

Pipe trenches were assuaied to be baclsfllled to original groimd sur- 
face and compacted to a depth sufficient to pi'ovide 120 degree bearing on tbe 
pipe. In certain instances flooded send backfill ■vjas assumed. Bacisfill for 
all structures along the pipe line was assumed to be compacted. 

Air Release a nd V acuu m VaT.ve Structtires. Air release and vacuum 
valve structures were located at sumiolts along the pipe line to allow air to 
escape when pipes are being filled and to allow the entry of air lahen. the pipe 
is being drained in order to prevent collapse of the pipe under operating con- 
ditions. P>3.1 air valves were a combination of air-inlet and air-i-elease valve 
assemblies and of the type actuated by metal floats. Standard commercial 



-lie- 



ad.r=release and vacuxan valve assemblies were assiimed. For piirposes of the 
estimates, it was assumed that the valve opening wovild be eight inches in 
diameter. 

The stmcture housing the valve assembly woiild consist of aji unrein- 
forced concrete block at the appropriate location which wovild encase the main 
pipe line and act as a base for the concrete pipe riser. The concrete block 
would act as a fovindation for the structure as well as giving support to the 
pipe walls, A precast reinforced concrete pipe would fit vertically into a 
groove on the concrete block and serve as a chamber for the air valve and for 
an entrance into the manhole in the main pipe line. A typical design of these 
structures is shown on Plate 20, entitled "Typical Pipe Line Structures and 
Trench Details". 

Manhole and Blowoff Structures . Manhole smd blowoff structxires were 
located in all low points along the pipe line. These structures serve two 
purposes; first, to drain water from the pipe line for maintenance purposes; 
second, to provide an entrance into the pipe for inspection and maintenance. 

The structure would consist of a reinforced concrete block at the 
appropriate location, which would encase the main pipe line. The concrete 
block would act as a foundation for the structure, as well as giving support to 
the pipe walls, A precast reinforced concrete pipe would be fitted vertically 
into a groove on the concrete block and serve as a chamber for entrance into 
the manhole in the main pipe line. The valves and fittings were located so 
that water could be drained from the pipe line without removing the manhole 
cover. 

Turnout Structures . Turnout structures were located at points along 
the pipe line where water would be diverted from the aqueduct. The structure 
wovild consist of an outlet from the main line to which a valve would be attached. 



=119- 



The valve ■would be enclosed in a staadpipe of appropriate dimeasious ■which 
■woiild ex-tead to approximately tiro feet abc\-e nat-ural grouad level. A s-oitable 
cover would be attached to the top of the vertical staadpipe. 

Vent StractTires . Vent stnictures were provided ■wherever the grade of 
the pipe line approached the hydxa^ilic grade line therein. The structure 
■would consist of a concrete block east around the main line upon which vertical 
precast concrete pipe sections would be erected. The diameter of the standpipe 
would be the same size as the maia line^, and would extend to approximately 10 
feet above the hydraulic grade line. The top of the standpipe would be covered 
with a grating vriaich would allow free passage of air into and out of the pipe 

line. 

Since -the design capacity of the pipe line would decrease progres- 
sively as it extends south'ward, thei-e is possibility of intermittent overflow 
at the vent structures under certain operating conditions. Therefore, facil- 
ities were provided for collecting this overflow and leading it away from the 
struct'ore. All vent Fstructures were enclosed -with chain link fence. 

Road and Fa.gb.way Crossings. Where the main pipe line wo-Jld cross 
secondary and county roads,, no specia]. provision was made in the design. It ■was 
assumed that the trench would be excavated across these roads and temporary 
wooden bridges provided during constiniction. After backfilling aad compacting, 
temporary paving would be laid followed later by replacement of the existing 
pavement. Wiere the line wouJLd cross state high-ways, the pipe would be placed 
by cut and cover methods, or by slacking a casijag under the roadway and thread- 
ing the pipe through, the method used depending upon the amount of traffic 
involved and the type of material encountered at each crossing. 



-120- 



Dams and Reservoirs 

Dams and reservoirs were laid out on available U. S. Geological 
Survey quadrangles at a scale of 1 inch equals 2,000 feet enlarged to a scale 
of 1 inch equals 500 feet except at certain sites where topography was obtained 
in the field or larger scale topography was available, as described for each 
site in Appendix E. 

A geological reconnaissance was made of the dam sites and suitable 
material for embankment was located for those dams which were best suited for 
earth or rockfill type of construction. Selection of slopes and of type of 
construction was based upon reconnaissance data on the character of the earth 
and rockfill materials available, utilizing past experience of various agencies 
in the construction of fill type dams. 

Estimates of cost of raising the existing concrete dams at the Lower 
Otay and San Vicente sites were based on the amount of additional concrete 
required in the cross section to maintain stability and provide the required 
additional height, together with provision for additional appurtenant 
facilities. 
H Detailed descriptions of each of the dam and reservoir sites and of 

preliminary designs of structiires therefor, accompanied by detailed cost esti- 
mates, are presented in Appendix E of this report. 

Tunnels 

Tunnel sections utilized were of a standard 9 • 0-foot diameter horse- 
shoe design employing steel ribs and timber lagging for support when necessary 
1 and wovild be concrete lined throughout. 



-121- 



Ri ghte of Way for CaLaal aad Pipe Lines 

Right of way costs for canal sections were of a reconnaissance 
nature. An attempt was made in the estimates to reflect the character of the 
land taken, improvements affected, and severance damages resulting from loss of 
access and size or impaired shape. It was assimed that an average width of 150 
feet would be taken for the canal. 

The present market value of the land was based on records of com- 
parable property sales available in the affected area. For the pipe lines, it 
was assumed that easements woiAld be obtained, the consideration for which was 
assumed to be equal to one-half of the estimated cost of the land. It was 
assumed that a permanent easement of 100 feet would be obtained for the pipe 
lines . 

The costs of acquisition of lands for the various reservoir sites 
considered were estimated in a manner similar to that described for the canals. 

Unit Prices 

As has been indicated, the investigation of alternative acjueduct 
routes to San Diego County required preparation of estimates of cost with twa 
degrees of refinement: (&) those estjjaates prepared oa a preliminary basis for 
purposes of economic comparison of alternative routes, utilizing weighted unit 
prices and based upon designs carried only to svifficient degree of detail to 
establish engineering feasibility; (b) a detailed estimate of the capital costs 
of facilities hereinafter selected for initial construction. 

Unit prices for the detailed cost estimate were developed from several 
sources. Reports of the Daily Construction Service and recent construction con- 
tracts throughout western United States were employed as a guide in selecting 
appropriate prices for the San Diego County area. These prices were modified irtiere 



-122- 



required in order to reflect paxticvilar conditions on the job vinder considera- 
tion. 

In general, the average of the vuiit prices bid by the three lowest 
bidders on a given item were used, with this average, as stated, adjusted for 
the difference in current cost index and for apparent differences in constjruc- 
tion or fabrication conditions. For special items, such as large control 
valves, manxif acturers ' prices were obtained and estimated installation costs 
added thereto. 

Costs of pipe for both reinforced concrete and steel were supplied by- 
major pipe manvifacturers in the southern California axea after consultation 
with personnel of the Department of Water Resources and in some cases field 
reconnaissance of the silignments under consideration. To the prices furnished 
by these manuf actvirers , costs of installation were added. 

Set forth in Appendix C are unit prices upon which the foregoing 
detailed cost estimate was based. 

Storage Requirements 

Economical construction and satisfactory operation of an aqueduct, 
such as that considered herein, require the construction of reservoir storage 
capacity for both regulatory and emergency purposes. 

Generally, in long aqueducts, economics dictate the design and opera- 
tion thereof on a continuous flow basis and the use of storage capacity to 
regulate this continuous flow from the aqueduct to the demand schedule of the 
service eirea. Since, in the normal process of aqueduct operation, periods of 
shutdown are required for maintenance emd inspection, additional storage is 
required for these pvirposes. It is also considered desirable to provide a 
further amoxmt of storage at strategic locations so that service can be main- 
tained in the event of unforeseen bresJtdowns along the aqueduct. Storage for 



-123- 



these latter two pvurposes is designated herein as "emergency storage", as dif. 
ferentiated from regulatory storage req:aired for normal aqueduct operation. 



The amoxmt of regulatory storage capacity required for imported water 
in year 2000 for both the existing and proposed aqueducts was determined on the 
basis of data presented in Chapter II. It was assxmed that reseri/oirs operated 
in conjimction with the main aqueducts would provide regulation of water 
deliveries to monthly demand schedules. Where reqiiired daily and weekly peaks 
would be satisfied by local regiolatory storage facilities. From data presented 
in Chapter II and on Plate 8, it was found that the volume of regulatory 
storage capacity reqiiired would vary from about 11 per cent of the estimated 
total annual imported water req-cdr^neat in year 2000 for the San Diego Metro- 
politan Area to about 26 per cent of this amount for certain of the predominantly 
agricultiiral areas. The totaJ. reqiiiremeat for regulatory storage capacity was 
found to be about 150,000 acre-feet or about 17 per cent of the total estimated 
annual delivery of imported water to the service area in the year 2000. 

Since it was assumed that water would be delivered to the proposed 
San Diego Aqueduct at San Jacinto t-mnel portal on a continuous flow basis, the 
total required storage capacity was fixed as determined above. However, deter- 
mination of the proper location and distribution of the total capacity neces- 
sitated careful economic analyses of several alternative plans. Reconnaissance 
investigation was made of 55 potential reservoir sites. Preliminary estimates 
of cost were prepared for six proposed dams and reseivoirs and for conveyance 
facilities to provide water service to the ai'eas of need and to coimect the 
reservoirs with the main aqueduct, with various patterns of geographical dis- 
tribution of resei-yoir storage. 



-.124- 



Estimates of cost were also prepared for raising Lower Otay Dam and 
San Vicente Dam to the heights required to provide regvilatory storage capacity 
required for the "S" and "W" line operation hereinafter described. The esti- 
mated costs for these dams and reservoirs for the different storage capacities 
required in the "E" line operation were based on the foregoing estimated costs 
of these two dams and reservoirs adjusted for the different heights of dams 
reqviired. 

On the basis of these preliminary studies, the most economical plaji 
for operation, conveyance, and regulation of the delivered supply was selected 
for each of the alternative aqueduct routes. 

The reservoirs selected for each of the considered alternative routes 
and the capacities thereof are presented hereinafter for each of the alterna- 
tive routes studied. Presented in Appendix E are descriptions of each of the 
dam and reservoir sites, for which cost estimates were prepared, including 
descriptions of the construction features of dams considered at these sites, 
and estimates of cost therefor. 



As previously mentioned, emergency storage would be required in con- 
nection with the San Diego Aqueduct to maintain continuity of supply dtiring 
periods of shutdown for maintenance or because of the occurrence of natviral 
phencsnena causing interruption of operation such as esirthquake, damage by flood 
or leuadslide, or other acts of God. 

In determining the required amo\mt of storage capacity, consideration 
was given to the requirements during a period of plaixned shutdown for mainte- 
nance and inspection work and also to the length of time that would probably be 
required to repair the Colorado River Aqueduct in the event of xmpredicted 
interruption. In this connection, the facilities of The Metropolitan Water 



-125- 



District of Southern California and Los Angeles Department of Water and Power 
were revieved. The Metropolitan Water District at their Lake Mathews facility- 
maintains about tx?o months' supply for its service area for emergency and 
plsinned interruptions in the Colorado River Aqueduct. The Los Angeles Depart- 
ment of Water sind Power in connection with the Los Angeles Aqueduct provides 
sufficient storage to accommodate Ebout a three-week shutdown period. 

If a3J.ow£^ce were made for three weeks' supply during emergency and 
planned shutdown, resejrve storage required for the proposed San Diego Aqueduct 
would be in the order of 50jiOOO acrs-feet based upon estimated water deliveries 
in the year 20CXD, with a requirement of about 29,000 acre-feet based on esti- 
mated water deliveries in the year 19BO. Since the City of Ssui Diego and many 
of the other agencies in the Saxi Diego County Water Authority have, emd prob- 
ably will continue to have, the use of several large storage reservoirs as 
supplementary water supply soiirces, the foregoing emergency storage requirements 
are on the conservative side. However, it appears that emergency stor-age is 
needed to provide assurance of water deliveries to areas in the northern peurt 
of San Diego County and southwestern Riverside County \rtiere storsige facilities 
adaptable for this purpose aire limited or nonexistent. 

Between San Jacinto Tunnel and San Vicente Reservoir, the only 
storage on the existing San Diego Aqueduct is at San Jacinto Reservoir, which 
has a gross capacity of about 1,800 acre-feet. This relatively small amount of 
storage capacity would be completely Ineffective in supplying needs of the 
service area to the south in the event of shutdown of the Coloi^auio River Aqueduct 
for more than a day or two. It is believed imperative that a substantial amount 
of emergency storage be provided near the upper end of the proposed new San 
Diego Aqueduct for the afore -stated reasons. 

Investigation was made of possible dam and reservoir sites between 
San Jacinto Tunnel and Rainbow Pass. It was found that few sites were available 



-126- 



and that these generally posed construction diffic-'xLties requiring large 
expenditure for a relatively small amo\int of stoz'eige capacity or were not at a 
proper elevation for gravity operation. Two possibilities were given detailed 
consideration, the existing Vail Reservoir and the Auld Valley site located on 
Tucalota Creek, both shown on Plate 9, entitled "Alternative Aqueduct Routes" . 
A substantial amount of storage capacity in both the existing Vail Reservoir 
and the proposed Auld Valley Reservoir coiild be utilized with gravity operation 
of the canal extending from San Jacinto to the viciaity of Temecula River. It 
was foxmd that, in order to connect the proposed aqueduct to the existing Vail 
Reservoir, it would be necessairy to swing the alignment a considerable distance 
eastward of a more or less straight line from San Jacinto tunnel portal to 
Rainbow Pass ^ereas the Atild VaLLley site is located very near to such a 
general line. Use of Vail Lake for an emergency reservoir site would therefore 
necessitate construction of substantially greater aqueduct length. On the basis 
of preliminary cost compsirisons, it was indicated that the use of the Auld 
Valley site would be some'irtiat less expensive than use of the existing Vail 
Reservoir and, further, utilization of Vail Reservoir would interfere with an 
existing water conservation facility owned and operated by a private entity. 
For these reasons, it was concluded that the Auld Valley Reservoir would be 
superior to Vail Reservoir from the standpoint of providing emergency storage 
for the future operation of the existing and proposed San Diego Aqueducts. 

It was found that a storage capacity of about 3-3,000 acre-feet could 
be obtained by construction of Auld Valley Dam with a spillway lip elevation of 
1,U85 feet. It sho-old be noted that Auld Valley Reservoir would provide emer- 
gency storage for only that portion of the service su:ea to the south. The 
portion of southwestern Riverside County lying north of the reservoir site, 
including lands within the Eastern Municipal Water District considered for 
service from the aqueduct, would not benefit from emergency storage in Aiild 



-127- 



Valley Reservoir. On the fcasis of a three-week emergency or plsiined shutdown 
period, it is estimated that the axaa that wovld be seived fi'om the proposed 
San Diego Aqueduct to the north of Auld Valley Reservoir would recniire about 
1,400 acre-feet of emergencir storage in 19^0^ and 1,550 acre-feet in year 2000. 
The Eastern Municipal Water District has under consideration constardction of a 
dam and reservoir at the Eemet site located near Hemet. It is estimated that 
about 28,000 acre-feet of storage capacity could be developed at this site to a 
maximum water siirface elevation of 1,570 feet. Storage of flows from the 
proposed San Diego Aqueduct in this reservoir wovild require pumping. Until, 
and imless, this reserxoir were constructed, two possible relief measures coiild 
be undertaken in the event of axi emergencji-, neither of which are considered 
satisfactory substitutes to the construction of resei-voir storage capacity for 
the area. 

Provision could be made for pimping of grouxid vrater into the canal to 
tide water users over a period of emergency shutdown, or, with check stjructvires 
located in the canal, as prevloxisly described, water covild be pumped out of 
Auld Valley Reservoir and over the check stroictures to the service area. Each 
of these plans woul.d require investment in pumping equipment that wo'iLd be 
idle for extensive periods and, as stated, are not considered satisfactory sub- 
stitutes for reservoir storage. 

Analyses of Alternative Aqueduct Routes 

In accordance with the basic assumptions and premises for the investi- 
gation set forth hereinbefore, a comparison was made of the several alternative 
aqueduct routes to San Diego County extending southerly from facilities of the 
Metropoliteua Water District between the west ported of San Jacinto Tunnel £uid 
Lake Mathews. As stated, the preliminary comparisons were made on the basis of 
conveyance of 1,000 second-feet of continuous discharge which is equivalent to 



-128- 



the estimated demand for additional impojrfced water in the potential aqueduct 
service ficrea in the year 2000 developed in Chapter II. 

The terrain south of the Colorado River Aqueduct, between San Jacinto 
Tunnel and Lake Mathews, consists of a series of broad interconnected valleys 
extending down to the Agua Tibia and Sa^ita Rosa Mountain Ranges. South of 
these mountain ranges to the vicinity of San Diego, the terrain consists of 
moderately high mountain ridges on the east sad rolling hills interlain by 
limited valley ereas extending westward from the mountains to the coast. 

The gently sloping valley lands south of the Colorado River Aqueduct 
merging into the moderately rolling terrain north of the Agua Tibia and Santa 
Rosa Mountain Ranges is adB-ptable to canal construction. The more rugged 
terrain south of these mountain ranges is considered suitable only for pipe 
line construction. Passes in the divide between the drainage areas of the Saji 
Jacinto and Santa Margarita Rivers are located adjacent to Rainbow Valley and 
Pala Creek and have elevations of about 1,300 and 1,260 feet, respectively. In 
order to maintain gravity flow to San Diego Coxinty and provide water service at 
minimum cost to the potential aqueduct service area, it was decided that the 
proposed San Diego Aqueduct could traverse either of these passes with a 
hydraulic gradient above that of the groimd surface elevation of that pass 
through which it would be located. 

It was found that from the standpoint of cost of construction of 
aqueducts south of the afore -mentioned drainage divide. Rainbow Pass was superior 
to Pala Pass for aqueducts generally parallel to or west of the existing Seua 
Diego Aqueduct, and Pala Pass was found to be more desirable for an aqueduct at 
an intermediate elevation such as the Barona line. 

Presented following are descriptions of each of the alternative 
routes studied, the appurtenant facilities for conveyance of water to strategic 
points in the service area, the method of operation and delivery of water for 



-129- 



e&ch. rov-te, and pi'elir>d.n?.r/ estlHiates of cost for the aqueducts and appurtenant 
facilities. The followrlag sections deal sep&j:ately \rlth the reach of aqueduct 
from the Colorado River Aqueduct to P^-inbow Pass and with foxir alternative 
alignments for the reach of aqueduct between Rainbow Pass smd the Otay River. 

It should again be emphasized that the cost estimates upon which the 
economic comparisons are hereinafter based were carried to a degree of refine- 
ment sufficient only to provide a basis of comparison of the alternative 
aqueduct routes, and, since certain items common to each of the considered 
lines were omitted from the estimates, they are not to be construed as repre- 
senting estimates of final construction costs. 

Col orado River Aque duct to Rainbow Pass 

Analyses were made of a number of dj.version points from the Colorado 
River Aqueduct between the west portal of San Jacinto Tunnel, with a hj-dra^olic 
grade line elevation of about 1,50> feet, and Lake Matlriews with a masd-mum water 
surface elevation of 1,357 feet. These points were: (l) west portal of San 
Jacinto Tjanel, (2) Casa Loca Siphon west of San Jacinto River, (3) west end of 
Casa Loaia Siphon, (h) east end. of Lakeview Siphon, (5) Lakeviev Siphon at San 
Jacinto R:.ver, (6) west end of Lakeview Siphon, (7) east end of Perris VeQ-ley 
Siphon, and (8) Lake J.fe.thews> Each of these diversion points required a dif- 
ferent location for aa aquedv.ct e:jrtending to the south. 

Of the eight points of diversion given study, locations (l) and (h) 
above were selected for inore detailed e.<i&.lyses. The other diversion points 
were eliminated fron further investigation because of increased lengths of, and 
vinfavorable terrain for, aqueduct construction therefrom, emd since the progres- 
sively lower hyxiraalic grade line in the Colorado River Aqueduct, as it proceeds 
west of San Jacinto Tunnel, restJ-ts in increasing the size of aqueduct to the 
south to meet required control elevations without pvunping. 



-130- 



Two tyi>e8 of aqueduct, each having a capacity of 1,000 second=-feet, 
were studied from the diversion point at the west portsil of San Jacinto Tunnel: 
(l) pressure pipe, and (2) a combination of lined caiieil suad pressure pipe. The 
comparative costs of these two types of conduit to a common point in the vici- 
nity of Rainbow Pass, a distance of about 30 miles, indicated an advanteige of 
about $13,000,000 in favor of the combination of carnal suad press\ire pipe type 
construction. Because of this laxge differentiaJL in cost, subsequent ansLLyses 
of routes heading both at San Jacinto Tunnel and at the east end of Lakeview 
Siphon gave consideration to construction of a combination of lined caned and 
pressure pipe for the northerly section of the aqueduct where the terrain is 
adaptable to this type of construction. 

The two general routes, heading at Saa Jacinto txannel portal and east 
end of Lakeview Siphon, were then compared on the basis of the foregoing type 
of construction, extending to a common elevation of about 1,300 feet at Rainbow 
Pass. 

The aqueduct diverting at the west poirtal of San Jacinto Tunnel would 
have an initial water surface elevation of about 1,505 feet and would follow a 
genereLL southwesterly alignment across the western edge of San Jacinto Valley, 
passing approximately three miles east of the community of Winchester. The 
alignment wo\ild then continue westerly and southerly through Domenigoni, French, 
and Auld Vsilleys crossing Temecula River aad continuing on to Rainbow Pass . 
The total length of this alignment between San Jacinto Txmnel and Rainbow Pass 
would be about 32 miles, of which about 22 miles woiold be in canal section and 
about 10 miles in pipe line. It shoxild be noted that this alignment is slightly 
different than the alignment hereinafter adopted for the reach between San 
Jacinto tunnel portal and Rainbow Pass shown on Plate 9- The principal differ- 
ence is that this latter adopted alignment, as hereinafter described, would have 
a cansQ. section about 29.5 miles in length and a pipe line section 6 miles in 



-131= 



length as compared to the foregoing 22 miles of canal and 10 miles of pipe 
line. 

The alignment of the aqueduct diverting at the east end of Lakeview 
Siphon, at a hydravilic grade line sleTation of 1,467 feet, would "be generally 
south along the westerly periphery of the Lakeview Mountains passing just east 
of the ccpmunity of Romoland and across the east end of Menifee Valley to a 
point at the southwest end of Paloma Valley. From this point the alignment is 
generally due south crossing Temecula River about one mile east of the cc«nmu- 
nity of Temecxila and continuing on to Rainbow Pass. The toted length of this 
route woxild be about 28.5 miles ^ of which about 15-5 miles would be in canal 
section, and the remainder in pipe line, and is shown as a dotted line on 
Plate 9- 

A preliminary estimate of cost was prepared for facilities to provide 
water service from each of the considered aqueduct eilignments to lands in San 
Jacinto Valley. It was found that the cost and degree of service provided would 
be equivalent from either route. It siioald be noted that these cost estimates 
were of a very preliminary nature intended only for this economic comparison 
£ind are not compai'able to estimates for similar features shown in ens\iing sec- 
tions of this report. 

On the basis of a preliminary cost analysis of the two aqueducts, each 
having a capacity of 1,000 second-feet, it was found that the easterly route 
heading at the west portal of San Jacinto Ttuxnel woiild be about two and one 
half million dollars cheaper than the other route considered. Further, diver- 
sion from the west portal of San Jacinto Tannel would permit gravity diversion 
of aqueduct water, for regulatory ajid emergency storage, into the proposed Auld 
Valley Reseivoir, hereinafter described. By construction of the new aqueduct 
along this route, it would be possible to utilize about 36,000 acre-feet of 
active resei^roir storage capacity in Auld Valley Reservoir by storing to a 



-132. 



vater svtrface elevation of 1,^5 feet. It would not Toe possible to effect a 
gravity diversion to this reservoir site from sui aqueduct heading at the east 
end of the Lsdteview Siphon » It should be mentioned that the Auld Valley reser- 
voir site was foimd to be the only feasible storage site in the area which could 
be utilized for regulatory and emergency purposes. 

It was therefore concluded that a genereQ. aqueduct alignment heading 
at the west portal of Seua Jacinto Tunnel, as described, is superior, and as a 
result, no further consideration was given to the other aqueduct alignments 
north of Rainbow Pass. 

"B" Line 



The Barona Aqueduct, as described in State Water Resources Board 
Bulletin No. 3 (Preliminary Version), would originate at Arrowhead Springs 
Afterbay with a hydraulic gradient elevation of about 1,760 feet, and would 
extend southerly along the eastern periphery of Upper Sajita Ana Valley passing 
between Redlands ajad San Bernardino in pressure conduit. The aqueduct would 
enter a tunnel through the Badlands area south of San Timeteo Creek, and at 
its southerly portal woiild extend southwesterly ailong the Sam Jacinto River in 
pressixre condviit to the western portal of the San Jacinto Tvtnnel. From the 
western portfiiL of the San Jacinto T'unnel, the Barona Aqueduct wovild continue to 
the proposed Baxona Reservoir. 

The portion of the Barona Aqueduct herein considered as an alternative 
route to San Diego County is that portion from San Jacinto south to the pro- 
posed Barona Reservoir designated the "B" line, as is shown on Plate 9. 

The "B" line was selected for study in this investigation because it 
wo\ild be capable of serving higher and more remote areas of Ssin Diego County as 
compared with the other three aqueducts considered. 



-133- 



Operation of the "E" line woiild require a pump lift of about 200 feet 
in the vicinity of San Jacinto in urde;.- to serve Colorado Hiver water ia the 
interim matil Feather River Project water beccames available, at \rtiich time pump- 
ing would no longer be required since water carried from the north in the Barona 
Aqueduct would reach the San Jacinto area with a hydraxilic grade line elevation 
of about 1,700 feet. As previously discussed, the definite location of the 
aqueduct facilities required to bring water into the San Jacinto area from the 
north cannot be made at this time but must await the conclusion of studies of 
eilternative aqueduct routes from northern CsLLifomiac 

After preliminary investigation, it was concluded that the Barona 
line would not adequately serve those areas of the Coiinty which have the 
greatest growth potential in the neai" future at a cost coiapetitive with the 
other routes studied. It was, therefore, not further considered in this inves- 
tigation. However, as indicated in State Waiter Resources Board Bulletin No. 3> 
the Barona line as well as the "High Line" route shown on Plate 9 as "The 
Authorized Feather River Project Aqueduct Route to San Diego County" will be 
needed in the fut-jxe, in adda.tion to the existing ejid proposed lower aqueducts, 
to series the higher and aiore remote lands of the County. 

"E" Line 



The "E" line was selected for aneiysis because it would facilitate 
interconnection with the existing Ssja Diego Aqueduct and with existing lateral 
conveyance systems takiiig water then^frcm. Further, because existing convey- 
ance systems could be connected to both the existing and proposed aqueducts, it 
would be possible to operate the existing aqueduct at essentially fuLLl capacity 
throughout the year. Since there is on3.y about a five second-foot reduction in 
capacity in the existing aquedtict between San Jacinto and San Vicente Reservoirs, 
service to intervening areas could be provided from the "E" line, and the 



-13*!- 



existing line, as stated, coxild flow at essentially full capacity. TMs opera- 
tional procedure coiild not "be effected with the other lines considered imless 
expensive interconnections to the existing aqueduct vere constructed at frequent 
intervals along the alignment. The locations of the "E" line and of required 
appurtenauit conveyance and storage facilities are shown on Plate lOA, entitled 
"Location of 'E' Line and Appurtenant Facilities". 

Description of Route . The "E" line, as shown on Plate lOA, from the 
vicinity of Rainbow Pass pareillels the existing aqueduct, which crosses Reiinbow 
Valley and passes about one mile east of the proposed Vallecitos Dam to Rainbow 
Tunnel. For the piirposes of this investigation, it was considered that a 
tunnel would be constructed generally parallel to the existing Rainbow Tunnel, 
ailthough preliminary estimates indicate a pipe line bypass could be constructed 
at about aji equivalent cost. 

From the south portal of the Rainbow Tunnel, the "E" line would con= 
tinue psurallel to the existing aqueduct across the San Luis Rey River, passing 
immediately east of the City of Escondldo to a point Just south of La^e Hodges. 
In the reach north of Laike Hodges, the "E" line would deviate from the existing 
San Diego Aqueduct line at two points where pipe line sections approximately 
two miles in length would bypass the existing Lilac and Red Mountain Tunnels. 
In this reach, the "E" line would have a tunael section parallel to the exist= 
ing Oat Hills Tunnel about three miles west of the cordmunity of Valley Center. 

About one mile south of Lake Hodges, the "E" line wo\ild swing west- 
ward tram, the existing €LLignment euid continue southward to the north shore of 
the existing Murray Reservoir. From Murray Reservoir the line would pass 
generally southward through La Mesa> Lemon Grove and Spring Valley, cross the 
Sweetwater River just downstream from Sweetwater Dam, and pass generally south- 
eastward to a terminus at Ofcay Reservoir. 



-135- 



Constnzetioa P^pjlem s. The "E" li.^ie throughout a substantial psLrt of 
its leag-fch, "because of prevailing topogi'aphical conditions, would necessaxily 
be coastructed inDaediately adjacent to tiie right of way of tae existing aque- 
duct. This close proximity would make accessary special precautions at all 
times to protect the existing lines from heavy impact loeids, undermining, and 
other possible sources of damage. Trenches would be shored in many locations 
siad heavy pads placed over the existing line wherever heavy equipment would 
cross. In addition, in such locations all excavated material would be dumped 
away from the existing lines and, ^^iere the line is on steep side slopes, this 
material would require a seco:id handling. This additional work would add to 
the cost of the construction , but because of its scanei^Lat intangible nature, in 
many cases, it could not be adequately reflected in the prelimi;aary cost 
estimates. 

Between Eaanbow Pass aE'.d San Luis Rey River, the "E" line would tra- 
verse very rugged and remote terrain o Consid.erable portions of this section of 
aLLignment are on steep cross slopes whera a wide wox'king bench would have to be 
excavated in hard rock. Constryction of the crossing of the valley of the San 
Liiis Rey River would be costly as was the constrtictioa of the existing barrels 
of the San Diego Aquedizct. 

South of the San Luis Rey River and to the northern limits of the City 
of Escondido, the terrain is rugged with considerable outcropping of rock along 
the entire alignment. It is expected that site preparation and trenching will 
be costly throughout this reach. Saae construction of access roads will be 
required. Since a considere.ble length of the trenching will be in rock, it is 
most likely that s\iltable backfill material for this reach would be imported 
from borrow areas near the City of Escondido. The nearest railhead for this 
section of the line is Escoadido, ■ytoere most of the heavy equipnent and 
materials would be unloaded. 



-136- 



In the vicinity of Escondido and southerly past the eastern edge of 
Lake Hodges, thence to the proposed Carroll Reservoir, there appear to be few 
construction dif f iculties o The alignment south of Carroll Reservoir to the Sfiua 
Diego River would present no major problems in construction. Excavation 
throxighout this entire area should be easily accomplished, and excavated trench 
material appeaurs to be suitable for backfill. 

The crossing of Mission Valley Gorge on the San Diego River would be 
in siphon It is believed that in the final design, consideration should be 
given to crossing of this gorge by an overhead structure. In the immediate 
vicinity of this gorge, there appear to be considerable constraction problems. 
The terrain is rxigged and excavation would be in rock. 

The alignment south of Murray Reservoir as far as La Mesa poses no 
appreciable problems of construction. However, pipe line construction through 
La Mesa, Lemon Grove, and Spring Valley would be typical of pipe line construc- 
tion in southern California cities. Considerable difficulty will be experienced 
in laying large diameter pipe line in the streets because of the lack of space 
and interference with traffic. It is anticipated that considerable relocation 
work would be required for existing xtnderground utility lines. 

From Sweetwater Reservoir to Otay Reservoir, there should be little 
construction difficulty. The area is presently sparsely settled, and access 
roads to the zone of construction are adequate. Site preparation throughout 
this entire reach of the line would be at a minimun, and it appears that suit- 
able backfill material could be obtained from trench excavation. 

aeration of "E" Line. Preliminary analyses of the "E" line, as well 



as the other lines considered, were based on supplying needs for imported water 
in the potential aqueduct service area in year 2000, which would require diver- 
sion of 1,000 second =feet of continuous discharge from the source of supply. 



-137' 



This would be in addition to the 195 secoad-feet which could be conveyed by 
the existing aqueduct, as is presently occurring. South of Rainbow Pass, the 
capacity of the "E" line and the other lines considered wo'old be about 860 
seccad-feet. As stated it was assximed that the existing and proposed aqueducts 
would operate as an integrated unit. 

Cost comparisons were made for numerous locations and capacities of 
required regulatory storage reservoirs, with resulting differences in aqueduct 
size and capacity for various sections. In this connection, the variation in 
cost of delivering water to the veirious components of the aqueduct service area 
was given consideration. As a restOLt of these studies, it was considered that 
south of Rainbow Pass, storage sfco\ild be provided at six reservoirs. The 
reseivoirs, with the storage capacities required to provide the desired regula- 
tion, are tabulated following: 









Msucimvun water 




Capacity, 


surface elevation. 


Reservoir 


i2L 


acre -feat 


in feet 


Vallecitos 




10,000 


938 


San Marcos 




16,000 


1*21 


Carroll 




8,000 


Ilk 


Lower Otay 




68,000 


53h 


San Viceiite 




18,000 


667 


Murray 




6,000 


5^*0 



T0a?AL 126,000 

Of the foregoing reservoirs, Vallecitos, San Msircos, and Carroll 
woiild require construction of new dams. Lower Otay and San Vicente Dams would 
be raised 43 feet and 17 feet, respectively, to provide additional, storsige 
capacity in the amounts indicated. Miirray Reservoir is an existing facility 
owned by Helix Irrigation District and operated by the City of San Diego. 

Storage in San Vicente Reservoir in the amount of about 20,000 acre- 
feet is presently being utilised by the Ban Diego County Water Authority for 



-138- 



regulation of vater conveyed in the existing San Diego Aqueduct. As Indicated 
in the foregoing tabulation, the amount of storeige in this reservoir needed for 
coordinated operation of the facilities of the proposed aqueduct located on the 
"E" line woxild be equivalent to the amount presently utilized. As stated in 
ensuing sections of this chapter, different amounts of storage at this site sure 
needed for the other alternative routes studies. Therefore, in the econanic 
ccairparisons of the alternative routes presented hereinaf-fcer, the capital costs 
of red-sing Sem Vicente Dam to provide the needed regulatory storsige are 
included in order to reflect the economic effect of varying degrees of use of 
the storage in this reservoir characteristic of each route studied. 

The operational procedure and conveyance and regulatory storeige facil- 
ities by ^rtiich water service would be provided to the veurious subdivisions of 
the service area, described in Chapter II and shown on Plate 2, from facilities 
of the "E" line emd existing San Diego Aqueduct are set forth in the ensuing 
paragraphs . 

As indicated on Plate lOA, water service to Agua Tibia would be pro- 
vided directly from the "E" line through a latersQ. 1.1 miles in length. The 
grade line elevation for delivery to this area would be about 1,600 feet 
requiring a pump lift of about 350 feet from the aqueduct grade line. 

Water would be turned out for Camp Pendleton, Fallbrook, and approxi-= 
mately two-thirds of the Rainbow Municipal Watsr District near the proposed 
Vallecitos Reservoir, Water for Fallbrook would be conveyed directly from the 
"E" line through the existing Fallbrook-Oceanside Lateral, the existing 
Fallbrook Lateral, and a new lateral 3.6 miles in length. Water service coxild 
be provided at a grade line elevation of 800 feet by gravity. 

The north two>=thirds of Rainbow Municipal Water District could be 
served directly from the "E" line through the existing Rainbow Lateral, the 
existing Canonita Lateral, and throvigh a new lateral which would also serve the 



=139= 



Camp Pendleton area. The proposed Vallecitos Reservoir, with a minim\an operating 
water s\irface elevation of 830 feet, would provide regulation for water supplies 
delivered in this vicinity. Rsiinbow Municipal Water District coiiLd be served 
with water at a grade line elevation of 600 feet through these various laterals 
by gravity. Water service for Camp Pendleton would be provided through a new 
lateral 11.2 miles in length also serving a portion of Rainbow Municipal Water 
District. Camp Pendleton co\ild be served at a grade line elevation of ^00 feet 
without pumping. 

Pavmia Valley and Lower Pauma Valley would be served directly from the 
"E" line. A common lateral 2.7 miles in length would extend up Lower Pauma 
Valley to the vicinity of Pala, and the lateral for Pauma Valley with a length 
of 4.9 miles would continue from there up to the service axea. A second lateral 
1.7 miles in length would serve the western portion of Lower Pauma Valley. 
Lower Pauma Valley and PaTjma Valley co^lLd be served at grade line elevations of 
500 and 1,100 feet, respectively, fraa these laterals without pumping. 

The south one-third of the Rainbow ManicipsLL Water District, the 
Valley Center Municipal Water K.strict, Rincon del Diablo Municipal Water Dis- 
trict, and the City of Escondido, all of ^ich now receive water from the 
existing San Diego Aqueduct, woiJld, in lieu thereof, with construction of the 
"E" line, be served directly from the latter line. Existing laterals serving 
these areas would be connected to the "E" line. In order to provide for anti- 
cipated future demands in these exeas, new laterals would be required for the 
three districts which could be served aqueduct water by gravity at elevations 
of 600 feet, 1,100 feet, and 1,000 feet, respectively. The City of Escondido 
could be served at a grade line elevation of 85O feet by gravity. The new 
laterals to the south one -third of the Rainbow Municipal Water District and the 
Valley Center M\micipal Water District would be k.2 and 0.8 miles in length, 
respectively. 



l1i-o-- 



Oceanside, Bueno Colorado Municipal Water District, Near Oceanside, 
Santa Fe Irrigation District, North of Santa Fe, and a portion of the demand of 
Carlsbad Municipal Water District would be served directly fr<»n the "E" line. 
A portion of the demand for the Oceatiside area voxild be served from the exist- 
ing San Diego Aqueduct through the existing Fallbrook-Oceanside Lateral and the 
remainder from a new lateral system, with an aggregate length of 35.0 miles, 
which would also serve Bueno Colorado Municipal Water District, Santa Fe 
Irrigation District, North of Santa Fe, Near Oceanside, and Carlsbad Municipal 
Water District, A portion of the Carlsbad demand would also be served through 
a new lateral, U.U miles in length, fran the proposed San Marcos Reservoir, 
\rtiich would have a minim\im operating water surface elevation of 365 feet. 
Oceanside, Bueno Colorsido Municipal Water District, Near Oceanside, Santa Fe 
Irrigation District, North of Santa Fe, and Carlsbad Municipal Water District 
could be served at grade line elevations of 400, 9OO, 300, 6OO, 5OO, and 3kO 
feet, respectively, by gravity. 

San Dieguito Irrigation District and East of San Dieguito would also 
be served from the proposed San Marcos Reservoir. Conveyance of water to the 
San Dieguito Irrigation District area would be through a new lateral, branching 
from the Carlsbad Lateral, k.^ miles in length, and connected to the existing 
line which runs from San Dieguito Reservoir. The capacity of the existing 
lateral is estimated to be sufficient to meet the monthly peak demands of this 
area in the year 2000. The area East of San Dieguito would be served through 
the new laterad. Delivery to these areas could be made at grade line elevations 
of 250 and 320 feet, respectively, by gravity. 

The Rincon area would be served directly from the "E" line through a 
new lateral with a length of I.7 miles. A pump lift of approximately 200 feet 
would be required to serve this area at a grade line elevation of 1,100 feet. 



=lUl- 



The area South of Lake Hodges could lae served by gravity at a grade 
line elevation of 600 feet directly from the "E" line through a new lateral k.O 
miles long. 

The Eamona Municipal Water District and Poway Municipal Water District 
areas woTild be served directly from the "E" line. Service to the Ramona Muni- 
cipal Water District area voald be through a new lateral 7-0 miles in length 
and would require a pump lift of approximately 700 feet to a grade line eleva- 
tion of 1,500 feet. Poway Mmicipal Water District at present is served from 
the existing San Diego Aqiieduct. La the future the entire supply for this area 
would be delivered through the foregoing new Ramona Lateral connected to exist- 
ing distribution facilities. No pumping would be required to serve this area 
at grade line elevation of 8OO feat. 

The areas designated East of Del Mar, Camp Elliott, and Near Miramar 
vould be served directly from the "E" line, with the portion of the service 
area of the City of Saa Diego in this vicinity taking water from the "E" line 
during low demand months a^d from the proposed Carroll Reservoir during peait 
demaad months. Carroll Resenroir wouJ-d have a miiiimum operating water surface 
elevation of 61O feet. Gravity seinrice could be provided to East of Del Mar, 
City of San Diego, and Near Miramar at a grade line elevation of 500 feet and 
to Camp Elliott at a grade line elevation of 6OO feet. A common lateral k.k 
miles in length woiild serve the Camp Elliott and Near Mirsjnar areas and 
laterals 7*1 miles and 3«2 miles in Iv^ngth would serve the City of San Diego 
and East of Del Mar areas, respect i'/ely. 

Service to the Rancho El Cajon, El Capitan, and San Vicente areas 
would be made from San Vicente Reservoir from water supplies delivered to the 
resezn^oir from the existing aqueduct. New laterals to these areas woxild have 
lengths of 3«0, 9>5, and 2.6 miles, z-espectively. Tlie maximian water surface 
elevation in San Vicente Reservoir would be 667 feet and the minimum would be 



-li«2- 



U60 feet. The hydra\ilic grade line elevation of the existing aqueduct at the 
point where it discharges into the reservoir is about 750 feet. Delivery to the 
foregoing areas would reqiiire the coastruction of laterals and piimping instal- 
lations to reach grade line elevations of 1,300, 2,000, and l,k60 feet, 
respectively. 

For the purpose of emalyzing the deliveries of water from Seua Vicente 
Reservoir to Rio San Diego Municipsd Water District, Helix Irrigation District, 
and a portion of the City of Seua Diego, the assumption was made that the 
La Mesa-Sweetwater extension; the City of San Diego's bypass line from the 
existing aqueduct; the lines diverting directly from San Vicente Reservoir; and 
the Helix-Rio San Diego bypass, all shown on Plate 2, would be used jointly by 
the afore-mentioned areas. It is estimated that there is s\ifficient capacity 
in these existing lines to convey to the above-noted areas the monthly peak 
water demands estimated for the year 2000. Water delivered through the bypass 
lines would require pumping to serve JU.O Saji Diego at a grade line elevation of 
850 feet, but no pumping would be reqixired to serve Helix Irrigation District 
and the City of San Diego at grade line elevations of 6kO feet and 5U0 feet, 
respectively, from the bypass lines. Water delivered from San Vicente thro\igh 
the City of San Diego's pipe lines woxild req\iire pumping when the water surface 
in the reservoir is at a minim-jm, to serve the above-mentioned areas. 

A portion of the water service for the City of San Diego and South 
Bay Irrigation District emd National City would be provided directly from the 
"E" line by gravity. Part of the service to the City of San Diego wovild be pro- 
vided with water from the "E" line delivered to Murray Reservoir. 

During months of peaJt demand, water service for portions of the City 
of San Diego and South Bay Irrigation District and National City would be pro- 
vided from Lower Otay Reservoir requiring a maximum pump lift of about 2i4^0 feet 
to deliver water to these agencies at grade line elevations of 5^0 and ^4^00 feet, 

-IU3- 



respectively. Lover Otay Reservoir after eMleirgeiaent would have a maximum 
water siirface eie\''atioa of 53^ feet sad a minimimi water siirface elevation of 
370 feet. Delivery to these areas from Lower Otay Reservoir during such times 
would be made by backflow through the "E" line, whereby water could be pumped 
from the reservoir back into the aqueduct. 

Otay Municipal Water District and Imperial would be served water 
from Lower Otay Reservoir. A maximum pumping lift of 230 feet would be required 
to serve Otay Municipal Water District at a grade line elevation of 570 feet. 
No pumping would be required to supply Imperial at a grade line elevation of 
300 feet. Service to Imperial would be through a lateral 8 ..6 miles in length 
and service to Otay Municipal Water District would be provided from a branch 
line from the Imperial Lateral 0.8 mile in length. 

Estimated Cost of "E" Line and Appurtenant Facili ties . A preliminary 
estimate of cost was prepared for the "E" line, together with the cost of those 
conveyance laterals and regulatory storage facilities needed to supply the 

i 

demand for imported water in the service area in year 2000= This estimate of 
cost is presented in Table 15 • 



-l^i*-. 



TABLE 15 

ESTIMATED COST OF "E" LINE TO MEET DEMAND FOR IMPORTED WATER TO 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY IN YEAR 2000, INCLUDING REGULATORY RESERVOIRS 

AND MAJOR LATERALS AND APPURTENANT FACILITIES 



Item 




: Unit 


: Quajn.tity 


: Unit 
: price 


: Cost 


Aqueduct Cost 
















Rainbow Pass to San Marcos 


) Reservoir 


Turnout 








(Cap. 


bbk cfs to 


767 cfs) 






Pipe 

Excavation 
Backfill 
Tunnel 




ft. 

cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 
ft. 


107, Uoo 

l,Ul3,000 

505,000 

10,200 


$ 9^.81 
2.51 
0.90 

275.39 


$10,183,000 

3,5^9,000 

455,000 

2,809,000 


$16,996,000 


San 


Marcos Reservoir 


Turnout to Carroll Reservoir Turnout 






(Cap. 


bkk cfs to 


611 cfs) 






Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 




ft. 

cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 


97,^00 
780,000 
1+33,000 


89.61 
2.U1 
0.90 


8,728,000 

1,880,000 

390,000 


10,998,000 


Carroll 


Reservoir Turnout to Murray Reservoir Turnout 








(Cap. 


550 cfs to 


534 cfs) 






Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 




ft. 

cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 


51,600 
395,000 
2lU,000 


69.i+i+ 
1.32 
0.90 


3,583,000 
521,000 
193,000 


4,297,000 




Murray Reservoir 


' Turnout to 


Lower Otay 


Reservoir 








(Cap. 


36ti cfs to 


3^+2 cfs) 






Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 




ft. 

cu.yd. 

cu . yd . 


75,i+oo 

1,858,000 

286,000 


61^.66 
1.05 
0.90 


4,876,000 

1,954,000 

257,000 


7,087,000 


Subtotal 












$39,378,000 


Reservoirs 








lump sum 




15,478,000 


Major Laterals 
Appurtenances 


ajid 






lump sum 




14,480,000 


Subtotal 












$69,336,000 


Administration 
Contingencies, 
Interest during 


and engineering, 

15^ 

; construction 


10^ 






$ 6,934,000 

10,400,000 

2,718,000 


TOTAL ESTIMATED 


COST 








$89,388,000 



-l45- 



"S" Line 

The "S" line as described hereinafter generally follows the route 
studied by the Sem Diego County Water Authority and described in the afore- 
mentioned report of that agency issued in 1955* This line exhibited consider- 
able merit in supplying siipplemental water to those portions of San Diego 
County considered to have the greatest immediate potentieil for growth and 
attendant demand for water. The locations of the "S" line and required convey- 
ance and regxilatory storage facilities sure shown on Plate lOB, entitled "Loca- 
tion of 'S' Line and Appurtenant Facilities". 

Descripti on of Route. The "S" line;, as shown on Plate lOB, from the 
vicinity of Rainbow Pass would parallel the "E" line south to Rainbow Tuanel. 
As in the case of the "E" line, a tunnel would parallel the existing Rainbow 
'Punnel. From the south portal of the Rainbow Tunnel, the "S" line wo\ild con- 
tinue parallel to the existing aqueduct southward to about two miles south of 
the San Luis Rey River. At this point, the line would depart from the existing 
aqueduct and would proceed southward ge^ierally parallel and about I.5 to 2.5 
miles westerly of the existing line to a crossing of the San Dieguito River 
.just downstream from Hodges Item. The line then woul.d continue southward to a 
crossing of U. S. Highway 395 and would join the previously described "E" line 
just east of this crossing. Frcan this point south to Lower Otay Reservoir, the 
"S" line would follow the same route as the "E" line as previously described. 

