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PHOTO BY HA2ELTINE STUDIO, BAKER, OREGON. 1890 






GENEALOGY 

of the 

WISDOM FAMILY 

1675 to 1910 





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Compiled by 





GEORGE W. WISDOM 

t-Great-Grandson of (4) Francis Torrence Wi 
and Son of (239) Thomas Barnes Wisdom 






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CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Portrait of Compiler Frontispiece 

Preface v 

Prelude vii 

Memorial {poem ) . . xii 

Introduction xiii 

The Sunny Hours of Childhood {poem) i8 

Abner Wisdom ( i ) 1675 19 

Thanksgiving 20 

Brinsley Mortimer Wisdom (2) Branch 23 

Veteran of California Column 31 

The "Savior" of Rome 32 

Facsimile Letter (1853 ) 49-50 

Poem 54 

Pollard William Wisdom (3) Branch 57 

Letter from W. W. Wisdom (81 ) 59 

James M. Wisdom's (72) Family 64 

Andrew Jackson Wisdom (74) 70 

Francis Torrence Wisdom (4) Branch 77 

Paducah's Only Millionaire 84 

Letter from John Randolph Wisdom (379) .... 115 

John R. Wisdom (379) Passed Away 116 

A Story of the Early 6o's 124 

Vesper Wisdom (414) 135 

Obituary — M. D. Wisdom (400) 140 

Aviator's Death — Everett Stanton Wisdom (433). 142 

From Earth to Heaven (461) Nora B. Shanklin. . 150 

Crossing the Plains in the Early Days 176a 

Abner Wisdom, Jr. (5) Branch 179 

Letter from W. J. V^isdom (650) 183 

Letter from Thomas Wisdom (697) 197 

Tavner Wisdom (6) Branch 205 

Index 221 

Explanation and Chart 229 

Blank for Record of Lineage 2^1 



P 9 7 *> a 



PREFACE 

The compilation of this work was begun March 9, 
1890. The prosecution of it has been repeatedly inter- 
rupted by other occupations and by occasional derange- 
ment of health. It was only within the last eight years 
that I have been able to apply myself to it steadily. In 
renewing my task, I find it necessary to make the follow- 
ing statement: 

The history of a new country is that of the men who 
founded it. For more than a hundred years the history 
of the West has been in the making. At that time the 
''West" meant Kentucky, and as ''Westward the star 
of empire takes its way," that term has been used to de- 
scribe each section from the AUeghanies to the peaceful 
Pacific. As each of these sections of the country was 
settled by intrepid pioneers — first Tennessee and Ken- 
tucky, then Missouri, and finally the great Oregon coun- 
try, on the shores of the sunset seas — the Wisdom family 
was at the forefront, bearing its share of the burdens and 
sharing its part of the dangers. 

It has been a labor of love that the compiler of this 
sketch has been engaged in. It was undertaken primarily 
that his sons might have in compact form a brief, though 
accurate, account of their ancestors. The work is not 
intended as a history of the family or of any of its mem- 
bers, but it is only a genealogical sketch, and only the 
barest outlines have been attempted to be given. 

In presenting this sketch to the members of the Wisdom 
family, the writer will say that in all his researches he 
has found the Wisdoms to be men who are a credit to the 
pioneer history of a great republic. 

[v] 



The Wisdoms have not been aristocrats as that term 
is implied in the monarchies of Europe, but in the found- 
ing of this country they have represented that which 
means most to a free country — they have been industrious, 
brave and honorable. I will conclude by calling your 
attention to the fact that I have endeavored to execute 
my task with candor and fidelity — stating facts on what 
seemed to be good authority, and avoiding as much as pos- 
sible any false coloring or exaggeration. A careful colla- 
tion of all the records that I have been able to obtain has 
convinced me of the correctness of it and the safety with 
which it can be relied upon for the purpose it is intended, 
and I am exceedingly happy to bear this testimony to rela- 
tives who may come in possession of this book, and / 
earnestly request that the same be kept from generation 
to generation. 

In closing my remarks I deem it not out of place to 
express my sincere thanks to relatives and friends who so 
zealously assisted me in procuring the information herein 
contained. 

G. W. W. 

Seattle, Washington, July, 1910. 



[vi] 



PRELUDE 

Almost my entire life has been devoted to the study, 
or in other words in compiling a synopsis, of the Wisdom 
family, which enables me to state unhesitatingly, that 
many good traits of character are prevalent among them. 
I never knew or heard of any one of the name having 
been hanged or sent to prison, nor arraigned before a 
Chief Magistrate for any crimes of whatsoever kind. 
They are men who have always had a higher ideal in life, 
viz., ministers of the Gospel (usually Baptists), w^ell- 
to-do farmers, doctors, lawyers and of various other pro- 
fessions. Some are presidents of banks, proprietors and 
managers of some of the largest enterprises in the United 
States and Great Britain. Millionaires may also be 
named among them. In olden times the Wisdoms were 
noted for their stalwart strength, steady habits, and 
patriotic ardor. My father had lost none of the original 
sturdy instincts of the stock, nor of the stalwart strength 
incident to his ancestral breeding. His word was as good 
as the old wheat in the mill. I have often heard my 
father say that he had never heard of an infidel among the 
Wisdoms. They were religiously inclined, if not a mem- 
ber of some church. 

It is not my intention to make this a sporting edition, 
but a few little incidents that have occurred in the Wis- 
dom family in the years gone by, and that I can vouch 
for the truthfulness of, I deem it not out of place to 
mention : 

(144) John Wisdom, my great-grandfather, was a Bap- 
tist evangelist minister, who traveled about a great deal 
preaching the Gospel. In a little village in Kentucky, I 

[vii] 



cannot remember the name of the place, Rev. Wisdom was 
called to preach. There was a certain blacksmith who 
lived in the place who was opposed to any preaching there 
and had been in the habit of stopping every minister who 
would come to preach, and, in fact, run them out. He 
was a big burly fellow and they were all afraid of him. 
Rev. Wisdom, having been warned of the fact, said, 
''Never mind, I will be there and preach regardless of 
the blacksmith." As there was no regular church in that 
vicinity, they always used a little old log schoolhouse for 
their meetings. At the appointed time a large concourse 
of people began to gather from the surrounding country 
— the blacksmith was there too — so was Rev. Wisdom. 
It seems that an unusual crowd had gathered as the meet- 
ing had created quite a sensation. Of course these people 
were acquainted with the circumstances of all previous 
meetings, and, no doubt, expected something exciting to 
happen. Presently, Rev. Wisdom arose and began his 
discourse, which was repeatedly interrupted by the black- 
smith, who kept up a fusillade of insults and finally ob- 
scene language. This was more than the reverend could 
stand. He walked off the platform, pulled off his coat 
and walking directly up to the blacksmith, took him by the 
collar and proceeded to carry him to the door, where he 
threw him out bodily. When the blacksmith struck the 
ground he found the minister on top of him, and he re- 
ceived a thorough thrashing. After the reverend had 
finished chastizing him he made him go back into the 
church and listen to the rest of the sermon. 

(234) Francis Wisdom, one of my father's uncles, was 
a powerful man in physique and was considered about the 
best man in the state of Kentucky, in his days. He was, 
however, a good citizen, peaceable and law abiding — 
never quarrelsome or anything of that kind. At this time 

[viii] 



there lived a man by the name of Smith, who 

claimed to be "bully" of Kentucky. Well, of course, 
Francis — Frank, they called him — did not consider Smith 
a better man than himself and did not hesitate to express 
himself in that light. The two men kept sparring at each 
other, until finally to settle the dispute they agreed to 
meet and fight it out, the time and place being decided 
upon. My father at this time was about fifteen years old, 
and, boylike, when he heard of the affair which was to 
take place was anxious to witness it. He knew, however, 
that he would have to be sly about it or he would not be 
allowed to go. The fight took place not far from where 
they lived, so he planned that he and his oldest sister, 
Lucy, should go. When the time came they stole away 
from home and off they went. Men gathered from far 
and near, as an occasion of this kind would bring people 
any distance to witness it. The ring having been made 
and the seconds selected, the fighters entered the arena 
dressed for the event. In those days Queensbury rules 
were unknown. They fought with bare knuckles. Soon 
they were engaged in their bitter warfare. The battle 
\vas of short duration, it being evident from the first that 
Smith was no match for his opponent. He was knocked 
out, several ribs having been broken, and he was badly 
bruised otherwise. Frank came out without a mark. 
Smith was so completely whipped that it put an end to 
his fighting career. 

(235) John Amons Wisdom, my father's brother, was a 
Baptist preacher — a very peaceable and good-natured man 
who would not row or fuss with any one if it could pos- 
sibly be avoided. As it happened, there lived in his neigh- 
borhood a man who was inclined to be troublesome and 
would rather settle his differences with a man by fighting 
than in any other way, and as far as his physique and 

[ix] 



strength were concerned he was plenty able to take care 
of himself, and he was conceited about it too. Uncle 
John, who was a wonderfully built man, was afraid of no 
one, and very unassuming. Some trouble arose between 
these two men, and instead of listening to reason as Uncle 
John suggested, this man allowed himself to be worked 
up to a high pitch of anger and challenged Uncle John to 
a bare-fisted fight. In those days few men would take a 
banter, and they agreed to fight, naming the day and place. 
When the scheduled time arrived. Uncle John went alone, 
he really should have taken someone with him, and 
when he reached the appointed place of battle he dis- 
covered that the other man had brought four friends 
along. Uncle John could instantly see what he was up 
against, but he was not a man to back down even though 
the odds were against him. The fight was soon on and it 
did not take Uncle John long to put his man down and 
out. As he expected, one of the other men pounced upon 
him, but it did not take much effort to put him out. A 
cousin of Uncle John's, I cannot remember his name, hap- 
pened along just as the third man was engaging him in 
fistic encounter. The cousin was not slow in sizing up 
the situation, so he jumped in and the two Wisdoms were 
not long in paving their way to victory. 

(239) Thomas Barnes Wisdom, my father, who was a 
grandson of Rev. John Wisdom, was over six feet tall in 
his stocking-feet. Broad shoulders, straight as an arrow, 
very muscular and a powerful man, whose average weight 
was two hundred pounds. In his prime he would take his 
maul, wedge and ax and start out in the morning, some- 
times when the sun would be an hour high, and would 
split his two hundred rails — and large ones at that — and 
get home long before sunset. Day after day he would do 
that. The average man would probably split one hun- 



dred and twenty-five rails from sunrise to sunset. In those 
days they had what they called ''Log Rolling." On these 
occasions it was customary to select the strongest men. I 
remember hearing father tell about a "log rolling" at my 
grandfather's place, where among those gathered to do the 
work was father, also a man by the name of Green. 
Green was a big strong fellow and considered a bully. 
The mxen there got to arguing about who was the best 
man in the crowd. Some said Wisdom was, while others 
held that Green was the better man. One word brought 
on another until nothing would do but that they must 
fight. Father, being a very peaceable man, told them that 
he did not want to fight. This seemed to make Green 
rather anxious for a battle, and he even encouraged the 
situation. Finally, father told him if nothing else would 
do to come on, saying, "I am a youth untried, but I can 
tan your dog-hide the best day you ever saw." At this 
time father had not yet reached his majority, while 
Green was a man thirty years old. Only two blows were 
struck — father hit Green and Green hit the ground — 
then the fight was over. Father used a straight right to 
the jaw and his man went down for the count. That was 
the first and only fight father ever had, and I have heard 
him say many times that he was ashamed of that. 



[xi] 



MEMORIAL 

Our forefathers peacefully sleep beneath the sod, 

Who once by their brave acts and grand, noble deeds 
Paved the way to this glorious land, the soil their children 
might trod ; 
And follow the footsteps of those who lived and died regard- 
less of creed. 
They w^ere men of great morals and physique, not like men 
of to-day; 
Robust and strong, energetic with courage, and brave. 
By their many noble traits of character, can proudly say, 
Still fresh in our memories, tho' centuries ago, were silently 
laid in their grave. 



INTRODUCTION 

This book was written with the greatest care and 
study and I hope it will appeal to every relative. Its 
vivid biographical sketches portray the men of whom they 
treat. It shows no little research and no small amount 
of strenuous labor, and, above all, it is void of exaggera- 
tion. It is a work of great dignity and purpose. 

Among special features of marked interest may be men- 
tioned the following character sketches of our ancestors, 
incomplete in many cases, but all clearly drawn — the 
nearest approach 5^et made to an adequate account of the 
momentous period which I have undertaken to depict. 
It rests on abundant information and the interest of the 
reader is sure to grow as he turns the pages, and it is safe 
to say that the stirring account of our ancestors has never 
been told in a more forcible and vivid way. 

The Wisdoms were originally from England. Three 
brothers — Brinsley, Pollard and Francis — before reach- 
ing man's estate emigrated to America. A few years 
after they had settled in America they were married. 
Brinsley married a lady of Scotch-Irish ancestry, Pollard 
was married to a lady of German ancestry, Francis mar- 
ried a lady of English birth. The reader will observe in 
the following a more accurate account of the Wisdom 
brothers' history. And as far as I have been able to 
ascertain, from a moral point of view, socially and com- 
mercially, they ranked among the foremost. 

In early boyhood the thought came to me, would it be 
possible to compile a Family-Tree of the Wisdoms in 
America and abroad, that would give anything like an 
accurate account of our forefathers and their descendants? 

[xiii] 



Realizing the fact, however, that it would be a very dif- 
ficult task, but being determined, I delved deeper and 
deeper into the matter, gathering facts and data as the 
days passed by and being encouraged by the progress made 
and records obtained from my father, Thomas B. Wis- 
dom, during his lifetime, relative to our ancestors of long 
ago. It was obvious that the undertaking could be ac- 
complished. Revealing nothing to my immediate family, 
something over fifteen years ago I began work in earnest, 
not leaving anything undone that would add to its ad- 
vancement, even its research, which comprises the United 
States, England, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zea- 
land and Germany. I have used the utmost care and 
precaution to make these records clear and comprehensive, 
obtaining facts and data from the best authority, having 
for its object to permanently establish an historical sketch 
of the Wisdom family in America and abroad. The same 
is recorded on the pages of this book to be preserved and 
held in sacred memory of our forefathers and may stand 
as a memorial for the present and future generations. 

In olden times it was one of the characteristics of the 
Wisdoms to keep a record of their ancestors and their 
families, some of whom took a great pride in and even 
boasted of what they knew of their antecedents, but as 
time rolled on the elderly ones dropped off one by one, 
meantime records were being lost — some consumed by fire 
and some destroyed in various other ways. The younger 
generations gradually came on as time passed by, a ma- 
jority of whom knew little or nothing of their ancestors, 
until finally the data was almost lost sight of and scarcely 
a trace could be found. Fortunately the key which had 
been hidden by the lapse of time has been discovered. 
Its discovery opens wide the door and unfolds the shrouded 
myster}^ and reveals to us the name of Abner Wisdom, 

[xiv] 



who was born in England, about the year 1675. He was 
the parent of five sons, viz., Brinsley, Pollard, 
Francis^ Abner, Jr., and Tavner. 

Some time in the early part of the Eighteenth Century, 
probably about the year 1730, or about the time James- 
town, Virginia, was being settled, three of the brothers — 
Brinsley, Pollard and Francis — emigrated from England 
to America and settled in the new-formed Territory of 
Virginia. Later they went to Kentucky, where they took 
up land near the present city of Dansville, and built 
homes there. Those were the first people of this name 
who are known to have come to America. The brothers, 
although advanced in years, took an active part in the 
Revolutionary War of 1776, on the side of the Colonies. 
Pollard was captain of one of the companies, no records 
being at hand to show to what companies they belonged. 
Our forefathers' ''Rock" on which they first stepped has 
been held by posterity in grateful remembrance. Nothing 
in Indian history surpasses in thrilling interest the experi- 
ence of the Wisdom brothers in their struggles with the 
savages — their repeated capture, hairbreadth escapes, etc. ; 
their bravery, their consummate knowledge of the Indian 
character. (230) John, a grandson of (4) Francis, who 
v/as in the arm)^ under General Washington, was killed 
some time during the war. The exact data cannot be 
ascertained. 

Kentucky was made a count}^ of Virginia, and the first 
court was held at Harrodsburg in 1777. In 1792 it was 
admitted into the Union as a sovereign state. 

This briefly gives the most important events of their 
lives, whose efforts were all in the line of advancement 
and enlightment of their fellow men in this respect. 
Though their personal presence is among them no more, 
their influence abides with them, and the good work 

[xv] 



which they commenced still progresses, until, like the 
river which is lost in the sea, ''their influence shall merge 
into immensity." 

Abner, Jr., the fourth son of (i) Abner^ had one son, 
Robert, who was a colonel in the British arniy/he had a 
son, William, the descendants of whom will be briefly 
given. Abner, Jr., was eminent in literature and in the 
military affairs of his country. • 

Tavner, the fifth son of ( i ) Abner, lived near Lon- 
don, England. He was a wealthy farmer and stock 
raiser. His wife kept a seminary near London, which 
was for girls. It was the most elaborate institution of 
that kind in the country. They had three sons — Moses, 
Hezekiah and Oroclia. The account of this branch will 
be brief. 

Brinsley, oldest son of ( i ) Abner, who was a Baptist 
minister, went from Kentucky to Armagh, Ireland, on 
an evangelistic mission. He remained there a few years, 
then returned to America, and settled somewhere in the 
State of Virginia. 

Hezekiah and Oroclia, nephews of Brinsley, were mem- 
bers of the British army, and were sent from England to 
Armagh, Ireland, several years prior to Brinsley's arrival 
there. This explains why the idea prevails with some of 
the Wisdoms that they were originally from Ireland. 

O God of nations, by Thy guiding hand 

Were our forefathers led to this blest shore, 

When they were seeking some friendly land 

Where they Thy praise from fervent hearts might pour 

In deep libations. 

We praise Thee for gifts Thy love bestows 

On this our country with unsparing hand; 

Though undeserved, it thus most freely shows • 

Thy watchful care o'er this God-favored land, 

On which blest liberty first saw the light. 

Where it was cradled, as the world records; 

When our forefathers' faith is "lost in sight." 






(I) 

ABNER WISDOM 

1675 



THE SUNNY HOURS OF CHILDHOOD 

The sunny hours of childhood 

How soon they pass away, 
Like flowers in the wild wood, 

That once bloomed fresh and gay. 

The perfumes of the flowers 
And the freshness of the heart 

Live but a few brief hours. 
And then for an age depart. 

Can we recall those sunny hours, 

Just as they used to be — 
Amid the pleasant summer showers 

And our hearts so light and free. 

The friends we saw around us, 

In boyhood's happy days. 
The fairy links that bound us, 

No feeling now displays. 

For time has changed forever 

What youth cannot retain; 
And we may know, ah, never, 

Those sunny hours again. 




N THE many years consumed in unearthing 
the records of the Wisdom family, it affords 
me great pleasure to announce to the readers 
of my book that I have succeeded in tracing 
the name as far back as the reign of Charles 
II, King of England. Few perhaps can even imagine the 
long and tedious efforts that have been made to accom- 
plish this end. I begin with the name of 

I. Abner Wisdom 

Abner Wisdom was born in England, near the border of 
Wales, about the year 1675. There are no records at 
hand to show when he was married or to whom. It is 
generally conceded, however, that he married at a young 
age. He was a man of high intellectual powers and was a 
member of the House of Commons during the reign of 
King George II, and is reputed to have been a very bril- 
liant lawyer, being quite influential among his colleagues. 
He was the parent of the following children, to wit: 

2. Brinsley Mortimer 

3. Pollard William 

4. Francis Torrence 

5. Abner, Jr. 

6. Tavner 

Brinsley Mortimer, Pollard William and Francis Tor- 
rence emigrated to America about the year 1730. So far 
as I know the others remained in England. 



We thank our heavenly Father that we sprung from such 
noble ones, 
Without stain or blemish; we may protect this grand name, 
While we remain on this earth, during life's busy throng, 
In an effort to do justice to our fellow men, rich or poor 
the same. 

What hardships and peril during those pioneer days; 

The truth can never be told — we can only conjecture and 
surmise. 
In the pioneer days; in an unsettled land; in its sunset rays 

Leaves an everlasting memorial for generations to rise. 



Brinsley Mortimer Wisdom 
Branch 



RINSLEY MORTIMER WISDOM, son 

of ( I ) Abner Wisdom, was born in Eng- 
land and emigrated from there to America 
with two of his brothers, Pollard and Francis, 
about the year 1730. He was a Baptist 

evangelistic minister and was noted for his oratorical 

ability. He married a woman of Scotch-Irish ancestry. 

(Read the introduction for further particulars of Brins- 

ley's life.) 

Have account of one son 

7. Tavner. 

7. Tavner Wisdom^ son of (2) Brinsley Wisdom, was 
probably born in Virginia. How^ever, this is not authen- 
tic, as his father, as stated in the introduction, went to 
Ireland from America on an evangelistic mission, and 
there is a possibility of Tavner having been born there. 

He was married to (name not known) and had two 

children : 

8. Abner. 

9. Elidge. 

8. Abner Wisdom, son of (7) Tavner Wisdom, was 
born in Virginia in the year 1767. He was married and 
moved with his family to North Carolina, where he be- 
came a prosperous farmer. They had the following 
children : 

10. Tavner T. 

11. Jesse. 

12. Bird. 

13. William. 

g. Elidge Wisdom, son of (7) Tavner Wisdom, was 
born in Kentucky. He was a farmer and stock raiser. He 



24 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

moved from Kentucky to Missouri, where he died. Have 
record of one son : 

53. Thomas Lewis. 

10. Tavner T. Wisdom, son of (8) Abner Wisdom, 
was born in Virginia and moved to North Carolina with 
his father. He became a large slave holder and was ex- 
tensively engaged in the cotton, corn and tobacco indus- 
tries, all of which were grown on his plantations. His 
family consisted of the following children, all of whom 
were living when these records were obtained : 

14. William. 

15. J. B. 

16. L. F. 

17. Tavner T., Jr. 

18. J. R. 

11. Jesse Wisdom, son of (8) Abner Wisdom, was 
married to Miss Elizabeth Griffin, of Mecklenburg, Vir- 
ginia, July I, 1 8 19. They had six children: 

36. John Henry. 

37. Frank (deceased'). 

38. Abner James. 

39. Julia Ann. 

40. Fabyann. 

41. Francis Alexander. 

Soon after he was married he moved with his wife 
to Green County, Georgia, where he engaged in farming 
and trading. He owned much land and was a large slave 
holder. Georgia at that time was very wild, being thickly 
inhabited by Indians. On March 11, 1836, Jesse was 
thrown from a horse and killed. He was about forty 
years old at the time of his death. 

12. Bird Wisdom, son of (8) Abner Wisdom, was 
born in Virginia and moved with his father to North 



Brinsley Mortimer Wisdom Branch 25 

Carolina. He was engaged in farming. No further 
account given of him. 

13. William Wisdom, son of (8) Abner Wisdom, 
was a farmer and by his business traits of character ac- 
cumulated a handsome fortune. He was born in Virginia 
and when his father moved to North Carolina he emi- 
grated to Missouri. 

53. Thomas Lewis Wisdom, son of (9) Elidge Wis- 
dom, was born in Howard County, Missouri, in 1825. 
He married Miss Nancy Bramen, in Metcalf County, 
Kentucky. They had seven children, five boys and two 

Sirls: 54^ Elidge. 

55. William Reilley. 

56. Thomas Taylor, who died when sixteen years 

old. 

57. James Warford. 

58. John Henry. 

59. Mary Elizabeth. 

60. Irene. 

Thomas Lewis Wisdom was a farmer. He died in 
1896 at the age of seventy-one years. 

14. William Wisdom, son of (10) Tavner T. Wis- 
dom, was born in North Carolina. He is a carpenter and 
now lives in Hanford, Kings County, California. He has 
the following children: 

19. Tavner Pollard. 

20. James. 

21. Brinsley Bird. 

22. John A. 

23. Thomas B. 

15. J. B. Wisdom, son of (10) Tavner T. Wisdom, 
was born in North Carolina. He is now comfortably situ- 



26 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

ated in Brentwood, Contra Costa County, California, 
where he is engaged in farming pursuits. He is the father 
of the following children: 

24. John. 26. Alonzo Clark. 

25, Henry. 27. Lee. 

16. L. F. Wisdom^ son of (10) Tavner T. Wisdom, 
is a blacksmith and lives iw Cooper County, Missouri. 

17. Tavner T. Wisdom^ Jr., son of (10) Tavner T. 
Wisdom, was born in North Carolina. He now lives in 
Pittsburg, Kansas, where he is engaged in farming. He 
has the following sons: 

28. Jesse. 

29. Abraham. 

30. Charles. 

18. J. R. Wisdom, son of (10) Tavner T. Wisdom, is 
engaged in farming and lives in Hickory County, Mis- 
souri. 

The following four children are grandsons of (10) 
Tavner T. Wisdom : 

31. Archie T. 

32. Harvey L. 

33. Edward B. 

34. William Wisdom. 

35. Mrs. Ella Wisdom Hansen, of Los Banos, Mer- 

ced County, California, belongs to this 
branch, unable to place her. 

36. John Henry Wisdom^ son of (11) Jesse Wisdom, 
was born in Green County, Georgia, June 10, 1820. He 
lived in that state until just before the Civil War, when 
he moved to Gadsden, Alabama. Here he ran a ferry 
across the Coosa River. During the war he carried the 
United States mail between Alabama and Rome, Georgia, 
by means of a private conveyance. He married Susenann 



Brinslc'jf Mort'uner Wisdom Branch 27 

Silvey, daughter of Robert Dukes and Mary White Gil- 
liam, April 25, 1843. Susenann joined the Baptist 
Church at Ennon, Floyd County, Georgia, August 29, 
1845. In December, 1846, John Henry was converted 
to the Christian faith and joined the Ennon Baptist 
Church. In March, 1882, he moved w^ith his family to 
Hokes Bluff, Alabama, w^here he novv^ resides on his farm. 
Four score years and nine have passed since the birth of 
this prominent figure. He is the father of nine children, 
seven girls and two boys: 

42. Frances Delilah. 48. Mary Ann. 

43. Julia Catharine Cordelia. 47. Lou. 

44. Rome Penelope, 49. H. A. 

45. Martha Roberta Hatty. 50. J. L. 

46. Sarah Isabelle. 

38. Abner James Wisdom, son of (11) Jesse Wis- 
dom, was first married to Miss Fanny Glass, of Arkansas, 
January, 1843. Three children were born to this union, 
all of whom are dead. Twelve grandchildren, however, 
were left, eight of whom are still living. His second mar- 
riage was to Miss Toney Claudas, of Chattanooga, 
Georgia, May 29, 1861. Three daughters were born of 
this union, the oldest of whom is dead — she leaving one 

daughter. 

50a. 

50b. Mrs. Brantley. 

50c. Mrs, Mrs, Wisdom-Lanier, 

5od. Katherine (daughter of Mrs. Wisdom-Lanier) 

The second daughter, Mrs. Brantly, is a widow and 
has one son. The youngest daughter, Mrs. Jessie Wis- 
dom-Lanier, is living with her husband, a prosperous 
real estate man, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, R. F. D. 
No. 2. 

Abner James Wisdom was born in Floyd County, 



28 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

Georgia, in the year 1827, and died in his seventieth 
year. He was a man of an exceptionally sympathetic 
nature, especially so with the poor who appealed to him 
for aid. He was a remarkable judge of human nature, 
and was known by all to be a just, honorable and up- 
right man in all his dealings. His word was his bond. 
Being an owner of stock yards and fine stock he was, of 
course, an excellent judge of stock. His daughter, Mrs. 
Lanier, wrote the following in a letter which was re- 
ceived by the compiler: "We are justly proud of our 
father, not because he was self-made, but because he was 
a kind and sympathetic father." 

Abner James Wisdom died in 1897, leaving his widow 
in very comfortable circumstances, his estate being esti- 
mated to be worth $400,000. 

Lon Foust, grandson of Abner James Wisdom, who 
lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee, is a very successful 
lawyer. He has been elected to the Senate several times 
and has been favorably spoken of as being made Speaker 
of the House. The newspapers of Tennessee often refer 
to him as the future Governor. 

39. Julia Ann Wisdom^ daughter of (11) Jesse 
Wisdom, was married in Floyd County, Georgia, Octo- 
ber I, 1845, to Jerry M. Myers. 

40. Fabyann Wisdom, daughter of (11) Jesse Wis- 
dom, was married December 21, 1848, to Figue Strick- 
lin, of Floyd County, Georgia. 

41. Francis Alexander Wisdom, son of (11) Jesse 
Wisdom, was married to Sarah Powers in Floyd County, 
Georgia, January 18, 1849. 



Brinsley Mortimer JVisdom Branch 2g 

54. Elidge Wisdom^ son of (53) Thomas Lewis Wis- 
dom, is a farmer and lives in Jeffersonville, Clark 
County, Indiana. 

55. William Reilley Wisdom, son of (53) Thomas 
Lewis Wisdom, is a farmer and resides in Breding, Ken- 
tucky. 

57. James Warford Wisdom^ son of (53) Thomas 
Lewis Wisdom, was born in Cumberlain County, Mis- 
souri, in 1863. He married Miss Lillian Franklin, of 
Kentucky, in 1882. He is a carpenter, and they now live 
in Montesano, Washington. They are the parents of six 
children, the names of whom were not given. 

58. John Henry Wisdom^ son of (53) Thomas 
Lewis Wisdom, lives in Breding, Kentucky. No record 
of him. 

59. Mary Elizabeth Wisdom, daughter of (53) 
Thomas Lewis Wisdom, is living in Breding, Kentucky. 
No record of her. 

60. Irene Wisdom, daughter of (53) Thomas Lewis 
Wisdom, lives in Yacolt, Washington. No record of her. 

42. Frances Delilah Wisdom, daughter of (36) 
John Henry Wisdom, married R. L. Lindsey, who was 
a figure in the famous ride made by John Henry Wisdom 
from Gadsden, Alabama, to Rome, Georgia, which re- 
sulted in the saving of Rome and the Confederate sup- 
plies. They were married at Gadsden, Alabama, Janu- 
ary 16, 1868. 

43. Julia Catherine Cordelia Wisdom, daughter 
of (36) John Henry Wisdom, was married May 24, 
1868, to George Elihue Hallis, at Gadsden, Alabama. 



30 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

44. Rome Penelope Wisdom, daughter of (36) 
John Henry Wisdom, married Joseph Monroe Robert- 
son, at Gadsden, Alabama, February 21, 1 871. Mr. 
Robertson is the writer referred to in John Henry Wis- 
dom's sketch on page 32. 

45. Martha Roberta Hatty Wisdom, daughter of 
(36) John Henry Wisdom, was married December 26, 
1880, to Jesse Tavner Brady, at Gadsden, Alabama. 

46. Sarah Isabelle Wisdom, daughter of (36) 
John Henry Wisdom, was married at Hokes Bluff, Ala- 
bama, October 15, 1882, to Robert Tavner Moore. 

47. Lou Wisdom, daughter of (36) John Henry 
Wisdom, remained single and lived at home with her 
father at Hokes Bluff, Alabama. Although having been 
blind since fourteen j^ears of age, she is a remarkable 
woman. She attends to the housework, making beds, 
sweeping, dusting and washing dishes. Plays the piano 
and sings. She knits beautiful lace and makes shawls 
and mats. In fact makes anything in the knitting line. 
She is now knitting her second counterpane. She works 
entirely by sound and feeling. Her sense of hearing is 
perfect. She has a bright smile and pleasant word for 
every one — is of a lovely Christian character and always 
jolly. If any of the other members of the household 
want to know where to find anything that is wanted they 
always ask Lou, and she invariably gets it. She sings 
nearly all the time and one would not think her blind to 
be with her, except for the sightless eyes. She knits with 
her gold needles which were presented by her father who 
always thought there was no one like Lou. 



Andrezv Thomas Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 31 

48. Mary Ann Wisdom^ daughter of (36) John 
Henry Wisdom, married Richard B. Wright, of Rome, 
Georgia. Have account of one daughter: 

51. Lizzie, who married Mr. Pierson, an engineer 
on a Southern railway passenger train. The 
Piersons have two sons and two daughters. 

49. H. A. Wisdom, son of (36) John Henry Wisdom, 
is a wealthy farmer and stock raiser at Dallas, Texas. 

50. J. L. Wisdom, son of (36) John Henry Wisdom, 
lives at Hokes Blutf, Alabama. He is a Baptist minister 
and is also engaged in farming. 

VETERAN OF CALIFORNIA COLUMN DIED IN TUCSON 

Andrew Thomas Wisdom Succumbs to Stroke of Apoplexy at 
t/ie age of 72 Years — Fought in Battle Near Fort Loivell 

"Andrew Thomas Wisdom, a pioneer Arizonian and a soldier 
in the famous California column of Union troops which swept 
over California, Arizona and New Mexico during the Civil 
War, engaging the rebel troops from Texas in several battles, 
died yesterday from a stroke of apoplexy. Arrangements for 
the funeral will be made by Negley Post, G. A. R., of which 
the deceased had for many years been a member. 

"John Wisdom, a brother, arrived here this morning from 
Wickenburg, and is awaiting advices from other relatives in 
Michigan and Kansas before proceeding with the funeral. 

"He first came to Arizona forty-nine years ago, traversing the 
territory from Yuma to New Mexico with the California col- 
umn in 1862. He fought in the engagement with the Confeder- 
ates near where the ruins of Fort Lowell now stand, and also 
took in several brushes with the rebels in eastern Arizona and 
western New Mexico. When the war ended and the California 
column of volunteers were mustered out of service he came to 
Arizona and had made this territory his home ever since. Be- 
sides being a member of the G. A. R. he was a Freemason 
from the time he reached young manhood and had a very 
large number of friends in this city. 

"Arrangements were made this afternoon for sending the 
remains of Mr. Wisdom to Winfield, Kansas, for interment." 

Note — Unable to give neivspaper credit as only a clipping 
<vas sent. 



* THE ''SAVIOR" OF ROME 

• Written by J. M. Robertson, April 27, 1906 

A sketch of the heroic ride inade by John Henry Wis- 

doTJij during the Civil War, which gave him the title of 

being the ''Savior' of Rome^ Georgia 

**The spring of 1863 witnessed stirring events through- 
out the Central South. General Grant was relentlessly- 
pushing the Confederate forces down the Mississippi 
River toward Vicksburg, Mississippi, with the avowed 
purpose of cutting off the West from the South. When 
Vicksburg fell, July 4, 1863, the Confederates had lost 
five battles, ten thousand soldiers killed and wounded, 
thirty-seven thousand prisoners, and an immense quantity 
of stores. The Mississippi River was open to the Gulf, 
and the purpose of General Grant had been accomplished 
— the Confederacy had been cut in twain. 

"In middle Tennessee the Federal forces, under Gen- 
eral Rosecrans, were pressing General Bragg's army 
across the valleys, back upon the Cumberland Mountains, 
and ultimately to Chattanooga and Chickamauga, with 
the evident purpose to cut a line squarely through the 
very heart of the Confederacy. It was while General 
Bragg's headquarters were at Shelb5rville, and he was 
playing all the forces at his command to the best advan- 
tage possible, and could ill afford to spare so much as one 



* A story of the war in which is told for the first time how 
(36) John Henry Wisdom rode from Gadsden, Alabama, to 
Rome, Georgia, eighteen hours ahead of Colonel Streight, and 
thwarted the purpose of the Federal raid. Written from per- 
sonal observation and notes furnished the author by his uncle, 
Lieutenant Murphy, of General Forrest's escort, and by Mr. 
Wisdom. 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 33 

regiment of his small cavalry equipment, that a coup de 
main was made by the Federals from the Mississippi de- 
partment. 

'*Blue Mountain, Alabama, was the eastern terminal 
of Selma, Rome & Dalton Railroad, and was sixty-one 
miles southwest of Rome, Georgia. All supplies gathered 
along that line of railway naturally, by necessity, went to 
the support of Joseph E. Johnston in Mississippi who was 
hastening to the relief of Pemberton. Rome, Georgia, 
was the terminal of the Rome Railroad, a branch from 
Kingston, eighteen miles east, on the Western & Atlantic 
Railroad. All the ''tithes" that were collected for fifty 
miles around, from the rich valleys and river bottoms west 
and south of Rome, were stored at that place, besides 
there were gunpowder factories and gun factories at that 
point. Being far inland and far to the rear of Bragg's 
army, it was thought that Rome was perfectly safe from 
attack. 

''Nearly all the supplies for Bragg's army had to be 
transported over the Western & Atlantic Railroad, which 
connected Atlanta, Georgia, with Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee. The Federal authorities, presumably in the per- 
son of General Grant, saw that if a small force could 
strike across the country from northern Mississippi, de- 
stroy the immense stores of provisions, ammunition and 
ordnance supplies at Rome and, pressing on a few miles 
farther, tear up the Western & Atlantic Railroad tracks 
and burn the bridges, which are numerous on that section 
of the road, Bragg would be completely cut off from his 
base of supplies and forced to fall back. 

