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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 
APPROPRIATIONS FOR 2014 


HEARINGS 

BEFORE A 

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTEENTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 


SUBCOMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY 

JOHN R. CARTER, Texas, Chairman 

ROBERT B. ADERHOLT, Alabama DAVID E. PRICE, North Carolina 

JOHN ABNEY CULBERSON, Texas LUCILLE ROYBAL-ALLARD, California 

RODNEY P. FRELINGHUYSEN, New Jersey HENRY CUELLAR, Texas 
TOM LATHAM, Iowa WILLIAM L. OWENS, New York 

CHARLES W. DENT, Pennsylvania 
CHARLES J. FLEISCHMANN, Tennessee 

NOTE: Under Committee Rules, Mr. Rogers, as Chairman of the Full Committee, and Mrs. Lowey, as Ranking 
Minority Member of the Full Committee, are authorized to sit as Members of all Subcommittees. 

Ben Nicholson, Kris Mallard, Valerie Baldwin, 

Cornell Teague, and Hilary May, 

Staff Assistants 


PART 3 

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 

Page 


Department of Homeland Security 1 

U.S. Coast Guard 521 

U.S. Customs and Border Protection 663 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Appropriations 


82-380 


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
WASHINGTON : 2013 


AUTHENTICATED 
U.S. GOVERNMENT 
INFORMATION 


COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS 
HAROLD ROGERS, Kentucky, Chairman 


C. W. BILL YOUNG, Florida i 

FRANK R. WOLF, Virginia 

JACK KINGSTON, Georgia 

RODNEY P. FRELINGHUYSEN, New Jersey 

TOM LATHAM, Iowa 

ROBERT B. ADERHOLT, Alabama 

KAY GRANGER, Texas 

MICHAEL K. SIMPSON, Idaho 

JOHN ABNEY CULBERSON, Texas 

ANDER CRENSHAW, Florida 

JOHN R. CARTER, Texas 

RODNEY ALEXANDER, Louisiana 

KEN CALVERT, California 

JO BONNER, Alabama 

TOM COLE, Oklahoma 

MARIO DIAZ-BALART, Florida 

CHARLES W. DENT, Pennsylvania 

TOM GRAVES, Georgia 

KEVIN YODER, Kansas 

STEVE WOMACK, Arkansas 

ALAN NUNNELEE, Mississippi 

JEFF FORTENBERRY, Nebraska 

THOMAS J. ROONEY, Florida 

CHARLES J. FLEISCHMANN, Tennessee 

JAIME HERRERA BEUTLER, Washington 

DAVID P. JOYCE, Ohio 

DAVID G. VALADAO, California 

ANDY HARRIS, Maryland 


NITA M. LOWEY, New York 
MARCY KAPTUR, Ohio 
PETER J. VISCLOSKY, Indiana 
JOSE E. SERRANO, New York 
ROSA L. DeLAURO, Connecticut 
JAMES P. MORAN, Virginia 
ED PASTOR, Arizona 
DAVID E. PRICE, North Carolina 
LUCILLE ROYBAL-ALLARD, California 
SAM FARR, California 
CHAKA FATTAH, Pennsylvania 
SANFORD D. BISHOP, jR., Georgia 
BARBARA LEE, California 
ADAM B. SCHIFF, California 
MICHAEL M. HONDA, California 
BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota 
TIM RYAN, Ohio 

DEBBIE WASSERMAN SCHULTZ, Florida 
HENRY CUELLAR, Texas 
CHELLIE PINGREE, Maine 
MIKE QUIGLEY, Illinois 
WILLIAM L. OWENS, New York 


^ Chairman Emeritus 

William E. Smith, Clerk and Staff Director 


(ii) 



DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 
APPROPRIATIONS FOR 2014 


Thursday, April 11, 2013. 

BUDGET HEARING— UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF 
HOMELAND SECURITY 

WITNESS 

HON. JANET NAPOLITANO, SECRETARY, UNITED STATES DEPART- 
MENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 

Opening Statement: Mr. Carter 

Mr. Carter. Today we welcome back Secretary Napolitano. That 
is a little loud, isn’t it? 

Secretary, welcome. We are glad that you are here. We look for- 
ward to your testimony on the President’s budget for this depart- 
ment and so that we can have homeland security for the fiscal year 
2014. 

Madam Secretary, once again, DHS finds itself at a crossroads. 
As our budgetary constraints tighten and true threats to the home- 
land persist, DHS must find a way to accomplish its vital mission 
with increasingly scarce resources. 

Specifically DHS must find a way to adequately support its costly 
workforce and necessary operations including enforcement and also 
follow through on essential upgrades on border security technology. 
Coast Guard acquisitions, and necessary research. 

Budgeting for competing priorities with limited resources is not 
a new challenge. In fact, it has been the hallmark of the Appropria- 
tions Committee work since 1865. And that is why this sub- 
committee has adhered to three core principles since its establish- 
ment more than ten years ago. 

Unwavering support for our front-line personnel and essential 
operations is the first, secondly, clear alignment of funding to re- 
sults and, finally, true fiscal discipline meaning we provide every 
dollar needed to Homeland Security but not a penny more. 

And that brings us to the department’s budget request for fiscal 
year 2014, to recent events. 

First, your fiscal year 2014 budget prioritized and so it defies 
logic, more money for headquarters’ consolidation and research, but 
deep shameful proposals to cut operations including a proposed re- 
duction of 826 Coast Guard military personnel, a proposed cut of 
nearly 40 percent to Coast Guard acquisitions, a proposed reduc- 
tion of 2,200 ICE detention beds, and a proposed reduction of more 
than 1,000 full-time positions in ICE resulting in substantial de- 

( 1 ) 



2 


creases to investigation and to everything from threats to national 
security to child exportation to cyber crime to drug smuggling. 

Secondly, what I have seen in the last few months, what I be- 
lieve is apparent with this budget request is a complete lack of can- 
dor and that is something that as chairman I cannot and will not 
tolerate. I am not talking about information on internal policy de- 
liberations or pre-decisional discussions with the Administration. I 
am talking about facts, facts about what things cost, the facts 
about actual performance. 

Madam Secretary, statutory mandates and reporting require- 
ments within our bill are not flexible. They are the law. What I am 
getting at is the department’s repeated failure to submit numerous 
required plans and reports on time. This includes nearly all the 12 
reports and plans that were statutorily mandated to be submitted 
with the budget yesterday morning. 

Now, we did receive some late yesterday evening, I understand 
about three reports required, but quite honestly with the thousands 
and thousands and thousands of people that you have got over 
there in your department and the law requiring a priority date for 
the submission of these reports, I see no good excuse why you can- 
not And enough people that know how to do their job over there 
if they cannot get these reports put together. 

Furthermore, what I am getting at is the department’s failure to 
answer basic factual questions about program cost and perform- 
ance. We have asked repeatedly about mandatory E-Verify costs. 
We have asked repeatedly about resource implications of the new 
uses programs. We have asked for updated information about the 
department’s sequester impacts given that the flscal year 2013 ap- 
propriation bill was enacted more than two weeks ago. 

And three weeks after the unwarranted release of thousands of 
ICE detainees, I had to hold a hearing to get an entirely confusing 
and incomplete accounting of the incident including that ICE re- 
leased ten level one criminal aliens and 159 level two criminal 
aliens. 

Madam Secretary, let’s be blunt. If DHS cannot explain how it 
is proposing to spend the taxpayers’ limited dollars on its programs 
and on its projects, how are we going to make a decision as to how 
these funds relate to the mission requirements? 

We need congressional oversight. We have given congressional 
oversight authority. This is part of congressional oversight and it 
should not be ignored. 

We have little choice other than to hold the department’s leader- 
ship accountable and to cut requested and unjustifled funding. 

So when DHS has a statutory mission to fulflll, we expect a le- 
gitimate and adequate budget to support it. When the law man- 
dates a spend plan, we expect compliance. When we ask a question 
for factual information, we expect straightforward and prompt an- 
swers instead of getting little more than excuses, delays, and out- 
right irresponsiveness. And all that has got to stop and it has got 
to stop today. 

Yesterday we were talking. I talked to you on the phone briefly 
about the plans that we were not receiving and you made the com- 
ment you would try to get it to us by May 1st. I thought about that 
after our conversation and that is not acceptable. 



3 


Just because the President thinks he gets to be two months late 
on his budget does not mean that the people who work in his de- 
partments get to also ignore deadlines. We have deadlines that we 
have on this committee and I think those deadlines should be met. 
And I think May 1st is too long to wait for those reports. 