Constru.ction Problems . South of Rainbow Pass where the line would 
follow the general alignment of the existing San Diego Aqueduct to a point 
approximately two miles south of the San Luis Rey Valley, the difficulties in 
construction would be identical to those outlined for the "E" line above. From 
the point where the "3" line would swing west of the existing aqueduct to the 



-Ike- 



northerly limits of San Marcos Valley in the vicinity of Escondido, the align- 
ment woiild traverse extremely nagged terrain. Access roads to the alignment 
exist only in the intersecting canyons, smd it is expected that substantial 
site preparation wotLLd he reqviired throughout the entire reach. 

The alignment through the Sam Marcos Valley appears to offer little 
difficvilty as far as construction is concerned. Good rail treuisportation 
facilities axe provided by a rsdlhead at San Marcos, irtiich is easily reached 
from the alignment. 

In the vicinity of Lake Hodges and southward, the character of the 
terrain again becomes rugged. The steep, rocky and rugged slopes west of Lake 
Hodges offer considerable difficulty to any type of construction. South of 
Lake Hodges eind as fax south as the site of the proposed Carroll Reservoir, 
which is a common intersecting point of all the lines discussed, there wovild be 
little difficvilty in aqueduct construction. However, existing access roads 
into the area wovild require some improvement and additional roads would be 
required. From this latter point southward, the "S" line is identiceLL to the 
"E" line. 

Operation of "S" Line . As in the case of the "E" line, numerous loca- 
tions for providing required regulatory storage capacity, with resulting 
variations in aqueduct size, were investigated and ccmpeired on a cost basis. 
As a result of these studies ;, it was found that storage should be provided in 
seven reservoirs. These reservoirs with required storage capacities are tabu- 
lated below and shown on Plate lOB. 



=1^7 « 







Maximum ffater 




Capacity;, 


surface elevation, 


Reseirvoir 


in acre -feet 


in feet 


Vallecitos 


10,000 


938 


Saa Marcos 


16,000 


421 


Carroll 


8,000 


71k 


Woodson 


8,000 


775 


Lower Otay 


56,000 


527 


San Vicente 


23,000 


671 


Murray 


6,000 


5U0 



TOTAL 127,000 

It will be noted that construction of the "S" line would, by year 
2000, require constsruction of 8,«X)0 acre-feet of storage capacity at the 
Woodson site and 5,000 acre-feet of adciltional capacity at San Vicente Reser- 
voir, both of which would not be req.uix'ed with construction of the "E" line. 
However, the "S" line would require only 56,0<jO acre-feet of additional 
capacity at Lower Otay Reservoir as coHipared with about 68,000 acre-feet of 
additional capacity required at this site for the "E" line. San Vicente Dam 
would be raised 21 feet sad Lower Otay Dam would be raised 36 feet imder this 
plan. 

It will be noted from the foregoing tabulation as compared with the 
tabulation of storage required for the "E" line that the geographical distri- 
bution of storage required in the operation of the two lines would be 
substantially different. It will be f^xrther noted that the aggregate amovint of 
storage required in the operation of each of the two lines differs by an amount 
of only 1,000 acre -feet. 

Water service to Agua Tibia, Fallbrook, Camp Pendleton, and the north 
two-thirds of Rainbow Municipal Water District would be provided from the "S" 
line in a manner identical to that described for the "E" line. As stated, the 
location and hydraulic gradient of the two lines woxild be equivalent in this 
area. Laterals extending from Vallecitos Reservoir and to Agua Tibia and 
Fallbrook would be the same length as those described for the "E" line. 



Lower Pauma Valley woiald be served a portion of its demand directly 
from the "S" line and the remaining portion from the existing aqueduct. Pauma 
VeQley would be served directly from the existing aqueduct through a lateral 
which wovild also serve the remaining portion of the demand for Lower Pa\ima 
Valley. The new lateral from the existing San Diego Aqueduct extending up the 
Pa\ima Valley and the new lateral from the "S" line extending down the valley 
woxild have the same aggregate length as the laterals described for the "E" 
line. As was the case with the "E" line, Lower Pauma Valley and Pauma Valley 
could be served at grade line elevations of 500 and 1,100 feet, respectively, 
from these laterals without pumping. 

The south one-third of Rainbow Municipal Water District would be 
served directly from, the "S" line. At present this area has a lateral from the 
existing line extending to the easterly boundary of the area. This existing 
lateral together with a new lateral generally parallel to it and 2.2 miles in 
length would be connected to the "S" line. This area could be served at a 
grade line elevation of 600 feet without pumping. 

The Valley Center Municipal Water District, Rincon del Diablo Btuni- 
cipal Water District, and the City of Escondido all would continue to receive 
water from the existing San Diego Aqueduct with construction of additional 
laterals as needed to meet future water demands. The areas could be served at 
grade line elevations of 1,100 feet, 1,000 feet, and 85O feet, from the exist- 
ing aqueduct by gravity. 

Bueno Colorado Municipal Water District would be served from the "S" 
line throvigh a new lateral, 3.4 miles in length, which could deliver water at 
a grade line elevation of 900 feet without pumping. 

Service would be provided directly from the "S" line to the Santa Fe 
Irrigation District, 'North of Santa Fe, Near Oceajiside, portions of the d e mand 
of Ocesuaside and Caor-lsbad Municipal Water District through a new latereuL 

.149- 



conveyance system 29.6 miles in length. The rsmaining portion of Ocesuaside's 
demand wovild Toe sersred as describad for the "E" line through the existing 
Fallbrook-Oceanside Lateral « The remaining portion of Carlsbad Mxmicipal Water 
District's demand and the demands for East of Saa Dieguito and San Dieguito 
voTild be provided in a raamaer identical to that d,escribed ijnder the "E" line 
frcaa laterals out of Saa Marcos aeseivoir. Water deliveries could be accom- 
plished without pumping, as with the "E" line. 

The Rincon sirea would be served directly frott the existing San Diego 
Aqueduct through a new lateral I.7 miles in length. A pvunp lift of approxi- 
mately 250 feet would be required to serve this area at a grade line elevation 
of 1,100 sE'eet. 

Tb.e area South of Lake Eodges coijld be served by gravity at a grade 
line elevation of 6OO feet directly from the "S" line through a new lateral 
0.6 mile in length. 

The Ramona Municipal Water District and Poway Municipal Water Dis- 
trict would be supplied directly from the existing San Diego Aqueduct during 
the months of low water daasand^ end diLi'ing those months when water demand would 
be high and the flow in the aqueduct would be depleted, water would be pumped 
from the proposed Woodson Reser^/oir, ■tjhich would hs.ve a minimum operating water 
surface elevation of 69O feet. Poway Mimicxpal Water District could be served 
by gravity at a grade line elevation of 8OO feet, from the aqueduct, and its 
supply woiLLd be pumped irtien being supplied from Woodson Reservoir. A new lateral 
0.6 mile in leng-bh would be required to tie Poway Municipal Water District's 
existing conveyance system to Woodson Reservoir. A new lateral 5'7 miles in 
length and a pvmp lift of about 8OO feet would be required to provide water 
service to Ramona at a grade line elevation of 1,500 feet. 

Service from the "S" line to East of Del Mar, Camp Elliott, Near 
Miramar, the portion of the City of San Diego in this area, Rancho El Cajon, 



-150- 



El Capitan, Rio San Diego Municipal Water District, and San Vicente would be 
identical to that described for the "E" line with the exception that the 
lateral to East of Del Mar would be 1.1 miles in length rather than 3-2 miles 
as required for the "E" line. 

By the year 2CXX) the remaining portion of City of San Diego and Helix 
Irrigation District would be sei*ved directly from the "S" line, and also from 
Murray Reservoir in the case of City of San Diego, therefore reqviiring no 
delivery of water from the existing San Diego Aqueduct. Service to these areas 
could be made at grade line elevations of 5^0 and 640 feet, respectively, by 
gravity. 

South Bay Irrigation District and National City wovild be served both 
directly frcan the "S" line and from Lower Otay Reservoir. Delivery to this 
area from the "S" line at a grade line elevation of UOO feet could be made by 
gravity. Delivery at that elevation from Lower Otay Reservoir could be accom- 
plished by a pump lift of up to 200 feet -jriaereby water would be pumped back 
through the "S" line. 

Otay Municipal Water District and ImperieO. wo\ild be served in a 
manner identical to that described for the "E" line. 

Estimated Cost of "S" Line and Appurtenant Facilities . The prelimi- 
nary estimate of cost of the "S" line and required regulatory storage and 
conveyance facilities is presented in Table l6. 



-151- 



TABLE 16 

ESTIMATED COST OF "S" LINE TO MEET DEIVLAND FOR IMPORTED WATER TO 
SAN DIEGO COUNTY IN YEAR 2000, INCLUDING REGULATORY RESER\rOIRS 
Al^D MAJOR LATERALS AND APPURTENANT FACILITIES 



Item 



: : Unit 

Unit : Qii arttit y : price 



Cost 



Aqueduct Cost 



Rainbow Pass to Saji Marcos Reser voir Turnout 
'^cSpT'BS^cfs to 767 cfs) 

Pipe ft. lll4-,800 $100.51 $11,539,000 

Excavation cu.yd. l,iHO,000 2.23 3,1^6,000 

Backfi.ll cu.yd. 5^3,000 O.9O U89,000 

Tunnel ft. 5,200 272.69 l,in6,000 $16,592,000 



San Marco s Reservoir Turnout to Carroll R eservoir Turnout 
ICap.TrO cfs to~558~cfs7 



Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 



ft. 92,000 87.-38 8,039,000 
cu.yd. 1,093,000 2 lii 2,336,000 
cu.yd. Ill4,000 0«90 173^000 



Carroll Reservoir Turnout to Mu r ray Reservoir To mout 

~~™~ ICa?. 588 cfs to"572 cfs) 



Pipe 

Excavation 

Be-ckfill 



ft, 51,600 73.^7 3, 791, (WO 

cu.yd. 366,000 1.29 lv71,000 

cu.yd. 222,000 O.9O 200,000 

Murray Reservoir Tuxnout to Lower Otay Reser\'-oir 
"" (Cap. Sl^TcfTto 288 cfs, 



Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 

Subtotal 

Reservoirs 

Major Laterals and 
Appurtenances 

Subtotal 



Administration and engineering, 10^ 

Contingencies, 15^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL ESTIMATED COST 



ft. 75,^00 62.69 

cu.yd. 1,715,000 1.05 

cu.yd. 280,OiOO O.9O 



l\jimp sum 
lump stun 



1^,727,000 

1,809,000 

252,000 



10,7^8,000 



4,U62,000 



6,788,000 

$38, 590,000 

16, i* 52, 000 

13,212.000 

$68,25^,000 

$ 6,825,000 

10,238,000 

2,6 71,000 

$87,988,000 



-152- 



"W" Une 

On the basis of preliminary study, it appeared desirable to give con- 
sideration to an aqueduct route farther to the west than that studied by the 
San Diego Covmty Water Authority, Such a route would take advantage of less 
rugged terrain through part of its alignment, and would be located closer to 
the portion of the County with the greatest immediate potential demand for 
imported water. Location of an aqueduct in this area would reduce conveyajice 
costs to the individual se3rvice eireas i.rhile the hydraulic gradient in the aq.ue- 
duct could be maintained eqiiivalent to that of the other alternative routes 
maJsing it possible to provide eqiiivalent gravity water service. The locations 
of the "W" line and required appurtenant conveyance and regulatory storage 
facilities are shown on Plate IOC, entitled "Location of 'W Line and Appurte- 
nant Facilities". 

Description of Route . The "W" line, as shown on Plate IOC, from the 
vicinity of Rainbow Pass generally parallels U. S. Highway 395 south through 
Rainbow Valley passing about one mile to the west of the proposed Vallecitos 
Reservoir. The line then runs nearly due south departing westward frcan the 
existing Saji Diego Aqueduct line up to a maximum distance of about seven miles 
westerly of the City of Escondido, From this point, the "W" line swings south- 
eastward to a crossing of U. S. Highway 395 neax the proposed Carroll Reservoir. 
From that point southward, the "W" line is identical with the previously des- 
cribed "E" and "S" lines. 

Construction Problems . Construction of an aqueduct from Rainbow Pass 
south to San Luis Rey River along the "W" alignment could be accomplished with 
substantially less apparent major construction problems than wouJ.d be encountered 
on the "E" or "S" lines. The point of crossing of the San Luis Rey River was 



-153- 



selected for its accessibility to two main highw&is. From a construction stand- 
point, this location appears to offer the least difficulties of locations 
considered. It appears that a substantieJ. amount of backfill material through- 
out this entire reach covild be provided from trench excavation » 

In the portion of the alignment between San Luis Rey River and about 
three miles south of State Higtiway 78, some rocTt excavation would be req.\iired. 
Accessibility; to the alignment from main and secondsac^r roads is adequate and a 
minimuiJi of site preparation would be required for pipe line construction. It 
is probable that a substantial amount of excavated trench material could be 
utilized for backfill. Railheads for nec::^33ary construction supplies and heavy 
equipment are available at San M?.rcos and Vista, which are within relatively 
short hauling distances of the alignment. 

From the area south of State Highway 78 southward to the San Dieguito 
River, the alignment world pass through several miles of rugged terrain parti- 
cularly in the vicinity of Escondido Creek. A considerable amount of rock 
excavation as well as hau3.ing of imported backfill material would be necessary 
in this reach. However, accsss to this reach couD.d be readily accomplished from 
existing secondary roads, \rLth. supplemental construction of additionsj. required 
roads at relatively nominal cost. 

The reach of the "W" line from Saa Dieguito River to the crossing of 
U. S. Highway 395 would encounter a minimum of construction problems. Backfill 
■material could be made available frora trench excavation and secondary access 
roads are available ttiroughout the entire alignraent; however, some improvements 
of these roads wo\ild be required. 

O peration of "W" Line . As a result of economic studies of aqueduct 
operation relative to location of regulatory storage capacity and aqueduct size, 
it was concluded that those storage reservoirs and attendant capacities 



-l^h. 



enumerated for the "S" line would be most desirable for the "W" line. Except 
as hereinafter noted, water service throughout the area would be provided in 
essentially the same manner from the "S" and "W" lines. 

Water service to Agua Tibia, Fallbrook, Camp Pendleton, and the north 
two-thirds of Rainbow Municipal Water District would be provided in a manner 
identical to that described for the "E" line with the exception that the common 
lateral to Camp Pendleton euid Rainbow would divert water from the inlet -outlet 
line of VaLLlecitos Reservoir. New laterals extending from Vallecitos Reservoir 
wovild be the same length as those described for the "E" line. The new lateral 
to Fallbrook and the new lateral to Agvia Tibia would be 0.4 and 1.7 miles in 
length, respectively. 

Service to Pauma Valley and Lower Paimia Valley would be the same as 
that described for the "S" line. However, the new latereil from the "W" line to 
Lower Pauma Valley would be 1.9 miles in length. 

Service to the south one=third of Rainbow Municipal Water District 
would be the same as from the "S" line. The new lateral to serve this area 
from the "W" line would be 1.3 miles in length. 

The Valley Center Municipal Water District, Rincon del Diablo Muni- 
cipal Water District, and Escondido would be served in an identical manner to 
that described under the "S" line. 

Bueno Coloreido Municipal Water District could be seived directly from 
the "W" line at grade line elevation of 900 feet by gravity. 

A portion of the demand for Oceanside and the demand for Near 
Oceanside areas would be served through a new lateral, 10.6 miles in length, 
diverting water from the "W line. The remaining part of the demand for 
Oceanside wovild be served from the existing aqueduct through the existing 
Fallbrook-Oceanside Lateral. Delivery to these eureas could be provided at 
grade line elevations of UOO and 300 feet, respectively, without pvmiping. 

-155- 



Rincon would be ser'/ed in a manner identical to that described for 

the "S" line. 

The South of Laie Hodges area would be served from the "W" line in 
the same manner as described for the "S" line with a new lateral 1,7 miles in 

length . 

A portion of the demand for Carlsbad Municipal Water District, and 
the demands for North of Santa Fe and Santa Fe Irrigation District would be 
served as described for the "S" line but with a new latereil length of 5-5 miles 
from the "W" line to Carlsbad and a common new lateral k.l miles in length for 
North of Santa Fe and Santa Fe Irrigation District. 

The remainder of the demand for Carlsbad Municipal Water District and 
the demands for East of San Diegxiito, San Dieguito Irrigation District, and 
East of Del Mai- would be provided with water in a manner identical to that des- 
cribed for the "E" line. The new laterals for Carlsbad Municipal Water 
District, East of San Dieguito, and San Dieguito Irrigation District would have 
the same lengths as for the "S" line and the new lateral for East of Del Mar 
would be 1.4 miles in length. 

Delivery and lateral lengths from the "W" line and existing San 
Diego Aqueduct for Ramona Municipal Water District, Poway Municipal Water Dis- 
trict, Rio Saaa Diego Municipal Water District, Rancho El Cajon, San Vicente, El 
Capitan, Near Miramar, Camp Elliott, City of San Diego, Helix Irrigation Dis- 
trict, South Bay Irrigation District and National City, Otay M\micipal Water 
District, and Imperial would be identical to that described for the "S" line. 

Estimated Cost of "W" Line and Appurtenant Facilities . Presented in 
Table 1? is the preliminary estimate of cost of the "W" line and required regu- 
latory storage and conveyance facilities. 



•156- 



TABLE 17 

ESTIMATED COST OF "W" LINE TO MEET DH4AND FOR IMPORTED WATER TO 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY IN YEAR 2000, INCLUDING REGULATORY RESERVOIRS 

AND MAJOR LATERALS AND APPURTENANT FACILITIES 



Item 



: : Unit 

Uiiit ; Quantity ; price 



Cost 



Aqueduct Cost 



Rainbow Pass to San Marcos Reservoir Turnout 
(Cap. 864 cfs to 72b cfs) " 



Pipe 


ft. 


Excavation 


cu.yd 


Backfill 


cu.yd 



i4o,ooo $122.61 $17,166,000 

1,296,000 1.93 2,^95,000 

653,000 0.90 588,000 $20,2^9,000 



San Marcos 


Reservoir Turnout to Carroll Reservoir Turnout 






(Cap. 


670 cfs to 


648 cfs) 






Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 




ft. 

cu.ydo 
cu.yd. 


77,000 
637,000 
3^*3,000 


99.96 
2.37 
0.90 


7,697,000 

1,508,000 

309,000 


9,51^,000 


Carroll Reservoir Turnout to Mu 


\rra.y Reservoir Turnout 
572 cfs) 








(Cap. 


5tJtJ cfs to 




Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 




ft. 

cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 


51,600 
377,000 
230,000 


73.»^5 
1.24 
0.90 


3,790,000 
466,000 
207,000 


4,463,000 




Murraj 


r Resei^oir 


Turnout to 
314 cfs to 


Lower Otay 


Reservoir 






(Cap. 


288 cfs) 






Pipe 

Excavation 

Backfill 




ft. 

cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 


75,'*00 

1,715,000 

280,000 


62.69 
1.05 
0.90 


4,727,000 

1,809,000 

252,000 


6,788,000 


Subtotal 












$41,014,000 


Reseirvoirs 








liMp svaa 




16,452,000 


Major TAterals 
AppurtensinceE 


and 

5 






limp sum 




11,025,000 


Subtotal 












$68,491,000 


Administration and engineering. 

Contingencies, 15^ 

Interest during construction 


10^ 






$ 6,649,000 

10,27^,000 

2,737,000 


TOTAL 












$88,351,000 



-157- 



Svmimary Comparison of "E", "S", and "W" Lines 

As a resxilt of the foregoing analysis and investigation of costs and 
accomplishments of the considered routes, it was found that aqueducts, together 
with appurtenant facilities, required to regulate and convey water to areas of 
need, constructed on the "E", "S", or "W" lines would have equivalent over-all 
costs. Presented in Table l8 is a summary of the estimated costs of the three 
aqueducts and appurtenant works. It may be noted in Table l8 that altho\igh the 
over-all cost of each of the routes is equivalent, the cost of necessary con- 
veyance units to serve areas of need varies between the routes, being the least 
for the "W" line. 

TABLE 18 

CCMPARISON OF ESTIMATED COSTS OF AQUEDUCTS AND 
APPURTENANT STORAGE AND CONVEYANCE FACILITIES 
FOR THE "E", "S", AND "W" LINES 



Item 



Aquedxicts $39,378,000 $38,590,000 $4l, 01^^,000 

Reservoirs 15,^^78,000 l6,h32,OOQ l6,i(-52,000 

Major laterals and appurtenances l4,l<-80,000 13,212,000 11,025,000 

Subtotals $69,336,000 $68,25^,000 $68,491,000 

Administration and engineering, 10^ $ 6,93^,000 $ 6,825,000 $ 6,8^+9,000 

Contingencies, 15^ 10,400,000 10,238,000 10,27^,000 

Interest during construction 2,718,000 2,671,000 2,737,000 

lOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS $89,388,000 $87,988,000 $88,351,000 



The investigation disclosed that, in addition to factors reflected in 
the cost estimates, each of the lines has inherent adveuatages and disadvantages 
relative to the others. Although each line would provide the same degree of 
water service at about the same cost, in the selection of a route for immediate 
construction, certain other factors sho\ild be tsLken into consideration. 



.15B- 



The "E" line, by virtue of its proximity to the existing aqueduct, 
would lend itself to interconnection therewith at minimum expense and could 
easily be connected to existing conveyance systems, which factors would be of 
great advanteige in aqueduct operation. However, as reflected in the estimate 
of cost, water service wovild be comparatively expensive for the area lying 
westerly of the "E" line, which area is considered to have the greatest imme- 
diate growth potential. The proximity to the existing aqueduct in itself offers 
one outstanding disadvantage, that of vtilnerability of the entire imported 
water supply system for San Diego County in the event of enemy action during a 
war. Similetrly, an act of God which could disrupt service in one line would in 
all probability affect the other. Also, as previotxsly mentioned, construction 
difficulties would be encountered in certain axe&a particularly where the 
nature of the terrain fixes the location of the aqueduct within naurrow limits 
and poses a hazard to the existing aqueduct during the construction period. 

The "S" line, which lies to the west of the existing San Diego Aque= 
duct but closer to it than the "W" line, also could be cross connected to the 
existing aqueduct at a nvmiber of strategic locations at a lesser cost than for 
the "W" line. From the standpoint of proximity to the portion of the service 
axea with the greatest potential immediate growth, it is considered superior tO' 
the "E" line. Its alignment offers, in certedn areas, difficult construction 
problems and in those reaches where it is in close proximity to the existing 
aqueduct offers the same disadvantages as the "E" line with respect to vulner- 
ability in times of national emergency or as a result of acts of God, and 8j.so 
with respect to possible damage to the existing aqueduct during the construction 
period. 

The "W" line, ^ich lies farther to the west, traverses that part of 
the service airea which is considered to have the greatest immediate growth 
potential and attendant demand for water. Although constiniction of cross 

»159-= 



connections with the existing aqueduct would be more costly, it is believed 
that this disadvantage weald be more tlaan outweighed by the over-all advantage 
to the westerly service area through lesser construction cost of conveyance 
facilities from the proposed aqueduct. The alignment traverses an area ^ere, 
by comparison with the other two lines considered, construction problems would 
be at a minimum and ^ich would be mast accessible during construction and for 
maintenance thereafter, which factors may be expected to result in more rapid 
construction progress for the "W" line than for the "S" and "E" lines. Further, 
of the three lines considered, the "W" line lies farthest away from the exist- 
ing San Diego Aqueduct reducing common vulnerability of the combination of 
existing ajad proposed aqueducts to brea&s through acts of God or disruption of 
service in the event of enemy action during a war. 

On the basis of the foregoing, it is considered that the "W" line is 
superior to the other lines studied in this investigation for the reach of the 
proposed San Diego Aqueduct between Rainbow Pass and Otay Reservoir. 

Selection of Facilities for Initial Construction 

It was concluded in foregoing sections of this chapter that the next 
aqueduct to Sea Diego County should originate at the westerly portal of San 
Jacinto Tunnel and extend southerly a distance of about 100 miles to a terminus 
southeast of the City of San Diego. It was further concluded that economics 
dictate construction of the aqueduct in caneJL section for the upper 29.5 miles 
of its length followed by a pipe line to the point of terminus. From, the 
standpoints of ease and possible rapidity of construction and the cost of water 
service to that portion of the Co\inty with the greatest potential growth, it 
was concluded that the "W" or Westerly line below Rainbow Pass, shown on Plate 
9, is superior to the other routes considered and that the next aqueduct to San 
Diego County should b^ constructed along this alignment. It has been stated 



"160- 



that, by the year 2000, about 150,000 acre=feet of regulatory storeige capacity, 
distributed among eight sites along the existing and proposed aqueduct, will be 
needed for efficient operation of the existing and proposed facilities. How- 
ever, until demands on the system exceed the peeiking capacity thereof, construc- 
tion of certedn of these reservoirs could be deferred. Immediate construction 
of Auld Valley Reservoir is considered essential for emergency purposes to 
provide continuity of supply in the event of a breakdown or plajmed shutdown of 
the facilities of the Colorado River Aqueduct east of San Jacinto, and to pro- 
vide regulation for continuous flow deliveries therefrom. 

Presented in this section eire the results of an analysis to determine 
the proper capacity of the aqueduct for an initial construction program which 
would be consistent with anticipated future demand for water in the service area 
thereof and with econcanic considerations related to staging of the pipe capa- 
city. Also presented is em analysis of alternative plains for terminating the 
aqueduct at either the existing Otay Reservoir or the proposed Minnewawa 
Reservoir . 



Determination of the aqueduct facilities which should be immediately 
constructed necessitated consideration of staged construction of the predomi- 
nantly canal section between Ssm Jacinto Tunnel and the Temecula River area and 
of the pipe line section south of Temecula River to the Otay Reservoir. The 
hydraulic characteristics and methods of construction of these two types of 
aqueducts are inherently different. As a result, conclusions reached relative 
to staging of facilities within the two sections may be expected to be at 
variance . 



=161= 



Canal Section . Iii. order to arrive at the proper initial capacity of 
the canal section, detailed estimates of cost were prepared fo^* two canal 
sections, and attendant siphons, with capacities of 500 second-feet and 1,000 
second-feet, respectively, to Axild Valley Reser/oir and 5OO second -feet and 
&8k second-feet, respectively, from Auld Valley Reservoir to the hegiiming of 
the pipe line near Temecula River. Detailed estimates of cost on comparable 
bases were prepared for the foregoing two sizes of cajaal. A description of the 
larger installation is presented in Appendix B aad the detailed cost estimate 
is reproduced in Appendix D. No detailed description or breakdown of the cost 
estimate for the smaller installation is herein presented but assumptions and 
criteria utilized in preparing it were the same as those utilized for the 
larger installation. 

The estimated capital costs of the two sizes of caasJ. installation 

extending from, but not including, the canal head.works, metering structure, and 

siphon near the west portal of the San Jacinto Tunnel to the end of the canal 

section near Temecula River and not including the cost of the bypass siphon at 

Avild Valley Reservoir, are presented in the following tab^ilation: 

Capacity, in 

second-feet Estimated capital cost 

500 $ 9,216,000 

1,000 to 884 ll,60i^,000 

It will be noted from the foregoing tabulation that a 100 per cent 
increase in capacity from 500 to 1,000 second-feet woiiLd result in only eui 
estimated 26 per cent increase in. cost. As shown in Chapter II, by about the 
year 1981, it is estimated that the additional demand for imported water in the 
aqueduct service area will have reached 500 second-feet of continuous flow. 
The cost of a 500 second-foot canal cojastructed by the year 198I, discounted to 
present worth (1960) on a 3-1/2 per cent interest rate, woxild be about $i|-,U75,00C 

-162- 



Adding this latter veilue to the $9;2l6,000 capital cost of immediately install- 
ing a 500 second-foot cecial installation results in a present worth of 
$13j691,000 for the steiged construction, as compared to a cost of $11,60^,000 
for constructing the 1,000 second =foot car.al immediately. On tlie basis of the 
foregoing, it was concluded that the initial capacity of the canal section 
should he that which would meet demands in the service axea in year 2CO0, or 
1,000 second-feet. It would be possible to reduce the initial construction 
cost somewhat by building only single barrels of considered two barrel siphons 
within the canal section. This saving, however, woiild not be appreciable and 
could be outweighed by costs arising from construction difficulties in the 
future when the second barrels were constructed. Further, the foregoing gives 
no consideration to probable increased construction costs or to increased value 
of lands required for right of way. Thus, on this basis, there would be an 
euivanteige of about two million dollars in favor of initiei construction of the 
larger aqueduct. 

Pipe Line Section . For purposes of compejrative ansLLyses of staged 
construction, preliminary estimates of cost were prepared for pipe lines having 
three different capacities, all of which wovild follow the "W" line from the end 
of the canal section to Lower Otay Reservoir. The pipe line stsiges considered 
ha^ capacities of 864, U32, and 2l6 second=f9et, all measured at the point of 
origin at the end of the canal section, wita appropriately reduced capacity as 
the aqueducts proceeded southward. It is estimated that the pipe line with an 
initieJ. capacity of 861*^ second-feet could provide for imported water deieands in 
the aqueduct service area up to the year 2000 and that the h-i2 second-foot pipe 
line and the 2l6 second-foot pipe line could meet future water demsjids therein 
equal to one-half and one-quarter, respectively, of the total deraajids estimated 
for the year 2000. It is further estimated that the capacities of these latter 



-163- 



two pipe lines wcxld be used up by the yeai-s .1981 and I969, respectively, if 
either unit were constructed in the year 196O, and operated in conjunction with 
the existing San Diego Aqueduct, 

The economic analysis of staged construction of the "W" line consisted 
of comparing the present worth of the estiiLated construction costs for the 
following ccMnbinations of installations: 

1. Initial installation of a 664 second -foot pipe line in 196O. 

2. Initial installation of a ^4-32 second-foot pipe line in 196O and 
an additional installation of a ^32 second -foot pipe line in 1981. 

3. Initial installation of a 432 second-foot pipe line in I96O and 
additional installation of two 2l6 secoad-foot pipe lines in 1981 and 1989^ 
respectively. 

h. Initial installation of a 2X6 second-foot pipe line in I96O, 
additional installation of a 4-32 second -.foot pipe line in 1969^ and final addi- 
tion of a 216 second-foot pipe line in 1989- 

5. Installation of fovn* 2l6 sicond-foot pipe lines in the years 196O, 
1969, 1981, and 1989, respectively. 

The costs of the foregoing ccsiibinations of pipe line installations 
are presented i:i Table 19- Present worths of the capital costs as of the year 
i960 were computed on the basis of Literest at 3-1/2 per cent per annum. It 
should be noted that all costs shoi«i are on the same price basis regardless of 
the assumed date of construction. A continuation of the cxirrent and historical 
inflationary trend would give more adv£Jitp^e to the installation schedules 
involving the greatest immediate or nep.r future expenditures. 



-164- 



CO 



K >^ 



CO 



CO 

c! m fH 

+> iH d (8 

Ifl O rH 

4; •> iH H 

, J«D 0) H O 

I <1>J 0) :3 H -CJ 

|(C "3 ^ *Hl 










o 


H a +j 


Pc< 


O fl O QJ 




«} tH y Qj 




P( 0) l»H 




a) CO 




o 



a CO 

0)1(1) -N^ 

"" m o> H 
0) ^ ^ 

103 |PU "3 

M >> 
■P 
H 



S\ 



^^\ 





d -p 

O 0) 

fj 0) 



0) 

-P 

0) 
0) 



■P 

•H 

O 



d (0 

•H d 

o 

Si '-* 

H 



t 



d +» 

O 0) 

O (D 

(U ^ 

CO 



d 

0) 



d cQ ^ 

H d «) 

O iH 

.CO 0) H O 

4) Q) ;J H Tt 

bO^ rH -rj 

05 !PM a) B <H 

> o 



■p -d 

■H ^ d -p 

u d o a> 

oS tH O 0) 

0] CO 
o 



0) 



i.1:^ 



c -p 



CQ 






CO 

CO u 

d 3 

o H 

•H H 

--I 5 

o 



d -p 

O (U 

O 0) 

CO 



(U 
tH 






M3 
CVJ 



cu 



VO 
H 






CU 

on 



VO 



0\ 



cu 



OJ 
CA 



J- 
CX3 



O 

VO 
ON 



CVI 

CD 



VO 



!>- 
CM 



CU 

J- 



CVJ 



CVJ 

ON 



VO 
VO 



VD 


VD 


-^ 


H 


H 


VO 


CVJ 


CVJ 


CO 



CVJ 



VO 
H 
CVJ 



CVJ 

e 

CO 

H 



CU 
CO 



CVJ 
ON 



VO 
H 
CU 



CU 
ON 



VO 
H 
CU 



ON 
VO 
C3N 



H 
00 
C3N 
H 



CJN 
CO 
CJN 



o 
o 
o 

CVJ 



VO 

« 

oo 
VO 



.J- 

VD 

CO 



6 

VO 



vo 

00 



CO 



J- 

VO 

CO 



CU 



LfN 



VD 
CO 



03 



-165- 



It is indicated in Table 19 that a two-stage construction of the pipe 
line vould he esseatialljf equivalent to initial construction to fiill capacity 
from an economic standpoint . It is believed to be conclusively demonstrated 
that either full or half capacity initiail construction is definitely superior 
to construction of a quarter of fnill capacity initially or 2l6 second-feet. 

Although initial coastructioa c-f an aqueduct to supply half the 
demand in the year 2000 is equivalent from an. economic standpoint to initial 
construction of an aqueduct that would supply the needs of the service area in 
the year 2000, two-stage construction would permit a re-evaluation of the 
proper location and capacity for the second stage of aqueduct construction from 
the experience and knowledge in the future as to pattern and rats of develop- 
ment . It is coacludedj tbere';fore, that the initial construction of the pipe 
line a].ong the "W" line shovild provide for a capacity of 432 second-feet at its 
point of origin at the e.ad of the canal section, with appropriate reduction of 
capacity as the aqueduct proceeds southiiard;, vhich capacity operated with the 
existing aqueduct, would satisfy the estimated demand for imported water in the 
service area until the year 193l« 

Economic Comparison of Alternative Plans for 
Term inating Aqueduct F aci lities 

Preliminary comparisons of the three alternative aquediict routes and 
of staged construction of selected facilities were made on the basis of ter- 
minating each route at Lower Otay Reservoir. This reservoir was the point of 
terminus of the aqueduct route investigated by the San Diego Covsnty Water 
Authority and described in its report of 1955- 

During the course of this investigation j further study was given to 
the location of a terminal resein/oir and several alternative sites were given 
reconnaissEiace examination. As a result of the reconnaissance exami.nation. 



-166. 



more detsdled study was given to the raising of Lower Otay Dam, and to con- 
stniction of a new dam at the Mlnnewawa site on Jamul Creek, a tributary of 
Otay River. The locations of the two sites are shown on Plate 9. 

Frcan previously described studies, it was concluded that in the year 
2000, about 56,000 acre-feet of reservoir storaige capacity at Lower Otay Reser- 
voir or 59,000 acre-feet of reservoir storage capacity at the Mianewawa site 
would be reqxxired at the terminal reservoir for the "W" line. Provision for 
this amount of storage wovild require raising the existing Lower Otay Dam about 
36 feet or to a maximum water surface elevation of 52? feet. The cost of 
raising the existing dam was estimated to be $7>286,000. It should be empha- 
sized that this cost is of a preliminary nature, and that a firm cost of such a 
plan would reqviire a detailed design analysis, which is beyond the scope of 
this report. 

Minnewawa Reservoir with a capacity of 59>000 acre-feet would require 
construction of a dam 175 feet in height from stream bed to spillway crest, and 
on the basis of earthfill construction was estimated to cost $6,185,000. 
Further data relative to raising of Lower Otay Dam and construction of 
Minnewawa Dam are presented in Appendix D. 

Since there would be a difference in the maximum water surface eleva- 
tion in the two reservoirs of 173 feet, the slope of the hydravilic gradient in, 
and the size of, the proposed aqueduct to the north would vary according to 
the termineil reservoir selected. Further, this variance in hydraulic gradient 
8lLso would affect the cost of service from the two suLtemative plans because 
pimiping wovad be required to accomplish delivery to certain areas for the plan 
utilizing Otay Reservoir but not for the plan utilizing Minnewawa Reservoir. 
Proper comparison of the costs and accomplishments of the alternative systems 
therefore required consideration of not only dam and reservoir costs, but also 
the attendant costs of aqueducts, pumping plants, and energy required to 

accomplish water deliveries at the necessary hydraiiLic grade line elevations. 

-167- 



This comparison was made for the "W" Ixae constructed with a capacity- 
necessary to supply one-half the seiryice area demand estimated for the year 
2000, considered to be the reqxiix'sment in the year 196I, and also for the addi- 
tional aq^ueduct facilities needed to provide for the remaining half of the 
service area demand assviming that these latter facilities would be constructed 
by the year 198I. It was found that^ depending on the terminal point selected, 
the size of aqueduct woxild be affected as far north as the vicinity of Vista 
near the point of turnout for the lateral to Oceanside. Also affected would be 
the cost of the lateral leading to Otay Municipal Water District and Imperial. 
The comparison was made on the basis of present worth of capital costs of con- 
struction items and of smnual costs of operation, maintenance, emd replacements 
for pumping facilities including power costs in perpetviity. The present worth 
computations were based on an interest rate of 3-1/2 per cent per aonim. The 
restilts of the comparison axe set forth in Table 20. 

It will be noted in Table 20 that, from the standpoint of cost, there 
would be an advantage of about $2,200,000 in favor of the aqueduct terminating 
at Lower Otay Reservoir rather than Minnewawa Reser^/oir. There are, however, 
certain other factors not susceptible of economic evaluation which should be 
considered in making a choice between the two points of terminus. 

Although, on the basis of studies described hereinbefore, the City of 
San Diego and Helix Irrigation District woxild not require delivery of aqueduct 
water frcM either Lower Otay Reservoir or the proposed Minnewawa Reservoir, 
variations in the pattern of development from that indicated in the demand 
studies would result in the need for delivery of water thereto from Minnewawa 
Reservoir by reversing the direction of flow in the main aqueduct. Such 
delivery could be accomplished by gravity from Minnewawa Reservoir but would 
require pimping from Lower Otay Reservoir. 



.168- 





,5 


Q 


O 


o 








o 


o 








o 


o 




i> 




o 


o 








o 


o 








o 


o 




o 2 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 








o 


o 




o > 


* 


* 


Ck 








Ok 










«k 


•k 




+ 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 








o 


o 




& CM ■»> 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 








o 


o 




•P« CM C 


o 


o 


CM 








CM 


oo 








oo 


o 




O IT ® 


e\ 


c^ 


^ 








Ok 


Ok 








•l 


•k 




sis 


JH 


c^ 


NO 








o 


J- 








ja- 


UN 




o-\ 












J- 


7^4 








•H 


UN 




• c 


c 


•*» 
























-««- 




a o 


a. 






























« •>< 
































"=^■5 


.. 






























g^ 


■y 


o 


o 


o 










o 














1 o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










o 














o 


o 


o 


o 










o 














« +> 




Oi 


e^ 


Ck 










•l 














go 


rH 


o 


o 


o 










o 














m 


o 


o 


o 










o 














s? 


4> 


o 


o 


CM 










UN 














'!J 


Ok 


^ 


Ot 










Ok 














gH 


a 


fH 


t»N 


NO 










o 














C CM 


i< 


•r\ 














c^ 














W ^ 


o 


-69- 




























C4 
































?fi 


•• 


•a 




























«4 O 




« 














■d 














'f> <rt 




■p 














« 














d -P 




o 


•^ 












■•» 














C l< 






4 












o 














1- 




1 


a, 












1 














4. « 




o 
o 














g 














X 30 








». 










o 














+i O 




V 


■O 


^ 
























'H 9 




c 


5 


o 










« 














» 




■rt 


t 










B 












• 


■*-" 




!H 












v4 












to 


TJ O 









a 










iH 












•o 


o s 




« 


O 


w 
























+> XI 




o. 


o 


fl> 










e 












d e 


■p 


•H 


&^ 


IX 










Oo 












g 


'H 3 


M 


O. 














Tf 














§s 




«-■ 


s 


■a 










o. 












■O 


in 




o 


S 


«j 










Vi 












to 


3| 






g 










o 
a 












«1 


OB -O 






a 










tf 












■P 3 




•p 


o 






















oH 


01 ;-l 
O O 




a 

•-t o 


■p 

1-4 


1 










■p 

n 












d » 


•H 




J^^ 


d 


» 










•a oo 












IS +. 






(. 


« 










C ON 












^2 






■p f-i 


e 


g 










O rt 
















•r4 


•p 










o 












W^ 






C C 


<« 


•K 










e B 












U) 


.. 


i-i »^ 


.J 


S 










W -H 












65 


,£ 










XI 


.o 








X3 


XI 






fr 


+■• 


o 


o 






o 




o 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


1, 


o 


o 






o 




o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


8 


o 


o > 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


Q 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


IH 


o S 


c« 


flk 


Ck 


ik 


Ok 


• 


Ck 


Ck 


•k 


•k 


o 


Ok 


«> 


^ c 


Sc o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


.^a 


•><♦■*> 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


c 


ir\ 


ON 


C^ 


.* 


UN 


o 


NO 


e^ 


CM 


J- 


•TN 


CM 


oo 


® 3 


> CM 


IV 


Ok 


Ok 


•k 








Ok 


Ok 








Ok 




-p 


t. c> 


*/l 


UN 


CM 


r^ 






1-1 


t^ 


rH 






C^ 


UN 


CM 


d -o 


a) IP 


ffi 


C-J 












c^ 


«H 








r* 


UN 


n 


(< 


-te- 
























-*»• 


r! « 




0, 




























M 


■H 






























fc 


>> +" 






























O. n 


3> d 


+» 








d 










d 










0.-P 


SS 


v> 


O 


O 


o 


o 








O 


o 










4 n 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 










o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 










■fi o 


h O 




Ct 


«k 


*^ 


•k 








•» 


Ok 










l« ^ 


a -p 


jH 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 










« g" 


•» 


$ 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 










o o 


UN 


CTN 


c^ 


UN 








c^ 


UN 










o ^4 


J o 


»-) 






Ok 










Ok 












w o. 


+ 


a 


UN 


CM 


f^ 










c^. 












C rt 


<8 


CM 














CM 












■P a 


,-1 M 


o 


-te- 


























a B< 


fv 
































UCM 


" 


"O 


























§•3 


•H e 




o 




t, 










•d 












•P 3 


■P o 




■p 




•rt 










e 














4 -H 




o 


■3 


o 










4» 












B B 


C -P 




3 


t 






















•H d 


B ■P 




♦^ 


to 


e 




















T3 «> 


ti 10 




a 


o 


00 






















a> to 


o 




c 


o. 


« 






















iH 3 


+3 » 




o 


s 


cd 










g 












r! i; 


^1 




o 






•o 






o 




-o 








$a 




ft 


-§ 


§ 




s 






• 




s 








s*. 




■H 


eS 












a 












•H O 


•o ■»» 




l-t 




i 




Ok 

c 






S 




•k 

c 








a x: 


• o 


§ 


O 


Q 


Q 




o 










o 








■p -P 


+> 3 


o. 


» 






•H 






« 




•H 








■rt to 


^■g 


+> 


^ 


:3 


>> 




•p 






Oi 




•p 








§ § 


M 


o. 




1 




d 






•H 




d 








o 3 






s 




u 






O. 




to 










s s 




«1 
o 


>> 




s. 






t~, 




o. 








s-^ 








o 


1 


1 




d> 




O 

• 
63 


1 


o 


4» 


Hi 

•a 
-p 


:3 


US 


+» TJ 


■p 


o 


>j 


r-l 


B O 


c 


o 


d 


I-I 


c o 


c 


o 


«i 3 


a 


■p 




tt 


o C 


e 


•p 


■p 


0. 


a c 


o 


t 


< 




O .H 






•o 




e <t 




XI 


« 




B d 




s 




•H 


H§> 


iH 


IB 




<s> c 


•rl 


3 




g 

^ 


« C 


•H 


^ 


• • 




■P iH 


O 


Oc 


f* c 


P. 




O f-! 


i* 


rH C 


o. 










ir4 


■P 






a, v^ 






O 




O. -H 














£5 


.J 


iS 


(2 


5 g 




W -rl 


1 


^ s 


1 









-169- 



The greatest advantage of Miaaewawa Reservoir is considered to "be its 
utility in serving the distribution systems of the City of San Diego, Helix 
Irrigation District, and National City aiid South Bay Irrigation District dviring 
em emergency or a plemned shutdown of the aqueduct north of Murray Reservoir. 
The minimum operating water surface elevation of the proposed Mimiewawa Reservoir 
is 615 feet and the elevation of the Luraout to Lake Murray on the proposed 
aqueduct line would be about ^80 feet. Therefore, water stored in Minnewawa 
Reservoir could, if required, be fed back through the aqueduct by gravity at 
rates of from 100 to 200 second-f eet depe.ud7.ag on tiie water surface elevations 
in the former reservoir. It shoold be noted further that water could also be 
delivered by gravity froat Minnewawa Reservoir into the existing Sweetwater 
Reservoir of the California Water and Telephone Company on Sweetwater River. 
This would not be possible from Lower Otay Reservoir. It is, therefore, con- 
cluded that the constru.ction of Mioae'irawa Reservoir would add a substantial 
degree of assurance of continuity of we,ter service ia the event of emergency 
shutdown of the aqueduct, and would permit flexibility'' and coordination of 
operation of the storage and conveyance system of the City o.f Saa Diego and of 
the California Water and Telephone Company for utilization of imported water 
from the north. 

It should again be emphasized that a detailed design analysis of the 
plem for raising Lower Otay Reservoir, xAich woiild be required for a firm esti- 
mate of cost therefor, was beyond the scope of this investigation, and that the 
estimated cost of Minnewawa Dam and Reservoir is considered to be the more 
reailistic of the two. Prior to final selection of one of the two alternatives, 
additional engineering investigation should be laidertaken at both of the sites 
to more closely ascertain the difference in cost between the alternative plsms. 



-170. 



Timing of Reservoir aad Aqueduct Construction 

As previously stated, with the construction of the initial irnit of 
the proposed aqueduct to San Diego Co\mty, construction of certain of the reser- 
voirs required for operation in the yeeur 2000 may be deferred. By operating 
Auld VsLLley Reservoir, to be constructed initially, together with the existing 
Murray Reservoir and by operating the existing Saa Diego Aqueduct to fiill capa- 
city with attendant regulatory storage In San Vicente Reservoir, it would be 
possible to meet the demands of the potential water service area until about 
1975= It appears that at that time axiditional reffalatory storage would be 
required ■vrtiich covild be provided by the construction of either Mlnnewawa Reser- 
voir or the combination of San Marcos, Vallecltos, and Carroll Reser^rolrs. If 
Mlnnewawa Reservoir or the combination of San Marcos, Vallecltos, and Carroll 
Reservoirs were constructed at that time, it wo\ild be possible to provide for 
service area water requirements from the existing and proposed aqueducts vintll 
1981, at which time the second stage of aqueduct construction would be required. 
By constructing the foregoing three smaller reservoirs as well as Miinewawa 
Reservoir between 1970 and 1980, the second stage of aqueduct construction 
could only be deferred about two years. It shovild be noted that It may be 
desirable to construct certain of the aforennentioned reservoirs prior to the 
time they would be needed for regulation of aqueduct water to provide emergency 
storage, or to give more flexibility to the aqueduct operation. 