"As it was, Bragg was stubbornly contesting every inch 
of the ground over which he was slowly retreating, and 



34 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

many thousands of the Federal army were being sacrificed 
in its advance movement. It was not possible to move a 
large body of troops so far as from Mississippi to Rome 
with sufficient swiftness to accomplish the desired end. A 
small troupe, well mounted and lightly equipped, might 
make a dash across north Alabama and destroy Rome and 
the railroad, but never hope to get back within the Fed- 
eral lines. It was simply a question of cost. On the one 
hand, many months of hard fighting and many thousands 
of fine soldiers slain ; on the other hand, a few hundred 
daring well-equipped troops, the stores and railroads de- 
stroyed, only a few score, at most, killed, and the remain- 
ing few hundred prisoners of war. Which should it be? 
The latter was decided upon — it would cost much less in 
time and money, and far less in human lives, and at what- 
ever cost, Bragg must be forced out of Tennessee into 
Georgia. In pursuance of this wisely devised plan to 
strike far to Bragg's rear, a strong detachment of infantry 
and artillery, under command of General Dodge, was 
detached from the forces at Corinth, Mississippi, about 
the middle of April, 1863, and marched in the direction 
of Tuscumbia, Alabama. Only a handful of Confederate 
cavalry, under command of Colonel Roddy, were at hand 
to meet this formidable force. They could do nothing 
more than harass its advance. Under cover of General 
Dodge's movement. Colonel A. D. Streight, with twenty- 
two hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, moved up the 
west bank of the Tennessee River from Eastport and 
joined Dodge at Tuscumbia. In the meantime. General 
Bragg had ordered General N. B. Forrest to take his own 
brigade of cavalry and move into north Alabama, by way 
of Decaturf to the relief of Colonel Roddy, which he did. 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 35 

"On the morning of April 28, 1863, General Forrest, 
having formed a junction with Colonel Roddy, brought 
on an engagement with Dodge's forces at Town Creek. 
Colonel Streight, with eighteen hundred picked cavalry 
and a battery of light artillery, was under cover of 
Dodge's maneuver, moving rapidly to the south and east 
in the direction of Mount Hope and Moulton. Colonel 
Dibrell had been detached from Forrest's command and 
now made demostrations from Florence against Dodge's 
rear, giving it out that General Van Dorn, with his entire 
cavalry force, was sweeping around between Dodge and 
Corinth. Accordingly, General Dodge, believing that 
General Streight was well on his way to north Georgia 
and that the object of his demonstration had been accom- 
plished, fell back toward Corinth. 

"Trusted scouts reported to both Forrest and Roddy 
the movement of Streight. Forrest, on the morning of 
April 29, 1863, divided his forces into two columns; one 
under Roddy following directly the track of Streight and 
the other, led by himself, taking a circuitous route with 
the purpose of heading off any deflection Streight might 
make to the north. 

"Colonel Streight's troops consisted of the 51st and 
73d Indiana, i8th Illinois and 3d Ohio Regiments, and 
two companies of Alabama Union cavalry. By riding all 
night Forrest overtook Streight on the morning of April 
30, 1863, at Day's Gap, on Sand Mountain, and trans- 
ferring his headquarters to Roddy's column, advanced to 
the attack. From this time up to the time of Colonel 
Streight's surrender, May 3, it was a running continuous 
fight, day and night, the clash of arms being heard almost 
every hour. 



36 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

"At Black Creek, two miles southwest of Gadsden, 
Alabama, Strefght burned the bridge behind him. The 
stream was deep and rapid and the banks were high and 
precipitous. There was no ford and it was impossible to 
cross. While Forrest was considering what to do a 
young girl, Miss Emma Sanson, came out from a house 
near by, and mounting behind General Forrest, piloted 
him to an obscure but difficult ford half a mile up the 
creek, where his force, after a delay of two hours, crossed 
over. 

"John Henry Wisdom having been in business so long 
both in Rome and Gadsden, sixty-five miles apart, and 
along the public roads both north and south of the Coosa 
River, was well known in both places and throughout the 
country. 

"On the morning of May 2, 1863, Mr. Wisdom took 
a sack of corn in his buggy to a mill southeast of Gadsden, 
six miles away, across the Coosa River. While he was 
away the quiet little town, nestling peacefully on the 
bluffs of the Coosa, was startled from its sense of security 
by a large force of Federal cavalry riding into the midst 
of the town and quickly distributing themselves among 
the residences in quest of something to eat. They came 
unannounced and wholly unexpected. If the sun had been 
suddenly blown out the people would not have been more 
surprised nor more frightened. 

"Some time before a large drove of hogs had been 
driven from middle Tennessee to Gadsden, where they 
were butchered and the meat stored in Mr. Wisdom's 
large smoke house. Some of the Federals heard of this 
and soon found the place. His daughter, Miss Mary, 
had conveniently stepped across the street to a neighbor 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 37 

with the key in her pocket. The soldiers became impatient 
of her return and proceeded to break down the door. At 
this moment Forrest's troops dashed into town and the 
meat was not saved, but served to feed the famishing 
Confederates. 

''Mr. Wisdom, on his return, reached the river about 
three o'clock and found that his ferry boat and batteau 
had been sunk. He saw O. P. Hill, Pink Lidell and 
H. W. Pickens skulking along under the bank of the 
river, on the Gadsden side. They succeeded, by shouting 
to him across the river, in making him understand that 
the Federals in strong force had been in town and had 
left, going in the direction of Rome; but they did not 
know, at least did not tell him, that Forrest was in 
pursuit. 

''Wisdom fed his horse, hitched him to his buggy and 
drove rapidly to a neigborhood known as Gnatville, 
twenty-two miles from Gadsden. After having made 
several unsuccessful attempts to procure a fresh horse, the 
widow Nancy Hanks finally let him have a lame pony. 
This he rode to Gashen, five miles, reaching that place at 
sundown. Simps Johnson furnished him a fresh horse 
and went with him eleven miles to Rev. Allen Whems', 
an old stage stand on the main road leading from Rome 
to Jacksonville and Blue Mountain, Alabama. While 
Rev. Whems was saddling a pair of mules, Mr. Wisdom 
ate his supper. Whems went with him eleven miles to 
John Baker's, one mile west of Cove Springs, Georgia. 
Mr. Baker furnished him a fresh horse and his son ac- 
companied him ten miles to Mr. Jones', six miles south of 
Rome. Mr. Jones furnished him a fresh horse and went 
with him to Rome, reaching that city at midnight. 



38 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

"He had used five horses and one mule, and had ridden 
from Gadsden, Alabama, to Rome, Georgia — sixty-five 
miles — from four o'clock in the afternoon to twelve 
o'clock midnight. Mr. Wisdom, in telling the writer 
about this ride said: 'The horses I rode after I left my 
horse with the widow Hanks were not trained saddle 
horses by a good deal. Every one of them had a rough 
gait, and each one was rougher than the former one. 
One horse fell down with me but did not get me off. 
The mule fell down and pitched me over his head and I 
had to do some lively rolling to keep him from rolling 
over on me. I tell you my legs were peeled on the inside, 
and when I got off my horse in Rome I was so sore that 
I could hardly move. If I could have ridden on a gallop 
it would not have been so hard on me, but the horses and 
mule could go no gait but trot, and part was up and 
down about as fast as forward. The first man I saw in 
Rome was John Doyle, watchman on the railroad, in 
front of the wagon bridge across Etewah River. The 
next one I saw was George S. Black, proprietor of the 
Etewah House, and I told him the Yankees were coming. 
I rode up the street and awakened a good many people I 
knew, and when they found out the Yanks were coming 
you ought to have seen them hustle. They got a move 
on them a little faster than they were used to. After the 
alarm got started, and that was a mighty few minutes I 
tell you, I went to my mother, who was living in Rome, 
and went to bed. If Colonel Streight had come on into 
town he would have had a lively time getting me out 
of bed.' 

"When Mr. Wisdom gave the alarm to a few his task 
was at an end. He was so well and favorably known 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 39 

that there was not the shadow of doubt but that the 
Federals were making a raid on Rome. The courthouse 
bell was rung for an hour. Citizens sprang upon horses 
and rode into every part of the little city of five thous- 
sand people, giving the alarm. In thirty minutes after 
Mr. Wisdom rode out of the covered bridge at the foot 
of Broad Street every man, woman and child in Rome 
knew that 'The Yankees Are Coming.' Then pande- 
monium reigned supreme. Old men and boys rushed 
down town to get the particulars and then back home to 
add confusion to the confounded. Mothers and young 
women rushed from room to room in their homes snatch- 
ing up one article of value to throw it down to grab 
another — another of greater or less value. Many of the 
men and boys drew out their old rifles and shotguns, and 
vowed that they would fight. By two a. m. an immense 
crowd of people had collected at the depot of the Rome 
Railroad and were clamoring for transportation, which 
the road could not furnish. The only engine in town 
had gone to Kingston, pulling a train of box cars loaded 
to the guards with the 'sooners,' but was expected to re- 
turn by sun-up with other engines and two or three 
companies of troops that were thought to be available. 
That time was not fast enough for the excited populace. 
Sun-up found the public roads leading east, south and 
southwest crowded by hundreds of people walking and 
riding in every conceivable style of vehicle, miles on their 
way from their doomed homes. 

''A large number of men and boys met in the street in 
front of the Etewah House, and by acclamation elected 
a prominent citizen, who had been in his younger days a 
general of militia, commander. He promptly appointed 



40 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

or confirmed the election of his subordinates; companies 
of old men and boj^s ranging from the age of seventy-five 
down to fourteen were organized. All the cotton drays 
and wagons in town that had not gone out on the road 
were impressed to haul cotton, and by nine o'clock a line 
of formidable breastworks made of cotton bales had been 
built on the north side of the Oastanaula River, about a 
half mile from the covered bridge. By noon about three 
hundred convalescent soldiers from the Government hos- 
pitals and perhaps a thousand old men and boys were 
massed behind these breastworks, which were mounted 
by stove-pipe cannon. The bridge behind them was filled 
with straw and other combustible material, and this was 
saturated with turpentine and oil. 

''Southwest of Rome, along the road over which Mr. 
Wisdom had made his night ride, the news had spread 
like wild-fire, and old men and boys were coming in by 
hundreds all day, armed with squirrel rifles and shotguns. 
The writer's father lived on the main stage road leading 
from Rome to Jacksonville, Alabama, a mile below where 
Mr. Wisdom intersected that road and thirty-three miles 
from Rome. The news reached our home in less than an 
hour after Mr. Wisdom passed up the road. Four in- 
fantry soldiers, who were walking through from Blue 
Mountain to Rome on their way to the front, were spend- 
ing the night with us. The mother and a negro cook 
spent the night cooking three days' rations for six. Sun- 
up found the father and the writer, then a boy of four- 
teen, both armed with double-barrel shotguns and navy 
pistols, and the four soldiers armed with Springfield rifles, 
in a two horse wagon, well on their way to Rome, which 
city we reached about eleven o'clock — just in time to 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 41 

cross the bridge to the breastworks before the bridge was 
blockaded with straw and turpentined. These were war 
times, and the boy who had never seen a 'Yankee' was 
enthusiastic over his golden opportunity to win 'renown 
immortal' and 'glory unfading' on the bloody field. The 
old soldiers who knew what war meant smiled and told 
how the young boys at the front were the most daring 
and fearless fighters in the army. 

"A mile out from Rome, where the party stopped to 
feed and eat and divide the rations, the boy braggart gave 
an exhibition of his skill with a navy pistol by putting 
five balls out of six within a three-inch circle at a dis- 
tance of fifty yards. He now put in fresh loads, powder, 
ball and cap, not cartridges as the boys now use, and was 
ready and eager for the fray. It never occurred to him 
that while he was shooting the other side would be shoot- 
ing too. 

"General Forrest and an old negro washerwoman 
saved the scalps of that crowd of old men and boys who 
were lined up behind their breastworks, effectually cut 
off by the 'stuffed' bridge from retreat. 

"Colonel Streight had sent forward an advance guard 
force of two hundred and fifty picked men, under com- 
mand of Captain Milton Russell, one of his most daring 
and skillful officers. This force was nearly twenty miles 
ahead of the main column, having been sent forward 
from Turkeytown, forty-five miles west of Rome. 
Young R. L. Lindsey, who afterwards became Mr. Wis- 
dom's son-in-law, was driving Wisdom's mail wagon 
back. Going west he drove plump into this advance 
squad of Streight's cavalry a few miles below Rome. He 
told me* of this incident which occurred in his presence: 



42 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

"On top of a high hill near Colonel Alfred Shorter's 
residence, a mile and a half out of Rome, Captain Russell 
met an old negro woman with a basket of clothes on her 
head. When she saw the soldiers, all dressed in blue 
uniforms, she stopped and set her basket down by the 
side of the road, her eyes looking as if they would pop 
out of her head. When Captain Russell came up to her 
he stopped and said: 'Auntie, how far is it to Rome?' 
'Well sar, leme see, I specks it's bout er mile, if thar 
warn't nothin in the way. The way yer'll have ter go, 
I specks yer'll think it's futher, marser. Are yer solgers 
Yankees?' 

" 'Yes, my good woman, we are Federal soldiers,' said 
Captain Russell. 

" 'Lor bress my ole eyes. I never spected ter see any 
Yanks way down here. Yer must er come er long waj^s? 
Ise fraid, marser, if yer'll scuse me, that yer too far from 
home, and yer won't git back as easy as yer got here.' 

" 'Auntie, are there any rebel soldiers in Rome?' 

" 'My Lordy, yes sar, ther shor is, I never seed ther 
like, why marser, Rome are plum full of solgers, Ther 
trains has been comin in all night and all day, jist 
crowded wif em. And they's been comin in all day in 
wagons and on horses. I specks thar mus be bout ten 
thousan here by this time (whistle of engine was heard) ; 
ther comes nother train now, I specks that's ther regi- 
ment from Atlanter I hearn em sayin while ergo ther war 
lookin fer. They's done got bresworks.' 

" 'Where, Auntie?' asked Captain Russell, excitedly. 
'Can you tell me exactly where the works are?' 

" 'Bress yer soul, honey, right down thar befoe yer 
eyes. Don't yer sees em right down thar on that hill, 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 43 

this side o ther riber? They's got cannons on em too, big 
nuf fer a boy ter crawl inter em.' 

''While this conversation was in progress in sight of 
Rome, Colonel Streight's forces were stacking their arms 
twenty miles below. If Captain Russel had known the 
conditions in Rome he could easily have turned north, 
crossed the river at a shoal a mile above the bridge and 
rode into Rome with little or no resistance. The Con- 
federate stores would have been at his mercy. If Mr. 
Wisdom had not made his ride the night before from 
Gadsden, on the opposite side of the river from Streight, 
Captain Russell would have ridden into Rome unan- 
nounced and destroyed the stores and gun works before 
he knew of Colonel Streight's surrender. 

"Captain Russell hastily scanned the breastworks in 
front of him, and while he was doing so a squad of old 
soldiers left each end of the works, both of which rested 
on the river bank, and struck off north and south. He 
saw at a glance that these movements were intended to 
cut off his retreat. He turned and rode back in the di- 
rection he had come, leaving Lindsey, the mail carrier, 
and his team standing in the road. Ten miles below 
Rome he met Colonel Streight and his officers, prisoners 
of war, under Confederate escort, on their way to Rome. 
Nothing was left for him to do but surrender, which he 
gracefully did. 

"When General Forrest arrived on the hill where 
Captain Russell had turned back he experienced consid- 
erable difficulty in opening communication with the com- 
mander of the breastworks. Up to this time it was not 
known in Rome that, he was in pursuit of Streight and 
that the Federals were prisoners. When that fact was 



44 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

established to their satisfaction the rejoicing knew no 
bounds. The only casualties sustained by the Rome sol- 
diers were a number of men and boys wounded by reck- 
less firing of guns loaded with shot and shell in salute. 
When General Forrest reached the bridge it took an hour 
to clear the obstructions so he could cross over into the 
city. He was not noted at that time for his delicate 
choice of words and he indulged in some pretty vigorous 
non-Sunday School language when he saw how several 
hundred soldiers, old men and boys practically without 
arms, had been thrown across the river to fight the enemy, 
and the bridge obstructed, ready to be burned behind 
them in case they should suffer defeat. 

"The citizens of Rome presented Mr. Wisdom a sub- 
stantial purse and a handsome and costly silver service, 
which he still has in his country home near Hokes Bluff, 
Alabama, eight miles above Gadsden. They also sent a 
handsome sum of money to the widow Hanks who had so 
patriotically furnished Mr. Wisdom her lame pony to 
ride to Gashen. 

''The only published reference to this timely service 
of Mr. Wisdom known to the writer or to Mr. Wisdom 
is a footnote, page 270, 'Campaigns of General Forrest 
and His Cavalry,' by T. J., New York, October i, 
1867, as follows: 'Mr. John H. Wisdom of Gadsden, 
however, had previously hastened on the same errand, 
gave the people of Rome the first warning of the coming 
danger, for which a grateful people gave him a silver 
service.' 

"In closing this bit of history it will not be out of 
place to briefly revert to the pursuit and capture of 
Colonel Streight. 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 45 

''When General Forrest's cavalry dashed into Gads- 
den the Federals hastily retired, taking the road up the 
north side of the Coosa River leading to Rome. They 
halted in Turkeytown Valley, ten miles above Gadsden, 
to feed. Selecting a favorable spot in a pine thicket, 
Colonel Streight arranged an ambush for the Confeder- 
ates. After a brief stop in Gadsden, where the citizens 
say many of his troopers actually nodded sitting on their 
horses, Forrest, selecting about five hundred of his best 
men, pursued the enemy in hot haste. When he came 
upon the line of skirmishers, thrown forward as decoys, 
he charged through the thicket so impetuously that he ran 
through the ambush before the enemy supposed him to 
be half way through the thicket. The ambush was a 
failure. In the melee Colonel Hathaway, the best and 
favorite officer of Streight's command, was killed — it is 
said by Private Joseph Martin, of Colonel Bliffle's regi- 
ment, at a distance of six hundred yards. The loss of 
Colonel Hathaway was irreparable. Forrest camped 
that night on the ground the Federals had abandoned. 
By dawn next morning, Sunday, May 3, 1863, his little 
troop were in their saddles, and in a short time were 
harassing Colonel Streight's rear. When they reached 
the bridge across Chattanooga River, two miles below 
Cedar Blu£F, they found it in flames. The troops dis- 
mounted and carried the artillery and ammunition over 
by hand. The Federals were overtaken again near the 
old Lawrence Homestead, four miles above Cedar Bluff 
and twenty-four miles below Rome. Colonel Streight 
had disposed troops for battle. Forrest quickly disposed 
his small forces for a general charge, front and flank. 
He sent an officer. Captain Henry Pointer, under flag of 



46 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

truce to Colonel Streight, demanding his immediate sur- 
render. Streight demanded a personal interview with 
Forrest. The two officers met in a skirt of woods be- 
tween the lines. Streight insisted that he would not sur- 
render unless it be to a force at least equal to his own. 
While they were talking Forrest's battery of light artil- 
lery galloped across the field in sight. Streight inquired 
how much artillery he had. 'Enough to destroy your 
command in thirty minutes,' was Forrest's prompt reply. 
Streight insisted that no more troops come nearer than the 
top of a ridge three hundred yards away. To this Forr- 
est readily assented, but while giving his orders to an aid 
quietly ordered that the section of artillery should re- 
peatedly appear at different places along the ridge and 
wheel as if taking position. When Streight was about to 
return to his command Forrest remarked that it was 
useless to parley longer, that he had him (Streight) at his 
mercy, a river on the right, a mountain on the left, a 
strong force in front, and his own command behind him. 
Streight returned to his command, Forrest sending one 
of his aids with him for his protection. Within fifteen 
minutes Streight returned for another parley, an armistice 
of twenty minutes having been agreed upon. As he re- 
turned from his second conference with Forrest he met 
one of his officers bearing a white flag who informed him 
that his officers desired to surrender. He returned to 
General Forrest and announced his willingness to sur- 
render, on two conditions : First, that all were to be held 
as prisoners of war; this would include his two Alabama 
companies, about whose treatment he seemed to have 
some misgivings. Second, that the officers be allowed to 
retain their side arms and personal baggage. 



John Henry Wisdom — Brinsley Branch 47 

"These terms were promptly accepted by General 
Forrest and the surrender was formally made. At this 
moment Captain Pointer, of Forrest's staff, asked his 
general what disposition should be made of four imagi- 
nary commands, one being General Armstrong's. Forr- 
est promptly gave orders for their disposition, at the 
same time explaining to Streight that as forage was very 
scarce at Rome he would simply take one regiment of his 
command as an escort to the prisoners. The Federal 
troops stacked their arms in a field and then marched 
away a half mile and formed in columns of four. The 
Confederates came up, took charge of their prisoners and 
escorted them to Rome, the officers being escorted by 
Forrest and his staff some two miles in advance of the 
main column. Thus, with five hundred men he captured 
seventeen hundred as fine soldiers as ever invaded the 
South, and saved Bragg's base of supplies to him. 

*'At Rome he turned his prisoners over to the local 
military authorities, and after giving his own command 
first-class mounts, sent the balance of the captured horses 
and mules to Chattanooga, with the request that they be 
returned to the citizens of Alabama from whom Streight 
had taken many of them in exchange for his own broken- 
down horses and especially so at Gadsden, where he had 
unexpectedly ridden in upon many citizens from the sur- 
rounding country, the day being Saturday. 

"Never was a raid into the North or South more skill- 
fully conducted or more vigorously prosecuted than that 
by Colonel A. B. Streight, but he was in the heart of an 
enemy's country, far from his own communications, with 
foes on either hand and in front of him, and with the 
most daring and adroit cavalry general in the South at 



48 Genealogy of Wisdo?n Fainily 

his heels. Without knowing the possibility of finding out 
the strength of the force that was pursuing him, or being 
massed in his front, his was a forlorn hope. There was 
nothing but surrender or be cut to pieces. The whole 
country was aroused, and he would have been confronted 
at Rome by more than three thousand infantry. 

''When he scuttled John H. Wisdom's ferry boat and 
batteaux and sunk them in Coosa River at Gadsden he 
did not know that Wisdom was on the other side of the 
river and would ride through to Rome, eighteen hours 
ahead of him, and give the warning which would have 
resulted in his complete destruction had he reached that 
city armed and not escorted by the men who wore the 
gray." 

John H. Wisdom died July 27, 1909, at the age of 
eighty-nine years and two months, at his home in Hokes 
Bluff, Alabama.* 



* (154) Deixi Moore Wisdom, a descendant of (4) Francis Wis- 
dom, ivas a member of General Forrest's famous cavalry, and 
no doubt accompanied Forrest to Rome. 







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Facsimile of letter written in 1853, at Ilightown, N. C, by (8) Abner Wisdom 
(who was born in 1767) to (36) John Henry Wisdom, of Rome, Georgia 




Family Record — Brinsley Branch 51 

FAMILY RECORD 

BIRTHS 



52 Genealogy of JVisdom Family 

FAMILY RECORD 



MARRIAGES 



Family Record — Brinsley Branch 53 

FAMILY RECORD 

DEATHS 



You of the spirit with the Mayflower dew, 
A pilgrim father, faithful to the end. 
Stout-hearted foe and trust-hearted friend, 

Who never trimmed your sails to winds that blew 

With breath of popular favor; but foreknew 
Storm followed sun, and knowing did depend 
On one behind all storm, high aid to lend ; 

And from heaven's fount alone your wisdom drew. 

Farewell — farewell to the bygone days. 

We ill can spare the good gray head that wore 
The honors of a nation. Fare-you-well. 

When love and justice climb the starry way, 

And freedom wins the height where angels dwell,, 
They there shall find your presence gone before. 



(3) 

Pollard William Wisdom 

Branch 




OLLARD WILLIAM WISDOM, son of 
( I ) Abner Wisdom^ was born in England. 
He came to America in the early part of the 
Eighteenth Century, probably about 1 730. 
Soon after the Revolutionary War he was 
sent to Germany by the United States Government on 
some official business. He was there perhaps for several 
years, during which time one son. Pollard M., was born. 
He then returned to the United States and settled in 
Kentucky. He had three sons: 

61. William. 62. John. 63. Pollard M. 

61. William Wisdom, son of (3) Pollard Wisdom, 
married Dorcas Crues. He was a farmer and trader; 
was born some time between 1765 and 1770 and lived to 
be over a hundred years old. Have names of two sons: 

64. Francis * 64a. William, Jr. 

63. Pollard M. Wisdom, son of (3) Pollard Wis- 
dom, was born in Germany soon after the Revolutionary 
War. He came to America with his parents on their 
return to the United States and lived in Kentucky, where 
he was reared to manhood. He married a Kentucky girl 
and they had the following children: 

70. David. 71. Jackson. 72. James M. 

64. Francis Wisdom, son of (61) William Wisdom, 
was born in the year 1798. He was a successful farmer 
and trader. Have account of three sons: 

65. A. G. 66. W. C. 67. F. M. 



* '"Lieut. William Wisdom served under General Andrew Jackson from June 20, 1814 
to January 27, 1815, (in a Tennessee regiment.)" — Records Washington. D. C. 



58 Genealogy of Wisdom Family 

70. David Wisdom, son of (63) Pollard M. Wisdom, 
was born in Kentucky. He was a farmer. Unable to get 
details of his life. 

71. Jackson Wisdom, son of (63) Pollard M. Wis- 
dom, was born in Kentucky. He was a member of the 
Baptist Church and followed farming as an occupation. 

72. James M. Wisdom, son of (63) Pollard M. Wis- 
dom, was born in Kentucky in 1804. He was married 
to Miss Susan Payne, of Tennessee, in 1827. Nine 
children came as an issue, most of whom are dead. He 
moved from Tennessee to Benton County, Missouri, in 
1836, and was a pioneer of that section. He was a 
farmer and highly respected. The children we have 
records of are as follows: 

73. Harden Payne. 77. John (John the Baptist). 

74. Andrew Jackson. 78. Nancy. 

75. Pollard M. 79. Martha. 

76. Timothy 80. Mary C. 

65. A. G. Wisdom, son of (64) Francis Wisdom, 
was born February 16, 1824. Have account of one son: 
68. W. C. 

73. * Hardon Payne Wisdom^ son of (72) James 
M. Wisdom, was born in Tennessee. He married Miss 
Martha Malen. They had the following children: 

87. James (deceased). 90. Sylvester. 

88. Jackney (deceased). 89. George Luther. 

74. *Andrew Jackson Wisdom^ the oldest living son 
of (72) James M. and Susan, was born in Tennessee, 
May 14, 1834. "When two years of age he moved with 
his parents to Missouri, where he was raised and lived 



* See Records, beginning on page 64, compiled by C. C. Wisdom 



Pollard William Wisdom Branch 59 

until 1905, when he went to Oakland, California. He 
followed farming till the year 1876, when he was ap- 
pointed collector of state and county taxes of Benton 
County, Missouri. Later he was presiding judge of the 
County Court. From 1881 to 1893 he was a merchant, 
after that he retired and went to California. He was 
married three times and has one son and a daughter: 

81. W. W. 

82. Susan (Mrs. H. W. Fristoe). 

The following is an extract of a letter received from 
(81) W, W. Wisdom shortly after the death of his 
father J Andrew Jackson, who died since the above was 
written: 

"It is with deepest regret that I have to report to you the 
death of my father. He died here at my home on the twentieth 
of December last (1906). 

"About last May, while in California, father was taken with 
a shortness of breath, and with all that the skilled physicians 
could do he continued to grow worse. As Missouri had always 
been his home, and all of his family and near relatives that 
were dead were buried here, his request was that if he could 
not get well, he wanted to come back to Missouri to die and be 
buried in his lot at Warsaw, Missouri. Complying with this 
request and after receiving a telegram from him I left here on 
the 20th day of August, 1906, for California to bring him back 
to Missouri. Father stood the trip well and we had great 
hopes of his recovery, but his gain at any time, if any, was 
very slight, and after the first month he declined rapidly. 

"Father was a noble and grand man. He was a member of 
the Christian Church, and was loved and respected by all who 
knew him. He left his business in fine shape, and as executor 
of his estate it has been a pleasure for me to follow his strict 
methods of business. 

"I am now making arrangements to take my family and go 
to California to spend the summer, and if I can so arrange 
will be pleased to come and see you." 

It can readily be seen that A. J. Wisdom had been a 

very useful and worthy citizen; so favorable conclusion 



6o Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

can easily be drawn from the record of this honorable 
career, that it is perhaps impertinence to point out more 
fully his worthiness to be the recipient of the highest 
respect and esteem of his fellow men. 

75. * Pollard M. Wisdom^ son of (72) James M. 
Wisdom, married Miss Salina Elizabeth Cox, and they 
had the following children: 

91. Benjamin. 

92. Martha. 

93. Zuckie Temperance. 

94. James (deceased). 

76. * Timothy Wisdom, son of (72) James M. 
Wisdom, was born about the year 1850. He is a farmer 
and stock raiser and lives in Wisdom, Benton County, 
Missouri. He married Miss Nancy McKenzie, of Ben- 
ton County, Missouri, and they had eight children, as 
follows : 

120. Dana. 124. Zelda. 

121. Wallace. 125. Otis. 

122. Osa. 126. Zala (deceased). 

123. Leta. 127. Judson (deceased). 

77. * John Wisdom (called John the Baptist), son 
of (72) James M. Wisdom, was a traveling salesman. 
He left home when a young man and was never heard 
of afterward. 

78. * Nancy Wisdom, daughter of (72) James M. 
Wisdom, married Newton Rippetoe, of St. Clair 
County, Missouri. Two children were born to them: 

128. Martha. 

129. 

* See Records, beginning on page 64, compiled by C. C. Wisdom 



Pollard William Wisdom Branch 6i 

79. * Martha Wisdom, daughter of (72) James M. 

Wisdom, married George Neeley, of , and they 

had three children: 

130. Joseph. 131. Martha. 132. Ann. 

80. * Mary Wisdom, daughter of (72) James M. 
Wisdom, was born about the year 1853. She married 
W. R. Vance, of Warsaw, Missouri. They now live in 
Fairfield, Benton County, Missouri, and have nine 
children : 

133. James. 138. 

134. Homer. 139. 

135. Nellie. 140. 

136. 141. 

137. 

68. W. C. Wisdom, son of (65) A. G. Wisdom, was 
born April 24, 1847. He was a farmer and a highly 
respected citizen, and was a man of broad views and 
was loved by all who knew him. While not a member 
of any church, like most Wisdoms, he leaned toward the 
Baptist faith. Have account of one son: 
69. Agrippa G. 

81. W. W. Wisdom, son of (74) Andrew Jackson 
Wisdom, was born March 12, 1864, in Benton County, 
Missouri. He was raised on a farm until he was six- 
teen years of age. Since then he has been engaged in 
the mercantile business in Warsaw, Missouri, and in 
southern California; also Lincoln, Missouri, since 1889. 
In 1 89 1 he was married to Miss Ida Harvey, of Lin- 
coln, Missouri. Four children were born to this union: 

83. Charles Andrew. 85. Anna ^»Iargaret. 

84. William W. 86. Helen Harvey. 

* See Records, beginning on page 64, compiled by C. C. Wisdom 



62 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

W. W. Wisdom has served continuously since the fall 
of 1889 as a member of the School Board of Lincoln, 
Missouri. Since 1890 he has been a member of the 
Democratic County Central Committee. He belongs to 
no secret organizations and has no vows to fill to any 
one excepting his family and church. Having for a num- 
ber of years successfully done business in Lincoln under 
the firm name of Brill & Wisdom, it is not surprising 
that he should be devoted to interests of his favorite city. 
He is one of that city's enterprising business men, and 
never misses an opportunity to contribute to her up- 
building and general prosperity. These commendable 
qualities are universally appreciated by his fellow citi- 
zens, who vie with each other in their general endorse- 
ment of respect and good will. 

Aside from the business world he is interested directly 
as well as indirectly in the growing of corn and wheat; 
having been raised on a farm it seems he cannot entirely 
quit it. He has a stock and grain farm of six hundred 
acres; also another grain farm consisting of two hundred 
and seventy acres, and for recreation he goes to the farms 
to help push things along a little. He says they do not 
make any big money on the investment, but that they are 
safe and then he likes to have something on the outside 
to attend to. Corn and wheat is king in his country. 

82. Susan (Mrs. H. W. Fristoe), daughter of 
(74) Andrew Jackson, was born some time between 
i860 and 1865. She now lives in Windsor, Missouri. 

89. * George Luther Wisdom^ son of (73) Hardon 
Payne Wisdom, married Miss Clara Fears, of Headrick, 

* See Records, beginning on page 64, compiled by C. C. Wisdom 



Pollard William Wisdom Branch 63 

Oklahoma. They have two boys, the names of whom 
were never sent me. 

89a. 89b. 

90. * Sylvester Wisdom, son of (73) Hardon 
Payne Wisdom, married Miss Leona Smith, of Benton 
County, Missouri, and as far as I know they have no 
children. They live in Headrick, Oklahoma. 

91. * Benjamin Wisdom, son of (75) Pollard M. 
Wisdom, married Miss Malinda B. Ashnihurst in 1881. 
They had ten children as follows: 

95. C. C. 100. Teddie. 

96. A. J. loi. Hannah. 

97. Audrey 102. 

98. Gedney Jackson. 103 

99. William. 104. 

Benjamin Wisdom is owner of the "Maple Grove 
Farm," in Benton County, Missouri. 

92. * Martha Wisdom, daughter of (75) Pollard 
M. Wisdom, married William T. Love, of Wisdom, 
Missouri. He is engaged in farming pursuits. They 
have eight children: 

105. Omer Lee. 109. Edith May 

106. Luther Halleck. no. Bertha Frances. 

107. William Lawrence. in. John Oscar. 

108. Elizabeth. 112. Mary. 

93. * ZucKiE Temperance Wisdom, daughter of 
(75) Pollard M. Wisdom, married William R. Scott, a 
large real estate holder of Benton County, Missouri. 
They have seven children, as follows: 

113. James. 117. John. 

114. Emma. 118. William. 

115. Robert Lee. 119. 

116. Maggie May. 

* See Records, beginning ofi page 64, compiled by C. C. Wisdom 






64 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

69. Agrippa G. Wisdom, son of (68) W. C. Wis- 
dom, was born September 21, 1878. He is superintend- 
ent of the public schools at Warsaw, Missouri. Like his 
father, he is of broad views, influential and takes a lead- 
ing interest in educational matters. He is also connected 
with the Times Printing Co., of Warsaw, which paper 
was established in 1865. 

95. * C. C. Wisdom, son of (91) Benjamin Wisdom, 
compiler of records beginning on this page, is an energetic 
young business man of Okeene, Oklahoma. He and his 
brother, A. J., are connected with Boardman Land and 
Loan Company, of Okeene. [See (96) A. J. Wisdom.] 

96. * A. J. Wisdom, son of (91) Benjamin Wisdom, 
lives in Okeene, Oklahoma. He and his brother, C. C, 
are connected with Boardman Land and Loan Company. 

These young men are an example of what ability, 
coupled with some experience and training, can accom- 
plish when persistently and honestly applied, for it is 
by these that true success is judged, and not by the noisy 
applause of the world or the glittering trappings of 
wealth. May success attend them. [See (95) C. C. 
Wisdom.] 

(72) JAMES M. WISDOM'S FAMILY 

The following was compiled by (95) C. C. Wisdom, 
of Okeene J Oklahoma: 

My great-grandfather's name was (72) James M. 
Wisdom. He came from the State of Tennessee to Ben- 
ton County, Missouri, some time in the thirties and 

*See Records, beginning on this page, compiled by C. C. Wisdom 



James M. Wisdom — Pollard Branch 65 

settled on Hogles Creek, and lived there until his death. 
He was a well-to-do farmer and owned a large amount 
of land. He was married in the State of Tennessee to 
a girl by the name of Susan Payne. (Susan Payne's 
mother's maiden name was Buchanan, said to be an own 
cousin to James Buchanan, one of our former Presi- 
dents.) To them were born eight children, five boys 
and three girls. Their names are as follows: 

(73) Hardon Payne, (74) Andrew Jackson, (75) 
Pollard M., (76) Timothy, (77) John (John the Bap- 
tist), (78) Nancy, (79) Martha, and (80) Mary. 

(74) Andrew Jackson Wisdom was born in the State 
of Tennessee on the 14th day of May, 1834, ^.nd came 
to Benton County with his parents in the latter part of 
1835. He was first married on the 14th day of January, 
1858, to Miss Nancy Campbell, daughter of Nicholas 
Campbell who was a farmer and stock dealer. His first 
wife died leaving four children, two of whom are now 
living: (81) W. W. Wisdom, of Lincoln, Missouri, and 
(82) Mrs. Susan Fristoe, of Windsor, Henry County, 
Missouri. Andrew Jackson was afterwards married 
twice, as you will note from the enclosed "obituary." 
He had no children by either of his two last wives. He 
died at the home of W. W. Wisdom, of Lincoln, Mis- 
souri, in December, 1906, and was among the wealthiest, 
if not the wealthiest man in the county at the time of his 
death. He accumulated his wealth in the hardware busi- 
ness at Warsaw, Missouri. (See obituary, page 70.) 

His only living son, (81) W. W. Wisdom, is now and 
has been for the past twenty years in the mercantile 
business at Lincoln, Missouri. He also has quite an 
amount of real estate, and is very wealthy. He married 



66 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

a girl by the name of Harvey, of Lincoln, Missouri. 
They have five children, two boys and three girls, all of 
whom are unmarried. 

Andrew Jackson Wisdom's daughter (82) Susan mar- 
ried Harvey Fristoe, of Benton County, Missouri. Mr. 
Fristoe has been a successful stock dealer, and he also 
owns quite an amount of property. They now live at 
Windsor, Missouri. As to their children I am unpre- 
pared to say how many they have, but they have two 
boys that I know of. 

(73) Hardon Payne Wisdom married Miss Martha 
Malen. To them were born four children, two of whom 
are living; their names are as follows: (87) James and 
(88) Jackney, both dead; (89) George Luther and 
(90) Sylvester who now live at Headrick, Oklahoma. 

Hardon Payne has been dead a number of years. He 
was a prosperous and well-to-do farmer of Benton 
County, Missouri, and owned several hundred acres of 
land and a large amount of personal property at the time 
of his death. (89) George Luther is now about thirty 
years of age. He married Miss Clara Fears, of Head- 
rick, Oklahoma, and they have two small boys. 

(90) Sylvester married Miss Leona Smith, of Benton 
County, Missouri, but they have no children. The two 
boys and their widowed mother now live at Headrick, 
Oklahoma. Both of the boys are farmers. They own 
all of the real estate that was left by their father, Har- 
don Payne, and George Luther also owns land in Okla- 
homa near Headrick. 

(75) Pollard M. Wisdom, son of (72) James M. 
Wisdom, was married to Miss Salina Elizabeth Cox, 
and to them were born four children, three of whom are 



James M. Wisdom — Pollard Branch 67 

now living. Their names are as follows: (91) Ben- 
jamin, of Tackner, Missouri (my father), (92) Martha 
Love, of Wisdom, Missouri, and (93) Zuckie Temper- 
ance Scott, of Wisdom, Missouri; (94) James died 
when about five years old. 

Pollard M. Wisdom was killed in the Civil War, and 
his widow died several years ago. 