So I would appreciate it if you would get whoever you hire or 
have hired to get the various reports done that we require and if 
they cannot remember what they are, we will be glad to share that 
information with them. 

I would like for them to have that for us by no later than the 
end of next week, Friday of next week. And, you know, I would also 
like to know who was assigned that job because if they cannot do 
the job, then there is a management problem somewhere. 

And we will talk. I will give you an opportunity to reply to this, 
but I do not want to play the game. Others are having to, but I 
do not want to play the game of we will give it to you when we 
want to. And then honestly we have a statutory mandate on a 
budget, but we did not get the budget when it was statutorily man- 
dated. We got it two months later. I am not going to play that 
game. That is pretty simple. 

At a time when our budget is hemorrhaging with red ink, the de- 
partment has to get the budgeting right. That means meeting over- 
sight responsibilities and clearly aligning requested funding to in- 
tended results for our Nation’s security. And that is the commit- 
ment I am going to ask of you today. The American people deserve 
no less. 

Madam Secretary, I think it is clear that we have a lot to cover 
here today. Before I recognize you for your testimony, let me turn 
to our distinguished ranking member and former chairman of this 
committee for his remarks that he may wish to make. 

Mr. Price. 

[The statement of Mr. Carter follows:] 



4 


The Honorable John Carter 
Subcommittee on Homeland Security 
Committee on Appropriations 

FY 2014 Budget Request for the Department of Homeland Security 
10:00 AM I Thursday | April 11, 2013 | 2359 RHOB 
Opening Statement As Prepared 


Hearing is called to order - 

Today, we welcome back Secretary Napolitano, Madam Secretary, we thank you for being here 
and look forward to yom testimony on the President’s budget request for the Department of 
Homeland Security for fiscal year 2014, 

Madam Secretary, once again DHS finds itself at a crossroads. 

As our budgetary constraints tigliten and true threats to the homeland persist, DHS must find a 
way to accomplish its vital mission witli increasingly scarce resources. 

Specifically, DHS must find a way to adequately support its costly workforce and necessary 
operations - inclndiug enforcement - and also follow-tluougli on essential upgrades in border 
security technology. Coast Guard acquisitions, and necessary research. 

Budgeting for competing priorities with limited resources is not a new challenge; in fact, it has 
been the hallmark of the Appropriations Committee’s work since its inception in 1865. 

And, that is why tliis Subcommittee has adliered to tliree core principles since it was established 
more tlian ten years ago: 

1 . Unwavering support for om- frontline personnel and essential operations; 

2. Clear alignment of funding to results; and 

3. True fiscal discipline - meaning, that we provide every dollar' needed for homeland security, 
but not a peraiy more. 

And that brings us to the Department’s budget request for fiscal year 2014 and recent events. 

First, your FY14 budget priorities defy logic — more money for headquarters consolidation and 
researcli, but deep, shameful proposals to cut to operations, including: a proposed reduction of 
826 Coast Guard military personnel; a proposed cut of nearly 40% to Coast Girard acquisitiorrs; 
a proposed reduction of 2,200 ICE detention beds; and a proposed reduction of more than 1 ,000 
full-time positions in ICE, resnltmg in substantial decreases to urvestigations iuto evei'ythuig 
from tlrreats to national security to child exploitation to cyber-crime to dnrg smuggling. 

Secondly , what I have seen in the last few months - and what I believe is apparent with this budget 
reque,st - is a complete lack of candor. . and that is something that, as Chairman, I cannot and will 
not tolerate. 



5 


I’m not talking about information on internal policy deliberations or pre-decisional discussions within 
the Administration.. I’m talking about facts. ...facts about what tilings cost and facts about actual 
performance. 

Madam Secretary, the statutory mandates and reporting requirements within our bill are not 
flexible, they ate the law. 

What 1 am getting at is the Department’s repeated failure to submit numerous required plans and 
reports on time - and this includes nearly all of the 12 reports and plans that were statutorily mandated 
to be submitted with the budget yesterday momiiig. 

Furthennore, what 1 am getting at is the Department’s failine to answer basic, factual questions about 
program costs and performance. We’ve asked repeatedly about mandatory E-Verify costs. We've asked 
repeatedly about resomce implications of new USCIS programs. We’ve asked for updated information 
about the Department’s sequester impacts given that the fiscal year 2013 appropriations bill was 
enacted more than two weeks ago. And three weeks after the unwarranted release of thousands of ICE 
detainees, I had to hold a hearing to get an entirely confusing and incomplete accounting of tire 
incident, including that ICE released ten Level 1 criminal aliens and 1 59 Level 2 criminal aliens. 

Madam Secretary, let me be blunt — if DHS can’t clearly explain how it is proposing to spend 
the taxpayers’ limited dollars on its programs and projects; won’t show how funds meet mission 
requirements; and refiises to answer Congress’ basic oversight questions, then we have little 
choice other than to hold the Department ’s leadership accoimtable and cut requested, but 
imjustified funding. 

So, when DHS has a statutory mission to fulfill, we expect a legrtrmate and adequate budget to 
support it. 

When the law mairdates a spend plan, we expect compliance. 

Wlren we ask a question for factual infonnation, we expect straiglrtforward and prompt answers. 

Instead, we are getting little more than excuses, delays, and outright imresponsiveness .... and, 
that errds today. 

My poirrt is simple; at a time wheit our budget is hemorrhaging with red ink, tire Department has to 
get its budgeting right. And. that meatrs meeting oversight responsibilities and clearly aligning 
requested ftmding to intended results for ortr Nation’s secrrrity . . and that is the commitment I am 
going to ask of you her e today . . . the American people deserve no less. 

Madam Secretary, I thirrk it is clear tlrat we have a lot to cover here today. Before I recogtrize 
you for your testimony, let me turn to our distinguished Rartking Member and former Chaimran 
for any remarks he wishes to make. 


##### 



6 


Opening Statement: Mr. Price 

Mr. Price. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Good morning, Madam Secretary. It is a pleasure to have you 
kick off our budget season a little later than usual, hut we are glad 
to have you here. 

The fiscal year 2014 net discretionary budget request for the De- 
partment of Homeland Security is $39.04 billion, not including an 
additional $5.6 billion in disaster relief funding that does not count 
toward the discretionary cap. The total is some $550 million below 
the equivalent number for the current year. 

This year also marks the tenth anniversary of the creation of 
DHS and the continuing efforts to make 22 components operate 
under a common vision and leadership. Complicating these efforts 
is the reality that, like all federal agencies, you have been asked 
to do more with less. And this has required some tough decisions. 

I am pleased that a full year Homeland Security Appropriations 
Act was included in the final Continuing Resolution for the current 
year providing an allocation of funds that is more aligned with 
your current needs. 

It provided significant and necessary funding increases, for ex- 
ample, for preparedness and anti-terrorism grants, for customs and 
border protection salaries, and for advanced research. 

However, you are still under the thumb of sequestration. Seques- 
tration, the very definition of irrational and irresponsible budg- 
eting, which ironically leaves the two main drivers of the federal 
deficit, tax expenditures and mandatory spending, largely un- 
touched. 

Today I look forward to exploring how the Department is assess- 
ing risk and prioritizing funding in this era of shrinking budgets. 
It is also time to reflect about where the department has been and 
where you are heading. 

This includes the Department’s efforts to enforce our Nation’s im- 
migration laws which we all know are in need of comprehensive re- 
form. As bipartisan efforts to craft legislation continue, no doubt 
security at the border will remain center stage. 

Despite what some opponents of comprehensive immigration re- 
form say, significant progress has been made along the southern 
border. This subcommittee, under both democratic and republican 
leadership, has been at the forefront of these changes. We must re- 
sist misleading claims about border security by those who simply 
wish to block reform. 

Two decades ago, fewer than 4,000 border patrol agents mon- 
itored the entire southwest border. By the end of fiscal 2012, there 
were more than 18,400 such agents. Fencing totaling some 651 
miles has also been constructed in targeted areas of the border. 
Now sensors have been planted, cameras erected, and unmanned 
aerial vehicles monitor the border from above. 

Couple these efforts with targeted outbound inspections of vehi- 
cles for illegal drugs, weapons, cash, and other contraband heading 
south into Mexico resulting in some impressive seizures in Cali- 
fornia, Texas, and Arizona over the past three years and you can 
see just how successful our border security efforts have been. You 



7 


should be proud of how far we have come under your leadership 
and that of your predecessor to secure our border. 