If the construction of Mlnnewawa Resex^roir were not accomplished 
until 1975 or later as just discussed, it would not be necessary to construct 
the three -inile section of the aqueduct between Lower Otay Reservoir and 
Mlnnewawa Reservoir until such time as the reservoir is required. However, 
until Increased water demands create the need for regulatory storage of 
Mlnnewawa Reseivolr, water service could still be provided to Otay Municipal 



-171- 



Water District aad Imperial by deliTeries from the end of the aqueduct without 
pumpiag, prior to oonstructioa of Minsj,ewawa Reservoir aad the foregoing terminsLL 
reach of aqueduct. la the interim iiatil these latter facilities were built, 
any excess flows in the aqueduct could be discharged into Lower Otay Reservoir. 

Summary of Facilities Selected for Init ial Construction 

The facilities selected for iaitial construction and their estimated 
capital costs, including aJLlowance of 10 per cent for engineering and 15 per 
cent for contingenciss as well as en allowance for interest dtiring construction, 
are shown in the follovriag tabulation: 

San Jacinto Tu nnel to Ead_of_C8jaal Section 

Type of conduit - CsaaJL 
Capacity - 1,000=884 second-feet 
Length - 29*5 miles 
Capital Cost - $13,045,000 

End of Canal Section to Proposed^ Mnaew awa Reservoir Site 

Type of conduit - Reinforced concrete and steel pipe 
Capacity - Ma>:l!a.um 4-32 second-feet diminishing to 

93 second-feet at terminus 
Length - 7'+ '5 miles 
Capital Cost - $52,786, OCO 

Auld Valle y Reser^j^oir 

Type of dam - Earthfill 

Height of dam to spillway - 85 feet 

Gross reseirvoir c£:.pacity - 38,000 acre-feet 

Purpose - RegvL).ation aud emergency stoi-age 

Capital Cost - $6,053^000 

Totea Capital Cost 

$71,880,000 

It will be noted that the foregoing facilities include a pipe line 
leading all the way to the proposed Mi:ojiew«,wa reservoir site. As previously 
discussed, it will probably not be necessary to construct Minnewawa Reservoir 



-17S- 



for a number of years. Therefore, the section of pipe line between Otay Reser- 
voir and the inlet to Minnewawa Reservoir woiJ.d not be necesseiry for initial 
construction. The capital cost of this section of pipe line is estimated to be 
$2,630,000. 

The foregoing facilities of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct selected 
for initial construction are described in detail in Appendix B of this report. 
Plem and profile for the aqueduct line are shown on Plate 2k, entitled "Plsua 
suad Profile", and typical aqueduct structures and appurtenances including Auld 
Valley Dam and Reservoir shown on Plates 11 thro\igh 21. 

Presented in Appendix D is a detailed estimate of the capitail costs of 
the initisLL features described in Appendix B and based upon unit prices shown 
in Appendix C A summary of the detedled cost estimate is presented in 
Table 21. 

The facilities shown in Table 21 operated coordinately with the 
existing Sem Diego Aqueduct could supply the estimated demands for imported 
water in the potential aqueduct service area \mtil about the year 1975- With 
construction of Minnewawa Reservoir with a capacity of 59 > 000 acre-feet, the 
foregoing facilities could supply the estimated water demands until about 1981. 
The method of delivery of water from the existing and proposed aqueducts as 
estimated for the year 198O is illustrated on Plate 25, entitled "Schematic 
Diagram of Estimated Annual Water Deliveries from the Existing San Diego Aque- 
duct and from Proposed 'W' Line in the Year 198O". 

It should be noted that the canal section of the foregoing aqueduct 
facilities, with a design capacity ranging from 1,000 to 884 second-feet, would 
have svifficient capacity to convey, as far as the vicinity of Temecxila River, 
the water needed in the potential service area estimated for the year 2000. 
However, conveyance of the additional water supplies estimated to be needed 
south of Temecula River eifter about the year 198O would require the construction 



-173- 



of the second stsige of the pipe line section of the aqueduct vhich woiild have 
a capacity ranging from k^ second-feet to 9& second-feet and would essen- 
tially parallel the pipe line route selected for initial construction, as well 
as Vallecitos, San Marcos, Carroll, and Woodson Reservoirs with an aggregate 
storage capacity of 42,000 acre-feet. The method of delivery of water from 
the existing and proposed aqueducts as estiinated for the year 2000 is illus- 
trated on Plate 26, entitled "Schematic Diagram of Estimated AnnuaLL Water 
Deliveries from the Existing San Diego Aqueduct and from Proposed 'W' Line in 
the Year 2000". 



-1T4- 



TABLE 21 



SIWIARY OF 
ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN JACINTO 
TUNNEL TO PROPOSED MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR SITE 

"W" LINE 

(Based on prices prevailing in the fall of 1956) 



Station 



Item 



Cost 



0+00 to 17+50 



17+50 to 1202+00 



1202+00 to 12U5+5O 



12lf5+50 to 1586+75 



1 1586+75 to 2100+00 



2100+00 to 2721+00 



2721+00 to 29^5+00 



29^5+00 to 3163+00 



3163+00 to 3269+00 



3269+00 to 3861+00 



3861+00 to 40lf3+00 



U043+OO to U214+00 



1^2lU+00 to k6lk-¥00 



San Jacinto Tvumel to Beginning of 
Canal, Capacity 1,000 cfs 

From Beginning of Canal to Auld Valley 
Reservoir, Capacity 1,000 cfs 

Auld Vaaiey Reservoir, Capacity 
38,000 acre=feet 

AuLd. Valley Reservoir Bypass Siphon, 
Capacity kk2 cfs 

From Avild Valley to Beginning of Pipe 
Line, Canal Capacity 884 cfs 

Pipe Line from End of Canal to 
Vallecitos Reservoir Turnout, 
Capacity 432 cfs 

Turnout (Vallecitos Reservoir) to 
Turnout (Oceanside), Capacity 39^ cfs 

Turnout (Oceanside) to Turnout 
(Bueno Colorado), Capacity 383 cfs 

Turnout (Bueno Colorado) to Turnout 
(Ceirlsbad), Capacity 37^ cfs 

Turnout (Carlsbad) to Turnout (Ssua 
Marcos Reservoir), Capacity 364 cfs 

Turnout (San Marcos Reservoir) to 
Turnout (East of Del Mar), Capacity 
335 cfs 

Turnout (East of Del Mar) to Turnout 
(Carroll Reservoir), Capacity 324 cfs 

Turnout (Carroll Reservoir) to Turn- 
out (Camp Elliott), Capacity 29^ cfs 

Turnout (Camp Elliott) to Turnout 

(San Diego and Helix), Capacity 286 cfs 



$ 



872,600 
6,246,000 
4,701,600 

218,800 
2,633,600 

5,205,600 
7,620,900 
2,286,800 
2,258,000 
1,182,700 

6,713,300 
1,849,000 
1,778,200 
3,524,100 



-175- 



SUMMARY OF 
ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN JACINTO 
TUNNEL TO PROPOSED MIOTffiWAWA RESERVOIR SITE 

"W" LINE 
(continued) 



Station 



Item 



Cost 



i+6lU+00 to i(995+00 



4995+00 to 527^+00 



5274+00 to 5522+00 



Subtotal 



Turnout (San Diego and Helix) to 
Turnout (South Bay aiid National City), 
Capacity 157 cfs 

Turnout (South Bay and National City) 
to Turnout (Otay and Imperial), 
Capacity ikk cfs 

Turnout (Otay and Imperial) to 
Minnewawa Reservoir, Capacity 98 cfs 



Administration and engineering, 10^ 

Contingencies, 15/^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL 



$ 3,557,300 



2,U06,000 

1,963,600 

$55,018,600 

$ 5,501,900 
8,252,800 
3,111,500 

$71,884,800 



-176- 



I 



CHAPTER IV. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

The following conclusions and recommendations are submitted with 
reference to the investigation of alternative Feather River Project Aqueduct 
routes to San Diego County. 

Conclusions 

As a result of the investigation, it is concluded that: 

1. San Diego County is faced with a critical water problem requiring 
construction of additional aqueduct capacity to supply imported water to the 
County at the earliest practicable date. 

2. This aqueduct must be so located as to serve presently surplus 
Colorado River water in the interim \mtil Feather River Project water can be 
made available, and this location should be that which will provide maximvmi 
water service at minimum over -all cost. 

3. Determination of the location of a route for the Feather River 
Project Aqueduct through San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, pvirsuant to the 
directive of Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 19, must await completion of 
current studies of alternative Feather River Project Aqueduct routes to southern 
California. 

U. The aqueduct should be constructed initieilly to the most econom= 
ical size that will provide sufficient water for the growth of southwestern 
Riverside County and San Diego County for a reasonable period in the future. 

5. By year 2000, with provision for an adequate water supply, it is 
estimated that there will be about 2,800,000 people in San Diego County, 80 per 
cent of which woiild be located in the San Diego Metropolitan Area, and that the 
present area of irrigated agriculture may have expanded about 300 per cent to 
about 210,000 acres in San Diego and southwestern Riverside Counties. 



-177- 



6. The requirement for imported water in sovithwestera Riverside emd 
San Diego Coimties, ia addition to the liH,000 aere-feet per year olitained 
through the existing aqueduct, may approach 800,000 acre-feet annually hy 
year 2000. 

7. The rate of increase in deiaand for imported water in San Diego 
and southwestern Riverside Comities, herein estimated, coupled with ever 
increasing demands for imported water in the remainder of the service area of 
The Metropolitem Water District of Eoiithem California, emphasizes the need 
for rapidity of action In constructioa of tJae Feather River Project. 

8. The over-all future demand for water ia the potential aq.ueduct 
service area will be influenced only to a relatively small degree "by those 
factors of aqueduct location and price \>7ithin the limits and assumptions of 
the investigation. 

9. The aquedtict sho'old origiaats at the westerly portal of San 
Jacinto Tunnel and from this point to the vicinity of Temecula River, a dis- 
tance of about 29-5 miles ^ sLoiild be constructed as a canal with a substaaatial 
saving in costs over pipe line const:n.iction. The remaining 7^«5 miles of 
aqueduct to a terminus in the proposed Mia.aew£',wa Res'^rvoir would be of pipe 
line construction comprising sections of both reinforced concrete pipe and 
steel pipe. 

10. Because of the relatively small increment in cost of construction 
of successively larger canal capacities, amounting to only about 26 per cent in 
the increment between 500 second^feet and 1,000 second-feet, the canal section 
should be constructed initially to supply demaiids in the potentied aqueduct 
service area in the year 2000 or with a capacity of about 1,000 second-feet. 

11. Economic comparison of lines "E", "S", and "W", which routes were 
given detailed consideration, including evaJ.uation of xLe cost of regulatory 
storage capacity and of major laterals necessary to provide water service to 



-178" 



existing eind potential water service agencies. Indicates no clear cut advaxiteige 
of one route over the others. 

12. Although equivalent in over-all cost to the other routes con- 
sidered, the Westerly or "W" route is deemed superior from the standpoints of 
ease and rapidity of construction and of the cost of necessary conveyance facil- 
ities to serve that portion of the service area with the greatest potential 
future water dememd. 

13 • Construction of the "W" line should provide for a capacity of U32 
second-feet at a point of origin at the end of the canal section, with appro- 
priate reduction of capacity as the aqueduct proceeds southward, which capacity 
when operated coordinately with the existing San Diego Aqueduct would satisfy 
the estimated demand for imported water in the potential service area until 
about the year 1981, 

14. A two stage construction of the aqueduct is not only desirable 
from an economic standpoint but will also permit a re-evaluation of the proper 
location emd capacity for the second stage of aqueduct construction with the 
experience and knowledge of the future as to pattern and rate of development. 

15. Auld VsuLley Reservoir adjacent to the canal section on Tucalota 
Creek shoxild be constructed initially with a capacity of about 38,000 acre-feet 
as an aqueduct appurtenance to provide flexibility of operation and desirable 
emergency storage near the upper portion of the aqueduct. 

16. By year 2000, regulatory storage capacity of about 150,000 acre- 
feet will be reqxiired for economical aqueduct operation. The required storage 
capacity, in addition to that provided at Auld Valley Reservoir, should be 
distributed as follows: 



-179- 



Capacity, in 

Re servoir acre -feet 

Vallecltos 10,000 

San Marcos l6,000 

Carroll 8,000 

Woodson 8,000 

Minnewawa 59^000 

San Vicente 23,000* 

Murray 6,000** 

♦Portion of capacity of existing reservoir. 
**Existing reservoir. 



17. Construction of certain of the regulatory reservoirs other than 
Auld Valley may be deferred tmtil such time as peak demainds on the aqueduct 
exceed capacity therein. 

18. Featiures of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct to be constructed 
initially, estimated to have a cost of $71,880,000;, are summarized as follows: 

San Jacinto Tunnel to End o f CaasQ. Section 

Type of conduit - Canal 
Capacity - 1,000-884 second-feet 
Length - 29-5 miles 
Capital Cost - $13,0^5,000 

End of Canal Sectio n to Proposed Minnewawa Reservoir Site 

Type of condvslt - Reinforced concrete and steel pipe 
Capacity - Maximum ^32 second-feet diminishing to 

98 second-feet at terminus 
Length - 74»5 miles 
Capital Cost - $52,786,000 

Auld Valley Reservoir 

Type of dam - Earthfill 

Height of dam to spillway - 85 feet 

Gross reservoir capacity - 38,000 acre-feet 

Purpose - Regulation and emergency storage 

Capital Cost - $6,053*000 



-180- 



19. The Metropolitan Water Didtrict of Southern California and the 
San Diego County Water Authority intend to proceed with the financing and con- 
structing of an aqueduct to San Diego County and that this aqueduct would 
follow an alignment generally eqiiivalent to that considered herein but would 
have a capacity of 500 second-feet in the canal section and a capacity in the 
initial pipe line section of 250 second-feet. 

Rec ommendat ions 

As a result of this investigation, it is recommended that: 

1. In view of the estimates of future water requirements in San 
Diego and southwestern Riverside Counties and economic analyses relative to 
initial aqueduct capacity, presented in this report, immediate steps be taken 
to construct the proposed Seui Diego Aqueduct with a capacity varying from 
1,000 to 884 second-feet in the caneil section, and a capacity varying from 
l»-32 to 98 second-feet in the pipe line section. 

2. Responsible local agencies give continuing support to immediate 
construction of the Feather River Project and to future units of The California 
Water Plan which will be needed for satisfaction of forecast water requirements 
in the South Coastal Area including San Diego County. 



-181- 



PLATE I 




PLATE 2 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO SANDIEGO COUNTY 

MAJOR EXISTING WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES 



ICALC or MILES 



PLATE 3 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

SUBDIVISIONS OF INVESTIGATIONAL AREA 

1957 

SCALE or HILEt 




DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

NVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO S ANOIE GQ COUNTY 

SUBDIVISIONS OF INVESTIGATIONAL AREA 

1957 



PLATE 4 




SHEET I OF 2 




SHEET I OF I 



HLAIt 4 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

CLASSIFICATION OF LANDS FOR 
PROBABLE ULTIMATE USE 



SCALE OF MILES 
2 



SHEET 2 OF 2 




INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

CLASSIFICATION OF LANDS FOR 
PROBABLE ULTIMATE USE 

1957 



SHEET 2 OF Z 



PLATE 8 



*A. 



A S N D 

WATER DISTRICT 



20 
18 
16 
































































14,3 










14 














129 






13 4 














12 






















104 










lU 










92 
















8 










71 














60 




6 
4 








42 


















38 


3.0 


20 






















2 

n 





























M 



M 







N 



RAMONA M.W.D., MURRIETA AREA, 
WINCHESTER SOUTH AREA, 
AGUA TIBIA AREA 



18 

16 






























































143 


148 














14 














13b 














12 
























10.6 






10 












94 
















8 










70 


















6 




























4 




25 




-3:5 


















3.6 








2 






13 




























M 



M 



N 



RAINBOW M.W. D., VALLEY CENTER M.W.D., 
PAUMA VALLEY AREA, LOWER PAUMA VALLEY 
AREA, NORTH OF SANTA FE AREA, 
SOUTH OF LAKE HODGES AREA 





















1 \ — A 

/ 
/ 

/ 






1 


...J... .J.. 


/ 








1 

1 


I 






/ 


/ 
















1 

1 


















1 
1 


/i 
/ i _ 


















n 














1 


! A 


1 












/ 








Sr«TE OF C»u 

1 


'ORXI* DE 


..„«-, 




/ 














A 


f 












1.4IER BE 


OVRCES~ 


"~>/ 


f 












I I 


y 












-— r-^"^ 











HISTORICAL 4ND ESTIMATED FUTURE POPULATION OF 
SAN DIEGO COUNTY 





A 


1 
i 




1 


/ , 


®/ 


©/] 


/ 




/ 






/; / 






/ y 






1 






®ASSUH>NI) WATEIt OELIVEBEO 
AT SQUEOUCT IT 115 00 PER ftCREFT 
©ASSUMINO WATEfl OELIVEBEO 
»T IQUEOUCT AT 14000 PERftOBE FT, 









ESTIMATED FUTURE AREAS OF 

IRRIGATED LANDS IN THE 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT SERVICE AREA 



PLATES 5. 6 AND 7 




®.l 



AT |1S00 PE» aC«£ TT 

(B)aSSUMIF<0 WATEtt OELIVEBEO 
AT AQUEDUCT AT $40 00 PER ACRE t 



ESTIMATED FUTURE DEMAND FOR WATER 
IN THE SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT SERVICE AREA 



PLATE 9 




LEGEND 

AUTHORIZED FEATHER RIVER PROJECT AQUEDUCT ROUTE TO 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY 

"S' LINE-BARONA ALIGNMENT 

V LINE-LINE GENERALLY PARALLEL TO EXISTING SAN DIEGO 

AQUEDUCT 

—— "S" LINE -APPROXIMATE ALIGNMENT INVESTIGATED BY 
SAN DIEGO COUNTY WATER AUTHORITY 

_^_ "W" LINE -WESTERLY ALIGNMENT 

ALTERNATIVE ALIGNMENT LEADING FROM EAST END OF 

LAKEVIEW SIPHON 

_— ALTERNATIVE ALIGNMENT TO TERMINUS IN MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT ROUTES 

1957 



KALE OP UILCB 



\i 



-T^- 



CARLSBAD M.W. D., RflNCHO EL CAJON AREA, 
NEAR OCEANSIDE AREA, EAST OF OEL MAR AREA 





















































































Ji±. 


il^ 


-^ 


JIS. 


























J2^ 














_90. 






















-^ 














A' 








.«_ 


















41 


JJ. 


^ 















































RINCON DEL OlftSLO MWD., RINCON AREA. 
EAST OF SAN DIEGUITO AREA 



























































































JU. 


^ 


jn. 








































.BB_ 






















— 














_^ 








-U- 


















Ji- 






Lii. 

















































JFMAUJ JASONO 

SUE NO COLORADO MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT 

































































lii 




















iis 
































^, 












_2zJ 






















^ 






















.! 




















.112- 

















































FMAMJ J ASON D 

RAMONA U.W.O., MURRIETA AREA, 

WINCHESTER SOUTH AREA. 

AGUA TIBIA AREA 



D 













































































































»> 


— 


iUL 


i££. 
















2i_ 










JL. 


























.Si, 


























' 










































1 







M 



M 



CITY OF SAN OIEGO. CITY OF ESCCNOIDO. CITY OF 

OCEANSIOe. HELIX IRRIO. DIST., NA-|ONAL CITY, 

SOUTH BAY IRR16. DIST.. U.S. GOV'T CAMPS 

PENDLETON B ELLIOTT. OTAY M.W. D,. RIO SAN DIEGO 

MW.D., IMPERIAL AREA 8 NEAR MIRAMAR AREA 



18 

? 11 
























































































ii/. 


JiB 


II- 








i .0 

< 

8 
° 6 
j! 4 

2 













iii_ 






















_8S. 




















il. 
















.o. 




.ii_ 


41 




















.ii- 



















































SAN DIEGUITO (RHIG. DIST.. FALL BROOK P. U. D.. 

SANTA FE IRRIG. DIST., POWAY M. W. D. 