Pollard M. was a prosperous and well-to-do farmer 
at the time of his death. His son, (91) Benjamin, mar- 
ried Miss Malinda B. Ashinhurst on the i8th day of 
January, 1881, and to them were born ten children, 
seven of whom are now living, and are all unmarried. 

The names of the children of Benjamin Wisdom are 
as follows: (95) C. C. and (96) A. J., both of Okeene, 
Oklahoma, engaged in the banking and farm loan busi- 
ness; also (97) Audrey, (98) Gedney Jackson, (99) 
William, (100) Teddie, and (lOi) Hannah Bennett, 
all at home with their parents, and all small except 
Audrey and Gedney Jackson, whose ages are fifteen and 
fourteen respectively. 

(91) Benjamin Wisdom also owns several hundred 
acres of land in Benton and St. Clair counties, Mis- 
souri, and has one of the best improved farms in the 
country. His farm is known as the ''Maple Grove 
Farm," of Benton County, Missouri. He also has been 
very successful in the stock and agricultural business. 

(75) Pollard M. Wisdom's daughter, (92) Martha, 
married William T. Love, who is also a farmer, of 
Wisdom, Benton County, Missouri. To them have been 
born eight children, all of whom are living. Their 
names are as follows: (105) Omer Lee, (106) Luther 
Halleck, (107) William Lawrence, (108) Elizabeth, 



68 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

(109) Edith May, (no) Bertha Frances, (in) John 
Oscar, and (112) Mary. All are married except the 
last two mentioned. All the boys are farmers, and all 
the girls married farmers. 

(75) Pollard M. Wisdom's other daughter, (93) 
Zuckie Temperance, married William R. Scott, who 
also owns several hundred acres of real estate in Ben- 
ton County. To them have been born seven children, 
all of whom are living except one that died in infancy. 
Their names are as follows: 

(113) James, of Warsaw, Missouri, (114) Emma, 
(115) Robert Lee, (116) Maggie May, (117) John, 
(118) William. All married except the last two mem- 
tioned. 

(76) Timothy Wisdom married Miss Nancy Mc- 
Kenzie, the daughter of a well-to-do farmer of Benton 
County, Missouri. To them have been born eight chil- 
dren, the names of whom are as follows: (120) Dana, 
(121) Wallace, (122) Osa, (123) Leta, (124) Zelda, 
(125) Otis, all of whom are now living, and the dead 
are (126) Zala, and (127) Judson, both of whom died 
while small. (121) Wallace is the only one that is 
married. He married Miss Mamie McClerran, of Ben- 
ton County, Missouri. All the other children are at 
home with their parents at Wisdom, Missouri. 

(76) Timothy lives on the old home farm, the farm 
of my great-grandfather. He has been very successful 
also in the agricultural and stock business, and has one 
of the best stock farms in Benton County. I would 
judge him to be a man about sixty years of age, and I 
think he is the youngest one of the boys. He is a quiet 
man and a very distant fellow; a man that attends 



James M. JVisdom — Pollard Branch 69 

strictly to his own business, and has certainly been suc- 
cessful as a farmer and stock raiser. He always keeps 
the very best quality of stock and always has lots of it 
around him, especially lots of mules and cattle, and he 
is also a raiser of thoroughbred hogs. His boys are both 
farmers and are both at home with him — that is the 
ones that are large enough to farm. His son Otis is 
only about six years old. 

(77) John the Baptist, son of (72) James M. and 
Susan, left when a young man and has never been heard 
of since. He was a traveling salesman at the time he 
left home. My father has written to most every person 
that he ever heard of by the name of Wisdom trying to 
get some trace of his Uncle John, but has never been 
able to find him. 

(78) Nancy Wisdom, daughter of (72) James M. 
and Susan, married Newton Rippetoe, a farmer of St. 
Clair County, Missouri. To them were born two chil- 
dren, both of whom are now dead ; Nancy is dead also. 

(128) Martha, one of the daughters of Nancy, mar- 
ried William Copenhaver, of Iconium, Missouri, but 
now of the State of Oregon. To them were born three 
children, the names of whom are as follows: Stella, Ida, 
and Lee, all are single so far as I know. 

(79) Martha Wisdom, daughter of (72) James M. 
and Susan (now dead), married a man by the name of 
George Neeley. To them were born three children: 
(130) Joseph and (131) Martha, now of Dillon, Mon- 
tana, both unmarried, and (132) Ann, now of Osceola, 
Missouri. Ann married a banker by the name of George 
Lewis. To them have been born several children. I am 
unable to give any names or state how many they have. 



70 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

(80) Mary Wisdom, daughter of (72) James M. 
and Susan, married W. R. Vance, of Warsaw, Benton 
County, Missouri, also a farmer. To them have been 
born nine children, all of whom are living. Their names 
are as follows: (133) James, now of Montana, unmar- 
ried, (134) Homer, a traveling salesman, who married 
a Miss Haller, of Fristoe, Missouri, the daughter of a 
well-to-do man, (135) Nellie, who married C. D. Bailey, 
a farmer of Tackner, Benton County, Missouri. Homer 
has no children so far as I know, but Nellie has two or 
three. The children of W. R. Vance have all been 
prominent in Benton County as educators. James owns 
a large ranch in Montana and is doing well. 

Respectfully submitted by the undersigned. 

(Signed) C. C. Wisdom. 

The following article appeared in a Warsaw, Mis- 
souri, paper after the death of A. J. Wisdom, and is the 
obituary referred to by (95) C. C. Wisdom: 

(74) ANDREW JACKSON WISDOM 

"The subject of this sketch was born in the State of Ten- 
nessee on the 14th day of May, 1834, and came to Benton 
County, Missouri, with his parents in the latter part of 1835, 
where they settled on Hogles Creek, and he resided in this 
county continuously since that time, except a portion of the 
year 1905-6, when he resided in Oakland, California, where 
his rapidly failing health caused his return to Missouri during 
the past summer; since which time he resided with his son, 
Wm. W. Wisdom, at Lincoln, until his death, which occurred 
on the 2ist day of December, 1906. On the following day he 
was laid to rest in the family lot in the Warsaw cemetery. 

"Mr. Wisdom's parents were numbered among those sturdy, 
honest, Christian pioneers who found this country a wilder- 
ness, and who, by their industry and frugality, laid the founda- 
tion stones on which has been builded this great Common- 
wealth. Brought up by such parents in an atmosphere of 



Andrew Jackson Wisdom — Pollard Branch 7 1 

honesty, industry and Christian example, it is not surprising 
that he grew to manhood possessing those sterling qualities 
of mind and heart that made his life and character a success, 
and after filling the full measure of his duties as an upright 
citizen and Christian man for more than the allotted three 
score years and ten he laid down his life work and passed to 
his final rest, an honor to his teaching and a credit to hu- 
manity. He was reasonable and liberal in his religious and 
political beliefs, generous and charitable in his conduct toward 
his fellow men, and just, fair and honorable in all his deal- 
ings. He met every duty that confronted him in life cheerfully 
and promptly, and was diligent in good works among his fel- 
low men, and his kindly, gentle disposition and upright and 
lovable character has left a sweet and pleasant memory with 
all who knew him. 

"Mr. Wisdom was married January 14, 1858, to Miss Nancy 
Campbell, who died May 13, 1877, leaving four children, two 
of whom are now living, W. W. Wisdom, of Lincoln, and 
Mrs. Sue Fristoe, of Windsor. On October 19, 1881, he was 
married to Mrs. Martha A. Huntley, of Cumberland, Mary- 
land, and she died in February, 1899. He was again married 
on the 17th of October, 1900, to Mrs. Abigail Morley, who sur- 
vives him. No children were born to the last two marriages. 

"In 1877 Mr. Wisdom was appointed by the Governor as 
collector of the revenue of Benton County to fill the unexpired 
term of E. H. Powers, and at the succeeding election he was 
elected to the same office, and afterwards when Judge George 
Gallaher resigned the office of presiding judge of the County 
Court, he was appointed by the Governor to fill the vacancy. 
During all of his official life Mr. Wisdom performed every 
duty honestly, conscientiously and justly. From the earliest 
years of his manhood he was an active, earnest and sincere 
member of the church, and in his every-day life acted out the 
Divine principles, which teach the great brotherhood of man- 
kind. But the sturdy, honest and God-fearing generation to 
which he belonged is fast passing away. The few of his com- 
peers in that earnest, active life of the past that are left look 
out into the future with a faith and hope for the reward they 
feel sure he has reached, like children standing on the shores 
of the restless and murmuring ocean listening to its myrial 
voices and stretching their arms with confident faith toward 
the unknown future." 

"A Friend." 



72 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

FAMILY RECORD 

BIRTHS 



Family Record — Pollard Branch 73 

FAMILY RECORD 

MARRIAGES 



74 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

FAMILY RECORD 

DEATHS 



(4) 

Francis Torrence Wisdom 
Branch 




RANCIS TORRENCE WISDOM, son of 

( I ) Abner Wisdom, was born in England 

and came to America about 1730 with his 

two brothers, Brinsley and Pollard. He 

was married soon after his arrival to a lady 

of English ancestry. Have account of the following 

three sons: 

142. James. 

143. Abner. 

144. John 

142. James Wisdom, son of (4) Francis Wisdom, 
more than a hundred years ago moved from Culpepper 
County, Virginia, to Rockingham County, North Caro- 
lina. Later the family moved to Overton County, Ten- 
nessee, and in 18 19 moved to what is now McNairy 
County, Tennessee. 

Here in 1828 or 1829 James was killed by the falling 
of a tree which he was cutting in the forest. (143) 
Abner Wisdom, a brother, moved to Missouri at an early 
date, not long after the days of Daniel Boone. These 
people were related remotely to the Kentucky branch of 
the Wisdom family. The Wisdoms of Tennessee and 
the family by that name in Kentucky exchanged visits. 
Belonging to this branch of the family was a man by the 
name of (171) Tavner Wisdom, who lived in the Lower 
James River country in Virginia. He was a rich planter 
and was a man of social importance. 

James Wisdom had five sons and four daughters: 

145. William Sargeant. 150. Diana. 

146. George Washington. 151. 

147. Publius. 152. 

148. Ignatius. 153. 

149. Moore 



yS Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

145. William Sargeant Wisdom, son of (142) 
James Wisdom, was born in Rockingham County, North 
Carolina, in 1796, and moved with his father to Ten- 
nessee. On the death of his father, he took charge of 
his affairs and reared and educated a large family of 
brothers and sisters. He was then but eighteen years of 
age. He was married to Miss Jane Anderson, a member 
of an old Tennessee family, and was for many years a 
successful merchant in Purdy, McNalry County, Ten- 
nessee. He was also a large land owner, owning at one 
time about one-third of McNalry County. He amassed 
a large fortune and was considered one of the best busi- 
ness men In the state. He was for a long time County 
Court Clerk of that county. He was the the parent of 
three sons and four daughters: 

154. Dew Moore. 158. Susan. 

155. Peter Shull. 159. Hettie. 

156. John Lee. 160. Loraine. 

157. Mary. 

William Sargeant died in 1871 In the seventy-fifth 
year of his life. 

154. Dew Moore Wisdom, son of (145) William 
Sargeant Wisdom, was born in Purdy, McNalry County, 
Tennessee, in 1836. He was a graduate of the Cumber- 
land University, Lebanon, Texas, and practiced law 
until the outbreak of the Civil War. He served the first 
year of the war in the 13th Tennessee Cavalry, and fol- 
lowed the "Wizard of the Saddle," General W. B. 
Forrest, until the surrender. He was wounded at the 
battles of Belmount, Missouri; Shilo, Tennessee, and 
Bryce's Cross Roads In Mississippi. In 1861 he married 
Miss Anna Terry, of luka, Mississippi. After the war 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 79 

he became editor of the Jackson Tribune, of Jackson, 
county seat of Madison County, Tennessee. He became 
Chancery Court Clerk of that county and after some 
years moved to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he edited a 
paper. In this calling he was rarely gifted. He left 
Fort Smith to accept the position of Chief Clerk to the 
United States Indian Agency in Muskogee, Indian Ter- 
ritory, now Oklahoma. 

During President Cleveland's second administration 
he was appointed Indian Agent and had charge of the 
five civilized tribes: Creeks, Cherokees, Choctaws, Chic- 
kasaws and Seminoles. He was greatly beloved by the 
Indians, and though an ardent Democrat, he was re- 
tained throughout President McKinley's first term. He 
then resigned on account of ill health. He served as 
Mayor of Muskogee, Oklahoma. He died there in No- 
vember, 1905, and was buried by the Confederate Vet- 
erans, the camp there having been named for him. He 
left three sons and one daughter. Have the name of 
one son: 

161. Wiley Terry. 

161. Wiley Terry Wisdom, son of (154) Dew 
Moore Wisdom, is at present private secretary to Colonel 
Robert L. Owen, United States Senator from Oklahoma. 

155. Peter Shull Wisdom, son of (145) William 
Sargeant Wisdom, died in the year 1864, in Memphis, 
Tennessee. He left one son and one daughter: 
162. Lee. 163. Clara. 

162. Lee Wisdom, son of (155) Peter Shull Wis- 
dom, died at the age of twenty-one years, in Jackson, 
Tennessee, in the year 1880. 



8o Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

163. Clara Wisdom, daughter of (155) Peter Shull 
Wisdom, married Wiley Terry, and they now live in 
Fayette, Alabama, and have one son: 
164. John. 

156. John Lee Wisdom, son of (145) William Sar- 
geant Wisdom, was born in Purdy, Tennessee, Novem- 
ber, 1850. He was educated at St. Cecilia's, a Catholic 
college in Kentucky. After the death of his father he 
moved to Jackson, Tennessee, where for many years he 
was in the mercantile business. He has now retired from 
that business and is president of the First National Bank 
of Jackson. He is also president of the Citizens Gas 
Light Company and the Buddi-Lindsey Manufacturing 
Company. In 1879 he was married to Miss Kate Meri- 
wether. They have four children as follows: 

165. John. 167 Loraine Allen. 

166. Ray. 168. Katharine Meriweth 

John Lee Wisdom and wife are safely anchored in the 
harbor of prosperity and happiness, where in peaceful 
quietude they are spending their latter years enjoying the 
esteem of their many friends, toward w^hom their hands 
have always been turned in kindness and love, and ac- 
quitted at the tribunal of their own consciences. They 
are worthy members of the Methodist Church (South). 

165. John Wisdom, son of (156) John Lee Wis- 
dom, lives in Jackson, Tennessee, where he is superin- 
tendent of the Jackson Railway and Light Company. 
He is a very capable young man and prominent in his city. 

166. Ray Wisdom, son of (156) John Lee Wisdom, 
lives with his parents in Jackson, Tennessee. He is a 
clerk in the First National Bank of that city. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 8 1 

167. LoRAiNE Allen Wisdom, daughter of (156) 
John Lee Wisdom, married William Holland, a mer- 
chant of Jackson, Tennessee, June 9, 1908. She is a 
very accomplished young lady of truly Southern type. 

168. Katharine Meriwether Wisdom, youngest 
daughter of (156) John Lee Wisdom, lives at home 
w^ith her parents. 

157. Mary Wisdom, daughter of (145) William 
Sargeant Wisdom, married Calvin Shull. She died May, 
1904, in Jackson, Tennessee. 

158. Susan Wisdom, daughter of (145) William 
Sargeant Wisdom, married John Hughes Duke. They 
are both living and reside in Jackson, Tennessee. 

159. Hettie Wisdom, daughter of (145) William 
Sargeant Wisdom, married Presley H. Tapp. They 
live in Louisville, Kentucky. 

160. LoRAiNE Wisdom, daughter of (145) William 
Sargeant Wisdom, married James Henry Allen, and they 
live in St. Louis, Missouri. 

146. George Washington Wisdom, son of (142) 
James Wisdom, moved from McNairy County, Ten- 
nessee, to Port Arkansas and later to Texas, w^here he 
lived to a ripe old age and left a good many descendants, 
some of whom are living somewhere in Texas. 

147. PuBLius Wisdom, son of (142) James Wisdom, 
moved from McNairy County, Tennessee, to Port 
Arkansas. He served in the Confederate army as quar- 
ter-master general under General Sterling Price, and 
died soon after the war was over. He left no descendants. 



82 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

148. Ignatius Wisdom, son of (142) James Wis- 
dom, was a farmer and moved from McNairy County, 
Tennessee, to Port Arkansas. He was thrown from a 
horse and killed. No descendants were left. 

149. Moore Wisdom, son of (142) James Wisdom, 
was a Cumberland Presbyterian minister and lived in 
McNairy County, Tennessee. He was sheriff of the 
county and was killed by desperadoes. He never married. 

150. Diana Wisdom, daughter of (142) James Wis- 
dom, married a man by the name of Carter, of Missis- 
sippi. Her son became a colonel in the Confederate 
Army and was killed in the battle of Gettysburg while 
commanding the old Barksdale, Mississippi, brigade. He 
was a very brilliant man. Unable to get his name: 

169. 

143. Abner Wisdom, son of (4) Francis Wisdom, 
moved from Culpepper County, Virginia, to Missouri, 
about the time of Daniel Boone. The only son we have 
account of is: 

170. Tarence. 

170. Tarence Wisdom, the only known son of (143) 
Abner Wisdom, lived somewhere near Bowling Green, 
Virginia. He was a large land owner. Have account of 
one son: 

171. Tavner. 

171. Tavner Wisdom, son of (170) Tarence Wis- 
dom, married Miss Rachael Winn, a Virginia belle. 
In 183 1 they emigrated from Bowling Green, Virginia, 
to Todd County, Kentucky, where he took up land. He 
was a very rich planter on the Lower James River in 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 83 

Virginia, and after moving to Kentucky became one of 
the largest tobacco and cotton dealers in the South. Five 
sons and four daughters were born of this union, as 
follows : 

172. John Buford. 177. Drucilla. 

173. Benjamin,. 178. Sally. 

174. Tavner W. 179. Nancy. 

175. Minor. 180. Lucy. 

176. Richard. 

172. John Buford Wisdom, son of (171) Tavner 
Wisdom, married Miss Maria Minor. Nine children 
were born of this union — three boys and six girls: 

181. Benjamin Henry. 186. Sallie. 

182. John Minor. 187. Agnes. 

183. Thomas W. 188. Maria. 

184. Dorothy P. 189. Lucy. 

185. Rachael. 

John Buford inherited his father's business traits and 
was a very successful merchant, and a large land owner. 
He was born in Bowling Green, Virginia, and moved to 
Kentucky with his parents when a boy. Later he moved 
to Montgomery County, Tennessee, with his family and 
lived there the remainder of his days. 

181. Benjamin Henry Wisdom, son of (172) John 
Buford Wisdom, married Miss Margaret Belle Saffar- 
rans, of Fayette, Missouri. He started in business in 
Trenton, Kentucky, in a dry goods store, working for the 
first year for twenty-five dollars; second year for seventy- 
five dollars, and the third year for one hundred dollars. 
Of course, his board was included. He then went to 
Clarksville, Tennessee. He was married several years 
previous to this. See page 84 for full details of his 
eventful life. 



PADUCAH'S ONLY MILLIONAIRE 

The following is a crippi7ig from a Paducah, Kentucky j 
paper J ivhich gives a glowing account of the life of (l8l) 
Benjamin Henry Wisdom: 

"While there are comparatively few people in Paducah, as 
the world goes, excessively poor, so there are comaratively few 
excessively rich. The mean condition appears to be the rule. 
Of course the war [Civil] interrupted the march to wealth, and 
many sacrificed or lost their all in that terrible conflict. So 
it is probably true that most of Paducah's fortunes have been 
made since the war — that is, had it been possible to continue 
under the old regime to the present time, it is more than pos- 
sible that to-day Paducah would be able to boast of many 
millionaires. But while there are a great many who own and 
control large wealth, as far as we have been able to ascertain, 
there is but one millionaire among us; but he is a millionaire 
many times over. We refer to Benjamin H. Wisdom, whose 
picture accompanies this sketch. 

"Mr. Wisdom was born near Bowling Green, Caroline 
County, Virginia. His father moved to Kentucky when he was 
about eight years of age, and settled in Todd County, near 
Trenton, where he invested largely in land at $1.25 an acre — 
land that is now worth from $50 to $75 an acre. 

"The subject of this sketch lived with his parents on the farm 
until he was about seventeen years of age, when he went to 
Trenton and engaged as a clerk with Stokely Wagner, a 
dealer in general merchandise, in which position he rendered 
such efficient service that when he became of age he was ad- 
mitted to partnership in the business. The name and style of 
the firm was Wagner & Wisdom, and this was his first venture 
in business for himself. His close attention to business, honesty 
and integrity, and fair dealing to his fellow men, soon brought 
him into favorable notice, and the firm was eminently success- 
ful. This partnership endured for some fifteen years or more, 
during which time they were engaged in shipping 'strips' for 
English markets. This was Mr. Wisdom's first transaction in 
tobacco, and proved profitable from the first. 

"At the conclusion of this fifteen years of experience Mr 
Wisdom's superlative qualifications had come to be so gener- 
ally acknowledged that he was invited to accept the position of 
cashier of the Bank of Tennessee, at Clarksville, the presidency 



Benjamin Henry Wisdom — Francis Branch 85 

of which was held by Hon. Cave Johnson, Congressman from 
Tennessee, and one time Postmaster-General. It is a matter of 
record that among all the statements made on a call from the 
state bank upon the branch, the largest and most satisfactory- 
deposits were reported when it was managed by Mr. Wisdom. 

''Those who at present know Mr. Wisdom, and see him in his 
quiet and unobtrusive everyday life, would doubtless be sur- 
prised to learn that he at one time engaged in the turmoil of 
politics. While in Trenton he enjoyed the distinction of being 
the only Democratic postmaster under a Whig President. 

"Mr. Wisdom continued to perform the routine duties of 
cashier of the bank until the breaking out of the Civil War. It 
was at that time that he made his successful deal in tobacco, 
which added largely to his financial standing. He bought large 
quantities of the weed on the Clarksville break, at desperately 
low prices, the greater part of which he shipped to New Or- 
leans and placed in the warehouse of John E. King & Com- 
pany. About this time the first dark cloud gathered, and the 
storm of war threatened the wreck of his fortune, for Ben 
Butler had taken command of New Orleans. For three weeks 
thereafter Mr. Wisdom slept without knowing it, as in the 
disturbed condition of the country at that time, with the city 
in which his property was stored in the possession of an invad- 
ing army, he knew not at what moment it might be swept 
away by the fortunes of war. But General Butler proved to 
be more considerate than he had been given credit for being, 
and his tobacco, which represented the accumulation of long 
years of toil and saving, remained unmolested and intact. He 
eventually disposed of his ventures at a marvelous profit — 
about 500 per centum above the cost — and thereby made a 
pretty penny. 

"The next turn in Fortune's wheel found the subject of our 
sketch in New York City, where he embarked in the commis- 
sion and brokerage business, helping to organize the firm of 
Morton, Slaughter & Co. In this venture he was so successful 
that when he retired from the firm in 1865 he was understood 
to have received as his individual profits a quarter of a 
million of dollars. On leaving New York he came to Paducah 
and engaged in private banking under the firm style of Morton, 
Wisdom & Co., the head of the firm being the late president 
of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. All who have been 
associated with him in business speak in the highest terms of 
the perfect harmony with which they worked together. 



86 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

"At length, having accumulated a fortune even for these 
days of great individual wealth, he devoted his time and 
attention to investing it, and it is unnecessary to say that a 
large experience had taught him to know and grasp a good 
investment when it appeared. 

"Finally his attention was directed to the advantages offered 
by Superior City, Wisconsin, at the head of Lake Superior. His 
investments there brought him almost fabulous returns, which 
led to larger ventures and heavier deals elsewhere. 

"At the time of greatest depression in the price of Texas 
lands he bought the heaviest, and these investments in the 
Lone Star State proved fully as profitable as those in the great 
Northwest. His last ventures are in the harbor town of 
Valasco, at the mouth of the Brazos River, and the conditions 
are such, that as satisfactory results are anticipated, as have 
been realized in all of his previous undertakings. 

"Mr. Wisdom has found time in the whirl of business to pay 
some attention to literature, and is well read and well posted 
not only in classics but in the current affairs. His commercial 
education is simply perfect, he being proficient in bookkeeping 
and in penmanship, writing a hand that a graduate of the 
Spencerian system need not be ashamed of. Mr. Wisdom has 
always been a man of quiet and subdued ways, retiring in dis- 
position, yet affable and courteous to those with whom either 
business or social intercourse calls him in contact. He was 
never very rugged or robust, but by his steady, methodical and 
temperate habits has nurtured his strength and preserved his 
health. He is now about sixty-eight years old, with prospects 
of many years of industrious and useful life. The career of 
Mr. Wisdom is one that the youth of the present day may 
study and emulate with profit to themselves, for his example 
closely followed can scarcely lead to other than successful 
results. 

"While Mr. Wisdom is largely interested elsewhere, he has 
elected to make Paducah his home, and has always had great 
faith in the future of the place. In conversation he frequently 
predicts that at no distant day it is safe to say that it will be 
a city of from 50,000 to 60,000 people. He does not, however, 
believe in booms, and has never advocated them for the city 
he has chosen for his home. On the contrary, he is conserva- 
tive, and believes that a city with a steady and gradual growth, 
such as Paducah has been having of late, and will continue to 
have, is likened to a city built upon a rock." 



Benjamin Henry Wisdom — Francis Branch 87 

Benjamin Henry Wisdom was the father of five chil- 
dren: 

190. Henry (who died when two years old). 

191. Norton. 193. Nellie. 

192. May. 194. Belle 

191. Norton Wisdom, son of (181) Benjamin Henry 
Wisdom, was born in Clarksville, Tennessee. He mar- 
ried a Clarksville girl. Miss Ibbie Elliot. One son was 
born of this union: 

195. Benjamin Henry. 

192. May Wisdom, daughter of (181) Benjamin 
Henry Wisdom, was born in Clarksville, Tennessee. She 
married a well-to-do business man of Paducah, Kentucky, 
George Wallace. The following children were the result 
of this union: 

196. Robert. 199. Benjamin 

197. Fannie. 200. Phillip. 

198. George. 

195. Benjamin Henry Wisdom, son of (191) Nor- 
ton Wisdom, was named after his grandfather, (181) 
Benjamin Henry Wisdom. He married a girl from 
Terrell, Texas, Miss Margie St. Mary. Benjamin 
Henry and family are living in Rockwall, Texas. They 
have one daughter: 

201. Fannie Fern. 

193. Nellie Wisdom, daughter of (181) Benjamin 
Henry Wisdom, was born in Clarksville, Tennessee, and 
married a Presbyterian minister named W. E. Case. He 
is a Virginian and lived in Paducah, Kentucky, when they 
were married. They had six children : 

202. Belle. 205. Edward. 

203. Henry. 206. Nellie. 

204. Mary 207. Jack. 



88 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

194. Belle Wisdom, daughter of (181) Benjamin 
Henry Wisdom, was born in New York City. She mar- 
ried a prominent attorney of Lexington, Kentucky, C. J. 
Bronston. 

182. John Minor Wisdom, son of (172) John Bu- 
ford Wisdom, was born in 1820 and died in 1857. At 
the time of his death he was a member if the firm of 
Hewett-Norton & Co., of New Orleans, this being the 
largest cotton, tobacco and commission house in the South, 
with branch offices in Louisville, Kentucky; New York 
City, and Liverpool, England. 

He married Miss Maria Winn Bell, of Louisville, 
Kentucky, February 3, 1853. She was born in 1834 ^"d 
died in 1899, and was the daughter of Caroline Heading- 
ton and Samuel Bell. Samuel Bell was a merchant and 
was president of the Union Bank of New Orleans. The 
issue of this marriage was three children: 

208. Mortimer Norton. 

209. John M (who died in infancy). 

210. William Bell. 

John Minor Wisdom left a fortune which he had 
amassed in the commission business. When he was but 
eighteen years of age he started into business in Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee, with Henry Bearmont. He later made 
his home in New Orleans where he died. 

208. Mortimer Norton Wisdom, son of (182) John 
Minor Wisdom, was born February 11, 1854, and was 
educated in Europe. He entered Washington-Lee Uni- 
versity in 1868, was graduated in 1872, and in 1873 he 
was graduated as Bachelor of Law. In 1874 he entered 
mercantile life and has been so engaged ever since. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 89 

He was married April 6, 1876, to Miss Rebecca 
Kruttschnitt, daughter of John Kruttschnitt and Peniva 
Benjamin Kruttschnitt. John Kruttschnitt was German 
Consular at New Orleans. Peniva Benjamin Krutt- 
schnitt was a sister of the late Judah P. Benjamin, United 
States Senator from Louisiana and Secretary of War and 
Secretary of State, Confederate Government, and late 
Queen's Councilor of England. Rebecca died January i, 
1877, no children being born of this union. 

In 1879 he was married to his second wife, Miss 
Martha Somerville Noble. She was born January 7, 
1854, and was the daughter of Martha Somerville and 
John Irby Noble, who were originally from Alabama. 
At the time of their daughter's marriage, however, Mr. 
Noble was a merchant of New York. Three children 
were born of this union: 

211. Mortimer Noble, born January 25, i88o (de- 

ceased). 

212. John Irby, born April 3, 1882 (deceased). 

213. Jessie, born September 15, i886. 

Martha, mother of the above, died May 28, 1889. 

Mortimer Norton Wisdom was married the third time, 
his third wife being Miss Adelaide Labott, daughter of 
Elizabeth House and David C. Labott, who was an at- 
torney. This marriage took place in 1898. Adelaide 
Labott Wisdom was born July 28, 1867. Of this mar- 
riage were children as follows: 

214. William Bell, born June 9, 1900. 

215. John Minor, born April 17, 1905. 

216. Norton Labott, born August i, 1907. 

Mortimer Norton Wisdom was a college "chum" of 
ex-Governor George E. Chamberlain, who is now United 
States Senator from Oregon. Senator Chamberlain can 



90 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

boast of being the only Democrat who has never been 
defeated in a Republican state, for any office. The State 
of Oregon is Republican by from 15,000 to 20,000 ma- 
jority. 

210. William Bell Wisdom, son of (182) John 
Minor Wisdom, was born March 23, 1857. He married 
Miss Eliza Johnston, of Frankfort, Kentucky, October i, 
1890. Eliza Johnston Wisdom is the daughter of Colonel 
J. Stoddard Johnston and Eliza Johnston. 

William Bell Wisdom was educated in Europe and was 
a graduate of Washington-Lee University. He has al- 
ways been engaged in mercantile pursuits. He died 
June 30, 1906, in his forty-ninth year. He was the 
father of one child : 

217. Eliza Johnston, born October, 1902. 

183. Thomas W. Wisdom, son of (172) John Bu- 
ford Wisdom, died in 1865 in his forty-first year. He 
married Miss Clara Bearmont, of Owensboro, Kentucky. 
Five children were born to them: 

218. Ruth Gibson. 

219. Henry Percival. 

220. Thomas W., Jr. 

221. John Buford. 

222. Sterling Bearmont (died in infancy). 

Thomas W. Wisdom was an attorney and entered 
earnestly into the duties of his profession and was very 
successful. Soon after acquiring a high reputation for 
legal ability and eloquence in debate, and as a result of 
his increasing popularity, he was elected Circuit Judge 
over two other older and very capable candidates by an 
overwhelming majority. Besides this office Judge Wis- 
dom had served at different times in various minor ca- 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 91 

pacfties, doing able work in all. In the distinctive feature 
of his life, that of public service, he has won the con- 
fidence and respect of his fellow men, always serving the 
best interests of the community to the extent of his 
ability. As a studious reader, profound thinker and 
earnest, logical talker, he was distinguished. His mind 
was judicial in bent, and the harmony between mental 
and moral forces was complete. 

In civic and social life he was eminently esteemed for 
unswerving fidelity and integrity and for supreme justice, 
tempered with benevolence. No man has ever contrib- 
uted more to the establishment and maintenance of the 
high character of the judicial tribunals than he, and no 
one could do more to advance the material and moral 
welfare of the community or state. Such was the pure 
and noble life of the subject of this sketch during his 
entire official career. 

He was criminal, county and circuit court judge, suc- 
cessively, and had the distinction of being the youngest 
judge who ever presided over a circuit court. 

Mrs. Clara B. Wisdom, the widowed wife, still re- 
sides in their beautiful home at Owensboro, Kentucky, 
at No. 724 W. Eighth Street. 

218. Ruth Gibson Wisdom, daughter of (183) 
Thomas W. Wisdom, lives with her widowed mother at 
Owensboro, Kentucky. 

219. Henry Percival Wisdom, son of (183) 
Thomas W. Wisdom, has a wife and one child. He is 
a prosperous farmer and lives near Lexington, Kentucky. 
I do not know the child's name: 

223. 



92 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

220. Thomas W. Wisdom, Jr., son of (183) 
Thomas W. Wisdom, lives with his mother and looks 
after her comfort and welfare. He is in the transfer 
business with his brother, John B. Wisdom, in Owens- 
boro, Kentucky. 

221. John Buford Wisdom, son of (183) Thomas 
W. Wisdom, is in the transfer business with his brother, 
Thomas W., Jr., in Owensboro, Kentucky. He is mar- 
ried and has two sons and one daughter, the names of 
whom I do not know: 



224. 

225. 

225a. 

184. Dorothy Wisdom, daughter of (172) John 
Buford Wisdom, was born in Kentucky and moved with 
her parents to Tennessee when a girl. She married a 
Mr. Bradley, of Todd County, Kentucky. 

185. Rachael Wisdom, daughter of (172) John 
Buford Wisdom, was born in Todd County, Kentucky. 
She married a Mr. Boyer, a man of Southern birth. 

186. Sallie Wisdom, daughter of (172) John Bu- 
ford Wisdom, married George Mimms, of Tennessee. 
He was a very wealthy farmer. 

The following is an extract from a letter received 
from Mrs. Sallie Wisdom Mimms, of Guthrie, Ken- 
tucky, R. F. D. No. 3. She is now in her eighty-third 
year, 5^et she writes a good hand: 

"I gave no sketch of my family, yet to show my reverence 
for my maiden name, three of my children bear the name 
^Wisdom.' All are grown and have developed the Wisdom 
business traits. They are in business in Nashville, Tennessee, 
Clarksville, Tennessee, and Guthrie, Kentucky," 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 93 

187. Agnes Wisdom, daughter of (172) John Bu- 
ford Wisdom, married Joseph Ohlman, of Tennessee. 
Mrs. Agnes Wisdom Ohlman's present address is Hamp- 
ton Station, Tennessee. 

188. Maria Wisdom, daughter of (172) John Bu- 
ford Wisdom, was born in Tennessee. Have no record 
of her life. 

189. Lucy Wisdom, daughter of (172) John Buford 
Wisdom, was born in Tennessee. Have no record of 
her life. 

173. Benjamin Wisdom, son of (171) Tavner Wis- 
dom, was born in Bowling Green, Virginia, and moved 
with his father to Todd County, Kentucky, where he en- 
gaged in farming. 

174. Tavner W. Wisdom^ son of (171) Tavner 
Wisdom, was born in Bowling Green, Virginia, and 
moved to Todd County, Kentucky, with his parents in 
1 83 1. He died in early life leaving one son and two 
daughters : 

226. James. 227. 228. 

226. James Wisdom, son of (174) Tavner W. Wis- 
dom, was born in Kentucky. He now lives near AUens- 
ville, Kentucky, where he owns a handsome, well-fur- 
nished residence, and fine farming lands. He has ac- 
cumulated a fortune solely by his own efforts. 

175. Minor Wisdom, son of (171) Tavner Wisdom, 
was born in Bowling Green, Virginia, and moved to 
Todd County, Kentucky, with his parents in 1831. He 
died soon after reaching that place. 



94 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

176. Richard Wisdom, son of (171) Tavner Wis- 
dom, was born in Todd County, Kentucky. He married 
a Miss Davis, who died leaving one child: 

229. Amelia. 
Richard's second wife was a Mrs. Carroll, a most 
estimable lady of Trenton, Kentucky. 

229. Amelia Wisdom^ daughter of (176) Richard 
Wisdom, married a Mr. Turnly, who is in the tobacco 
business in Clarksville, Tennessee. 

177. Drucilla Wisdom, daughter of (171) Tavner 
Wisdom, married a Mr. Fulcher, who is from a wealthy 
and highly respected family of Kentucky. The Fulchers 
were formerly of Virginia, near Richmond. 

178. Sally Wisdom, daughter of (171) Tavner 
Wisdom, married a Mr. Fulcher, of Richmond, Virginia, 
a brother of Drucilla Wisdom's husband. He was a 
well-to-do business man. 

179. Nancy Wisdom, daughter of (171) Tavner 
Wisdom, married a Mr. Smith, a farmer and tobacco 
dealer. 

180. Lucy Wisdom, daughter of (171) Tavner Wis- 
dom, was born in Todd County, Kentucky, and married 
a well-to-do farmer by the name of Hermber. 

144. John Wisdom, son of (4) Francis Wisdom, 
married Miss Marcilla Wadham, of Devonshire, Eng- 
land. He was born in America and was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War in the defense of the Colonies. He 
also had a son (230) John killed in this war. A son 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 95 

born afterward was also named John, whom they called 
John Jr., he being named after his brother who was 
killed. 

John Wisdom was a Baptist evangelistic minister, and 
is the Rev. John Wisdom referred to in my prelude. 
He was a grand man and lived to the ripe age of 104 
years. Have record of five sons, namely: 

230. John. 234. Francis. 

231. Thomas. 233. John, Jr. 

232. Pollard. 

230. John Wisdom, eldest son of (144) John and 
Marcilla, w^as born in America, and died in the defense 
of his country during the Revolutionary War. The 
family records do not state to what company he belonged. 

231. Thomas Wisdom, son of (144) John and Mar- 
cilla, was born in the year 1780 and died in i860. He 
married Miss Lurana Barnes in 1799. She was the 
daughter of John Barnes who was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. Thomas Wisdom was a very successful farmer 
and stock dealer. He was extensively engaged in ship- 
ping live stock, principally horses, to different parts of 
the country. He was a good mixer and therefore very 
popular. Every one knew "Uncle Tommy." 