Recalling our efforts to apply cost-effectiveness criteria to that 
border fence, I know just how elusive the definition of secure can 
be. I also know that we cannot simply throw an unlimited supply 
of money at the southwest border and assume it will solve all the 
problems. 

We must continue to look analytically for the right mix of per- 
sonnel, infrastructure, and technology to find the best path forward 
and today we hope you can shed some light on your thinking in 
this regard. 

In addition, the Administration has taken positive steps to im- 
prove its immigration enforcement policies. Here, too, some have 
been eager to criticize, but I believe it is both prudent and wise for 
the Administration to focus on the removal of criminal aliens first 
and foremost while providing prosecutorial discretion on less press- 
ing cases and deferred action in the case of the so-called dreamers. 
With limited resources, we simply must prioritize our efforts. 

Much has been made of the release of ICE detainees in February, 
although following Director Morton’s testimony before this sub- 
committee, I hope we have reached the point where suspicions of 
a political motive have subsided. 

In that regard, I hope you can touch on the funding realities ICE 
must deal with when facing a statutory mandate that ties its 
hands on the number of individuals it detains. 

Director Morton has testified that this statutory minimum bed 
requirement will reduce such priorities as the investigation into 
human and drug smuggling as well as child pornography. 

We need to get to the point where ICE decision making about the 
use of detention is based only on consistent, reviewable, risk-based 
criteria, and that ICE has full discretion and available funding to 
use less costly supervision methods and alternatives to detention 
when risk is low. 

I also support your effort to better focus the Secure Communities 
Program to make sure it is fulfilling its intended mission and not 
being applied indiscriminately. 

Now that the Secure Communities Program has been imple- 
mented nationwide, I look forward to examining how effective this 
program has been in fulfilling its intended mission. 

This subcommittee also feels some ownership of that effort to 
focus on the criminal alien population. 

I must also commend you on the job FEMA continues to do. Over 
the past few years, FEMA has faced significant challenges, includ- 
ing an unprecedented 99 presidentially declared disasters in 2011. 

In comparison, 2012 had about half that number with 47 presi- 
dentially declared disasters, but that number included Hurricane 
Sandy, a storm of historic magnitude. Currently every state in the 
Nation has pending disaster recovery projects with FEMA. 

In each of these instances, FEMA has done a remarkable job of 
working with affected areas to make sure that individuals, fami- 
lies, and localities have the resources to remove damaged struc- 
tures and debris and to begin the rebuilding process. 



8 


This recent experience confirms that much of the lost capacity we 
witnessed following Hurricane Katrina has been restored, yet an- 
other success of which this subcommittee claims some ownership. 

Now, I must say there are some questions, some disappointments 
in this budget that we are going to want to explore. There is a net 
reduction in FEMA grants here. There is the same flawed proposal, 
I believe, for a national preparedness grant program. It was re- 
jected by all sides in the Continuing Resolution. 

The budget also proposes a significant reduction to coast guard 
personnel and acquisitions that raises serious questions about fu- 
ture Coast Guard capabilities and recapitalizations efforts. 

Now, on the face of it at least, this significant reduction in fund- 
ing for the Coast Guard appears to have been made in order to pro- 
vide a full $714 million to complete construction of the National 
Bio and Agro-Defense Facility. We know that facility must be con- 
structed, but we have got to consider the implications for the rest 
of DHS, particularly if there is a viable option to phase in NBAF 
construction and avoid a tradeoff with the Coast Guard or with 
other science and technology efforts in the coming fiscal year. 

So we have a number of questions that will need to be addressed 
by you and your colleagues as this subcommittee works to produce 
a bill in the coming weeks. 

Madam Secretary, I look forward to your testimony and working 
with you again this year. 

[The statement of Mr. Price follows:] 



9 


Price Statement at Hearing on Department of Homeland Security2014 Budget Request 


Good morning, Madam Secretary. It is a pleasure to have you kick off our budget season, albeit 
later than usual. The fiscal year 2014 net discretionary budget request for the Department of 
Homeland Security is $39.04 billion, not including an additional $5.6 billion in disaster relief 
funding that does not count toward the discretionary cap. This total is some $550 million below 
the equivalent number for the current year. 


This year also marks the 1 0th anniversary of the creation of DHS and the continuing efforts to 
make 22 components operate under a common vision and leadership. Complicating these 
efforts is the reality that, like all federal agencies, you have been asked to do more with less, 
and this has required some tough decisions. I am pleased that a full-year Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act was included in the final Continuing Resolution, providing an allocation of 
funds fhat is more aligned with your current needs. It provided significant and necessary funding 
increases, for example, for preparedness and anti-terrorism grants, Customs and Border 
Protection salaries, and advanced research. However, you are still under the thumb of 
sequestration. 


Today, I look forward to exploring how the Department is assessing risk and prioritizing funding 
in this era of shrinking budgets. It is also time to reflect about where the Department of 
Homeland Security has been and where you are heading. This includes the Department's 
efforts to enforce our nation's immigration laws, which we all know are in dire need of 
comprehensive reform. As bipartisan efforts to craft legislation continue, no doubt security at the 
border will remain center stage. 


Despite what some opponents of comprehensive immigration reform say, significant progress 
has been made along the southern border. This Subcommittee, under both Democratic and 
Republican leadership, has been at the forefront of these changes, and we must resist 
misleading claims about border security by those wishing to block reform. Two decades ago, 
fewer than 4,000 Border Patrol agents monitored the entire Southwest border. By the end of FY 
2012, there were more than 18,400. Fencing totaling some 651 miles has also been constructed 
in targeted areas of the border. Now sensors have been planted, cameras erected, and 
unmanned aerial vehicles monitor the border from above. Couple these efforts with targeted 
outbound inspections of vehicles for illegal drugs, weapons, cash, and other contraband 
heading south into Mexico, resulting in some impressive seizures in California, Texas, and 
Arizona over the past three years, and you can see just how successful our border security 
efforts have been. You should be proud of how far we have come, under your leadership and 
that of your predecessor, to secure our borders. 



10 


Price Statement at Hearing on Department of Homeland Security2014 Budget Request 


Recalling our efforts to apply cost-effectiveness criteria to the border fence, I know how elusive 
the definition of "secure" can be. I also know that we cannot simply throw an unlimited supply of 
money at the Southwest border and assume that will solve all the problems. We must continue 
to look analytically for the right mix of personnel, infrastructure and technology to find the best 
path forward. I hope you will shed some light on your thinking in that regard. 


In addition, the Administration has taken positive steps to improve its immigration enforcement 
policies. Here too, some have been eager to criticize, but I believe it is both prudent and wise 
for the Administration to focus on the removal of criminal aliens first and foremost, while 
providing prosecutorial discretion on less pressing cases and deferred action in the case of the 
so-called Dreamers. With limited resources, we simply must prioritize our efforts. 


Much has been made of the release of ICE detainees in February, although following Director 
Morton's testimony I hope we have reached the point where suspicions of a political motive 
have subsided, in that regard, I hope you can touch on the funding realities ICE must deal with 
when facing a statutory mandate that ties its hands on the number of individuals it detains. 
Director Morton has testified that this requirement will reduce such priorities as the investigation 
into human and drug smuggling, as well as child pornography. We need to get to the point 
where ICE decision making about the use of detention is based only on consistent, reviewable, 
risk-based criteria, and it has full discretion and available funding to use less costly supervision 
methods and alternatives to detention when risk is low. 


I also support your effort to better focus the Secure Communities program to be sure it is 
fulfilling its intended mission and not being applied indiscriminately. Now that the Secure 
Communities program has been implemented nationwide, I look forward to examining how 
effective this program has been at fulfilling its intended mission. 


I must also commend you on the job FEMA continues to do. Over the past few years, FEMA 
has faced significant challenges, including an unprecedented 99 Presidentially-declared 
disasters in 201 1 . In comparison, 201 2 had about half that number, with 47 
Presidentially-declared disasters, but it included Hurricane Sandy, a storm of historic 
magnitude. Currently every state in the Nation has pending disaster recovery projects with 
FEMA. 


In each of these instances, FEMA has done a remarkable job of working with affected areas to 
make sure that individuals, families, and localities have the resources to remove damaged 



Price Statement at Hearing on Department of Homeland Security2014 Budget Request 


structures and debris and to begin the rebuilding process. This recent experience confirms that 
much of the lost capacity we witnessed following Hurricane Katrina has been restored. 