EL CAPITAN AREA. S&t^ VICENTE AREA 































































Jii_ 


^ 


























~~~ 


























10^ 




































-IS- 










































ii. 






















_is_ 




LLi_ 























J FMAMJ JASOND 

RAINBOW M.W. D.. VALLEY CENTER M.W.O., 
PAUMA VALLEY AREA. LOWER PAUMA VALLEY 
AREA, NORTH OF SANTA FE AREA, 
SOUTH OF LAKE HODGES AREA 



ESTIMATED MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION 



OF DEMAND FOR WATER IN PER CENT OF ANNUAL DEMAND 
IN YEAR 2000 



1^ 




PLATE 10-A 



LEGEND 



E LINE-LINE GENERALLY PSRALLEL TO EXISTING SAN DIEGO 
AQUEDUCT 



MAJOR EXISTING WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



NVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO SANDIE60 COUNTY 

LOCATION 0F"E" LINE 

APPURTENANT FACILITIES 

1957 

KALt V WLH 



>i 




WLIN£-WiSTEflL« 4LI0NM[ 



— -~ ALtEONitTIVE JU.IGNUE'iT T 



HINNEWtWIk nE^fNOR 



OEPAnTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN C«l.l'onNI* DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGSTION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANOIEGO COUNTY 

ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT ROUTES 

1957 



PLATE lO-C 




LEGEND 
w'line-westerly alignment 
major existing water supply facilities 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

LOCATION 0F"W" LINE 

AND 

APPURTENANT FACILITIES 



1957 



tCALC OF MILCt 



I 




MAJOR EklSTINQ WATER SUPPLY fACIL 



FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

NVE5TIG4TI0N OF ALTERNSTIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO S4N0IEG0 COUNTY 

LOCATION OF"e" LINE 

AND 

APPURTENANT FACILITIES 

1957 



PLATE II 




^1 



TYPICAL SECTION THROUGH 
DEEP ROCK CUT 




'AYLINE FOR EXCAVATION 
XCAVATION 



PAYLINE FOR EXCAVATION 



LONGITUDINAL GROOVE 
TRANSVERSE GROOVES, 
AT l2'-0" CENTERS 

EARTH EXCAVATION 



LINING DETAIL 



CONCRETE CANAL 
LINING 




CONTINUOUS 
GRAVEL BLANKET 



- FLAP VALVE WEEPS SPACED AT 
6'-0" CENTERS ON ALTERNATE 
SIDES OF CANAL CENTER LINE 



TYPICAL UNDERDRAIN 



ii4T( or CAkiro*H>a 

SOUTHERN CflLiPQBN'a DISTRICT 



PROJECT FEATHER RIVER 

«.Tu« SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL CANAL SECTIONS 




ion EaiSTING WATER 5UPPVT FtCILITlE 



FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO S AN DIE GO COUNTY 

LOCATION 0F"S" LINE 

AND 

APPURTENANT FACILITIES 

1957 



l 



PLATE 12 




ir 



)" I.D. PRECAST OR 
NOLITHIC REINFORCED 
NCRETE PIPE 



REINFORCED CONCRETE 



SECTION B-B 

TYPICAL OUTLET TRANSITION 

(CONNECTION TO CONCRETE PIPE TYPE SIPHON SHOWN) 

1 g a 4 6 •FT. 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE PIPE SIPHON 



Q = 684 c f s 
(i = I ft, 
A » 78.54 Sq. ft. 
V = I I 26 fl./sec. 



n = .0115 

r =2.50 

3 = .00224 



DESiONEO 

£.CJ 



DRAWN' 
LSG 






OEPAOTHENT OF •*!£« RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CftLlPORNia DISTRICT 



FEATHER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL SIPHONS 

STA.O+OO TO STA. 1586+75 



SUBMtTTEO .^ . -* 



■;:^ta. 



iamittijiiat, 



DkTty^^^r 



'yn.fy^ 



ORAWINO NO 




LEGEND 

r'u«-VIEST£OLy ftLIGNMEHT 

riNG •ittn sueoLT f«ciLiriES 



FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO SANOIEGO COUNTY 

LOCATION OF V LINE 

AND 

APPURTENANT FACILITIES 

1957 



/Ti 



PLATE 13 



^■ 



y 




/ 



■ -J 



GRAVEL DRAINS WITH 
f' 2' WEEP PIPES AT 5' 

Y'' centers 



12 GRAVEL BLANKET 



-6 SEWER PIPE UNDEROfiAIN 



SECTION A-A 

SCALE OF FEET 

I t>*3 lO 




SECTION B-B 

SCALE Of FEET 




SECTION C-C 



SC*LE OF FEET 



60" X 30" VENTURI METER - . ^ 



-30 CONE VALVE 

- - 60" CONE VALVE 



-STEEL PIPE 




TO ROUND 
ISITION 



BULKHEAD FOR 

FUTURE CONNECTION 



-FUTURE 120 X 60 
VENTURI METER AND 
CONE VALVE 



BULKHEAD FOR 
FUTURE CONNECTION 




EL 1482.00 
13'DIA. MONOLITHIC CONCRETE 
PIPE 



GRAVEL BLANKET- 



13' OIA. MONOLITHIC - ' 
CONCRETE PIPE EXTENDS 
ACROSS SAN JACINTO 
RIVER 



^JAL SECTION 



MtcawT>«« 



OCMRTHCWT Of «*TI» WSOUnCCS 
SOUTHERN caLIFORNI* DISTRICT 



FEATHER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

DIVERSION AND 
METERING STRUCTURES 




I> 



SECTION FOR CUTS 0' TO 12' 





:^^ 



i y^lJL^ L 

SECTION FOR CUTS 12' TO 25' 




-^ i^yiN |>- 



TYPICAL SIDE HILL SECTION 







DETAIL OF OPERATING ROAD AND BERM 



TYPICAL SECTION THROUGH 
DEEP ROCK CUT 



CJWiL OlUtNSlMS »W MtOBiULK PROPERT.ES 1 


b 


d 


H 


A 


V 

















:90» 


i*4 




SS4 




OMI 


12 


»flT 


1140 


!MSt 


9 34 


ta* 


sse 


0» 


oooi 




BACKFILL M1TH SELECT 
MATERIAL OR CBJSHEr) 
RUN BASE 



BOCK EXCAVflTION 



MVLINE FOR EXCAVATION 

INAL OBOOvE 
TRANSVEOSE CROOVES. 

EARTH EXCflVATION 



LINING DETAIL 




E MEPS S 

6'-0* CENTERS ON AL'ERNAIE 

SIDES OF CANAL CENTER LINE 



TYPICAL UNDERDRAIN 



SAN OIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL CANAL SECTIONS 



PLATE 14 



I 



UcENTER LIN 



E OF BRIDGE 



,3"xe"RAlLING 



J 




-6"X6" RAILING POST 



6X8 POSTS 



—CANAL LINING 



SECTION B-B 



^-3'X12' BULKHEADS 



OEMRTytNT OF WATEH BCSOU«CES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA QISTRICT 



FEATHER RIVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL FARM AND 
PRIVATE ROAD BRIDGES 



Mtwtt 
CM.V 



3>l 



«ttlluuS.<^i 



M 



lOtD 



APPROVAL RE col 



OATi x/fA; 



>z^ 



DRAWINO NO 



:L»StlC riLLCB 




HALF PLAN 



..^ 



iH< 



IT' ■ ■/ "■ r 



EINFOftCCD C0NGNE1 




SECTION A-A 

TYPICAL INLET TRANSITION 

(CONNECTION TO BOX TYPE SIPHON SHOWN) 




ijo'i.o. PREe*si on 

MONOLITHIC flEINFORCED 
CONCRETE fl(iC 



MINIMUM BANK 



ORCEO CONCRETE 



SECTION B-B 



TYPICAL OUTLET TRANSITION 

(CONNECTION TO CONCRETE PIPE TYPE SIPHON SHOWN) 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE PIPE SIPHON 



SECTION C-C 

TYPICAL SECTION OF 
BOX SIPHON 

HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF BOX SIPHON 



FESTHCA niVER 
SAN DIEGO AOUEOIiCT 

TYPICAL SIPHONS 

STfl + 00 TO STA 1586 + 76 



PLATE 16 



V e^ 



^^m. 





SECTION A-A 



SECTION B-B 





SECTION C-C 



SECTION D-D 



3ATI0N CROSSINGS 

ONNECTION TO 

> PIPE LINES AS REQUIRED 



(►• ' 



m 




SECTION E-E 



SECTION F-F 



*(« Oltt 



DEPAATMCNT OF WATER RESOUttCES 

SOUTMCRN CALlPOBNIfl DISTRICT 



wojECT FEATHER RIVER 

rE4Tu« SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL OVERCHUTES, 
CULVERTS AND IRRIGATION CROSSINGS 



OCSIONCD 






D^AWM- 
CM V 



.^2L 



"^E- 



."^ x y-L^ 



'»'*y*>; 



on AW mo NO 



Ill 




TOPOGRAPHY AT SITE 



S' CHAIN UNH FENCE - 



CnOUNO SURFACE 






/ 




OUVEl tWUNS * 

r tKXf "PCS »i 

CEHTERS 



i - I I 



SECTION A-A 





SECTION B-B 



SECTION C-C 



BATE sEcnow *-i 



60'X 30* VEHTURI METER--. 
I»"l»* tflHTUBI METED 




LONGITUDINAL SECTION 



FEIThCR RIVCft 

SAN OIEGO AQUEDUCT 

DIVERSION AND 
METERING STRUCTURES 



PLATE 18 




SECTION B-B 



¥ 



"ION C-C 



CALE OF FEET 



■ Tan 0* c*LiroiiH<* 
OCPMTUENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOQTmEBN C&LIPQBNia DISTRICT 



PROJECT FEATHER RIVER 

rc.TuRE SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

CANAL TERMINAL 
STRUCTURE 



DCSIMED 






DAAWH 

C M V 



KKSSBESqrr 



^■. 



'-/"^ 



P0ROVI 



f*--^ £cU^>r-^^i^ 



WTti^/J.7 



ORAWrwO MO File NO 



Xk 






u 



.'■jj 



»a' n.«HN ft OB 



(P LINE OF ca«n 

■T1^ 



-fHi I 



h® 



■^ 



4. 



I I IT 



31 



» 1 



I T'. 



IN. I TT 



I- i 



PLAN 



SECTION A-A 



—w »— 



J 




[-CENTER LIKE OF BBIOOE 







SECTION B-B 



SAN 0IE6O AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL FARM AND 

PRIVATE ROAD BRIDGES 



r^ 



PLATE 19 




SECTION A-A 



=^— ^ 

--f- 






~4- 



PLAN 

SAND TRAP 



SCALE OF FEET 



I I I 4 S 






r- -1 



P 



I TEMPC 
,--TIH 



f 



TEMPORARY 

BER 
BULKHEAD 



Micamio* 



sraoat — 
BUBff 



CidiKlk 



• T»T1 or C»L»«"I* 
DCMItTHCMT OP WATCN WCMUnCCt 
SOUTHEHN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 



••ojtCT FEATHER RIVER 

>iATu« SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

MISCELLANEOUS 
CANAL STRUCTURES 



BuIBTTB 



ot>- 



e:^ 






IMMvlB 



-TOT 



•7?^ 



ONAWMt NO 



1»! 



\ r 

■o '. 




vt-o- 




B . 


— — »--o- . 


1 — - 


— - ■■ ti-tf — — — 


\ 




OF BWiaSE 




1 


\^ 




n -J 










Li 

■ IZ'-O* 


li-0' - 








" 


•■--r- ii 





•—ABUTMENT 




SECTION B-B 



PLAN 




SECTION A-A 



SflN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL COUNTY AND 
STATE HIGHWAY BRIDGES 



^% 




^ANSVERSE SECTION 



PLATE 20 



, S'XIB" VENT 



r 
r 



SECTION C-C 



TURNOUT 






,48" BALL VALVE 



a 



jjrl 



1 



:USHI0NED 
JADINi-, PRESSURE 
TROL VALVES - 




31^ 



GATE VALVES , 



^<HM~ 



=^#^'^^- 



=3^<7r{»^ 



^78 PIPE 



i^- 




,--60 PIPE 



-24" SWING CHECK VALVE 



LAKE MURRAY CONTROL STATION 
PIPE AND VALVE ARRANGEMENT 



DEPARTMENT or WATEfl RCSOUHCCS 

SOUTHERN CflLiFORNifl DISTRICT 



PROJECT FEATHER RIVER 

rt.Twt SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL PIPE LINE STRUCTURES 
AND TRENCH DETAILS 



DESIGNED 



bSXwH 

CM V 



_^ 



SUBMITTtO 



Mfrr^.T 

PPROVAL^ecpfMI 



.M:^ 



DATE 



■^-0-7 



Ml 



OAAWINa NO FILE NO 



CENTER LINE or CAhAL 




.J 



l^X 



jO. 



SECTION A-A 





SECTION B-B 



LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH TYPICAL CULVERT 



r' ^«-o-< 






SECTION C-C 





SECTION D-D 



LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH TYPICAL FLUME OVERCHUTE 



COUPLING SAND. 

r-t r*-'1 '■•, I- e--o-- 

^I- V^ ■• 1 ,-WELOEO STEEL PIPE 




STIFFENER RINGS 



'AT IRRIGATION CROSSINGS 
MAKE CONNECTION TO 
' EXISTING PIPE LINES AS REOUIHEO 



-,.n 



if i -■; ^"'"^ Jl 



ft 



SECTION E-E 



m 



SECTION F-F 



LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH TYPICAL PIPE OVERCHUTE 
OR IRRIGATION CROSSING 



Bwjta FEATHER RIVER 

n.n« SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL OVERCHUTES. 
CULVERTS AND IRRIGATION CROSSINGS 



^i: 



weoBurwMB,. 



'yru^ ^■ 



tSSii^. 



"« M,, 



PLATE 21 





STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

AULD VALLEY DAM ON TUCALOTA CREEK 

RESERVOIR STORAGE CAPACITY OF 38,000 ACRE — FEET 

1957 




CENTER UNE OF CANAL 



HALF PLAN 




FEATMEfi HIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

CHECK STRUCTURE 




PLATE 22 




RANDOM 




EXCAVATION LINE- 

SECTION OF DAM 

SCALE OF FEET 
200 



iyyX\yy''W/Ayy^<\v/A\ V''Ayu\vyAvyy<\\-y^^ 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

MINNEWAWA DAM ON JAMUL CREEK 

RESERVOIR STORAGE CAPACITY OF 59,000 ACRE -FEET 
1957 



I 



I 



] 




PLAN 




SECTION B-B 



CAMAL LINING- 



^^ 



TOP OF MIN CANAL EMBANKMENT- 



TOP OF CkNAL LINING 



^STOP PLANK GUIDE 




SECTION A-A 



SECTION C-C 



SOOTMEflW CtLitQBNIt OISTWIC 



FIATMEn RtVEfi 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

CANAL TERMINAL 
STRUCTURE 



_4;,i- 



«5(Sa! — 



......rrisa.t 



■ "^^aMAi 



PLATE 2 3 



2'- 



2400 




< 

> 



— 2200 



2000 



1800 



1600 



1400 



1200 



1000 



800 



600 



400 



200 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TOSANDIEGO COUNTY 

GENERAL PROFILE 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 
1957 



5 5 

+ + 

si S 



TOP OF CANAL UNING-,! 



-""ff^yr 



-OHOUND SURFACE 



IE 



LONGITUDINAL SECTION 



T5"I0 
REINFOnCEO 
CONCRETE PIPE 



^. \ ~N 




PLAN 



I ,1 

MODIFIED CANAL SECTION 
STA.521 + 98 TO STA.523 + 43 




SECTION A-A 





4 












4 




j i 


A 


, ■ 






1 _| 


1 ir- ., 


Li 


\ 






/ 


'. -f ' ,.' - '' 


_W1 








C: 






1 !- ^- 


I 


/ 






\ 


' ' K " '' 


■-- i 


4, 


_^ 


•■-J^_ 




, „-H,' 


— \Z 


-0" 




„..; .! 



PLAN 

SAND TRAP 



.CENTER LINE OF CANAI 



, -CENTER LINE OF CANAL 






h 




7~^- 



TEMPORABY 
.--TIMBER 

SULKHEAO 



»^rr 



^--HEINFOOCED CONCRETE PIPE 



SECTION B-B 



PLAN 



TYPICAL TURNOUT 



FEATHER RIVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

MISCELLANEOUS 
CANAL STRUCTURES 



''^ 






'"'W-7 




PLATE 24 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO SANDIEGO COUNTY 

INDEX MAP TO PLAN AND PROFILE 
SHEETS IT0I5 INCLUSIVE 
1957 

SCALE OP HILE9 



METAL TRAP OOOBi 



BACKFILL AS 
DIRECTED 

\ -r" * 

V" 


rr*- 


' 


6- GATE V 


ALVE 


■r 


r-^ 



r^r 



w -6*CAST IRON PIPE. 

'^C' Extend as 

' ~ti DIRECTED 




I VEN- 




SECTION A-A LONGITUDINAL SECTION 

MANHOLE AND BLOWOFF 



METAL TRAP OOOR 




PRECAST CONCRETE COVER 



:si 



20' MANHOLE 



8' GATE VALVE 



H 



LONGITUDINAL SECTION 



SECTION B-B 

MANHOLE AND AIR VALVE 




TRANSVERSE SECTION 



,,9'XI8* VENT 



— 




■ 











SECTION C-C 



TURNOUT 



GROUND SURFACE 



-BACKFILL TO GROUND SURFACE . 



-V 



--\"fr 



CONSOLIDATED i3i\ 

OR COMPACTED ytj—iX, 

BACKFILL-- '' .***?• 




^:e::^ 



-—IN ROCK.OVEREXCAVATE 

9'AND REPLACE WITH 

COMPACTED BACKFILL 



TYPICAL SECTION OF 
TRENCH AND PIPE LINE 




REINFORCED CONCRETE 
PIPE SAME I AS 
AQUEDUCT PIPE 



LONGITUDINAL SECTION 



, STEEL GRATING 




VENT 



SECTION D-D 



Q-Z86 C F S 



B4"PIPE- I / 



36' CUSHIONED 
UNLOADING PRESSURE 
CONTROL VALVES 




,46* BALL VALVE 



;bate valves- 




24* SWING CHECK VALVE 



LAKE MURRAY CONTROL STATION 
PIPE AND VALVE ARRANGEMENT 



CT FESTMEfi flivER 

n SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

TYPICAL PIPE LINE STRUCTURES 
AND TRENCH DETAILS 



PLATE 24 







































■ 








1 i 








, 
















; 




: 1 1 : , 1 : ■ 


' 1 












.ill' 


. I : ; : 


I . I ' 










1 


1 


1 • , , 




! 1 t^ 


^a 1 


' 




u 




; ' 




i i imi 


g 


' 


^, 


s 






*? g 


' i !o- 






X 


s 




¥ 


■ ■ ■ X 


S a ^ 


« 


'4 


; 


K 


. 


?i 


3 




i 


Ci 


K 




* 


s 


s 


$ 


n 


So s 




t 




1 


' ; ; 1 . . ^ 


s 






T u X 


iS 


: , . Z 




1 


1 ■ - I 1 




t; 3e 


. 1 z 


r^ i" 


K 


1 ' 1 O' 




a 


1 ■ 1 'g 


p 


* «r 


1 ! ■ iS ' 








1 . 


s 




8 


ff i^p; 


! i i is i 


II ■ r 


^ 


1 |j» I . : 


1 ■ 


i 


5 


i ^ 




' 1 ; 1 S, 1 ■ 


-iJ~— i 


; ; S • ' ^ 


1 , i a - ' 




' ' ■ * 


] . ■ ** , 




f^ -? 




Si g 


;K 


i 1 iPi 




? 


3 




c 


r £3 


j 1 iS 


S 1 S 


: iS 


1 iS . 






5 


♦ « 


?ff 


; : S' ■ ■ 




,S, ' , 


; ;* 




< 


a 


M 


;i] . e 


p Ks 




? 


» ^ . » 


1 :s- 


' 1^ 


1 i 


, ■ 




; 1 ; , 1 


f ■ ■ i ■ 


1 r 




i T 


"Mi::, 


. : :t' 


' ' ' ' i 




: : 






1 ; . ! 


: 1 




1 ;i , 


ill 1 


i :i: 1 


1 ll 1 








i M i ■ 1 




, 1 




; .' 


1 M ; 1 M 


! 1 ill 


, ; i ' " 








!..',) 1 




' ' 1 








1 : i 1 : : 


■ 1 (!. i ' ' 


; . i 1 




I ■ 






■ 1 ! 1 i 


; -■: ;i 








' : 1 1 ! ' ■ 


! !' 1 ■ ^ 


■ i ; !i 1 1 




i -i 1 




i Li ill.: 




' 1 




1 : 1 




' "1 - , 


111!!; ' 


1 ■ 1 ' 






! i : : ! 


l-iji4 1 jii-! ; 


'= ; j ! 


1 ; ;' 




! II. , , : 


]/!].;!' 


'■ ',;t' i ' 


; - ' 1 




1 i 












i 1 !h ■ 


ir, ! . i ■ 


j^r^ ~- 


L_ .j . 


] ■ 










! :i 




^ ^ ■{ \ 


II , '■ ' ' 


■ = 1 1 , 1 


; ! ' i i , 1 . 






: I } 




■ ■ 










1 ; , 






:;!i 1 ' ■ 


i ; ; ' ' 1 . : ' 


; 1 ; ■ . ■ 1 


— i — ^ — ■ — ' — — ■ — ■ — ■ — 


— ; — 1 — tU — ^ — . — i 


i 1 ' 


1 1 I- 


Ml; iT-i-; 1- 




i ; . , ■ 


!-{iii!-i>^ 


:-i 1 . " i 1 M 1 


i ! ; : ; i : ; i 


1 i 1 ' 


; tl-i ■ i- -ly 


j ' 






1 , . 




>+- J 1 






' * : ^ 6.ie^,y 




. . i\ ^ \ \ \ ' 


"i : i " ; ' 




■ ^^tMe.Rr OP 


SAKiALi i 1 ! ; 1 


i - , 1 ' ' 




i ■ 




! { J - ' i ' ' ■ 


1 . ! , , ; 


: 1 : , i 




i ! M 




^ 


■ . ■ : -. ■ ■ 


" 1 ■ : . " 




■[ M : ■ ■ : ; 


: i : 1 ; i : 




, I 


1 




■ i . i t ■ " 


. . . - ' 


■: 1 M_i — ■ 




■ I i ; 




J 




- ; ■ ' ."■:'■ 


■. ■ i ^ ' 


1 i J ; . i ; ! 


i 1 1 1 III 






I ■ 




i -- i i i i - ■ 




.■-)■■: 


i i : ' 1 


_ 


Mill 




f . 


■ 


-i^ ^ i i 1 , 


1 — ' f^ANAI 




— ■ i I ; i i 1 i 1 


- 


1 1 ' 1 1 ■ 


— 1 — '• • < — i » 






- j-;i — T^— 






: ; 1 i i ' ' ■ ' 




! . 1 . 




i : 


.'■'■'■ 


.■■ I : A ' 


1 ; ■ ; i ; ; i ; 




: 1 ! ; 1 .i i : i 


1 






I 






; 1 ■ ■ r ■ 


1 


I . : ■ 


■ ! : : 1 1 : ' -■ 


! 


1:1 








^ 1 - i -i : ■ ; ■- ; 










i 










M i i 1 : ^ ^ 


i : I ; : , ' 






. , : i M M — 


■ i 1 i 1 ' ■ " 


■ . 


eJr-K- 


1 . '■ 


■ ) -, \ ' \ : 


h ; ; M ; 1 • 


1 


f ' ! i ; 


!!'::■'' 


r-""T-T ■- • ^ 

it:;' 


' ' • I ^ 






i,.L.ii.l„.L^,. 


:.',.., 1 . , . 


-L 




.i^j-^j-d^... 




1 1 1 1 ■ ■ ■ 



200 
lEDS OF FEET 




SHEET I OF 15 



i 




I*- 3 

— o 

Z u> '500 P 



Naiurol Ground • 




^^¥^- 



HE^ 



200 400 eOO BOO 1000 1200 1400 1600 ISOO 2000 



2200 

LENGTH 

PROFILE 

LOOKING 



z«oo 

IN FEET 

OF DAM 
UPSTREAM 



ZeOO 2800 3000 3200 3400 3G00 3600 4000 4200 4400 4600 



STATE OF CAUFOBMA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CALtFORNI* DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO S AN DIE GO COUNTY 

AULD VALLEY DAM ON TUCALOTA CREEK 

RESERVOIR STORAGE CAPACITY OF 38.000 ACRE — FEET 
1957 



PLATE 24 




SHEET 2 OF 15 



I 



PLATE 24 









- 


1 




■■ ■ ■ " 


1650 


1 




. 












1 i 1 


; ; , ; 






M j i 1 . : : 


' ' i • 1 ' ' 


' 1 . 


. 1 


1 J 




II;!,' 


i i ! 


. , 


I 






, 1 ! ; • i , i • 


, ' [\ \ ' ■ 


ill! 




, 1 1 : 1 : : ; 








^i — i 


hi' ■ 








'■''■'• i 










: 




1 ' ' 












' 


. M : ; M H 


1 : ; . 






■ ! i i ! ■ ; 1 , 








1 




: ! , 






i 1 1 • 


1 i ■ 




1 ' i i 




1 












■ ' 






. i j. 


i 1 ■ . 


1 i : 


1 1 i , . 




i j I S' 1 i ' 


1 




'-H~ 


i 






^ 1 1 






, 1 


' 1 ! -3 


1 1 i «:■:,, 


i 


, ! ' 


1 . ; J 1 


1 1 E^ ' 




r— , 






1 


r"^ 








j ; IS * 






■ 1 ■ 


! i 1 ii i ! 1 • r;^ 


1 




1 r: ' , 


i i S- 1 ( ■ 
















1 


! : ig -i 


1600 


1 ' 


: : 1 ^ : ^ ^ 


; i j : £■ 




i j 


[ ; 


: 1 , w ' . ' 










] 










: ' S 








■ ■_! ■ ' ■ ■ 






_) 1 : ! Ei ■ ' : 


r 






I ; 1 1 i 












y* 


" s 


» 


lid . ' 


■ 4 ■ 


1 : , : :^ 




J , . a 














: J £' 






5 1 I 


_„ — S-fe- — 


— -s-^ 


-*!- 


-1— 


-4- 




1 ! ; M IS 


— . 


c 


i g, : |: 


; M u ;a 1 ( 




-- 




Jfsfe' 




*M 


-Iff— 1 


:: g j 


— t- 


>. 


T^ 


T 


~ 


h4i-^ 


! 


1 a: , :s^ 






i l| i ; 




^ 




-||^- 




1 


g" 


Ll_-^ 






O 


3 


^ 






^ i . ' lu 










\°\ 






S^^'H' 






!«.« 






: :S ; 






,» 






[ 


-1 -S ' ^ 






"" s ■- 


- 


- 








:?la -i ^ 2 


. Is 


■f . 






•• 




; t ! '+ 




i 1 * ■ a 






IS 






8 g g 




m 


SSF ' s 


S a 


■ o ■■ 


If 


■ t ■ 


t 




■ : : ^ 


1 


< ]' S: ' '£: 




"t- 


1^ ■■ 


^ 


- 






t 


oi n «) & 


M s a 


■ i2 , 




1 1 


y 


^ 1 i ■ ' 5 


! :.:.S; 1 .B, 






^ ■ 






i t ?=,=: 










i i f ; :i: ^ T ;- 


i 1 


" * -.j ; ; : 1 


1 ! ii-ti ! :fj 






^^ . ^ 






,:h i :T!|! 








:' ■ '■ ■ ■ 


M-t ^ :l. : 


i t 


■ : '. I 




1 ■ 


i 


! II " : 


■ 




1 i ;iii; 








- - ^ t I . 


Mi ; '] i } : 


■ t 


■ - \ \ 


! i ; I i*-i \ !'; 


1- 




■ t - 




_ 




M *iM'L 








: . 1 h 




'1.1:! ■ ,1 


■ : 1 ' ' ; 1 ! ' i 








: i! ^ 




: } \ t 








I k ; - 


: t 1; I 


: J -1 ■ ! M U 


j i ; - 1 , ; : 1 i 


; _ 






■ '! 


_i 


- 1 ^* ' 




i* ■ ■ 




|i t 1 : 




! *: 


1 - 


i\ 


1 ! 1 : H 


1 i , t) Ml! 






"^ 


1 




J ' 'l 






:*:*:*; i : ' 


X ' / 


■ i 1, : ■ li 1 '■ 


4 -rr : ' i i if 


i 1 i T 1 fU 


!." 






m in- 




T^ fl it t 




-\ 


1:1,1, ! : ■ 1 




I i 1 : i 


M- - . i ; I 


: j - ' 1 '"' 




. 


... 


« 1 


■ 


J ,lll 








X It. 


: 1' ' 1 ■ 1 


1 - ■ ! : i |l 


r, i 1,1 


; ^ 


1 1 . 


! i 11 


1500 


V 




A_x-v " 


1 1 /\ 1 /■ 


[ '. i j»+ . 1 f\i I ' 




i - A ^ ' rV 


, . 1 . J '1 !■ 




KlA'' ,._^ 


. - ^11 _^ 


'^J^ '/\'f 


\ \ 1^ if * 




* ' =A*/n 


.>f\J-+x:* 


-Vf 








\'/ 


■\ ^7 W 


\ ' /I /''^'^ \ ' 




|I/-^J^\'/ 


^i rTTy 








yic"--i 


— -^ V 


— ^ ^ 1 


M ' \' 




^Im y : 


liil;-^ ^- 




eUMJa^ 


i^ ! 


r*^EL.K7 


LSI 




-;WT ■ — ; — V 




^r 


^ ^i: 
















iJti^J-: • . . 




i/ 1 


^VEL.i4T«4 i : ; 










' - r ■ ' ■ 


■ i ; ! ■ . i - 


: ; r3'- -'■'.-. 


■: E ...r ■ : -i 


1 1 


■ . t " ■ ■ ■ : i 










8 S : : 




_ J : , . ; 


': '. \ . i Ji i ' . ' 


M ^ ^ ^ ^ g 


<z> 




-■- i i i t 








i 3 ^ ;^ 


■.'..]'- 


r i -i t i 5 : 


I ^- :i--^ 




i 1 ; 4r f i » . .* 


; .1 • . = 


\-\ 


-i-t-l 










S 8 , ; : i 


] -.-l I : \ ■ ■ ■ 




t iaii :m ! ^ ; 


i- i ] M t : -p 






; 4- 










1 1 !-[-+ ! 


t:^M-- i ; ; : 


r rri i I i 


!.-■ a-:^ 




i fjiii-i §t 12 




i. i - 


zr-i: 




": 






i 1 ; ■ ' ^ 












-"" -i 


i- 


1 








": " 


11" 






■ ": y~i ~ : ; - 


M ri ! ij" .J ' 












-1 i»— — 








^ ' , . '■"I 1 H 








.1 BOX TYP 


: siPH(»i 




■ : ' . . 


: ; 14 : T. 


BOX TYPE SIPHON 






"T"*? — TZ 


TWO-tO' 


(8'BAPHEt^ 


1 : ; : ■ . 


. ll A I . 


: , ; : ■ : 


TWQ-tQ'Xe'BARWLS i:! : i 1 ^ 






— ^ 




■ - 'i •=■ ■' — '■ — ■ — - '■-f'- 


1 .i-=U4-i- : ; 




; .; i_: ^_ i i | p= 


"^1' : ■ ^ t ' f • 








i^M^ ,; , , 








j ^u,fc;mft..i jj. 


r^,iJ,i5^-i4 1, . 


1400 



9S0 

REDS OF FEET 




7?^ 



SC»tl Of FEET 



OEPAMTMCMT Of W«TE<t KIOUACCS 
SOUTHERN CftL'FQBMft DISTRICT 



MIOJICI FEATHER RIVER 

•i.TMt SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 750+00 TO STA 1125 + 00 




SHEET 3 OF 15 



2400 






;?-Hfe^! 


plpili?^-;, 


a 






1? 






! 












UJ 










s 










31 

1 


2200 


1 — 




■ I "I 
! 1,1 

111 


1 ^ 






1 

V 

13 












. 


5 




I iili 1 


i 




1 


if— 

ii 




< 
"^ o 

o 
o 




s 


Ii 






? 


2000 






3 »« 
t~ — 

O 

a 

+ 




^ 

% >■ 

O "j 

? 3 


^ 


>- 

3 






bJ 


1 

3 




1- 

Z> -1 






o 




1 %^oS^ 


1 H 




-f-- 




1 


S15 

i 




m 

1 




< 

i 


1 




i 


u. 
o 

1- 


1800 


i - 

t 


SUN JAC NTO VALLEY 


_ 


T § 

1 B 

L.J __£ 




:J- 

$ 

X 

u 

z 


1 

1 

f 




^3 


O 
O 

+ 
ID 




n 

o O 






o 




e i: 

§ 1 


o 
o 

+ 




' 3 

§ 

+ 




o 
o 

+ 
2 


a 
o 

+ 




s 


8 

+ 
lO 


1 ^— 

o 

o 

+ 

at 

s 






1 

g 

1 






II ■ ' 1 gl ■ E 






5 1 ! ! 17 


K 


\K 


T 
1 

1 














7 '7 1 7 T ' 




7 






1 «~M_ 


■ 1 1 °' ^1 






1 


\ 


1 
1 

! ^" 


' 




' 






1400 


; pWATER 

i I 


SURFACE 














■^^ 


1 > " 


1 
1 

YDRAULIC 

1 


GRADIENT 


1 




1 


1 1 








1000 


— 


1 


__- 








~-"1 







T" 








1*/ 


rV 




A 
\ 








* 


A 


z 


1 / V 


\l\ 


1 


rWi:= 






600 


-"" ' 
























- 


h- 


r^ 


- 


-i~ 


IT 


At 


^ 


o S 


1 A ft 




L 




■ 600 


-- 


-"1 
















. J ; ; ■ ,. : ' ; '1 j 


T'--:-;" 


:: 


;-:. 




















1 


\ 


1+ 


1 


tU4^ 


\l 






iA 


5 i 


H 


tr~ 


1 


V 


























\ ^ 


5 










1 










S 


















^ 


', 








400 


: 






1 








1 






1 ! 














J ^ __^ 


/ 




















! ■ 




& 










^r^ 














t ' ^ 












V 


u 












L 


- . . 






200 
















1 








\I 






















1 i 




1, 


. 


































! 1 




1 TUNNE 


-.FLUnEAto Simon 
















! 








[ 


1 ., „ ' 1 






































1 


! 1 1 












1 1 


















1 


Q=4-i2C.FS ! 


1 


' 1 ■'"'"^ 








1 








r 1 ; '■ 1 ' '1 1 1 ■ : 


1 


1 
1^ 


- 










1 L 


Q"432CF< 




' ' 








-335 




L_ 






" 




ri ■ - —■- 1 




1 CFS- i 



STATIONING 



IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 



iQ^ 



1600 




DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 



INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO SAN OIEGO COUNTY 



GENERAL PROFILE 



PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

1957 



^ll^_ 



PLATE 24 




DS OF FEET 




HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES | 




Q 


r 


n 


S 


4 


1000 


584 


014 


0001 


4 


884 


5 56 


014 


0001 



OCMATMCNT Of WATEft flESOUIKCS 

SOUTHERN CALigQBNia DISTRICT 



FE4THER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 1125+00 TO STA 1475+00 



OCSIGMED 



wuss 

JPB a EEA 



SUBMITTED- ^1, i' 

*■«-■«« k P«Hri 



SRWiiBiBm 



IZ. 



MMCMDt 

' S.wj.jl't K- - 



CMECKEO /^ lAPPROVAI. RE^yUCt«DED 



OATB //^i/-*'; 



■?:>'^*.^ 



DRAWING NO 



SHEET 4 OF 15 



II 



fc 



i 



i 



PLATE 24 































1 . : 














■ ' 1 ' ' 


1 > ^ 1 


■ I : . ' ■ 














. : 1 : ■ ■ i 














1 ; , 1 ; 




' 1 1 








' 








, 1 1 f ' 










( ■ ■ 


■ ' 1 r 




' 1 . : 








' 




lilt' 




, 1 ■■ • ■ 














1 ■ 


. 1 . 1 . ■ 












{!'■.: 
















1 1 : 




i ! ! i 1 : 








' 






'. 1 




! : [ i 












111:; 








1 - i ! ■ 










i ' ■ ' ' 




; ■ : lit 














■ i 1 1 




' 1 1 1 i ; 






^- ! , : i . 1 1 








1 


1 : i 1 1 1 1 ■ 




, 1 _ 1 ; 1 i ' 


T-i : • 1 i , 








. I 




' I '. ', 




■ ;. ! ■ 












1 ■ ; ; 


1 ! . t ■ ' ; ! 


1 ' 1 ' 1 












i 1 ■ 




1 i ! ■ 1 






^HYOKAULIC iJHt 


DILNl 






'■.,':.:, 






■^ 




■ ' 


— '— — . ' ' 






1 \ iL.«jat9^ ■ 




^ 


^ X u 


-"-^- 1~ 


, j • ' : - 


— f-r- r— 


' : . i 1 : ; t^ 
J 1 : i ; : I ; , 




= 


=1 


^ 


1 "A 

' 1 ■ 1 


z 


T - 


5 S £3 


I 


■ i ' ' ■ ' ■ fe 






• 








- 1 , i 




i 5 


5 m <> 


i 


; I 1 ■ - j^ 


: 111 < ' ' ,:- 


i i : M ! i i 1 










! : . 1 


~r' 


T 


' A 


! 1 .' : 1 


5 


J. 


■■ 


S 










' ' i 


1 


' / 


V ' /n 


: i ^GROUNC 


SURFACE 


n 


3! 


.» 












1 ■ 




-^. . 1 / 


\ ' / ^ 


^i.*-^^ 1 




,t , ^ 


(E 


$d 




^ i , - ■ 1 




'S. ^1/ 


V 1 / — 


• x^ -, 1 


. ', i ' J '■ 




1 t "^3 


■ ! ' 






Ni'^ 


1 i r^ ^ : 1 


: ' i 1 i 


!jA' 1 • . ' ' § 


^ fe si 


} 1 IJ ; 


; 






. i . :\. ^ 


; i ■ ' 






1 ?a 


1 I ' T ' i 






1 


• t ■• i N-^V 




/ V ° 


5 5 


$- 


; 1 1 ^ i > 






, . , . 


i 1 .: J 


~"~-*^-^-V_ : 1, 


/ \ + 


K ^ • 


; M » 










: . : , , ~V 


:V i « 


1:1; T 


■ t |T ' ^ 








i -i i i .; '. . 


:: i :;•-.; L . 




,'!!!:;:' 


i 1 1 i i 








i 1 i [•! : ■ ■ 




■ 1 1 V i ■ ' ■ ' 


II. 1 ^ 




- ■ 1 ^ 


; 


■ : ■ , ; 


" i 1 ■ ■ 






■ 1 jS^ 1 


\.i , ! - 




1 




-.;■[; 




i > ■ 




' ^ . 1 TV .1 


1,1 1 


u-4-H'^''^| 


: 




; ■ ■ " . ' 








■^~iiL^, ^,- 


















1 






— >>KM t »* 


TiTrr ' ~ 


' } . ~- 






■It'" 










'IPE 




'.'.]■'■,'[ 


: : ;. ■ ': -"T-- 




\ \ ^ : - -"^ 


■ ' -I 




- , 










!.,,;;:- 




J : . ; 


i i - 


1 ' • " 








. , , , 






;'■;■■! ^ : 


i t 














- 1 


■ j ' - ^ ' - - ' 


■, i ' - 










1 i 1 ; , ■ 




: 1 . 1 ; ■ : 


- 1 i p ; 










..--,■ . _ . 


rl-l4 






,, 1 i--t i.-i : , , 


, i . 





1675 
OS OF FEET 




PIPE LINE HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES ] 


DIA. 





A 


V 


n 


r 


S 


90" 


432 


4418 


9 78 


0115 


1825 


002477 



OEP«STMC>JT OF W*TE« RESOUflCCS 
SOUTHERN CflLlFOWUlA DISTRICT 



pKojtci FEATHER RIVER 

rt.T„«£ SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 1475+00 TO STA 1850+00 



DESIGNED 
£ t'J 



MA»>t 
EEA 



SUBMITTED- T~7 



CMCCKEO . ,f APPROVAL UecptiMliENOfO tWAWIMO NO FILC NO 



0*TT ^^«i/*-: 



•?»t<u^ 



SHEET 5 OF 15 



i 



i 



. 




SHEET I OF 15 



PLATE 24 

























y 




1 I 










2 


















' r ' 9 




■ ! 








L 


•• 




I 3 












,p s 




' ' i ' E 




Mi! 








s s 




' *■ i K 










•t^* 




'''Is 




' ■ i ' . 






55S 




! ' i g 




■ ; ■ 


: 










, : ■ S 




: ' i ' 








g£ g 


. . , . »J 


■• ■ '« 










' 


5» o 






' + 




' ; I 






Q.«Uj 


1 


z 


J 






»HAUI 


IC GRADIENTv 


I<=^ 




> 


(V 




' ' 1 


— 


^ 


T^-Rl .l27Z.afi 


— f- ^ 

j^ : p 


— — ^—rt-i- 


- 






~ 










: ^ ! : . ^ /\ 


^^-<!^-%i, 


if 


' 1 . ■ 


- ' ''i^> 






=! 


1. ■ ■ 1 


' ,/ /I 


z 










t 


« ! 


: S; ; • 


ji fe / 


a » 




' ! ! ' 




t 


' I 


K 






^-^ 


nf 


2 ' It w 














- ^ 


< i 


• ' 3 


^ \ 5/ 


\ 9 J Y ^ 


Pi 


T 


)!; 


S- ■ 








\ "* 


I f 


? : / 


' \ "1 


\ 2/\ Hi, 


1 


J 


f : 


1 1 




1 






y^""^^ 


' / 


■ ■ ■ Ik ' / 


vJ \ ^ - 


3 




3 




• 1 




I 




1 


y 


y. 1 ■ . j/ 


Am 


\i \ ? « 


CD 


■* 


ID 












r 


y 




' ! ■ .■ \ '/ 


It \ ' 


I 


1 1:1,1 


. \ 


\-\ 




"■"■ \^ ' 


^ 


'**' ; f 


\'l 


I \ =' 


1 


1 1 ' 1 ; 




\ 1 




My 




i 


' 1 ; ■ r ' "U ' 


" \ \ s 


1 


1 ; 


4— 


' 1 


\ '=! t, :5: : 1 




V 


! ■ I ■ 


M ! M-i 


■;';-;■. 


: . \ 1 1 


\\ 


V - 








■ ' - ! ' : ■ 


■ i ' i ■' M 


■ j 1 




. 1 : . \ 1 1 


T 


A ; 1 1 :, 4 J jsi : 1 




. ' ' ' 


' : ■ ■ 


■ , n 1 1 i- ! 




■ j-'i 


1 . i 1 ,1 


1 \ ' /\ i 'i ni S: (o: 


1 






— : . 1 1 ' ' ■ ! : j .4- ■ -" 


, \ I 


j ! ! 


I ! \ J yh^ 1 


\ ' Z' ' \ ' " " ' ' -^' '^ 








■ ■ 1 1 ; ! 


s ■ ^ ' 1 ■ I 


: i ; 




' 1 W \'i 




,1, ii 










M ■ + • ' : ! 




1 i ■ 1 j i ■ 


jy . ! t \ 


,1 li ;l 






i ' 


■ "" o ■■■■!! 




] '■ill, 


1 'A 


1 1 ! Mi 








.... 


r ■ i' ; ' 


■ 1 ! : _ "! r ; I 




'. I ' : \j 


A /\' 11 








'111' 




i - i ■ ! i 


( ! ■■ : ■ i , 


: : : : '1 1 ; 




A./ \ \K 














'''•'.'.'.'■'. 


; * ■ ■ ; ' 1 1 


" ! i 1 ^ '\ 


\ mv 








■ ; i ■ 






'..-•■-■■ 


■ ' ! , 


. , { , ' 






'- : I '. 










' ' ■ i - 1 1 1 


1 !\f^ 




< I I 






I . ^ ' ■ 1 i ' 


1 : 1 




! 1 IB' 








« . . i ! 


' ■ ■ ■ • i 1 ' 


• ■ .1 ■ ; , 1 




■ ■ ^ k 








* ■ • :-n 


. : , ■ ■ ■ : 






! r 




. i ; : 


■ : -: ; ^ - ! ■ 


: ■ [^ • 


' ! 1 ■ V ' ; .- ' 






I i ' 


















' ■ ! ' ! t i ,fc 




i _: 






-- i- 






i ; ; j 1 


















' ^ ' 


1 ; I 1 




'- .; ^ 1 


' ' \ '. \ -. \ . \ ■ 




; \ 


,| ; 1 _ ; ; j -, | 


1 i ' 


, . ' ' 






. , M -i .; ; 


.A , , '"■ \ ■ 


■(■:!' 




■ i ■ i ' ! ! ' 1 


. 1 , I 1 ! 




■•1 \\\\- 



20 BO 2075 

OS OF FEET 




OC^ARTyENT OF WATCH RESOURCES 

SOUTM£RN CftLlFORMfl DISTRICT 



«R0JECT FEATHER RIVER 

<e«Tu.£ SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA. 1850+00 TO STA 3225 + 00 



DESIOMCO 

i [J 



SUBMITTED ~7 ' 



;^ 



'itSi>itifia 






APPROVAL REIXUWCN13E0 ORAWINO NO 



APPROVED 0ATEy^»/(7 



SHEET 6 OF 15 



Plate 24 




SHEET 2 OF 15 



PLATE 24 




2425 2450 

TATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 





DCMMTHCHT Of ■ATE* MMUMCCl 
SOUTMEWW CALIFOBNI* DiSTHICT 



M.OJCC' FEATHER RIVER 

n.tunt SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA. 2225+00 TO STA 260O«)0 



SHEET 7 OF 15 




950 

HUNDREDS OF FEET 




TOPOORAPMY ADAPTED fnOU US6S f 



WIKUTE OUAOR ANGLES 



CANAL DEMENSIONS AND HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES 


b 


d 


H 


A 


V 


Q 


r 


n 


S 


12 


10.49 


12 00 


S9094 


344 


lODO 


584 


014 


0001 



FEATHER RiVEH 
S4N OIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA, 750 + 00 TO STA II2S + 00 



(rS3l 



5^ 



TSUTTTrr- 



J/.^-"-^ 



JW53vn im ,/m,^s, 



SHEET 3 OF 15 



1 



PLATE 24 







■ - 




• i li 


., 1 1 ; ■ ■ r^ — r ■-•' ;■ ' ' i' "^'T'l- 






! i 




L ■ 


' < t 1 1 ' i ' 


w \ ■■ V 


I Vi- 




\ 






1 . -t 


I 1 !,J ! ! i 


Mil: i 


1 ! M ' 


1 — 1~ 


) i 


1-K-^ 


^^^^ 


1 , 1, 1 M 


-^TT^--! 


-— 4:^l-'-^-4^:^— -^-if-Ti^ 




_j — , — 


H — 1~ ~^ 


"''',.' ,1 


y^-'^ 


tT ~^ 


j^II^==^=^4^i..__tk^ 










jsj « * i 


r >v 


3 , , I ! ; 


i . ! 1 [ . j 


1 


1 






± _ Q J 






»„ .^' ! ' ' I ! 1 " -V ] 






1 . 


is 2 f 


k i 


1 ■ ^*-^ 


> iV^ >' 


1*^ 1 • 1 ' 1 * ' > 




1 


1 \ 


1 ! : 1 7 


^ ' 1 


\ \ 


t '^^ 


t N^L-^*^ ' ^ 1 * a. *■ "^ 


1 






1 i. ■ \ ^ f 




\ * 


1 . ' 1 


i+'Tv t 1 '■■ !:;! «|; / 


■ r 


1 


} : 


!/. "^ y 


^^-i- 


'■ 


i i 


i \ t Mf^ W / --- 








■ y \ 


: 1 






■ \ 1 ' ' is '3 / i ^ 


* ft 




i i 


\f\ : " r L 


' 1 


■ 




\ ■ ' :?«■"/ r ^ 


5 ; 


i 




: 


/ . ■ " ~- 


" 






■ . V ' ! ^ ' ' / . ' 










Z. ' ' • r f^ 


■ ) = 


L 1 I 




J \ :i ■ IS 1 i/j 


V « 






'^^-'-s.^.^ ■ "f- 


- 1 ! 1 ! i 




, v'+^-o- '' r \i'^ 


T— r 


■ 1 ! 


-; I y 


■7'"^" 


niinn: tiiiRr^rlp! 




y^t^" \h 


1 1 




/ 


: : \ 1 - 




. ; 1 


! '1 1 t 


Ar-I 


! 1 i 


^^.^"^ 


i i - -■: 
-{— 1 1 1 ' - 


-- ' i : i M — r 




--. L__}.^__^J_^^^ i :_j L^ --- 


^ 


^y'Yl 




4-1 — ^-tp, 
H - - --+- - 


- 1 i r 


— r~i — ' — f ^ 


• — --I — j^-pL4-'--^--H — j .__^_ 


■ \i 


~< ; 






; ' 


' ' \ 


~ !■ I 


\ r* 


, 1 ! i 




t 1 - --: -^ 








I • - 


1 ! 


;i: !| - 


- 








\ i 


f 


1^- 


! ! 1 i I — H- 


j i ^--- - 


\ — '-^- 


--i — "-^ 




O 


1 : 








'. 






i ; 




\ i r ---_-i 




1 






j : 




i I : ;■ + ■ 


} : M f 




1 -^- f "^ t" - 


. ; 


\ ■ ■ ■ i 


- ■ i i i 




i ! 






! ! L ; 


■: * • -1" "*" ■ 


1 : 1 j i ! " 








: ; : : '. 


T i '" t." 




. 1 


- r ■ ' 1 - ? i ^ " ■ ■ 




• ■ ■ ! 


it i" - ^ ' " " 






- 1 ...-..-■__.--._ 1 { 1 _ "* "' ^ . " - 




; 1 ! r 


i i i ^-- !"- = , 


^ " i i ' 




:X '- \ - ~ "- ■ ■ 1 - . 1 - _ - _ ■ ■ 




1 i i 








1 " ■- '" i " " - j -^ -"- - -" "- 




! : : 


Ljsb" ID. PiP 


i : ; i 


! , 






• ' — ri — ':- 










; -' 


!■:;;■•;:- 






i ; 






'.!:![ 








: 




_- ! 




' ; ■ i : 




- )- 




1 - "- ---f 


"" i 


: - ■ , : 


. - i-- i ' 






j 


; ■ ' - 1 f -■ 




1 - ! 


1 j ' i---- 


-1 i 


1 1 




- . 1 ■ .. "^ . .. 1 




■ 1 ■ 


-+^-4 


1- 


! 1 




-^^^--4--. — -L-4 K--- M — te=-- 






-m^-^- 


^- - 


- ^4- 


— — ~ — — ^ 


-=--^^-fe-f^-XiT"""^^-" — ~*F«" 



2800 
DS OF FEET 



ZOO 
Z97S 






=r» 




lOPERTIES 


n 


r 


S 


.0115 


1.75 


.002978 


.0115 


1.875 


.001947 


1 .0115 


1.875 


001856 



• Tin or c*L^o«nii 
OCMHTMNT OF WATCH KCSOMCCS 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 



FEATHER RIVEH 

SAN OIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 2600+OOTO STA 2975+00 




SHEET 8 OF 15 



i 



/ 




1275 1300 1335 

STATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 




TOPOGRePMt ADAPTED FROM SSS. 7'^ MINUTE OUaORANGLeS 





.^ 


sc 


»l,C OF FSET 


xao 






CANAL DIMENSIONS AND HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES 


b 


d 


H A 


V Q 


r 


n 


S 


12,0 


1019 


12 00 29040 


3.44 1000 


594 


014 


0001 


lao 


9.87 


11-40 2G457 


234 984 


556 


.014 


,0001 



SOUTHERN aufOIWi PISTHICT 



FEATHER RIVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 1125+OOTOSTA 1475+00 






"""3/ |T°-r.i.gg.rSA:^ 



SHEET 4 OF 15 



I 



1 









































PLATE 24 
















1200 
1000 
800 
600 
400 
200 






























1 






1 


















■""*- 




, 


















Tf f 
















' 






















1 I ! [ 














■ ■ 1 






' : I 'Z 




3 


i 








■ ■ : : ■ 




• 


; ; ; , s 


?5" 


? 






CL KM 


Lir 


i ■ i 




. 


1 


1 !C_ 




■ ; . ' 








-^^ f^ 


' 4l3 


-410I75I ^^ 1 


-^ 




— -1 


■ ~nnMA<k -■ - • 


ELwaoo^^ 






\ ■ \ 1 


— r-V^ 


1 


I ' 








, ; 


. ' i , ■ ■ I 






A »^ 


, " . ! 




1 




i i 1 ';■-!■ ' 


I / i . , 


^ 5 5: o ' 


r \ o ^ 


*. ' : ... u. 


b. U. 


' 




^ ; 1 ; i ■ 1 ! 


/ . . ' 1 


. V I a i 1 j 


\ X S 


K 


>. 5 


>, t>, % 


i 


■ ! ' ■ ' 


, i ' ^ i ; ( -.: 


/].-.[ 


\ 1 / 




ii_l-. --.i-J. 


5 i« I 




. : \ \ ^ , 


! : i j ■ : ■ 1 . : 


'J ■'■-.'■' \ ' 




1^1 




I 3 


* 3- 3 






: M ; M t 


i ] t , I ■■ ' '. 


! 1 ' i ' ' / 


1 ' ' 


^ 


i \ ^ 


« 0< ffi 




. ^ i ; • i : 


1 i : i ' 1 


/\ ':','. \ '■■'. i 


■ . K ] f\ 1 K / 


\ ^ ' 


T II 


1 ' ' ' 




1 . ■ 


■ ! ! j . ■ 


' : 1 . ; . 


' A'/ i'/* 


\ ' ' 


1 J^ 1 


1 i 1 1 






' ' ' ■■ -J 


; i 1 i ; ; 1 . 


] 1 \l / \l/ 1 


\ ' r\ 


1 /'^x ' 


/\ ' i, ' 


' 


*. : 


-Mi i i i / 


■ : I . i . ; . ■ 


j 1 V |( 1 


v/ \ 


' ( , / V/* 


^^ v/\ ' 


\ : 


i* i ; 


'MI- ' : 1 / 


■ : : ' i 1 ; i 






-i : ; 1 ; . 


t ilT \ 


1 ; / \l/ 


■ i \ ' 


' 




1 ' , ! 1 • i ' 1/ 


' 1 ■ 






i j 1 i; 


; j j ■ . S. 


' J^ W 


\' 


! 


, o : ; - , . ! 


1 : ; t-1 ; r ; 


/ 








1 1 : ■': 


'.'■'. \ '' \ 


I ;/ " 


V/" 




■ o ! ; i ; ■ ■ ■ : 


! ; ; 1 i 


/ 






j 1 i 1 . '1 


X. 


1 / ] 






: T : ' M J : ^ 


r ■ i ■ ; Jf : 


i . 1 i . 1 : : 




hit 1 


V 


L^ : 


; 




! I ■ 1 1 ■ i ; 


■ I 'l ' ; ' / 




i I i ■ 1 ■ ' 












. : \ ^ I \ I 


it : : : / , 


■ !!;-■.;. 


] ' i • ' I 




' ' , 






■ 


-.11 i ■ 


■: 1. i i/l 


i : ^ . 


: i , ' 1 1 












1 ; ; \ ' ■■ 


■ - i • ' yj : 




; i ; o 




I ' ■ ■ 


1 • ' 






! . i ■ : 






i 1 








1 1 






i " 




1 1 1 >- s . 


, : 1 ; ; j . , 1 


j 1 : 


« 




1 


1 '; 


i I • ' ' 


-^■*-fc_ 






-t-1 — , : ■ 8 r 


■ • ■ , ■ 1 ■ ■ ■ 


i 1 - 


t ^ 






i . 1 


1 1 ! 1 






~ i 1 ■ ■ 


i- ^-i i M s ; 


j i ! i ■ ■ ■ ; i 






]'■:-. \ ■ , 












: 1 - j 1 . 1 ■ 


■ ; ; ■ i 


' \ ■ ' ' 




I'll' 


■ ' 1 ' - 






4 ■ ■ 


^ i i M i 1 


1 : i ; i i ■ ;. ) 


1 ! 




: I 1 i ; ; , ; 


t r I i ■ : 


1 ! ! i.' ; . . 




' 


i , ; 


: iJ 1 M 




1 i 




I ■ 1 ! I J ' 


! j 1 1 i . • 


■ ' t • 1 ■ ; 


1 






1 i ■""]""! ■ ' 


i ■ j I 1 ■ ; t ! 


j ! 


) : 1. 




i 1 i : 


; i 1 1 1 ! . ; 






i -■ ; ■ 


1- 1 : j 1 


i 1 • : ■ ■ 


: i 














\ 






• 1 1 1 - ■'I'* 


: M T : , : 1 








i 




; 














: . ' I 












\ 


; ; ; ; 


■; j i T " ■ ■ 


It '. j 1 I , 






; , . ' ; 1 ' ! 


1 






' i » 








' i ■ ■ i ' 




. t , 1 




t^^K^ ** '^^ 






■ -l ' 1 








t ■ ' ■ 'I 












i ' 


-i-I- i ; ! ■ ■ 








■ 1 1 : ' ■ 


I 1 




- ■• 




j:i |-;riM 1 i I 


: ■ f 1 








■ i i ' 1 ' i 


i i i ! M ' 










i-4a;i -til' 














i 1 '- ' 






■ . 


-tislit: ! ; , 


1 i ,. .i i 111 




111!: 




1 . 







3175 

OS OF FEET 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES | 


DIA 


Q 


A 


V 


n 


r 


S 


90' 


374 


4418 


847 


0115 


1.875 


001856 


84" 


374 


3848 


972 


0115 


1750 


.002683 


84" 


364 


3848 


94G 


0115 


1.750 


002549 


90' 


364 


44 18 


8 24 


0115 


1875 


001751 


90" 


335 


4418 


7 58 


0115 


1875 


00I4B9 



/^V;^ 



M1C«'>»>0» 




FEATHER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA.2975+00 TO STA 3350+00 




SHEET 9 OF 15 



i 



J 




SHEET 5 OF 15 



/ 



PLATE 24 




1000 sooo 



DEPARTMENT OF WATEM RESOUfKES 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 3350+00 TO STA 3725+00 




SHEET 10 OF 15 




Q - 4 3 i ! CrO. 



-Q-— 394^ Ct^d. 



2025 2050 

STATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 




TOPOGBAPHT iOAPTED FfiOM OSOS T '/» Mlt4l/T£ OUAORANSLES 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES 1 


DIA. 


Q 


A 


V 


n 


r 


S 


90* 


432 


44.1 a 


9 78 


0115 


I.B75 


.002477 


M" 


394 


36.48 


1024 


.0115 


1.75 


-002978 



FEATHER RIVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA. 1850+00 TO STA_ 2 225 + 00 



l"" ^"^9jl^ 



nesihiF^Er 



M:^ 



^ingi 



*l»HOvCD MTT ./ifcU 



S»"iS5~S5 IFILC n6 



SHEET 6 OF 15 



PLATE 24 





DEPARTMENT OF W*Tt<1 BESOUWES 
SOUTHERN CflLlPOBNia DISTRICT 



FEATHER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 3725 + OOTO STA 4100+00 



OC&IMEO 



BHIwif 

JP8 a LSG 



!:#. 



rtuM^ 



ISiS^M 



.^ 






''tr^ — 

IcqmSenocd 



S2* 






APWOVtO DAT* >/u/s^ 



CMAWIN6 NO 



\ 



Mfi FIPtlB^ 




2425 2450 

STATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 




TOPOGfliPHT flDHPTED FROM USGS rl^ MINUTE OJAOHANGLES 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES | 


DIA 


Q 


A 


V 


n 


r 


S 


84' 


394 


3848 


1024 


0II& 


175 


002978 



FEATHER RtVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 2225+00 TO STA 260O+O0 




SHEET 7 OF 15 



>i 



1 



PLATE 24 




ilklt O' CALirOKNIl 

DCPAftTUENT OF WATCN RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA.4I00+ 00 TO STA 4475+00 





HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES 1 


DIA. 


Q 


A 


V 


n 


r 


s 1 


B4" 


394 


3848 


10 24 


0115 


1 75 


.002978 


90' 


383 


44,18 


667 


0115 


1875 [001947 


90" 


374 


44.16 


8 47 


.0115 


1 875 1.001656 



FEATHER RJVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 2600*00 TO STA 2975+00 




SHEET 8 OF 15 



/ 



PLATE 24 




SHEET 13 OF 15 



i 




SHEET 9 OF 15 



/ 



PLATE 24 




■^GR II 



1 : I 



St -.000590 



UNO SURFitCE" 



4+H+ 



! I M 



i ; I I- 



■- 1- 




DCPARTWENT Ot IMATCII MSOUTCES 
SOUTHERN CALlFOHMft DISTRICT 



FEATHER RIVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA, 4850+00 TO STA.5225+00 



OCSION^b 



MBTTfT — 



. Mlwlr 

JP8 a RPB 



APrftOVtD 0*TT r/3t/47 



CM>l»lNO MO 



SHEET 14 OF 15 



^ 



i 




3525 3S50 

STATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 




1WO0UPHY 



ACWPTEO FROM U.9G3 T^ MINUTE OU4DRAK0LI 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES 1 


DIA. 


Q 


A 


V 


n 


r 


E 


90" 


335 


4418 


7 58 


0115 


1875 


001469 


94' 


335 


3848 


871 


0115 


1750 


002.53 



FEATHER RIVER 
SAN 0)EGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 3350+OOTOSTA 3725+00 



vsm 

_£JJ_ 



JSCTTTT- 



JJ;^^ 



ifRiiBoniKir-^p 



iPHtOrtO MTl ./«» 






SHEET 10 OF 15 



/ 















PLATE 24 














■ . 




t~ 






eoo 

600 
400 

200 
n 






^5 
























III ^ 


O 










ti 


1- 


1 






















z 










r. o 


. 










5" 












«z 












of 


«s 












■" s 














u 












^^ m 




^WLL«»T t 


. 700 ■ ■ ■ 












,/\ «^ 














1\A-. 


' ■ 






■^ 














-J 


^ 












i 








>'";,' 








* 




\ 










■4 


/ 


\ 


1 : ' ' ■ 






X 






DAM \ 








/\ 




/ 


y_ 


1 1 [ 






/ 


V /-^ 


\ 




i i ' ■ 






/ 


Nlr^ 






1 1 1 1 








vf:- ' 




, ' ; I i 


i 1 ! ! ' 








■ ) 1 j 1 




■ ■ I . 1 1 1 1 














, . I.; M ;■ i 


M } ' ' 














1111 






' 


■ 




,-.,::]■ 


111! 








i i . 1 . 






1 1 1 












'!'''' 










" 1 . ' ■ 






: 1 ! '. 


^ , 






. ■ ■ 




.:,.,. 


J ! : 








; : . ; f 




















: ' 1 i 














. . - 












. i i ; , ! : 


1 ' : ; 














; i ' ■ 












r' . ', ■ 
















> i < 








. ; ; : 




















1 < 












■ " 










































' : 












' 


' 








r i ' ! ' 


1 


1 










. . . . : . 










■Tan o* cALivoaHi* 
OCPARTHCNT O' WATER RESOUXCCS 

SOUTHERN CflttPOBMfl DISTRICT 



FEATHER RIVER 

SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 5225*00 TO STA.5522»00 



'=11/ 



MCdU^tiutn^ 






•M I'i /-— ^•-»_» 'V-^ 



WwwfT 



7?T^ aC^^i^ 



MAWaM 10 



SHEET 15 OF 15 



/ 






K^ 




^wtt; 



f=4^ 



m 



^: 



x H YO R AUL i e - 




j G H OU M D S U R 




M*- 



a o'" I .D. F IPC 



64 I . D. Pip e 



^--i a 4 c.r.5. 



3900 3925 

STATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 




HYORflULIC PROPERTIES 1 


DIA 





fl V 1 n 


, 




e-j' 


335 


U4a 


871 0115 


1750 


002153 


90" 


335 


44 16 


758 


0115 


1675 


001469 


84" 


321 


3B48 


042 


0115 


1750 


002013 


go- 


324 


4418 


733 


0115 


1875 


001393 


so" 


294 


44 IB 


665 


0115 


1675 


001147 




SHEET II OF 15 



PLATE 25 






AN VICENTE 
4,500 A F 



72,900 A.F 




SAN DIEGO 

METROPOLITAN 

AREA 

234P00 AF 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO SANDIEGO COUNTY 

SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM 

OF 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL WATER DELIVERIES 

FROM 

EXISTING SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT AND 
FROM PROPOSED "W"LINE IN THE YEAR 1980 



1000 










-fs— 






















800 


^- 


-. S— -0 




EUTHl 


°^\ 








BJI^RflULIC (RAPIEWTs- 




> 




- 






EL (fJBd^ 


z 


N?==i 


( 




>. 

< 


\=^=r^ 


1— 


li 


^==F== 












7^^-=^ 


— i — 


— rH 


gfc 






. :>. 




4 < 


r 


q 




3 « § 


o: 


....i? 


— ^ 


-l*-^^i — 


||. 


u. 


... 


S 51 It 


.Ul fc Ijl 


t tH4 




- — *- 


— i — 


i 


$ ^ 


I^ 




i ' ■ > , 


o 




f~ 


1 


1 


— f f-^ 


1 


1 


— + 


g^ ;-f — 


— ^ 


_o 


— ■ — 1 


-J ^-^ 


f— H — 1 






^^-v- 


/ \ V — — ^- 


- ■ JE ; 

3 . 


S- 

o 


ft_S- — 

< m 


-^- 




1 1 1 1 ' . . 


in 


t ^ 


^^-^ 1 ^-L^ 


1 1 1 






-5 ' s 




Q 




3 ' 3 




r « ^ 










1 \ ' 


to 




V/'^\ 


1 1 1 


1 1 




1 3 < J 


« 


m 


< 


o < o 


A < 


^ 




e a / 


; \ ' 


/V 1 








S 


^ — r^ 7^ 


V" N 


1 ^ 1 


y\ ' 














1 J ■ \ 1 


/ \ 1 










V"i — r 




\ 1 y^ 1 


^V ' 






1 








: 1 J ' \ 1 


^ \ 1 


/\i^^ ^ 












-SI/' H- 


\ ' 




^\ ' 


X 


A 








\ ' 


y ^ 


K , Rg 4 t: '■ , . 1 




\ ' / 






\ 1 


/--v h^^ 




— -' \ 


/\ 








\ ' 


f 


A ■ 1 / 


: -^ 




Vy— ' 


, 




V 1 


y 


V- --r 




■. 1 y' 


\ 


1 / \ ' 


Av /v 


1 .^V 1 / 


■ 1 ' ' 


\' / 














. . : ^1 


1 


" 


^ 


1 / V 1 


f. \ '/ \ 


' /^ v/ 


J ! 


y/ 




N , ^ 


'I 


i 3 / ' 




hi 














~v '/ V 


: ,N/ \ 


1 / V 


1 ■ 


v/ 






3 ■ ii: 7l 




u. 








: - 


■ 1 






'. 


■ \ 


/ i ^ : ; 


! * ■ 1 


V 




\ Ss 


■1 1 7 




















- ■- - - ^^ 


'/ 


' '■ ■ . - 






\ Si 


1 / 


Z 












, ! " 








r. - 






. . . 


' \ 


1 / 
























1 1 1 _ . 






\ / 


\ ' / 














1 










'.'■'-.': 






\ / 


\ '/ 


400 










^ 












- . 






1 1- / 


\ '/ 












" " * 










i ; 








"J 


i ■ i " 












. . 














■ 1 : . 




\ 


- i / 


' 1 1 i 
























' - i i i ^ 








. : . : 1 1 / 


; 1 J 1 ' 


P 










■ . 














1 J ; i 






: • 12 


1 i 


Ml:, 


? 








- I - 














: ! ■ ! ■ ■ 


\ ■■- i : . 




, ' 






1 ! 


.1 '■{■■■ 
























, , . 


1 ; ' 














\ ' ' - - 


ijj 






















■ 1 I - ■ ! ■ ' 


Mil 




































. 1 " ; ■ ■ 








- : , , 


^ 


■ ] j 


1 ' " 




















. . 




- . i ■ . 1 ' : 


' " i - i ' 


- ' ! ■ 




■ • ■ 


' / 






















■ 




; 


1 ; 


i -t-i i 1 


, 1 




, 


:/ 


I ) 1 1- 




















1 , 


i "■ ■ 


; ; ; . ; r . 




, . ■ ; ■ 1 , ■. 


M i : ■ 


. ' . ~ 


1/ 


! , . ■ 






















\ I \ -. \ 










! : VI 


1 ' , 






















i f i J - 


" r . 




■ 1 1 




Ml: V 


] 1 


















- 




: J ■- - ■ j. 








111.' 


























\ ■■-- ■ 






. ■ 








































■ i.:j_ \ ' 










■ 






, 


■ " 






« : ^rt^ .- .. 










, i:^i^-.i ■ ■ ^ 
















■ 


[ - 




' - 




w — 








1 i i ■ ■ 




! ! ! ' ' - 


-^ 


- 































STATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 




TOPOCftflPH* ADAPTED t=ROM USOS ''^ MINUTE OUaORANQLES 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES | 


DIA. 


Q 


A 


V 


n 


r 


S 


90" 


294 


44 18 


6,65 


0115 


I 875 


001147 


64" 


286 


38.48 


7 43 


Otis 


1 75 


001569 



FEATHER «tVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 4100+ 00 TO STA 4475+00 




SHEET 12 OF 15 



,N VICENTE 
r.ZOOA.F. 



PLATE 26 



23,500 A.I: 




^ SAN OIEGO 
METROPOLITAN 
AREA 
434.000 A F 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO SANDIEGO COUNTY 

SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM 

OF 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL WATER DELIVERIES 

FROM 

EXISTING SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT AND 
FROM PROPOSED "W"LINE IN THE YEAR 2000 



1000 
















' ■ 


- 










■ 


■1 














H+- 


O 


1- 


-s 








,)•;■- -■ 


, ; 1 


■. 














H^ 


■* 


^ -f 


^1 — ^ 


/ 


.HTDHAULIi; BHAIItNT -T" 






M- 


-t : 




^bL 


TT3:iro 














- 1 


^B^ S~ 


7^ 


— ^T 


— '. ' -" 


, ! 


' 


■ i ' ' : . 


+ .- 




/ 














3 




/ 






■ . ' . i M 1 , 


; 1 


1 " 




y 




=— «"" 


19 




\ ' ' p. 
V 1 


=? . . 


-J — 


S 3 


J^ 










M — ^=^ 


g 