Thomas and Lurana were the parents of ten children, 
all of whom were born in Kentucky: 

235. John Amons. 240. Moses Smith. 

236. Pollard Washington. 241. Lucy. 

237. Brinsley Benton. 242. Sarah. 

238. James Madison. 243. Lydia. 

239. Thomas Barnes. 244. Nancy. 

235. John Amons Wisdom, son of (231) Thomas 
and Lurana, was born in Kentucky, March 31, 1800. 



96 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

He was married July 31, 1821, to Miss Fannie Wade, 
daughter of Pierce and Feraby Wade. Fannie Wade 
was born May 24, 1802. She was the granddaughter of 
Ballinger Wade, a prominent Baptist minister and 
evangelist. 

John A. Wisdom had excellent business ability and 
indomitable energy, and was an honorable, upright 
citizen. He and his amiable wife were worthy members 
of the Baptist Church, to the support of which they con- 
tributed very liberally. In those days ministers were not 
plentiful and John A. often officiated in that capacity. 
He was the eldest of a family of ten children and was 
married in Boone County, Missouri, where he followed 
agricultural pursuits for a number of years. Later he 
moved with his family to Iowa and settled in Ringgold 
County, where he purchased a fine farm. He resided 
there until his death, which occurred August 4, 1875, 
and his beloved wife followed him November 20, 1882. 
They were the parents of the following children: 

245. Thomas W. 250. Martha A. 

246. Eliza J. 251. Moses B. 

247. Lucinda. 252. Lucy E. 

248. Henry M. 253. Susan H. 

249. James T. 254. Pierce J. 

Friendship is built firm against flood and wind, 
On rock foundations of the mind; 
Absent or dead, still let thy friend be dear — 
A sigh — the absent claims, the dead — a tear. 

245. Thomas W. Wisdom, eldest son of (235) John 
Amons, was born in Boone County, Missouri, June 6, 
1822. He was married July 21, 1842, to Miss Margaret 
R. Hulen. He was a Baptist missionary and minister and 
died in that faith, May 15, 1873. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 97 

Thomas W. was an energetic and forceful speaker and 
always had a large following. His demise was a great 
loss to the community in which he lived. He was the 
•father of the following children: 

255. William W. 261. Francis B. 

256. Emily E. 262. Oliver W. 

257. Sarah T. 263. Andrew J. 

258. Livicia J. 264. T. G. 

259. Rose A. 265. George W. 

260. Mary A. 

255. William W. Wisdom, son of (245) Thomas 
W. and Margaret, was born September 20, 1843; died 
November 19, 1885. He was a well-to-do farmer and 
was married July 16, 1863, to Henrietta H. Bell. They 
were the parents of the following children : 

266. Sarah M. 268. R. W. 

267. Mary E. 

266. Sarah M. Wisdom, daughter of (255) William 
W. and Henrietta, was born June 25, 1864, and died 
March 14, 1882. 

267. Mary E. Wisdom, daughter of (255) William 
W. and Henrietta, was born October 16, 1866. She 
was married December 14, 1884, to Henry H. Cecil, a 
successful farmer near Bloomfield, Iowa. Three chil- 
dren were born of this union: 

269. William W. (died in infancy). 

' * T ^. A * f Twins born December 18, 1886. 
271. Jennette A, ) ' 

268. R. W. Wisdom, son of (255) William W. and 
Henrietta, was born November 18, 1870. He is in the 
live stock business and owns a fine farm near Mark, 
Iowa. His address is West Grove, Iowa, R. R. I. 



g8 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

On April 24, 1892, he married Miss Addie A. Brake. 
To them was born one child: 

272. Ruth M. 

272. Ruth M. Wisdom, daughter of (268) R. W. 
Wisdom, was born June 16, 1893. 

256. Emily E. Wisdom, daughter of (245) Thomas 
W. and Margaret, was born April 16, 1845. She was 
married October 20, 1878, to John W. Cecil, a well-to- 
do farmer of Bloomfield, Iowa. Emily E. died August 
22, 1907. She was the mother of the following children: 

273. Arthur. 

274. John, Jr. 

275. Georgia. 

276. Brother (died at birth). 

257. Sarah T. Wisdom, daughter of (245) Thomas 
W. and Margaret, was born February 22, 1848. She 
was married November 22, 1872, to Samuel Wilcox, a 
prosperous farmer of Floris, Iowa, R. R. I. They have 
two children: 

277. Anna. 

278. Rosella. 

258. LiviciA J. Wisdom, daughter of (245) Thomas 
W. and Margaret, was born June 11, 1849. She was 
married to John W. Norton, May 5, 1878. 

Mr. Norton is a large propert)^ owner of Lusk, 
Wyoming. 

259. Rose A. Wisdom, daughter of (245) Thomas 
W. and Margaret, was born November 8, 1854. She 
married Francis M. Beck, of Mark, Iowa, November 27, 
1879. Mr. Beck died February 22, 1888, and Rose 
passed away December i, 1900. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 99 

260. Mary A. Wisdom, daughter of (245) Thomas 
W. and Margaret, was born March 4, 1856. She was 
married to Charles W. Stogdill, March 23, 1876. Mr. 
Stogdill owns a large farm in West Grove, Iowa, R.R.I. 
They had two children: 

279. William. 

280. Sudie A. 

261. Francis B. Wisdom, son of (245) Thomas W. 
and Margaret, was born February 22, 1859. On De- 
cember 21, 1886, he marired Miss Lizzie Roach, who 
was born November 4, 1862. Francis B. is a successful 
farmer and stock raiser. The following children were 
born of this union: 

281. Gilbert L. 283. Volma. 

282. Mae. 

281. Gilbert L. Wisdom, son of (261) Francis B. 
Wisdom, was born January 13, 1888. 

282. Mae Wisdom, daughter of (261) Francis B. 
Wisdom, was born November 27, 1891. 

283. Volma Wisdom, daughter of (261) Francis B. 
Wisdom, was born April 22, 1894. She died April 16, 
1907. 

262. Oliver W. Wisdom, son of (245) Thomas W. 
and Margaret, was born November 28, 1861. He was 
married April 14, 1882, to Elizabeth Vanlandinghem. 
Two children blessed their home: 

284. John W. 

285. Jessie A. 

Oliver W. is a farmer and owns a fine farm near 
Mark, Iowa. His address is West Grove, Iowa, R.R.I. 



lOO Genealogy of the WisdoTn Family 

284. John W. Wisdom, son of (262) Oliver W., 
was born June 27, 1883. He resides with his father on 
the farm. His address is West Grove, Iowa, R.R.I. 

285. Jessie A. Wisdom, daughter of (262) Oliver 
W., was born January 16, 1885. She was married to 
Fred Morris, September 23, 1906. Mr. Morris is a 
farmer and they reside near Mark, Iowa. 

263. Andrew J. Wisdom, son of (245) Thomas W. 
and Margaret, was born April 30, 1867. He married 
Ella E. Green, who was born January 23, 1868. He is 
the owner of one of the finest farms in Davis County, 
Iowa. His farm is noted for its Scotch and Scotch 
topped shorthorn cattle in which he is an extensive dealer. 
A. J. is one of the most successful farmers in Iowa. He 
is a man of executive ability, honest, unassuming, and is 
respected by the many who know him. The family con- 
sists of the following children : 

286. Francis E. 289. John C. 

287. Ethel. 290. Marie. 

288. Lowell G. 

A. J. Wisdom's address is Bloomfield, Iowa, R. R. 
No. 3. 

286. Francis E. Wisdom, son of (263) Andrew J. 
and Ella, was born August 27, 1888. He bears the dis- 
tinction of having been made principal of the Savannah 
High School, Savannah, Iowa, at the age of nineteen 
years, which position he has filled with honor to himself 
and credit to the school. 

287. Ethel Wisdom, daughter of (263) Andrew J., 
was born August 30, 1892. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch lOI 

288. Lowell G. Wisdom, son of (263) Andrew J., 
was born May 31, 1895. 

289. John C. Wisdom, son of (263) Andrew J., was 
born June 20, 1902. 

290. Marie Wisdom, daughter of (263) Andrew J., 
was born April 28, 1906. 

264. T. G. Wisdom, son of (245) Thomas W. and 
Margaret, is a farmer and lives at Allen, Lyon County, 
Kansas. Unable to find out anything about T. G., ex- 
cept that he has one son: 

291. Gilbert Marion. 

291. Gilbert Marion Wisdom, son of (264) T. G. 
Wisdom, was born July 18, 1881. His occupation is 
farming and he resides in Allen, Lyon County, Kansas. 
He married Miss Latena Spade, July i, 1903, who was 
born May 10, 1881. They have one daughter: 

292. Juanita, born July 21, 1904. 

265. George W. Wisdom, son of (245) Thomas W. 
and Margaret, lives in Iowa. Have no record of him, 
other than knowing of his having been married and hav- 
ing had one son : 

293. T. A. 

293. T. A. Wisdom, son of (265) George W. Wis- 
dom, resides in the state of Iowa, where he is highly re- 
spected by all who know him. His address is R.F.D. 
No. 2, Box 37, Blockton, Iowa. 

246. Eliza J. Wisdom, daughter of (235) John 
Amons Wisdom, was born December 28, 1823, and died 
February 25, 1825. 



102 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

247. LuciNDA F. Wisdom, daughter of (235) John 
Amons Wisdom, was born December 19, 1825. Lucinda 
died October 27, 1843, at the age of eighteen years. 

248. Henry M. Wisdom, son of (235) John Amons 
Wisdom, was born December 12, 1827. By his first wife 
he had one child : 

294. Frank M. 

After the death of his first wife he again married and 
had two children : 

295. Elmore U. G. 

296. Adolphus Burton. 

In 1867 Henry M. married for a third time, his third 
wife being Miss Melissa Burks, who was born July 22, 
1850. To this union were born the following children: 

297. Roy C. 300. Laura. 

298. Robert W. 301. Paul. 

299. Golda E. 

Henry M. was a farmer and owned a fine farm in 
Iowa. He is a man of business ability and very indus- 
trious. He now lives at Bluesprings, Nebraska. 

294. Frank M. Wisdom, son of (248) Henry M. 
Wisdom, was born May 5, 1856. He married a Miss 
King, who was born December 10, i860. They are the 
parents of the following children: 

302. Duward M. 306. Floy. 

303. Pearl. 307. F. Dale. 

304. Paul W. 308. Delia Portia. 

305. Fay M. 

Frank M. is a brilliant and forceful attorney-at-law. 
He entered earnestly into the duties of his profession and 
has been very successful, acquiring a high reputation for 
legal ability and eloquence in debate. His life has been a 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 103 

great, pure and good one, and his public work will be re- 
membered with gratitude by the future generations of 
intelligent people that inhabit this great commonwealth, 
in the founding of which he has taken so prominent a 
part. He has made an impression on his state and his 
name will be revered by every worthy citizen of Iowa 
while the world lasts and history is preserved. He now 
resides with his faimly at Bedford, Iowa. 

302. DuwARD M. Wisdom, son of (294) Frank M. 
Wisdom, was born October 17, 1879. He married Miss 
Agnes Griffin of Ottumwa, Iowa. They now live at 
371 1 Twenty-second Street, Omaha, Nebraska, and have 
one daughter: 

309. Pauline. 

Duward M. is a young man of ability and progres- 
siveness. He is manager of the fresh meat department 
for Armour & Co., at South Omaha. 

303. Pearl Wisdom, daughter of (294) Frank M. 
Wisdom, was born June 18, 1881. She married Dr. 
McFarland Price, of Bolckow, Missouri, where they 
now reside. They have two children: 

310. Duward. 

311. Josephine. 

304. Paul W. Wisdom, son of (294) Frank M. Wis- 
dom, was born April 19, 1884. He was married in 1905 
to Miss Sadie McLean, in Omaha, Nebraska. They have 
no children. Paul W. is a hustler and is sure of success, 
as he is a keen business felloW. 

305. Fay M. Wisdom, son of (294) Frank M. Wis- 
dom, was born October 10, 1886. He is single and is a 
young man of integrity and business ability. 



I04 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

306. Floy Wisdom, son of (294) Frank M. Wisdom, 
was born March 6, 1890. 

307. F. Dale Wisdom, son of (294) Frank M. Wis- 
dom, was born June 20, 1891. He is associated with his 
father in Wisdom-Richards Land Co. of Bedford, Iowa. 

308. Della Portia Wisdom, daughter of (294) 
Frank M. Wisdom, was born February 9, 1895. 

295. Elmore U. G. Wisdom, son of (248) Henry 
M., was born August i, 1863. He married Miss Carrie 
Chambers, daughter of Edward Chambers, a prominent 
farmer and stock raiser of Baker County, Oregon. 
Elmore is a contractor and builder of Portland, Oregon. 
They have two daughters: 

312. Blanche. 

313. Florence (adopted). 

296. Adolphus Burton Wisdom, son of (248) 
Henry M., was born September 2, 1864. He now re- 
sides with his family at Pendleton, Oregon, where he is 
engaged in the sheep business. 

297. Roy C. Wisdom, son of (248) Henry M., was 
born March 7, 1872. He married Miss Edna Dalton, 
who was born November 20, 1885. They live in Omaha, 
Nebraska, and have one son : 

314. Francis, born June 11, 1906. 

298. Robert W. Wisdom, son of (248) Henry M., 
was born June 23, 1878. He was married to Miss 
Margaret McAslan, who was born December 2, 187 1. 
This family lives at Florence, Nebraska, R. F. D. They 
have one son: 

315. Harold, born May 7, 1907. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 105 

299. GoLDA E. Wisdom, daughter of (248) Henry 
M., was born June 11, 1884. She married Clark Buf- 
fington, who was born June 10, 1877. They live in or 
near Florence, Nebraska. 

300. Laura B. Wisdom, daughter of (248) Henry 
M., was born March 30, 1886. 

301. Paul Wisdom, son of (248) Henry M., was 
born December 16, 1890. He lives in Omaha, Nebraska. 

249. James T. Wisdom, son of (235) John Amons, 
was born September 30, 1830, and died March 21, 1846. 

250. Martha A. Wisdom, daughter of (235) John 
Amons, was born September 30, 1832. On February 9, 
1850, she was married to Samuel Eaton, who was born 
October 19, 1820. Martha Wisdom-Eaton lives in 
Blockton, Iowa. Her children are as follows: 

316. John A., born November 11, 1854. 

317. Sarah F., born April 6, 1856. 

318. Susan R., born May 24, 1857. 

319. George S., born January 19, 1859. 

320. Laura E., born October 31, i860. 

321. Elizabeth J., born October 28, 1862. 

322. Elmer G., born April 26, 1866. 

323. Laura, born September 15, 1869. 

251. Moses B. Wisdom, son of (235) John Amons, 
was born September 10, 1834. He is a well-to-do farmer 
and lives at Bluesprings, Nebraska. He and his worthy 
wife are honored and respected by all who know them, 
and are members of the Baptist Church. They had the 
following children: 

324. Josephius. 

325. Fannie. 

326. A. S. 



lo6 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

324. JosEPHius Wisdom, son of (251) Moses B., 
was born October 9, 1857. He was married to Miss 
Laura Shearer, who was born November 19, 1861. They 
were married September 14, 1 880. He is a farmer in 
Harlington, Nebraska. Their children are as follows: 

327. Orville. 331. Merle. 

328. Daisy. 332. Mabel. 

329. Nellie. 333. Ivan. 

330. Ona. 334. Dean. 

327. Orville Wisdom, son of (324) Josephius Wis- 
dom, was born March 31, 1882. 

328. Daisy Wisdom, daughter of (324) Josephius 
Wisdom, was born February 22, 1884. 

329. Nellie Wisdom, daughter of (324) Josephius 
Wisdom, was born November 14, 1886. She married 
George Morten, September 11, 1906. 

330. Ona Wisdom^ daughter of (324) Josephius Wis- 
dom, was born July 30, 1892. 

331. Merle Wisdom, daughter of (324) Josephius 
Wisdom, was born October 10, 1894. 

332. Mabel Wisdom, daughter of (324) Josephius 
Wisdom, was born December 19, 1896. 

333. Ivan Wisdom, son of (324) Josephius Wisdom, 
was born May 26, 1899. 

334. Dean Wisdom, son of (324) Josephius Wis- 
dom, was born July 25, 1901. 

325. Fannie Wisdom, daughter of (251) Moses B., 
was born April 19, i860. She was married June i, 1883, 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 107 

to John Hill, who was born October 14, i860. Their 
children are: 

335. Jessie S., born September 29, 1885. 

336. Roscoe E., born March 29, i888. 

337. Ralph D., born July 20, 1895. 

338. Alex. W., born October 21, 1898. 

326. A. S. Wisdom, son of (251) Moses B., lives at 
Mosier, Oregon. He is employed on a fruit farm in the 
famous Hood River and Mosier districts. 

252. Lucy E. Wisdom, daughter of (235) John 
Amons, was born July 24, 1836, and died March 21, 
1846. 

253. Susan H. Wisdom, daughter of (235) John 
Amons, was born September 19, 1840. She married 
Jonathan Hodgins, February 15, 1861, and had the fol- 
lowing children: 

339. Martha Frances. 343. Joseph Burton. 

340. Harriet Jane. 344. Henry Franklin. 

341. Ella Nora. 345. Cora May. 

342. John Carlton. 

Jonathan Hodgins died April 2, 1887, and his widow, 
Susan H., now lives in Florence, Nebraska. 

254. Pierce J. Wisdom^ son of (235) John Amons, 
was born September 6, 1842. His early life was occupied 
in farming and stock raising. In 1872 he opened a store 
in the straggling little hamlet of Mormontown, now 
Blockton, Iowa, where he supplied the wants of the 
settlers for miles around, his store being a favorite resort 
for the pioneers. He maintained a private post office and 
it proved such a convenience that he was prevailed on to 
have it changed to a Government office. This he did and 



lo8 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

he was reappointed to succeed himself till Cleveland's 
administration, when he resigned. He conducted the 
store and post office for thirteen years. He again turned 
his attention to farming and stock raising, following this 
occupation for the next five years. He served repeatedly 
on the City Council and School Board of Blockton. In 
1 86 1 he responded to his country's call and served six 
months under Captain John Flick, in Missouri. In 1862 
he volunteered in Company G, Twenty-ninth Iowa, and 
served to the end of the war. 

Pierce J. married Miss Jane Carter and they were the 
parents of the following children: 

346. Guy Wade. 348. Carrie. 

347. Jennie. 349. Zora. 

After the death of his first wife he married Miss 
Harriet Worthington, and to them was born: 

350. Earl. 353. Milton V. 

351. Pierce J., Jr. 354. William D. 

352. Samuel. 

Death again visited his home, this time claiming Har- 
riet Worthington Wisdom, his second wife. After her 

death he married Miss Ella . They now live in 

Escondido, California, where he has been engaged in the 
mercantile business. 

P, J.'s life has been characterized by sobriety, sim- 
plicity, honesty and industry. He has given his chief at- 
tention to the rearing of his family. If success attends 
the most worthy, and the fittest survive, we require no 
better exponent than the mentioning of this whole-souled, 
upright and amiable citizen, who by his endeavors, hon- 
estly and honorably exercised, has acquired wealth and 
the esteem of his fellow men. He has been a very active 
member in the Baptist Church, having served as deacon 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 109 

for a number of years, and was a cheerful contributor. 
He has now retired, having turned his business over to his 
sons, who are doing a lucrative business. 

346. Guy Wade Wisdom, son of (254) Pierce J., 
married Miss Mittie Nelson. They have three children: 

355. Gail. 

356. Marie. 

357. Alta. 

He is a man of more than ordinary executive ability. 
Having been associated with his father for a number of 
years he has attained many of the business traits that have 
characterized that indivdual's success. Guy W. has a 
strong personality and makes friends wherever he goes. 
He is kind and generous; honest in his dealings, and pos- 
sesses a true Christian character. He is now engaged in 
the mercantile business in Escondido, California, where 
he enjoys an extensive patronage. Both he and his good 
wife are members of the Baptist Church and always take 
an active part in the welfare of others. They are highly 
respected and loved by all who know them. 

347. Jennie Wisdom, daughter of (254) Pierce J., 
married Benjamin Worthington, a well-to-do farmer and 
a prominent citizen of Blockton, Iowa. 

348. Carrie Wisdom, daughter of (254) Pierce J., 
married Dr. J. W. Rankin, a prominent specialist, of Los 
Angeles. Carrie is also a doctor, and they work to- 
gether in their profession. 

349. ZoRA Wisdom, daughter of (254) Pierce J., is 
an accomplished young lady and lives at home with her 
father at Escondido, California. 



no Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

350. Earl Wisdom, son of (254) Pierce J., lives in 
Los Angeles, California, where he is studying law. He 
holds a responsible position with the Los Angeles Trust 
Company, being manager of the land department. He is 
a very capable 5^oung man. 

351. Pierce J. Wisdom, Jr., son of (254) Pierce J., 
is a traveling salesman, and travels with his two brothers, 
Milton and William for the Shinola Shoe Polish Com- 
pany, of Rochester, N. Y. Pierce, Jr., is a young man of 
good habits and is well liked by all who know him. His 
home is in Escondido, California, where he is interested in 
the mercantile business. • 

352. Samuel Wisdom, son of Pierce J., is married 
and lives in Escondido, California, where he is manager 
of the mercantile business conducted by P. J. Wisdom & 
Sons. He is a young man of rare business qualifications 
and is to be complimented upon the way he handles the 
large trade of their firm. 

353. Milton V. Wisdom, son of (254) Pierce J., is 
a traveling salesman, being Pacific Coast representative 
of the Shinola Shoe Polish Company, of Rochester, N. Y. 
He has been with this concern for several years and is 
considered one of the best representatives the Shinola 
people have, and is perhaps their youngest district man- 
ager. He is conservative and enterprising, with force and 
ability. He is also interested in the mercantile business in 
Escondido, California, his home. 

354. William D. Wisdom, youngest son of (254) 
Pierce J., is a salesman for the Shinola Shoe Polish Com- 
pany, of Rochester, N. Y., and travels with his brothers 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch III 

Milton and Pierce J., Jr. The three brothers are a 
lively trio and "business getters." William D., although 
the youngest of the family, takes no back seat when it 
comes to business. He is a young man of high ideals and 
makes a host of friends wherever he goes. He, also, is 
interested in the mercantile business of Escondido, Cali- 
fornia. 

236. Pollard Washington Wisdom, son of (231) 
Thomas and Lurana, was born in the state of Kentucky 
in the year 1801. He died in the state of Missouri, Octo- 
ber, 1846. He married Miss Patty Wade, who was a 
Southern girl and native of Virginia. Patty Wade was 
born May 11, 1806, and died November 27, 1868. Four 
children were born of this union : 

358. R. S. 360. Caroline E. 

359. Lydia A. 361. Christopher C. 

Pollard Washington Wisdom was a hard-working, in- 
dustrious, well-to-do farmer and in every public enterprise 
was found on the side of development and progress. He 
and his good wife were devout Christians and were mem- 
bers of the Baptist Church. Thus it is with pleasure I 
record their names among the worthy pioneers of the 
great state of Missouri. 

Patty Wade moved with her parents from Virginia 
to Kentucky when she was but four years old. She lived 
there till she was eighteen years old, when her parents 
again moved, this time to Boone County, Missouri. A 
year later she was married to Pollard Washington Wis- 
dom. She was left a widow young in life with four little 
children and lived to raise them all. She was a noble 
Christian character, a true wife, and a faithful mother. 



112 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

358. R. S. Wisdom, son of (236) Pollard Washing- 
ton, was born August 30, 1829, in the state of Missouri. 
He was married to Miss Clara Kennedy, of Clinton, 
Missouri. They had one child (deceased). R. S. was 
engaged in the mercantile business in Marshall, Missouri. 
After retiring from business both he and his estimable 
wife were engaged in school teaching, until a few years 
ago when he was bereft of all that was near and dear to 
him, his beloved wife having passed to the great beyond. 

As a teacher R. S. has achieved great success and is 
highly esteemed in the community in which he lives. He 
is a man of high qualities of mind and heart, is a deep 
thinker, with broad views on every subject of interest. 
Genial and whole-souled, it is a pleasure to meet him and 
it enables one to account for his very great popularity 
with his fellow teachers and pupils. He is thoroughly 
devoted to his life work, which when rightly understood 
and followed is one of the greatest professions known to 
man. 

The author is deeply grieved to state that since the abo'Ve 
nvas ivritten R. S. Wisdom has joined the majority of that 
generation in the great beyond. "The Lord doeth all things 
li'ell." May he rest in -peace. 

359. Lydia a. Wisdom, daughter of (236) Pollard 
Washington, was born August 26, 1834. She married 
a man by the name of Hall, who was a farmer in Mis- 
souri. They had three children — two sons and one 
daughter. The oldest son is a well-to-do farmer and lives 
in Spokane, Washington. He is married and has six 
children. Lydia's daughter married W. E. McClure, a 
farmer of Barton County, Missouri. They have a son 
who is telegraph operator in Oklahoma and a daughter 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 113 

who is a teacher in the public schools. Lydia's youngest 
son is married and has two children. They live at Lamar, 
Barton County, Missouri, as also does Lydia, who is now 
a widow, her husband having died some years ago. The 
names of the children were never sent me: 

363. (eldest boy). 

363. (boy). 

364. (girl)- 

360. Caroline E. Wisdom, daughter of (236) Pol- 
lard Washington, was born October 5, 1842. In 1869 
she was married to P. E. Ewell, of Clark County, Ken- 
tucky, who was a carpenter by trade. They have four 
living chidren: 

365. Etta M. 367. Robt. E. 

366. Charles W. 368. Katherine. 

361. Christopher C. Wisdom, son of (236) Pollard 
Washington, was born May 17, 1844. He was married 
to Miss Mary Hendrix in Audrain County, Missouri, in 
1867. They had seven children: 

369. Callie Lowen. 373. Francis Mitchell. 

370. William Pollard. 374. Thomas Bourne. 

371. Elizabeth Welburn. 375. Ellen Ward. 

372. Daisy Dean. 

Christopher C.'s success as a farmer is due entirely to 
his own natural ability and his habits of industry and 
economy, by which qualifications he has raised himself 
from obscurity to his present condition of comfort and 
prominence. He now resides at 460 W., N. Street, Mar- 
shall, Missouri. 

369. Callie Lowen Wisdom, daughter of (361) 
Christopher C, was born December 27, 1869. She mar- 
ried a man by the name of Maulgy. 



114 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

370. William Pollard Wisdom, son of (361) 
Christopher C, was born September 28, 1871. He is a 
farmer and lives near Arrow Rock, Saline County, Mis- 
souri, is married and has one little girl: 

376. Frances May. 

371. Elizabeth Welburn Wisdom, daughter of 
(361) Christopher C, was born June 7, 1874. She mar- 
ried a Mr. Seeper, a prosperous farmer. 

372. Daisy Dean Wisdom, daughter of (361) 
Christopher C, was born July 16, 1876. She married a 
Mr. Clayton. No further record of her. 

373. Francis Mitchell Wisdom, son of (361) 
Christopher C, was born March 16, 1878. He is a 
street-car conductor and lives in Kansas City, Kansas. 

374. Thomas Bourne Wisdom, son of (361) 
Christopher C, was born April 19, 1880. He lives with 
his parents in Marshall, Missouri, and is a painter. 

375. Ellen Ward Wisdom, daughter of (361) 
Christopher C, was born May 24, 1888. 

237. Brinsley Benton Wisdom, son of (231) 
Thomas and Lurana, was born in Kentucky in 1803. He 
was married to Miss Tharsy Hearn, in Boone County, 
Missouri. They had three sons and two daughters: 



377- 


Clayton. 


380 


378. 


Doc. 


381 


379- 


John Randolph. 





Brinsley Benton and two of his sons. Doc. and J. R., 
fought in the Federal Army during the Civil War. Doc 
was killed in the battle of Kirksville, Missouri, in 1863. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 1 15 

Brinsley died several j^ears ago in Missouri. He was an 
industrious farmer, quiet and unassuming, hospitable, 
generous and respected by his fellow citizens, all of which 
may also be said of his estimable wife, who was one with 
him in his ambitions, sorrows and cares. They were 
worthy m.embers of the Baptist Church. 

377. Clayton Wisdom, the oldest son of (237) 
Brinsley Benton Wisdom, died in 1856. 

378. Doc. Wisdom, son of (237) Brinsley Benton 
Wisdom, was an ardent patriot and enlisted in the Fed- 
eral Army at the outbreak of the Civil War. He died 
for his country in the battle of Kirksville, Missouri, in 
1863. 

379. John Randolph Wisdom, son of (237) Brins- 
ley Benton, was born in Randolph County, Missouri, 
March 22, 1848. He enlisted with the Federal Army 
during the Civil War and remained with it to the finish. 
In 1 87 1 he was married to Miss Malinda Van Horn. 
One son was the only issue of this union: 

382. Charles R. 

The following is an extract of a letter written by John 
Randolph to W. T. Wisdom, of Trenton, Missouri. 
The letter was dated from McCloud, California, Febru- 
ary, 14, 1903, and read: 

"My Dear Cousin — I have yours of the 7th inst. and much 
pleased to note contents of same. 

"It is somewhat of a surprise you should be in possession of 
a clipping from the Sisson Mirror. Sisson is a little town on 
the main line of the Southern Pacific, about fifteen miles di- 
rectly west of McCloud. McCIoud is located on a line of road 
operated by this company (Scott- Van Arsdale Lumber Com- 



Il6 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

pany) ; the junction point with the Southern Pacific is a little 
place called Upton. We have a pretty well equipped line of 
road, and a very good one, from Upton to McCloud, which is 
the common carrier and a chartered line. We have practically 
thirty miles more of a good road for our logging purposes. 
Our equipment for this line is about two hundred and thirty 
cars, eight good locomotives of sixty tons each. Our road is 
not as long as the Rock Island or the C. B. & Q., but it is 
just as wide and going down the mountains we could get up 
as high rate of speed if we choose to do so, but we prefer not. 

''We are building new saw mills, planing mill and box 
factory at this place in connection with two other saw mills 
that we have, anticipating manufacturing this year about 90,- 
000,000 feet of lumber, so you see we may be somewhat out of 
the world but not out of business. 

"We have a general store at this place, run by the company, 
and we are selling on an average of $30,000 per month, so 
you can see we have a little business in the mercantile line. 

"Since my arrival here, which was the i6th of August last, 
I have really been too busy to spit, but will rtiake an effort to 
answer your letter the best I can. 

"Can it be possible that it has been twenty years since we 
met? I trust it won't be another twenty before we meet again. 

"My son is in Quincy now — went back for a short stay to 
see his friends — he and his wife. We only have the one child, 
you understand, his initials are C. R., weighs 236 pounds, 
stands 6 feet i^ inches, he's a baby in name and reality but 
not in physique. 

"Yes, it is true I was booked and advertised as one of the 
delegates from Quincy at the time the commercial men were 
touring the country and I am sorry of not making the trip on 
account of not seeing you, but I never was a great hand to 
play in the grandstand, have preferred to do business in a more 
quiet way and have found it successful to some extent." 

The following extracts are from daily papers of 

Quincy, Illinois: 

JOHN R. WISDOM PASSED AWAY 

"John R. Wisdom is dead. All Quincy held him in great 
esteem, and the tidings of his death is a distinct shock. 

"The announcement came shortly before noon to-day in the 
form of a dispatch from his son, Charles, addressed to Cal 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch II7 

Baker, father-in-law of the sender of the dispatch. The mes- 
sage stated further that the remains would be brought to this 
city for burial. 

**Mr. Wisdom had been sick for about three weeks with 
typhoid fever and this is presumably the cause of his death. It 
is a dangerous disease and appears to be especially severe with 
men of large physique. Mr. Wisdom was a man with superb 
physical proportions and was correct in his habits and regular 
in his mode of life. He seemed able to defy all disease, but 
once the typhoid germ found lodgment in his stalwart frame he 
was marked for the tomb. He died at McCloud, California, in 
the shadow of the great white dome of Mount Shasta. Mc- 
Cloud was the center of the huge lumbering interests in which 
he was the controlling spirit, and there he had resided since the 
2ist of last August, when the family left Quincy. 

"John R. Wisdom was born on a farm in Randolph County, 
Missouri, on March 22, 1848, and was therefore in his fifty- 
fifth year. He attended the country school as a boy and also 
aided in the work on the farm — which was one of the best in 
the country. As a boy of fifteen he went into the army when 
men were needed in the Civil War. He enlisted in Company 
D of the Thirty-ninth Missouri Infantry. He was only a lad, 
but he served with the courage and spirit of a man, and he 
remained in the army until the close of the war. He then 
went into the lumber business as a contractor in a small way 
and still later was in the livery business at Hannibal — the firm 
name being Loudon & Wisdom. In 1880 Mr. Wisdom was 
elected to the Legislature from Marion County, being the first 
Republican elected to the Legislature from that county since 
1870. In 1886 he went to Arkansas as general manager for 
the Heme Lumber Company, and in 1890 he came to Quincy 
to take charge of the Gem City Saw Mill Company. He was 
at the head of this enterprise until the company retired from 
business as a result of the great fire of April 21, 1902, when 
the mills and yards were entirely destroyed. Mr. Wisdom 
was the president and heaviest stockholder of the company at 
that time. During the dozen years of the residence of the 
Wisdom family in this city, Mr. Wisdom was recognized as 
one of the most upright and public-spirited of citizens. He 
had the confidence and regard of his men and the good will of 
the entire community. 

"After the burning of the mills here, Mr. Wisdom became 
interested in the development of California timber and became 
the manager of the Scott-Van Arsdale Lumber Company. This 



Ii8 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

company is capitalized at $3,000,000, and the Wisdoms held 
$200,000 of the stock. It is believed to be the largest lumbering 
corporation west of the Mississippi Valley. In the various de- 
partments of this great business the dead man was the chief 
factor, and his passing is therefore a blow to the business world. 

"Mr. Wisdom is survived by his wife and son, Charles R. 
Wisdom. The latter has been his father's right-hand man in 
the business for several years. 

"The funeral is to-morrow. 

"The remains of the late John R. Wisdom arrived here this 
afternoon about four o'clock on the H. and St. Joe train. The 
body was accompanied from California by Mrs. Baker, her son 
Charles and her aunt. James Dickson, the Q. local master 
mechanic, and W. E. Kendall, the Q. baggage master, met the 
party at St. Joe. 

"The remains were placed in charge of undertaker Daugherty. 
The funeral services will be held to-morrow, Sunday, after- 
noon, at 3.30 o'clock at the residence of C. E. Baker, 628 Spring 
Street. 

"Some additional details have been learned concerning the 
illness of Mr. Wisdom. He first had typhoid fever, which 
developed into pneumonia July 27, on which date his tempera- 
ture was 99 degrees. By the 28th the trouble had become heart 
failure, of which Mr. Wisdom died on the morning of that day." 

JOHN R. WISDOM LAID TO REST 

"The Funeral Is Largely Attended 

"The Discourse a Warm Tribute to His Splendid 

Character — The Choir Music — Many Flowers and 

Notable Designs 

"As the rays of the descending sun last evening passed from 
the shimmering depths of the great river into the beautiful 
Woodland Cemetery, tinting the green of leaf and vine with 
gold, amid a silence broken only bv the sobs from hearts for 
whose pain there is no earthly balm, the mortal remains of 
John R. Wisdom were laid in the tomb. 

"The funeral services, which were held at the residence of 
Calot E. Baker, No. 628 Spring Street, beginning at 3.30 o'clock, 
were very largely attended, including many friends from Han- 
nibal and some from Minneapolis. 

"The services were conducted by Rev. Ransom Harvey, 
pastor of the Vermont Street Baptist Church, whose thought- 
ful, impressive and eloquent discourse was eminently befitting 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 119 

the occasion and the deceased. In the course of his sermon, 
the minister paid a fine tribute to the splendid business reputa- 
tion of Mr. Wisdom, whose well-known integrity was especially 
emphasized. 

"The number of floral offerings was no less notable than their 
remarkable beauty of design, particularly a magnificent column, 
the tribute from Mr. Wisdom's employees, and there were many 
other fine pieces. 

"The selections by the choir, namely, Mrs. David Schanz, 
Miss Leila Turne, George Reeves and Harry Dickinson, were 
very beautiful. 

"The pallbearers were Dickerson McAfee, Sam Woods, 
Joseph Lusk, H. H. Cober, W. E. Kendall and James Dickson. 

"Among those from other cities along the Mississippi Valley 
who attended the funeral were the following: 

"J. E. Carpenter, Minneapolis; H. Lee Service, St. Louis; 
Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Hearne, St. Louis; A. D. Buckner, Paris, 
Missouri; G. W. Curtis, Clinton, Iowa; F. P. Hixon and 
George H. Ray, La Crosse, Wisconsin; Walter Alexander, 
Wausau, Wisconsin; Mr. and Mrs. George A. Mahan; Mr. 
and Mrs. W. T. Loudon, W. B. Pettibone, G. D. Dulaney, J. J. 
Cruikshank, John J. Conlon, Hannibal; Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Hewitt, St. Louis." 

John R. was fifty-five years old at the time of his 

death, which occurred July 28, 1 903. The preceding 

accounts show him to have been a man of sterling worth 

and great integrity, who was honored and loved by all 

who knew him. 

382. Charles R. Wisdom, son of (379) John Ran- 
dolph, was born May 28, 1872. On March 25, 1896, 
he was married to Miss Jennette Calot Baker, of Quincy, 
Illinois. They have no children. Charles R. is exten- 
sively interested in the lumber business at McCloud, 
California, and also the Diamond Match Company, of 
Stirling, California. 

238. James Madison Wisdom, son of (231) Thomas 
and Lurana, was born in Kentucky, March 24, 1808. 



120 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

He married Miss Catharine Turner, of Boone County, 
Missouri; she was born November ii, 1811. They had 
the following children: 

383. Martha Jane. 389- Thomas Smith. 

384. Nancy. 390. Fielding Wilhoit. 

385. Lurana. 39i- Lydia A. 

386. Mary Ann. 392. Susan Frances. 

387. Sarah Ellen. 393- Lucy Catharine. 

388. Gabriel Turner. 

James Madison was a thoroughly reliable business 
man, and was highly esteemed. His career, marked as it 
has been by many of the characteristic events of the 
pioneer days and by his integrity and enterprise, will 
leave a conspicuous and lasting impression upon the com- 
munity in which he lived. Both he and his beloved wife 
were devout Christians and died in the Baptist faith. 