I must say, however, that I am very disappointed to see the budget propose a net reduction to 
FEMA grants, as well as offering the same, flawed National Preparedness Grant Program 
rejected by all sides in the Continuing Resolution, The budget also proposes a significant 
reduction to Coast Guard personnel and acquisitions that raises serious questions about future 
Coast Guard capabilities and recapitalization efforts. On its face at least, this significant 
reduction in funding for the Coast Guard appears to have been made in order to provide $714 
million to complete construction of the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility. We must 
seriously consider the implications for the rest of DHS, particularly if there is a viable option to 
phase in NBAF construction and avoid a tradeoff with the Coast Guard or with other Science 
and Technology efforts in FY14. 


So we have a number of questions that will need to be addressed quickly by you and your 
components as this Subcommittee works to produce a bill in the coming weeks. 


Madam Secretary, I look forward to your testimony and working with you again this year. 




12 


Mr. Carter. Thank you, Mr. Price. 

I would now like to recognize the chairman of the full committee 
and the founding chairman of this subcommittee, Harold Rogers, 
for any comments that he would like to make. 

Mr. Chairman. 

Opening Statement: Mr. Rogers 

Mr. Rogers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and congratulations on 
your work on this as the new chairman of this subcommittee. 

Madam Secretary, it is good to be with you again and good to see 
you. Tough job. Pardon me. 

In the past three years now, we have struggled on the committee 
and on this subcommittee to try to bring regular order to the proc- 
ess where we take up individual bills and debate them and amend 
them and take them to conference with the Senate and we hash 
out the differences like the old fashion way which is regular order. 

And I am very pleased that a couple of weeks ago now, we were 
able to work that process with our colleagues in the Senate and 
produce, I think, a fair hybrid Continuing Resolution which in- 
cluded Homeland Security. 

And I wanted to congratulate Senator Mikulski and her counter- 
parts in the Senate along with my counterpart here, Nita Lowey, 
for working together to bring out a good bill. I know it is not ex- 
actly all that you wanted, but it is the best we could do. So the ef- 
fort for regular order continues. 

Now, your budget submissions do not make our job any easier. 
Like Yogi Bear talked about deja vu all over again, here we go 
again. The department has produced a proposal to, I think, deci- 
mate the coast guard and ICE that supports the men and women 
who bravely defend our homeland on the front lines in favor of 
headquarters’ pet projects and controversial research programs. 

Once again, the budget request uses phoney, unauthorized offsets 
to pay for critical aviation security measures. Once again, the de- 
partment has failed to submit a number of plans and reports which 
are required by law, which are essential to help us do our work and 
do our work well to try to justify every penny that we spend of the 
taxpayers’ money under the constitution appropriated to agencies 
of the Federal Government. 

And, once again, this budget submission would add layers of bu- 
reaucracy to the already tangled web of agencies under your pur- 
view at headquarters. Many of these proposals are recycled directly 
from last year’s budget. Nearly all of these misaligned priorities 
were patently rejected by the Congress in the fiscal 2013 bills that 
passed both chambers and the CR. 

These trends are becoming a sadly predictable asset and tenet of 
this Administration’s budgeting strategy. Particularly where our 
Nation’s security is involved, we need a legitimate budget that ties 
funding to results and mission requirements. 

Unfortunately, what I see here is a largely political document 
which mirrors the fear mongering tactics employed by DHS and 
others leading up to implementation of sequestration, especially 
ice’s release, opening the jail doors for several hundred detainees 
prior to the budget cuts. 



13 


Needless to say, this gives me great concern. I certainly hope 
your testimony allays those concerns as we go on today. I hope and 
trust that it will. But we have rehashed these things ever since you 
have heen the secretary and we have gone over them time and 
again. And we reject your pleas and you keep coming back and we 
keep rejecting them. 

We should be spending this time talking about positive things 
rather than going over old rehashed, rejected proposals. So I wel- 
come your testimony. 

[The statement of Mr. Rogers follows:] 



14 


Chairman Hal Rogers 
House Committee on Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Homeland Security 
FY14 Department of Homeland Security Budget Request 
April 11, 2013 

Opening Statement As Prepared 


Mr. Chairman, thank you for your conuneiits and for yielding to me. Madam Secretary, tliank 
you for being with us today to discuss the Department of Homeland Security’s Fiscal Year 2014 
budget request. 

In tire past three years, die Appropriations Committee has worked across the aisle and across die 
Capitol, demonstrating the commitment of Members and staff alike to regular" order as well as 
honest and fair negotiations. I am proud to associate myself with similar comments made by 
Senator Mikulski, my newly minted counterpart in the other body, as well as Ranking Member 
Nita Lowey, about the importance of having hearings on what the federal agencies are spending, 
crafting bills that responsibly fund die federal government, and looking for areas in oiu 
goveimnent where we can be more efficient. 

This return to regular order has culminated in a number of bipartisan Appropriations bills that 
have slowed the pace of govemnent spending in historic fashion, balancing die realities of our 
dire fiscal situation with the need to protect our homeland and our coimtry’s most "vulnerable 
citizens. This is the way it’s supposed to work, and the way that is best for oiu" coimtiy’s 
economy and the taxpayer. 

But, candidly. Madam Secretary, oiu" shared task isn’t made any easier with budget submissions 
like the one you’ve put before us today. I feel like Yogi Beira with deja vii all over again: 

• Once again, the Department has proposed to decimate Coast Guard and ICE ftuidiiig that 
supports the men and women who bravely defend our homeland oii the frontlines, in 
favor of headquarters pet projects and controver sial research programs. 

• Once again, the budget request uses phony, unauthorized offsets to pay for ciitical 
aviation seciuity measures. 

• Once again, the Department has failed to submit a niunber of plans and reports required 
by law, which aie essential to help this Committee do its work - and do its work well. 

• And once again, this budget submission would add layers of buieaucracy to the aheady 
tangled web of agencies under yoiu purview' at DHS headquarters. 

Many of these proposals are recycled directly ffoin last year’s budget, and nearly all of these 
misaligned priorities were patently rejected by the Congress in tire FY13 bills that passed both 
Chambers last month. These trends are becoming a sadly predictable tenet of this 
Administration’s budgeting strategy. 




15 


Pffl-ticulai'ly where our Nation’s security is involved, we need a legitimate budget that ties 
fimding to results and mission requirements - unfortunately, what I see here is a largely political 
document wlrich mirrors the fear-mongering tactics employed by DHS and others leading up to 
implementation of sequestration, especially ICE’s release of several hundred detainees prior to 
these budget cuts. 

Needless to say, this gives me great coucem. Madam Secretary, I hope your testimony today 
will allay my concerns as we work together' in protecting our homeland. Thank you. 

mm 



16 


Mr. Carter. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. We are honored to have 
you here. 

We are now also honored to have the ranking member of the 
whole committee, Ms. Lowey. I recognize her for her comments. 

Thank you, Ms. Lowey, for being here. 

Opening Statement: Ms. Lowey 

Ms. Lowey. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. 

And I want to also acknowledge that I join with Chairman Rog- 
ers in hoping that we could have regular order and go through the 
process and work together to accomplish our goals. 

I want to welcome you. Secretary Napolitano. It has been my 
pleasure working with you over the past four years to secure our 
borders, prevent acts of terrorism, improve cyber security, and pro- 
vide our first responders with the equipment and resources they 
need to protect our communities. 

I would also like to thank you and Administrator Fugate for your 
handling of Super Storm Sandy. As our Nation confronted one of 
the most severe and damaging storms in our history, you managed 
the federal response to the storm with precision. 

I also truly appreciate your regular updates for Members so that 
we could get timely information to our local partners on the ground 
in the immediate aftermath of the storm. 

However, you come before us today with a budget that again 
would consolidate state and local grants into a large pot with little 
direction without authorization from Congress and expressly 
against the wishes of this subcommittee. 

I am concerned that efforts to consolidate these grants in such 
a way could result in diluting crucial terrorism funds from the 
areas most at risk of attacks and leaving transit and port security 
in the Nation’s most densely populated areas without the resources 
necessary to prevent and respond to acts of terror. 

Again, I would like to thank Chairman Carter and Ranking 
Member Price for holding this hearing today and you. Secretary 
Napolitano, for joining us. Thank you. 

[The statement of Ms. Lowey follows:] 



17 


Lowey Statement at Hearing on Department of Homeland Security 2014 Budget Request 


Welcome, Secretary Napolitano. It has been my pleasure working with you over the past four 
years to secure our borders, prevent acts of terrorism, improve cyber security and provide our 
first responders with the equipment and resources they need to protect our communities. 