IS 






\ \ ' 


i- — 


r \ ^ 


^j i 1 

— e e— 1 — 


O _I 

*-i 


ft 




- a g g 


h-i — — 


■^MMiM 


w ■ ■■- ' 




-^^-ll:;- 


i . ' i M 1 1 


^ 


— — 1 


7^ 


"V.,^ 


i 5__. 

1 3 _aL__^- 


t 


^-r-r- 


-^ j 


ri 


— ^ 


~~rrr- 


- s- i - - ^ — 


— g- — __, 




!l^ l;- ; 


-I — 1 ' . 1 h : 


M-|— i 1- 


'■•MM 


3 


r- ^ ~^— 


— y~ 








_j_ — ^ — , 


^^^^T^ 


-■^ — 1 1 


rp- 


: - 1 


II i 


1 ■ ■- -. \ 


! 1 )! ■ ! 


! i ' ■ ; ; 


■r^+T^ ' 


1 i I ^ ' 


! M , " 




600 


■ — ^ 1 






— ^V'-/^ — ^ 


^^ XiXi 


— \^^- 




1 < ' 1 


II : 1 


" ; 1 




^■r\A.\\ 


-h-T -^ r 


I : ' 1 t 


MM 


1 ; M ' , [ 


: 1 1 ■ 1 • 




■-"■ 






'I 








,1 1 -1 










1 IJ} t 


i 'fe ' !> 








■ - . ■ 












— N^ ■ — .. 






1 ' ^ 


1 


; ; 1 . ' ■ ! 1 


11 r 


\ ' 1 : il ! 1 ■? 




S ' 1 M { ' 


,_ 




- . ^ 1 














.1 . 1 , J 


-i , , 1 j 1 






S ■ ' 


3' '» 


■ ■ \ 


i : , i 1 1 


UJ 


■ ■ 1 ; : " 


- 1 . j ^ . 










^->^ 




■ II' 


, ■ ■■ 






■■i 


! , i , il 1 i 1 < 


III. ; [ 


i I ' ' 1 1 


"- 




■ i 










\ 


' /^ 


lit; 


1 ; 1 ' 




— ^.*4__ 


1 1 




' \ 


i 1 ■ ' 1 1 


T 1 ■ 1 1 




' ! ■ ' 












. ; 1 


^ \i ■ 


i i 1 ' ' 






1 




' ■ ' L 


I ■ 1 1 > '] ' 






1 , ! 1 


£ 
















><l 


1 ! , 


. . 1 1 ■ 






■ ■ 1 1 "^^s. 




! i ! 'li ' 


>-*>4 


1 i 1 1 1 


( , 1 1 ! 1 














, '! 1=1 ^ 


■ ; ■ ■ 








1 






1 ; 








■St^ ■ ■,— ,. " 








> ■ 








' ' I, 1 ; ; 




' i 1 ) : 


■ 


; ' 




1 


. 1 




. 


1 r^l i - 


-u ^ ■ . 'i/l 


i 1 


■I ■' i 1 V 


' ' ' ' 


400 


: . - - 












1 ■ ■ . ■ 






. L ; 










. ' . i 


; . - I ! 


1 ! i 1 ', 1 


1 1 


M 1 ; 1 


^^ : ! M 






; I 








1 ' H f 1 1 




' 1 ' , 




, 1 ' ' 


1 i 


\ 








1 


' ! ' 1 ' I 






I : ^-Ki 1 -1 




■ , . 1 


■ - 1 






' ■ 


■ ' - ; 1 ■ 






" 1 ' ' 


■ , , . ; 


I 1 




( 










^ 


1 1 


i M 1 


! : ; : Tnl; ' 


z 




1 1 










1 


. 1 . ■ : 1 
















\ ■ 








' 1 M 


1 i ' 1 ' '"-J 


— 


' ; ■ i ■ ' . 








J : 1 ' 




,- . • 


' '" , ' 








: 




1 












■Mill 






1 




< 


i ! i ! ' 












■ I ■ 


I 1 ' 




' ■ ; ' ' 




! 






*-i" 








. , ; i t t i 1 




1 


. 1 1 


' ' 1 




! ' ' 1 ■ ' 


■ : : i ■ 








-t I i 


:£•,■■■: 




■ 1 ! 


i i ; 1 I. 






\ : 


1 > ! t ' 


i 








j r 1 1 1 










u! 


■ ■ . i 
















: 1 


, ! 1 ; ' ! 
















1 


' M M 1 1 




1 


-T- ; ! 1 1 




1 ■ . ■ 


( ' " J 1 






■ " 




' ■ 


... 


: 1 ■ : 






- 


1 1 . f r t ■ 










1 h ! I I ' 




1 T 


1 1 -1. 




■ 


















" . ■ : i i 




1 


: 1 . ■ ■ ' , 








1 ' ; > ' : 1 


1 ( 1 M 


■ ' ' 1 


200 


















' i ■ ;■ ; : i 




- 


l:e 




' : : , i-L- - 


■ f) 


i -i ! ' t 1 




1 1 -J 1 1 ] 






■■ ■ 






















; : ' 1 1 


, ■ < \ < \ 




1 1 i ' ; : 


''Ml i 


i ! - 1 1 ' 




' ■ 








■ ' " 








' 


i ' 
















' Ml M 1 L 










r . 




" li 1 ■ 




. 1 1 I i 




1 : i ' ! 








.11 1" 




















, ■ ; 1 












1 M 1 


i ; 1 




' 


: 
















' ■ , I 






. " 1 1 


1 1 






" ' ; 






■ ; r 1 


■ ■ ■ ; 


-_L"I , 1 


















' M ( i ! * 










■ ; 1 F 1" 


^ j ■ 


' 1 1 I r j 




1 ■ ■ . 




. ■ ' i 1 i 




■ . 1 f : ! M 




: . :■■■■. 


1 1 






' ..;-■■ 








; ' ' ; i 


■ l-t ! 


■ i ■ : 1 ' ■ 1 1 


- : ■ ■ ' 






1 


i , : ; r i I 


' . : .-l 





























i ; 1 -1 1 1 


! , ■ - 


■ : . 1 L i .. 




-,^1.111 : . 1 1 



4650 4675 

STATIONING IN HUNDREDS OF FEET 




TOPOOTWHY ftOAPTEO FROM USC S TJJ MINUTE OUAORANGLES 
HOUSES SHOWN NEAR AQUEDUCT ALIGNMENT ONLY 



HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES 


DIA. 





A 


V n 


r 


S 


84" 


286 


38 48 


7 43 OIIS 


175 


00I5G9 


7 8- 


157 


33.18 


4 73 0115 


1 625 


000702 


1 


£ ° "''n'"' m 


^S" 



FEATHER RIVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 4475+00 TO STA 4850+00 



^- -' rjmi — L 



.'l^- 



(nSSi 



.*i* 






IS 






SHEET 13 OF 15 



APPENDIX A 
CORRESPONDENCE 




HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES | 


DIA 


Q 


A 


V 


n 


r s 


78" 


157 


3318 


4 73 


0115 


1625 00070Z 


76" 


144 


33je 


4 34 


0115 


I6Z5 000590 



E535EB 



ZML 



FEATHER RIVER 
S4N DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

ST4 4850+00 TO STA.5225+00 



Jl.-^ 



HiSUuitJKB V 









9n*^ f 



SHEET 14 OF 15 




iRAWrr ftOftPTEO FHou uses t>, minute ouiOflnHCLES 



HrOfiAUUC PROPERTIES 1 


DIA. 





A 


V 


n 


r 


S 


7B- 


144 


33 18 


4 34 


0115 


1625 


000590 


78- 


98 


33 le 


295 


,0115 


1.625 


.000273 



SOUTHeSH CflL.lFORHia QISTHICT 



FEftTMER RIVER 
SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 

PLAN AND PROFILE 

STA 5225*00 TO STA, 5522*00 






•M. 



iSmsB 



IJBiSvfr 



SHEET 15 OF 15 



EXISTING 
SAN DIEGO 
AQUEDUCT 



AGUA TIBIA 
400 AF 



PROPOSED W LINE 
SAN DIEGO 
AQUEDUCT 



AULD VALLEY 

RESERVOIR 
\3B.000AF/ 



SOUTH OF LAKE HODGES 
4.500 A F 



SAN VICENTE 

RESERVOIR 
\23.000aFy 



PORTION OF CAPACITY OF EXISTING RESERVOIR 




FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO S ANDIE GO COUNTY 

SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM 

OF 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL WATER DELIVERIES 

FROM 

EXISTING SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT AND 
FROM PR0P0SED"W"LINE IN THE YEAR 1980 



EXISTING 
SAN DIEGO 
AQUEDUCT 



PR0P0SED"W"LINE 
SAN DIEGO 
AQUEDUCT 




WOODSON 
RESERVOIR 



" " 



ESCONOIDO METROPOLITAN AREA 
25,500 A. F 



oo.oooarZ- 

^CAP 



SAN VICENTE 

RESERVOIR 
\2 3.000A Fy 
^\CAP , ^ 




DEL MAR 
15,000 A F 




PORTION OF CAPACITY OF EXISTING RESERVOIR 



FEATHER RIVER PROJECT 

INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE AQUEDUCT 
ROUTES TO S ANDIE GO COUNTY 

SCHEMATlT^DIAGRAM 

OF 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL WATER DELIVERIES 

FROM 

EXISTING SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT AND 
FROM PROPOSED "W"LINE IN THE YEAR 2000 



(^ 



r^ 



COPY 



January 3, 1957 



Board of Directors 
Metropolitaji Water District 

of Southern California 
306 West Third Street 
Los Angeles, California 

Board of Directors 

San Diego County Water Authority 

2750 Fourth Avenue 

Sein Diego 3, California 

Gentlemen: 

Pursuant to the provisions of Item ivl9.5 of the Budget Act of 
1956 of the California Legislature, this Department is conducting an 
investigation of alternative Feather River Project aqueduct routes to 
San Diego County. Work on this investigation is essentially completed 
and preparation of a report thereon is now in progress . It is proposed 
to submit the report to the Legislature on or about February 1, 1957. 
Time being of the essence, certain conclusions of our investigation were 
submitted at a meeting of the Engineering Advisory Committee on Feather 
River Project Aqueduct Route Studies on December 19, 1956, contained in 
a "Statement by State Department of Water Resources on Investigation of 
Alternative Feather River Project Aqueduct Routes to San Diego Co\inty" . 
A copy of the foregoing statement is attached hereto. 

We intend to include in our report to the Legislature recommen- 
dations as to the capacity euid alignment for an aqueduct to Saji Diego 
Coimty which would not only convey Feather River Project water but also, 
in the interim vintil such water is available, covild carry Colorado River 
water. 

The present legislative authorization of the Feather River 
Project includes delivery of water via the so-called "High Line" route 
as far south as Horsethief Canyon in San Diego Coijnty. If the State of 
California is to participate in financing eind/or constructing an aque- 
duct, as described in the enclosed statement, as a \m±t of the Feather 
River Project, new legislation would be required reauthorizing the project 
in accordance with the revised alignment. 

We understand that the Metropolitan Water District of Southern 
California emd the San Diego County Water Authority are preparing pleins 
and are considering the financing and construction of the next aqueduct 



A-1 



Boards of Directors 
Metropolitan Water District 

of Southern California 
San Diego County Water Authority 



-2- 



January 3, 1957 



to San Diego County. We also are in receipt of Resolution No. 1355^2, 
dated October 2, 1952, of the City Council of San Diego, which expresses 
the desire for State participation in this project, and reauthorization 
of the Feather River Project in. accordan.'^e with the findings of the 
Department's current investigation. 

In order for this Department to make proper recommendations to 
the Legislatiire in our afore -mentioned report, we must be fully informed 
as to the desires and plans of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern 
California and the San Diego County Water Authority in this regard. It 
would, therefore, be appreciated if you woiild advise us, in time for use 
in our present report, of the intentions of your agencies with respect 
to financing and construction of the next aqueduct to San Diego County. 

Very truly yoxirs, 

HARVEY 0. BANKS 

Director of Water Resoxirces 



By /s/ Max Bookman 



Enc. 



Max Bookman 
District Eiigineer 



cc: City Council 

Citjr of San Diego 
Dept. of Water Resources 
Sacramento 



A-2 



COPY 



January 2k, 1957 



Mr. Harvey 0. Bauiks 
Director of Water Resources 
P. 0. Box 1079 
Sacramento 5^ California 

Dear Mr. Banks: 

Your letter signed by Max Bookman, District Engineer, 
and addressed jointly to the Board of Directors of this Dis- 
trict and of the San Diego County Water Authority \mder date of 
January 3^ 1957 > enquiring as to the respective intentions with 
regard to the financing and construction of the next aqueduct to 
serve the member-areas in San Diego County is hereby acknowl- 
edged. 

Following its consideration on January 22, 1957 j the 
Board of Directors instructed me to inform you that it is the 
intention of this District to b\iild an aqueduct to deliver addi- 
tional water to the San Diego County Water Authority and that con- 
struction on it will begin within the present year. 

Previously, on January 8, 1957? your foregoing letter 
was referred to Mr. Robert B. Diemer, General Manager and Chief 
Engineer. His specific recommendations contemplate an aqueduct 
capable of delivering to San Diego County l80,000 acre feet of 
water a year, the first l6 miles from the point of diversion at 
the Colorado River aqueduct to Axild Valley to be open canal hav- 
ing a capacity of 500 cf s and the remainder to be a pipe line hav- 
ing a capacity of 250 cfs. 

Very truly yovirs, 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 



B y /s/ Joseph Jensen 

cc: SDCWA Joseph Jensen, Chairman 

Mr. Max Bookman 



A-3 



SM DISGO COmTY WATER AUTHORITY 

2750 FOURTH AVSNUE 
SM DIEGO 3. CALIFORNIA 



January 29, 1957 



Mr. Max Boolanan 

District Engineer 

State Department of Water Reso\irces 

P. 0. Box 15718 

Los Angeles 15, California 

Dear Mr. Bookrrian: 

This letter is in reply to your telephone call of last week in regards 
to your letter dated January 3, I956. No action was taken on this 
letter by the Authority Board at its meeting on January 10, since 
action of our Board wouJ-d depend on the action taken by the Metro- 
politan Water District with respect to construction of the Second 
Aqueduct . 

You have received by now a copy of a letter from the Chairman of the 
Metropolitsua Watei^ District giving resiilts of Metropolitan Water 
District Board action on Jar).uary 22, in which the District agreed to 
build the northern portion of the Aqueduct, with construction to be- 
gin within the present year. 

The Authority Board, at its meeting on November 9, adopted a statement 
of policy relative to the construction of the Gecond Sail Diego Aqueduct, 
in which it urged the immediate construction of the Aqueduct by Metro- 
politan Water District; and support for a bond issue within the 
Authority area to finance the Authority's section of the Aqueduct. A 
copy of this statement is enclosed. 

It appears that this might be the answer to your letter, now that 
Metropolitan has definitely decided to go ahead with its portion of 
the Aqueduct. 

Also bearing on this matter, is action taken by the Authority Board 
at its January 15 meeting, which authorised and directed me to pro- 
ceed with the preparation of engineering plans and specifications for 
the Second Aqueduct along the westerly route, as set forth in the 
State's alternate aqueduct route study, subject to such modifications 
as may be desirable in the light of further engineering studies. 

I hope this will give you the information requested in your letter 
of Jantiary 3- 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Richard 3. Holmgren 
Richard S. Holmgren 
Enclosure General Manager & Chief Engineer 



A'k 



COPY 



STATEMENT OF POLICY OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
OF THE SAN DIEGO COUNTY WATER AUTHORITY RELA- 
TIVE TO THE CONSTEJCTION OF A SECOND SAN DIEGO 
AQUEDUCT AND IN SUPPORT OF THE FEATHER RIVER 
PRO.JECT AND CALIFORNIA WATER PLAN. 



1. In order that San Diego County's immediate water needs can 
be supplied at the earliest possible date, responsible of- 
ficials of all agencies distributing public water supplies 
are urged to join with the Board of Directors of the San 
Diego Coiinty Water Authority, 



(a) in securing the immediate construction of an 
aqueduct by The Metropolitan Water District of 
Southern California from a connection with its 
Colorado River Aqueduct to its point of delivery 
in San Diego Coxonty, and 

(b) in supporting a bond issue within the Water 
Authority to finance the extension of such an 
aqueduct southerly through the Authority's ser- 
vice area. 



In order that additional water supplies shall be made con- 
tinuously available when the Colorado River supplies are put 
to fxill use, such agencies are virged to continue their all= 
out support of the State's Feather River Project and other 
featvires of the California Water Plan. 



(Adopted by the Board of Directors of the San Diego Covinty Water 
Authority at its regular meeting on November 8, 1956. ) 



A-5 



APPEJfDIX B 

DESCRIPTION OF FACILITIES OF THE PROPOSED SAN 1 

DIEGO AQUEDUCT SELECTED FOR INITIAL CONSTRUCTION / 



i 



Description of Facilities of the Proposed San 
Diego Aqueduct Selected for InitieUL Construction 

There is presented following a description of the canal, pipe line, 
and storage facilities recommended for construction as the initieul stage of the 
proposed San Diego Aqueduct, The facilities selected for initisQ. construction 
include 29.5 miles of caneil section with capacity varying from 1,000 to 88U 
second- feet, and Jk.^ miles of pipe line constructed on the "W" line with a 
capacity varying from U32 second-feet to 98 second-feet, and Auld Valley Reser- 
voir with a gross storage capacity of 38,000 acre-feet. Typical designs of 
facilities appurtenant to the proposed aqueduct are shown on Plates 11 through 
21 and the plans and profiles of the recommended line are shown on Plate 2U in 
15 sheets. The layouts and designs shown on the foregoing plates and described 
in detail following were the basis for a detailed estimate of capital cost for 
the proposed aqueduct enclosed as Appendix D of this report. 

The canal section of the proposed aqueduct was designed with a con- 
veyance capacity of 1,000 second-feet for the reach from the west portal of 
San Jacinto Tunnel to a point on the north slope of Avild Valley in Section 2, 
T. 7 So, R. 2 W., S.B.B.&Mo, a distance of 23 miles. 

At this point the canaJ. would discheirge into Auld VsLLley Reservoir, 
\rtiich wovild be formed by construction of an earthfill dam, approximately 100 
feet high and 3>^00 feet in length, across the valley at this point. This 
reservoir would have a gross storage capacity of about 38,000 acre-feet aaad 
would provide regulatory storeige, made necessary by fluctuating withdrawals of 
water from the 1,000 second-foot canal to the north, as well as providing regu- 
latory and emergency storage for areas to the south. The reservoir would have 
an active storage capacity of about 36,000 acre-feet if water surface eleva- 
tions were fluctuated between the elevation limits of 1,U85 feet, the normal 
water surface in the canal where it enters the reservoir, and 1,U24 feet, the 
minimum water surface in the canal at the end of the reservoir outlet. 

B-1 



The outlet works of the dam would be located on the south side of the 
valley and -woiHd discharge into a caaeJ. section designed for a cajjacity of 884 
second-feet. A bypass siphon woiild also be constructed across the valley imme- 
diately downstream from the dam to permit passage of water directly from the 
1,000 second-foot canal to the &&k second-foot canal without entering the reser- 
voir. This bypass siphon would have a capacity of kk2 second-feet, one half the 
design capacity of the canal to the south. 

From the outlet of Auld Valley Reservoir, the water woxild continue 
southerly in a series of canal sections a'ad siphons, a distance of approxi- 
mately 6.5 miles, to a point on the north rim of Long Canyon, which would be 
the end of the last canal section. From this point on, the water would be 
carried to the south in a pipe line laid along the "W" line some 7^.5 miles in 
length, teiminating at the Minaewawa reservoir site. 

From the end of the canal section to its terminus at the Minnewawa 
reservoir site, the capacity of the aqueduct would be decreased successively as 
it passed points of turnout. Capacity at the north end would be U32 second- 
feet and at the south end, 98 seco:ad-f eet . The capacity for each reach of pipe 
line would be one-half of that required to convey the quantities of water esti- 
mated to be needed in the service area in the year 2000. 

Canal Headvorks and Metering Sta ructures 

The headworks of the canal section of the proposed aqueduct would 
consist of a short tunnel intersecting the San Jacinto Tunnel, a flume leading 
therefrom to a metering structure, and a siphon terminating in the open canal. 
Following is a description of these works as designed and used for the cost 
estimate. A preliminary design of these facilities is shown on Plate 13. 



B-2 



Tunnel . Connection to the Colorado River Aqueduct wovild be made by 
tunneling frcan a point about 50 feet east of the west portal of the Saa Jacinto 
Tunnel and intersecting that tunnel about 50 feet upstream from the portal. 
This connection wotild be made on the southerly side of the existing tunnel. 
Since it is desirable to bring the water out with a free water surface, a 
tvinnel section of the same cross section as the existing tunnel woxild be used. 
During construction of this connection, a partial flow in the existing aqueduct 
covild be maintained by temporarily installing a length of 8U=inch diameter 
steel pipe in the north heilf of the l6=foot diameter section of the existing 
t\innel bypassing the construction area. Biilkheads would be constructed across 
the tunnel at each end of this pipe. This pipe coxild carry VOO second^feet, 
the capacity of two of the Colorado River Aqueduct pumping units. It would be 
necessary to shut down the aqueduct to install and remove the pipe and bulk= 
heads. The pipe, ■vrtiich would be approximately 36 feet long, would be brought 
into the ttonnel in four 9-toot long sections thro\agh the top of the existing 
portal structure but could be removed in one piece through the new tunnel 
section. 

Flume . Immediately downstream from the headwall of the short tuimel 
section, a 20-foot long transition to am open flvmie would be constructed. The 
first 36 feet of this flume section would be a gate section in which would be 
installed a 13-.foot by 15=foot radial gate. This gate would be equipped with 
motor operated hoist and would be used to regiilate the flow into the proposed 
San Diego Aqueduct. 

Since proximity to the existing aqueduct in this area wovild not per= 
mit use of a canal section, the flume would be extended an additional 292 feet 
to Station U+00 where it wovild join a siphon under Soboda Road and the San 
Jacinto River. The flume section wo\ild consist of a 15''inch thick bottom slab, 



k 



B<=3 



13 feet wide, and 12-lnGh thick walls extending to a height of l6 feet ab'sve 
the floor. At the top of the 12-inch walls would be l8=-iach "by 12-iaeh loiagi= 
tudinal beams. The 12-inch walls were dasigaed to transmit the earth loads to 
the floor slab and to the longitiidJ.naJ. Tbeams. The longitudinal beams were 
designed to take the reaction from the vertical wall and transmit it to 12=i3ach 
by 12"inch cross struts located at 25 -foot intervals along the flitme. An 8-inch 
cantilever wall would extend vertically above the cross struts to the ground 
surface. The walls were designed to withstand earth loads of 30 pounds per 
cubic feet equivalent fluid pressure. The hydrostatic pressure within the 
fl\ane would be resisted by the backfill of the flume walls which wo^old be ccan- 
pacted to an elevation two feet above the normal water surface and down on 1;1 
slopes on each side. 

The bottoms of the cross stints would be 15 feet above the floor slab 
and would provide a freeboard of 2 feet over the maximum water surface. Two- 
inch diameter standard pipe sections woiild be installed through the flume walls 
near the base of the wall and at heights of 3 smd 10 feet at approximately 
5-foot intervals to act as weep holes. Graded gravel drains would be con- 
structed on the outside of the wall .loliaing the weep holes ^ and the floor slab 
would rest on a 12 -inch gravel blanket. A 6-?.nch sewer pipe., longitudinal drain 
under the center of the floor slab would tiischarge through a flap valve into the 
flume section ^en ground water pressure exceeded hydrostatic pressure within 
the flume. A six-foot chain link fea^^e woul.d be erected on each flume wall. 

Siphon. At Station 4+00, the flume section would be transitioned to 
a 13-foot inside diameter monolithic concrete pipe siphon idiich would pass under 
Soboda Road, through a metering stractisre and continue njoader the San Jacinto 
River terminating with a transition to a cama.! section at Station 17+50. The 
siphon would be extended approximately 350 feet beyond the levee on the south 



B-4 



I 

I 



bank of the river to allow passage between the levee and the siphon headwall of 
any flood flows which might overtop the levee. The embankment around the siphon 
headwall and the left bank of the canal from the siphon headwall to State High=> 
way 79 would be protected by riprap from possible flood waters. Further study 
of flood flows to be expected in the San Jacinto River may justify extending 
the siphon sin additional 1,100 feet across State Highway 79, 

Metering Station . Between Stations k-^&O and 6+72 of the foregoing 
siphon, a metering station wovild be constructed. The "water would be measured 
by a combination of three venturi tubes in peirsLLlel. Two of these tubes would 
be 120 inches by 60 inches and the third tube would be 60 inches by 30 inches. 
The 120=inch by 60-inch ventxiri tubes each were designed to measure flows from 
125 second=feet to 500 second=feet. The 60=inch by 30= inch venturi tube was 
designed to measure flows between 125 second-feet and 30 second-feet. Each 
venturi tube would be equipped with a cone type valve at the throat. These 
valves were designed to be used only as shutoff valves to enable the operator 
to select the meter or combination of meters required. The veLLves wo\ild be 
placed at the throat of the tubes so that they would have minimum sizes. Cone 
valves of the type which provide a full opening of the same size as the venturi 
throat, to reduce head losses at the design capacity to a minimum, would be 
utilized. 

In operation, only the 60-inch by 30=inch tube would be used when the 
quantity of water to be dispatched down the canal wotild be less than 125 second- 
feet. When this quantity would be between 125 second-feet and 500 second-feet, 
a single 120-inch by 60-inch tube would be selected. When the quantity would 
be in excess of 500 second-feet, both 120-inch tubes would be used. Flows up 
to 1,125 second-feet could be measured with all three tubes in operation. At 
the design flow of 1,000 second-feet, the differential pressure for each tube 



B-5 



would be approximately 113 inches of water and a head loss of 11 per cent of 
this or 1.04 feet was assxaned. 

The grade line of the siphon was depressed at the meter location to 
place the top of the tube below the invert of the canal at the downstream end 
of the siphon. This would insure a full venturi tube at all flows. 

The venturi meters would be housed in a vault of reinforced concrete 
construction. Structural design of the vault is similar to that for the flimie 
section, with the vertical walls of l6-inch thickness transmitting the earth 
pressure load to the footings and to horizontal beams cast integrally with the 
walls at a height of 22 feet above the floor. Sixteen-inch square cross struts 
would taJse the reactions from the beams and footii^gs, and would be supported by 
l6-inch square columns at the intersections, A caaatilever wall would extend on 
up to the ground surface and a parapet wall would be provided to prevent 
entrance of flood waters from the San Jacinto River. An 8-inch thick floor 
slab would be placed between the wall and column footings and the bottom cross 
struts. A sump woxild be placed below the floor level and a sump pump provided. 

Canal Section to Auld Valley Reservoir 

As stated, the aqueduct would continue, from the headworks and meter- 
ing structure, in canal section southward to Auld Valley Reservoir, involving 
siphon crossings of major drainage channels, timber emd concrete bridges for 
road and highway crossings, overhead crossings for minor drainage and irrigation 
pipe crossings, and turnouts and checks to provide for water deliveries to 
areas along the alignment. 

Canal Grade and Section . At the end of the siphon under the San 
Jacinto River, the aqueduct would enter an open concrete-lined canal section. 
Total head loss through the diversion and meterixxg structure was calculated to 



B-6 



be approximately 2.k3 feet. Adding 10 per cent to this for safety factor and 
an additional O.5 foot to eClow for possible future encroachmeLit on the canal 
freeboard to convey flows greater than the presently considered design capacity 

results in a totsil difference of 3 -SO feet between the normal water surface 

I 

elevation of 150U.7^ feet at the tunnel poirbal and the normal water surface of 

1501. 5*<- feet at the beginning of the csjnal section. 

Two special conditions in addition to the usual considerations were 
given consideration in setting the cstnal grade between its point of begimiing 
and Auld Valley Reservoir. The first and controlling factor was the proposed 
spillway elevation for the reservoir. To develop the site properly and provide 
regialatory and emergency storage of 36,000 acre-feet, the spillway elevation 
was set at approximately 1,^5 feet. The foregoing ass^jmption resulted in a 

difference of iS.^k feet between the normal water surface elevation at the 

I 

beginning of the canal and the adopted spillway elevation, with a distance 

along the canal center line of approximately 118,000 feet. A grade of .0001 
was adopted for the canal; and, additional head losses through six siphons, 
computed as previously described under "Preliminary Design Criteria", resulted 
in a water surface elevation of IU85.85 feet at the point of entrance into Auld 
Valley Reservoir. 

Another special condition affecting the canal grade is the deep rock 
cut through ^ich the canal must pass between Station 910+C'O and Station 9^?+00. 
The steeper the canal grade the greater would be tlie cost of cutting through 
this hill. 

If the plan to build the Auld Valley Reservoir is for any reason 
abandoned, the design grade of the canal should be re-examined. An evalT»tion 
of all factors involved, including the deep cut mentioned above, the size of 
the canal section at different slopes, the length of the canal at different 



I 



B-7 



slopes aid consideration of head loss in decreasiiig pipe sizes in siphons might 
result in a some'sAiat steeper slope. 

The base width of the canal cross section was set at 12 feet, \*tich 
width is considered to be vide enough for efficient use of most excavating 
eqvilpnient. This base width, with a slope of .0001 and. 1.5:1 side slopes 
results in a water depth of 10.49 feet for the 1,000 second-foot canal. One 
and one-half feet of lining were provided for freeboard to give a lining height 
of 12 feet. This res?jlts in a ratio of -water depth to base width consistent 
with general practice in constr:icting canals of this size. A relatively high 
ratio of water depth to base width is desirable since considerable portions of 
the canal would be located on moderately steep side slopes. 

Alijgaaent_ and Cross^ Drainage . Based on estimated costs of canal 
excavation and of compaction of embailiments, the most econosiical depth foi- the 
ca-aol section was determined to be one for which the water surface would be 
approximately one foot above the original ground surface at the canal center 
line. la general, the canal center line was located to approximate this condi- 
tion. However, other factors influenced the selection of silignmeat, such as 
the buildings and property lines encountered and cross drsiinage problems. The 
area traversed by the cyaal between Station 17+50 and Station 600+00 has very 
little cross slope and few defined drainage channels except the drainage 
ditches which parallel most of the roads. Since no drainage would be taken 
into the caaal and the flat cross slope precluded the use of cxilverts under the 
canal, the cansal woi0.d be located with the water surface below the ground level 
at most of such drainage crossings to perjjiit the use of overchutes without 
appreciable ponding on the uphill side of the canal, particularly at the road 
crossings . 



B-6 



Between Station 600+00 aad Station 850+OO, the cajial would be located 
J on fedrly smooth ground with moderate cross slopes and quite well defined 
dralrage channels, near the base of steep hills. The canal would be located 
generally to obtain the most economical depth as described, swinging into the 
grovind at dr8d.nage crossings to facilitate construction of overchutes for cross 
drainage . A siphon wo\ild be provided across Domenigoni Valley at Statiom 
773+00 because of the large flood flows from the tributary dr6d.nage etrea. 

Between Station 85O+OO and the inlet to the Auld VeLLley Reservoir at 
Station 1202+00, the canal wo\ald be located generally on foothills lyiag at the 
base of steep movintainous terrain. Cross slopes would be moderately steep 6uid 
drainage channels well defined. The topography in this area is too irregular 
to eLLlow close following of the contour with the canal without using curves of 
shorter radius them 200 feet, the minimum cxirvature assumed in this investiga- 
tion, and without appreciably increasing the canal length. Therefore, in this 
area, the canal would consist largely of a series of heavy cut sections between 
■vrtiich wovild be sections of heavy fill. In some cases the entire canal prism 
would be in comi>acted embanlment for short distances. Where drainage from 
large areas would cross the canal near Station 96O+OO and Station IO7O+OO, 
siphons would be constructed to carry the canal flows under the drainage 
channels. Smaller quantities of cross drainage woiild be taken over the canal 
with overchutes or under the canal with culverts. Where the drainage channels 
would be crossed with the canal largely in fill, culverts were \zsed. Where the 
canal wo\ild be largely in cut, drainage crossing overchutes were used. At some 
overchute locations, the drainage channels on the upstream side of the sanal 
would be filled up with earth to the invert elevation of the overchute inlets 
to eliminate ponding. Small drainage channels for which overchutes or culverts 
were not provided would be diverted to adjacent channels by means of drainage 
ditches constructed at the toe of the uphill caneJ. embamlment . 



B-9 



Canal Underd rains . Underdxains for the concrete-lined canal wo^ild be 
provided in areas of high groiuad •water, or where high groimd •water •would result 
from developaent of irrigated agricxilt'ore . Two soiirces of information on 
depths of gro^und water are a-vailable: (l) a series of test holes drilled by 
the Metropolitan Water District in December, 1956, approximately on the aqueduct 
alignment, between the San Jacinto tnjnael portal euad approximately Station 
^20+001 and (2) logs of the test holes drilled by the U. S. Bureau of Reclama- 
tion in 19^6, prior to construction of the existing San Diego Aqueduct. These 
latter holes were drilled along the alignment of the existing San. Diego Aque- 
duct and the logs of the holes, together ■with other notes on undergroimd condi- 
tions experienced in construction of the first barrel of that aqued'act, are 
shown on the profile drawings in specifications for construction of the second 
barrel . 

The holes drilled by the Metropolitem Water District indicate ground 
\)fater at depths of approximately 11 to l6 feet in the area between the San 
Jacinto Tunnel and the San Jacinto Reservoir. Although this would be consider- 
ably below the bottom grade of the canal, it is probable that the ground water 
will rise considerably in this area -with increased irrigation and during years 
of heavy precipitation. Therefore, underdrains would be provided from the begin- 
ning of the caxial section at Station 17-+-50 to Station 17 0+00. 

None of the test holes indicate the danger of high ground -water in 
the upper end of the Sein Jacinto Valley -which would be traversed by the canal 
between Station 17O+OO and Station 6OO+OO. Test holes in this surea to depths 
of approxinately 25 feet encountered no -water. 

In the Domenigoni Valley, ground water was encountered at a depth of 
approximately 10 feet along the alignment of the existing aqueduct. The pro- 
posed canal would cross this valley approximately 7;i0C'O feet upstream fr«:m the 



B-10 



existing alignment, and it was assumed that high ground water would be 
enco\uitered there. Therefore, canal tanderdrains were provided between Station 
760+00 and Station 830+OO. 

The canal underdrains would be constructed by overexcavating the 
entire canal prism to a depth of four inches 6uad backfilling to the carnal sub-= 
grade with selected gravel to form a continuous gravel blanket as a foondatiom 
for the concrete cemed. lining. In the bottom of the canal lining, flap valve 
weeps would be placed in two rows near the bottom of the canal slopes » The 
flap valve weeps would consist of short lengths of l=l/2=inch pipe throiugh the 
cajial lining o The upper end of these pipes would be fitted with canpaMon 
flanges > recessed into the concrete lining one-half inch. A rubber flap would 
be attached to the flainge smd would allow water to enter the canal •^rtien the 
pressxire under the lining exceeded the pressure due to water depth in the canal. 

Turnouts and Checks. Three turnouts would be included in this reach 
of the canal. They wotild be designed to supply the requirements of the eireas 
designated as Winchester South and Murrieta. The turnout at Station 4l6+00 
would supply approximately one~third of the needs of the Winchester South area 
and the turnout at Station 68O+OO wovild supply the remaining two=thirds. The 
turnout at Station 991+00 would supply approximately one=fourth of the require^ 
ments of the Murrieta area. The remaining three=fourths of the requirement for 
this area wo\ild be supplied from the canal reach below Auld Valley Reservoir. 
The turnouts would consist of concrete pipe leading from the cajml through the 
embankment. A slide gate would be provided at a headwall in the caxiLal bajak. 
The tiimouts were designed to discharge the required flow of water from the 
canal with a six=foot depth of water in the canal. The turnout structures are 
described in the section of the foregoing report entitled "Preliminary Design 
Criteria", and a typlceil design is shown on Plate 19 • 



B=ll 



In order to ensure a minimum water depth at the ttimouts of six feet 
under all flow conditions, check structxires would he located in the canal at 
plajiaed intervals. The checks are so located that a water depth of six feet 
would be maintained at any point in the canal between the end of the siphon at 
Station 162+98 and the reservoir inlet at Station 1202+00 by checking the water 
to the normal depth of 10.i<-9 feet at the check structures. The checks would be 
spaced to provide the required water depths at all points rather than at the 
specified points of turnout since it is probable that additional turnouts at 
intermediate points may be installed in the future. It is assumed that no turn- 
outs would be required between San Jacinto Tunnel and the siphon under the 
existing aqueduct at Station 156+IO, making a check in this reach Tamecessary. 

The radial gate which would be installed in the flume section at the 
inlet to Auld Valley Reservoir near Station 1202+00 would serve as a check. 
This gate will control the water surface back to Station 956+OO where the next 
previous check structure would be installed to control the water surface back to 
Station 553+00. A second check structure at this point would control the water 
surface for the remaining reach upstream to about Station 156+IO. A typical 
check structure is shown on Plate 17. 

Bridges . In this reach the canal would cross two state highways and 
thirteen county roads. Two methods of road crossing are considered, either 
carrying the canal under the roadway in e ctilvert or inverted siphon or carry- 
ing the roadway over the canaQ. on a bridge. Because of the desirability of 
holding head losses in this reach to a rainim\jm, bridges were provided wherever 
possible. Bridges were provided at all but one road crossing in this reach. 

In general the decks of bridges crossing the caneil would be above the 
grades of the roadways crossed and ramps leading to the bridges would be 
required. As previously mentioned, most roads crossing the first 11 miles of 



B-12 



I 



the ceuasQ. are peor'eLLleled by drainage ditches and the csuaal center line was 
swung into the cross slope far enough to permit taking this drainage across the 
c£inal in overchutes. This procedure also decreased the height emd lengths of 
approach ramps reqtiiredo 

The county road crossing the cemal alignment at Station 83+35 is 
paralleled by two ditches approximately three feet deep with the flow line 
being below the normal water svirface in the canal. Since it would be imprac- 
tical to change the location of the canal center line at this point, a siphon 
under the road and drainage ditches was used at this crossing. 

Concrete bridges i<-0 feet in width were provided at the two state 
highway crossings. Concrete bridges 26 feet in width were provided at 8 of the 
county road crossings and timber bridges 26 feet in width at h crossings of 
secondary county roads. Timber bridges l6 feet in width were provided at all 
crossings of private roads and at intermediate points within properties which 
would be severed by the canal right of way. A total of 22 timber farm emd 

private road bridges were included in this reach of the canal. The locations 

P 

of these bridge structures are shown on the plan and profile on Plate 24, 

Typical designs of the bridge structiares are shown on Plates ik- and 15 aad are 
described in the section of the report entitled "Preliminary Design Criteria". 

I Santa Fe Railroad Crossing . The canal alignment crosses a branch 

line of the Santa Fe Railroad at Station 508+8O. The crossing would be made by 
constructing a box type siphon vmder the tracks with a length of 121 feet 
between headwalls. Traffic during construction would be handled by construction 
of a short shoofly or by constructing a temporary failsework to support the 
tracks in their present position during construction. The siphon wovild have a 
design similar to the typiceil siphon design shown on Plate 12 and previously 
described in the section of the report entitled "Preliminary Design Criteria". 



B-13 



Aqueduct Crossing s. The e:r,isting Saa Diago Aqueduct is crossed by 
the canal aligoment at two places. The first crossing would be at Station 
160+00 near San Jacinto Reservoir. A bo:£ type siphon 6OO feet long;, similar to 
the typical design shown on Plate 12 and described previotisly in the section of 
the report entitled "Preliminary Design Criteria", would be provided at this 
location to carry the canal flow under the two existing 73-inch diameter pipes 
and also under a drainage channel which crosses the canal alignment at this 
point. The existing pipes woxild be supported by falsework during construction 
of the siphon o 

At the second crossing near Station 522+50, the two existing 73-inch 
diameter pipes are at different elevations. The invert of the lower pipe is 
approximately 22 feet below grox^nd surface and the top of the upper pipe is 
approximately 9 feet below ground or 2.5 feet above the normal invert grade of 
the canal at this point. To avoid the cost of a siphon under these pipes and 
the loss of head which would result, a modified canal section carrying the 
water over both pipes was provided. Details of this section are shown on 
Plate 19. The modified canal section would consist of a reach of canal 55 t^et 
long with a normal water depth of 7. 05 feet and bottom width of 33.62 feet. 
This section would have the same slope and nearly the same velocity as wovild 
the normal canal section at the design caiDacity. This section would be con- 
nected to the normal cansil section up and downstream by transition sections 50 
feet long for the inlet and kQ feet long for the outlet. These transitions 
were proportioned to maintain a near constant velocity and slope of water 
surface throughout. Although the tlieoi*etical loss of head due to the minute 
velocity changes is negligible, a loss of 0.10 foot was allowed in the design. 

The subgrade of the canal lining would be approximately 7 inches 
above the top of the existing 73-i-^ch concrete pipe. To strengthen the exist- 
ing pipe against the increased external loading imposed by the canaJ,. structure, 



B-lU 



a concrete encasement of the existing pipe up to a level 2 feet above the 
spring line would be provided. Compacted backfill would be placed in the 
remainder of the space between pipe and canal lining. In order to drain water 
which would pond in the caiial upstream from this raise in the caneQ, subgrade, 
sua l8-inch concrete pipe drain would be installed, beginning at a sump at the 
upstream end of the inlet transition and leading to a sump at the downstream 
end of the outlet transition. This drain would pass under the existing 73<=ijach 
pipe, and would have a length of about l45 feet. 

Irrigation Crossings . The reach of the canal between Station 17+50 
and Station 700+00 would traverse an area >rtiich is at present paxtly under 
irrigation and the canaJ. alignment would intersect many existing irrigation 
pipe lines and ditches. The scope and purpose of this design does not permit 
a detailed analysis of each individxml problem thus created. Instead a typical 
irrigation crossing, as shown on Plate l6, consisting of an 18-inch diameter 
welded steel pipe carried over the canal was assimied at all crossings. Irriga= 
tion crossings were provided at 11 locations ■irtiere open irrigation or drainage 
ditches cross the canal or where the existence of underground pipe lines were 
evident. An additionsQ. 20 crossings were included in the cost estimate to 
provide for pipe line crossings not located and for additional drainage cross- 
iiigs 6uid alterations i^ich would be required due to severance of the irrigated 
fields. 

Classification of Materials to be Excavated . A field recomiaissance 
of the csmal alignment was made by geologists to determine the character of 
materials to be excavated. It was fo\ind that the csuml prism would be exca= 
vated in materials ranging from loose alluvial fill, that could be excavated 
easily with scrapers, to extremely hard ajid massive granite, ^ich would require 
drilling and blasting. In estimating the quantities of common and rock 



B»15 



excavation, materials were categorised generally into foxir groups. These 
groups included: unconsolidated and parbially consolidated alluYium which 
coiild generally he excavated with scrapers.; consolidated alluvium and seamy to 
massive metamorphic rock which covild be broken up with a ripper but might 
require some drilling and blasting; hard granite rock for the entire section, 
which would require drilling and blasting^ and hard granite rock for part of 
the section with softer icaterial overlying. The unit prices assumed for exca- 
vation in these fovr classes of materials are included in Appendix C. 

From the beginning of the caaal to approximately Station 610+00, the 
canal prism would be excavated entirely in alluvial material consisting of 
moderately consolidated silts and sands except for a possible localized high 
point in bedrock in the vicinity of Station 350+00. 

From Station 61O+OO to Station 67O+OO, the canal prism would be exca- 
vated largely in alluvium with possibly some metamorphic bedrock in the lower 
portion. 

From Station 67O+OO to Station 720+00, it is estimated that the lower 
80 per cent of the canal prism would lie in hard granite having very few joints 
and fractures. The remaining 20 per cent of the excavation woiild be easy going 
in the overlying alluvium. 

From Station 720+00 to Station 83O+OO, the canal prism would be exca- 
vated in the alluvial deposits of Bomenigotti Valley with possible localized 
granitic bedrock highs extending into the bottom of the canal near the edges of 
the valley. 

From Station 85O+OO to Station 950+00, the excavation for the cansJ. 
would be almost entirely in hard graaite having little jointing or fracturing. 
Center line cuts up to approximately ^5 feet would be encountered in this por- 
tion of the canal and drilling and blastijig would be necessary. 



B-16 



From Station 950+00 to Station 975+00, the canal prism wo\ild lie in 
the alluvivan of French Valley. 

From Station 975-^00 to Station IO65+OO, the canal prism would lie 
Istrgely in metamorphic rock. This rock is hard, moderately to strongly 
fractured and parts well along "bedding planes. Alluvium overburden woiild vary 
from 10 to 50 per cent of the excavation sLLong this reach. 

From Station IO65+OO to Station 1095+00, the canal prism would lie 
approximately 60 per cent in hard granite and i+O per cent in alluvium. 

From Station 1095+00 to Station 1135+00, it is estimated that the 
lower 80 per cent of the canal prism wotild be excavated in metamojrphic rock 
with alluvium overburden comprising the other 20 per cent. 

From Station 1135+00 to the inlet to Auld Valley Reservoir at Station 
1202+00, the excavation will be practically all in hard, moderately to strongly 
fractured metamorphic rock. 

Where the canal prism wovild be excavated in granite or metamorphic 
rock, special preparation of the subgrade woiild be required. It was assumed 
that the rock woiild be overexcavated to a minimum depth of three inches below 
the subgrade of the lining. The space between the lining and the rock excava- 
tion line wo\ild be filled with a cushion of selected material or crusher run 
base. In estimating the quantities of foundation preparation for concrete 
lining, it was assimied that wherever appreciable rock was indicated in the sec- 
tion, the entire section would require this type of preparation. 

Inlet to Avild Valley Reservoir . At Station 1202+00, the caneQ would 
enter a transition to a flume section. This rectangular flvmie section would 
have a width of 20 feet and a normal water depth of 10, U9 feet. The flume 
would cxirve to the left and parallel the spillway of A\ild Valley Dam for a dis- 
tance of approximately 300 feet with a common center wall. Opposite the ogee 



B-17 



section of the spillway, the elevation of the top of the flxune walls would be 
1,500 feet, the elevation of the cic'est of the dam. At this poiat, a 20-foot 
wide by 25-foot high radial gate would be installed. This gate would be 
designed to resist hydrostatic pressure from either side. The gate would be 
used to control the water surface elevation upstream in the canal, as 
previously discussed, during normal operation. In the event of heavy natural 
inflow to Auld Valley Reservoir cau,sing the water surface therein to rise above 
the spillway lip elevation emd the aormsuL water surface elevation of the canal, 
which would be essentially identical, the gate would be closed to prevent back- 
flow of flood water into the canal. The gate would be operated automatically. 
The common wall between the flume section and the spillway would have aa eleva- 
tion 6 inches aboira the normal water surface in the flume instead of I8 inches 
of freeboard between normal water surface and top of lining ^ich is maintained 
throughout the canal. This wall would then act as an overflow wasteway for the 
cemal flow -^en the radisil gate is closed. The length of this lowered section 
of the wall is sisfficient to allow a discharge of 1,000 second^feet without 
causing overtopping of the canal lining upstream. 

The flxuae would be extended 6OO feet beyond the spillway lip into the 
reservoir area where a drop structure would deliver the water into axx unlined 