He died in October, 1882, while his wife survived 
him till February 21, 1897, when she too passed beyond 
death's cloudy portal. 

384. Nancy Wisdom, daughter of (238) James 
Madison, was born October 20, 1835, iri the state of 
Missouri. She married a Mr. Cassidy, of Mexico, Mis- 
souri. Nancy died February 3, 1877. 

386. Mary Ann Wisdom, daughter of (238) James 
Madison, was born in Missouri, August 28, 1837. She 
married Thomas C. Cleaton, of Higbee, Missouri. 

387. Sarah Ellen Wisdom, daughter of (238) 
James Madison, was born in Missouri, June 7, 1839. 
She married Frank Cleaton, a brother of Thomas C. 
Cleaton. Sarah Ellen lives in Mexico, Missouri. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 121 

389. Thomas Smith Wisdom, son of (238) James 
Madison, was born August 14, 1843, in the state of Mis- 
souri. He lives on his farm with his family, in Audraine 
County, Missouri, near Centralia. 

During the Civil War he served four years in the Con- 
federate Army under General Sterling Price. After the 
war he settled on a fine farm, where he has since lived 
and accumulated a goodly portion of the world's goods. 

390. Fielding Wilhoit Wisdom, son of (238) 
James Madison, was born in Missouri, August 29, 1845. 
He is a prosperous farmer and lives on his father's old 
farm in Audraine County, Missouri. 

391. Lydia a. Wisdom, daughter of (238) James 
Madison, was born in Missouri, September 14, 1847. 
She is single and lives with her sister (387) Ella Cleaton, 
in Mexico, Missouri. 

392. Susan Frances Wisdom, daughter of (238) 
James Madison, was born in Missouri, August 9, 1849. 
She married Hardy Herdto, deceased. Susan Frances 
lives in Mexico, Missouri. 

393. Lucy Catharine Wisdom, daughter of (238) 
James Madison, was born in Missouri, May 15, 1851. 
She married John Pulis, who is a conductor on a railroad 
train that runs from Thompson to Singleton, Missouri. 

239. Thomas Barnes Wisdom, son of (231) 
Thomas and Lurana, was born in Kentucky, June 26, 
1 8 14. He was married March 22, 1836, to Miss Lu- 
cinda Gess, who was also born in Kentucky, July 21, 



122 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

1820. Twelve children, seven boys and five girls, were 
born of this union : 

394. Frances Luranie. 

395. John W. 

396. James T. 

397. Fielding Wilhoit (deceased). 

398. Armilda Elizabeth (deceased). 

399. Geo. W. 

400. Michael Davidson 

401. Wesley Monroe. 

402. Sarah Catharine 

403. Jefferson Davis. 

404. Anna. ] Who died while crossing the 

405. Ade ) plains in 1863. 

Captain William Gess, father of Lucinda Gess Wis- 
dom, was born in Kentucky, and was of Scotch-Irish 
parentage. He married Sallie A. Hulen, of English an- 
cestry, who was born in North Carolina. Captain Gess*^ 
grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 

Captain G^ss led the company who drove the Mor- 
mons out of Missouri. Thomas Barnes Wisdom was 
a member of the company and assisted in the capture of 
Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism. Captain 
Gess at the outbreak of the Civil War was very wealthy,, 
owning large tracts of land, all of which was under culti- 
vation and stocked with fine horses and cattle. He also 
had a large number of slaves, all of which were con- 
fiscated. These slaves were so well treated that they 
wanted to stay on the plantations after they were freed, 
but were forced by the Federals to leave. Captain Gess,. 
like many others, in order to protect his life, was forced 
to leave. He went to Illinois, where he was taken with 
smallpox and died. G. W. and T. B. Gess, sons of Cap- 
tain Gess, reside in Boise, Idaho. G. W. for years con- 
ducted the largest butcher business in that city. He also- 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 123 

engaged in the farming and stock-raising business. He 
owns several hundred acres of good land, which is under 
cultivation and yields him a substantial annual income; 
is said to be worth a half million dollars. T. B. owns 
a fine home in Boise and has been postmaster of that city. 
He was also elected county treasurer of Ada County, 
Idaho. At the time of his death he was clerk of the cir- 
cuit court, which position he had held for years. T. B. 
was foreman of the jury that tried Wm. Hayward, of 
the famous Hayward-Moyer-Pettibone dynamiting case 
in Boise, Idaho, pertaining to the killing of Governor 
Stunenberg. 

Lucinda Gess Wisdom, wife of Thomas Barnes Wis- 
dom, was an amiable lady, a devout Chrsitian of the 
Baptist Church, a devoted wife, and a loving, intelligent 
mother. She was very fond of her family and had many 
friends. She died February 5, 1865, at Wingville, Baker 
County, Oregon, and her death was a great shock to the 
community. 

Much may be said of Thomas Barnes Wisdom, as his 
many traits of character have endeared him to all who 
knew him. He was always ready to extend a helping 
hand to those who were in need and was a consistent 
Baptist until his death, which occurred at Baker, Oregon, 
February i, 1893. 

What success but change of sorrow, 
When the smiles, that used to play 

In the dawn of hopes to-morrow, 
Have forever passed away. 

What is fame? Amid that sweepeth 

The cold surface of the grave. 
What is death? A storm that sleepeth. 

What is life? A restless wave. 



124 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

A STORY OF THE EARLY 6o's 

(239) Thomas Barnes Wisdom, the compiler's father, 
with his family crossed the plains with a wagon train (ox 
teams) in 1863. The company under the leadership of 
G. W. Gess, son of Captain Wm. Gess, left Missouri, 
April 10, 1863, and reached Baker County, Oregon, 
October 25, of that year. This was one of the best- 
equipped wagon trains that ever crossed the continent. 
It consisted of 100 wagons and 150 men well armed. 
They also had plenty of food and ammunition. Mr. 
Gess was a brave, bold and daring man with nerve and 
decision, yet he was always prudent and conservative. 

The entire journey was beset with perils, there being 
constant danger of Indian attacks as well as assaults from 
white bandits — jayhawkers and guerrilas. There were 
several skirmishes with the Indians but no serious damage 
was sustained. Mr. Gess, his family and a number of 
the emigrants stopped at Boise, Idaho. 

The Wisdom family and a greater part of the com- 
pany moved on to Baker County, Oregon, where the 
Wisdom's located at Pocahontas, a little place at the foot 
of the Baisley-Elkhorn Mountain in the Blue Mountain 
Range. Pocahontas is in Powder River Valley, which is 
one of the most fertile spots not only in Baker County 
but in all Oregon. 

The Civil War with its devastations and bitterness led 
thousands to leave their homes, in Western and South- 
western states; not always from patriotic motives. Mis- 
souri, especially, sent hundreds of men with their families 
— ''Southern sympathizers" — ^who were glad to get away 
from the perils of the conflict. As this army of people 
came to eastern Oregon, they scattered over Powder 



Thomas Barnes Wisdom — Francis Branch 125 

River and Grande Ronde valleys, and strayed somewhat 
through the Blue Mountains and along the Umatilla and 
John Day rivers. So, between the gold seekers of the 
West and the emigrants of the East, when the winter of 
1863 and 1864 settled down, there was quite a popula- 
tion east of the Blue Mountains and within Oregon. 

The two valleys that earliest drew the favorable atten- 
tion of those who traveled through the country were 
Powder River and Grande Ronde. The emigrants 
reached Powder River Valley soon after leaving the gray 
sagebrush deserts of Snake River, and to them it seemed 
as an Oasis, in a Sahara, as it really was. As they drove 
their weary oxen up the eastern slope of a dry and rocky 
hill to its summit and saw before them the green and 
beautiful plain, through whose center the willowed thread 
of Powder River was glancing away northward for 
thirty miles, they could but stop and gaze, wonder and 
admire. The valley ten miles in width and thirty miles 
long was all within range of vision; just across it, spring- 
ing abruptly from its western margin, the granite pin- 
nacles of the Blue Mountains shot sharply, in Alpine 
abruptness and roughness from 5,000 to 8,000 feet above 
its emerald bosom; their sides blue with pines, through 
which, in places, avalanches of rock and snow had plowed 
their way in deep and wide furrows to their very base 
In this soft haze of an early October afternoon of 1863, 
when I first looked upon it, this seemed an enchanted 
vale in its gracefulness of outline and its strong enframe- 
ment by its mountain bordering. The valley has an alti- 
tude something like 3,450 feet above the tide, but the 
sunshine kisses its bosom with fruitful warmth through 
an atmosphere of amber purity. 



126 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

Gradually these roamers began to concentrate about 
more favored "camps." Auburn, on Powder River, grevsr 
into a city of thousands in a itw weeks, Canyon City, on 
John Day River, nearly equalled it. These were the chief 
mining camps of that interior — Oregon, and it is proba- 
ble that their superior as placer diggmgs and quartz 
mining have not existed on the Pacific Coast. In addi- 
tion there was and is yet hundreds of smaller camps in 
nearly every valley of the Blue and Snake River Moun- 
tains. 

The hegira of the Wisdom family and others from 
Missouri to the untried lands of far-off Oregon, made 
with untold hardships, across burning, sandy deserts and 
high rugged mountains, was one of the inevitable results 
of the bitter combat that was waged in Missouri in the 
first years of the Civil War. Some of the Wisdoms cast 
their fortunes with the South and their property was 
taken from them and their lives were in constant danger. 
They took up the intrepid march westward across the 
continent. Poor in goods, but rich in character and 
courage, they came to a new and barren land to carve 
out homes for themselves and their posterity. These are 
some of the men who helped to conquer the wilderness 
and fashion the state. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War Thomas Barnes 
Wisdom was a well-to-do farmer and stock raiser. But 
as I have briefly stated his affiliations were in the South, 
consequently could not longer remain without placing his 
life and the lives of his family in jeopardy, as it had been 
threatened time and time again, until forbearance had 
ceased to be a virtue. His property was all confiscated, 
everything but his land. Still he remained neutral, never 



Thomas Barnes Wisdom — Francis Branch 127 

having taken part in any way. However, determined to 
protect himself and family, he sold his land for whatever 
he could get and prepared to make the long perilous trip 
across the continent to the far-off West. With two good 
ox teams, heavy laden with provisions, and his family, he 
started. No human tongue can ever tell the hardships 
endured during that six months — traversing deserts, 
plains and rocky mountains. 

To add torture and sorrow to our long and tedious 
journey, my two youngest sisters, Anna and Ada, aged 
four and two years respectively, were taken from us and 
laid to rest on the wild plains of the West, where nothing 
could be heard but the whistling of the winds or the 
howling wolves and occasionally the Indian warwhoop. 
The youngest was buried where the flourishing city of 
Boise, Idaho, now stands; the other was buried some- 
where on the Payette River, the exact place being now 
unknown. 

Since that sad and sorrowful day, 

I have often heard my dear mother say, 

"The dear little ones are gone, but not forever"; 

Soon we too, shall follow, 
Where the sting of death cannot sever. 

At last we reached our destination and father located 
on a fine piece of land consisting of 160 acres of good 
alluvial soil. Here, however, his troubles did not cease. 
After two years of hard work and toil he had improved 
his farm to such an extent that it had become very valu- 
able. The few head of cattle had increased lOO per cent. 
Then death came knocking at the door and stole from 
him my mother, Lucinda, also my sister, Armilda Eliza- 
beth ; their deaths being only five days apart. This was 



128 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

more than any noble and kind husband and father could 
endure. Father became dissatisfied, sold out his stock 
and farm to his eldest son, (395) John W., in an en- 
deavor to keep his children together, several of vrhom 
were very small. Removing with them to the Willamette 
Valley, in the western part of Oregon, he settled on a 
farm in Lane County. Here he remained with his chil- 
dren until they were able to do for themselves. Later he 
sold his interests in Lane County and returned to Baker, 
Oregon, where he spent the balance of his days with his 
sons. 

Father was a man of great vitality — strong, robust 
and muscular. I am unable to find language to express 
his ennobling traits of character — a pure, clean Christian. 
Such is a brief sketch of one of Oregon's brave pioneers, 
one who had the courage to break away from civilization 
and become one of the men who made it possible to sub- 
due the then unsettled portion of eastern Oregon, which 
is now one of the greatest states in the Union. 

Of my dear mother, Lucinda Wisdom, it can be truth- 
fully said that in crossing the plains to Oregon she 
willingly sacrificed everything, except her love for her 
husband and children. She was in every respect truly 
his helpmate. By her bouyant disposition she aided him 
in making financial losses incentive to new efForts and 
reserves by her sympathy and encouragement. There 
never was a braver, nobler, or better woman; nor truer, 
more devoted, or more helpful wife. A trip across the 
plains at that particular time was full of danger and 
peril ; none but the bravest heart could endure. She only 
lived about two years after reaching the great West. She 
was taken violently ill and passed to the great beyond, 



Thomas Barnes Wisdom — Francis Branch 129 

and was laid to rest near Wingville, Baker County, 
Oregon, under the green fir boughs at the foot of the 
Blue Mountains, bordering on the Powder River Valley, 
where she now peacefully sleeps, beside her daughter, 
Armilda Elizabeth. 

Before concluding this narrative I want to relate our 
experience with the Jayhawkers, an organization of horse 
thieves, cut-throats and outlaws, who, masquerading un- 
der the guise of self-appointed police, inaugurated a reign 
of terror and preyed upon the whole South. 

It was in the heat of the Civil War when they were 
in the height of their gory career. Never a day passed 
without some outrage. Men were shot down in cold 
blood, or torn from the bosoms of their families and 
publicly lynched by the bloodthirsty crew. Helpless 
householders were ofttimes shot down in their own door- 
way, while in other instances wives and children of pros- 
pective victims were faithfully promised that the husband 
and father should be returned to them after some slight 
punishment — but they never came back. 

My father fell under the ban of this terrible band. 
Its members could assign no reason for wishing to harm 
him but in their unabaiting thirst for gore they wildly 
cried for the life of every honest man. He was secretly 
marked for death — either by shooting or hanging, which- 
ever might prove the more expedient method of putting 
him out of the way. 

No sooner had the day been set by the Jayhawkers 
than my father learned of their plans. They had de- 
cided that he should be sacrificed on a Friday, in October 
of 1862 (cannot remember the exact date of the month). 
When my mother heard of the fate in store for father 



I30 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

she begged him to flee to some place where he might hide 
in safety until the day of mob rule in the South had 
passed. He was obdurate, however, and although he 
fully expected to pay the penalty of his bravery with his 
life, declared that he would remain and face the assassins. 

Despite the tears and pleas of our family the brave man 
went calmly about making preparations for his last stand, 
giving no outward indications of an unusual state of 
mind, other than a slight tightening of the lines around 
his mouth and a gleam in his eyes which told as plainly 
as words could have done that his life would not be 
cheaply purchased. Father knew that the Jayhawkers 
hoped he would attempt to run away; in fact, he be- 
lieved he was allowed to learn of their plans to cause 
him to attempt to flee. Had he taken to his heels he 
would have fallen directly in with the plans of these out- 
laws for they would have declared him a bushwhacker 
and would have had a flimsy excuse for shooting him 
down on sight. So after all, what may in this day ap- 
pear as foolhardy bravery was actually the wisest kind 
of discretion. 

At that time we lived on our farm, occupying a log 
house which was considerably larger than the ordinary 
residents of that section. The house was equipped with 
the heavy wooden doors of the day which when closed 
and bolted placed a formidable barrier in the way of an 
unwelcome visitor. As soon as father learned of the 
proposed attack he nailed heavy boards over all the win- 
dows and fastened all the doors except one. On the floor 
directly behind this one he nailed a strong strip in such 
a manner as to allow the door to open just enough to 
admit the body of one person at a time. 



Thomas Barnes Wisdom — Francis Branch 13 1 

When he had taken these precautions against a sur- 
prise the determined defender armed himself with a huge 
corn knife, which in the meantime he had ground to a 
razor edge, and began his vigil. Taking a seat behind 
the one door by which the Jayhawkers could enter the 
house, he was ready at any minute for an attack. It was 
his plan to stand in the shelter of the door and as each 
member of the attacking party attempted to squeeze 
through the small opening to cut oH the intruder's head. 
Of course he knew they would get him in the end, but 
he also knew they would pay dearly in numbers before 
they accomplished their fiendish intentions. 

I will never forget that day. Father sat in silence at 
his post near the door, while mother and the rest of us 
were wild with grief and excitement. As the sun went 
down he gazed at the beauties of nature with keenest 
regret for he, as did the rest of us, believed that it was 
his last time to see the fiery orb sink behind the horizon. 

As darkness drew down father ordered us children to 
bed. He placed us all in one room for the night and 
tried to persuade mother to remain there too. His latter 
wish was in vain, however, for our mother, bravest of 
women, insisted upon remaining at father's side through- 
out the entire ordeal. Our banishment was merely for 
our protection, for not an eye was closed in slumber in 
our home that night. 

About midnight the furious barking of our dogs ap- 
prised us that the Jayhawkers were approaching. When 
they discovered the precautions father had taken, their 
cries of joy became howls of rage and they retreated into 
the darkness for conference. Throughout the whole 
night they parleyed, at times advancing toward the house 



132 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

but always failing in their purpose through cowardly fear 
of my father's weapon. Every member of the gang knew 
my father, ''Uncle Tommy," he was generally called; 
and no one of them dared risk his own life in an attempt 
to capture or kill this brave man. After it was broad 
day light some of the Jayhawkers became discontented 
and soon they were snarling among themselves like a 
pack of hungry wolves cheated out of their prey. One 
of the motley crew asked the captain, John Roberts (who 
now lives somewhere in Oregon) what he intended to 
do? His reply was: "I know 'Uncle Tommy' will put 
up a fight. Some of us will get killed; I guess we had 
better give it up." 

Father remained at home until the following spring, 
when we started on our long and perilous journey to the 
Far West. 

394. Frances Luranie Wisdom, daughter of (239) 
Thomas Barnes, married John Blew, in Grundy County, 
Missouri, December 25, i860. They crossed the plains 
in 1862 and located in Pocahontas, Baker County, Ore- 
gon. Later they removed with their family to Lancaster, 
Lane County, Oregon, where they lived many years, sub- 
sequently locating at Junction City, a little town near 
Lancaster, Oregon, where they spent the remainder of 
their days. 

They were both members of the Methodist Church. 
Frances Luranie had a wide circle of friends and by her 
kind acts, loving heart and a most pleasing manner had 
endeared herself to all whose privilege it was to know 
her. She died at Junction City, Oregon, November 27, 
1875. John Blew was a blacksmith and also followed 



Francis Torrence Wisdo?n Branch 133 

farming. He died August 30, 1894. The following 
children were born of this union: 

406. Thomas, blacksmith, who lives with his wife 

in Portland, Oregon. 

407. James, bookkeeper, lives in southern Oregon 

with his wife and daughter. 

408. Birdie, married; her first husband was N. L. 

Mackay (deceased), a furniture dealer; 
they had two children — Donald and Norma. 
After the death of Mr. Mackay Birdie mar- 
ried Bert Taylor, an engineer, and they live 
in Portland, Oregon. 

409. Catharine, married ; her first husband's name 

was McEwen. He was an engineer and 
was killed in a wreck; they had one boy, 
Lawrence. She is now married to Fred 
S. Gollings, an engineer on the Southern 
Pacific, living in Portland, Oregon. 
409a. John, who is a printer, never married. 

We shall sleep but not forever 
In the lone and silent grave; 
Blessed be the Lord that taketh ; 
Blessed be the Lord that gave. 

In the bright, eternal city. 
Death can never, never come; 
In His own good time He calls us 
From our rest to home, sweet home. 

395. John W. Wisdom, son of (239) Thomas 
Barnes, was born March 15, 1840, in Boone County, 
Missouri. He crossed the plains in 1862 with his 
brother-in-law, John Blew, and stopped at Bannick, 
Idaho, a mining camp near Boise. Here he engaged in 
placer mining until the Fall of 1863. 

In those days every one around a mining camp was 
known by some nickname. This caused considerable dif- 
ficulty, for John W.'s father, who on his way from Mis- 



134 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

souri to Oregon, stopped at Fort Boise (now Boise, 
Idaho) to search for his son. It required several days 
to accomplish this task. Father knew John W. was there 
somewhere, but as he was known by his nickname no one 
seemed able to understand who was wanted. They 
finally met by accident. He then sold his property and 
accompanied his father to Oregon. 

John W.'s constituents have shown their apprecia- 
tion of his worth by making him their representative at 
various times. In 1874 he was elected State Senator 
from Baker County, which office he held for four years. 
In 1880 he was elected a delegate to the National Demo- 
cratic Convention held at Cincinnati, Ohio, at which 
convention the great soldier, Winfield Scott Hancock, 
was nominated standard bearer of the party. Later John 
W. served tv/o terms as City Treasurer. He was also 
chairman of the School Board for twelve years. Since 
then he has confined himself to his business and the pleas- 
ures of his home. Aside from his drug store he is a large 
land owner and stock raiser. His blooded horses from 
the "Blue Grass" region are among the finest on the 
continent. 

John W. has been in the drug business in Baker, 
Oregon, since 1867. He married Miss Mary E. Sturgill, 
June, 1868. They have the following children: 

410. Frankie (deceased). 415. Loys W. 

411. Ada (deceased). 416. Mabelle. 

412. Frances C. 417. Glen A. 

413. "Grettie" (deceased). 418. John W., Jr. 

414. Vesper. 

412. Frances C. Wisdom, daughter of (395) John 
W., was born in Baker County, Oregon. She married 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 135 

Eugene H. Blake, May, 1893. Mr. Blake was at that 
time cashier of the Citizens Bank of Baker, Oregon. 
They nov/ live in Kansas City, Missouri, where Mr. 
Blake is in the real estate and loan business. They have 
no children. 

414. Vesper Wisdom (Bessie), daughter of (395) 
John W. Wisdom, who died when eighteen years of age, 
was a great favorite among those who knew her. The 
following is a clipping from The Democrat, a Baker, 
Oregon, newspaper, dated November 20, 1893: 

"The shocking news of the death of Miss Bessie Wisdom, 
the eighteen year old daughter of Hon. and Mrs. J. W. Wis- 
dom, was received here to-day. The receipt of the sad in- 
telligence has cast a gloom over the entire community as the 
young lady was an especial favorite with all her acquaintances. 

"About five months ago Miss Bessie accompanied her father 
to Missouri, Mr. Wisdom being in quest of health. While 
there she entered a female seminary at Camden Point, where 
she was progressing nicely with her studies. No intimation 
of her sickness was received until yesterday, when a dispatch 
was received by her parents stating that Miss Bessie was 
dangerously ill with typhoid fever, and to come at once. Mrs. 
Wisdom made hasty preparations and started by the ten o'clock 
train. Almost immediately after her departure a second dis- 
patch came announcing her death. Mrs. Wisdom was tele- 
graphed to at Huntington, Oregon, and the lady returned home 
on the next train, her heart bowed down with sorrow. 

"All arrangements have been made for the shipment of the 
remains of the deceased to her home here and they will arrive 
about Thursday evening. The sympathy of all goes out to the 
sorrowing and almost distriacted parents and sister, Mrs. E. H. 
Blake, who are unconsolable in the loss of their treasure. 
Such a loss is irreparable and especially as in the death of Miss 
Bessie, who was endeared to all relatives and friends alike." 

415. LoYs W. Wisdom, daughter of (395) John W. 
Wisdom, was born in Baker, Oregon, and now lives at 
home with her parents. 



136 Genealogy of the Wisdom Faintly 

416. Mabelle Wisdom, daughter of (395) John W. 
Wisdom, was born in Baker, Oregon. She lives with her 
parents and is a high school student. 

417. Glen A. Wisdom, son of (395) John W. Wis- 
dom, was born in Baker, Oregon. He lives in Kansas 
City, Missouri, where he is studying law. 

418. John W. Wisdom, Jr., son of (395) John W. 
Wisdom, was born in Baker, Oregon. He lives with his 
parents and is a bookkeeper for the Baker Electric Light 
Company. 

396. James T. Wisdom, son of (239) Thomas 
Barnes, was born in Missouri, in 1842. He crossed the 
plains in 1863 with his parents and settled in Baker 
County, Oregon, and was married January 28, 1892, to 
Mrs. Lavina Shinn, widow of the late Judge James H. 
Shinn. They have no children. 

James T. has done credit to the name. He has al- 
ways been deeply interested in educational work and was 
himself a successful school teacher in his earlier life. 
After giving up teaching he went to Portland, Oregon, 
where he entered a commercial college and was graduated, 
later on graduating as a pharmacist. He then returned 
to Baker City, where he was employed by his brother 
(395) John W., of the firm of John W. Wisdom & Co., 
druggists, as prescription clerk, which position he held 
for twelve years. 

He has invested heavily in real estate in Baker County, 
and owns several large business buildings in Baker, and a 
number of fine residences. He also has some good farms 
among which is the "Salmon Creek Farm," one of the 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 137 

best in eastern Oregon. This farm is stocked with 
blooded horses and shorthorn cattle, all thoroughbreds. 

In 1872 he was elected County School Superintendent. 
He now devotes his time to his business interests. As a 
business man he has always been characterized by the 
most sterling qualities of mind and heart and justly en- 
joys the confidence and esteem of his community. 
"Apply thine heart unto knowledge" 

399. George W. Wisdom, son of (239) Thomas 
Barnes, was born in Randolph County, Missouri, August 
6, 1853. On October 19, 1879, he married Miss Cynthia 
W. Moore, daughter of William M. Moore, a well-to- 
do farmer and a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Cynthia W. was born in Washington County, Iowa, 
June 9, 1863. Three children were born of this union: 

419. Cordelia Catharine, born in Baker County, 

Oregon, November i, 1880; she died in 
infancy. 

420. Orville Kendrick. 

421. Lacy Larrowe. 

In 1863 George W. crossed the plains with his par- 
ents, who settled in Baker County, Oregon. When only 
a boy he went to the Willamette Valley and a little later 
to the Puget Sound country in the then Territory of 
Washington. Here he was chief deputy at the Terri- 
torial Prison at Steilacom. He returned to Baker 
County, Oregon, and was elected marshal of Baker City 
in 1875. He was also elected fire warden. He then 
turned his attention to farming and stock raising. In 
1892 he gave up farming and invested in eastern Oregon 
mines, some of which were of the best properties in that 
section. His health failing him he moved with his family 



138 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

in 1903 to Portland, Oregon, their present home. George 
W. and wife are members of the White Temple Baptist 
Church of Portland. 

420. Orville Kendrick Wisdom, son of (399) 
George W., was born October 6, 1882, in Baker, Oregon. 
He was married June 12, 1904, to Miss Dorothea Bock- 
house, of Omaha, Nebraska. Orville is a traveling sales- 
man. One child was born to them: 

422. Frances Margaret. 

422. Frances Margaret Wisdom, daughter of 
(420) Orville Kendrick, was born in Portland, Oregon, 
January 29, 1 906. 

421. Lacy Larrowe Wisdom, son of (399) George 
W., was born on the ''Salmon Creek Farm," in Baker 
County, Oregon, November 14, 1884. He was married 
in Spokane, Washington, April 14, 1906, to Miss Julia 
L. Bildner, a former schoolmate, who was born in Baker, 
Oregon, December 6, 1887. 

Lacy possesses a rare tenor voice and is a professional 
singer, having traveled extensively in concert. His wife 
is a fine pianist and always accompanies him on his tours. 
They have two children — a girl and a boy: 

423. Veta Winters. 

424. Pollard Valentin. ■ 

423. Veta Winters Wisdom, daughter of (421) 
Lacy Larrowe Wisdom, was born in Sydney, Australia, 
October 28, 191 2. Her parents were touring the antip- 
odes with the Jourdane Operatic Quartet during the 
season of 1912-1913. Veta started traveling when 
only three weeks old and has the distinction of having 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Bratich 139 

covered nearly twenty thousand miles, the greater part 
having been by water, before her eighth month. 

424. Pollard Valentin Wisdom, son of (421) 
Lacy Larrowe Wisdom, and grandson of the compiler, 
was born in Spokane, Washington, January 10, iQilf- 
(since the compilation of this book). 

400. Michael Davidson Wisdom, known as "M. 
D," son of (239) Thomas Barnes, was born March 13, 
1854, ir^ Randolph County, Missouri; crossed the plains 
with his parents in 1863. In 1875 he married Miss 
Cordelia Moore, daughter of Wm. M. Moore, and sister 
0^ (399) Mrs. George W. Wisdom, of Baker County, 
Oregon. Three children were born of this union: 

430. Layton L. 

431. "Little Brother," who died in infancy. 

432. James Merton. 

Cordelia Wisdom, wife of M. D., died January 30, 
1882. She apparently died at the same hour and to the 
minute as did the (419) infant child of (399) George 
W., as in her last dying moments she told them ''the 
baby" was dying also, although they were four miles 
apart. 

M. D.'s second wife was Miss Roberta Winifred 
Brown, daughter of Hon. A. H. Brown, ex-State Treas- 
urer of Oregon. They had two boys: 

433. Everett Stanton. 

434. Preston. 

In 1884 M. D. was elected County Clerk of Baker 
County, Oregon. Later he engaged in the handling of 
hardware, provisions, fuel, hides and furs in Baker City. 
He retired from that business and moved with his family 



l_j.O Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

to Portland, Oregon, where they now reside at 300 East 
Sixteenth Street, North. Since his residence in Port- 
land he has engaged in the publishing business, being 
editor and proprietor of the Rural Spirit, a live-stock 
paper. He is also secretary of the State Live Stock and 
Agricultural Association, which position he has held for 
many years. 

N. B. — Since the above was written it is with deepest regret 
that I announce the death of both M. D. and Roberta Winifred, 
his wife. M. D. died August 19, 1909, his wife surviving him 
till May 3, 1910. 

The following is a clipping from the Portland Ore- 
gonian under date of August 20, 1909, concerning the 
death of M. D. Wisdom: 

"IS CALLED BY DEATH 

"Death claimed M. D. Wisdom yesterday afternoon at 4.32 
o'clock. He died peacefully like one going to sleep. Gathered 
about his bedside were his immediate family and Dr. L. W. 
Hyde, a lifelong friend, who did his best to render the last 
days and nights of his comrade comfortable and free from 
pain. 

"Mr. Wisdom's death was due to heart failure and a com- 
plication of kidney trouble. He had been in a very critical 
condition for four or five days prior to his death. He was 
first taken ill last April but got over the attack apparently. 
Subsequently, however, he had been afflicted with pains about 
the heart. For a week he was treated in the Good Samaritan 
Hospital and improved sufficiently to be able to walk to his 
carriage on July 27 in which he was sent to his home, 300 East 
Sixteenth Street, North, where he was confined until the end 
came. 

"M. D. Wisdom was born in Randolph County, Missouri, 
near Sturgeon, March 13, 1854, the son of T. B. Wisdom, who 
died in December, 1893. With his parents he crossed the 
plains to Oregon at the age of nine years. The Wisdoms 
settled at Baker City, where M. D. lived a greater part of his 
life until in the late 8o's, when he came to Portland. He 
farmed until he was twentyone, when he entered the feed and 



M. D. Wisdom — Francis Branch 141 

hide business. He afterwards was elected county clerk of 
Baker County. Upon serving one term as county clerk he moved 
to Portland in 1888, the year of the great flood, and entered 
into the drug business at First and Stark Streets with his 
brother, (401) Wesley M., conducting what was at that time 
the finest drug store on the Pacific Coast. 

"In 1895 Mr. Wisdom bought the Rural Spirit, in which J. 
W. Bailey, present State Dairy and Pure Food Commissioner, 
later became interested. Mr. Wisdom afterwards took com- 
plete charge of it and conducted it ever since. 

"On December 22, 1899, Mr. Wisdom was chosen Secretary 
of the State Board of Agriculture. He served as secretary of 
the board until 1904, when he was appointed a member of the 
board by ex-Governor Chamberlain. 

In the Fall of 1904 he was elected superintendent of the 
Livestock Exposition of the Lewis and Clark Fair, and gained 
the honor of having organized and conducted the greatest 
livestock show ever held in the Northwest. 

"In 1907 he was appointed a member of the Oregon State 
Commission of the Alaska, Yukon, and Pacific Fair, which 
was held at Seattle, and when the commission was organized 
he was elected secretary. His appointment as superintendent 
of the Livestock Exposition at Seattle came just about a year 
ago. 

"M. D. Wisdom was one of a family of six sons and one 
daughter. His surviving brothers are: J. W. Wisdom, Baker 
City; J. D. Wisdom, Greenhorn, Oregon; W. M. Wisdom, 
California; George W. Wisdom, Portland, and J. T. Wisdom, 
Baker City. 

"Mr. Wisdom was twice married, his first wife being Miss 
Cordelia Moore, whom he married at Baker City, March 21, 
1876. She died January 30, 1882. On July 24, 1888, he married 
Miss Winnie Brown, of Salem, Oregon, who is still living. 

"By the first marriage Mr. Wisdom had three children, 
James M. Wisdom, of Oakland, California; Layton L. Wis- 
dom, manager of the Rural Spirit. The third child died in 
infancy. By the second wife there are two children, Stanton 
Wisdom, aged fifteen, and Preston Wisdom, aged twelve. 

"The funeral will take place at 2 P. M. from the St. David's 
Church, under the auspices of the Elks Club. The remains 
will be cremated." 

"A Good Name Is Rather to Be Chosen Than Great Riches.'* 



1^2 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

430. Layton L. Wisdom, son of (400) M. D., was 
born in Baker City, Oregon, December 21, 1877. He 
was married June 24, 1908, to Miss Ethel Wehrung, 
daughter of Hon. W. H. Wehrung, of Hillsboro, Ore- 
gon. They have no children. 

Layton L. was for a long time associated with his 
father in the publishing business. He is now dealing in 
real estate, and lives in Portland, Oregon, where he is 
well and favorably known. 



432. James Merton Wisdom, son of (400) M. D., 
was born in Baker City, Oregon, June 17, 1881. He 
married Miss Helen Hazel Ellory, of Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, November 27, 1907. James Merton is a printer 
and is foreman of an office in San Francisco, California. 

433. Everett Stanton Wisdom, son of (400) M. 
D., was born in Portland, Oregon. 

The following description of the death of Lieutenant 
Everett S. Wisdom is taken from a Los Angeles news- 
paper dated May 31, 191 9: 

AVIATOR'S DEATH CAUSED BY CRASH 
INTO MOUNTAIN 

LIEUT. E. S. WISDOM KILLED — WRECKED PLANE MASS OF FLAMES 
— RESCUE IMPOSSIBLE 

Lieut. Everett S. Wisdom, army aviator from Rockwell 
Field, was killed, and his passenger, Lieut. E. R. Kelly, slightly 
burned, when the airplane which Wisdom was piloting crashed 
into a spur of the mountains near the top of Mussey's grade 
yesterday morning. The wreckage caught fire, and the plane 
was almost completely destroyed. 



Everett S. Wisdom — Francis Branch 1 43 

The airplane, a JN-4-H type Curtiss, left the North Island 
flying field at 9.25 a. m. for Warner Springs. Near Lakeside 
the fog became so thick that Wisdom and Kelly decided to 
descend at Ramona. The fog was at least 3000 feet deep, 
and it was necessary that the aviators fly low to keep their 
bearings. They flew near the ground, using a road as a 
guide and traveling through a canyon. Near the top of 
Mussey grade, according to Kelly, a spur of the mountain 
loomed up, and, although Wisdom attempted to "zoom" over 
the hill, the plane crashed into the mountainside. The forward 
speed was so great that the plane tipped over forward, throw- 
ing Kelly partly out of his seat. The gasoline tank burst, and 
caught fire from the still running engine. Kelly fought his 
way free and rolled down the hill with his clothes afire. 

As soon as Kelly put out the fire in his garments he at- 
tempted to rescue Wisdom, but the plane was a mass of 
flame and Wisdom's rescue impossible. It is believed at Rock- 
well Field that Wisdom was unconscious or dead before the 
flames reached him. Wisdom's watch stopped at 10.30, which 
probably was the exact hour of the accident. 

ROOMMATE SETS OUT 

When news of the crash reached Rockwell Field, Lieut. Don 
M. Hansell, Wisdom's roommate, started at once by automobile 
for the scene of the accident. He took charge of the body, 
and it was sent to Bradley & Woolman's undertaking estab- 
lishment here. 

Lieut. Wisdom was proceeding to Warner to become a unit 
in the airplane patrol of the Cleveland national forest. 

KNOWN AS "smiley" 

Lieut. Wisdom was twenty-four years old and was known 
as one of the best fliers at Rockwell Field, according to his 
former associates, and was a pursuit instructor at North 
Island. He had a sunny disposition and was beloved by all 
with whom he came in contact. On account of his smile under 
all circumstances he was affectionately known as "Smiley." 
He was commissioned a second lieutenant at Mather Field in 
September, 1918, after receiving training at Berkeley and 
Mather Fields. He lived with Lieut. Hansell in the San Diego 
hotel and before entering the service made his home in 
Portland, Ore. He has a brother living at 714 Clayton Street, 
San Francisco, and another in the navy, in Alaska. An aunt 



144 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

resides at Portland, where the body probably will be taken 
for burial, although no funeral arrangements have been an- 
nounced. 

{Associated Press) 
Portland, Ore., May 30. — Lieut E. S. Wisdom, killed today 
in an airplane accident at San Diego, Calif., was born and 
reared in Portland and was a graduate of Oregon Agricul- 
tural College. He was twenty-four years old. His father, 
the late M. D. Wisdom, was prominently known as a pub- 
lisher of farming periodicals. 

434. Preston Wisdom, son of (400) M. D., was 
born in Portland, Oregon. 

401. Wesley Monroe Wisdom, son of (239) 
Thomas Barnes, was born in Missouri, in 1856, and 
crossed the plains with his parents when a very small 
child. He was married twice; his first wife was Miss 
Frances Brown, daughter of Hon. A. H. Brown, ex- 
State Treasurer of Oregon. They were married in 
Baker City, Oregon, in 1881, and had two children: 

435. Herbert Brown. 

436. Hazel Roberta. 

W. M.'s second wife was Mrs. Ida Ackerman. They 
were married in New York City, and were the parents of 
two children: 

437. (deceased). 