I would also like to thank you and Administrator Fugate for your handling of Superstorm Sandy. 
As our nation confronted one of the most severe and damaging storms in our history, you 
managed the federal response to the storm with precision. I also truly appreciate your regular 
updates for Members so that we could get timely information to our local partners on the ground 
in the immediate aftermath of the storm. 


However, you come before us today with a budget that again would consolidate FEMA State 
and local grants into a large pot with little direction, without authorization from Congress, and 
expressly against the wishes of this Committee. I am concerned that efforts to consolidate these 
grants in such a way could result in diluting crucial anti-terrorism funds from areas most at risk 
of attacks and leave transit and port security in the nation's most densely populated areas 
without the resources necessary to prevent and respond to acts of terror. I look forward to 
discussing this with you shortly. 


Again, I'd like to thank Chairman Carter and Ranking Member Price for holding this hearing 
today and you. Secretary Napolitano, for joining us. 




18 


Mr. Carter. Thank you, Ms. Lowey, and, once again, welcome. 

Madam Secretary, your entire written statement, we have that. 
It will he entered into the record. You are now recognized for five 
minutes to summarize your testimony. 

Opening Statement: Secretary Napolitano 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, thank you. Thank you. Chairman 
Carter, Chairman Rogers, Ranking Member Lowey, Ranking Mem- 
ber Price, Members of the committee, subcommittee. Thank you for 
the opportunity to discuss the President’s fiscal year 2014 budget 
for the Department of Homeland Security [DHS]. 

There have been several points raised by you and others in their 
opening statements and I look forward to addressing issues like re- 
ports and the FEMA [Federal Emergency Management Agency] 
consolidation with you during the Q&A part of the program. 

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the creation of DHS, the 
largest reorganization of the Federal Government since the forma- 
tion of the Department of Defense. 

After 10 years of effort, DHS has transformed 22 legacy agencies 
into a single integrated department, building a strengthened home- 
land security enterprise and a more secure America better 
equipped to confront the range of threats that we face. 

Our workforce of nearly 240,000 law enforcement agents, officers, 
and men and women on the front lines puts their lives at risk 
every day securing our land, air, and maritime borders, enforcing 
our immigration laws, and responding to natural disasters. They 
work in every state and more than 75 countries strengthening 
homeland security through cooperation, information sharing, train- 
ing, and technical assistance with many of our partners. 

The President’s fiscal year 2014 budget for DHS allows us to 
build on our progress over the past 10 years by preserving core 
front-line operational priorities. At the same time, given the cur- 
rent fiscal environment, this is the third straight year that our 
budget request reflects a reduction from the previous year. 

Specifically, the budget request is 2.2 percent or more than $800 
million below the fiscal year 2013 enacted budget. While our mis- 
sion has not changed and we continue to face evolving threats, we 
have become more strategic in how we use limited resources focus- 
ing on a risk-based approach. 

This is coupled with an unprecedented commitment to fiscal dis- 
cipline, which has led to over $4 billion in cost avoidances and re- 
ductions over the past 4 years through our Efficiency Review. 

Before I discuss the department’s budget, however, I would like 
to take a moment to talk about the mandatory reductions imposed 
by sequestration, which are significant, more than $3 billion in cuts 
across DHS over 6 months. 

The recent full year appropriations bill enabled DHS to mitigate 
to some degree the projected sequestered impacts under the CR 
[Continuing Resolution] on our operations and workforce, but there 
is no doubt that these cuts will affect operations both in the short 
and the long terms. 

Sustained cuts at these sequester levels will result in reduced 
operational capacity, breached staffing floors, and economic impacts 
to the private sector through reduced and canceled contracts. 



19 


Nonetheless, we continue to do everything we can to minimize 
impacts on our core mission and employees consistent with the 
operational priorities in our 2014 budget, which I will briefly high- 
light for you. 

First, to prevent terrorism and enhance security, the fiscal year 
2014 budget continues to support risk-based security initiatives in- 
cluding TSA PreCheck, Global Entry, and other trusted traveler 
programs. As a result, we expect one in four travelers to receive 
some form of expedited screening domestically by the end of the 
year. 

The budget supports Administration efforts to secure maritime 
cargo and the global supply chain by strengthening efforts to inter- 
dict threats at the earliest possible point. 

We continue our strong support for state and local partners 
through training, fusion centers, and information sharing on a wide 
range of critical homeland security issues. 

We also fund cutting-edge research and development to address 
evolving biological, radiological, and nuclear threats, including con- 
struction of the NBAF [National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility], a 
state-of-the-art bio-containment facility central to the protection of 
the Nation’s food supply and our national and economic security. 

Next, to secure and manage our borders, the budget continues 
the Administration’s robust border security efforts while facili- 
tating legitimate travel and trade. It sustains historic deployments 
of personnel between our ports of entry along our borders as well 
as continued utilization of proven effective surveillance technology 
along the highest traffic areas of the southwest border. 

To expedite travel and trade while reducing wait times at the 
ports of entry including both land and air ports, the budget re- 
quests an additional 3,500 port officers, 1,600 paid for by appro- 
priations and the remainder by an increase to the immigration user 
fees that have not been adjusted since 2001. 

To secure our maritime borders, the budget invests in recapital- 
ization of Coast Guard assets including the seventh National Secu- 
rity Cutter and Fast Response Cutters. 

The budget also continues the department’s focus on smart and 
effective enforcement of our Nation’s immigration laws. The budget 
supports the Administration’s unprecedented efforts to more effec- 
tively focus the enforcement system on public safety threats, border 
security, and the integrity of the immigration system through ini- 
tiatives such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and 
greater use of prosecutorial discretion. 

At the same time, the budget makes significant reductions to in- 
efficient programs like the 287(g) Task Force agreements while 
supporting more cost-effective initiatives like the nationwide imple- 
mentation of Secure Communities. 

The budget invests in monitoring and compliance, promoting ad- 
herence to work-site related laws. Form 1-9 inspections, the en- 
hancements to the E-Verify program, while continuing to support 
Alternatives to Detention, detention reform, and immigrant inte- 
gration efforts. 

Comprehensive immigration reform will help us continue to build 
on these efforts and strengthen border security by enabling DHS 



20 


to further focus existing resources on criminals, human smugglers 
and traffickers, and national security threats. 

Next, to safeguard and secure cyberspace, this budget makes sig- 
nificant investments to strengthen cybersecurity including funds to 
first secure our Nation’s information and financial systems and to 
defend against cyber threats to private-sector and federal systems, 
the Nation’s critical infrastructure, and our economy. 

Second, the budget includes funds to support the President’s ex- 
ecutive order on improving critical infrastructure and cybersecu- 
rity, and the presidential policy directive on critical infrastructure 
security and resilience. 

And, finally, the budget includes funds to expedite the deploy- 
ment of EINSTEIN 3 to prevent and detect intrusions on govern- 
ment computer systems. 

Finally, to ensure continued resilience to disasters, the Presi- 
dent’s budget focuses on a whole community approach through 
emergency management. It includes resources for the DRF, the dis- 
aster relief fund, to support presidentially declared disasters or 
emergencies. 

And the Administration is again proposing the consolidation of 
18 grant programs into one National Preparedness Grants Program 
to create a robust national response capacity while reducing admin- 
istrative overhead. 

This competitive risk-based program will use a comprehensive 
process to assess gaps, identify and prioritize deployable capabili- 
ties, put funding to work quickly, and require grantees to regularly 
report on their progress. 

In conclusion, the fiscal year 2014 budget proposal reflects this 
Administration’s strong commitment to protecting the homeland 
and the American people through the effective and efficient use of 
DHS resources. 

Chairman Carter, Representative Price, Members of the com- 
mittee, thank you for the opportunity to testify here today and I 
am pleased to be able to answer your questions. 

[The information follows:] 



21 


Statement for the Record 
The Honorable Janet Napolitano 
Secretary 

United States Department of Homeland Security 


Before the 

United States House of Representatives 
Subcommittee on Homeland Security Appropriations 

AprUll,2013 


1 



22 


Chairman Carter, Ranking Member Price, and Members of the Subcommittee: 

Let me begin by saying thank you to tliis Subcommittee for the strong support you have provided 
me and the Department over the past 4 years. I look forward to continuing to work with you in the 
coming year to protect the homeland and the American people. 