chsumel running down the hillside into the reservoir. At high reservoir stage, 
the channel and flume in the resei^oir area beyond the radial gate section 
would be invindated. A layout of the flume section and of the dam and spillway 
at Auld Valley axe shown on Plate 21. 

Auld Valley Dam and Reservoir 

Auld Valley Dam and Reservoir, with a gross storage capacity of 
38,000 acre-feet, would be operated to regulate flow from the 1,000 second-foot 
canal section leading thereto and in the section of the aqueduct south of the 



B-18 



reservoir above Rainbow Pass. These flows would fluctxiate throughout the year 

because of withdrawals of irrigation water from the aqueduct on a peaking 

basis. The reser\roir would also provide emergency storage in case of shutdowns 

on the Colorado River Aqueduct or on the 1,000 second-foot canal section. A 

detailed description of the dam and reservoir is included in Appendix E, and a 

layout of the facilities is shown on Plate 21. 

Water would be withdrawn from the reservoir thro\igh a vertical outlet 

tower located near the south abutment. This tower would permit selection of 
I 

the level from which the water is to be withdrawn. The water would be led 

xinder the south abutment of the dam in a 102-inch diameter outlet pipe. At the 

downstream end of this pipe, the flow would be controlled by two 72-ineh, 

hollow jet valves and measixred by two venturi meters. The hollow jet vsLlves 

would discharge into a stilling basin from which the second section of canal of 

the proposed San Diego Aqueduct would continue. 

Reservoir Bypass Siphon . In order to make it possible to conduct 
water from the 1,000 second-foot canal section north of Auld Valley directly 
into the section of csmal south of Auld Valley, a bypass siphon would be con- 
structed across Auld Valley. The siphon woiJld consist of 66-inch, inside 
diameter, concrete pipe, 4,350 feet in length, and would have a conveyance capa- 
city of kk2 second-feet. The siphon would take off from a point near the 
beginning of the fltmie leading into Auld Valley Reservoir, cross Auld Valley 
immediately downstream from the dam and discharge into the stilling basin at 
the end of the outlet works previously described. The pipe woxild pass imder 
the paved section of the reservoir spillway to minimize the danger of the pipe 
being washed out by spillway discharge. Flow throtigh the bypass siphon would 
be controlled by a slide gate at the inlet end. At the outlet end, stop plank 
guides would be provided so that the siphon could be dewatered with the canal 



B-19 



in operation. A 'blowoff would be included at the low point in the siphon and 
a standpipe vent ik inches in diameter would be provided iinmediatelji' downstream 
from the inlet gate. It will be noted that the aqueduct stationing was con- 
tinued suLong the bypass siphon on Plate 2k. 

Canal Section from Auld Valley Reservoir to Beginning of Pipe Line 

The canal section of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct woixLd continue 
from Auld Valley Reservoir outlet works southward from Station 12^5+50 to 
Station 1586+75 where the pipe section wovild begin. The canal in this reach 
would have a conveyance capacity of 884 second-feet. 

Cajgal Gra de and Section. Selection of the grade and section of the 
canal leading southward from the Auld Valley Resen^oir outlet works was greatly 
influenced by two considerations: the desirability of minimizing the dead 
storage in the reservoir, and the topography of the area thro'ogh which the canal 
would pass. A nomal water surface el-svation of about 1,427 feet at the point 
where the canal section would leave the stilling basin we.s selected. Under 
minimum flow conditions in the canal, the check at Station l4Ul+10, hereinafter 
described, would maintain a minimum water svjrface elevation in the canal at the 
foregoing point of departure from the stilling basin of about 1,42*+ feet. As 
indicated in Table E-1 of Appendix E, storage in Auld Valley Reservoir btlow 
this latter elevation woiild be about 2,000 acre-feet. Since the gross storage 
capacity of the reservoir indicated by the table would be about 38^000 acre- 
feet, the active storage in the reser/oir wouJ-d be about 36,000 acre-feet. 

The alignneat and gradient from the foregoing assumed point of begin- 
ning were fitted to the topography encountered. The canal was generally 
directed toward Rainbow Pass through which, as previously discussed, the 
aqueduct should pass. A study of the maps and field reconnaissance dictated 



B-20 



termination of the canal in the viciaity of Station 1586+75 > because the grovind 

elevations beyond this point in the direction of Rainbow Pass fall away rapidly 

eind remain relatively low all the way to the approach to Rainbow Pass. The 

grovind line shown on the foregoing plate demonstrates this condition clearly. 

From the point selected as the end of the canal section noirthward to 

about Station 1^50+00, topography along the general route consists of a series 

of flat topped ridges having approximate elevations of about l,it-20 feet. An 

attempt was made to bring the canal grade line into the area at about this 

elevation. By a series of trial and error computations;, beginning at the point 

previously selected as the end of the canal with various starting elevations, 

the approximate hydraulic grade line of the cajial section^, including allowance 

for heeul losses in intervening siphons, was projected upstream to Auld Valley 

Reservoir outlet works. It was found that, by starting with a hydraulic grade 

line elevation of l,UlO feet at the foregoing beginning point, the grade line 

elevation at the stilling basin at Station 12^+5+50 would be 1U26.8 feet. This 

latter elevation compared favorably with the elevation of 1,^27 feet originally 
I 

assimed at the Auld Valley Reservoir outlet works as previously discussed. 

This combination of initial and terminal grade line elevations and gradient 

was therefore adopted. It will be noted on Sheets k and 5 of Plate 2k that 

the adopted grade line fits the topography quite satisfactorily. 

Further refinement of this canal grade and alignment was not con- 
sidered to be warranted without detailed topography along the proposed align- 
ment. It is possible that some adjustment in the canal grade, section, and 
siphon sizes will be required vhext. such data are available. 

It appears, from preliminajry studies made d\iring this investigation, 
that even if the Auld Valley Reservoir were not to be constructed as part of 
the aqueduct, the section of canal just described should be constructed to 



B-21 



approximately the grade and aligament shewn with a siphon across the Aiild 
Valley approximately between Station 1150+00 and Station 1310+00. 

Alignment and Cross Drainage . The reach of the canal between the 
A\ad Valley Reservoir outlet works at Station 12^5+50 and approximately 
Station 1430+00 would be located on rolling hills with moderately steep cross 
slopes and well defined drainage shaonels. The ground is too irregular to 
allow close following of the contour and the canal in this section would be 
largely a series of alternate cuts and fills. A concrete box siphon woTild be 
provided to carry the cansuL under the unnamed stream which crosses the csinal 
line at about Station l39i4-+00. All other cross drainage would be taken over 
the canal in overchutes or under the ce^aal in culverts, which structvires have 
been previously described. 

From Station 1^30+00 to Station 1586+75 > the aqueduct would consist 
of short sections of canaO. running along flat topped ridges and connected by 
siphons crossing the ravines which separate these ridges. Since the canal 
wovild be located on or near the tops of these ridges, cross drainage is quite 
small in qviantity of flow in this reach. A few small culverts and overchutes 
would be provided to carry the small quantities of drainage water iirtiich would 
collect between the ridge tops and the canal embankments. 

Turnouts emd Checks . Two turnouts were provided in this part of the 
aqueduct. The turnout at Station 1326+00 would supply approximately three = 
foiirths of the requirements of the Murrista area and the turnout at Station 
1580+00 would supply the requirements of the Vail area. 

In order to control the water surface elevation in the cemal, checks 
would be provided. The check at Station lMn+10 would make it possible to 
maintain a minimum depth of water of 7.5 feet in the canal at Avild Valley Reser- 
voir outlet stnicture. The check at Station 1517+it2 would maintain a minimum 



B-22 



water depth of 6 feet at the end of the siphon at Station 1^+51+13. This check 
was included even though no turnouts are presently planned in the affected 
reach. The two foregoing check struottjres would be incorporated into the inlet 
treuasitions of the siphons as described later for the canal termineil structure 
and shown on Plate l8. The check at the canal terminal stru.cture, described in 
£in ensuing section, would maintain a minimum water depth of 9.5 feet in the 
short reach upstream from the canal terminus to the downstream end of the Long 
Valley Siphon at Station l^hrj+hO. 

Bridges and Siphons . This section of canal would be crossed by Buck 
Road, an unimproved coirnty road, at three places and timber county highway 
bridges with 26-foot roadway widths would be constructed at each crossing. 
Crossings of the canal would be provided at the headwalls of each of four 
siphons included in this reach and therefore no farm bridges were provided. 
The typiceJ. siphon designs previously described were utilized for the four 
siphon installations. 

Cajial Terminal Structure . The caneQ. terminal structure is shown on 
Plate 18, This structvire would consist essentieilly of a transition from the 
trapezoidal canal section to two 90-inch diameter concrete pipes. One of these 
pipes would connect to the pipe line which would continue southward and the 
other would be bvilkheaded until the second pipe line steige of the aqueduct is 
constructed. A check structure wovild be constructed at the inlet of the 
transition end and a steel trash rack would be provided at the point of 
entrance into the 90-inch pipes to prevent entrance of larger sized foreign 
material into the pipe line. The trash rack would consist of 3/8-i2ich thick 
steel bars on 2-1/2 -inch centers. Stop pleuik guides would be provided at the 
entrance to each 90-iach pipe so that one pipe could be dewatered -while the 



B-23 



other is in operation. A ssad trap, siiulJ-ar to that shown on Plate 19, wo\ild 
be pro/ided Immediately upstream from the terroinsiLL stru.cture. 

The capacity of the canal between the Auld Valley Reservoir outlet 
and the beginning of the pipe line would be 8Qh second-feet euid the capacity of 
the initial pipe line stage beyond this point would be ^32 second-feet. As 
stated, provision would be made for constz-action of another pipe line with 
equal capacity bringing the aqueduct capacity to a total of &6k second-feet. 
The 20 second-foot difference between the csmal capacity and total pipe line 
capacity represents the estimated Eietxirauni delivery requirement in the year 
2000 for the Vail area. It was assumed that the water taken from the canal at 
the Vail turnout about 600 feet upstx'eam fx'om the canaJ. terminus would be 
pumped into Vail Lake and wou.ld therafore be subject to sudden interruption by 
power failure. To provide for this cond;.tion under ultimate development with 
both cemal and pipe line operating at fuJ.1 capacity, an overflow wasteway was 
provided in the design of the canal near the terminal stru.cture. This wasteway 
would be constructed by lowerl.ng a 15-foot le^igth of the canal linj.ng approxi- 
mately 9 inches or one-half of the normal freeboard, to form a side channel 
spillway. The overflovr wo\ild be colle::ted in a small channel and led into a 
ravine away from the canal. The length of the spillway would be long enough to 
allow a discbarge of 20 second-feet with a depth of flow of 6 inches. 

Classification of Materials to be Excavated . From the field exami- 
nation of the materials to be excavated along the canal alignment, as discussed 
for the reach of canal north of Auld VsJLley, the following data were obtained. 

From the outlet works of Auld Valley Reservoir to approximately 
Station 1*4-00+00, it is estimated that the lower portion of the canal prism 
would be excavated in moderately jointed, slightly weathered granite with the 
upper 30 per cent being in the overlying alluvium. 



B-24 



From Station lUoO+00 to Station 1586+75, the canal prism would be 
excavated in loosely to moderately consolidated residuum and alluvium with 
possible occasional outcrops of caliche. All of this material covild be easily 
excavated euid was classified as common excavation. This material is eO-so con- 
sidered to be excellent for construction of the ccsnpacted embankments. 

The water table in this area is well below the subgrade of the canal 
sections and is expected to remain so. Therefore, no underdrains wovLLd be 
required. 

Pipe Line from End of Ceinal to Minnewawa Reservoir Site 

The general alignment of the aqueduct from the end of the canal to 
Minnewawa reservoir site would follow that of the "W" line. The location of 
this line and general construction problems involved have been discussed else- 
where In this report. 

Hydraulic Design . The pipe line as designed wovild be a series of 
nine inverted siphons, the ends of which would be open to the atmosphere at 
vent structures located at high points along the alignment. The location and 
elevation of the vent structure at Rainbow Pass, Station 19OO+OO, was dictated 
by the elevation of the pass. A controlling grade line elevation of TOO feet, 
the spillway lip elevation proposed for Minnewawa Reservoir, was adopted for 
the terminus of the line. Intervening control points were set from a study of 
a preliminary profile and hydratilic gradient laid out along the general guLign- 
ment. Control points were set by running the pipe alignment up to high points. 
An attempt was made to keep the grade of the pipe line at higher elevations to 
reduce the head thereon. 

Pipe sizes in each reach were then selected so that at the design 
capacities the hydraiolic gradient would meet the controlling elevations. The 



B-25 



design capacity was decreased at the ti^raouts by the estimated miiadmum monthly 
amount of water turned out at that poiiat raider full operating conditions, 
except that capacity changes were not made where this quantity woxxld be less 
than 8 to 10 second-feet. Where two sizes of pipe were used in a siphon, the 
smaller pipe was placed where the head would be highest. 

The first siphon ran of the pipe line would begin at the end of the 
canal and terminate at the vent structure at Station 19OO+OO. The relative 
capacities of the ensuing siphon runs oould be adjusted somewhat xaader varying 
operating conditions resulting from txamout of more or less water to certain 
areas than presently estimated, by varying the vent heights, but the head at 
the beginning of this first siphon would definitely be limited by the canal 
freeboard. Therefore, an additional five-foot head loss was assumed at the 
beginning of the first siphon run as a safety factor. This is approximately 
five per cent of the head loss in the siphon at design flow. Because of this, 
the plan and profile shown on Sheet 5 of Plate 2k shows a hydraiJlic grade line 
elevation at the beginning of the pipe of 1,405 feet as compared with the water 
surface elevation at the csnaQ. terminus previously stated to be l,4lO feet. 

Pipe Line Aligar cent aad Accessory Stru ctures . The alignment of the 
pipe dowastream from vents was so arx'^anged that the pipe would proceed downhdll 
from the vents on a straight line laatil the grade of the pipe would be below 
the pool level at the next following vent. Wherever possible, the aligmnent of 
the pipe between vents was so arranged at intervening s^«raflits that the pipe 
wovild be below the pool level established at the next downstream vent, and air 
relief and vacuum valves were provided at all such stmmiit points. Where the 
foregoing procedure was not possible, such as at Station 2159+00, vents were 
prmi'ided by running the vent pipe up the adjacent hillside to the maximum 
hydraulic gradient elevation. 



B^6 



Blowoffs were provided at all low points in the pipe line. Access to 
the interior of the pipe would be provided by manholes at each air valve and 
blowoff structure, and additionsil majiholes would be provided where required to 
maintain a maximum length between manholes of 2,500 feet. Details of typiceG. 
vent, air relief, blowoff, £uid manhole structures were described previously 
under "Preliminary Design Criteria", and are shown on Plate 20. 

Control Facilities in Terminal Siphon Run . As previously discussed, 
it would not be necessary to construct Minnewawa Reservoir as a part of the 
initieil works of the proposed San Diego Aqueduct. It was further stated that 
the reach of pipe line from Station 5325+00, near Otay Reservoir, to Station 
5522+00, the point of entremce to Minnewawa reservoir site, would also not be 
necessary of construction as an initial aqueduct feature. Because of certain 
operational conditions, hereinafter described, which woiild exist both before 
and after construction of Minnewawa Reservoir and the final reach of pipe line, 
certain flow and pressiire control facilities wotild be provided as described in 
the following petra^raphs. 

The ninth and last siphon run would begin at the vent at Station 
^+355+00 and woiad end at Minnewawa Reservoir at such time as that reservoir 
were completed. It is expected that the water sxirface in this reservoir will 
vary between elevations TOO feet and 6l5 feet. With uncontrolled flow in this 
siphon, the hydraulic gradient would rise and fall with the water surface eleva- 
tion in Minnewawa Reservoir, This would be satisfactory when the water surface 
is high in Minnewawa Reservoir. However, when the water siarface is low in 
Minnewawa Reservoir, the hydraulic gradient in the aqueduct would drop along 
the reach from the terminus back to Station l;355+00. This would be undesirable 
from the standpoint of operation of the turnouts for City of San Diego and 
Helix Irrigation District at Station i^6li4-+00, and also would cause the 



B-27 



hydra\J.ie grade line elevation to drop below the pipe grade at several inter- 
vening summits making additional pipe vents necessary. Therefore, a station 
equipped with pressure control devices was provided at Station i4-6l4+00 near 
Lake Murray. The piping and valve arraxigement at this station is shown on 
Plate 20. 

The pressure control station would consist of a i|-8-inch ball or plug 
type bypass valve in the main line, two 36-inch unloading pressure control 
valves, each designed to pass one -half of the design flow through the station, 
and a 2if-inch check valve all arranged in parallel. The 36-inch pressure 
control valves wovild be set to maintain the upstream pressure at a constant pre- 
determined value. If the pressure rose, the valve would open and pass water to 
the ensuing reach of pipe line. If the pressure fell off, the vsilves would 
close to maintain the upstream pressure at the set value. 

The proposed operation of the control station would be as follows: 
(1) When the water surface elevation in Minnewawa Reservoir is between the 
maximum of TOO feet and approximately 685 feet, the bypass valve would be fully 
open aiid all other gate valves closed. This woiild permit deliveiy of the 
design flow of water to a full reser/oir. (2) When the water surface elevation 
in Minnewawa Reservoir is below approximately elevation 685 feet, the pressure 
control valves would be placed in operation by opening the required gate 
valves and closing the bypass valve. One valve wo\ild be used for flows less 
than 78 second-feet and both valves for flows in excess of 78 second-feet. The 
valves would be set to maintain the upstreari hydraulic gradient a little below 
the design hydraulic gradient at this point. Design flows in the aqueduct 
could still be maintained, since the additional head loss thro-ogh the control 
valves woxild be compensated for by the decreased back-pressure on the pipe 
terminus resulting from low water surface elevation at Minnewawa Reservoir. 



B-28 



I 



Prior to the construction of Minnewawa Reservoir, the foregoing 

r 

control station wo\ild provide a valuable service in regulating pressure at the 
turnouts for City of San Diego and Helix Irrigation District. Therefore, the 
control station was included in the facilities selected for initial construction. 

The part of the aqueduct below the last vent structure at Station 
1+355+00 would be operated on a demand besis. With Minnewawa Reservoir in 
operation, \*ien water flowing past Station U355+OO would be in excess of the 
demands below this point, the excess would flow into Minnewawa Reservoir. When 
the water flowing past Station 4355+00 would be less than the demand, the addi- 
tional water would automatically be withdrawn from Minnewawa Reservoir by back- 
flow in the aqueduct. 

In normal operation, an amount of water in excess of the requirements 
of the City of San Diego and Helix Irrigation District would be flowing past 
Station U355+00 at all times, the excess being passed down into the lower reach 
of pipe line through the pressure control vsilves. However, if an amount less 
than this requirement should be entering the pipe line, the hydraulic gradient 
above the valves would drop until it would be below the normal downstream 
gradient and water wo^lld be fed back throvigh the 2U-inch check valve at the 
control station to supply the deficiency upstream from that point. 

In order to permit water to be withdrawn from Minnewawa Reservoir at 
low water surface elevations ajad fed back through the aqueduct as far upstream 
as Lake Murray, it would be necessary to place the pipe line in a deep cut from 
about Station 5232+00 to about Station 5265+00. To insure proper operation of 
the pipe line under the reverse flow conditions when the hydraiilic gradient 
would approach the elevation of the pipe along this area of deep cut, the high 
point in the pipe line would be vented to the atmosphere. This vent would 
extend above the msixiraum hydraulic gradient, acccMnplished by running the vent 
pipe up the adjacent hillside to the desired elevation. The foregoixig condition 



B-29 



demonstrates the need for placing the pipe in deep cut at the stated location 
to provide for future operation with Miaaewawa Reservoir. 

The design of the pipe line as an open system made possible the use 
of pipe designed for hydrostatic heads corresponding to the design hydraulic 
gradient o However ;, the stretch of pipe line between the vent at Station 
4355+00 and the control station would be designed for a hydrostatic head cor- 
responding to the elevation of the vent at Station 4355+00, since this head 
could be impressed on the pipe when the valves in the Lake M\array control 
station are closed. 

Interconnection with Existing Aqueduct. In order to effect a greater 
degree of coordinated operation of the existing and proposed aqueducts to San 
Diego County, it woiild be desirable in the future to interconnect the two 
aqueducts in at least one location. The point of interconnection that would 
require the least expensive works wo^Jild be in Rainbow Pass at about Station 
19I4.O+OO, where the two barrels of the existing aqueduct are less than 50 feet 
west of the alignment of the proposed aqueduct. Interconnection of the two 
aqueducts at this point would permit ws,ter to be transferred from the proposed 
line to the existing barrels in the event of interruption of flow in the latter 
line north of the point of interconnection or on the Colorado River Aqueduct. 
The provision of the storage reservoir at Auld Valley would make this possible. 
Because more study amd the experience of a few years operation are needed 
before a decision on interconnection facilities can or need be made, the cost 
of this interconnection was not included in the cost facilities for initial 
construction presented in Appendix D. 

Trench Excavation and Backfill . For this design, it was assumed that 
the pipe line would be bxiried throughout its length. To arrive at estimated 
quantities of trench excavation, a tentative grade line for the bottom of the 



B-30 



pipe was established on the center line profile, maintaining a minimum cover of 
three feet. The pipe line was then divided into lengths of approximately 2,500 
feet each and average trench depth for each such length was determined. These 
average depths were used to estimate quantities of excavation for each length of 
pipe line. 

The cross section of the trench used for estimating the excavation 
quantities is shown on Plate 20. The angle of side slope would vary according 
to the character of the material. Where conditions would be such that backfill 
could be consolidated by flooding and jetting, a clearsmce of nine inches 
between pipe and trench would ordinarily be used. Where conditions are such 
that backfill must be consolidated by tamping, the foregoing minimum clearance 
would be 18 inches. Since it is beyond the scope of this design to accurately 
determine the locations where each type of trench would be used, a trench exca- 
vation section using an average clearance of 12 inches was used. In estimating 
costs of consolidating backfill, it was assxmied that 70 per cent would be con- 
solidated by jetting and 30 per cent by tamping based upon experience in the 
construction of the existing Saxi Diego Aqueduct. 

Between approximately Station 5232+00 and Station 5265+00, the pipe 
would be placed with an invert grade elevation of approximately 6OO feet, neces- 
sitating a maximum cut of about 50 feet. This excavation would be made by 
making a cut to elevation 6l2 feet with a bcttom width of 38 feet. The existing 
county road which paxeLLlels the proposed aqueduct alignment in this reach woijld 
be relocated through the cut after placement of the pipe line in a 12-foot- deep 
trench in the road subgrade. The additional road width would be available for 
installation of the second stage of the aqueduct. 

In locating the pipe line alignment, an effort was made to avoid 
steep cross slopes wherever practical. However, at a few locations, the line 
was located on steep side slopes, particularly in the vicinity of Station 



B-31 



3250+00 and Station 3V4O+OO, At these locations, additional excavation 
quantities to provide for tenching were included in the estimates. 

Between Station ^{^620+00 and Station 4910+00, the pipe line would be 
located on or near streets in the towns of La Mesa and Spring Valley. Addi- 
tional cost of trenching was assumed to allow for the construction difficulties 
"vrtiich vould be encountered in this ajrea. 

Classification of Materials to be Exca vated . The material which 
would be excavated for the pipe trench would vary over a wide range from 
easily excavated topsoil to hard massive granite. A geological reconnaissance 
of the line was made to determine the amounts of the various types of materials 
to be excavatedo In preparing estimates of excavation qiiantities, the two 
general categories "common" and "rock" were utilized for classification pur- 
poses. Common classification was given to all imconsolidated or partially 
consolidated materials which could generally be excavated with trencher, back 
hoe, drag line, or scrapers. There is presented following a brief summary of 
the classification of materials along the aqueduct line. 

From the end of the canal to about Station 185O+OO south of the 
Temec-ula RLver, trench excavation would be practically all common. From 
Station 1850+OO to about Station 2^32+00 at the north edge of the San Luis Rey 
River, excavation would be approximately 87 per cent in rock. From Station 
2U32+OO to about Station 3082+00 at the north edge of the San Marcos Valley, 
excavation wo\ald be approximately 65 per cent in rock. From Station 3082+OO 
across the valley to about Station 3217+00, excavation would be all common. 
From Station 3217+00 to about Station 3585+00 near the San Dieguito River, exca- 
vation woTild be almost exclusively in rock. From Station 3585+00 to about 
Station 5322+00 at Lower Otay Reservoir, the excavation would be predominantly 
common, with an estimated 19 per cent classified as rock. From Station 5322+00 



B-32 



to the end of the line at Station 5522+00, the excavation would be almost 
exclusively in rock. 

To estimate the cost of excavation, the pipe line was divided into 
approximately 50 reaches, based on the geological reconnaissance of the line. 
Estimated trench side slopes and unit prices for excavation were assigned to 
each reach and the costs were computed using the average trench depths in each 
2,500-foot section as previously described above. The \init prices used con- 
sisted of base costs for common and rock excavation modified for such special 
conditions as anticipated high ground water or slxamping of trench walls. 

Steel and Concrete Pipe . A study of unit prices of furnishing aad 
laying concrete and steel pipe indicated that concrete pipe wovild be most 
economical up to heads of approximately 200 feet and steel pipe at heads above 
200 feet. In estimating the cost of the pipe, the entire pipe line was divided 
into nine contiguous sections. These sections were so selected that in each 
section the head on the pipe woxold be either nearly all \mder 200 fest or over 
200 feet. For the sections where the head was generally under 200 feet, the 
use of concrete pipe throiighout the section was ass^Jmed and estimated prices of 
concrete pipe for each head class, shown in Appendix C, were used. The unit 
prices for concrete pipe shown in the estimates in Appendix D are the weighted 
averages of all head classes and sizes in that section. For the sections where 
the head was generally over 200 feet, the use of steel pipe was assumed through- 
out the section eind estimated prices of steel pipe for each head class were 
used. The \mit prices of steel pipe shown in the estimates are likewise the 
weighted average prices for all head classes used within the reach designated. 



B-33 



I 



APPENDIX C 

UNIT PRICES USED FX)R DETAILED COST ESTIMATES 
OF PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 
"W" LINE 



UNIT PRICES USED FOR DETAILED COST ESTIMATES 
OF PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 
"W" LINE 



Item 



Canal Construction 



Unit : Unit price 



Excavation for canal, common 

Excavation for canal, granitic rock, full section 

Excavation for canal, granitic rock, partial section 

Excavation for canal, metamorphic rock 

Excavation for structures, common 

Excavation for structures, rock 
Excavation for dralnaige channels 
Compacting ceinal embankments 
Compacting road embankments 
Backfill 

Compacting backfill 

Trimming earth foundations for concrete lining 

Preparing rock foundations for concrete lining 

i|— inch gravel blanket for canal underdrains 

Furnish and install flap valve weeps 

Concrete in canal lining 

Concrete in structures 

Furnishing and placing reinforcing steel 
Furnishing and laying concrete pressure pipe : 

l8-inch, head class 50 

24-inch, head class 50 

30-inch, head class 50 

36-inch, head class 50 

42 -inch, head class 50 

48-inch, head class 50 
PVimishing and laying corrugated metal pipe : 

18 -inch, 12 gauge 

24-inch, 12 gauge 

30 -inch, 12 gauge 

36-inch, 12 gauge 
Furnishing eind installing welded steel pipe: 

18 -inch, 10 gauge 

24-inch, 10 gauge 

30-inch, 10 gauge 

36 -inch, 10 gauge 
Furnishing and installing couplings and stiffeners 
Furnishing and installing cast iron slide gates : 

24-inch diameter 

36 -inch diameter 

42 -inch diameter 

48-inch diameter 



cu.yd. $ 


0.25 


cu.yd. 


2.50 


cu . yd . 


3.00 


cu.yd. 


1.25 


cu.yd. 


1.25 to 




3.50 


cu.yd. 


4.50 


cu.yd. 


o.4o 


cu . yd . 


0.45 


cu.yd. 


1.00 


cu . yd . 


0.70 to 




1.50 


cu . yd . 


3.50 


sq.yd. 


0.50 


sq.yd. 


1.70 


sq.yd. 


1.25 


each 


7.50 


cu . yd . 


23.50 


cu . yd . 


75.00 to 




85.00 


lb. 


0.16 


lin.ft. 


6.00 


lin.ft. 


6.75 


lin.ft. 


10.00 


lin.ft. 


13.50 


lin.ft. 


15.00 


lin.ft. 


18.00 


lin.ft. 


7.50 


lin.ft. 


9.50 


lin.ft. 


11.50 


lin.ft. 


15.60 


lin.ft. 


11.00 


lin.ft. 


16.00 


lin.ft. 


21.05 


lin.ft. 


27.30 


lb. 


0.65 


each 


240.00 


each 


400.00 


each 


470.00 


each 


634.00 



C-1 



UNIT PRICES USED FOR DETAILED COST ESTIMATES 
OF PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 
"W" LINE 
(continued) 



Item 



: Unit : Unit price 



Canal Construction (continued) 

Furnishing and installing raMal gates and hoists: 

16 -feet by 11 -feet 

13 -feet by l4-feet 

12 -feet by 10 -feet 
Furnish and erect untreated timber in structures 
Furnish and erect treated timber in structures 
Furnish and install steel guard railing for bridges 
Furnish and place gravel on operating road 
Furnish and place bituminous surfacing for roads 
Fvimish and erect barbed wire right of way fences 
Furnish and erect 6-foot chain link fence 
Furnish and install metal fence gates 
Riprap 

Gravel blankets and drains 
Furnish and lay 6 -inch pipe drains 

Pipe Line Construction 



each $ 


13,200 


each 


12,680 


each 


9,000 


M.B.M, 


3^1.00 


M.B.M. 


iU)5-00 


lin.ft. 


8.00 


cu . yd . 


il.OO 


sq.yd. 


3.00 


mile 


2,500 


lin.ft. 


1.75 


each 


50.00 


cu.yd. 


9.00 


cu.yd. 


7.00 


lin.ft. 


2.00 



Eiccavation, common 

Excavation, rock 

Bacicfiil 

Compacting backfill by tamping 

Conaolide.ting backfill by saturation and vibration 

Concrete in structures 

Furnish and place reinforcing steel 

Furnish and erect 84-inch concrete culvert pipe for 

shafts of structures 
Furnish and erect 48-inch concrete culvert pipe for 

shafts of structures 
Furnish and place 48-inch precast concrete covers 
Furnish and install 6-inch diameter nozsles 
Furnish and install 20-inch nozzle without cover 
Furnish and install 20-inch nozzle with cover 
Furnish and install 4-5 -inch nozzles 
Furnish and install 6 -inch globe valves 
Furnish and install 6-inch-125 pound gate valve 
B'urnish and install 20 -inch -125 pound gate valve 
Furnish and install 45-inch-125 pound gate valve 
Furnish and install cast i3ron pipe and fittings 
Furnish and install steel pipe and fittings 
Furnish and install 8-inch air valves 



cu.yd. 


0.40 to 




3.50 


cu . yd . 


1.50 to 




4.50 


cu . yd . 


0.65 


cu.yd. 


3.90 


cu.yd. 


2.x 


cu.yd. 


93.00 


lb. 


0.18 


lin.ft. 


70.00 


lin.ft. 


50.00 


each 


56.00 


each 


150.00 


each 


350.00 


each 


550.00 


each 


800.00 


each 


180.00 


each 


107.00 


each 


1,800 


each 


4,500 


lb. 


0.55 


lb. 


0.60 


each 


400.00 



C-2 



UNIT PRICES USED FOR DETAILED COST ESTIMATES 
OF PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT 
"W" LINE 
(continued) 



Item 



Unit 



Unit price 



Pipe Line Construction (continued) 

Furnishing and laying 78-inch concrete pipe: 

Head, class 100 

Head, class I50 

Head class 200 

Head class 250 

Head class 300 

Head class 350 

Head class ^tOO 

Head class ^50 

Head class 500 
Furnishing and laying 8^-inch concrete pipe: 

Heaui class 50 

Head class 100 

Head class I50 

Head class 200 

Head class 250 

Head class 300 

Head class 350 

Head class 400 

Head class k^O 

Head class 500 
Furnishing and laying 90-inch concrete pipe: 

Head class 50 

Head class 100 

Head class 150 

Head class 200 

Head class 250 

Head class 300 

Head class 350 

Head class 400 

Head class 4-50 

Head class 500 
Furnishing and laying 78-inch steel pipe: 

13/ .32 -inch thick 

15/32 -inch thick 

17/32-inch thick 

9/16-inch thick 

5/8-inch thick 

11/16 -inch thick 
Furnishing and laying 8U-inch steel pipe: 

7/16-inch thick 

1/2 -inch thick 

9/16-inch thick 

5/8-inch thick 

11/16-inch thick 



lin.ft. $ 


51.00 


lin.ft. 


55.00 


lin.ft. 


61.00 


lin.ft. 


66.00 


lin.ft. 


71.00 


lin.ft. 


76.00 


lin.ft. 


81.00 


lin.ft. 


86.00 


lin.ft. 


91.00 


lin.ft. 


52.00 


lin.ft. 


57.00 


lin.ft. 


61.00 


lin.ft. 


67.00 


lin.ft. 


73.00 


lin.ft. 


79.00 


lin.ft. 


85.00 


lin.ft. 


91.00 


lin.ft. 


97.00 


lin.ft. 


103.00 


lin.ft. 


64.00 


lin.ft. 


69.00 


lin.ft. 


74.00 


lin.ft. 


81.00 


lin.ft. 


89.00 


lin.ft. 


95.00 


lin.ft. 


102.00 


lin.ft. 


109.00 


lin.ft. 


116.00 


lin.ft. 


123.00 


lin.ft. 


63.00 


lin.ft. 


71.00 


lin.ft. 


79.00 


lin.ft. 


83.00 


lin.ft. 


90.00 


lin.ft. 


97-00 


lin.ft. 


72.00 


lin.ft. 


81.00 


lin.ft. 


89.00 


lin.ft. 


96.00 


lin.ft. 


104.00 



C-3 



UNIT PRICES USED FOR DETAILED COST ESTIMATES 
OF PROPOSED SM DIEGO AQUEDUCT 
"W" LINE 
(continued) 



Item 


: Unit : 


Unit price 


Pipe Line Construction (continued) 






Furnishing and laying 81<-inch steel pipe (continued) 






3/l+-inch thick 


lin.ft. $ 110.00 


13/16-inch thick 


lin.ft. 


119.00 


7/8 -inch thick 


lin.ft. 


128.00 


15/16 -inch thick 


lin.ft. 


13^.00 


1-inch thick 


lin.ft. 


li+3.00 


1-1/16-inch thick 


lin.ft. 


151.00 


1-1/8-inch thick 


lin.ft. 


159.00 


1-3/16-inch thick 


lin.ft. 


167.00 


Furnishing and laying 90-inch steel pipe: 






15/32 -inch thick 


lin.ft. 


79.00 


17/32-inch thick 


lin.ft. 


87.00 


19/32-lnch thick 


lin.ft. 


96.00 


21/32-inch thick 


lin.ft. 


104.00 



c-U 



APPENDIX D 

ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 
"W" LINE 



SOTM.'mY OF 
ESTDIATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACINTO TUNNEL TO MBINEWAWA RESERVOIR 
"VI" LINE 

(Based on prices prevailing in the fall of 1956) 



Station 



Item 



Cost 



0+00 to 17+50 



17+50 to 1202+00 



j 1202+00 



to 12U5+50 
to 1586+75 



1586+75 to 2100+00 



2100+00 
2721+00 
29U5+00 
3163+00 
3269+00 



to 2721+00 
to 29i;5+00 
to 3163+00 
to 3269+00 
to 3861+00 



1 3861+00 

: h0U3+00 



to Uoii3+00 
to U21U+OO 
U21U+OO to ii6lU+00 



San Jacinto Tunnel to Beginning of 
Canal, Capacity 1,000 cfs 

From Beginning of Canal to Auld Valley- 
Reservoir, Capacity 1,000 cfs 

Auld Valley Reservoir, 
Capacity 38,000 acre-feet 

Auld Valley Reservoir By-Pass Siphon, 
Capacity Uh.2 cfs 

From Auld Valley to Beginning of Pipe 
Line, Canal Capacity 88U cfs 

Pipe Line from End of Canal to 
Vallecitos Reservoir Turnout, 
Capacity lj.32 cfs 

Turnout (Vallecitos Reservoir) to 
Turnout (Oceanside), Capacity 39li cfs 

Turnout (Oceanside) to Turnout 
(Bueno Colorado), Capacity 383 cfs 

Turnout (Buenc Colorado) to Turnout 
(Carlsbad), Capacity 37U cfs 

Turnout (Carlsbad) to Turnout (San 
Marcos Reservoir), Capacity 36U cfs 

Turnout (San Marcos Reservoir) to 
Turnout (East of Del Mar), 
Capacity 335 cfs 

Turnout (East of Del Mar) to Turnout 
(Carroll Reservoir), Capacity 32h cfs 

Turnout (Carroll Reservoir) to 

Turnout (Canp Elliott), Capacity 29ii cfs 

Turnout (Camp Elliott) to Turnout 

(San Diego and Helix), Capacity 286 cfs 



^ 872,600 

6,2U6,000 

14,701,600 

218, 800 

2,633,600 

5,205,600 
7,620,900 
2,286,800 
2,258,000 
1,182,700 

6,713,800 

1,81;9,000 
1,778,200 
3,52U,100 



D-1 



SUMl/lRY OF 
ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNEWAVJA RESERVOIR 
"W" LINE 

(continued) 



Station 



Item 



Cost 



U61U+00 to U995+00 

ii995+O0 to ^27U+00 

527U+OO to 5522+00 

Subtotal 



Turnout (San Diego and Helix) to 
Turnout (South Bay and National City), 
Capacity l57 cfs 

Turnout (South Bay and National City) 
to Turnout (Otay and Irperial), 

T\irnout (Otay and Imperial) to 
Minnewawa Reservoir, Capacity 98 cfs 



Administration and engineering, 10^ 

Contingencies, l5^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL 



$ 3,557,300 

2,U06,000 

1, 963, 600 

$55,018,600 

5,501,900 
8,252,800 
3,111,500 

$71, 88U, 800 



D-2 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACINTO TUNNEL TO MIN^yAWA RESERVOIR 
"W" LINE 

(Based on prices prevailing in the fall of 1956) 



: s t Unit : 
Item ; Unit ; Quantity ; price ; Cost 

Sta. O-t-OO to Sta. 17+50 
San Jacinto Tunnel to Beginning of Canal, Capacity 1,000 cfs 

T\innel and Connection 
to San Jacinto Tunnel 



Excavation 


cu.yd. 


Removing existing 




concrete 


cu.yd. 


Concrete in tiinnel 




lining 


cu„yd. 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


Diversion of aqueduct 




flow 




Transition, Gate Section 




and Flume. Sta, 0+52 to 




Sta, U+00 





U70 $ 75.00 $ 


35,250 


25 30.00 


750 


lUO 100.00 
20,000 0,20 


iU,ooo 
U,ooo 


Imnp sum 


3,000 



13^200 
7,000 

1,850 


3.50 
1.50 
3.50 


U6,200 

10,500 
6,U70 


Uio 

810 

122,000 

1 


7.00 

75.00 

0.16 

12,680 


2,870 
60,750 

19,520 
12,680 


725 


1,75 


1,270 


350 


2,00 


700 



structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


39,000 


3.00 


117,000 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


30,000 


0.70 


21,000 


Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


300 


3.50 


1,050 


Concrete in structures 


cu,yd. 


2,330 


75.00 


17U, 750 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


215,000 


0,16 


3U,li00 


Riprap 


cu.yd. 


660 


9.00 


5,9U0 



57,000 



structure excavation cu.yd. 

Backfill cu.yd. 

Contacting backfill cu.yd. 
Graded gravel blankets 

and drains cu.yd. 

Concrete in structures cu.yd. 

Reinforcing steel lb. 

Radial gate and hoist each 
6-foot chain link 

fence lin.ft. 
6-inch pipe under 

drains lin.ft. 350 2,00 700 l60,960 

13 '-0" I.D. Monolithic 
Concrete Siphons, Sta^ 
U+00 to Sta, U+80 and 
Sta, 6+72 to Stao 17+50 



35U,ll;0 



D»3 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 

'W" LINE 

(continued) 



Item 



Unit ; Quantity 



Unit 
price 



Sta^O+00 to Sta. 17+50 (continued) 



Cost 



Steel Pipe^ Metering and 
Control Stations Sta. 
Li+80 to Stao 6+72 





Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


18,000 


$ 3.00 $ 


5U,ooo 








Backfill 


cu.yd. 


lis 000 


0.70 


7,700 








Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


1,650 


3.50 


5,780 






Concrete in structures 


cu.yd. 


ii75 


75.00 


35,620 






Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


50 J 000 


0.16 


8,000 








Steel piping 


lb. 


196,000 


o,Uo 


78,U00 








Venturi meters^ 120- 
















inch and 60=inch 






lump sum 


50jOoo 








30"inch cone valve 


each 


1 


19,U00 


19,U00 








60-inch cone valve 


each 


1 


37,900 


37,900 








Electrical installation 






lurt^) s\im 


1,500 








Sunp piuTip 


each 


1 


300 


300 








Gravel blankets and 
















drains 


cu.yd. 


130 


7.00 


910 


$ 


299,510 




Right of Way- 






lurp sum 






1,000 




Subtotal 










$ 


872,600 




Sta. 17+50 


to Sta, 1202+00 










From Beginning of Canal 


to Auld ' 


/alley Reservoirj Capacity 1,000 


cfs 






Earthwork,, Concrete 
















Lining, Fences and 
















Underdrains 















Excavation for canal 

Common 

Rock 
Excavation for 

drainage channels 
Compacting embankments 
Backfill over canal 

lining 
Trimming earth 

foundations for 

concrete lining 
Preparing rock 

foundations for 

concrete lining 
ii-inch gravel blanket 

for canal underdrains 



cu.yd, 
cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 



sq.ydo 



1,330,000 
7lU,000 

1U7,000 

i9U,ooo 
3h,300 



550,700 



0,25 332,500 
1.90 1,3565600 



o.Uo 
0.U5 

1.30 



58,800 

87,300 

UU,590 



0,50 275,350 



sq.yd. 


177,)400 


1.70 


301,580 


sq.yd. 


86,000 


1.25 


107,500 



ESTD'IATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 
"W" LINE 
(continued) 



Item 



Unit % Quantity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



Sta, 17-t-50 to Sta. 1202-fOO (continued) 



Earthwork, Concrete 
Lining, Fences and 
Underdrains (continued ) 
Flap valve weeps 
Concrete lining 
Safely ladders 
Gravel on operating 

road 
6-foot chain link fence 
Barbed wire fence 
Steel gates 
Aqueduct crossing 
sta, 521+98 

Concrete Bridges (10 ) 
S tincture excavation 
Backfill 

Conpacting backfill 
Conp acting road 

embankments 
Bitiiminous road 

surfacing 
Concrete 

Reinforcing steel 
Steel guard railing 

Timber Bridges (2$ ) 
Structure excavation 
Backfill 

Compacting backfill 
Concrete 

Reinforcing steel 
Conpacting embankments 
Gravel road surfacing 
Untreated timber 
Treated timber 

Turnouts (U ) 

Structure excavation 
Backfill 

Conpacting backfill 
Concrete 

Reinforcing steel 
2U"inch reinforced 
concrete pipe 



each 


3,700 


% 7.50 \ 


\ 27,750 


cu.yd. 


71,6^0 


23.50 


1,683,780 


lb. 


9,250 


0.35 


3,2U0 


cu,yd. 


15,300 


U.oo 


61,200 


lin.ft. 


llOj 200 


1.75 


192,850 


ml. 


21.9 


2,500 


5U,75o 


each 


120 


50.00 


6,000 






lunp sum 


10,000 


cuoyd. 


1,960 


1.25 


2,U5o 


cuoydo 


2,U10 


0.70 


1,690 


cu.yd. 


2,U10 


3.50 


8,UUo 


cu.yd. 


2,U70 


1.00 


2,h70 


sq^ydo 


U,380 


3.00 


13,1U0 


cu.ydo 


1,395 


85.00 


118,580 


Ibe 


222, UOO 


0.16 


35,580 


lin„ft. 


1,250 


8.00 


10,000 


cu,yd. 


1,100 


1.25 


5,130 


cu.yd. 


3,000 


0.70 


2,100 


cu.yd. 


3,000 


3.50 


10,500 


cu.ydo 


250 


85.00 


21^250 


Ibo 


27,500 


c„i6 


h,Uoo 


cu.yd. 


1,500 


1.00 


1,500 


cu.yd. 


190 


U.oo 


760 


M.B.M, 


230 


3U0.00 


78,200 


M.B.M. 


29 


U05.00 


11.750 


cu.yd. 


1,520 


1.25 


1,900 


cu,yd. 


1,220 


0.70 


850 


cu.yd. 


1,220 


3.50 


U,270 


cu.yd. 


60 


85.00 


5,100 


lb. 


5,800 


0.16 


930 



lin.ft. 



^(> 



6.75 



380 



% 14,603,800 



192, Uoo 



135,600 



D=5 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNE^^^A¥A RESERVOIR 

"¥" LINE 

(continued) 





« * 
• • 




: Unit 






Item 


: Unit : 


Quantity 


: price : 


Cost 




Sta. 17+50 to Sta. 


1202+00 ( 


continued) 






Turnouts ()4) (continued) 












Ii.2-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


56 


$ 15.00 $ 


8I1O 




U8-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


112 


18.00 


2,020 




2i;-inch cast iron 












slide gate 


each 


1 


236.00 


2i;0 




U2-inch cast iron 












slide gate 


each 


1 


i470.00 


U70 




li8-inch cast iron 












slide gate 


each 


2 


635oOO 


1,270 




66-inch cast iron 












slide gate 


each 


1 


1,500 


1^00 $ 


19, 800 


Culverts (12) 












Structure excavation 












Comraon 


cu.yd. 


1,120 


1.25 


l.liOO 




Rock 


cu.yd. 


350 


li.50 


1^580 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


1,160 


0.70 


810 




Contacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


15000 


3.50 


3,500 




Concrete 


cu.yd. 


lUh 


85.00 


12,2ii0 




Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


16, 710 


0.16 


2,670 




l8-inch rein-forced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


700 


6.00 


h,200 




2a~inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


700 


6.75 


14,730 




30-lnch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


560 


10.00 


5,600 




Riprap 


cu.yd. 


60 


9.00 


51;0 


37,300 


Pipe Overchutes (Ul;) 












Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


3,7Uo 


1.25 


U5680 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


6,160 


0.70 


U,310 




Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


6,160 


3.50 


21,560 




Concrete 


cu.yd. 


350 


85oOO 


29,750 




ReixLforcing steel 


lb. 


28,900 


0.16 


U,620 




l8-inch C.M,P., 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


560 


7.50 


li,200 




2U-inch CM, P., 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


1.00 


9.50 


3,800 




30-inch CM. P., 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


Uoo 


11.50 


U,6oo 




36-inch CM. P., 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


Uoo 


15.60 


6,2kO 




l8~inch welded steel 












pipe, 10 ga. 


lin.ft. 


786 


11.00 


8,650 




2U-inch welded steel 












pipe, 10 ga. 


lin.ft. 


560 


16.80 


9,iao 





D-6 



2STm\TED COST OF INITI:\L FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACINTO TUNNEL TO KnTOE/JAWA RESERVOIR 
"I-l" LINE 
(continued) 



Item 



Unit ; Quantity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



Sta» 17+50 to Sta. 1202-1-00 (continued) 



I Pipe Overchutes (Uh ) (continued) 
30-inch welded steel 

pipe, 10 ga<, 
36=inch welded steel 

pipe, 10 gao 
Couplings and 

stiffeners 
Riprap 



lin.ft. 

lin,ft, 

Ibo 
cu<,yd. 



Flume Overchutes (I8 ) 

Structure excavation cuoyd. 

Backfill cuoydo 

Coir^jacting backfill cuoyd. 

Concrete cuoyd. 

Reinforcing steel lb„ 

Riprap cuoydo 

Irrigation Crossings (31 ) 

Structvire excavation cu<,yd. 

Backfill cuoyd. 

Contacting backfill cu«yd. 

Concrete cUoyd. 

Reinforcing steel lb, 
l8=inch reinforced 

concrete pipe lin<,ft. 
l8=inch welded steel 

pipe; 10 ga, lin.ft. 
Couplings and stiffeners Ibo 

oiieck Structures (2 ) 

Structure excavation cUoyd. 

Concrete cUoyd. 

Reinforcing steel lb, 
16' X 11' radial gate 

and hoist each 



560 
560 



8,200 
260 



10,510 

6^300 

6^300 

1.185 

190,730 

110 



2,6U0 

U,3U0 

UjOOO 

280 

23,250 

1,2U0 

1.730 
3,300 



3,0U0 

637 

20,000 



21.05 

27o30 

0.65 
9.00 



1.25 
0.70 
3o5o 
85.00 
0,16 
9.00 



1.25 
0.70 
3.50 

85.00 

0.16 

6„00 

11.00 
0.65 



1.25 

85.00 
0.16 



11,790 

15,290 

5,330 

2,3l|0 



13,1U0 

U,Uio 

22,050 

100, 730 

30,520 

990 



3,300 

3,0U0 

111, 000 

23,800 
3,720 

7,Uli0 