438. Roberta. 

W. M. was for many years engaged in the drug busi- 
ness in Portland, Oregon, where he and his brother 
(400) M. D. Wisdom, owned one of the finest drug 
stores on the Pacific Coast. W. M. was the original 
manufacturer of "Wisdom's Robertine," which is so popu- 
lar to-day as a face preparation. It is now manufactured 
by the Blumeir-Frank Drug Co., Portland, Oregon. W. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 145 

M. was one of the best chemists in the Northwest and 
manufactured many toilet articles, among which was 
"Wisdom's Velvet Cream." 

402. Sarah Catharine Wisdom, daughter of (239) 
Thomas Barnes, was born in Randolph County, Missouri. 
She married George M. Carson, at Fern Ridge, Lane 
County, Oregon, May, 1869. They were the parents of 
the following children: 

425. Fred M. 

426. Carlie (deceased). 

427. Maude Frances (deceased). 

428. Nora. 

429. Claud. 

Fred M. is married and has two children; he lives 
in Boise, Idaho. Maude Frances married Dr. 
Gullette, at Portland, Oregon, in 1900. He was 
a Government army physician and was detailed 
to go to China, his wife accompanying him. 
About a year later they returned to Portland 
where Maude died. She was laid to rest in the 
Lone Fir Cemetery. Nora and Claud are both 
single and reside in Boise, Idaho. 

435. Herbert Brown Wisdom, son of (401) Wesley 
Monroe and Frances, was born in Baker, Oregon. He 
married Miss Blanche Cleland, of Portland, Oregon, 
December 31, 1907. He is now employed by the Mit- 
chell, Lewis & Staver Co., of Portland, and has been with 
this firm for a number of years. One child, a girl, has 
come to bless their home: 



439. 



436. Hazel Roberta Wisdom, daughter of (401) 
Wesley Monroe and Frances, was born in Baker, Oregon. 
She is single and lives in Portland with her mother. 



146 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

438. Roberta Wisdom, daughter of (401) Wesley 
Monroe and Ida, was born in New York City. 

403. Jefferson Davis Wisdom, son of (239) 
Thomas Barnes, was born September, 1864, in Baker 
County, Oregon. He is a man of executive ability and 
was at one time chief bookkeeper of the First National 
Bank of Baker, Oregon. Later he was elected City 
Treasurer of Baker. 

Seeing a bright future for Greenhorn, Oregon, a little 
mining town situated on the summit of the Greenhorn 
Mountains, he moved there and opened a general mer- 
chandise store, which venture was so successful that later 
on he opened a drug store, also a butcher shop. He has 
been Justice of the Peace of that precinct since 1902. 
Wherever he is, J. D. always wins the confidence and 
esteem of his fellow men. J. D. is married and they have 
two children: 



440. 
441. 



'^Blessed are the zveak, for they shall inherit the earth." 
"The blessings of the Lord; it maketh rich and addeth no 
sorroiu ivith it." 

240. Moses Smith Wisdom, son of (231) Thomas 
and Lurana, was born in Kentucky, in the year 18 16. 
He moved to Trenton, Missouri, where he lived the 
major part of his life. For a number of years he was 
engaged in the bakery and confectionery business. His 
eminent success is due to his own initiative, persistently 
and intelligently applied. These efforts have always been 
pushed with due regard for the rights of others and with 
the most thorough honor and uprightness of dealing, 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 147 

hence, it is not surprising that he should have attained 
both financial success and the universal esteem of all. 

He was twice married, the first time in 1835 to Miss 
Zilpha Dodson, of Randolph County, Missouri. She 
was born March 27, 181 5, and died August 12, 1844. 
His second wife was Rebecca . 

Moses Smith was the parent of the following children: 

442. Sally Anne. 

443. Lucy Jane. 

444. William Thomas. 

445. Lucinda Frances. 

446. John Siegel. 

447. Daniel Moses. 

448. Ella Belle. 

449. Joe Anna. 

450. George Benton. 

451. Minnie Rebecca. 

442. Sally Anne Wisdom, daughter of (240) 
Moses Smith and Zilpha, was born in Randolph County, 
Missouri, August 9, 1838. She was married to J. C. 
Wilson, December 24, 1857. He was born in Tazewell 
County, Virginia, April 12, 1 83 1. Mr. Wilson is a 
prosperous farmer and lives eight miles northwest of 
Trenton, Missouri. They had the following children, all 
of whom were born in Grundy County, Missouri: 

452. Lou Emma, born March 7, i860. 

453. William Thomas, born February 16, 1863. 

454. Lora Frances, born February 2, 1866. 

455. Mattie May, born September 17, 1868. 

456. Edley Campbell, born January 24, 1871. 

457. Augustus, born May 4, 1875 (deceased). 

458. Walter K., born September 4, 1876 (de- 

ceased). 

459. Lydia Graves, born April 25, 1879. 

443. Lucy Jane Wisdom, daughter of (240) Moses 
Smith and Zilpha, was born in Randolph County, Mis- 



148 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

souri, December 14, 1838, and died November 21, 1896, 
at Trenton, Missouri. She married William H. Mc- 
Grath, December 25, i860. He was an attorney- at-law 
and was very successful. Their only child, a son, is: 

460. George Thomas, who was born in Vancouver, 

Washington, September 26, 1861. Since 
graduating from the Trenton High School 
he has followed the mercantile line of busi- 
ness. He married Miss Rose E. Hembree, 
of Baker City, Oregon, January 27, 1897, 
at Kansas City, Missouri, and they now live 
in Trenton, Missouri. 

444. William Thomas Wisdom, son of (240) 
Moses Smith and Zilpha, was born in Missouri, May 23, 
1 841. He married Miss Fannie Carter, of Trenton, 
Missouri, December 24, 1862. She died December 15, 
1 87 1. This was his first wife, by whom he had the fol- 
lowing children: 

461. Nora B. 

462. Carrie. 

463. William P. 

The following clipping from a Trenton paper shows 
the esteem in which Fannie Carter Wisdom was held: 

''LOVED BUT DEPARTED 

"Death should come 

Gently to one of gentle mold like thee, 
As light ivinds ivondering through groves of bloom, 

Detach the delicate blossoms from the tree. 
Close thy siueet eyes calmly, and ivithout pain, 

And nve ivill trust in God, to see thee yet again." 

"Death has visited us and laid his icy hand on one of our 
best and most beloved citizens in the person of Mrs. Fannie 
E. Wisdom, wife of W. T. Wisdom, of Trenton, who died 
Friday evening, December 15, 1871, of typhoid fever, after a 
short illness. Of her early history, we know but little further 
than that those who knew her best loved her most. She was a 



Francis Torrence Wisdoin Branch 149 

kind neighbor, an affectionate mother and wife and a Christian 
lady. Nothing more can be said in her praise. Her funeral 
was attended by a large number of citizens, and her remains 
deposited in the Odd Fellows Cemetery. The grief-stricken 
husband and children have the tearful sympathy of the entire 
community." 

'^O death ivhere is thy sting? 
O grave ivhere is thy victory?" 

William Thomas Wisdom took an active part in the 
Civil War, having been a soldier in the Union Army. 
He enlisted in Company B, Tvv^enty-third Missouri Vol- 
unteers, and was wounded in the battle of Shiloh at Pitts- 
burgh Landing, Tennessee, April 6, 1862, his left leg 
being shattered by a cannon ball. 

Excluding the time he served in the war, he has re- 
sided at Trenton, Missouri, since 1854. He was Revenue 
Collector and has held other offices of trust. He was 
engaged in the mercantile business for a number of years, 
and is a self-made man, very conservative, and has always 
taken an active part in public afiairs. His judgment and 
business sagacity are rarely at fault in private undertak- 
ings or public enterprises. He is a man of impressive 
presence and to a certain reserve and dignity of manner 
were united social qualities and generous impulses, which 
creates the warmest friendship. He retired from business 
and is now enjoying the fruits of his industry. 

His second wife was Mary A. Swayzee. They were 
married August 6, 1872. Five children were born to 
them: 

464. Frank. 

465. Hugh. 

466. Albert, born October 21, 1880; died Decem- 

ber 3, 1888. 

467. Fannie Edna. 

468. Thomas B. 



150 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

461. Nora B. Wisdom, daughter of (444) William 
Thomas and Fannie, was born in Trenton, Missouri, 
May 19, 1864. She married a Trenton capitalist, 
Nathan Shanklin. They had three children: 

469. Anna, born June 30, 1886, died June 3, 1902. 

470. Nathan, born March 8, 1888. 

471. Helen, born July 29, 1893. 

AVhen only sixteen years if age, Nora B. gained high 
honors at the New England Conservatory of Music at 
Boston, Massachusetts, having won first place both in 
vocal and instrumental music. She died January 23, 
1902. 

The following is an extract from a Trenton paper: 

"FROM EARTH TO HEAVEN 

"Again it becomes our painful task to record the death of 
one most near and dear to the writer. At 12.20 Thursday 
morning the angel of death entered the home of Mrs. Nora 
Belle Shanklin and summoned her from earth to an eternal 
existence. 

"For several days it was evident that no hope of her re- 
covery was entertained. Nervous prostration, rheumatism, 
neuralgia and other troubles baffled the skill of the physician 
and the best of nursing. For many days she suffered intense 
agony, and since it was impossible to alleviate her suffering, 
death to her was a friendly visitor; but to her relatives was a 
trial hard to bear. 

"Nora B. Wisdom-Shanklin was born in Trenton, May 19, 
1864. Was the wife of N. Shanklin, and daughter of W. T. 
Wisdom, and was the mother of three children, all of whom 
survive her. Was one of the most faithful members of the 
Christian church and a devoted Christian. With a heart over- 
flowing with sympathy for those in distress and a love for 
her family, relatives and friends surpassing all ordinary affec- 
tion, she was regarded by all who knew her as the noblest and 
purest of women. To her death had no terrors, having the 
greatest faith in her Maker whom she devoutly worshiped. 
In the church and the Sunday School she was a zealous worker 
and faithful to every Christian duty. Funeral arrangements 
will be mentioned later." 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 151 

Only a few months after the death of Nora B. Wis- 
dom-Shanklin, occurred the death of her daughter, Anna, 
who was held in great esteem by her many friends. The 
following article appeared in a Trenton paper: 

"AN IMPRESSIVE FUNERAL 

"The funeral of Miss Anna Shanklin took place from the 
residence of her grandfather, W. T. Wisdom, at ten o'clock 
A. M., Monday, going to the Christian Church, where Rev. T. 
R. Corr, of the First Baptist Church, conducted a very im- 
pressive service. At the church was a very large attendance 
and the countenances of all wore an expression of sadness, 
indicative of how dear to all was the memory of the departed. 
Her former schoolmates of the Trenton schools, with whom 
she had been associated with for so many years, were largely 
in attendance, many of whom could not suppress emotions of 
grief that their gentle, loving friend was gone from them 
forever, so far as this world is concerned. 

"The Christian Church choir contributed the song service, 
which was appropriate and impressive. The floral contribu- 
tions were most elaborate, beautiful and fragrant, their per- 
fume filling the whole church. 

"The casket was a white embossed velvet, in which the re- 
mains reposed, her countenance wearing an expression of 
loveliness and peace. 

"Rev. Corr, in his discourse, referred to the life and char- 
acter as pure and spotless, and of the brilliancy of her talents, 
which at school and in the home circle were above the or- 
dinary. As an evidence of the mold of her mind, he read 
extracts from an essay she had written on 'Paul's Use of the 
Old Testament, in which were some beautiful passages, one 
of which was added to the many by her deceased mother, 
Mrs. Nora B. Shanklin, who died January 23, 1902, which is 
recorded in Gal. 3.29: 'And if ye be Christ's, then are ye Abra- 
ham's seed, and heirs according to the promise.' The verse. 
Rev. Corr remarked, would be his text, from which he would 
preach the discourse, which he did and brought out many 
beautiful thoughts. Why it was that the young should pass 
away when full of hope and promise was something he could 
not understand. Like the fruit trees that bloom, not every blos- 
som brought fruit, but their fragrance had perfumed the air 
and the bloom had been admired, enduring only for a brief 



152 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

season and then fell to the ground. Their mission had been 
performed. The deceased, who like the bloom that never 
matured had passed away, but the sweetness of her character 
and purity of heart and soul would ever be remembered as 
virtues worthy of imitation. 

"After the sermon Pallbearers Leon Steer, Charles Cook Jr., 
Wilford Fair, Harry Asher, Clyde Fleming and Ben Cumings 
bore the casket to the hearse, which was followed by a long 
line of carriages to the I. O. O. F. Cemetery, where in a vault 
of cement her remains were laid, near her departed mother." 

462. Carrie Wisdom, daughter of (444) William 
Thomas and Fannie, was born in Trenton, Missouri, 
June 3, 1868. She married Jason C. Eagle, of Trenton. 
She was an accomplished musician, both vocal and instru- 
mental, and bore a loving disposition and was popular in 
her community. Her death, which occurred only a few 
months after her marriage, was a great shock to her 
many friends. She died September 10, 1892. 

463. William P. Wisdom, son of (444) William 
Thomas and Fannie, was born in Trenton, Missouri, 
June 21, 1 87 1. He marired Miss Flora lola Henry, of 
Aurora, Illinois, February 18, 1899. She was born at 
Bonaparte, Iowa, December 12, 1875. 

William P. has been in the employ of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad for fifteen years, and is now a freight con- 
ductor on that line, running from Freeport to Chicago. 
His brother (464) Frank is a brakeman on the same 
line. William P. and Flora have two children: 

472. Carrie Alverda. 

473. Myron Lester. 

472. Carrie Alverda Wisdom, daughter of (463) 
William P. Wisdom, was born in Chicago, March i, 
1 900. : 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 153 

473. Myron Lester Wisdom, son of (463) William 
P. Wisdom, was born in Freeport, 111., July 24, 1902. 

464. Frank Wisdom, son of (444) William Thomas 
and Mary A., was born in Trenton, Missouri, August 2, 
1873. He is a brakeman on the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, and is on the same run as is his brother, (463) 
William, who is conductor. 

465. Hugh Wisdom, son of (444) William Thomas 
and Mary A., was born October 6, 1874, in Trenton, 
Missouri. He was married to Miss Martha Jane Rouch, 
of Chicago, October 21, 1896. She was born in Chicago, 
January 25, 1875. 

Hugh is a prominent physician of Chicago and has a 
very extensive practice. He is a son of sterling worth 
and executive ability. 

445. LuciNDA Frances Wisdom, daughter of (240) 
Moses Smith and Zilpha, was born April 30, 1844, in 
Randolph County, Missouri. She married H. F. Ben- 
son, of Grundy County, Missouri, March 19, 1865. 
The following children were born in Trenton, Missouri: 

474. Robert Carnes (contractor), born April 24, 

1866. 

475. Eva, born October 30, 1869. 

476. Ollie, born December 17, 1870; died Novem- 

ber 10, 1883. 

477. Ada, born October 9, 1873 ; died August 4, 

189?. 

478. Lucy Jane, born December 31, 1875. 

479. James Grant, born January 25, 1879. 

480. Oscar Lebo.) Twins, born Feb. 15, 1881; 

481. George. ) George died June 23, 1883. 

482. 

483. 



154 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

446. John Siegel Wisdom, son of (240) Moses 
Smith and Rebecca, was born in Trenton, Missouri, 
September 25, 1861. He married Miss Lucinda French. 
Four children were born as follows: 

484. Harry. 486. Josie. 

485. Nellie. 487. Cecil. 

447. Daniel Moses Wisdom, son of (240) Moses 
Smith and Rebecca, was born in Trenton, Missouri, 
August 12, 1863. , 

448. Ella Belle Wisdom, daughter of (240) Moses 
Smith and Rebecca, was born August 12, 1865. She 
married Sherman Rickett, a farmer. 

449. Joe Anna Wisdom, daughter of (240) Moses 
Smith and Rebecca, was born December 16, 1868, in 
Trenton, Missouri. She married John Brown, a tinner. 
Four children were born to them: 

488. Leo Kemp. 490. Minnie Cleo. 

489. Daisy. 491. Harold W. 

450. George Benton Wisdom, son of (240) Moses 
Smith and Rebecca, was born in Trenton, Missouri, 
June 15, 1871. 

451. Minnie Rebecca Wisdom, daughter of (240) 
Moses Smith and Rebecca, was born in Trenton, Mis- 
souri, July 30, 1875. 

467. Fannie Edna Wisdom, daughter of (444) Wil- 
liam Thomas and Mary A., was born in Trenton, Mis- 
souri, February 4, 1885. She lives in Trenton with her 
parents. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch I55 

241. Lucy Wisdom, daughter of (231) Thomas and 
Lurana, was born in Kentucky in the year 1806. She 
married John Wade, son of Pierce Wade, a noted 
Baptist minister, who was a native of Ohio and of Eng- 
lish ancestry. 

Pierce Wade was a son of the great Baptist evan- 
gelist, Ballinger Wade. He moved from Ohio to Ken- 
tucky in 1 810 and a few years later moved to Missouri. 
John Wade was born in 1799 and died in 1847. 

Lucy was the mother of the following children: 

492. Pierce. 

493. Thomas M. 

494. Elizabeth, who married John Sims, of Mell- 

ford, Barton County, Missouri. 

495. Nancy, who married Frank Steners, of Slater, 

Missouri. 

496. William J. 

497. James B. 

Thomas M. Wade married Miss Elizabeth J. 
Barry, in 1850. She was a daughter of William 
T. Barry and Mary Ann Barry. John W. 
Wade, State Engineer of Montana, is a son of 
Thomas M. and Elizabeth J. His home is in 
Helena, Montana. 

Lucy Wisdom Wade, after the death of her husband, 
remained a widow until death which occurred in her 
eighty-ninth year. She was a member of the Baptist 
Church and was a devout Christian. 

The earth may ring from shore to shore 

With echoes of a glorious name. 
But he, whose loss our tears deplore, 

Has left behind him more than fame. 

For God has marked each sorrowing day, 
And numbered every secret tear; 

And heaven's long age shall pay 

For all His children's suffering here. 



156 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

242. Sarah Wisdom, daughter of (231) Thomas 
and Lurana, was born in Kentucky, in 1807. She mar- 
ried Cornelius Short, a native of Virginia, in 1827. He 
was a successful farmer. Have record of one child: 

498. Nancy C. (Married Geo. W. Pullum, of 

Boone County, Missouri, in 1863.) 

243. Lydia Wisdom, daughter of (231) Thomas and 
Lurana, was born in Kentucky, in 18 10. She was mar- 
ried in 1833 to Edward Graves, of Tennessee. 

They were married in Boone County, Missouri, and 
had the following children: 

499. Nancy J. 

500. Pollard W. 

501. Lucy E. 

502. Sarah F. 

503. Lurana (deceased). 

504. James F. 

Nancy J. Graves married John P. Naylor and 
they had three children. Pollard W. married 
Miss Helen Cochran and they were the parents 
of seven children. Lucy E. married Eli Row- 
land. One son was born to them. Sarah F. 
married Dr. B. F. Davis. They had three chil- 
dren. 

Lydia Wisdom Graves was a faithful Christian woman 

and was active in the Baptist Church. She died in 1902, 

in her ninety-second year. 

To know, to esteem, to love, and then depart, 
Makes up life's tale, to many a feeling heart. 
None knew thee, but to love thee, 
None name thee, but to praise. 

232. Pollard Wisdom, son of (144) John and Mar- 
cilia, was born in Kentucky. He was a farmer and re- 
moved to Missouri at an early day. Unable to find out 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 157 

to whom he was married, but have records of the follow- 
ing children: 

505. John Lee. 508. Andrew Jackson. 

506. Thomas Wadham. 509. Pollard Tavner. 

507. James Brinsley. 510. Dew Francis. 

244. Nancy Wisdom, daughter of (231) Thomas 
and Lurana, was born in Kentucky, in 1812. She re- 
mained single and cared for her parents. Nancy died in 
advanced years at the home of her sister, (242) Mrs. 
Sarah Wisdom Short. Thomas Wisdom, their father, 
also died there. 

468. Thomas B. Wisdom, son of (444) William 
Thomas and Mary A., was born November 19, 1889, iri 
Trenton, Missouri. At last account he was still at home 
with his parents. 

505. John Lee Wisdom, son of (232) Pollard, was 
born in Tennessee, August 15, 1823. He married Miss 
Mary Susan Howard, a Tennessee girl, January 22, 
1852. They had the following children: 

511. C. P. 515. Napoleon B. 

512. L. C. 516. Mollie. 

513. W. T. 517. Minnie. 

514. Josephine. 

John Lee removed with his family from Missouri some 
time in the 70's, and settled on a piece of land on Willow 
Creek, situated in Baker County, Oregon, where he en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising. In a very few years 
he accumulated a small fortune. About this time there 
was a great gold excitement and living almost in the 
midst of a rich mineral belt, he at once set out to try his 
luck in the gold fields, endeavoring to add to his already 



158 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

large possession of this world's goods. This he did on 
several occasions in search of the precious metal. Al- 
ways returning in due time and seemingly in good spirits, 
the last time he left, however, he failed to return as 
expected and the family became alarmed. They at once 
instituted a search and after several days of vigorous 
hunting, were horrified to find his lifeless body at the 
bottom of a prospect hole, which was about fifteen feet 
deep. As there were no signs of foul play it is supposed 
that he had accidentally fallen in. Unable to get exact 
data of this occurrence, but it was in the 8o's. 

John Lee was ambitious and a good citizen. The 
widow and her two youngest sons still live on the farm. 

511. C. P. Wisdom, son of (505) John Lee, was born 
in Missouri, November 4, 1853. He left home and was 
last heard of in California. As his whereabouts are not 
known and the mother being anxious to receive some 
information concerning him, it would be greatly appreci- 
ated if any one being cognizant of the fact would inform 
her of the same. Address: Mrs. Mary S. Wisdom, 
Ironside, Oregon. 

512. L. C. Wisdom, son of (505) John Lee, was born 
in Missouri, November 4, 1855. He is a farmer and 
resides near Weiser, Idaho, and is well to do. L. C. is 
married and has several children. 

513. W. T. Wisdom, son of (505) John Lee, was 
born in Missouri, June 20, 1858. He was married to 
(unable to get name) and they had two daughters: 

518. Haidle R. Wisdom, born February 11, 1891. 

519. Hettie M. Wisdom, born July 18, 1893. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch I59 

514. Josephine Wisdom, daughter of (505) John 
Lee, was born in Missouri, March 9, i860. 

515. Napoleon B. Wisdom, son of (505) John Lee 
Wisdom, was born in Missouri, August 3, 1863. He 
lives with his mother at Ironside, Oregon. 

516. MoLLiE Wisdom, daughter of (505) John Lee, 
was born in the state of Missouri, April 8, 1865. She 
married a Mr. Devins, who was at one time County 
Assessor of Malheur County, Oregon. He served two 
terms, having been elected on the Democratic ticket. 
Later they moved to California where MoUie died. 

517. Minnie B. Wisdom, daughter of (505) John 
Lee, was born in Missouri, May 4, 1870. She is the 
youngest child, is married, but I have no record of her 
family. 

The following are descendants of (232) Pollard Wis- 
dom, son of (144) John and Marcilla: 

520. Charles E. Wisdom, Butler, Bates County, 

Missouri. 

521. William H. Wisdom, Longmont, Colorado. 

522. Frank Wisdom, Longmont, Colorado. 

523. Samuel Wisdom, Whitchuta Falls, Texas. 

524. William C. Wisdom, Bluffs, Scott County, 
Illinois. 

All of the following live in Winchester, Illinois. 
Have made repeated efforts to procure a more satisfac- 
tory record of the same, but have been unable to do so: 

525. Jeff J. Wisdom. 



i6o Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

526. Carl W. Wisdom. 

527. George W. Wisdom. 

528. Clifford Wisdom. 

529. Cloud Wisdom. 

530. William Wisdom. 

531. Earl Wisdom. 

532. Leonard Wisdom. 

533. Pearl S. Wisdom. 

534. Julia L. Wisdom. 

535. Addie B. Wisdom. 

536. Cora B. Wisdom. 
537- Josephine Wisdom. 

538. James J. Wisdom. 

539. Charles Wisdom. 

506. Thomas Wadham Wisdom, son of (232) Pol- 
lard, was born in Tennessee. He was a farmer and had 
a family but no records at hand to show when or to 
whom he was married. 

507. James Brinsley Wisdom, son of (232) Pol- 
lard, was born in Tennessee. Have no record of him 
other than that he was a farmer. 

508. Andrew Jackson Wisdom, son of (232) Pol- 
lard, was born in Tennessee. He was a farmer. 

509. Pollard Tavner Wisdom, son of (232) Pol- 
lard, was born in Tennessee. He was a farmer and was 
married. Have record of one son: 

540. Pollard. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch l6l 

540. Pollard Wisdom, son of (509) Pollard Tav- 
ner, was married and had a large family consisting of six 
boys and four girls: 

541. David Franklin. 544. Andrew. 

542. James. 545. Pollard, Jr. 

543. Thomas. 546. John. 

Do not know the given names of the daughters or 
where they live: 

547. Mrs. Vandiver. 

548. Mrs. Yeager. 

549. Mrs. Jones. 

550. Mrs. Cummins. 

541. David Franklin Wisdom, son of (540) Pol- 
lard Wisdom, was married in Missouri and died there a 
number of years later. He was the parent of the fol- 
lowing children: 

551. James F. 555. Mrs. Ryanhart. 

552. Thomas A. 556. Mrs. Claymore. 

553. Pollard L. 557. Mrs. Martin. 

554. John William. 

551. James F. Wisdom, son of (541) David Frank- 
lin, lived in Garvin, Texas, and died in that city. 

552. Thomas A. Wisdom, son of (541) David 
Franklin, lives at Marysville, California. Have no 
further record of him. 

553. Pollard L. Wisdom, son of (541) David 
Franklin, is a farmer and lives at Marysville, California. 

554. John William Wisdom, son of (541) David 
Franklin, lives at Blair, Oklahoma. Do not know what 
his business is. 



1 62 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

558. Polk Wisdom, grandson of (541) David 
Franklin Wisdom. I have been unable to get records 
of him. He lives in St. Joe, Texas. 

542. James Wisdom, son of (540) Pollard, lived 
somewhere in Missouri and died in that state. 

543. Thomas Wisdom, son of (540) Pollard, lived 
in Missouri and died there. 

544. Andrew Wisdom, son of (540) Pollard, lived 
in Dallas, Texas. He was killed and robbed by a negro 
in that city. He had one son: 

559. Jack. 

559. Jack Wisdom, son of (544) Andrew, lives at 
Pottsville, Texas. No further record of him. 

545. Pollard Wisdom, Jr.^ son of (540) Pollard, 
lived in Texas and died in that state. I think it was 
Austin. 

546. John Wisdom, son of (540) Pollard, at one 
time lived in Texas but the last time he was heard of he 
was somewhere in Montana. 

510. Dew Francis Wisdom, son of (232) Pollard, 
was born in Tennessee. He was a prosperous farmer 
and had large tracts of land from which he raised cotton 
and tobacco. 

He was the parent of the following children: 

560. Pollard C. 562. James. 

561. Thomas A. 563. John. 

560. Pollard C. Wisdom, son of (510) Dew Francis 
Wisdom, lives in California. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 163 

561. Thomas A. Wisdom, son of (510) Dew 
Francis Wisdom, lives in California. 

562. James Wisdom, son of (510) Dew Francis 
Wisdom, lives in Texas. 

563. John Wisdom, son of (510) Dew Francis Wis- 
dom, lives in Texas. 

233. John Wisdom, Jr., son of (144) John and 
Marcilla, was born in Virginia and emigrated to Ten- 
nessee, where he settled in McNairy County, in the early 
days of that state. He was a cotton dealer and owned 
much land. Have account of one son: 

564. Ambrose B. 

564. Ambrose B. Wisdom, son of (233) John Wis- 
dom, Jr., was born in Tennessee. He emigrated to Mis- 
souri and settled in Polk County, in 1830. He was a 
farmer and trader; was a very shrewd man and by his 
skill and integrity accumulated a fortune. He had the 
following children: 

565. J. M. 

566. Jesse W. 

567. A. J. 

568. A. B. 

569. Mattie. 

570. . Girl. Have been unable to get Tier 

name. Married S. S. Reynolds, a carpen- 
ter. They were married about twenty years 
ago in Texas and moved to Portland, Ore- 
gon, soon after. Have been unable to get 
any further trace of them. 

565. J. M. Wisdom^ son of (564) Ambrose B., was 
born in Polk County, Missouri, December 15, 1844. He 



164 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

married Miss Lizzie Royalty, of Pike County, Missouri, 
November 24, 1868. The following children were born 
to this union: 

571. Chas. A. 

572. Walter S. 

573. Alice M. 

J. M. is an optician, wtiich profession he followed tor 
a number of years. Retiring from his profession he pur- 
chased a fruit farm in Washington County, Arkansas, 
near Brentwood, which is his post office address. 

In 1 86 1 he enlisted from Missouri in the Confederate 
Army and served through the Civil War. In 1892 he 
was elected Register of Deeds in Washita County, Okla- 
homa, on the Democratic ticket. He was reelected and 
served a second term in that capacity. 

J. M. now lives on his fruit farm in Arkansas, where 
he takes a lively interest in the affairs of his county and 
of the state, in both of which, during his lifetime, he has 
witnessed with glowing interest the constantly increasing 
development which in a short time has placed Arkansas 
in the van of the glorious sisterhood of states. Although 
having nearly reached the biblical three score years and 
ten, he is hale and strong of body and mind. He has 
been a man of strictest business methods. He has a fine 
residence on his large fruit farm, where he and his be- 
loved wife, who for more than a quarter of a century 
has been his partner in sorrows and joys, are spending 
their declining years in peace and comfort, enjoying the 
honor and respect of a wide circle of friends. 

571. Chas. A. Wisdom, son of (565) J. M. and 
Lizzie, was born July 5, 1872. He is a farmer and 
well to do. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 165 

572. Walter S. Wisdom, son of (565) J. M. and 
Lizzie, was born May 25, 1876. He is in the barber 
business. 

573. Alice M. Wisdom, daughter of (565) J. M. 
and Lizzie, was born April 17, 1882. She is single and 
lives with her parents near Brentwood, Arkansas. 

566. Jesse W. Wisdom, son of (564) Ambrose B., 
was born July 21, 1853, in Barry County, Missouri. 
He is proprietor of a hotel at Elk City, Oklahoma. 

567. A. J. Wisdom, son of (564) Ambrose B., was 
born in 1855. He is a successful farmer of Lone Wolf, 
Oklahoma. 

568. A. B. Wisdom, son of (564) Ambrose B., was 
born March, 1864. He lives in Victoria, Texas, where 
he owns a fine farm. 

569. Mattie Wisdom, daughter of (564) Ambrose 
B., and the youngest child, married C. B. Carpenter, a 
hardware merchant of Lipton, Missouri. 

The following are descendants of (233) John Wis- 
dom, Jr., but I have been unable to get satisfactory ac- 
counts of their lineage: 

574. G. Wisdom, 6435 Yale, Chicago, Illinois. 

575. Thomas B. Wisdom, 6439 Yale, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

576. F. M. Wisdom, St. John, New Brunswick, 
Canada. He was a Grand Master Mason. 

577. William Wisdom^ eye specialist, Chicago, 111. 



l66 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

578. Jack Wisdom, Greely, Reynolds County, Mis- 
souri. 

579. W. M. Wisdom, born in Tennessee and now 
lives at Hope, Arkansas, where he is superintendent of 
the oil wells. 

580. Thomas Wisdom, farmer and stock raiser, lives 
somewhere in Utah. 

581. Thomas Wisdom, school teacher, lives in Idaho. 

582. E. L. Wisdom, born about 1821. A lawyer, 
when last heard of lived in Illinois. 

583. John W. Wisdom, Macon, Missouri. 

584. George W. Wisdom, Macon, Missouri. 

585. Thomas Wisdom, Wisdom's Store, Georgia. 

586. William Wisdom, Popular Bluff, Missouri. 

234. Francis Wisdom, son of (144) John and Mar- 
cilia, was born in Kentucky. Frank, as he was usually 
called, moved from Kentucky to Tennessee in the early 
days, probably about 1827. He was a prosperous farmer, 
was married and had the following children: 

587. George. Have no record of him. 

588. Sargeant. Have no record of him. 

589. Harrison Henry. 

590. Andrew Jackson. 

591. Cas. 

592. Joseph. 

593. Golston M. 

589. Harrison Henry Wisdom, son of (234) 
Francis, was born in Cumberland County, Kentucky, in 
18 13. He moved to Pine County, Missouri, in 1835, 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 167 

where he married Miss Virginia A. Turner. Nine chil- 
dren were born of this union — six girls and three boys; 
unable to get records of girls. However, only three girls 
are living. Harrison Henry was a prosperous farmer 
and a large slave holder. He died January 7, 1902. 
Have account of one boy: 
594. Martin Van. 

594. Martin Van Wisdom, son of (589) Harrison 
Henry, was born in Missouri, in the 40's. At the out- 
break of the Civil War he enlisted in the Confederate 
Army and served till its close. He was wounded during 
the battle at Carthage. The bullet lodged in his ankle 
and remained in the marrow of the bone for seven years, 
during which time he suffered great agony. It finally 
became necessary to have the limb amputated. No longer 
being able to follow agricultural persuits his attention 
was turned to official work. He later served two terms 
as Assessor of Pike County, Missouri. 

Martin Van was married to Miss Annie M. Ogden, 
a native of Virginia. They were the parents of three 
boys: 

595. Carroll T. 597. Henry A. 

596. Charles H. 

The widowed mother is justly proud of her "boys." 
She speaks of her late husband in the very highest terms, 
referring to him as: "The best man who ever lived." 
We can bespeak for the widowed wife that all through 
their married life she was a loving and dutiful partner; 
a pure Christian character, who made an ideal mother. 

595. Carroll T. Wisdom, son of (594) Martin Van 
Wisdom, was born in Missouri. He married Miss 



1 68 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

Emma Lee Rogers, of Wellsvflle, Missouri, in 1895^ 
She is a niece of ex-Governor Ross, of Texas. Her 
great-grandfather was the guardian of Nancy Hanks, 
Abraham Lincoln's mother. Carroll T. is engaged in 
the livery and feed business, and deals largely in horses 
and mules. On May 26, 1906, he was elected Circuit 
Clerk of Pike County, Missouri, which office he still 
holds. He was elected on the Democratic ticket. It is 
to such young men of intelligence and morality that Mis- 
souri must look to for her future welfare; who shall 
assist her in retaining the proud position which the older 
generation of noble men and women have secured for 
her, enabling her to plant her streaming banners in the 
foremost ranks of her sister states. 

Carroll T. has shown the deepest interest in the 
''Genealogy of the Wisdom Family," and has on several 
occasions been of the greatest assistance to the compiler. 
He now lives in Bowling Green, Missouri. 

596. Charles H. Wisdom, son of (594) Martin 
Van, was born in Pike County, Missouri. He is a man 
of marked ability and is cashier of the railroad at Pecan 
Gap, Texas. 

597. Henry A. Wisdom, son of (594) Martin Van, 
was born in Pike County, Missouri. He married Miss 
Maude E. McNally, in 1905. They have a baby girl 
whom they call "Van," named for her grandfather Mar- 
tin Van Wisdom. Harry A. is engaged in the mercantile 
business in Girard, Illinois, where he is prominent in 
business circles. 

598. *'Van." 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 169 

590. Andrew Jackson Wisdom, son of (234) 
Francis, was born in Tennessee. He emigrated to Mis- 
souri in the early days, where he followed farming pur- 
suits. He had four sons, two of whom I have an ac- 
count : 

599. J. N. 601. 

600. Frank. 602. 



599. J. N. Wisdom, son of (590) Andrew Jackson, 
was born in Missouri. He had five sons, as follows: 

603. Richard Monroe. 606. Emery. 

604. William J. 607. Jeptha. 

605. Marion W. 

603. Richard Monroe Wisdom, son of (599) J. N. 
Wisdom, is a painter and lives in Assotin, Washington. 

604. William J. Wisdom, son of (599) J. N. Wis- 
dom, is a carpenter and lives at 1323 N. Garrison 
Street, St. Louis, Missouri. 

605. Marion W. Wisdom, son of (599) J. N. Wis- 
dom, is a locomotive fireman and lives at 2331 South 
Twelfth Street, St. Louis, Missouri. 

606. Emery Wisdom, son of (599) J. N. Wisdom, 
is a locomotive fireman and lives at 141 8 Hickory Street, 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

607. Jeptha Wisdom, son of (599) J. N. Wisdom, 
is a locomotive fireman and lives in Piedmont, Missouri. 

600. Frank Wisdom, son of (590) Andrew Jack- 
son, was born in Missouri. He lives in DeSoto, Mis- 
souri, where he is a clerk in a hardware store. 



I 70 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

591. Cas Wisdom, son of (234) Francis, was born 
in Virginia and moved to Missouri in an early day. He 
died in Huntsville, Missouri, in 1853. Have account of 
the following children: 

608. William L. 

609. Thomas C. 

610. Mary Susan. 

608. William L. Wisdom, son of (591) Cas, was 
born in Virginia and moved to Missouri with his par- 
ents. He died November 6, 1906. Have account of 
one son : 

611. Thomas E. 

611. Thomas E. Wisdom, son of (608) William L., 

was born June 14, 1867. He was married February 28, 

1889, and has four children, two boys and two girls, the 

names of whom I am unable to give. 

6iia. 611C. 

6iib. 6iid. 



Thomas E. is a prosperous business man of Macon, 
Missouri, where he is a prominent figure in political 
affairs. He is a Democrat and says: "All Wisdoms who 
are Democrats are relatives." 

The following is an extract from a Macon newspaper: 

"The real estate firm of Wisdom & Sandusky has done much 
toward advertising land values of this country. They are a 
hustling enterprising firm and are well acquainted with real 
estate values. 

"Thomas E. Wisdom was for four years Recorder of Macon 
County and familiarized himself with the prices of farm lands 
and real estate values. He took particular pains to notice the 
advancement along these lines and decided after his term of 
office expired that there was good money in the real estate 
business. 