I arn pleased to appear before the Subcoriunittee today to present President Obama’s Fiscal Year' 
(FY) 2014 Budget Request for the Department of Homeland Seanity (DHS). 

Tliis year marks the 10th armiversaiy of the creation of DHS, the largest reorgarrizatiou of the U.S. 
Govenunent since the formation of the Department of Defense, After 10 years of effort, DHS has 
transformed 22 agencies fiom across the Federal Govermnent into a siirgle integrated Department, 
building a strengthened homeland security enterpr ise and a more secure America better equipped to 
confront tire range of threats we face. 

Our workforce of nearly 240,000 law enforcement agents, officers, and men and women on the 
frontlines put their lives at risk every day to protect om' country from threats to the homeland, 
securing our land, air, and maritime borders; enforcing our immigration laws; and responding to 
natrnal disasters. Our employees are stationed in every state and in more than 75 coimtries aroturd 
the world, engaging with state, local, and foreign partners to strengthen homeland secruity through 
cooperation, information sharing, training, and technical assistance. Domestically, DHS works side 
by side with state and local^ law enforcement (SLLE) and emergency responders in om' 
communities, along orn borders, and tlnoughout a national network of fusion centers. The 
Department also collaborates with international partners, including foreign govermnents, major 
multilateral organizations, and global businesses to strengthen the security of tlie networks of global 
trade and travel, upon which om Nation’s economy and conmuurities rely. 

DHS employs a risk-based, intelligence-driven approach to help prevent teiTorisnr and other 
evolving security threats. Utilizing a multi-layered detection system, DHS focuses on enlianced 
targeting and information sharing, and on working beyond om' borders to interdict tlireats and 
dangerous actors at the earliest point possible. Each day. DHS screens 2 million passengers at 
domestic airports; iittercepts thousands of agr'iciiltm al thr eats: expedites the transit of near ly 
100,000 people througli tnusted traveler and known crewmember programs; and trains tliousands of 
federal, state, local, nual, tribal, territorial, and iriter'natiorial officers and agents tlirough more than 
550 basic and advanced training programs available at the Federal Law Enforcemenf Training 
Center (FLETC). We conduct vulnerability assessments of key' infiastiuctine, disseminate 
intelligence regar ding emrent and developing threats, and provide comrectivity to federal systems to 
help local law enforcemerrt and homeland security agencies across the comrtry irr reporting 
suspicious activities and implementing protective measures. 

Om borders and ports are stronger, more efficient, and better protected than ever before. At the 
southwest border, apprehensions have decreased to the lowest point in more tlian 30 years. We 
have significantly invested in additional peisomrel. technology, and infiastnictme, leading to 
historic progress along the border. We have deepened paifrierships 'with fedeial, state, local, and 


* “Local” law enfoi'ceiuent includes ail law enforcement at the municipal, tribal, and teiriiorial levels. 


2 



23 


inteniational law enforcement to combat transnational threats and criminal organizations to help 
keep our border communities safe. We have strengthened entry procedures to protect against the 
use of fraudulent dociuuents and the entry of individuals who may wish to do us harm. And we 
have made oiu ports of entry (POEs) more efficient to expedite lawful travel and trade. Each day, 
almost 1 million people arrive at our POEs by land, sea, and air. In FY 2012, DHS processed more 
than 350 million travelers at our POEs, including almost 100 million international air travelers and 
$2.3 trillion dollar s of tr ade, while enforcing U.S. laws that welcome travelers, protect health and 
safety, and facilitate the flow of goods essential to our economy. 

DHS has focused on smart and effective enforcement of U.S. immigration laws while streamlining 
and facilitating the legal immigration process. We have established clear enforcement priorities to 
focus the enforcement system on the removal of individuals who pose a danger to national secmity 
or a risk to public safety, including aliens convicted of crimes, with paiticrdar emphasis on violent 
cruninals, felons, and repeat offenders, while implementing a comprehensive worksite enforcement 
strategy to reduce demand for illegal employment and protect employment opportunities for the 
Nation’s lawful workforce. DHS has implemented major reforms to the Nation’s immigration 
detention system to enhance security and efficiency and protect the health and safety of detainees 
while expanding nationwide tire Secure Conmiunities program, which uses biometric mformation to 
identify criminal aliens in state and local correctional facilities. Over the past 4 years, the 
Department has also improved the legal immigration process by streamlining and modeniizing 
immigration benefits processes; strengthening fraud protections; protecting crime victims, asylees, 
and refugees; updating mles to keep iimnigraiit families togetlier; and launclring new initiatives to 
spin economic competitiveness. 

Today, our borders are more secure and oui' border coimmmities are among the safest communities 
in our country. We have removed record numbers of criminals from the United States, and oin 
hmnigration laws are being enforced according to sensible priorities, We have taken nmnerous 
steps to strengthen legal immigration and build greater integrity into the system. We are using our 
resources smaitly, effectively, responsibly. 

Despite these improvements, however, our inunigration system remains broken and outdated. That 
is why tlie Depaitment stands ready to unplement common-sense inunigration refonn that would 
contuiue investments in border security, crack down on companies that hire uiidocrnnented workers, 
improve the legal immigration system for employment-sponsored and family-sponsored 
inmiigrants, and establish a responsible pathway to earned citizenship. Comprehensive inmiigration 
refoim will help us continue to build on this progress and strengthen border security by providing 
additional tools and enabling DHS to further focus existing resomces on preventing the entry of 
crinunals, Inmratr smugglers and traffickers, and national secmity threats. 

Our Nation’s critical infrastructure is crucial to om economy and secmity. DHS is the Federal 
Government’s lead in secirring imclassrfted federal civilian govenunent networks as well as 
working with owners and operators of critical irrfrastrochrre to secme their networks and protect 
physical assets tluouglr risk assessment, mitigation, forerrsic analysis, and incident response 
capabilities. In 2012, DHS issued warnings and responded to arr average of 70 incidents per month 
arishig from more than 10,000 daily alerts. The President also issued an execrrtive order on 
cybeisecurity and a presidential policy directive on critical infrastructure secmity and resilience to 
strengthen the security and resilience of critical infrastructure against evolving tlireats tlnough an 


3 



24 


updated and overarching national framework that acknowledges the interdependencies between 
cybei-security and securing physical assets. 

In support of these efforts, DHS serves as tlie focal point for the U.S. Government’s cybersecmity 
outr each and awar eness activities and is focused on the development of a world-class cybersecurity 
workforce as well as innovative technologies that sustain safe, secure, and resilient critical 
iir& astincture. We work hand-in-hand with our private-sector partners, recognizing the importance 
of public-private partnerships to build resilience through a whole-of-community approach. In 
addition to tliese resporrsibilities, DHS combats cybercrime by leveraging the skills and resources of 
the law enforcement community and interagency partners to investigate and prosecute cyber 
criminals. 

DHS has fundamentally changed how we work with our state and local partners to prepare for, 
respond to, recover fiom, and mitigate the effects of disasters. Through the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), we have implemented irmovative practices to transform our disaster 
workforce tlirough the creation of FEMA Corps and the DHS Surge Capacity Workforce. Working 
closely with state and local officials, we preposition resouices before disasters hit and have 28 
national urban search and rescue teams on standby in addition to dozens of state and local teams to 
support response eflfoils. We train more tlian 2 million emergency management and response 
personnel aimually at the Emergency Management Institute, National Fire Academy, and tluougli 
Commimity Emergency Response Teams to improve capabilities across all hazards. Additionally, 
we have deployed new capabilities to help disaster survivors recover and communities rebuild. 

MAXIMIZING EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS 

The FY 2014 Budget for DHS is $60.0 billion in total budget authority and SdS-l billion in gross 
discretiouaiy ftmdiiig. These two amoimts include $5.6 billion hr Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) 
appropriations for recovery fiom major disasters, pursuant to the Budget Control Act. Excluding 
the $5.6 billion funding within the DRF, the net discretionary total is $39 billion. 

Realizing Efficiencies and Streamlining Operations 

Tire Department has implemented a variety of initiatives to cut costs, share resour ces across 
Components, and consolidate and streamline operations wherever possible. In FY 2014, these 
initiatives will result in $1.3 billion in savings fioin administrative and mission support areas, 
mcluding contracts, infonnatiou teclmology (IT), travel, persoimel moves, overtime, directed 
purchasing, professional services, and vehicle management. 