19,030 
2,150 



3,800 

5h,i5o 

3,200 



! 



$ 136,600 



171, 800 



76,500 



13,200 26,UOO 



87,600 



Siphons (6 ) 

Structure excavation 
Backfill 

Compacting backfill 
Concrete 
Reinforcing steel 

Right of Way 

Subtotal 



cu.yd, 
cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 
lb. 



57,360 

UO,380 

h,250 

U,530 

655,000 



D-7 



1.25 
0.70 
3.50 
85.00 
0,16 



71,630 

28,270 

lU, 880 

385,050 

loU, 800 



6oU,6oo 

180,000 
$ 6,2U6,000 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAW DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAM 

JACIOTO TUNlffiL TO MINT4EI-7AWA RESERVOIR 

^V' LINE 

(contimied) 



: : ; Unit : 
Item ; Unit : Qu arti ty ; price ; Cost 

Auld Valley Rese:."voirji Capacity 38^000 Acre-Feet 

Daji and Reservoir Ittirp sim $ U, 701,600 

(See appendix 
for cost breakdown) 

Sta. 1202<-Q0 to Stg. _ 12l|5+52 
ATild Valley Reservoir B^^-Pass Si phon^, Capacity kh2 cfs 

Siphon 

Excavation cu.yd. 30,900 $ 1.^0 $ U6,350 

Backfill cii,ydo Zh^lSO 0.65 l6,090 

Consolidating backfill cu.yd. 810 2c?0 2,030 
66-inch reinforced 

concrete pipe lino ft. U,350 3lu65' l50,730 

lU-inch pit)e vent each 1 UOCoOO UOO 

Blowcff " each 1 3,200 _„3£200 2l8,800 

Subtotal I 218,800 

Sta, 12U5+^0 to Sta. 1586+75 from Auld Yallej 



to Beginning 


of Pips 


Line, Canal 


Capacity 884 


cfs 




Earthwork, Concrete 












Lining, and Fences 












Excavation for canal 












Common 


cuoyd. 


u86,000 


0.25 


121,500 




Rock 


cu.yd. 


32 -',000 


2.70 


669, Hoo 




Excavation for 












drainage channels 


cu.yd. 


39,000 


CellO 


15, 600 




Trimming eaxth 












foujidations for 












concrete lining 


sq.yd. 


161,200 


0.50 


80,600 




Preparing rock 












foundations for 












concrete lining 


sq.ydo 


26,pOO 


1.70 


U5,o5o 




Compacting embankments 


cu,3'-d. 


50,000 


o,Ii5 


22,500 




Backfill over canal 












lining 


cu.yd. 


9,100 


1.30 


11,830 




Concrete lining 


cu,yd. 


18,100 


23.50 


.'425,350 




Gravel on operating 












road 


cu.yd. 


3,2U0 


U.oo 


12,960 




Safety ladders 


lb. 


2,550 


0.35 


890 




U-strand barbed wire 












fence 


mi. 


11.65 


2,500 


29,130 




6-foot chain link fence 


lin.ft. 


500 


1.75 


880 


1,635,700 



D-3 



ESTIMTED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 

"W" LINE 

(continued) 



Item 



Unit ; Quantity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



Sta. 12Ug+50 to Sta, 1^86+75 (continued) 



Timber Bridges (3) 










Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


500 $ 


1.25 $ 


630 


Backfill 


cuoyd. 


360 


0.70 


250 


Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


360 


3.50 


1,260 


Compacting embankments 


cu.yd. 


180 


1.00 


180 


Structure concrete 


cu.yd. 


Uo 


85,00 


3,hOO 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


5,800 


0.16 


930 


Gravel road siirfacing 


cu.yd. 


23 


U.oo 


90 


Untreated timber 


M.B.M. 


h5 


3Uo,oo 


15,300 


Treated timber 


M.B.M. 


h 


1I05.00 


1,620 


Check Structures (3) 










Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


3,900 


1.25 


14,880 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


2,250 


0.70 


1,580 


Contact backfill 


cu.yd. 


2,250 


3.50 


7,880 


Concrete 


cu.yd. 


275 


85.00 


23,380 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


37,500 


0.16 


6,000 


12' X 10' radial gate 










and hoist 


each 


3 


9,000 


27,000 


Steel trash rack 


lb. 


5,000 


0.65 


3,250 


Turnouts (2) 










Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


600 


1.25 


750 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


560 


0.70 


390 


Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


560 


3c50 


1,960 


Concrete 


cu.yd. 


25 


85.00 


2,130 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


3,200 


0.16 


510 


2h-inch reinforced 










concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


16 


6.75 


110 


36-inch reinforced 










concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


16 


12.50 


200 


2li-inch cast iron 










slide gate 


each 


1 


236.00 


2U0 


36-inch cast iron 










slide gate 


each 


1 


Uoo.oo 


Uoo 


Flume Overchutes (U) 










Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


1,700 


1.25 


2,130 


Backfm 


cu.yd. 


1,380 


0.70 


970 


Conpacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


1,380 


3.50 


14,830 


Concrete 


cu.yd. 


250 


85.00 


21,250 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


37,350 


0.16 


5,980 


Riprap 


cu.yd. 


2U 


9.00 


220 



4 



I 23,700 



71,000 



6,700 



35, Uoo 



D-9 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 

"W" LIN'E 

(continued) 



Item 



: : Unit 
Unit ; Quantity ; price 



Cost 



Sta. 12h$+^0 to Sta. lg86-»75 (continued) 



Pipe Overchutes (11) 










Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


935 ^ 


1»25 $ 


1,170 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


i,5Ho 


0,70 


1,080 


Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


i,5Uo 


3.50 


5,390 


Concrete 


cu.yd. 


85 


85eOO 


7,230 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


7,060 


0.16 


1,130 


l8-inch CM. P., 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


160 


7.50 


1,200 


2li-inch C. M.P.J 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


120 


9,^0 


1,1)40 


30-inch CM. P., 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


80 


iio5o 


920 


36-inch CM. P., 12 ga. 


lin.ft. 


80 


15.60 


1,250 


l8-inch welded steel 










pipe, 10 ga. 


lin.ft. 


22U 


11.00 


2,U6o 


2i;-inch welded steel 










pipe, 10 ga. 


lin.ft. 


168 


16,80 


2,820 


30-inch welded steel 










pipe, 10 ga. 


lin.ft. 


112 


21,05 


2,360 


36- inch welded steel 










pipe, 10 ga. 


lin.ft. 


112 


27.30 


3,060 


Couplings and 










stiffeners 


Ibo 


1,928 


0.65 


1,250 


Riprap 


cuoyd. 


66 


9cOO 


590 


Culverts (.^) 










Structure excavation 










Common 


cu.yd. 


325 


1,25 


Uio 


Rock 


cu.yd. 


75 


U.50 


3I1O 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


300 


C70 


210 


Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


300 


3.50 


1,050 


Concrete 


cu.yd. 


38 


85.00 


3,230 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


3,350 


O0I6 


510 


18-inch reinforced 










concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


280 


60 00 


1,680 


2ii-inch reinforced 










concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


U20 


6,75 


2,8UO 


Riprap 


cu.yd. 


30 


9»00 


270 


Siphons 










Structure excavation 


cu.yd. 


80,510 


1.25 


ioo,6ii.o 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


56,960 


0.70 


39,870 


Compacting backfill 


cu.yd. 


6,170 


3o50 


21,600 


Concrete 


cu.yd. 


710 


85.00 


60,350 


Reinforcing steel 


lb. 


101,200 


0.,16 


16,190 



$ 33, 100 



10,600 



D-10 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITL1L FEATURES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACINTO TUNNEL TO MINNE'.-J'AWA RESERVOIR 
"W" LINE 



(continued) 



Item 



Unit ; Quantity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



Sta. 12ii$+50 to Sta. lg86+75 (continued) 



Siphons (continued) 

6-foot chain link fence lin.ft. 
120-inch reinforced 

concrete pipe lin„ft. 

Right of Way 

Subtotal 



100 $ 1.75 $ 
lt,960 110.00 

limp sum 



180 
gli5>600 $ 781|^U00 
30.000 
I 2,635,600 



Sta. 1586+75 to Sta. 2100+00 



Pi£ 


e Line from End of Canal to 






Vallecitos 


Reservoir 


Turnout, Cap 


acity U32 


cfs 




Pipe Line 












Excavation 












Common 


cu.yd. 


217,135 


1.20 


260,560 




Rock 


cu.yd. 


115,290 


3.20 


368,930 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


218, U90 


0.65 


1U2,020 




Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


I8,h30 


2.50 


h6,080 




90-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


51,325 


83.10 


U, 265, no 




Manhole 


each 


6 


3,U00 


20, UOO 




Manhole and blowoff 


each 


9 


3,930 


35,370 




Manhole and air valve 


each 


8 


3,800 


30,1;00 




Vent structure 


each 


1 


6,130 


6,130 




Turnout 


each 


2 


730.00 


1,U60 




Turnout 


each 


1 


7,170 


7,170 


5,183,600 


Right of Way 






lunp sum 




22,000 


Subtotal 










1 5,205,600 



Pipe Line 



Sta. 2100+00 to Sta. 2721+00 
Turnout (Vallecitos Reservoir) to 
Turnout (Oceanside), Capacity 39h cfs 



1.70 
2.75 

0.65 
2.50 



Excavation 






Common 


cu.yd. 


162,560 


Rock 


cu.yd. 


2U9,070 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


283,650 


Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


2U,100 


81i-inch reinforced 






concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


6,300 



276,350 

681;, 9U0 

I81i,370 

60,250 



66.30 iil7,690 



D-11 



ESTIMTED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAl^ 

JACINTO TUWIEL TO MINTffiWAWA RESERVOIR 

'¥" LINE 

(cont5-nued) 



Unit 



Item 



Unit 



Quantity 



price 8 



Cost 



Sta. 2100+00 to Sta. 27214-00 (contimied) 



P ipe Line (continued) 

oii-inch steel pipe lin.ft. 

Manhole and blcwoff each 

Manhole and air valve each 

Vent structure each 

US-inch vent pipe lin.ft. 

Turnout each 

Turnout each 

Right of Way 

Subtotal 



55,800 I 102.90 $5,7lil.,820 



23 


3,930 


90,390 




20 


3o800 


76j000 




2 


6,130 


12,260 




800 


uO.oo 


32^000 




2 


730.00 


l,i;60 




2 


7pl70 


lh,3U0 


$ 7,591,900 




lujip sum 




29,000 



.$ 7,620,900 



Sta. 2721+00 to Sta„ 29U5+00 





Tui'nout 


(Oceanside) 


to 






Turnout 


(Bueno Colorado), Capacity 383 cfs 






Pipe Line 










Excavation 












Common 


cu.yd. 


22,920 


1.50 


3U.380 




Rock 


cu.yd. 


121, 6U0 


2.50 


3oU,ioo 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


9U,730 


0.65 


61,580 




Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


10, 320 


?.5o 


25,800 




90-inch rernforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


11,500 


76.25 


876,880 




90-inch steel pipe 


lin.ft. 


10,900 


82.10 


89h,890 




Manhole 


each 


2 


3,uoo 


6,800 




Manhole and blowoff 


each 


8 


3,930 


31,l;ii0 




Manhole and air valve 


each 


7 


3,800 


26, 600 




Vent structure 


each 


1 


6,130 


6,130 




Turnout 


each 


1 


7,170 


7,170 


2,275,800 


Right of Way 






lunp sujn 




11,000 


Subtotal 








< 


S 2.286.800 



Pipe Line 
Excavation 
Common 
Rock 



Sta. 29li5+00 to S ta . 3l6>00 

Turnout (Bueno Colorado) to 

Turnout (Carlsbad), Capacity 37U cfs 



cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 



63,990 
75,lj20 



0,50 
2o50 



32,000 
188,550 



D-12 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQlfEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TU]\INEL TO MINI-ffiWAWA RESERVOIR 

'¥" LINE 

(continued) 



Item 



Unit ; Quantity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



Sta. 29li5-'-00 to Sta. 3163+00 (continued) 



Pipe Line (continued) 
Backfill 

Consolidating backfill 
90-inch reinforced 

concrete pipe 
90-inch steel pipe 
81|-inch steel pipe 
Manhole 

Manhole and blowoff 
Manhole and air valve 
Turnout 

Right of Way 

Subtotal 



cu„yd„ 


96,900 


% 0.65 1 


62,980 




cuoyd. 


8,UUo 


2.50 


21,100 




linoft. 


14,000 


78.90 


315,600 




lin.ft. 


8,500 


81,. 20 


715,700 




lino ft. 


9,300 


91.65 


852,300 




each 


3 


3,U00 


10,200 




each 


S 


3,930 


19,650 




each 


6 


3,800 


22,800 




each 


1 


7,170 
lunp sum 


7,170 


$ 2,2l;8,000 
10,000 



Sta. 3163+00 to Sta. 3269+00 
Turnout (Carlsbad) to 
Turnout (San Marcos Reservoir), Capacity 36I|. cfs 

Pipe Line 
Ebccavation 

Common cu.yd. 8U,870 0.50 U2,UU0 

Rock cu.yd. U8,270 3.65 176,190 

Backfill cu.yd. 83,970 0.65 5U,580 

Consolidating backfill cu.yd. U,020 2.50 10,050 

8U-inch reinforced 

concrete pipe lin.ft. U,l50 59.00 2U1|,850 

8i;-inch steel pipe lin.ft. 6,U50 95.20 6lIi,0U0 

Manhole each 2 3,U00 6,800 

Manhole and blowoff each 3 3,930 11,790 

Manhole and air valve each 1 3, 300 3, 8OO 

Vent structure each 1 6,130 6,130 

Turnout each 1 7,170 7,170 

Right of I'Jay lump sum 

Subtotal 



2,258,000 



1,177,800 

I4..900 

% 1,182,700 



D-13 



ESTIMTED COST OF INITI^iL FEATUIiES OF 
PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 
JACIOTO TUNNEL TO MINKEVJAWA RESERVOIR 
"W" LINE 
(continued) 





• • 




: Unit : 






Item 


: Unit : 


Quantity 


: price : 


C- 


DSt 


Sta. 3269+00 


to Sta. .3861+00 






Turnout (San Marcos Reser 


voir) to 






Turnout 


fEast of De] 


Mai')s Capacity 335 cfs 






Pipe Line 










Excavation 












Cominon 


cu.yd. 


2U7,970 


$ l.UO $ 


3U7,160 




Rock 


cu»yd. 


160, 580 


2.60 


Ul7,5l0 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


280^900 


0,65 


182.590 




Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


19j280 


2.50 


U8,200 




90-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


10,250 


9I0OO 


932,750 




90-inch steel pipe 


lin.ft. 


13,000 


79.00 1, 


p 02 7, 000 




8i4-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


6,1-50 


82.90 


53U,710 




8It-inch steel pipe 


lin.ft. 


30,100 


100.25 3. 


,017,530 




Manhole 


each 


3 


3,Uoo 


10,200 




Manhole and bla^roff 


each 


18 


3,930 


70, 7li0 




Manhole and air valve 


each 


17 


3,800 


6U,600 




Vent structure 


each 


2 


6,130 


12,260 




Turnout 


each 


3 


7,170 


21,510 


$ 6,686,800 


Right of Way 






luii?3 sum 




27,000 


Subtotal 










$ 6,713,800 



Sta. 3861+00 to Sta, U0lt3+00 





Turnout (East 


of Del Mar) 


to 




Turnout 


(Carroll Reser\roir), Capacity 32U cf, 


s 


Pipe Line 












Excavation 












Common 




cu.yd. 


U6,890 


1.00 


16, 890 


Rock 




cu.yd. 


72,550 


3.00 


217,650 


Backfill 




cu.yd. 


81,570 


0.65 


53,020 


Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


7,U30 


2.50 


18,580 


90-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 




lin.ft. 


8,800 


77.20 


679,360 


81i-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 




lin.ft. 


9,liOO 


80.60 


757, 6U0 


Manliole and blcwoff 




each 


7 


3,930 


27,510 


Manhole and air valve 


each 


7 


3,800 


26,600 


Vent structure 




each 


1 


6,130 


6,130 


Turnout 




each 


1 


7,170 


7,170 



1, 8U0, 600 



D-lLj 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITL1L FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TUNTffiL TO MINNEWAVJA RESERVOIR 

"¥'• LINE 

(continued) 



: : : Unit : 
Item ; Unit ; Quantity : price : Cost 

Sta. 386I+OO to Sta. UOU3+OO (continued) 

Right of Way lunp sum $ 8,U00 

Subtotal $ 1,8U9,000 

Sta. U0U3+OO to Sta. U21U+OO 



Turnout (Carroll Reservoir) 


to 






Turnout 


(Camp Elliott), Capacity 


29I1 cfs 






Pipe Line 










Excavation 












Common 


cu.yd. 102,910 


$ 


1.00 $ 


102,910 




Rock 


cu.yd. 15,850 




3.00 


h7,55o 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 81,710 




0.65 


53,110 




Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 5,080 




2.50 


12,700 




90-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 17,100 




86, UO 1 


,U77,UU0 




Manhole and blowoff 


each 9 




3,930 


35,370 




Manhole and air valve 


each 9 




3,800 


3U,200 




Turnout 


each 1 




7,170 


7,170 


l,770,l;00 


Right of Way 




lump sum 




7,800 


Subtotal 










$ 1,778,200 



Sta. )42lU+00 to Sta. ii6lU+00 





Turnout (Cajtp Elliott) to 






Turnout (San Diego and 


Helix), Capacity 286 


cfs 


Pine Line 










Excavation 










Common 


cu.yd. 


2U2,66o 


1.00 


2U2,66o 


Rock 


cu.yd. 


22,970 


3.50 


80,U00 


Backfill 


cu.yd. 


187,630 


0.65 


121,960 


Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


10,880 


2.50 


27,200 


8U-inch reinforced 










concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


33,750 


70.75 


2,387,810 


8U-inch steel pipe 


lin.ft. 


6,250 


8l.li5 


509,060 


Manhole 


each 


1 


3,Uoo 


3,Uoo 


Manhole and blowoff 


each 


16 


3,930 


62,880 


Manhole and air valve 


each 


15 


3,800 


57,000 


Vent structure 


each 


1 


6,130 


6,130 


Turnout 


each 


1 


7,170 


7,170 



3,505,700 



D-15 



ESTIMATSD COST OF INITIAL FiiATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TWINEL TO MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 

'¥" LB]E 

(continued) 





• • 

• • 


• 


Unit : 






Item 


: Unit : 


Quantity : 


price : 


C( 


ost 


Sta. U2li;+00 to Sta 


. I461U+OO (( 


continued) 






Right of VJay 






lump sum 




$ 18,U00 


Subtotal 










1 3,521,100 


Sta. I;6lU+00 


to Sta. U995+00 






Turnout (San Diego and Helix) to 


157 cfs 




Turnout (South Bay and Nat 


ional City) 


, Capacity 




Pipe Line 












Excavation 












Common 


cu.yd. 


196,790 : 


$ 1.00 ; 


J? 196,790 




Rock 


cu.yd. 


37,030 


3.50 


129,610 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


170,2liO 


0,65 


110,660 




Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


10,950 


2.50 


27,380 




Construction in street 


lin,ft. 


19,500 


10 ,00 


195,000 




78~inch steel pipe 


lin.ft. 


38,100 


70.85 


2,699,390 




Mui-ray tiornout 












control station 






lurrp sum 


112,600 




Manhole 


each 


10 


3,U00 


3U,000 




Manhole and blowof f 


each 


h 


3,930 


15,720 




Manhole and air valve 


each 


3 


3,800 


iijhoo 




Turnout 


each 


1 


7,170 


7,170 


3,539,700 


Right of Way 






lunp sum 




17,600 


Subtotal 










$ 3,557,300 


Sta. 1|9 95+00 


to Sta. 527a+00 






Turnout I 


[South Bay 


and National City) to 


cfs 




Turnout (Otay and Jjmp 


lerial). Cap 


acity liiu - 




Pipe Line 












Excavation 












Common 


cu.yd. 


27U,300 


0.90 


2U6,870 




Rock 


cu.yd. 


5,930 


3.50 


20, 760 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


132, 890 


0.65 


86, 380 




Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


7,U10 


2.50 


18,530 




Prepare subgrade and 












surface road 


sq.yd. 


U,670 


5.00 


23,350 




78-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


15,150 


57.90 


377,190 




78-inch steel pipe 


lin.ft. 


12,750 


79.35 


1,011,710 




U8-inch reinforced 












concrete pipe 


lin.ft. 


550 


UO.OO 


22,000 





D.16 



ESTIMATED COST OF INITIAL FEATURES OF 

PROPOSED SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT FROM SAN 

JACINTO TUIWEL TO MINNEWAWA RESERVOIR 

"W" LINE 

(continued) 



Item 



: : Unit 

Unit t Quantity ; price 



Cost 



Sta. itQ95+00 to Sta. g27h-»-00 (continued) 



Pipe Line (continued) 












Manhole 


each 


1 


$ 3,U00 $ 


3,U00 




Manholes and blowoffs 


each 


8 


3,930 


31,UliO 




Manholes and air valves 


each 


8 


3,800 


30,U00 




Vent structure 


each 


1 


7,170 


7,170 




Turnout 


each 


1 


iU,ooo 


lUjOoo 


$ 2,393,200 


Right of Way- 






limp sum 




12,800 


Subtotal 










S 2,U06,000 



Sta. 527U-)-00 to Sta. 5^22+00 
Turnout (Otay and Imperial )"~to 
Minnewawa Reservoir, Capacity 98 cfs 



Pipe Line 












Excavation 












Common 


cu.yd. 


3li,080 


1.00 


3U,080 




Rock 


cu.yd. 


102,820 


2,00 


205, 61iO 




Backfill 


cu.yd. 


95,000 


Oe65 


61, 750 




Consolidating backfill 


cu.yd. 


11,250 


2.50 


28,130 




78-inch steel pipe 


lin.ft. 


214,600 


63.00 


1,5U9,800 




Manholes 


each 


2 


3, loo 


6,800 




Manholes and blowoffs 


each 


9 


3,930 


35,370 




Manholes and air valves 


each 


8 


3,800 


30,Uoo 


1,952,000 


Right of Way 






lunp sum 




11, 600 


Subtotal 










$ 1,963,600 



D-17 



APPENDIX E 

DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED DAMS AND RESERVOIRS NEEDED 
TO PROVIDE REGULATORY AND EMERGENCY STORAGE ON THE 
PROPOSED AND EXISTING SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCTS 

L 

Auld Valley Dam and Reservoir 
Minnewawa Dam and Reservoir 
Vallecitos Dam and Reservoir 
San Marcos Dam and Reservoir 
Woodson Dam and Reservoir 
Carroll Dam and Reservoir 
Enlargement of Sem Vicente Reservoir 
Enlargement of Lower Otay Reservoir 



Auld Valley Dam and Reseirvolr 

The Auld Valley dam site is located on Tucalota Creek along the west 
line of Sec. 2, T. 7 S., R. 2 W., S.B.B.& M. Stream bed elevation is about 
1,400 feet, UoS.G.So datum. 

The Auld Valley dam site was mapped at a scale of 1 inch equals 200 
feet with a contour interval of 10 feet by the Department of Water Resources in 
1956. Reservoir areas and storage capacities for various stages of water sur- 
face elevation were obtained by planimetering United States Geological Survey 
quadrangles at a scale of ls24,000 with a contour interval of 20 feet, and are 
shown in Table E-1. 

TABLE E-1 
AREAS AND CAPACITIES OF AULD VALLEY RESERVOIR 







Water surface 






Depth of water 




elevation 


Water surface 


: Storage capacity 


at dam, in feet 




U.S.G.S. datum 
in feet 


area, in acres 


: in acre -feet 



1,400 

10 1,410 60 300 

20 1,420 lUO 1,300 

30 1,430 250 3,250 

4o l,44o 380 6,4oo 

50 1>50 510 10,800 

60 l,46o 640 16,600 

70 1,470 810 23,800 

80 1,480 990 32,800 

85 1,485 1,080 38,000 

90 1,490 1,170 43,600 

100 1,500 1,350 56,200 



A geological reconnaissance of the dam site was made by this Department. 
The relief at the dam site is relatively low emd the abutment slopes are gentle. 
Topography, foundation conditions, and availability of materials indicate that 
an earthfill type of dam is feasible at this site. 



E-1 



Rock types are quaxtzite schist emd gabbro of Cretaceous or possibly 
Triassic age. The gabbro is exposed on the flank of the right abutment and the 
schist is exposed on the left abutment. The contact between the two rock types 
was found exposed in the stream chaimel at the base of the right abutment o The 
small hill on the right abutment is apparently a pendant of the main schist 
body which outcrops on the left abutment. Gabbro on the right abutment is a 
dark bluish grey, massive and very hard, with grain size fine to medium. The 
schist on the left abutment is layered and broken. The bedrock is slightly 
veined. Small localized shears were noted in the left abutment. 

No faults were noted but regional seismicity is high, the area being 
approximately eight miles from the Elsinore fault zone. 

The right abutment which extends southward has an essentially even 
slope of about 25 per cent, with outcropping occurring on 10 per cent of the 
surface. The slope falls away sharply upstream and downstream. There are no 
breaJcs in the slope and creep is negligible. The soil mantle is about three 
feet in thickness and composed of loose weathered rock and soilo Bedrock is 
moderately weathered and blocky to a depth of five feet. Stripping would be 
necessary to an average depth of about eight feet. 

The left abutment has an uneven slope of about 15 per cent. Of the 
surface area, about five per cent is gullied. The slope is continuous both up 
and downstream. There are no breaks in slope and creep is slight. The soil 
mantle is about five feet thick composed of weathered rock and soil, and the 
bedrock is weathered and layered to a depth of about 10 feet. Stripping would 
be necessary to an average depth of about 15 feet. 

The channel width is about 2,400 feet with no outcrops. From logs of 
wells in the vicinity, it is estimated that the channel is fil3.ed to a depth of 
about 100 feet with alluvium consisting of sand, silt and some cobbles. There 
appears to be a clay stratum about five feet thick at a depth of about 25 feet 

E-2 



underlying the channel. The channel material will probably have to be removed 
to a depth of about 100 feet and replaced with compacted impervious fill. 

Earthfill materials were found to be available near the site in ade- 
quate quantity. There are about 2,800,000 cubic yards of impervious material 
in the stream chajinel extending upstream from the dam site about two miles. 
Random fill materials in the amount of about 3,000,000 cubic yards were found 
in the reservoir area just upstream from the right abutment and on the high 
ground about one mile upstream from the site in the fork of the stream. In 
addition, about U88,000 cubic yards of earth material that would be removed 
from the channel and about 78,000 cubic yards of rock and earth salvaged from 
the spillway cut could be utilized for random fill. Because of the presence of 
considerable amounts of clay, the random fill materials are not considered to 
be free draining. Rock for riprap could be quarried on the flank of Bachelor 
Mountain within 2,000 feet of the dam site, or obtained from material excavated 
in the spillway cut. 

For the cost estimates, a zoned earthfill structure was selected which 
would create a reservoir storage capacity of 38,000 acre-feet with a spillway 
lip elevation of 1,U85. Tne dam would have a height of 100 feet above stream 
bed, side slopes of 2.5:1 and a crest elevation of 1,500. It would contain 
approximately 3,072,000 cubic yards of fill. The crest width would be 30 feet, 
coniprised of ten-foot width for the imper'/ious core, and ten-foot widths for 
each of the upstream and downstream random fill sections. The impervious core 
section would have upstream and downstream slopes of 1:1. In order to prevent 
excessive leakage, the impervious core was assumed to extend to bedrock at a 
maximum depth of 100 feet in the channel. Nfoderate to light grouting on the 
abutments was assumed. Since it was found that groxind water levels in the 
channel are within 15 feet of the surface, a well point system would be neces- 
sary to accomplish excavation of the core trench. 

E-3 



Because of bhe need for drainage of the dc^-stream random fill zone, 
a gravel blanket with a thickness of six feet would be placed on the dowtistream 
face of the impervious core extending to a height equal to two-thirds of the 
distance between stream bed and spillway lip. Seepage from the impervious core 
and abutment contacts intercepted by the blanket drain would be carried to the 
downstream toe of the dam by gra;vel drains. The upstream face of the dam would 
be protected against wave action by rock riprap to a depth of three feet normal 
to the slope. 

The spillway would he a concrete-3ined chute, with ogee weir control 
section, placed in a cut through a saddle behind the small hill on the right 
abutment. T}:ie maximum depth of cut in the paxidle would be 30 feet, with about 
two feet of soil, three feet of weathered rock and the remainder in massive, 
slightly blocky sjid hard gab'uro. The spillway would have a discharge capacity 
of about 19,000 second-feet, the esti:iiated discharge of a once in a thousand 
year flood modified by the effect of surcharge storage in the reser<Aoir. Depth 
of water above the spillway lip during maximum flood discharge would be approxi- 
matej.y 10 feet and the crest of the dfim waa assLimed to be five feet above this 
maximum water surface. 

Releases from the reservoir \(rould be made through an outlet tower 85 
feet in height, equipped with eight high pressure slidegates located at intervals 
of elevation necessary to permit water to be released from selected levels in 
the reservoir. The outlet cciduit wou.ld consist of a 102 -inch diameter steel 
pipe encased in rei'xf oread co:.icre';e, founded on bed;.-ock along the left abutment 
and leading through a control valve house to a stilling basin located at the toe 
of the dam. At the control valve house the conduit would be divided into two 
S^k-inch pipes each equipped with a 72"inch hollow Jet valve and a 72-inch by 
^-inch venturi meter. A 12-inch diameter steel pipe equipped with a gate 
valve and venturi meter would be cormected to the main outlet conduit at the 



control valve house and would discharge into Tucalota Creek downstream from the 
dam. The stilling basin at the end of the outlet works would consist of a 
reinforced concrete rectangular basin 20 feet wide, 32 feet long, and 20 feet 
deep. 

It was estimated that the dam could be constructed over a period of 
one and one -half years. Stream flow could be diverted through an imconrpleted 
portion of the dam in the channel section during part of the construction period 
\intil the outlet works were completed. 

Construction of a reservoir in Auld Valley would require the relocation 
of about 2.5 miles of secondary dirt road and the clearing of a small grove of 
trees and removal of a light growth of brush. 

A detailed cost estimate for Auld Valley Dam and Reservoir is pre- 
sented in Table E-2. For illustrative purposes, a plan, profile, and section 
for the dam are shown on Plate 21, entitled "Auld Valley Dam on Tucalota Creek" . 



E-5 



TAFiLE S-2 

ESTIM!IT2D COST OF AULD VALLEY DAM MD RESERVOIR 
WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 36,000 ACPJI-FEET 

(Based on prices prevailing in 1956) 

Elevation of crast of dam: 1,500 feet, Capacity of reserrvoir to crest of 

U.S.G.S. datum spillway: 38,000 acre-feet 

Elevation of crest of spillway: 1,^85 feet Capacity of spillway with 5-foot 

Height of dam to spillway crest, above freeboard: 19,000 second-feet 
stream bed: 85 feet 



Item 



: : Unit 
Unit : Quantity : price 



Cost 



CAPITAL COSTS 



Dam 

Exploration 

Diversion of stream and 

dewatering of 

foundation 
Stripping topsoil 
Excavation for embanlanent 

Foundation 

From borrow pits 
Stabankment 

Impervious 

Random 

Random, salvage 
Riprap 

Drilling grout holes 
Pressure grouting 
Gravel dioains 

Spillway and Inlet 

Excavation, unclassified 
Baclrfill, compacted 
Concrete 

Weir and cutoff 

Floor 

Walls 
Reinforcing steel 
Inlet gate 

Outlet Works 
Excavation 
Baclfi'ill, compacted 
Concrete 

Conduit and collars 

Inlet tower 

Stilling basin and 
transition 
Reinforcing steel 
Miscellaneous metalwork 







lump sum 


$ 40,000 


cu.yd. 


69,000 


luTiap siiffi 
$ 0.4o 


70,000 
27,600 


cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 


697,300 
2,770,400 


0.60 
0.40 


4l8,400 
1,108,200 


cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 

lin.ft. 

cu.ft. 

cu . yd . 


1,594,900 
851,200 
566,000 
78,100 
19,800 
13,200 
60, 300 


0.16 
0.12 
0.15 
3.50 
3.00 
4.00 

3.50 


255,200 

102,100 
84,900 

273,400 
59,400 
52,800 

211,000 


cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 


251,400 
5,770 


1.50 
3.00 


377,100 

17,300 


cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 
lbs. 


8(50 

4,360 

1,430 

317,800 


40.00 
35.00 
45.00 

0.15 
lump sum 


32,000 
152,60c 
64,400 
47,700 
20,000 


cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 


9,800 
2,500 


2.00 
3.00 


19,600 
7,500 


cu.yd. 
cu.3rd. 


l,l4o 
680 


50.00 
70.00 


57,000 
47,600 


cu.yd. 

lbs. 
lbs. 


120 

172,000 
67,100 


70.00 
C.15 
0.65 


8,400 
25,800 
43,600 



$2,703,000 



711,100 



E-6 



ESTIMATED COST OF AULD VALLEY DAM AND RESERVOIR 

WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 38,000 ACRE-FEET 

(continued) 



Item 

CAPITAL COSTS 

Outlet Works (continued) 
Steel pipe, 102=inch 

diac 
High pressxire slide 

gates 
Hollow- jet valves, 

72=inch diao 
Ventiiri meters 
Control house 
Tucalota Creek outlet 



Cost 



lbs. 
lbs. 

each 



Reservoir 

Land and improvements 
Clearing reservoir lands ac . 
Road relocation ml. 

Subtotal 

Administration and engineering, 10^ 

C ont ingenc i e s , 15?^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL 



176,1+00 
li+8,000 



1,260 
2.5 



$ 0.30 

0.50 

lump sum 

20,000 
lump sum 
lump sum 



lump sum 
50.00 
15,000 



52,900 
7^,000 

63,800 

ifO,000 
10,000 
3,000 $ ^53,200 



733,800 
63,000 
37.500 



83^, 300 
$4,701,600 

$ 470,200 
705,200 
176,300 

$6,053,300 



E-7 



Minnewava Dam and Reseryoir 

The Minnewawa dam site is located on Janiul Creek about one mile up- 
stream from Lower Otay Reservoiro It is in the KE ■^■ of Sec» U, T. 18 So, Ro 1 Eo, 
S0B0B0&. Mo Stream bed elevation is about 525 feet, U.S.GoSo dattmio Reservoir 
areas and capacities for various stages of water surface elevation were obtained 
by planimetering United States Geological Survey quadxsingles at a scale of 
1562,500^ with a contour interval of 50 feet, and are presented in Table E-3« 
A topographic map of the dam site at a scale of 1 inch equals 100 feet, with 
ten foot contour interval was made by the Division of Water Resources in 1955° 

TABLE E-3 
AREAS AM) CAPACITIES OF MIIirNEWAWA RESERVOIR 





: WateT' surface 







Depth of water 


: elevation, 


I Water surface ; 


Storage capacity. 


at dam, in feet 


s UoS.GoSo datiom 


: area, in acres : 


in acre -feet 




: in feet 


I I 







525 








5 


530 


1 


2 


15 


5^*0 


8 


47 


25 


550 


19 


180 


35 


560 


46 


510 


h5 


570 


75 


1,110 


55 


580 


110 


2,040 


65 


590 


140 


3,290 


75 


600 


180 


4,890 


85 


610 


220 


6,890 


95 


620 


280 


9,390 


105 


630 


340 


12,500 


115 


6ko 


410 


16,200 


125 


650 


490 


20,700 


135 


660 


590 


26,100 


li^5 


670 


680 


32,500 


155 


680 


800 


39,900 


165 


690 


920 


48,500 


175 


700 


1,080 


58,500 


185 


710 


1,230 


70,000 


195 


720 


1,390 


83,100 


205 


730 


1,550 


97,800 


215 


7^ 


1,700 


114,100 


225 


750 


1,870 


131,900 



E-8 



Based upon a prelimineiry geological recormaissarce, the Minnewe.va dam 
site is considered suitable for an earthfill or combination earth and rockfill 
dam. Bedrock is meta-volcanic of the pre -Cretaceous age. It is gray-green in 
color, hard, and the grain size varies from aphanitic to coarse. Fractures and 
joints are numerous and extend to a considerable depth. No faults were noted. 
Small zones of shears were observed. A small talus cone was noted at the base 
of the right abutment. Regional seismicity is low. 

The right abutment has an even slope of about 50 per cent. Outcrops 
are numerous on the upper part of the slope. The slope is even upstream and 
downstream with minor breaks. Creep is minor and no slides were apparent. 
For an earthfill structure, about ten feet of talus plus eight feet of bedrock 
should be stripped from the abutment. 

The left abutment is of an even slope of ko per cent diminishing both 
upstream ajid downstream. Outcrops are numerous and breaks in slope are minor. 
Minor creep was noted. Necessary stripping on this abutment would Include about 
two feet of soil plus about ten feet of weathered emd badly fractured and jointed 
rock. 

The chsjinel is about 150 feet wide with outcrops near the center on 
the axis. Alluvium is silt, sand, gravel, and boulders to aa average depth of 
about 15 feet with a maximxun depth of about 25 feet. Stripping would be neces- 
sary to an average depth of about 20 feet, consisting of about 15 feet of 
unconsolidated material plus about five feet of rock. 

Moderate to light grouting along the axis of the dam would be necessary. 

A dam with a height of 195 feet above stream bed is required to pro- 
vide a reservoir storage capacity of 59>000 acre-feet at this site. The dam 
would be a rolled earthfill type with an impervious core of select material and 
upstream and downstream sections of random material. It would have a crest 
elevation of 720 feet and side slopes of 3:1 and contain 2,485,000 cubic yards 

E-9 



of fill. The imperviaas core would, have a slope of 0.75:1 and extend to bedrock. 
Crest ^^dth would bs 30 feet, comprised of ten foot Td.dths each for the upstream 
and downstream random sections ajid ten feat for the crest of the core section. 

Earthfill materials were found to be available near the site in ade- 
quate quantity. There are about ]., 610,000 cubic yards of impervious material 
in Dulzura Creek extending upstream from the dam site about four miles. Addi- 
tional impervious material could be obtained from the upper reaches of Lower 
Otay Reser'/oir if the water stage is low. Although adequate quantities of 
pervious material are not available in the reser>/oir, approximately 1,880,000 
cubic yards of random fill material may be obtained from the hills on the 
northern edge of Lower Otay Reservoir 8t a distance of about four miles by roeid. 
Additional random fill material is s.v'aiiable from the San Diego formation 
immediately east of Lower Otay Reservoir. About 157; 500 cubic yards of material 
from the foundation excavation a.nd 200,900 cubic yards of material salvaged 
from the spillway excavation could be utilised for random fill. Rock for riprap 
could be quarried near the sjcis or obtained from material excavated in the 
spillway cut. 

Because of the need for drain£-.ge of the dowistream random fill zone, a 
gravel blanket with a thickness of six fset would be placed on the downstream 
face of the inrper\.'ious core extending to a height equal to two-thirds of the 
distance between streara bed and spillway lip. Seepage from the impenrious core 
and abutment contacts intercepted by the blanket drain would be carried to the 
downstream toe of the dam by gravel drains. The upstream face of the dam would 
be protected from wave action by riprap to a depth of three feet normal to the 
slope . 

The spillway would consist of an ogee weir control section and a 
concrete-lined apron placed in a cut through a saddle behind the left abutment. 
The maximum depth of cut in the saddle would be about 35 feet with about 10 feet 

E-10 



being weathered rock and soil and the remainder being blocky and very hard raeta- 
volcanic rock. The spillivay would have a discharge capacity of about ^9^000 
second -feet which is the estimated peak flow of a once in a thousand year flood. 
Because of the preliminary nature of this design, no consideration was given the 
effect of surcharge storage in the reservoir on reducing the peak flows over the 
spillway. The depth of water over the spillway lip during maximum flood dis- 
charge would be 15 feet and the crest of the dam was set five feet above this 
maximum water surface elevation. 

Inflows to the reservoir from the proposed San Diego Aqueduct and 
releases from the reservoir would be controlled by construction of an inclined 
outlet tower ^50 feet in length on the left abutment, equipped vrt.th six 46-inch 
diameter hydraulically operated butterfly valves located at various elevations 
in order to permit releases from selected levels in the reservoir. The inlet - 
outlet conduit would be a 78-inch diameter steel pipe encased in reinforced 
concrete and located along the left abutment. At the downstream toe of the dam 
the outlet conduit would divide into two 78-inch diaimeter branches, each equipped 
with a i<-8-inch diameter cone valve located in the valve house. One branch would 
be connected to the 78-inch diameter pipe line of the proposed aqueduct and the 
other would be bulkheaded off for futiire connection to a possible second stage 
barrel of the aqueduct. 

Time of construction is estimated to be one year. Stream diversion 
during construction could be effected through, the outlet conduit. 

Relocation of about one mile of state highway and a bridge would be 
required. In addition, the road through Proctor Valley would be improve! to 
compensate for inundation of the road along Dulzura Creek. 

A detailed cost estimate of Minnewawa Dam and Reservoir is sho^m on 
Table E-k. For illustrative purposes, a plain, profile, and cross section of the 
proposed dam are shown on Plate 22, entitled "Minnewawa Dam on Jaraul Creek" . 

E-11 



TABLE E-k 

ESIVUW,D CCS'T OF VilhWMAMA DAM MD RESERVOIR 
WII'H STORAGE CPJ:'ACTr;. OF 59,000 ACRS-5I3ET 

(Based on prices pi-evailing in 1956) 



Elevation of crest of dam: 720 feet, 

U.S.G.S. datum 
Elevation of crest of spill\ra,y: 700 feet 
Height of dam to spillway crest, above 

stream bed: 175 feet 



Capacity of reservoir to crest of 
spillvay: 59.000 acre-feet 

Capacity of spillway with 5 -foot 
freeboard: ^9,000 second-feet 



Item 



Unit 



CAPITAI. COSTS 



Qua ntity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



Dam 



Exploration 








lump S'orii i 


1 35,000 




Diversion of stream 


and 












dex/atering of 














fo'andatlon 








lumTJ sum 


15,000 




Stripping topsoil 




cu.yd. 


71,ii-00 


$ 0.50 


35,700 




Excavation for embarilmeat 












Fouo.c'^ition 




c^\.yd. 


134,670 


1.00 


134,90c 




I'^ora borrow pits 




cu.yd. 


S13-.70O 


C.55 


447,500 




From stream bed 




ca.yd. 


1,518,700 


0.40 


e(r(,300 




Emba.i}sment 














Impervious 




cu = yd . 


707,600 


0.16 


113,200 




Ranc.om 




cu.yd. 


1,320,600 


0.1 4 


164,900 




Ra/idom, salvage 




cu : yd .. 


356,400 


0.20 


7:, 700 




Riprap 




CV\.3rd. 


46,100 


4.00 


192,400 




Drilling grout holes 




lin.ft. 


12,400 


3 = 00 


37,200 




Press -a-e grouting 




Cli o X U o 


3,200 


4.00 


32,800 




GraveT drains 




cu.yd. 


50,500 


3.50 


176,800 


$2,084,600 


Spillway 














Excavation, unciassi 


fied 


cu.yd. 


236,300 


2.60 


6l4,4oo 




Coni;rete 














Weir and cutoff 




cu.ydo 


700 


40.00 


28,000 




Floor 




cu.yd. 


850 


35^00 


29,800 




Walls 




cu.yd. 


70 


45.00 


3,200 




Reinforcing steel 




lbs. 


118,000 


0.15 


17,700 


693,100 



Outlet Vi'orks 
Excavation 

Structures 

Conduit 
Backfill 
Concrete 

Condijiit and collars 

Inlet structure 

Gate chainber and 
•/alve house 
Reinforcing steel 
Miscellaneous metal work lbs. 



cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 


l4,80O 

12,600 

8,300 


2.50 
2.30 
2o50 


37,000 

31,500 
20,800 


cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 


1,S40 
1,510 


50.00 
70.00 


92,000 
105,700 


cu.yd. 

lbs. 

lbs. 


80 

200,000 

23,200 


80.00 
0.15 
C.65 


6,400 
30,000 
15,100 



E-12 



ESTIMATED 30ST OF MINNEWAWA DAM MD RESERVOIR 

WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 59,000 ACRE-?EET 

(continued) 



Item 



: : Unit 
Unit ; Quantity ; price 



Cost 



CAPITAL COSTS 



Outlet Works {continued) 
Steel pipe, 78-inch dia. 
Cone valve, US-inch dia. 
Butterfly valve, ^iS-inch 

dia. 
Asphalt apron-inlet 
tower 



Reservoir 

Land and improvements 
Clearing reservoir lands ac . 
Road relocation 

Subtotal 

Administration and engineering, 10^ 

Contingencies, 15^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL 



lbs. 
each 


316,250 
2 


$ 0.30 $ 9^,900 
20,000 U0,000 




each 


6 


22,500 135,000 




sq..ft. 


U2,000 


0.20 8,1'00 


$ 616,800 


ac. 


1,100 


lump sum 1,1^7,000 

50.00 55,000 

lump sum 255,000 


1,^57,000 

$u, 851, 500 


ng, 10^ 






$ 485,200 
727,700 
121,300 

$6,185,700 



E-13 



Vallecitos Dam and Resem-oir 

The Vallecitos cLara site is located on a tributary to the San Luis Rey 
River in the NW -^ of Sec. 13, T. 9 3-> R- 3 W. , S^B^B^Sb M. Stream bed elevation 
at the site is about 770 feet. Reservoir areas and storage capacities were com- 
puted from United States Geological Survey quadrangles at a scale of 1:24^000 
with a contour interval of 20 feet and are shown in Table E-5. 



TABLE E"5 
AREAS AND CAPACITIES OF VALLECITOS RESERVOIR 







Water siorface 






Depth of water 


elevation 


Water surface 


Storage capacity 


at dam, in 


feet 


U.S.G.S. datum 
in feet 


area, in acres 


in acre -feet 







770 








10 




780 


1 


5 


20 




790 


3 


25 


30 




800 


6 


70 


ko 




810 


12 


160 


50 




820 


20 


320 


60 




830 


25 


^ko 


70 




8140 


31 


820 


(So 




850 


40 


1,180 


90 




860 


50 


1,630 


100 




870 


61 


2,180 


no 




880 


76 


2,870 


120 




890 


92 


3,710 


130 




900 


110 


4,720 


lijO 




910 


120 


5,870 


150 




920 


1^ 


7,170 


i6o 




930 


160 


8,670 


168 




938 


180 


10,000 


170 




9ito 


185 


10,i+00 



Topography at the site is rough with steep slopes. Based upon prelimi- 
nary geological reconnaissance made by this Department, the Vallecitos dam site 
is considered suitable for either a zoned earthi'ill or rockfill type of structure, 
or, with more foundation preparation, a masonry dajci. 



E-IJ4 



Bedrock at this site is composed of moderately weathered Woodson 
Mountain granodiorite of the Cretaceous age. It is greyish white In color, 
moderately hard and of a coarse grain size. The joint system is fairly well 
developed with exfloiation type joints being most common. A moderate amount 
of grouting would be required for a grout curtain as the joints appear to close 
with depth. There are no apparent shears, faults, or slides. 

Regional seismicity is active, the site being approximately five miles 
southwest of the Elsinore fault system. 

The right abutment has an average slope of about 75 per cent with 
outcrops occurring over approximately half the areal extent of the area to be 
stripped. The slope falls away upstream and downstream. A break in slope occurs 
at about 900 feet elevation. Creep was noted to be negligible and talus minor. 
Stripping on this abutment would involve the removal of about two feet of soil 
and loose weathered rock plus approximately seven feet of weathered and jointed 
rock. 

The left abutment has an average slope of about 70 per cent, falling 
away upstream and downstream. Some loose boulders are present and this abutment 
appears to be more deeply weathered than the right abutment. Minor creep was 
noted. Stripping on this abutment would include removal of about three feet of 
soil and loose weathered rock plus approximately seven feet of weathered rock. 

The channel width is approximately 30 feet, with bedrock outcrops 
occupying about 15 per cent of the channel area. Alluvixun therein is composed 
of silt, sand, pebbles, cobbles, and boulders. Stripping would require removal 
of about six feet of alluvium and loose weathered rock plus shaping of about 
three feet of bedrock. 

An aiAXiliary dam would be required in a saddle which is located about 
1,000 feet southeast of the left abutment. Stripping of about five feet of soil 
and loose weathered rock would be necessary there. 

E-15 



Earthfill materials are not available near the site in adequate quanti- 
ties. Only about 2^,000 cubic yards of impervious fill material vera found to 
be available in the reservoir area. There are about 182,000 cubic yeards of 
inrper-zious fill material available in Rainbow Valley which is located about 
one and one -half miles north of the d.ara site and another 71,000 cubic yards in 
a small valley located about one mile southwest of Rainbow Valley. Pervious 
material in adequate quantity could be obtained from the San Luis Rey River 
channel at a haul distance of about eight miles. In order to reduce the amount 
of material hauled from borrow areas, it was assumed that about 28,900 cubic 
i^ards of pervious me-terial could be salvaged from the foundation excavation and 
19,600 cubic yards from the spillway cut. Rock for riprap or for a rockfill 
dam could be quarried from the sides of the reservoir. 

For purposes of cost estimating a zoned earthfill dam was selected 
with a height of 178 feet above stream bed and creating a reservoir with a 
storage capacity of 10,000 acre-feet. The dam would have a crest elevation of 
9U8 feet and side slopes of 3:1 upstream and downstream, requiring an embanlonent 
quantity of 1,530,000 cubic yards. The crest v/idth would be 30 feet, consisting 
of a ten-foot width of impervious core section and ten-foot widths for each of 
the pervious sections. The impervious core section would have side slopes of 
0.5:1 both upstream and downstream and would extend to bedrock, and the remainder 
of the embankment would be made up of upstream and downstream pervious sections, 
constinicted of materials considered to be relatively free -draining. Moderate to 
heavy grouting would be necessary. Riprap, with a thickness of three feet normal 
to the upstream face of the dam, would be necessary to protect the face against 
wave action. 

The spillway would be a concrete -lined chute with ogee weir control 
section placed in a cut through the ridge forming the left abutment. Maximum 
depth of cut would be about 35 feet with about five feet being overburden and 

E-16 



the remainder rock. The spillway would have a discharge capacity of about 
3,400 second-feet, the estimated discharge of a once in a thousand year flood. 
Because of the preliminary nature of this design, no consideration was given to 
the effect of surcharge storage in the reservoir in reducing estimated peak flows 
over the spillway. Depth of water above the spillway during maximum flood dis- 
charge would be approximately five feet and the crest of the dam was assumed to 
be five feet above the maximum water surface elevation determined thereby. 

Releases from the reservoir would be effected through a submerged 
inlet -outlet tower and controlled at a gate chamber under the main dam structure. 
The inlet-outlet conduit would be a 36-inch diameter steel pipe, encased in 
reinforced concrete from the tower to the gate chamber at the axis of the dam, 