Francis Torrcncc Wisdom Branch 171 

"Mr. Oscar Sandusky was Treasurer of Macon County for 
four years and formed a wide acquaintance over the country 
which enables him to handle all kinds of wants in the real 
estate business. 

"We are quite sure that there is no firm in Macon who sells 
more real estate than does Wisdom & Sandusky. In connec- 
tion with their real estate business they have a number of old 
line insurance companies and make a specialty of insurance, 
looking after their clients in a businesslike way. Most in- 
vestors insist upon knowing with whom they are dealing and 
sellers must feel sure they have their property in responsible 
hands. In this connection the Times-Democrat takes pleasure 
in calling its readers attention to the firm of Wisdom & San- 
dusky, who have thousands of acres of land in this and other 
counties, always using their best endeavor to satisfy both 
buyer and seller." 

609. Thomas C. Wisdom^ son of (591) Cas Wis- 
dom, was born in Virginia and moved with his parents 
to Missouri. He died in the year 1898. 

610. Mary Susan Wisdom, daughter of (591) Cas 
Wisdom, married a man by the name of Bagby, and 
now resides at 2753A Lafayette Avenue, St. Louis, 
Missouri. She is the only living child of Cas Wisdom. 

592. Joseph Wisdom, son of (234) Francis, was a 
well-to-do farmer of Knox County, Tennessee. Have 
records of two sons: 

612. Frank M. 

613. N. B. 

612. Frank M. Wisdom, son of (592) Joseph Wis- 
dom, was born in Knox County, Tennessee, in 1829. 
He now lives at Boscobel, Wisconsin, where he is a 
wealthy farmer and stock raiser. 

613. N. B. Wisdom, son of (592) Joseph Wisdom, 
was born and raised in Piatt County, Missouri. He 



172 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

crossed the plains in 1846 and settled on the Waldo 
Hills, in Marion County, Oregon, where he resided un- 
til his death, which occurred about the year 1892. He 
had the following children: 

614. Joseph G. 

615. James T. 

616. William S. 

617. Mrs. E. J. Wisdom-Mills. 

618. Minnie R. Wisdom-Gould. 

619. A. J. 

614. Joseph G. Wisdom, son of (613) N. B. Wis- 
dom, is a farmer of Florence, Lane County, Oregon. 

615. James T. Wisdom, son of (613) N. B. Wis- 
dom, is a farmer of Lostine, Wallowa County, Oregon. 

616. William S. Wisdom, son of (613) N. B. Wis- 
dom, is a farmer of Goff, Idaho County, Idaho. 

617. Mrs. E. J. Wisdom-Mills, daughter of (613) 
N. B. Wisdom, lives in Centralia, Washington. Do not 
know what her husband's business is nor if they have 
any children. 

618. Minnie Wisdom, daughter of (613) N. B. 
Wisdom, married a man by the name of Gould and they 
live in Weston, Oregon. 

619. A. J. Wisdom, son of (613) N. B. Wisdom, 
lives in Elgin, Oregon. I don't know to whom he was 
married, but have account of the following children: 

620. James W. 624. Napoleon B. 

621. Lucretia A. 625. John C. 

622. Robert E. L. 626. Etta V. E. 

623. Frederick S. 



Francis Torrence Wisdom Branch 1 73 

593. GoLSTON M. Wisdom, son of (234) Francis, 
was born in Tennessee. Do not know to whom he was 
married, but have account of five children, as follows: 

627. J- H. 

628. W. L. 

629. Thomas G. 

630. Mrs. May Wisdom-Trower. 

631. Mrs. Lizzie Wisdom-Morgan. 

627. J. H. Wisdom, son of (593) Golston M. Wis- 
dom, was born in Missouri. He now lives in Curryville, 
Missouri, where he is engaged in agricultural pursuits 
He has a family consisting of the following: 

632. Vernie B. 

633. Cash T. 

634. Sarah M. 

635. Mirtie V. 

636. Eva D. 



174 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

FAMILY RECORD 

BIRTHS 



Family Record — Francis Branch 175 

FAMILY RECORD 

MARRIAGES 



176 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

FAMILY RECORD 

DEATHS 




Id engraving from the American Agriculturist 



CROSSING THE PLAINS IN THE EARLY DAYS 

It was difficult for the artist to portray old scenes of this kind without the 
aid of a competent critic ; there were no photographs at that time, and such 
illustrations were usually based upon fragmentary and imperfect descriptions. 
To be true to life, the drawing should have been made to show the other side 
of the team and w^agon, with the outrider on the left (or "near") side of the 
wheel horse. Nevertheless, this is a fair contemporary illustration of a covered 
wagon loaded in the rear with a large box, trunk and rocking chair, similar 
to what was taken along by many emigrants. Even the cows were impressed 
as pack animals to help carry part of the household goods ; and brass knobs 
were sometimes affixed to the tips of their horns to prevent injury to persons 
or animals. Cows were usually preferred to steers for long overland trips 
because their milk was almost a necessity on the way, particularly with chil- 
dren in the party ; and in emergency they could be killed for beef 



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CROSSING THE PLAINS IN THE 
EARLY DAYS 

"Crossing the Plains." The young generation of this 
age cannot conceive the meaning of that phrase. And I 
will say that there are but few of the older generation left 
who appreciate it. It meant untold trials, misery, hard- 
ships, tortures, sickness, and even death accompanied a 
"train" when they started on this perilous journey to an 
unknown land. If the Indians did not attack you, or you 
were not molested by wild animals, you were in danger of 
bands of "Prairie Thieves." Should an epidemic of 
fever start it was sure to claim many of the little band, 
and it was no easy matter to bury a loved one on the 
desolate plains and know that you would never see 
even the grave again. You were so far from all civiliza- 
tion. Only the solemn winds of the great prairie to 
mourn after the ones you had felt so near and dear to 
you. Every "train" that crossed the plains in those days 
experienced these same hardships. I crossed with my 
parents. 

I was a mere lad twelve years of age, and, of course, 
too young to remember very much about the details 
of that long and perilous journey, which lasted six 
months. For that reason I am unable to give a more 
descriptive account of the incidents that happened. One 
experience, however, comes to me very vividly. We 
encountered a great desert, and it took our "train," con- 
sisting of one hundred wagons, about three days and a 
part of that many nights to cross it. Of course there was 
no water to be found during that time. Fortunately 
everyone who had a wagon was prepared to haul 

176c 




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Drawing by Margaret Landers Sanford 



GENERAL VIEW OF AN EMIGRANT 

Our train consisted of 100 wagons and 150 n 
ferent kinds of vehicles, drawn by horses, mul 
of the "ambulance" type, guarded by a i 
Then follows the characteristic type of 
master or "captain" of the train. The compan 
Gess, left Missouri, April 10, 1863, and 



from one to two barrels of water — the barrels being 
lashed to the side of the wagon-bed. All the water we 
could possibly carry was not enough to last through that 
terrible three days. We suffered and our animals too. 
There was scarcely enough water for drinking and cook- 
ing purposes, and still we had to share with the poor 
dumb creatures, and could hardly spare enough to wet 
the tongues of those suffering animals more than about 
twice during that three days. We would travel as long 
as there was light enough to see our way and then hault 
for the balance of the night. Hours seemed as days. It 
seemed as though we never would get off that desolate 
place. Not a spear of grass, nothing green save for 
the w^ild cactus, which grows in such a wilderness. The 
last night that we camped on this lonely desert, father 

I76d 




)UTE TO THE OREGON COUNTRY 

The long line was usually made up of dif- 
by cows. In the lead was a 4-horse wagon 
shown on the farther side of the team. 
"; and just behind it, the mounted wagon 
ership of G. W. Gess, son of Captain Wm. 
lounty, Oregon, October 25th of that year. 



made a bed for my brother James T. and me out in the 
open on the sands. 

I shall never forget the incident which occurred the 
next morning. Everybody arose at daybreak in an en- 
deavor to get an early start. My father came to awaken 
us and as he neared our bed his blood ran cold. Hear- 
ing a familiar noise that would startle any pioneer, he 
did not take time to call to us, but simply rushed up to 
where we lay and grabbing my brother with one hand 
and me with the other — all in the twinkling of an eye — 
he lifted us from the bed and sat us down several feet 
away from where we had been sleeping. 

We were frightened almost to death, not from the real 
danger that had been threatening -us, but from the way we 
had been handled, as we were not used to arising in that 



fashion. Father quickly threw the covers off the bed, and 
there, to our astonished gaze, lay coiled up a huge rattle 
snake which measured three feet in length and had nine 
buttons (rattles) on it. 

The night being a cold one, the snake had evidently 
crawled into our bed while we were asleep. That we 
escaped injury is a miracle, and is probably due to the 
fact that being so tired, and once asleep we never moved. 
The reptile never lived to sleep with anyone else, as father 
lost no time in putting it to death. To this day when I 
think of crossing the desert, especially that particular 
morning, it makes the cold chills run over me. 

Our train was soon moving onward. Captain Gess 
had started ahead of us on horseback, at the dawn of 
day, in search of water. Our animals were perishing 
with thirst. With only a little stale water in the barrels, 
and that was hot, we proceeded slowly across that deso- 
late sands. Every one was tired and discouraged. The 
sun was scorching hot. We watched a cloud of dust in 
the distance with utmost interest, for we did not know 
what it might be. Some of the women were frightened 
for fear it was the Indians. Our hearts were soon 
lightened, however, for it was the return of Captain 
Gess, bearing the good message that he had found water, 
and plenty of it, not more than five or six miles away. 
How glad every one was. He also said there was a 
world of feed for our starving stock and an abundance 
of wood for camping purposes. Such great rejoicing. 
I will never forget it. Women cried, children clapped 
their hands with joy. The whole train was thrown into 
a wild confusion. A new danger was at hand. We were 
facing a serious problem — how to prevent the stock from 
stampeding. When within about three miles of the 
water the animals could smell it and, of course, being 
nearly dead for a good cool drink they were almost 

I76f 



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wild. Every man was pressed into service to prevent an 
outbreak. The situation grew worse and worse ; it be- 
came necessary to have the aid of the women and children 
who were able to help, before a stampede was checked. 
Had our animals once gained control, death and destruc- 
tion would have been inevitable. The strategy and gen- 
eralship of Captain George William Gess no doubt 
averted a terrible disaster. 

At the time of our trip, there was no accurate way to 
ascertain either intermediate or cumulative distances; and 
with the still faraway Oregon country in mind, members 
of our company paid little attention to distances, and not 
much even to the calendar. 

Evidences of the hardships, misfortunes and general 
demoralization that had nearly overwhelmed a large part 
of the migration became painfully visible. Death of 
stock, breakdown of wagons, families who had lost the 
father and often the mother, or even both, all combined 
in necessity to lessen the loads. Wagons were cut down 
to carts, oxen and cows were yoked together, and not un- 
usual was the sight of an ox and a horse, both so poor 
they could hardly put one foot before the other, fastened 
together and drawing a load that could almost have been 
transported in a wheelbarrow. 

In the valleys of the Malheur, Burnt and Powder 
rivers we found excellent feed for our horses, but the 
crossing over of high hills or mountains between the 
streams made it very hard on the animals and everyone 
else, as all who could possibly do so walked uphill and 
down as well. 

We had at last reached our new home — Oregon — we 
settled at Pocahontas, and father immediately started to 
build a log house. 



1 76h 



(5) 
Abner Wisdom, Jr. 

Branch 




BNER WISDOM, Jr., son of (i) Abner 
Wisdom, was born in England and as far 
as any records show he remained in that 
country. It is known that he was a mili- 
tary man, but it is not known of what rank. 
Have record of two boys: 

637. Robert J. 

638. Pollard Brinsley. 

637. Robert J. Wisdom, son of (5) Abner, Jr., was 
born in England. He was a colonel in the British army, 
and some time during the year of 1816 he was called 
away to duty and was never heard of after that. He 
left an infant son: 

639. William. 

639. William Wisdom, son of (637) Robert J., 
was born at Tottenham Court Road, Long Acre, Lon- 
don, England, November 14, 18 14. He married Misr. 
Mary Warren, daughter of Phillip Warren, of London, 
England. She was born at Houndsditch, a suburb o( 
London, April 12, 1809. They were married Octobei 
18, 1834, 2,nd were the parents of six sons and four 
daughters (all were born in America). Have the fol- 
lowing names at hand: 

640. William James. 645. Mrs. Turner. 

641. Henry E. 646. 

642. Phillip. 647. 

643. Kate. 648. 

644. Edward. 649. 

William and Mary came from England to America in 
1840. They settled in Royalston, Ohio, and lived there 
about two years, when they moved to Ohio City, Ohio. 
In 1849 they moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where they 



l8o Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

resided till 1859. They then moved to Brooklyn, N. Y., 
where they lived until the death of William, v^hich oc- 
curred on the fourteenth day of December, 1883. His 
wife, Mary, died March 19, 1893. 

William Wisdom was employed by the Baeder & 
Adamson Co., glue manufacturers, as salesman. His 
ability to sell goods made him a working partner. About 
1870 he severed his connections with this firm to open a 
place in New York City, representing the Peter Cooper 
glue factory. In 1874 he opened another branch in 
Chicago, as their Western agent, placing his son Edward 
in charge. In 1876 he closed the New York office on 
account of ill health, and sent his son, Phillip, who was 
connected with the New York office, to the Chicago 
branch. 

In his early life the subject of this sketch was a hard 
worker, being obliged to support his mother and gain 
what education he could. All of his spare time he would 
keep close to his studies. He was considered a very 
bright man by all who knew him, and was popular with 
his business associates and oftentimes his friends would 
come to him for advice on important matters. His word 
was considered as good as his bond. 

He was one of the best glue salesmen in this country 
and had the ability to make friends wherever he went, 
never losing the confidence of any. He was a man of 
good moral habits, and loved his family, doing every- 
thing he could for their comforts. W. J. Wisdom, of 
Chicago, says: "On my visits to New York I would 
meet several of his friends, and it makes me feel proud 
to hear how highly he is spoken of." 



Abner Wisdom, Jr., Branch l8l 

William Wisdom was buried in the family plot in 
Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York. 

640. William James Wisdom, son of (639) Wil- 
liam and Mary, enlisted in the Federal army during the 
Civil War and gave his life while fighting for his 
country. 

641. Henry E. Wisdom, son of (639) William and 
Mary, like his brother, William James, enlisted in the 
Federal army during the Civil War and sacrificed his 
life for his country. 

642. Phillip Wisdom, son of (639) William and 
Mary, lives at Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Have no further 
record of him, except that at one time he was a member 
of the firm of Wisdom & Co., of Chicago. 

643. Kate Wisdom, daughter of (639) William and 
Mary, married a man by the name of Washington, and 
they live at 59 South Elliott Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
No record of any children. 

644. Edward Wisdom, son of (639) William and 
Mary, was born at Royalton, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 
February 14, 1841. He was married August 15, 1862, 
to Miss Emma Agusta Whitney, who was born in New 
York City in 1864. Four sons and one daughter were 
born to this union: 

650. William James. 653. Katherine Agusta. 

651. Henry Edward. 654. George Abner. 

652. Edward, Jr. 

In 1859 Edward, then in his eighteenth year, went to 
New York City, where he was employed by a large 



1 82 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

carpet concern. He stayed there till 1864, when he was 
engaged by the Baeder & Adamson Co., glue manufac- 
turers, with offices in New York City and factory in 
Philadelphia. In 1867 Baeder & Adamson Co. opened 
a branch office in Chicago, placing Edward in charge of 
the sales department. This was seven years previous to 
the time that his father, William Wisdom, opened a 
Chicago branch for the Peter Cooper glue factory. Ed- 
ward's ability to sell goods made him a reputation that 
was similar to that of his father. He made friends 
wherever he went and enjoyed the confidence of all. W. 
J. Wisdom, son of Edward, and member of the firm of 
Wisdom & Co., says: "We are still selling to trade who 
gave my father their first orders nearly forty years ago." 

Edward Wisdom in 1874 severed his connections with 
the Baeder & Adamson Co. to take charge of the branch 
office opened up by his father as Western agents for the 
Peter Cooper glue factory. New York. His reputation 
as a glue salesman, combined with the confidence the 
trade had in him, enabled him to build up a large busi- 
ness in a short time. On the death of his father, which 
occurred in 1883, Edward and his brother Phillip suc- 
ceeded as partners. In 1889 Phillip withdrew from the 
firm, selling his interest to his brother. This transaction 
making Edward sole owner of the business. 

In 1904 Edward formed a partnership with his two 
eldest sons, William and Henry, giving to each a one- 
third interest. Several years ago, on account of ill health, 
he retired, placing the business in charge of the two sons, 
under whose efficient management the business has con- 
tinued a success, enjoying the same confidence with the 
trade that their father and grandfather experienced. 



Abner Wisdom^ Jr., Branch 183 

Edward Wisdom was taken seriously ill in 1904 and 
was confined to his home until death relieved his suffer- 
ings. He was a member of the Second Baptist Church 
in good standing. He also held membership in the fol- 
lowing fraternities: Royal Arcanum, Royal League, 
National Union, North American Union, and Federal 
Mystic Circle. 

He was a man of excellent moral habits, and loved 
his family and home above all earthly things. He be- 
lieved in making his sons his companions and was always 
ready to enter in anything that was a pleasure to them. 
He was never known to be cross to any member of his 
family, and would correct any misdoings by kind words. 
His mind was always free from taint, thinking of the 
purest. He was a forgiving man, and had a heart to do 
good whenever in his power. Many times he had taken 
care of his sick neighbors, as he was as good in nursing 
as the best. He was never known to say an unkind word 
of any one, and was always ready to give help and advice. 
He was of broad ideas, capable of conversing on any 
subject. His standing in the commercial world was of 
the highest. Many counted him as one of the best busi- 
ness men of the country. He did not believe in notoriety^ 
being satisfied to live a plain life. 

Edward Wisdom died August 16, 1907, and was 
buried in the family lot at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago. 

The following is an extract from a letter the compiler 
received from W . J. Wisdom, son of the late Edward 
JVisdom: 

"Since father's death, my time has been well occupied in 
taking care of all of his affairs. He died August 16, 1907, 
at 6.15 in the morning, after a lingering sickness for the past 



184 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

three years. No one knows how he suffered, and as much as 
it broke my heart to see him go, at the same time it was a 
blessing to him. He has often said that when the time came 
for him to go, he hoped he would not have to suffer a long 
lingering sickness. It was very hard for us to give him up. 
He was a man of the few. He lived a year and a half be- 
yond his time, so the doctors tell us. The cause of his death 
was arterio sclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. He was 
a man that was respected by all who knew him. He was 
never known to say an unkind word of any one. Nor did 
he ever refuse to give help to those who asked him. He 
loved his family, and many times in the years past he would 
deprive himself of many things for their sake. He always 
believed in associating most of his time with his boys, and to 
advise them in the right way. He detested gambling and 
drinking, and I am proud to say that none of us ever had the 
desire to do either. His family of boys grew up as men 
should, with that great love for their parents to be ever ready 
to do for them when required. He told many of his friends 
that he was proud of his boys, and that they never gave him 
cause to worry. He was like the beam of sunshine at all 
times in his home, and at the office. He was very forgiving 
to those who had wronged him. He had all the good qualities 
that a man should have, and it makes us all proud to think we 
had such a good father, and it will be our aim to follow his 
footsteps. During all his sickness we did everything that 
could be done, sparing no expense whatever. All we thought 
of was to get him well and make him as comfortable as pos- 
sible. After his death we selected one of the best locations in 
Rosehill and placed his casket in a three-inch stone box thor- 
oughly sealed, and had his grave decorated with flowers he 
loved so much. We have placed an order for a fine monu- 
ment, and have deposited enough money to perpetuate the care 
of the lot for all time to come, in respect to him whom we 
loved so much." 

650. William James Wisdom, son of (644) Ed- 
ward and Emma Agusta, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
May 28, 1863. He was married June 24, 1887, to Miss 
Minnie E. Forsman. They had only one child: 

655. Edward Forsman, born October 9, 1888, and 
died in December of the same year. 



Abner Wisdom j Jr., Branch 185 

William James attended the public schools until he 
was fifteen years of age, when he was employed by A. T. 
Stewart & Co., a large wholesale dry goods house, as 
stock clerk. After serving them for two years he entered 
the employment of Robbins & Appleton, Western agents 
for the American Watch Co., of Waltham, Mass. Com- 
mencing as bill clerk he worked his way up to head 
bookkeeper. He left this company to accept a position 
with Wisdom & Co., of Chicago. Here he was em- 
ployed as salesman and has been very successful, continu- 
ing to sell to a large number of customers who they now 
have on their books. He has been connected with Wis- 
dom & Co. for more than twenty years, is well known to 
glue consumers and enjoys the same confidence and good 
will of those who know him, as did his father, grand- 
father and great-grandfather. 

Like the great majority of Wisdoms, he is a Baptist, 
being a member of the Second Baptist Church of Chicago. 

William James is a worthy member of the Masonic 
Order, S. B. R. S., 32nd Degree Consistory Scottish 
Rite, Valley of Chicago — there were two hundred and 
twelve in his class, each class electing a president, secre- 
tary and orator; W. J. was honored by being elected 
secretary. At that meeting Lord Euston and his entire 
suite, including Canada, were present; also the Grand 
Master of Knight Templars of the United States. In 
the procession twelve members of the St. Bernard Com- 
mandery had the honor as escort, W. J. being in the front 
rank. They were all members of the Shrine Medinah. 
He also belongs to Siloam Lodge, No. 780, A. F. & A. 
M.; Jackson Park Chapter, No. 222, R. A. M.; Wood- 
land Council U. D. R. & S. M.; St. Bernard Com- 



1 86 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

mandery K. T., No. 35 ; Madina Temple, A. A. O. N. 
M. S.; Royal League; National Union, and Fraternal 
Mystic Circle. 

At the death of his father, Edward Wisdom, William 
James was placed at the head of the firm of Wisdom & 
Co., with his brother, Henry E., as partner. 

William James Wisdom's biography would be an ex- 
cellent lesson for self-supporting young men to study as 
exemplifying the force of persistent industry intelligently 
applied, coupled with upright dealing and courteous 
manners, which qualities have secured for him not only 
financial success but also the favorable regard of his 
fellow men. Thus is the good name of a worthy family 
perpetuated by a descendant whose every act is governed 
by the highest principles, and cordial personality has 
grappled to him, by hooks of steel, a host of admiring 
friends. 

651. Henry Edward Wisdom, son of (644) Edward 
and Emma Agusta, was born in Montreal, Canada, 
July 21, 1865. He was educated in the public schools of 
Chicago and entered the employ of Robbins & Appleton,. 
Western agents for the Waltham Watch Co., of Walt- 
ham, Mass., as bill clerk. He was then sixteen years of 
age. After serving them faithfully for six years he 
severed his connections to accept a position as book- 
keeper for his father (Wisdom & Co., Chicago). In 
1904 he was taken in as partner with a third interest, 
and now he is assistant manager and has full charge of 
the books as well. 

Henry Edward is a member of the Royal League, and 
for many years has attended the Second Baptist Church 



Abner Wisdom, Jr., Branch 187 

of Chicago. He is single and is a young man of exem- 
plary habits and enjoys the confidence and respect of all 
who know him. 

652. Edward Wisdom, Jr., son of (644) Edward 
and Emma Agusta, was born in Chicago, March 13, 
1870. He married Miss Katharine G. Owens, October 
12, 1893. They have one son: 

656. Edward Stanley. 

Edward Wisdom, Jr., is a member of the Hyde Park 
Baptist Church, and is active in church duties. At the 
age of eighteen years he entered the employ of the 
Phoenix Insurance Co., of Brooklyn, N. Y., as office 
clerk. Attending strictly to his duties, he was promoted 
to higher positions until he was appointed assistant 
cashier, which position he now holds. He has a large 
circle of friends and is highly respected. 

656. Edward Stanley Wisdom, son of (652) Ed- 
ward, Jr., and Katharine, was born May 12, 1900. He 
lives in Brooklyn, N. Y., with his parents. 

653. Katherine Agusta Wisdom, only daughter of 
(644) Edward and Emma Agusta. No record of her at 
hand. 

654. George Abner Wisdom, son of (644) Edward 
and Emma Agusta, was born in Chicago, December 8, 
1877. He was married to Miss Marion A. Harris, 
February 3, 1906. They have one son: 

657. Henry Edward (named after his uncle 651.) 

George Abner was educated in the public schools of 
Chicago. At the age of eighteen he started to work for 



1 88 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

his father as shipping clerk. He is now one of their best 
salesmen. He is of good habits and popular among his 
friends. He is blessed with musical qualities, being an 
accomplished violinist. 

657. Henry Edward Wisdom, son of (654) George 
Abner and Marion, was born in Chicago, April 8, 1907. 

645. Mrs. George Turner, daughter of (639) 
William and Mary Wisdom, died a few years ago. Mr. 
Turner lives at 348 Quincy Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Do not know of any children. 

638. Pollard Brinsley Wisdom, son of (5) Abner, 
Jr., was born in England. Have no authentic record of 
him, but he is said to have been an instructor in a mili- 
tary school in England. He had a family of several 
children, but I have been unable to get records of them. 

658. George Arthur Wisdom, grandson of (5) 
Abner, Jr., was born in Sussex, England, January 8, 
1798. He was married at Brighton Old Church De- 
cember 24, 1 82 1, to Miss Catherine Muzzle. 

George Arthur was a carpenter and contractor. He 
emigrated with his family to Australia on the "Bucking- 
hamshire" and arrived at Adelaide, South Australia, 
March 22, 1839, where he located and followed his 
occupation as carpenter and contractor till death sum- 
moned him in the year 1 870. He was one of the sturdy 
pioneers of the antipodes, and helped to pave the way to 
what is now a thriving country. 



Abner Wisdom j Jr., Branch 189 

He and his beloved wife were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: 

659. George Thomas (born October 14, 1822; died 

October 15, 1833). 

660. Catherine Woodward (born September 25, 

1823; died December 3, 1828). 

661. Elizabeth. 

662. John Nicholas. 

663. Stephen Lusted. 

664. Thomas Henry. 

665. Alfred (born August 3, 183S; died April 4, 

1839). 

666. Mary Lusted. 
66^. Rose. 

(659) George Thomas, and (660) Catherine Wood- 
ward Wisdom were born in Sussex and died there. 
(665) Alfred was born in Sussex and died in South 
Australia soon after arrival. 

661. Elizabeth Wisdom, daughter of (658) George 
Arthur and Catherine, was born in Sussex, England, 
November 15, 1826. She emigrated with her parents 
to Australia, where she married Samuel Lazar, a promi- 
nent theatrical manager of that country. They were 
the parents of the following children: 

668. Kate; married F. Golding, proprietor of 

Birkenhead Hotel at Port Adelaide, S. A. 

669. Jack; unmarried and lives in Queensland, 

Australia. 

670. Julia; married a Mr. Hubert, hotel man of 

Adelaide, South Australia. 

671. Mrs. Fulton, Land of Promise Hotel, 

Hindmarsh, Adelaide, South Australia. 

Elizabeth died in Adelaide, April, 1910. 

662. John Nicholas Wisdom, son of (658) George 
Arthur and Catherine, was born in Sussex, England, 



1 90 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

March 6, 1830, and emigrated to Australia with his 
parents in 1839. He married Miss Sophia Sellicks, of 
Sellicks Hill, South Australia. They had the following 
children: 

672. Frederick, unmarried, died in South Aus- 

tralia in 1879. 

673. John. 

674. Sophia. 

(673) John and (674) Sophia have not been heard 
of for years. 

John Nicholas Wisdom was a contractor. He was 
a well-known character among sportsmen, having been 
a noted field and trap shot. He and his brothers (663) 
Stephen and (664) Thomas were the champions of 
South Australia, one winning and then the other. John 
Nicholas Wisdom won in 1875 from his brother Thomas. 
The boys were popular and had a host of friends. 

John Nicholas Wisdom died August 6, 1901, in 
Adelaide, South Australia. 

663. Stephen Lusted Wisdom, son of (658) 
George Arthur and Catherine, was born in Sussex, Eng- 
land, December 29, 1832, and went to Australia with 
his parents when only seven years of age. On Decem- 
ber 20, 1854, he was married at Geelory, Victoria, Aus- 
tralia. He was a carpenter. Like his brothers he en- 
joyed rifle shooting, his main sport being pigeon shoot- 
ing. He was a great shot and won his first match at the 
age of fifteen years. In 187 1 he won the championship 
of South Australia. In 1901, when he was sixty-nine 
years old, he again won the championship. This was 
thirty years after he won the first contest, and was a 
remarkable feat for a man of his years to accomplish, 



Abner Wisdom, Jr., Branch 191 

for he won against some of the best shots In his country. 
He died at Moonta, South Australia, December 24, 
1904. He had the following children: 

675. George Moulder. 

676. Stephen. 

677. Ellen Catherine. 

678. Mary. 

679. Elizabeth. 

680. Thomas (born February 25, 1864; died 

April, 1865). 

681. John. 

682. Alfred (born January 3, 1868; died October, 

1868). 

683. Rose (born May 12, 1871; died May 31, 

1875). 

Ellen Wisdom, widow of Stephen Lusted Wisdom, 
still lives in Adelaide, at 143 Wright Street, in a house 
built about 1840 by Wisdoms and has never been occu- 
pied by any one but Wisdoms. She is a very congenial 
old lady and is proud of the name — ^Wisdom. My son 
(421) Lacy and his wife had the pleasure of visiting 
her in 1912 and spoke in the highest terms of her and 
her hospitality. 

675. George Moulder Wisdom, son of (663) 
Stephen Lusted, was born in South Australia, Septem- 
ber 17, 1855. 

He was a boilermaker by trade and was connected with 
the government work of South Australia. He gradu- 
ally advanced himself till he became Superintendent of 
Construction and finally Government Inspector of Bridges 
and Jetties (ironwork). He was an expert in his line 
and was very accurate in specifications as to the amount 
of iron, paint, etc., and general cost of erecting bridges. 
He built many of the largest bridges in South Aus- 



192 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

tralia, as well as the viaduct, water tower, and Cape 
DeCondie and Wonga Shoal lighthouses. At the time 
of his death he was supervising the construction of 
Point Hughes Jetty. He went home to lunch and ex- 
pired of heart failure. His work necessitated his living 
away from home a great deal. He died February 19, 
1912. 

He was greatly interested in military affairs and was a 
member of the South Australia military forces for 
twenty-six years. He was the proud possessor of the 
King's Long Service Medal, which was sent from Eng- 
land when he resigned. He was compelled to resign 
owing to his work taking him into the country. He 
retired as warrant officer. He was a splendid shot and 
has won many medals, cups and valuable trophies in 
military matches. At his death he left a widow and ten 
children, seven of whom are married. They are as 
follows : 

684. Ethel Rose. 

685. William. 

686. Mabel Catherine. 

687. Ellen (died January, 1863, aged 4 months). 

688. Elsie Lillian. 

689. Elizabeth Elder. 

690. Adelaide. 

691. Fred. 

692. Leonard. 

693. Harold (died May 15, 1909; aged 15 years). 

694. Marjory. 

695. Frank Howard. 

684. Ethel Rose Wisdom, daughter of (675) 
George Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1878. 
She married a Mr. Hall. 



Abner Wisdom^ Jr.j Branch 193 

685. William Wisdom, son of (675) George 
Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1879. He is 
a fitter and turner in the Government employ. He is a 
popular young man and prominent in sporting circles. 

686. Mabel Catherine Wisdom, daughter of (675) 
George Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1882. 
She married a Mr. Coad. 

688. Elsie Lillian Wisdom, daughter of (675) 
George Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1885. 
She married a man by the name of Halden. 

689. Elizabeth Elder Wisdom, daughter of (675) 
George Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1886, 
and married a Mr. Henley. 

690. Adelaide Wisdom, daughter of (675) George 
Moulder, was born in South Australia. She married a 
Mr. Hales. 

691. Fred Wisdom, son of (675) George Moulder, 
was born in South Australia in 1889. He is wharf 
manager at the cutter harbor, Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. He is a good cricket player and quite popular. 

692. Leonard Wisdom, son of (675) George 
Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1891. He is 
a carpenter and joiner. Leonard holds four medals for 
the best football player in the association. He is quite 
an athlete and has a host of friends. 

694. Marjory Wisdom, daughter of (675) George 
Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1896. She is 
single and lives at home with her mother. 



194 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

695. Frank Howard Wisdom, son of (675) George 
Moulder, was born in South Australia in 1898. He is 
a progressive young man, and enjoys a wide acquaint- 
ance, and is very popular. He is a clerk in the Colonial 
Sugar Refinery. His address is Wills Street, Largs 
Bay, Adelaide, South Australia. 

676. Stephen Wisdom, son of (663) Stephen Lus- 
ted, was born in South Australia April 17, 1857. He 
married a Miss Campbell. He was a carpenter and fol- 
lowed his profession until August i, 1906, when he was 
called by death to the great unknown. His widow is 
proprietress of a hotel in South Australia. Do not 
know whether he had a family or not. 

677. Ellen Catherine Wisdom, daughter of (663) 

Steven Lusted, was born in South Australia August 27, 

1858. She married T. J. Qualthrough, December 28, 

1 88 1, and they had one daughter: 

696. Amy Effie, born October 18, 1882. She mar- 
ried Leonard J. Ewens, October 15, 1906. 
They live at "Isia," Marion Street, Unley,. 
Adelaide, South Australia. 

678. Mary Wisdom, daughter of (663) Stephen 
Lusted, was born in South Australia July 17, i860. 
She remained single and lives at home with her mother 
at 143 Wright Street, Adelaide, South Australia, in the 
house built by the Wisdoms over seventy years ago. 

679. Elizabeth Wisdom, daughter of (663) Ste- 
phen Lusted, was born in South Australia, April 19, 
1862. She married a Mr. Payne of Goodwood, South 
Australia. Elizabeth died December 14, 1889. Have 
no record of her family. 



Abner Wisdom, Jr., Branch 195 

681. John Wisdom, the only living son of (663) 
Stephen Lusted, was born in South Australia July 2, 
1866. He is a carpenter. Have no records at hand to 
shovi^ whether he was married or not. I presume he 
lives in Adelaide, South Australia. 

664. Thomas Henry Wisdom, son of (658) George 
Arthur and Catherine, was born in Sussex, England, 
May 6, 1835. He went to Australia with his parents 
when only a few years old, and was raised in South 
Australia, where he was a carpenter. He married Miss 
Rosanna Parkes and they had the following children: 

697. Thomas H. 701. Alfred. 

698. George. 702. Lizzie. 

699. Frederick. 703. Rose. 

700. Stephen Lester. 704. Anna. 

Thomas Henry Wisdom was a noted field and trap 
shot. He won the championship of South Australia in 
1870, 1872, 1873, 1874 and 1876. He was very fond 
of outdoor sports and at one time was a fast foot racer. 
About this time, *'Black" Montgomery, an aboriginal 
(native blackman of Australia), was considered the fast- 
est runner in the country. There were, however, some 
friends of Thomas Henry Wisdom who thought the 
blackman would be beaten if matched against the Ade- 
laide carpenter. A match was finally arranged and the 
two sprinters were to run one hundred and fifty yards 
on the Ballarat Oval. The first race was declared off 
on account of the crowds pushing onto the track; a race 
was then run between ropes and the carpenter won. 
The backers of the blackman wanted to arrange another 
match to be run in a month from that time. Wisdom's 
backers after conferring with their winner insisted on 



196 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

running right then and there and offered to back their 
man 750 pounds to 500 pounds ($3,750 to $2,500), but 
the backers of "Black" Montgomery could not see it 
that way and the carpenter was declared the champion. 
Thomas Henry Wisdom was a man of good habits 
and popular with his many friends and his death, which 
occurred in May, 1883, was a great loss to the com- 
munity in which he lived. 

697. Thomas H. Wisdom, son of (664) Thomas 
Henry and Rosanna, was born in Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia, about i860. He was married to Miss Mary 
Busteed, of Victoria, Australia, in 1887. They are the 
parents of the following children: 

705. Leila May. 709. Florence Marie. 

706. Muriel Linda. 710. Arthur Richard. 

707. Bessie Dorothea. 711. Nellie. 

708. Charles Shaw. 712. Elsie Winnie. 

All of the children were born at Brunswick, Mel- 
bourne, Victoria, Australia. All are single and live at 
home with their parents. 

Thomas Wisdom is a carpenter and lives at 12 Bank 
Street, Brunswick, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He 
is a man of ideal habits and commands the honor and 
respect of all who know him. My son (421) Lacy and 
his wife had the pleasure of meeting this congenial family 
while in Australia in 191 2, and say they were royally 
received and were made to feel perfectly at home. They 
were much impressed with the harmony that exists in 
such a large family and said: "'Uncle Tommy' has a 
family to be proud of." 



Abner Wisdom, Jr., Branch i(^'j 

The following extract is taken from a letter received 
from (697) Thomas H. Wisdom: 

"As far back as I can remember the Wisdoms have all been 
noted field and trap shots. In 1870 my father, Thomas Henry, 
won the championship of South Australia. In 1871 Stephen 
Wisdom, brother of Thomas Henry's won it. My father then 
won consecutively for three years (1872, 1873 and 1874). In 
1875 he was beaten by his brother John, but won again in 
1876. Stephen Wisdom, who had won way back in 1871, came 
out in 1901 and captured the championship. He was then an 
old buffer, and showed wonderful form against his younger 
antagonists. 

"Thomas Henry, my father, was also a noted runner. He 
beat the Australian aboriginal, "Black" Montgomery, in a 
race of 150 yards, which was run on the Ballarat Oval. 

"George Arthur Wisdom, my grandfather, was a great hand 
to play pranks and away back in the early sixties caused a 
big sensation by bringing home strapped to his horse a promi- 
nent parson of the neighborhood, who had imbibed too freely 
of the flowing bowl. The parson was too drunk to sit on the 
horse so grandfather strapped him lengthwise on the animal 
and took him home. The parson was an awful drunkard, but 
a great speaker and has often made me cry listening to him." 

705. Leila May Wisdom, daughter of (697) 
Thomas H. Wisdom, was born in Brunswick, Mel- 
bourne, Australia, in the year 1888. 