Dirough the Department-wide, employee-driven Efficiency Review (ER), which began in 2009, 
as well as other cost-saving initiatives, DHS has identified more than $4 billion in cost 
avoidances and reductions, and redeployed tliose fimds to mission-critical initiatives across tile 
Department. 

Strategic Sourcing 

Through ER and Component initiatives, DHS has used strategic soiucing initiatives to leverage the 
piuchasing power of the entire Department for items such as language services, tactical 
conirnimications services and devices, intelligence analysis services, and vehicle maintenance 
services. In FY 2012, we achieved $368 million in savings, and we project $250 million in savings 


4 



25 


for FY 2013- We expect a comparable level of savings as we continue forward with this approach 
iiiFY 2014. 

Travel and Conferences 

In support of the Administration’s Campaign to Cut Waste, DHS strengthened conference and 
travel policies and controls to reduce travel expenses, ensure conferences are cost-effective, and 
ensure both travel and conference attendance is driven by critical mission requirements. During 
2012, DHS issued a new directive that establishes additional standards for coirferences and requires 
regular reporting on conference spending, further increasing transparency and accountability. The 
Department’s FY 2014 budget projects an additional 20-perceut reduction in travel costs fiom 
FYs 2013-2016. 

Rea! Property’ Management 

DHS manages a real property portfolio of approximately 38,000 assets, which spans all 50 states 
and 7 U.S. territories. The Department has adopted strategies to achieve greater efficiencies in tire 
management of its real property portfolio that includes expediting the identification and disposal of 
imder-utilized assets as well as improving tire utilization of remaining Depar tment inventory. These 
efforts will result in reductions in the size of our civilian real estate inventory, aimuai operating and 
maintenance costs, and energy usage. DHS anticipates that the amount of space and cost per full- 
time equivalent employee will continue to decline as spaces ar e reconfigmed or new space is 
acquired on the basis of new workplace plaiming assumptions. DHS is committed to continuing to 
improve the management and alignment of its real property with advances in technology, mission, 
and work requirements. 

ManaBement and Integration 

Over the past 4 years, DHS has significantly improved departmental management, developing and 
impleraeiitiug a compr ehensive, strategic approach to enlrance Department-wide maturation and 
integration. We have improved acquisition oversight, onsming full consideration of the investment 
life cycle in cost estimates, establislrirrg procedttres to thoroughly vet new requirements and 
alternative solutions, and supporting fitll funding policies to minimize acquisition risk. The FY 
2014 Budget includes key investments to strerrgtlren the homeland security enterprise, increase 
irrtegration, address challenges raised by the U.S. Govemrnerrt Accountability Office (GAO), and 
continue to build upott the management refonns that have been inrplemented tmder this 
Administration. 

Modernization of the Department’s financial management systems has been consistently 
identified as critical by the Office of Management and Budget, tire GAO, and Corrgress, arrd is 
vital to orrr ability to provide strong stewardship of taxpayer dollars. Over the past several 
year s, we liave made significant pr ogress improving financial management practices arrd 
establishing irrtenra! controls, hr 2012. DHS earned a qualified audit opitrion on its Balarrce 
Sheet, a significant milestorre arrd a pivotal step toward increasing transparency and 
accountabihfy for the Department’s resources. This fitll-scope audit opinion is a result of 
DHS’s ongoing cormnitmeirt to instituting sound financial management practices to safeguard 
taxpayer dollars. 

Although DHS continues to maximize cost efficiencies and savings wherever possible, new 
irrvestruent must be made to improve om outdated financial systerrrs arrd tools. The FY 2014 


5 



26 


Budget supports financial system modernization at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), which also 
provides financial management services to two otlier DHS Components. 

DHS is also implementing a coordinated management approach for strategic investments and 
resour ce decisions involving multiple Components througlr the Integrated Investment Life Cycle 
Model. This initiative will help the Department enhance mission effectiveness while achieving 
management efficiencies by providiirg a broader, enterprise-wide per'spective and ensitring DHS 
investments address tire gr eatest needs of the Department. 

Strategic Re-Organizations 

In today’s fiscal enviromnent, the Department has challenged its workforce to fundamentally 
rethink how it does business, from the largest to the smallest investments. To help reduce costs, 
DHS conducted a formal base budget review, looking at all aspects of the Department’s budget 
to find savings arrd better align resources with operational requirernerrts. 

Uni fed States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US- VISIT) 

To better align the functioirs of US "VISIT with the operational Components, the Budget re-proposes 
the h ansfer of US-VISIT frmctions from the National Protection arrd Progr ams Directorate (NPPD) 
to U.S. Customs arrd Border Protection (CBP), consistent witlr the President’s FY 2013 Budget, 
Currently, CBP operates mmreroirs screerring and targeting systems, arrd integratirrg US-’VISIT 
within CBP will strengthen the Department’s overall vetting capability while also realizing 
operational efficierrcies and cost savings. 

Stale and Local Grants 

Given tire fiscal challenges facirrg the Deparfment’s state and local partners, DHS is also 
approaching these paifnerships in new and iimovative ways. The Budget re-proposes tire National 
Preparedness Gratit Program (NPGP), originally preserrted in the FY 2013 Budget, to develop, 
sustain, and leverage core capabilities across Hie country in support of national pr eparedness, 
preveirtiorr, and response, with appropriate adjushuents to respond to stakeholder feedback in 2012. 
While providing a stmctme that will give grantees more certainty about how fimdiug will flow, the 
proposal contimres to rrtilize a compr ehensive process for assessing regional and national gaps; 
support the development of a robust cross-jurisdictional and r eadily deployable state and local 
assets; and require grantees to r egular ly report progress in the acquisition and development of these 
capabilities. 

Land Port of Entry (LPOE) Delegation 

Begirmiug in FY 2013, the General Services Admruistratiorr (GSA) will work with DHS to delegate 
the operations of LPOE facilities to CBP. Tire distinctive nature of LPOEs as mission-oriented, 

24/7 oper ational assets of CBP, as well as natiorral trade and transportation inffastructme, 
differentiates tliis part of the portfolio fiotrt other federal brrildiugs matraged by GSA. The 
delegation facilitates faster delivery of service tailored to the specific needs of CBP’s mission and 
will be more resporrsive to charrging priorities and critical operations. 

DHS Commonality Efforts 

The successful irrtegr ation of 22 legacy agencies into DHS was an hrrportant arrd ambitious 
rmdertaking that has incr eased the Department’s ability to rmderstand, mitigate, and protect against 
tlrreats to the Nation. Fmther urtegration of the Department and of the development of a “One- 
DHS” cultme will strengthen effectiverress, improve decision making to address shared issues, and 

6 



27 


prioritize resources in an era of fiscal constraint. The FY 20 1 4 Budget continues this emphasis and 
supports ongoing efToits aimed at fintliering integration, some of wliich are higlilighted as follows. 

Common Vetting 

It is estimated tliat DHS spends approximately $1.8 billion aimually on information-based 
screening. Consequently, DHS has established a Common Vetting Initiative to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of vetting operations within tlie Department. Although this work is 
ongoing, it is expected that this effort will identify oppoifimities for streamlining operations and 
strengthening front-end assessment of requirements as par t of an integrated invesbnent life cycle. 

Additionally, DHS is leveraging existing capabilities and its research and development (R&D) 
capabilities at the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) to enhance the Department’s exit 
pr ogram, and to identify and sanction those who overstay their lawful period of admission to the 
United States. This initiative is focnsed on aggregating information within existing data systems, 
enliancitig review of potential overstays, increasing automated matching, and incorporating 
additional biometric elements to provide the foundation for a future biometric exit solution. The 
transfer of US-VTSIT functions to CBP and U.S. Iimuigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) 
supports this effort and better aligns mission fimctions. 

Aviation Commonality 

The Department is projected to spend approximately $ 1 .2 billion over FY s 20 1 4-20 1 8 on 
procmement of aviation assets. In 20 U , DHS stood up an aviation commonalities workiirg group to 
improve operational coordination hr acquisition, facilities, maintenance, and logistics between CBP 
and USCG. The Department also launched an Aviation and Marine Commonalities Pilot Project in 
the fall of 2012 to test the imified command and control of departmental aviation and marine forces. 
Complementing this effort, DHS recently began an ER initiative, which will mcrease cross- 
Component collaboration for aviation-related equipment and maintenance by establishing excess 
equipment sharing, maintenance services, and contract teaming agreements, as well as other 
opportunities for aviation-related efficiencies, 

Investigaliom 

A recent partnersliip between ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations and the U.S. Secret Service 
(USSS) demonstrates the Department’s commitment to leveraging capabilities across Components 
and findhig efficiencies. Both ICE and USSS are expanding participation in the existing Secret 
Seivice Eleetrouic Crimes Task Forces (ECTFs), wliich will strengthen the Department’s 
cybercrimes investigative capabilities and realize efficiencies in the procm ement of computer 
forensic hardware, software licensing, and trainiug. Tlris collaboration will integrate resources 
devoted to investigating transnational criminal organizations; transnational child exploitation; 
financial crime, including money laundermg and identity and intellecmal property theft; and 
network uitrusions by domestic and international threats. Hiis will fuitlier enhance tire response 
capability of the Department to a cyber event by leveraging the assets of the Secret Service’s 3 1 
ECTFs, which bring together more than 2,700 international, federal, state, and local law 
enforcement partners; 3,100 private-sector members; and 300 academic partners. 