ajid in an access conduit from the gate chamber to the valve house at the toe 
of the dam. A 36-inch butterfly valve would be placed in the line at the gate 
chamber and a 24-inch cone valve would be placed in the line at the valve house. 
The outlet conduit would be located along the right abutment. 

It was estimated that time of construction would be one year, and 
stream flow during construction could be diverted through the outlet conduit. 

There are only a few improvements in the reservoir area which may 
effect the purchase price of the lands therein, and no appreciable road relocation 
work is anticipated. Since impervious borrow material would be obtained from 
cultivated areas in Rainbow Valley, it was assumed for purposes of this estimate 
that the borrow areas therein would be purchased in fee. The major part of the 
pervious material would be imported from the San Luis Rey River Valley and would 
be taken from land which has no apparent value for cultivation purposes. 

It should be noted that a rockfill dam could be constructed at this 

site with material quarried from the reservoir area. Only earthfill for the 

impervious core or aggregate for a concrete face slab would need to be imported. 

A detailed estimate of cost for an earthfill dam and reservoir at the Vallecitos 

site is presented in Table E-6. 

E-17 



TABLE E-6 



ESTIMATED COST OF VALLECITOS DAM MB RESERVOIR 
WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 10,000 ACRE-FEET 

(Based on prices prevailing in 1956) 



Elevation of crest of dam: 9^8 feet, 

U.S.G.S. datum 
Elevation of crest of spillway: 938 feet 
Height of dam to spillway crest, above 

stream bed: l63 feet 



Capacity of reservoir to crest of 
spillway; 10,000 acre-feet 

Capacity of spillway with 5 -foot 
freeboard; S^'^-OO second-feet 







"^ 


; Unit 


^ 




Item 


: Unit 


: Quantity 


: price 


: Cost 


CAPITAL COSTS 












Dam 












Exploration 






lump sum 


$ 17,500 




Diversion of stream and 












dewateriiig of 












foundation 






lump sum 


2,500 




Stripping topsoil 


cu.yd. 


25,700 


$ 0.40 


10,300 




Excavation for embankment 












Foij^idation 


cu.yd. 


36,200 


1.10 


39,800 




From borrow pits 


cu . yd . 


277,000 


0.55 


152,300 




From stream bed 


cu . yd . 


1,337,500 


1.20 


1,605,000 




Embanlanent 












liTiper'/ious 


cu . yd . 


241,600 


o.i6 


38,700 




Pervious 


cu.yd. 


l,26U,if00 


0.l4 


177,000 




Per-/i ous , salvage 


cu.yd. 


48,500 


0.20 


9,700 




Riprap 


cu . yd . 


39,100 


3.50 


136,900 




Drilling grout holes 


lin.ft. 


20,300 


3.00 


60,900 




PressiJire grouting 


cu.ft. 


13,500 


4.00 


54,000 


$2,304,600 


Auxiliary Dam 












Stripping 


cu o yd . 


1,100 


0,50 


600 




Embanlnnent 












Impervious 


cu.yd. 


15,000 


0.70 


10,500 




Pex*vious 


cu.yd. 


32,300 


1.35 


43,600 




Riprap 


cu.yd. 


4,120 


3.50 


l4,4oo 


69,100 


Spillway 












Excavation, unclassified 


cu.yd. 


24,500 


2.10 


51,500 




Concrete 












Weir and cutoff 


cu.yd. 


150 


40.00 


6,000 




Floor 


cu.yd. 


310 


35.00 


10,800 




Walls 


cu.yd. 


50 


45.00 


2,200 




Reinforcing steel 


lbs. 


4o,6oo 


0.15 


6,100 


76,600 


Outlet Works 












Excavation 












Structures 


cu.yd. 


150 


2.00 


300 




Cond\iit 


cu . yd . 


5,900 


2.50 


l4,700 




Backfill 


cu . yd . 


3,200 


3.00 


3,600 





E-18 



ESTIMATED COST OF VALLECITOS DAM AND RESERVOIR 
WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 10,000 ACRE-FEET 
(continued) 



Item 


• • 

: Unit : 


Quantity 


: Unit : 
price : 


Cost 




CAPITAL COSTS 














Outlet Works (continued) 
Concrete 

Conduit and collars 

Structures 
Reinforcing steel 
Miscellaneous metal work 
Steel pipe, 36-inch dia. 
Cone valve, 2i*-inch dia. 
Butterfly valve, 36-inch 

dia. 


cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 

lbs. 

lbs. 

lbs. 


1,300 

300 

102,000 

9,200 

72,300 


$50.00 $ 

75.00 

0.15 

0.65 

0.30 

Ivaxg sum 

lump s\m 


65,000 
22,500 
15,300 
6,000 
21,700 
12,000 

5,500 


$ 


166,600 


Reservoir 

Land and improvements 
Clearing reservoir lands 
Road relocation 


ac. 

mi. 


200 
0.63 


iTjmp s\am 
50.00 
26,000 


408,300 
10,000 
16, 400 




434,700 


Subtotal 










$3,051,600 


Administration and engineer 
Contingencies, 15^ 
Interest during constructic 


ing, 10^ 
n 








$ 
$3 


305,100 

457,700 

76,300 


TOTAL 


,890,700 



( 



000 



E-19 



San Marcos Dam and "Reservoir 

The San Marcos dam site is located on San Marcos Creek in the SE ^ 
of Sec. 30, T, 12 S., R. 3 W., S.B.B.Se M. Stream bed elevation is about 310 
feet, U.S.G.S. datum. Resein/-oir areas and storage capacities vere obtained from 
United States Geological Survey quadrajigles at a scale of 1:2^4-, 000 with a contour 
intei-val of 20 feet and are shown in Table E-7. 



TABLE E-7 
AREAS AND CAPACITIES OF SAN MARCOS RESERVOIR 







Water surface 




• 




Depth of water 


elevation 


V/ater surface : 


Storage capacity 


at dam J in 


feet 


U.S.G.S. 


datum 


area, in 


acres : 


in acre -feet 






in feet 




: 









310 












10 




320 




1 




5 


20 




330 




15 




85 


30 




3^ 




33 




320 


ko 




350 




60 




790 


50 




360 




98 




1,580 


60 




370 




liK) 




2,770 


70 




380 




190 




4,420 


80 




390 




230 




6,520 


90 




4oo 




280 




9,070 


100 




4io 




330 




12,100 


110 




U20 




370 




15,600 


111 




i|21 




375 




16,000 


120 




430 




420 




19,600 


130 




kko 




470 




24,000 


Ito 




450 




515 




28,900 



A preliminary geological reconnaissance of the dam site was made by 
this Department. The site is located at the entrance of a rather narrow canyon 
with steep slopes. Consideration of the topographic conditions and available 
material indicates that a combination earth and rockfill type of dam is best 
suited to the site. 

The bedrock at this locality consists of a greenish grey, very hard, 
fine to medium grained granitic rock which contains inclusions of a darker medium 



E-20 



grained rock •which could possibly be gabbro. Joints were noted i^ich extend to 
an unknown depth. No faults or slides were noted, nor were shears apparent. 
The general appearance of the area indicates that it is only moderately active 
seismically. 

The right abutment has an even slope of 65 per cent, falling away 
sharply in the upstream and downstream dii^ctions. Outcrops occupy 5 per cent 
of the surface area. There are no breaks in slope and creep is negligible. 
It is estimated that about five feet of soil and loose weathered rock plus 
eight feet of jointed bloeky rock would have to be stripped from this abutment. 

The left abutment has an average slope of about 65 per cent. The bed- 
rock is jointed and not as much exposed as on the right abutment. The soil and 
weathered rock is about five feet in depth and the bedrock is jointed and bloeky 
for a depth of about ten feet. Stripping would be necessary to an average depth 
of about 13 feet. 

The channel section is about kO feet wide with outcrops occupying 75 
per cent of the surface area. Bedrock is veiy near the surface in the channel 
section. Channel alluviiun consists of sand, cobbles and boulders to a depth 
of about two feet in several small pockets. It is estimated that the channel 
section would require stripping to a maximum depth of about seven feet. 

Adequate qusmtities of earth and rockfill materials are available near 
the site. About 985,000 cubic yards of material suitable for use in the imper- 
vious section of the dam were found in the rese-C/oir area about one -half mile 
to the northeast of the dam site. Additional impervious fill material may be 
obtained from San Marcos Valley which is located about two and one -half ndles to 
the northeast of the site by read. About 159^000 cubic yards of material for the 
rock section could be salvaged from the spillway excavation. 520,000 cubic yards 
of possibly pervious material is to be found in the reservoir area, apprcocimately 
three -foui-ths of a mile east of the dam site. 

E-21 



For cost estimating purposes, a zoned earth and rockfill type dam 
with a height oi'' 135 feet above scicasm bed was considered which would create a 
reservoir storage capacity of 16.OOO ecre-feet. The dam would have a crest 
elevation of kk^ feet and upstream and downstream side slopes of 2.5:1. The 
crest width would be 30 feet, comprised of a iO-foot width for the impervious 
core section and 10 -foot widths for each of the rockfill sections. The impervi- 
ous core would have side slopes of 0.75 -o 1 upstream and downstream and would 
extend to bedrock and the remainder of the dam embaLnicment would be made up of 
upstream and downstream pervious sections constructed of pervious material. 
Because there was doubt that the proposed pervious material would be free- 
drainingj the slopes of the daiu were «.ssj.med to be flatter than ordinarily 
required for a structure of this heigh.t. Pervious filter material would be 
placed between the impei-zious core and the pervious fill because of expected 
large sizes of rock in the latter material. Total fill would be i»-42,000 cubic 
yards, and grading of the rock on the upstream face of the dam would be com- 
pai-able to riprap to protect against wave ac^tion. Grouting along the axis of 
the dam was assumed to be Kioiierate in amount as the open joints seem to tighten 
considerably 'rtth depth. 

The spill>7ay would be a concrete -lined chute with ogee weir control 
section placed in a cut around the and of the dam on the left abutment. The 
maximum depth of cut would be about 120 feet consisting of about five feet of 
soil and weathered rock sjid the remainder in granodJ.orlte . The spillway would 
have a discharge capacity of 30,600 second-feet, the estimated peak flow of a 
once in a thousand year flood. Because of the prel3.minary nature of this design, 
no consideration was given to the effect of surcharge storage in the reservoir 
on reducing the estimated peak flows over the spillway. Depth of water above 
the spillway during maximum flood di.scharge would be approximately I9 feet and 
the crest of the dam was assumed to be five feet above the maximum water surface 

elevation deteiinined thereby. 

?'~22 



Releases from the reservoir would be effected through a submerged 
outlet tower equipped with a trash rack and controlled at a gate chamber under 
the main dam structure at the proposed axis. The outlet conduit would be located 
on bedrock along the right abutment. It would consist of a 36-inch diameter 
steel pipe encased in concrete from the tower to the gate chamber and a 36-inch 
diameter steel pipe placed in an access conduit extending from the gate chamber 
to the valve house at the downstream toe of the dam. Releases would be regu- 
lated by a 30-inch butterfly valve in the line located in the gate chamber, 
and a 2U-inch cone valve placed in the line at the valve house. 

Estimated time of construction is one year and stream diversion would 
be effected through the outlet conduit. Construction of about k.h miles of 
relocated county road would be required. 

A detailed cost estimate of San Marcos Dam and Reservoir is presented 
in Table E-8. It will be noted in the table that the cost of spillway excavation 
constitutes a substantial portion of the total cost. This cost could be reduced 
if the effect of surcharge storage on reducing the flood flow is taken into 
account. Also, it may be more economical to build a higher dam which could 
utilize a saddle spillway location behind the left abutment. The greater reser- 
voir capacity created by a higher dam could be utilized to conserve natural run- 
off or as a substitute for storage at some other location along the proposed 
San Diego Aqueduct. 



E-23 



TABLS E-8 



ESTIMATED COST 0? SM MAP;COS DAM AMD RESERVOIR 

wriH sax)RAGE cAPAcrn of 16,000 acre-feet 

(Based on prices prevailing in 1956) 



Elevation of crest of dam: kk^ feet, 

U.S.G.S. dati;m 
Elevation of crest of spillway: ^21 feet 
Height of dam to spillway crest, above 

streain bed: 111 feet 



Capacity of reservoir to crest of 
spillway; l6,000 acre -feet 

Capacity of spillway with 5 -foot 
freeboard: 30,600 second-feet 



Unit ; Quantity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



CAPITAL COSTS 



Dsjn 

Exploration 

Diversion of stream and 

dewatsring of 

founaation 
Stripping topsoil 
Excavation for embankment 

Founda-tion 

From borrow pits 

From stream bed 
Bnbanioaent 

Iniper\-ious 

Pervious 

Rock, salvage 
Drilling grout holes 
Pressure grouting 

Spillway 

Excavation, unclassified 
Concrete 

Weir and cutoff 

Floor 

Walls 
Reinforcing steel 

Outlet Works 
Excavation 

Structures 

Conduit 
Backfill 
Concrete 

Conduit and collars 

Structures 
Reinforcing steel 
Miscellaneous metalwork 
Steel pipe, 36 -inch dia. 
Cone valve, 2U-inch dia. 
Butterfly valve, 30 -inch 

dia. 



lump sum $ 15,000 



cu . ya . 

cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 

cu . yd . 
cu . yd . 
cu . yd. . 
lin.ft, 
cu . ft . 



cu . yd . 



lump sum 
15,300 $ 0.5c 



31.500 
187,200 
132,800 

162,800 

120,700 

159,000 

5,880 

3,920 



198,800 



1.10 
0.38 
0.45 

0.16 
O.lif 
0.20 
3.00 

4.00 



2.50 



5,000 

7,700 

34,700 
71,100 
59,800 

26,000 
16,900 
31,800 
17,600 
15,700 



497,000 



cu.yd.. 


322 


40.00 


12,900 


cu . yd . 


630 


35.00 


22,000 


cu . yd . 


195 


45.00 


8,800 


lbs. 


90,4oo 


0.15 


13,600 


cu . yd . 


500 


2.00 


1,000 


cu . yd . 


4,100 


2.50 


10,300 


cu.yd. 


900 


3.00 


2,700 


cu . yd . 


980 


50.00 


49,000 


cu . yd . 


420 


75.00 


31,500 


lbs. 


126,000 


0.15 


18,900 


lbs. 


7,600 


0.65 


4,900 


lbs. 


57,000 


0,30 


17,100 






lump sum 


12,000 






lump sura 


5,000 



$ 301,300 



55^,300 



152,400 



E-24 



ESTIMATED COST OF SAN MARCOS DAM AND RESERVOIR 
WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF l6,000 ACRE-FEET 
(continued) 



♦ 

Item : Unit 


: Unit : 
Quantity : price ; 


Cost 


CAPITAL COSTS 






Reservoir 

Land and improvements 
Clearing reservoir lands ac. 
Road relocation mi . 
Access road 


lump sum $ 
500 $ 50.00 
U„4 20,000 

lump sum 


365,500 

25,000 
88,000 
10,000 $ 488,500 


Subtotal 




$1,496,500 


Administration and engineering, 10^0 

Contingencies, 15^ 

Interest during construction 




$ 149,600 

224,500 

37,400 


TOTAL 




$1,908,000 



/ 



E-25 



Woodson Dam and Reservoir 

The Woodson dam site is in the NW -^ of Sec. 29, T. 13 S., R. 1 W., 
S.B.B.& M. Stream bed elevation is about 65O feet, U.S.G.S. datum. Reservoir 
areas and storage capacities for various stages of water surface elevation were 
obtained from United States Geological Survey quadrangles at a scale of 1:24,000, 
with a contour interval of 20 feet, sjid are shown in Table E-9. 



TABLE E-9 
AREAS AMD CAPACITIES OF WOODSON RESERVOIR 



Depth of water 
at dam, in feet 



Water surface 




elevation 


: Water surface 


U.S.G.S. datum 


: area, in acres 


in feet 




650 





660 


1 


670 


10 


680 


19 


690 


33 


TOO 


hi 


710 


61 


720 


75 


730 


88 


7^ 


100 


750 


110 


760 


125 


770 


130 


775 


liK) 


780 


11^5 


790 


160 


800 


170 



storage capacity 
in acre -feet 





10 

20 

30 

ilO 

50 

60 

70 

80 

90 

100 

110 

120 

125 

130 

lliO 

150 





5 

60 
200 
k6o 

860 

1,400 

2,080 
2,900 
3,8k) 
4,890 
6,060 
7,340 
8,010 
8,730 
10,200 
11,900 



The site is located at a prominent constriction formed by a ridge in a 
rather small valley. Based upon a preliminary geological reconnaissance this 
site is considered suitable for either an earthfill or masonry type of dam. 

Bedrock of the area is a massive, grey-white, granodiorite of the 
Cretaceous age. It is hard, medium grained in character, and fairly resistant 
to weathering. The bedrock at the dam site is slightly blocky, exhibiting 
widely spaced rectangular jointing. There are no apparent faults or shears and 

E-26 



no slides. The seisniicity of the area is moderate to low, the Elsinore fault 
zone being approximately 20 miles to the northeast. 

The right abutment has ein even 65 per cent slope falling away upstream 
and downstream. Bedrock outcrops are prominent, making up approximately ^tO per 
cent of the surface area. There are no breaks in slope, talus is minor and 
creep negligible. Large loose blocks on the outcrops would need to be cleared 
when stripping the abutment. For an earthfill structure, an average of about 
two feet of soil and loose weathered rock plus about five feet of weathered 
rock would be stripped on this abutment. 

The left abutn^nt has an even slope of about 75 per cent falling away 
sharply upstream and downstream. Bedrock outcrops make up about 60 per cent of 
the surface area, exhibiting a slightly less weathered character than that of 
the right abutment. Loose blocks up to ten feet in diameter would have to be 
cleared from the surface when stripping. There are no breaks in slope, creep 
is negligible and talus is minor. An average thickness of about one foot of 
soil and loose weathered rock plus about five feet of weathered rock would be 
sufficient stripping on this abutment for an earthfill dam. 

Channel width is approximately 100 feet, with a few bedrock outcrops. 
Alluvial fill covering the channel to an estimated average depth of eight feet 
consists of silt, sand, and some gravel and scattered boulders. Stripping in 
the channel would include about eight feet of alluvium plus about three feet 
of weathered rock. 

Only limited amounts of earthfill materials were found to be availa- 
ble near the site. About 170,000 cubic yards each of impervious and random 
fill material are contained in the stream chemnel extending for a distance of 
about one mile upstream from the dam site. Residuum lying on the hillside above 
Green Valley, approximately one mile west of the site, would provide about 
230,000 cubic yards of impervious fill material, and additional impervious fill 

E-27 



could be oTrtained along the Poway -Green Valley road approximately I.5 miles 
southwest of the dam site. Adequate quantities of raiidom fill material may be 
obtained from the Poway formation which outcrops approximately five miles west 
of the site. In addition, about 37,100 cubic yards of foundation excavation and 
11,100 cubic yards of spillway excavation could be salvaged for use in the ran- 
dom fill sections. Rock for riprap could be obtained from material excavated in 
the spillway cut. 

The dam would be of the zoned earthf ill type with a height of lUo feet 
above stream bed, creating a reservoir storage capacity of 8,000 acre-feet. 
Both upstream and downstream slopes would be 2.5:1 and the iinpervious section 
would have slopes of 1:1. The dam would have a crest elevation of 790 feet and 
would contain about 705,000 cubic yards of fill. The crest width of the dam 
would be 30 feet, consisting of a ten-foot width for the impervious core and 
ten-foot widths for each of the upstreajn and downstream random fill sections. 
The iniper\?'ious core was assumed to extend to bedrock \^ere light grouting would 
be required. 

Because the random fill material in the upstream and downstream sec- 
tions is not considered to be free -draining, gravel drains would be provided at 
the downstream face of the impervious core to remove any leakage occurring 
through the impervious section and at the abutment contacts. A gravel blanket 
with a thickness of six feet normal to the downstream face of the impervious 
section would be placed at the contact between the impervious and random fill 
and would extend to a height of two-thirds of the distance between the stream 
bed and the spillway lip. Intercepted seepage would be carried away from the 
base of the blanket to the downstream toe of the dam by gravel drains. The up- 
stream face of the random fill section would be protected from wave action by 
riprap placed to a depth of three feet normal to the slope. 



E-28 



The spillway would consist of an ogee weir control section and a 
concrete -lined apron placed in a cut through a saddle behind the left abutment. 
The maximum depth of cut in the saddle would be 25 feet consisting of about five 
feet of residuum and weathered rock and about 20 feet of granodiorite . The 
spillway would have a discharge capacity of 9^^0 second -feet, which is the 
estimated peaJc flow of a once in a thousand year flood. Because of the pre- 
liminary nature of this design, no consideration was given to the effect of sur- 
charge storage in the reservoir in reducing the estimated peak flows over the 
spillway. Depth of water above the spillway lip during majtimum flood discharge 
would be approximately ten feet and the crest elevation of the dam was assumed 
to be five feet above the maximum water surface elevation so defined. 

Releases from the reservoir would be effected through a submerged 
inlet -outlet tower. The inlet -outlet conduit would consist of a 30 -inch diameter 
steel pipe encased in reinforced concrete from the tower to a gate chamber under 
the dam structvire at the proposed axis, and a 30-inch diameter steel pipe placed 
in an access conduit extending from the gate chamber to the valve house at the 
toe of the dam. Releases would be regulated by a 30-inch butterfly valve placed 
in the line at the gate chamber ajnd a 2i4--inch cone valve placed in the line at 
the valve house. 

Estimated time of construction is one year, and stream flow could be 
diverted through the outlet condioit during construction. 

Included in the cost of lands and improvements is the cost of acquisi- 
tion of land from which borrow material would be obtained and which lies outside 
the reservoir area. 

A detailed cost estimate for Woodson Dam and Reservoir is presented 
in Table E-10. 



E-29 



TA3:':s s-io 



ESTBIVCED COST 0^ WOODSOW DM MI> RESERVOIR 
WJITK STORAGE CAPACITY OF 8,000 ACFJ^l-FEET 

(Based on prices prevailing in 195^) 



Elevation of crest of dam: 790 feet, 

U.3.G.S. datvja 
Elevatio.a of crest of spillway: 775 i'eet 
Height of dam to spillway crest, above 

stream bed: 125 feet 



Capacity of reser%'oir to crest of 
spillway: 8,000 acre-feet 

Capacity of spillway \rith 5 -foot 
freeboard: 9,U00 second-feet 



Item 



: : Unit 
Unit : Quantity : price 



Cost 



CAPITA!. COSTS 



Dam 










Exploration 






luup sum $ 15,000 


Diversion of stream, and 










devatering of 










fouiidation 






lump sum 


5,000 


Stripping topsoil 


cu.ytic 


8,060 


$ 0.50 


4,000 


Excavation for eabanlatient 










Foi^iiidation 


cu > yd . 


Ul,030 


1.25 


51,600 


Froifl borrow pits 


cu.ydo 


393,200 


0.60 


235,900 


From quarry 


cu.yd. 


320,iiOO 


O.i^O 


126,200 


Erabankiiieiit 










Inpervious 


cu.yd. 


276,600 


0.16 


44,600 


Randora 


cu.yd. 


3'^ 1,900 


014 


47,900 


?.andora, fsalvage 


cu.yd. 


48,200 


0-.20 


9,600 


Rock, riprap 


cu^yd. 


17,200 


3 = 50 


60,200 


Drilling s-out holes 


linoft. 


8,6kO 


3.00 


25,900 


PresatAre grouting 


cu.ft» 


5,760 


it. 00 


23,000 


Gravel drains 


cu.yd. 


19,370 


3.50 


67,600 


Spillway 










Excavctiou, \mclassified 


cu.yd. 


33,300 


2.40 


79,900 


Concrete 










Weir and cutoff 


cu.yd. 


190 


40.00 


7,600 


Floor 


cu.yd. 


300 


35 "00 


10,500 


walls 


cu.yd. 


60 


45.00 


2,700 


Reinforcing steel 


lbs. 


4l,800 


0.15 


6,300 



Outlet VJorks 
Excavation 

Stni.ctu:res 

Conduit 
Backfill 
Concrete 

Conduit and collars 

Stro.ctares 
Rei.iforcing steel 
Eiscellaneovis metalwork 
Steel pipe, 30~inch dia. 



cu . yd . 
cu . yd . 
cu-ji-d. 

cu.yd. 

cu.yd. 

lbs. 

lbs. 

lbs. 



100 


2 00 


3,380 


2:50 


i,l4o 


3.00 


1,010 


50.00 


250 


75 = 00 


88,800 


0.15 


6,000 


0.65 


.46>,oOO 


0.30 



$ 718,700 



107,000 



200 
9,700 
3,400 

50,500 
18,800 
13,300 
3,900 
14, 600 



E-30 



ESTIMATED COST OF WOODSON DAM AND RESERVOIR 
WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 8,000 ACRE-FEET 
(continued) 



Item 



: : Unit 
Unit ; QueLntity ; price 



Cost 



CAPITAL COSTS 

Outlet Works (continued) 
Cone valve, 2U-inch dia. 
Butterfly valve, 30-inch 
dia. 

Reservoir 

Land and improvements 
Clearing reservoir lamds ac. 
Road relocation mi. 

Subtotal 

Administration and engineering, 10^ 

Contingencies, 15^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL 



l\mp sum $ 12,000 

lump sum 3,000 $ 131, UOO 



lump sura 
170 $75.00 
2.1 25,000 



U35,600 
12,800 
52,500 



500,900 

$1,458,000 

$ li^5,800 

218,700 

36,500 

$1,859,000 



E-31 



CcU'i-oll ^js fuid Reseiyoir 

The Carroll clam site is located o.i a tritutary to Carroll Canyon in 
the NE Ijk of Sec. 32, T, l4 S., R. 2 sv., S.B.B.&M. Stream bed elevation at 
the site is about 575 feet. Pieser-^oir areas aad storage capacities for various 
water siirface elevations were obtained from United States Geological Suirvey 
q'iadrangles at a scale of 1:2^1,000,, with a contour interval of 20 feet, and 
are shown in Table E-11. 



TABLE E-11 
AREAS AND CAPACITIES OF CARROLL RESEPT/OIR 





Water surface 








Depth of water 


elevation 




Water surface 


Storage capacity 


at dam, in feet 


U.S.G.S. datum 




area, in acres 


in acre -feet 




in feet 












575 


5 


580 


15 


590 


25 


600 


35 


610 


i^5 


620 


55 


630 


65 


640 


75 


650 


85 


660 


95 


670 


105 


680 


115 


690 


125 


7'X) 


135 


710 


139 


71^ 


1U5 


720 


150 


725 









2 


5 


7 


50 


11 


140 


16 


280 


22 


460 


28 


720 


38 


1,040 


50 


1,480 


64 


2,060 


79 


2,770 


96 


3,640 


120 


4,700 


l40 


6,000 


165 


7.530 


180 


8,220 


190 


9,300 


210 


10,300 



Topography of the dam site aad reservoir area is low in relief. 
Intermittent streams have developed ii-regu3-ar ridges and gvaiies. Preliminary 
geological reconnaissance by this Department in 1956 indicated that an earth- 
fill dam strv.cture is the most s-jitable for this site, considering topographic 
and foundation conditions and availability of construction materials. 



E-.52 



Bedrock in the area is overlain by a thick section of conglomerate, 

identified as the Poway conglomerate of the Eocene age. Bedrock outcrops 

observed consisted of volcanics tentatively identified as the Santiago Peak 

formation. The abutments and channel section of the dam site are meta-volcanic 

bedrock. The rock is very hard, aphanitic, blue black in color, and moderately 

blocky to very blccky. Locally, the rock exhibits foliation and some recemented 

breccia. No faiilts are apparent, but shears are prominent in the spillway cut 

of a small dam existing upstream from the proposed dam axis. Moderace to 

closely spaced jointing is evident but it appears to close with depth. The 

reservoir area is in the conglomerate formation, which is moderately weathered, 

buff to red brown in color, and slightly cemented. 

The right abutment has an even slope of about 50 per cent, falling 

away upstream and downstream. Outcrops occupy 10 per cent of the surface area. 
No lajidslides or talus were noted and creep is negligible. Required stripping 
on this abutment would include about two feet of soil and loose weathered rock 
plus about six feet of weathered rock. 

The left abutment has an even slope of 55 per cent falling away up- 
stream. There are no breaks in slope amd outcrops occupy 15 per cent of the 
surface area. Creep is negligible and no landslides or t£j.us were noted. It 
is estimated that about two feet of soil and loose weathered rock and about 

eight feet of weathered rock would be stripped from this abutment. 

The channel width is 30 feet and bedrock outcrops occupy about 10 per 

cent of that width. Unconsolidated material in the chsumel consists of 
boulders, cobbles, and sand, to en approxl\Tiate depth of two fset. Striping 
for an earthfill structure would require removal of an average of two feet of 
channel fill plus foxor feet of weathered rock. It should be noted that there 
is a small rockfill dam with a concrete diaphragm located at the upstream edge 
of the presently considered construction site, which structure could be incor- 
porated into the proposed structure. Moderate grouting of the dam foundation 

wo\ild be required. 

E-33 



Suitable impen/ioiis material is not available in the ressrvoir area. 
However^ appi'oximately 2^1,000 cubic j-ards of impei'vioiis material occiats north- 
west of the site in Los Penasquitos Canyon and in a tributary stream at a 
maximum distance of about 3«0 miles. Pervious material in adequate supply 
could be obtained from the conglomerate in the reservoir area. This material 
is not considered to be free-draining and is therefore classified as random 
fill. Approximately 80,200 cubic yards of pervious material conoid be salvaged 
from the foundation and spillway excavations » 

The proposed dam would have a height of 15O feet above stream bed and 
would create a reservoir with a storage capacity of 8,000 acre-feet. The dam 
would have a crest elevation of 725 feet, and side slopes of 2,5:1 upstream and 
downstream. The crest width wotad be 30 feet, consisting of a 10-foot width for 
the crest of the impervious core and 10-foot widths for the crests of each of 
the upstream and downstream random fill sections. The impervious core section 
woiild have side slopes of 1:1 for its upstream an.d downstream faces and would 
extend to bedrock. Upstream and downstream random fill sections wouJ.d make up 
the remainder of the embankment. The upstream fac^;, of the dam would be pro- 
tected against wave action by rock riprap to a depth of three feet normal to 
the upstream face. 

A low dike about 1,700 feet in length would be required along the 
ridge foraing the left abutment. This woiild be an earthfill structure similar 
to the main dam. The total fill in both embankments would be about 95^,000 
cubic yards. 

The spillway would be a concrete -lined chute with ogee weir control 
section placed in a cut located around the end of the dam on the right abutment. 
The maxim\mi depth of cut would be about 20 feet with about 10 feet being in 
overburden and 10 feet in conglomerate underlain by volcanic rock. The spill- 
way would have a discharge capacity of 1^200 second-feet, the estimated peak 



flow of once in a thousand year flood. For this estimate, the effect of sur= 
charge storage on the reservoir Eirea was not considered in determination of 
the reqviired discharge capacity of the spillway structure. During maximim dis= 
charge, the depth of water above the spillway would be about six feet and the 
crest of the dam was assumed to be five feet above the meucimum water stirface 
elevation so defined. 

Releases from the resei°voir wovild be effected through a submerged 
outlet tower equipped with a trash rack structure, and controlled at a gate 
chamber located \mder the main dam structvire at the axis of the damo I'he 
inlet -outlet conduit would be a 36-inGh diameter steel pipe encased in rein= 
forced concrete from the tower to the gate chamber and a 36=inch steel pipe 
placed in an access conduit extending from the gate chamber to a valve house 
at the toe of the dam. Releases would be regulated by a 36=inch butterfly 
valve located in the gate chamber and a 24°inch cone valve located in the 
valve house. 

Time of construction is estimated to be one yeax, and during con- 
struction stream flow woxild be passed through the outlet conduit. There are 
no roads or utilities within the eur-ea of the proposed reservoir. The cost of 
land outside of the reservoir area from which borrow material would be obtained 
is included in the estimate of costs of reservoir lands and improvements here- 
inafter presented. 

A detailed estimate of the cost of Carroll Dam aad Reservoir is pre- 
sented in Table E-12. 



E-35 



TABLE E-12 



ESTIMATED COST OF CABEOLL BAM AND RESERVOIR 
WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 8,000 ACRE-FEET 

(Based on prices prevailing in 1956) 



Elevation of crest of dam: 725 feet, 

U.S.G.S. datum 
Elevation of crest of spillway: 71^ feet 
Height of dam to spillway crest, above 

stream bed: 139 feet 



Capacity of reservoir to crest of 
spillway: 8,000 acre-feet 

Capacity of spillway with 5 -foot 
freeboard: 1,200 second-feet 





: 


: 


: Unit : 




Item 


: Unit 


: Quajitity 


: price : 


Cost 


CAPITAL COSTS 










Dam 










Exploration 






lump sum $ 


20,000 


Diversion of stream and 










dewatering of 










foujadation 






Ixjmp sum 


5,000 


Stripping topsoil 


cu.yd. 


3i^,600 


$ 0,50 


17,300 


Excavation for embankment 










Jbundation 


cu.yd. 


90,600 


0.90 


81,500 


Frtxji borrow pits 


cu.yd. 


U47,70G 


0.55 


246,200 


From quarry 


cu.yd. 


520,700 


0.60 


312,400 


Embankment 










liTipers/lous 


cu.yd. 


389,300 


0.16 


62,300 


Pei'vious 


cu^yd. 


i^52,800 


O.li^ 


63,400 


Pervi ous , salvage 


cu . yd . 


81,200 


0.25 


20,300 


Riprap 


cu.yd. 


30,900 


3.00 


92,700 


Drilling grout holes 


lin.ft. 


3/720 


3.00 


11,200 


Pressure grouting 


cu.ft. 


2U,800 


4.00 


99,200 $1,031,500 



Spillway 

Excavation, unclassified 
Concrete 

Weir and cutoff 

Floor 

Walls 
Reinforcing steel 

Outlet Works 
Excavation 

Structures 

Conduit 
Backfill 
Concrete 

Conduit and collars 

Stiractures 
Reinforcing steel 
Miscellaneous metalwork 
Steel pipe, 36-inch dia. 
Cone valve, 24-inch dia. 
Butterfly valve, 36 -inch 

dia. 



cu.yd. 

cu . yd . 
cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 
lbs. 



10,500 



1.70 



40 


40.00 


100 


35.00 


30 


45.00 


12,200 


0.15 



17,900 

1,600 
3,500 

1,400 

1,800 



26,200 



cu.yd. 


150 


2.00 


300 


cu.yd. 


4,100 


0.90 


3,700 


cu.yd. 


950 


3.00 


2,900 


cu.yd. 


1,090 


50.00 


54,500 


cu.yd. 


300 


75.00 


22,500 


lbs. 


106,500 


0.15 


16,000 


lbs. 


9,000 


0.65 


5,900 


lbs. 


58,500 


0.30 


17,600 






lump sijm 


12,000 






lump sum 


5,500 



l4o,900 



E-36 



ESTIMATED COST OF CARROLL DAM AND RESERVOIR 

WITH STORAGE CAPACITY OF 8,000 ACRE-FEET 

(continued) 



Item 



Unit : 



Qiiantity 



Unit 
price 



Cost 



CAPITAL COSTS 



Reservoir 

Lajid and in^jrovements 
Clearing reservoir lands ac. 
Access road 

Subtotal 

Administration and engineering, 10^ 

Contingencies, 15^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL 



lump sum $ 163,200 
210 $U0.00 8,lj-00 

lump sum 10,000 $ 181 , 6OO 

$1,380,200 

$ 138,000 

207,000 

3^^,500 

$1,759,700 



E-37 



Enlargement of San Vicente Reservoir 

The existing San Vicente Dam is a straight concrete gravity structure 
with central overpour spillway ending in a concrete bucket section. It is I90 
feet in height from stresun bed to spillway crest, has a crest length of 98O feet, 
and creates a reservoir with a storage capacity of 90;230 acre-feet. Elevation 
of the spillway lip of the dam is 6pO feet. The outlet works consist of a semi- 
circular tower attached to the upstream face of the dam. At 30-foot increments 
of elevation saucer valves are provided which are operated from a control plat- 
form at the top of the tower. Ttiree 36-inch diameter cast-iron outlet pipes 
discharge through the dam from the base of the tower. Two of the outlet pipes 
are provided with valves at a valve ho"ase at the downstream toe of the dam, 
and the third is covered by a blind flange. 

Water surface areas and reservoir storage capacities for various 
stages of water surface elevation were obtained fi-om a table supplied by the City 
of San Diego dated August 27, 19^3^ and are shown in Table E-I3 for the portion 
of the reservoir above the spillway lip elevation of the existing dam. 



TABLE E-13 
AREAS AND CAPACITIES OF ENIARGED SAN VICENTE RESERVOIR 







Water surface 








Increase 


in 


elevation 


Water su: 


-face : 


Storage capacity 


depth of water 


U,S.G.S. datum 


• area, in 


acres : 


in acre -feet 


at dam, in 


feet 


in feet 













650 


1,070 




90,200 


5 




655 


1,090 




95,600 


10 




660 


1,110 




101,100 


15 




663 


1,140 




106,800 


20 




670 


1,160 




112,500 


21 




671 


1>170 




113,700 


25 




675 


1,190 




118, too 


30 




680 


1,210 




124, too 


35 




685 


1,230 




130,500 



E-38 



Bedrock at the San Vicente Dam is composed of moderately jointed 
granitic and metamorphic rock which is hard and durable when fresh. No evidence 
of faulting was observed at the dam or in the nearby vicinity. The area is con- 
sidered to be moderately active seismically as the Elsinore fault zone lies 2k 
miles to the northeast. The pointing of the foundation material is moderately 
strong with generally clean joints. 

Many loose boulders are present and the depth of weathering varies 
with rock type. Stripping estimates for the right abutment would necessitate 
removal of about five feet of weathered rock and about five feet of jointed 
bedrock. The channel section downstream from the existing structure would 
require removal of about 12 feet of alluvial fill. Stripping on the left abut- 
ment would consist of the removal of about eight feet of weathered rock and 
about five feet of jointed metamoirihic rock. 

The existing dam was constructed with the consideration in mind of 
raising it at some future date, by adding concrete on the downstream side. 
Although grouting work done during the original construction work was based 
upon requirements for a higher dam, additional grouting may be required for the 
raising operations herein considered. No stepping or other special treatment 
was given to the downstream face of the existing dam to facilitate keying in the 
new concrete work. Studies indicate that special methods of construction will 
be required to properly place the new concrete on the old surface with due 
allowance smd consideration for shrinkage due to cooling ajid settling. A 
further problem presented is that of securing a good seal along the upstream 
contact between the old structure and the new section. The surface between the 
new and old concrete must be thoroughly drained, and galleries provided to per- 
mit inspection of such drainage. In order to increase the stoi-age capacity of 
the reservoir about 23,000 acre -feet, the crest of the spillway would be raised 



E-39 



21 feet above its present elevation to an elevation of 67I feet. Height of the 
enlp^'ged dam would be 211 feet from str.'eam bed to spillway crest. 

For cost estimating purposes the plan of enlargement contemplates 
making the upstream face of the new work vertical, and providing a batter of 
0.8:1 on the downstream face. The capacity and other features of the spillway 
would be similar to those now existing. Tlie crest ■v/idth of the raised dam 
would be 30 feet. The outlet tower would be raised by removing the existing 
operating platform and then extending the tower. Tixe original design of the 
tower included allowance for this extension. A 36 -inch diameter butterfly 
valve would be installed in the tower near the base of the new lift, and a 
24-inch diameter cone valve would be placed in the outlet pipe which is 
presentlj"- plugged. iTo temporary outlet works would be necessary during the 
enlargement work, and it was assumed tha,t there would be no appreciable inter- 
ference with reservoir operation. 

The City of San Diego now owns rights of way required for the enlarge- 
ment, and no highway or utility relocation would be Involved. A detailed esti- 

4. 

mate of cost of enlargement of San Vicente Dam is presented in Table E-l4. 



E-4o 



TABLE E-lk 



ESTIMATED COSTS OF ENLARGEMENT OF SAN VICENTE RESERVOIR 
TO A STORAGE CAPACITY OF 113,000 ACPJl-FEET 

(Based on prices prevailing in 1956) 



Elevation of crest of dam: 680 feet 

U.S.G.S. datiim 
Elevation of crest of spillway: 67I feet 
Increase in depth of water: 21 feet 



Increase in capacity of reser- 
voir: 23,000 acre-feet 

Capacity of spillway with . 5 foot 
freeboard: 26,000 second-feit 



Item 



: : Unit 
Unit ; Quantity : price 



Cost 



CAPITAL COSTS 

Dam 

Exploration and 

grouting 
Existing concrete 

preparation 
Excavation 
Mass concrete 
Cooling concrete 

Spillway and Parapet Walls 
Reinforced concrete 
Reinforcing steel 

Outlet Works 
Control house 

construction 
Butterfly valve, 36-inch 

diameter 
Cone valve, 2U-inch dia. 
Miscellaneous metalwork 







Iximp sum 


$ 25,000 




sq.yd. 
cu . yd . 
cu.yd. 
cu.yd. 


16,000 

36,000 

167,000 

167,000 


$ i+.OO 

3.00 

17.50 

0.50 


6k, 000 

108,000 

2,922,500 

83,500 


$3,203,000 


cu.yd. 
lbs. 


kso 

36,000 


45.00 
0.15 

lump sum 


22,000 

5,^00 
15,000 


27,1+00 


each 
each 
lbs. 


1 

1 

129,000 


5,000 

12,000 

0.65 


5,500 
12,000 
83,800 


116,300 



Reservoir 

Clearing ac . 

Subtotal 

Administration emd engineering, 10^ 

Contingencies, 15^ 

Interest during construction 

TOTAL 



100 



50.00 



5,000 



$3,351,700 

$ 335,200 

502,800 

83,800 

$1^,273,500 



E-Ul 



Enlargement of Lower Otay Reservoir 

Lower Otay Resex'voir is created by the existing Savage Dam on the Otay 
River wliich was constructed in 1919- The dam is a curved concrete gravity struc- 
ture -vrith a height of about 1^5 feet from stream bed to crest of dam and a crest 
length of about 750 feet. It has a central overpour spillway ending in a con- 
crete bucket section and an ai^iliarj"- chute spillway located on the left abut- 
ment. Flash boards were installed on the spillways in 1923 to raise the maxi- 
mum water surface to an elevation of ^91 feet, and creating a storage capacity 
of about 56,300 acre -feet. 

Water surface areas and reservoir storage capacities for enlargement 
of Lower Otay Reservoir were computed from United States Geological Survey 
quadrangles with a scale of l:2i<-,000 and a contour intei^'al of 20 feet, end 
are shorn in Table £-15- An increase in storage capacity of about 5^,000 acre- 
feet could be accomplished by raising the normal water surface approximately 36 
feet to an elevation of about 52? feet. 



TABLE E--15 
AREAS AM) CAPACITIES OF EiMLARGED J/MER OTAY RESERVOIR 







Water surface 






Increase 


in 


elevation 


Water surface 


Storage capacity 


depth of water 


U.S.G.S. datum. 


area, in acres 


in acre -feet 


at dam, in 


feet 


in feet 











i^91 


1,120 


56,300 


9 




500 


1.370 


67,500 


19 




510 


1,580 


82,200 


29 




520 


1,770 


99,000 


36 




527 


1,890 


111,800 


39 




530 


1,940 


117,600 


h9 




5J^0 


2,120 


137,800 



Bedrock at the Savage dam site consists of a grey-black meta-volcanic , 
presumed to be of the Sajitiago Peak group. It is a hard, fine to coarse grained. 



E-i|2 



I 



massive to fractured, rock that develops blocky outcrops. The seisinicity of 
the area is moderate to low. No faults were observed near the axis. However, 
small shears were noted. The additional grouting requirements for an enlarged 
structure should be moderate as the fractures appear to close with depth. 

The right abutment slope is fairly uniform above the existing dam. 
Stripping for a concrete structure would include removal of about two feet of 
soil and about ten feet of weathered and fractured bedrock. In the channel 
section an estimated 15 feet of overburden would be removed under the base cf 
the new concrete work to shape the bedrock and key in the new work with the old 
structure. The left abutment above the existing dam would require removal of 
about two feet of soil plus about 15 feet of fractured and weathered rock for 
the new concrete structure. To raise the existing structure, the axis on the 
left abutment would be realigned for best utilization of the conformation of 
the slope. 

Although Savage Dam was not constructed with the consideration of 
raising it, the difficulties involved are not insurmountable. The special con- 
struction methods and precautions required would be simj.lar to those necessary 
to raise San Vicente Dam. In addition, the soundness of the existing concrete 
structure and foundation should be ascertained prior to any enlargement. Tlrie 
additional concrete would be placed with the upstream face vertical ajad a batter 
of 0.8:1 on the downstream face. Tlie crest width would be 30 feet. 

The new spillway structures would have a discharging capacity of 65,000 
second-feet which is the estimated peak flow of the once in one thousand year 
flood flow without allowance for the effect of surcharge storage on the reser- 
voir surface. The new spillway structure would be a central overpour with a 
concrete bucket section smd an axoxiliary overpour spillway located on r;he left 
abutment. The spillways would be provided with five tainter gates, each 15 feet 
high and kO feet wide; three of which would be installed in the central section 

E-43 



and tvo on tlie au::lliai'y section, ^.ese gates could be operated so as to pass 
the Tiiore frequent :?ioods through the centr£.l spillway with only emergency use 
of the a\ixiliary spillway on the left abutiaent where spil3.way discharges could 
result in some erosional effects. 

A new inlet tower would be constructed in the reservoir for the raised 
stinicture. The tower would have a height of about 150 feet and a diameter of l8 
feet. Releases would be controlled by eight ii^-inch diameter butterfly valves 
installed at selected elevations in the toxver. Although a special connection 
would be required between the new tower and the existing outlet tunnel, it is 
believed that there is Mequate capacity in the tiinnel to accommodate the 
increased releases of water. Constamction of the nev7 otitlet tower could only 
be accoiirpllshed with the existing reser/oir at a very low stage. However, it 
would be possible to defer its construction until the proposed Ssm Diego Aqueduct 
were completed to the vicinity of Otay Reservoir and provide water service 
through, the aqueduct wliile constiTiction. operations were proceeding. 

If the water surface of Lov^er Otay Reseivoir were raised, there would 
be a possibility of leaJiage through the permeable San Diego formation which forms 
the upper portion of the west sice of the reservoir closure. To prevent this a 
blanket of impervious material averaging six feet in thickness would be placed on 
approxiras.tely 250 acres of the formation subject to inmida/bion. The clay blanket 
would be protected from ijave action by a layer of gravel about I.5 feet in thick- 
ness normal to the slope. 

Two small auxiliary dams would be required in saddles along the westerly 
edge of the reservoir. Tliey would each have a height of about 20 feet, crest 
lengths of about UOO feet, and contain approximately 15,000 cubic yards of fill. 

Enlargement of Lower Otay Reservoir would require the relocation of 
about seven miles of county road along its northerly and westerly edges. 



E-kk 



It is estimated that approximately 620 acres of additional rights of 
way would he purchased to accommodate the contemplated 36-foot rise in water 
surface elevation. 

A detailed estimate of the cost of raising Savage Dam is presented in 
Table E-I6. 



E-45 



TABLE E-16 

ESTIMATED COSTS OF ENLARGEMENT OF LOWER OTAY RESERVOIR 
TO A STORAGE CAPACITY OF 112,000 ACRE -FEET 

(Based on prices prevailing in 1956) 



Elevation of crest of dam: 532 feet, 

U.S.G.S. datum 

Elevation of top of gates: 52? feet 

Increase in depth of water: 36 feet 



Increase in capacity of reser- 
voir: 56,000 acre -feet 

Capacity of spillways with ?-.5-foot 
freeboard: 65,000 second-feet 





: ; 




: Unit 


: 




Item 


: Unit ; 


: Quantity 


: price 


: Cost 


CAPITAL COSTS 












Dam 












Exploration and grouting 






limip sum 


$ 50,000 




Existing concrete 












preparation 


sq.yd. 


7,600 


$ U.OO 


30,U00 




Excavation 


cu.yd. 


37,000 


3.00 


111 , 000 




Mass concrete 


cu . yd . 


lU9,000 


17.50 


2,607,500 




Cooling concrete 


cu . yd . 


lU9,000 


0.50 


74,500 


$2,873,400 


Spillway 












Gates and hoists 






lump sum 


200,000 




Reinforced concrete 


cu.yd. 


1,260 


45.00 


56,700 




Reinforcing steel 


lbs. 


9^^,600 


0.15 


14,200 




Bridge 






lump sum 


30,000 


300,900 


Outlet Works 












Connection to outlet 












tunnel 






lump s\m 


10,000 




Concrete tower 


cu . yd . 


720 


80.00 


57,600 




Concrete base 


cu.yd. 


660 


30.00 


19,800 




Reinforcing steel 


lbs. 


125,600 


0,15 


18,800 




Butterfly valve, i+8-inch 












dia. 


each 


8 


8,000 


64,000 




Miscellaneous metalwork 


lbs. 


112,000 


0.65 


72,800 


243,000 


Reservoir 












Land and improvements 






lijmp sum 


124,000 




Road relocation 






lump simi 


328,000 




Axixiliary dam 


each 


2 


15,000 


30,000 




Clay blanket 






lump s\jm 


1,815,000 


2,297,000 


Subtotal 










$5,714,300 


Administration and engineering, 10^ 








$ 571,400 


Contingencies, 15/0 










857,100 


Interest during construction 








142,800 


TOTAL 










$7,285,600 



E-46 



\ 



THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE 
STAMPED BELOW 



RENEWED BOOKS ARE SUBJECT TO IMMEDIATE 
RECALL 



r 




California. Dept, of 
water resources. 

rv.TT .x^^ 

PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 



Call Number 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
DAVIS 

240487 




UMIVtrnSITY OF CALIFOPJIIA LAvl^ 



3 1175 02037 7126