706. Muriel Linda Wisdom, daughter of (697) 
Thomas H. Wisdom, was born in Brunswick, Mel- 
bourne, Australia, June 27, 1890. 

707. Bessie Dorothea Wisdom, daughter of (697) 
Thomas H. Wisdom, was born July 28, 1892, in 
Brunswick, Melbourne, Australia. 

708. Charles Shaw Wisdom, son of (697) Thomas 
and Mary, is connected with the Membrey & Dean com- 
pany, real estate and financial agents, 17 Queen Street, 



198 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

Melbourne, Australia. He was born June 19, 1894, 
in Brunswick, Melbourne, Australia, and lives with his 
parents at 12 Bank Street in that city. Charles is a 
popular young fellow of excellent habits, progressive, 
and has hosts of friends. 

709. Florence Marie Wisdom, daughter of (697) 
Thomas H. Wisdom, was born April 19, 1896, in 
Brunswick, Melbourne, Australia. 

710. Arthur Richard Wisdom, son of (697) 
Thomas H. Wisdom, was born November 5, 1900, in 
Brunswick, Melbourne, Australia. 

711. Nellie Louise Wisdom, daughter of (697) 
Thomas H. Wisdom, was born November 11, 1902, in 
Brunswick, Melbourne, Australia. 

712. Elsie Winnie Wisdom, daughter of (697) 
Thomas H. Wisdom, was born December 30, 1904, in 
Brunswick, Melbourne, Australia. 

698. George Wisdom, son of (664) Thomas and 
Rosanna, was born in South Australia in 1865. He is 
a bootmaker. He married Miss Bessie Pollock, of Vic- 
toria, Australia, and they have the following children, 
all of whom were born in South Australia and all are 
single : 

713. Grace. 715. George, Jr. 

714. Lottie. 716. Jack. 

699. Frederick Wisdom, son of (664) Thomas and 
Rosanna, was born in Australia in 1868, and died in 
1889. He was a painter, was married and had one child: 

716a. 






Abner Wisdom , Jr., Branch 199 

700. Stephen Lester Wisdom, son of (664) 
Thomas and Rosanna, was born in Australia in 1870. 
He lives at Gippsland, Jumbunna, Victoria, Australia; 
married Miss Katheleen ; their children are: 

717. Claude. 718. Myrtle. 719. Alice Katheleen. 

701. Alfred Wisdom, son of (664) Thomas and 
Rosanna, was born in Australia in 1877. He lives at 
Waverly, Sydney, N. S. W., Australia. 

702. Lizzie Wisdom, daughter of (664) Thomas 
and Rosanna, was born in Australia about 1862. She 
married N. Vincent and they live at 133 Oxford Street, 
Bondi Junction, Sydney. They have five children: 

720. Arthur. 722. Vera. 723. Herbert. 

721. Sydney. 724. Norman. 

703. Rose Wisdom, daughter of (664) Thomas and 
Rosanna, was born in Australia in 1872. She rnarned 
Robert Threckled, of Victoria. The children are: 

725. Lilly. 726. Ruby. 727. Violet. 728. Robert. 

704. Anna Wisdom, daughter of (664) Thomas and 
Rosanna, born in Australia in 1874; married E. Fisher, 
of Outtrim, Victoria, Australia. The children are: 

729. Melva. 730. Harold. 

666. Mary Lusted Wisdom, daughter of (658) 
George Arthur and Catherine, was born at Adelaide, 
South Australia, July 2, 1840. She died June, 1907, at 
Sydney, Australia. No further record of her. 

667. Rose Wisdom, daughter of (658) George 
Arthur and Catherine, was born at Adelaide, South 
Australia. She married a Mr. Stevens and they lived 
in Sydney. They had three children that I know of: 

731. Kate. 732. Rose. 733. Fennette. 



200 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

FAMILY RECORD 

BIRTHS 



Family Record — Ahner, Jr., Branch 20l 

FAMILY RECORD 

MARRIAGES 



202 



Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 



FAMILY RECORD 

DEATHS 



f 



(6) 
Tavner Wisdom 

Branch 






i 




AVNER WISDOM, son of (i) Abner 
Wisdom, was born in England about 1720. 
He and his wife kept a seminary for girls 
near London, which is said to have been 
the finest in the county at that time. Tav- 

ner was a wealthy trader and owned considerable land. 

Have account of three of his sons, all of whom were 

born in England : 

734. Moses. 

735. Hezikiah. 

736. Oroclia. 

734. Moses Wisdom, son of (6) Tavner, was born 
in London, England. His two brothers, Hezikiah and 
Oroclia, were in the British army, and being stationed 
at Armagh, Ireland, induced Moses to go there. While 
there he married Miss Isabella Grant, a freeholder's 
daughter. Soon after their marriage they moved to 
Manchester, England. Eight children were born to 
them, five sons and three daughters: 

737. John. 

738. Samuel Napier. 

739. Grant. 

740. Moses. (Died in childhood.) 

741. David. (Died in childhood.) 
743. Isabella. 

743. Margaret. 

744. Mary Ann. (Died at the age of eighteen.) 

737. John Wisdom, son of (734) Moses, was born 
in Manchester, England. Have no record of him ex- 
cept that he resided in Manchester. 

738. Samuel Napier Wisdom, son of (734) Moses 
and Isabella, was born in Manchester, England. He 
married Miss Eliza Dickinson, of his home town; and 



2o6 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

was employed by the John Harding sewing thread mill, 
where he was foreman for many years. 

He emigrated to the United States about 185 1 and 
traveled westward, settling on a farm in the town of 
Douglas, Columbia County, Wisconsin, finally remov- 
ing to Portage, the county seat of Columbia County, 
where he went into business, and also served as a "City 
Father" for a number of years. He died at the home of 
his son (746) John Wisdom, Moose Lake, Minnesota, 
at the age of sixty-five years. He had six children: 

745. John (Died when one year aid). 

746. John. (Born after the death of 745.) 

747. Samuel. 

748. Anna. 

749. Isabella. 

750. William Henry. 

746. John Wisdom, son of (738) Samuel Napier 
and Eliza, was born in Manchester, England, about the 
year 1848. He came to the United States with his par- 
ents when about three years of age. They settled in 
Columbia County, Wisconsin. He is now engaged in 
the manufacturing business under the firm name of John 
Wisdom & Son, manufacturers of cottonwood and elm 
staves and lumber, of Sabula, Iowa. John Wisdom is a 
shrewd business man and has through perseverence and 
integrity established himself in the business world. He 
is the parent of two children: 

751. Samuel B. 752. Anna B. 

751. Samuel B. Wisdom, son of (746) John Wis- 
dom, is interested in the firm of John Wisdom & Son, 
manufacturers, of Sabula, Iowa. Have no personal ac- 
count of him. 



Tavner Wisdom Branch 207 

752. Anna B. Wisdom, daughter of (746) John 
Wisdom. Have no record of her. 

747. Samuel Wisdom, son of (738) Samuel Napier 
and Eliza. Regret to announce the absence of records 
of this man. 

748. Anna Wisdom, daughter of (738) Samuel 
Napier and Eliza. She married a Mr. Wm. Fidlin and 
now lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

749. Isabella Wisdom, daughter of (738) Samuel 
Napier and Eliza. She married a Mr. Kitridge and 
lives somevv^here in Wisconsin. 

750. William Henry Wisdom, son of (738) Samuel 
Napier and Eliza, is a well-to-do farmer near Spokane, 
Washington. Have record of one son: 

753. W. H. 

753- W. H. Wisdom, son of (750) William Henry, 
is a thriving young business man of Portland, Oregon, 
being located on East Twelfth Street, where he has a 
grocery store that enjoys a large patronage. He is mar- 
ried, but I have no details of his marriage. 

739. Grant Wisdom, son of (734) Moses and Isa- 
bella, was born in Manchester, England. Suppose he 
remained there, as I have no records to show that he ever 
came to America. 

742. Isabella Wisdom, daughter of (734) Moses 
and Isabella, was born in Manchester, England. She 
was married in her home town to Thomas Geddis. 



2o8 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

743. Margaret Wisdom, daughter of (734) Moses 
and Isabella, was born in Manchester, England, and 
married a Mr. Walker of that city. 

735. Hezikiah Wisdom, son of (6) Tavner, was 
born in London, England, about 1750. He and his 
brother, (736) Oroclia, were in the British army, be- 
ing stationed at Armagh, Ireland. 

(2) Brinsley Wisdom, brother of (6) Tavner and 
uncle of Hezikiah and Oroclia, met his two nephews in 
Ireland when he went there on an evangelistic mission, 
and it is possible that he induced Hezikiah to come to 
America, as he did come to this country after leaving the 
army. He settled in South Carolina and was heard 
from indirectly from time to time. 

He married Miss Lucy (name not known), who 

is probably Lucy born February 19, 1756, the mother 
of (754) William Henry Wisdom. They evidently 
moved to Nova Scotia, as Lucy died in Halifax, Febru- 
ary 19, 1854, on her ninety-eighth birthday. Don't 
know where Lucy was born, but she was in America at 
the time of the War of Independence, 1776. 

754. William Henry. 

736. Oroclia Wisdom, son of (6) Tavner, was born 
in London, England. He joined the British army and 
was stationed at Armagh, Irelandj with his brother 
(735) Hezikiah. After he left the army he settled on a 
farm in Tanderagee, Armagh County, Ireland, near 
border line of Downs County, about thirty miles south- 
west of Belfast. Have account of one son: 

755. William. 



Tavner Wisdom Branch 209 

755. William Wisdom, son of (736) Oroclia, was 
born at Tanderagee, Ireland. Little is known of him. 
He was a farmer and was married. Both he and his 
wife were of the Roman Catholic faith. Have account 
of one son: 

756. James. 

756. James Wisdom, son of (755) William, was 
born in Belfast, Ireland, in the year 1822. He was mar- 
ried twice. He married his first wife in England and 
they were the parents of four children, all of whom 
were born in England. They were: 

757. William E. 759. John. 

758. Jabez. 760. Susan. 

His first wife died in Northampton in 1866. After 
her death he married a Miss Sangster and she died in 
1890. 

Until 1858 James was a carrier. He afterward en- 
gaged in the wool and hide business. Although reared 
in the Roman Catholic faith and christened by a priest, 
he was converted to the Protestant faith in his early 
years and for nearly forty years was a local preacher in 
the Wesleyan Methodist Church. His home was in 
Brackley, Northampton, England. He died in 1905 at 
the ripe old age of eighty-three years. 

757. William E. Wisdom, son of (756) James, was 
born in Northampton, England. Shortly after graduat- 
ing from the London University he married Miss Carrie 
Harrison, and they had five children: 

761. Clara. 764. Ted. 

762. Mabel. 765. Alfred T. 

763. Winnie. 



2IO Genealogy of the Wisdo?n Family 

(763) Winnie and (764) Ted died in England in 
1886 from diphtheria. 

William E. founded the West Kent College, Wood- 
church, Kent, England, and was principal of that in- 
stitution for eight years. The death of his two children 
from diphtheria broke up his profession and in 1889 he 
came to the United States and settled in Chicago. Here 
he started the South Side Grammar School on Thirty- 
second and Praini Avenue. His wife was called by 
death in 1896. He married again and in 1899 he died. 
After his death his second wife took his children back 
to England. 

761. Clara Wisdom, daughter of (757) William E. 
Wisdom, was born in Woodchurch, Kent, England. 
She came to America with her parents in 1889, and 
after the death of her father was taken back to England 
by her step-mother. Later she married F. E. Milward 
and they reside at 35 Thames Street, Windsor, Beeks, 
England. 

762. Mabel Wisdom, daughter of (757) William 
E. Wisdom, was born in Woodchurch, Kent, England. 
She came to America with her parents and after the 
death of her father went back to England with her step- 
mother, and now lives at 56 High Street, Maldon, 
Essex, England. 

765. Alfred T. Wisdom, son of (757) William E. 
Wisdom, was born in Woodchurch, Kent, England. In 
1889 he came to the United States with his parents. He 
returned to England with his sisters and step-mother 
after the death of his father. He again returned to 



Tavner Wisdom Branch 21 1 

America in 1903 and has since then been all over the 
ivorld in connection with Y. M. C. A. work, in which 
he is proficient in managing the social privileges. He is 
a shrewd young fellow and makes a host of friends 
wherever he goes. My son (421) Lacy has met him in 
different parts of the world; the last time he saw him 
w^as in Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, "The Paradise of 
the Pacific." 

758. Jabez Wisdom, son of (756) James, was born 
in Northampton, England. He left England about the 
year 1885 and came to America, settling at Berlin, On- 
tario, Canada, where he now lives. Unable to get 
further record of him. 

759. John Wisdom, son of (756) James, was born 
in Northampton, England. He still lives in that coun- 
try, his address being 17 Olive Street, Northampton, 
England. Am sorry that I have no further record of 
this old gentleman, as I know from the letter I received 
irom him that he has been a grand man — a man of char- 
acter and influence; a Christian man. He is proud of 
the name and says that it is still uncommon. I would 
like to meet and talk with him for I am sure it would 
be most interesting. 

760. Susan Wisdom, daughter of (756) James, was 
born in Northampton, England. She is unmarried and 
lives at Leytonstone, England. 

754. William Henry Wisdom^ who no doubt was 
the son of (735) Hezikiah Wisdom, was born March 
12, 1797. He lived in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and was 



212 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

married May 15, 18 19, to Miss Mary S. Elliot, of that 
city. They were the parents of fifteen children, eight 
sons and seven daughters: 

766. Elizabeth Mary. 774. Abna. 

767. Louisa Lucy. 775. Charles Smith. 

768. Anna. 776. Herbert. 

769. William Henry, Jr. 777. Alonzo. 

770. Stephen Elliot. 777a. ) n,VH ?n 

771. Harriet Smith. 777b. [ . '/^ '" 

772. Alma Russell. 777c. ) ^^^^^^y- 

773. Olive. 

William Henry was a carpenter and contractor. His 
beloved wife, Mary S. died in Halifax, July 5, 1866, at 
the age of sixty-four years. In 1868 he accompanied his 
youngest son, Alonzo and family, to New Zealand. He 
died at Cobden, Greymouth, New Zealand, September 
17, 1883, at the age of eighty-six years. 

766. Elizabeth Mary Wisdom, daughter of (754) 
William Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, March 19, 1820. She was married September 3, 
1 84 1, to James C. Carter, a bookbinder. Have account 
of one son: 

778. Henry. 

Elizabeth Mary was ninety-one years old when this 
record Avas received and was living in South Boston, 
Massachusetts, with her son, Henry Carter. 

767. Louisa Lucy Wisdom, daughter of (754) 
William Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, September 8, 1821. She was married May 29, 
1845, to John William Carter, a tailor, brother of James 
Carter, who married (766) Elizabeth. 



Tavner Wisdom Branch 213 

768. Anna Wisdom, daughter of (754) William 
Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
August 4, 1823. She was married September 26, 1843, 
to Edward Stephens, who was a carpenter and contractor. 

769. William Henry Wisdom^ Jr., son of (754) 
William Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, May 23, 1825. When a young man he left 
Nova Scotia and cast his lot in the United States, finally 
settling in Florida, where he married Miss Frances B. 
Cozzens, July 28, 1851. Have account of three children: 

779. Ida. 780. Lizzie. 781. Charles. 

In 1876 William Henry went to Texas. He settled 
in Dallas in 1900 and lived there until his death, which 
occurred about 1913, at 1412 Blakeney Street. 

770. Stephen Elliot Wisdom, son of (754) Wil- 
liam Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
March 10, 1827. He moved to New Zealand and set- 
tled in Christchurch, where he still lived when this 
account was received. 

771. Harriet Smith Wisdom, daughter of (754) 
William Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, March 7, 1829. She was married November 16, 
1852, to William Muir, a sailmaker of Halifax. They 
had one daughter: 

782. Ethel. 

The following is an extract of a letter I received 
from (777) Alonzo Wisdom, of Cobden, Greymouth, 
New Zealand: 

"Ethel Muir, my sister Harriet's daughter, was a teacher 
in one of your colleges, and mentioned in writing to us about 



214 Ge?iealogy of the Wisdom Fajiiily 

fifteen years ago that in looking over some papers belonging 
to the college, it had been established by the Wisdoms. I do 
not remember the name of the college, but I know that she was 
at Holyoke (Mass.) College at one time. She is now teaching 
in some college in New York." 

772. Alma Russell Wisdom, daughter of (754) 
William Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, January 13, 1831. She was married March 3,. 
1859, to John Donald, brassfounder and gasfitter. 

773. Olive Wisdom, daughter of (754) William 
Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, No- 
vember 6, 1832. She was married October 18, 1866, to> 
John Case, of Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

774. Abna Wisdom, daughter of (754) William 
Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia,. 
August 18, 1834. 

775. Charles Smith Wisdom, son of (754) Wil- 
liam Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia,. 
July II, 1837. 

776. Herbert Wisdom, son of (754) William 
Henry Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, May 
20, 1839. 

777. Alonzo Wisdom, son of (754) William Henry 
Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, May 11,, 
1843. He worked at carpentering in Halifax till 1862. 
when he went to New York, where he lived for the next 
two years. Returning to Halifax he was married to^ 
Abigail Ann Ashmore, June 4, 1867. About a year 
later they left Halifax on the barkentine EinulouSj Capt. 
Cumminger, commander, for New Zealand. 



Tavner Wisdom Branch 215 

Alonzo's father, who was then seventy years old, ac- 
companied him on the long and perilous voyage to New 
Zealand and lived there sixteen 5^ears before death claimed 
him. Alonzo is the father of the following children: 

783. Florence May. 787. Jessie Edith. 

784. Alonzo, Jr. 788. Maude. 

785. Herbert. 789. Olive Eliza. 

786. Mary Ida. 790. Abigail Louisa. 

783. Florence May Wisdom, daughter of (777) 
Alonzo Wisdom, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
March, 1868. While an infant she was taken to New 
Zealand by her parents and was raised in that country. 
She died in Cobden, New Zealand, in 1901. 

784. Alonzo Wisdom, Jr., son of (777) Alonzo 
Wisdom, was born in Cobden, New Zealand. He was 
married to Miss Ida Sweetman, February 15, 1907, and 
they now live in Cobden, Greymouth, New Zealand. 

785. Herbert Wisdom, son of (777) Alonzo Wis- 
dom, was born in Cobden, New Zealand. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Jane Noble, November 26, 1901. They 
live in Cobden, Greymouth, New Zealand, and have the 
following children: 

791. Lincoln. 794. Florence Edith. 

792. Eric Ashmore. 795. Gladys Maude. 

793. Abigail May. 

786. Mary Ida Wisdom, daughter of (777) Alonzo 
Wisdom, was born in Cobden, New Zealand. She mar- 
ried a Mr. Olsen. 

787. Jessie Edith Wisdom, daughter of (777) Al- 
onzo Wisdom, was born in Cobden, New Zealand. She 
married a Mr. Malcolm. 



2l6 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

788. Maude Wisdom, daughter of (777) Alonzo 
Wisdom, was born In Cobden, New Zealand. She is 
single and lives with her parents. 

789. Olive Eliza Wisdom, daughter of (777) Al- 
onzo Wisdom, was born in Cobden, New Zealand. She 
is single and lives with her parents. 

790. Abigail Louisa Wisdom, daughter of (777) 
Alonzo Wisdom, was born in Cobden, New Zealand. 
She is single and lives with her parents. 

The follozuing, descendants of (6) Tavner Wisdom, 
are names I have been unable to get authentic records of, 
although I have made repeated efforts. Am sorry I can- 
not connect their lineage: 

796. Robert J. Wisdom, of Perth, West Australia, 
is a member of Parliament of the Commonwealth, and 
also a major in the Australian army. My son (421) 
Lacy, while in Perth, tried a number of times to see him 
and Robert tried equally hard to perfect a meeting, but 
it seemed that fate was against it. They never met. 

797. E. G. Wisdom, 569 Hornby Street, Vancouver, 
B. C, is a clerk in the Canadian-American Bank. 

798. G. F. Wisdom, Vancouver, B. C, Canada. G. 
F. is connected with the Vancouver Police Department. 

799. G. Wisdom, Vancouver, B. C, Canada. 

800. G. Wisdom, Victoria, B. C, Canada. 

801. Frank Wisdom, B. C, Canada. It is possible 
that Frank is a descendant of (5) Abner Wisdom. 

802. John Wisdom, of John Wisdom & Co., cricket 
outfitter, Cranbourne Street, London, W. C, England. 



Family Record — Tavner Branch 217 

FAMILY RECORD 

BIRTHS 



21 8 Genealogy of the Wisdom Family 

FAMILY RECORD 

MARRIAGES 



Family Record — Tavner Bratich 219 

FAMILY RECORD 

DEATHS 



INDEX 



PAGE 

A 

790 Abigail Louisa 216 

793 Abigail May 215 

774 Abna 214 

I Abner 19 

5 Abner, Jr 179 

8 Abner 23 

38 Abner James 27 

143 Abner 82 

568 A. B 165 

29 Abraham 26 

535 Addie B 160 

690 Adelaide 193 

296 Adolphus Burton 104 

65 A. G 58 

187 Agnes 93 

69 Agrippa G 64 

96 A. J 64 

567 A. J 165 

619 A. J 172 

701 Alfred 199 

765 Alfred T 210 

573 Alice M 165 

719 Alice Katheleen 199 

772 Alma Russell 214 

26 Alonzo Clark 26 

777 Alonzo 214 

784 Alonzo, Jr 215 

3^7 Alta 109 

564 Ambrose B 163 

229 Amelia 94 

— Andrew Thomas 31 

74 Andrew Jackson .... 58-70 

263 Andrew J 100 

508 Andrew Jackson 160 

544 Andrew 162 

590 Andrew Jackson 169 

85 Anna Margaret 61 

704 Anna 199 

748 Anna 207 

752 Anna B 207 

768 Anna 213 



PAGE 

31 Archie T 26 

710 Arthur Richard 198 

326 A. S 107 

97 Audrey 67 

B 

194 Belle 88 

91 Benjamin 63 

173 Benjamin 93 

181 Benjamin Henry 83-84 

195 Benjamin Henry 87 

707 Bessie Dorothea 197 

12 Bird 24 

312 Blanche 104 

2 Brinsley Mortimer .... 23 

21 Brinsley Bird 25 

237 Brinsley Benton 114 

C 

369 Callie Lowen 113 

526 Carl W 160 

595 Carol T 167 

360 Caroline E 113 

348 Carrie 109 

462 Carrie 152 

472 Carrie Alverda 152 

591 Cas 170 

633 Cash T 173 

95 C. C 64 

487 Cecil 154 

30 Charles 26 

83 Charles Andrew 61 

382 Charles R 119 

520 Charles E 159 

539 Charles 160 

571 Charles A 164 

596 Charles H 168 

708 Charles Shaw 197 

775 Charles Smith 214 

781 Charles 213 

361 Christopher C 113 

163 Clara 80 



221 



PAGE 

761 Ciara 210 

717 Claude 199 

377 Clayton 115 

528 Clifford 160 

529 Cloud 160 

536 Cora B 160 

511 C. P 158 

D 

328 Daisy 106 

372 Daisy Dean 114 

120 Dana 60 

447 Daniel Moses 154 

70 David 58 

541 David Franklin 161 

334 Dean 106 

308 Delia Portia 104 

154 Dew Moore 78 

510 Dew Francis 162 

150 Diana 82 

378 Doc 115 

184 Dorothy P 92 

177 Drucilla 94 

302 Duward M 103 

E 

531 Earl 160 

350 Earl no 

33 Edward B 26 

644 Edward 181 

652 Edward, Jr 187 

656 Edward Stanley 187 

797 E. G 216 

9 Elidge 23 

54 Elidge 29 

217 Eliza Johnston 90 

246 Eliza J 101 

371 Elizabeth Welburn .... 114 

661 Elizabeth 189 

679 Elizabeth 194 

689 Elizabeth Elder 193 

766 Elizabeth Mary 212 

35 Ella 26 

448 Ella Belle 154 

375 Ellen Ward 114 

677 Ellen Catherine 194 



PAGE 

295 Elmore U. G 104 

688 Elsie Lillian 193 

712 Elsie Winnie 198 

582 E. L 166 

606 Emery 169 

256 Emily E 98 

626 Etta V. E 172 

792 Eric Ashmore 215 

287 Ethel ICO 

684 Ethel Rose 192 

636 Eva D 173 

433 Everett Stanton 142 

F 

40 Fabyann 28 

201 Fannie Fern 87 

325 Fannie 106 

467 Fannie Edna i'54 

305 Fay M 103 

307 F. Dale 104 

390 Fielding Wilhoit 121 

306 Floy 104 

313 Florence 104 

709 Florence Marie 198 

783 Florence May 215 

794 Florence Edith 215 

4 Francis Torrence 77 

41 Francis Alexander ... 28 

42 Frances Delilah 29 

64 Francis <;7 

234 Francis 166 

261 Francis B 99 

286 Francis E 100 

314 Francis 104 

373 Francis Mitchell 114 

376 Francis May 114 

394 Frances Luranie 132 

412 Frances C 134 

422 Frances Margaret .... 138 

294 Frank M 102 

464 Frank iS3 

522 Frank 159 

600 Frank 169 

612 Frank M i7i 

695 Frank Howard 194 

801 Frank 216 



222 



PAGE 

67 F. M 57 

576 F. M 165 

691 Fred 195 

623 Frederick S 172 

699 Frederick 198 

672 Frederick 190 

G 

574 G i6<; 

799 G 216 

800 G 216 

388 Gabriel Turner 120 

3<5 Gail 109 

98 Gedney Jackson 67 

89 George Luther 62 

146 George Washington . . 81 

265 George W 101 

399 George W 137 

450 George Benton 154 

527 George W 160 

584 George W 166 

587 George 166 

654 George Abner 187 

658 George Arthur 188 

675 George Moulder 191 

698 George 198 

715 George, Jr 198 

798 G. F 216 

281 Gilbert L 99 

291 Gilbert Marion loi 

795 Gladys Maude 215 

417 Glen A 136 

299 Golda E 105 

593 Golston M 173 

713 Grace 198 

739 Grant 207 

346 Guy Wade 109 

H 

49 H. A 31 

518 Haidie R 158 

loi Hannah 67 

73 Hardon Payne 58 

315 Harold 104 

771 Harriet Smith 213 

589 Harrison Henry 166 

484 Harry 154 



PAGE 

32 Harvey L 26 

436 Hazel Roberta 145 

86 Helen Harvey 61 

25 Henry 26 

219 Henry Perclval 91 

248 Henry M 102 

597 Henry A 168 

641 Henry E 181 

651 Henry Edward 186 

657 Henry Edward 188 

435 Herbert Brown 145 

776 Herbert 214 

785 Herbert 215 

159 Hettie 81 

519 Hettie M 158 

735 Hezikiah 208 

465 Hugh 1^3 

I 

779 Ida 213 

148 Ignatius 82 

60 Irene 29 

742 Isabella 207 

749 Isabella 207 

333 Ivan 106 

J 

758 Jabez 211 

559 Jack 162 

578 Jack 166 

716 Jack 198 

88 Jackney 58 

71 Jackson 58 

20 James 25 

57 James Warford 29 

72 James M 58-64 

87 James 58 

94 James 60 

142 James 77 

226 James 93 

238 James Madison 119 

249 James T 105 

396 James T 136 

432 James Merton 142 

507 James Brinsley 160 

538 James J 160 

542 James 162 



223 



PAGE 

551 James F 161 

562 James 163 

615 James T 172 

620 James W 172 

756 James 209 

15 J. B 25 

403 Jefferson Davis 146 

525 Jeff J 159 

347 Jennie 109 

607 Jeptha 169 

II Jesse 24 

28 Jesse 26 

566 Jesse W 165 

213 Jessie 89 

285 Jessie A 100 

787 Jessie Edith 215 

627 J. H 173 

449 Joe Anna 154 

22 John A 25 

24 John 26 

36 John Henry 26 

50 J. L 31 

58 John Henry 29 

62 John 57 

77 John 60 

144 John 94 

156 John Lee 80 

165 John 80 

172 John Buford 83 

182 John Minor 88 

212 John Irby 89 

215 John Minor 89 

221 John Buford 92 

230 John 95 

233 John, Jr 163 

235 John Amons 95 

284 John W 100 

289 John C 101 

379 John Randolph 115 

395 John W 133 

418 John W., Jr 136 

446 John Siegel 154 

505 John Lee i';7 

546 John 162 

554 John William 161 

563 John 163 

583 John W 166 



PAGE 

625 John C 172 

662 John Nicholas 189 

673 John 19a 

681 John 195 

737 John 20'; 

746 John 206 

759 John 211 

802 John 216 

324 Josephius 106 

514 Josephine iijg 

537 Josephine i6a 

592 Joseph 171 

614 Joseph G 172 

486 Josie 154 

565 J. M 163 

599 J- N 169 

18 J. R 26 

292 Juanita loi 

127 Judson 60 

39 Julia Ann 28 

43 Julia Catharine 

Cordelia 29 

534 Julia L i6a 

K 

643 Kate i8r 

168 Katharine Meriwether. 8r 

368 Katherine 

653 Katherine Agusta .... 187 

L 

421 Lacy Larrowe 138 

300 Laura 105. 

430 Layton L 142 

512 L. C 158 

27 Lee 26 

162 Lee 79 

705 Leila May 197 

532 Leonard . 160 

692 Leonard 193 

123 Leta 60 

16 L. F 26 

791 Lincoln 215 

258 Livicia J 98 

631 Lizzie 173 

702 Lizzie 199 

780 Lizzie 2is 



224 



PAGE 

160 Loraine 81 

167 Loraine Allen 81 

714 Lottie 198 

47 Lou :?o 

767 Louisa Lucy 212 

288 Lowell G loi 

415 Loys 135 

247 Lucinda 102 

445 Lucinda Frances i^:? 

180 Lucy 94 

189 Lucy 9::^ 

241 Lucy iSS 

252 Lucy E 107 

393 Lucy Catharine 121 

443 Lucy Jane 147 

621 Lucretia A 172 

385 Lurana 120 

243 Lydia 156 

359 Lydia A 112 

391 Lydia A 121 

M 

332 Mabel 106 

686 Mabel Catherine 193 

762 Mabel 210 

416 Mabelle 136 

282 Mae 99 

743 Margaret 208 

188 Maria 93 

290 Marie loi 

356 Marie 109 

605 Marion W 169 

694 Marjory 193 

192 May 87 

630 May 173 

45 Martha Roberta Hatty. 30 

79 Martha 61 

92 Martha 63 

250 Martha A 105 

383 Martha Jane 120 

594 Martin Van 167 

48 Mary Ann 31 

59 Mary Elizabeth 29 

80 Mary C 61 

157 Mary 81 

260 Mary A 99 

267 Mary E 97 



PAGE 

386 Mary Ann 120 

610 Mary Susan 171 

666 Mary Lusted 199 

678 Mary 194 

786 Mary Ida 21s 

569 Mattie i6«; 

788 Maud 216 

331 Merle 106 

400 Michael Davidson .... 139 

353 Milton V no 

451 Minnie Rebecca ...... i';4 

517 Minnie 159 

618 Minnie 172 

175 Minor 93 

635 Mirtie V 173 

516 Mollie 159 

149 Moore 82 

208 Mortimer Norton .... 88 

211 Mortimer Noble ...... 89 

240 Moses Smith 146 

251 Moses B los 

734 Moses 205 

706 Muriel Linda 197 

718 Myrtle 199 

473 Myron Lester 153 

N 

78 Nancy 60 

179 Nanc}' 94 

244 Nancy 157 

384 Nancy 120 

515 Napoleon B 159 

624 Napoleon B 172 

613 N. B 171 

193 Nellie 87 

329 Nellie 106 

485 Nellie 154 

711 Nellie 198 

461 Nora B iso 

191 Norton 87 

216 Norton Labott 89 

O 

773 Olive 214 

789 Olive Eliza 216 

262 Oliver W 99 

330 Ona 106 



225 



PAGE PAGE 

736 Oroclia 208 268 R. W 97 

327 Orville 106 218 Ruth Gibson 91 

420 Orville Kendrick 138 272 Ruth M 98 

122 Osa 60 358 R. S 112 

125 Otis 60 

S 

P 186 Sallie 92 

301 Paul 105 178 Sail}' 94 

304 Paul W 103 442 Sally Anne 147 

309 Pauline 103 46 Sarah Isabeile 30 

303 Pearl 103 242 Sarah i<;6 

533 Pearl S 160 257 Sarah T 98 

155 Peter Shull 79 266 Sarah M 97 

642 Phillip i8i 387 Sarah Ellen 120 

254 Pierce J 107 402 Sarah Catharine 145 

351 Pierce J., Jr no 634 Sarah M 173 

558 Poik 162 588 Sargeant 166 

3 Pollard William 57 352 Samuel no 

63 Pollard M 57 523 Samuel i<;9 

75 Pollard M 60 738 Samuel Napier 205 

232 Pollard 156 747 Samuel 207 

236 Pollard Washington .. in 751 Samuel B 206 

424 Pollard Valentin 139 674 Sophia 190 

509 Pollard Tavner 160 222 Sterling Bearmont .... 90 

540 Pollard 161 663 Steven Lusted 190 

545 Pollard, Jr 162 676 Steven 194 

553 Pollard L 161 700 Steven Lester 199 

560 Pollard C 162 770 Steven Elliot 213 

638 Pollard Brinsley 188 82 Susan 62 

434 Preston 144 158 Susan 8i 

147 Publius 81 253 Susan H 107 

392 Susan Frances 121 

;^ 760 Susan 211 

185 Rachael 92 90 Sylvester 63 

166 Ray 80 

176 Richard 94 T 

603 Richard Monroe 169 170 Tarence 82 

298 Robert W 104 6 Tavner 205 

622 Robert E. L 172 7 Tavner 23 

637 Robert J 179 10 Tavner T 24 

796 Robert J 216 17 Tavner T., Jr 26 

438 Roberta 146 19 Tavner Pollard 25 

44 Rome Penelope 30 171 Tavner 82 

259 Rose A 98 174 Tavner W 93 

667 Rose 199 293 T. A loi 

703 Rose 199 764 Ted 210 

297 Roy C 104 100 Teddie 67 

226 



PAGE 

23 Thomas B 25 

53 Thomas Lewis 25 

56 Thomas Taylor 25 

183 Thomas W 90 

220 Thomas W., Jr 92 

231 Thomas 95 

239 Thomas Barnes 121 

245 Thomas W 96 

374 Thomas Bourne 114 

389 Thomas Smith 121 

468 Thomas B 157 

506 Thomas Wadham .... 160 

543 Thomas 162 

552 Thomas A 161 

561 Thomas A 163 

575 Thomas B 165 

580 Thomas 166 

581 Thomas 166 

585 Thomas 166 

609 Thomas C 171 

611 Thomas E 170 

629 Thomas G 173 

664 Thomas Henry 195 

697 Thomas H 196 

264 T. G 101 

76 Timothy 60 

V 

598 Van 168 

632 Vernie B 173 

414 Vesper i3«; 

423 Veta Winters 138 

283 Volma 99 

W 

121 Wallace 60 

572 Walter S 165 

401 Wesley Monroe 144 

161 Wiley Terry 79 

13 William 25 

14 William 21; 

61 William ^. . 57 

34 William 26 



^5 William 
64a William, 
84 William 
99 William 
145 William 
2IO William 
214 William 
255 William 
354 William 
370 William 
444 William 
463 William 
521 William 
524 William 
530 William 
577 William 
586 William 
604 William 
608 William 
616 William 

639 William 

640 William 
650 William 
685 William 
750 William 

754 William 

755 William 
757 William 
769 William 

66 W. C. . 
. C. . 
. H. . 
. M. . 
. L. . 
. T. . 
W, 



68 W 

753 W, 

579 W 

628 W, 

513 w, 

li w 



763 Winnie 



PAGE 

Reilley 29 

Jr 57 

W 61 

67 

Sargeant .... 78 

Bell 90 

Bell 89 

W 97 

D no 

Pollard 114 

Thomas 148 

P 152 

H 159 

C 159 

160 

165 

166 

J 169 

L 170 

S 172 

179 

James 181 

James 184 

193 

Henry 207 

Henry 211 

209 

E 209 

Henry, Jr 213 

57 

61 

207 

166 

173 

158 

61 

210 



126 Zala 60 

124 Zelda 60 

349 Zora 109 

93 Zuckie Temperance ... 63 



227 



PFisdo?n girls ivho married and whose given Jiames were 

never sent to me 



PAGE PAGE 

50b Brantley, Mrs 27 617 Mills, E. J. Mrs 172 

556 Claymore, Mrs i6i 570 Reynolds, Mrs. S. S... 163 

550 Cummins, Mrs 161 555 Ryanhart, Mrs 161 

549 Jones, Mrs 161 645 Turner, Mrs 188 

50c Lanier, Mrs 27 547 Vandiver, Mrs 161 

557 Martin, Mrs 161 548 Yeager, Mrs 161 



228 



EXPLANATION 

In order to make it possible for one to trace his or her 
ancestry it was necessary for the compiler to number 
every name. It is therefore a simple matter to follow 
ones lineage, e. g., (95) C. C. Wisdom, page 64, is the 
son of (91) Benjamin, page 63, son of (75) Pollard, 
page 60, son of (72) James M., page 58, son of (63) 
Pollard M., page 57, son of (3) Pollard, page 57, son 
of (i) Abner, page 19. 

I. ABNER 



3. 


Pollard 
















63. 


POLL.^ 


^RD 


M. 














72. 


James 


M. 














75. 


Pollard 










91. 


Ben J. 


A.MIN 








95. 


C. C. 



The page numbers may be found in the index opposite 
the respective name and number, and I would suggest 
that each one fill in blank on page 231 and check his or 
her lineage so that the coming generations will be able 
to trace their ancestors with ease. 



t^Iorth Carolina S^9 Ubrary 
Raleiqh, N.C. r,;. { 



229 ■•. - ,' ', : 



.vv 






.. -->■ 



I. ABNER 



•••* Oif<«f>* Sf Al« Ubrmy 



fi ... 



GR 929.2 W811W 



Wisdom, George W., 1853- 
Genealogy of the Wisdom family, 1675 to 



3 3091 00141 6585 



HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. 

DEC 94 



Bound -To -Pleas^ N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962