CBP Staffing and Mission Integration 

Given the Administration’s strong and continued focus on border security, DHS has imdertaken a 
series of initiatives to ensure tliat CBP’s operations are integiated and that Border Patiol Agents 
(BPAs) and CBP Officers (CBPOs) are optimally deployed. As part of its mission integration 

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efforts, CBP has applied corapleraentary BPA and CBPO deployments to enhance mission sets both 
at and between the POEs. Towaid tliis goal, CBP has identified numerous mission areas where 
BPAs can substantially support: port operations, including c anin e detection operations for drugs 
and concealed hiunans; outbound operations that target currency, firearms, and fugitives; port 
security, coimter-suiveillance, and perimeter' enforcement operations; inbound secondar'y 
conveyance inspections for narcotics and hmnan smuggling. CBP has also identified mission areas 
where BPAs secme and transport seized eorrtraband. 

CBP is realizing significarrt operational and force-multiplying benefits from deployiirg BPAs to 
support POE requirements. Over the last year, these efforts have augmented POE operations, 
enabling CBP to more effectively addr ess the threat of money and weapons being smuggled 
southbormd into Mexico for use by transnational criminal organizations. In 2013, CBP is 
expanding these efforts by synchronizing mission integration efforts across the fom key southwest 
border operational corridors: South Texas, El Paso/New Mexico, Arizona, and Southern California. 
Tile harmonization of current efforts will increase rapid response capability, develop unified 
intelligence and targeting approaches, and identify additional ar eas for on-the-ground operational 
collaboratiorr. 

Supporting Economic Growth and Job Creation 

In support of the President’s executive order on travel and toirrisrn and to continue birilding upon 
the Administration’s significant investments in border security, the FY 2014 Budget includes 
several proposals to invest in the men arrd women on the frontlines of oirr 329 POEs alorrg the 
border and at airports arrd seaports across the country. Processing tire more tharr 350 million 
travelers armually provides near ly $150 billion in economic stimulus, yet the fees that support these 
operations have not been adjusted in many cases for more than a decade. As the complexity of our 
operations continues to expand, the gap between fee collections and the operations they support is 
gr owing, and tire number of workforce hours fees support decreases each year. Accordingly, the 
Budget supports 3,477 newCBPOs to reduce growing wait times at om' POEs and increase seizmes 
of illegal items (guns, drugs, cuiTency, and cormterfeit goods). This includes appropriated ftmding 
for 1,600 additional CBPOs and, witli congressional approval, 1,877 new CBPOs through 
adjustments in immigration and customs inspections user fees to recover more of the costs 
associated with providing services. These fee proposals will also help address die staffing gap 
outlined in CBP’s Resource Optimization at Ports of Entry, FY 2013 Report to Congress, submitted 
with the President’s Budget. In addition, CBP and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are 
evaluating financial models to achieve full cost recovery for agricultural inspectioual services 
provided by CBP. 

Beyond the additional fi:ondine positions, the President’s Budget also provides direct support for 
thousands of new jobs through major infrastructure projects such as the National Bio and Agro- 
Defense Facility (NBAF) and a consolidated departmental headquarters at die St, Elizabeths 
Campus. Investment in USCG recapitalization projects supports more than 4,000 jobs as well in 
the shipbuilding and aii'craft industries. Through our gr ant programs we will continue helping 
local communities to create and maiutahi jobs, while strengthening the resiliency of important 
ecoiioinic sectors and infiastructme. The Budget additionally supports CBP and ICE efforts to 
combat commercial trade fraud, iiicludiug intellectual property law inliingement, estimated to 
cost the economy up to $250 billion each year. 


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Continued investment in Coast Guard frontline operations and recapitalization of its aging fleet 
helps to protect the Nation’s Exclusive Economic Zone, a source of $122 billion in annual U.S. 
revenue, and to secure 361 ports and thousands of miles of maritime thoroughfares that support 
95 percent of trade with the United States. Through CBP and the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA), we continue to promote safe and secure travel and tourism, supporting a 
$2.3 trillion dollar tourism industry. Tliese programs, among others, enhance our Nation’s 
safety and security while fostering economic growth and job creation. 

BUDGET PRIORITIES 


The FY 2014 Budget prioritizes programs and activities within the homeland security mission areas 
outlined in the Department’s 2010 Quadrennial Homeland Secmity Review, the 2010 Bottom-Up 
Review, and the FY 2012-2016 DHS Strategic Plan, undertaken by the Department to align its DHS 
resomces witli a comprehensive shategy to meet tire Nation’s homeland security needs. 

The Budget builds on the progress the Department has made in each of its mission areas while 
strengthening existing capabilities, enlianciug partnerships across all levels of government and with 
the private sector, streamlining operations, and increasing efficiencies. 

Mission 1: Preventing Terrorism and Enhancing Security - Protecting the United States from 
tenorism is the cornerstone of homeland security. DHS’s counterterrorism responsibilities focus on 
tliree goals; preventing terrorist attacks; preventing the unauthorized acquisition, importation, 
movement, or use of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear materials and capabilities 
within the United States; and reducing tlie vulnerability of critical U.S. infrastructure and key 
resources, essential leadership, and major events to tenorist attacks and other hazards. 

Mission 2: Securing and Managing Our Borders - The protection of the Nation’s borders — land, 
air, and sea— from the illegal entry of people, weapons, drugs, and otlier contraband while 
facilitating lawful travel and trade is vital to homeland security, as well as the Nation’s economic 
prosperity. The Department’s border security and management efforts focus on thiee mtenelated 
goals: effectively securing U.S. air, land, and sea borders; safeguarding and streamlining lawful 
trade and tiavel; and disiupting and dismantling transnational crimuial and terrorist organizations. 

Mission 3: Enforcing and Administering Our Immigration Laws - DHS is focused on suiait 
and effective enforcement of U.S. immigration laws while streamlming and facilitating the legal 
immigiation process. The Department has frmdamentally reformed inimigiation enforcement, 
focusing on identifying and reniovuig criminal aliens who pose a threat to public safety and 
targeting employers who knowingly and repeatedly break the law. 

Mission 4: Safeguarding and Securing Cyberspace - DHS is responsible for secirring 
rmclassified federal civilian government networks and working with owners and operators of 
critical infr astructme to secine their networks througlr risk assessment, mitigation, and incident 
response capabilities. To combat cybercrime, DHS leverages the .skills and resources of the law' 
enforcement conunmiity aird interagency partners to investigate and prosecute cyber criminals. 

DHS also serves as die focal point for the U.S. Govenmient’s cybersecur ity outreach and awareness 
efforts to create a more secme eirviromnent in which the ptivate or financial information of 
individuals is better protected. 


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Mission 5: Ensuring Resilience to Disasters - DHS coordinates the comprehensive federal efforts 
to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate a teiTorist attack, natiual 
disaster, or other large-scale emergency, while working with individuals; coirmiunities; the private 
and nonprofit sectors; faith-based organizations; and federal, state, local, territorial, and tribal 
(SLIT) partners to ensure a swift and effective recovery. The Department’s efforts to help build a 
ready and resilient Nation include fostering a whole community approach to emergency 
management nationally; building the Nation’s capacity to stabilize and recover fiom a catastrophic 
event; bolstering information sharing and building unity of effort and coimnon strategic 
understanding among the emergency marragement team: providing training to ortr homeland 
security partners; arrd leading and coordiuatirrg national partnerslrips to foster preparedness and 
resilience across the private sector. 

In addition to these missions, DHS shives to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of its 
operations while str engthening the horrreland security enterprise. Tire collective efforts of federal, 
SLTT, uon-goveinnrental, and private-sector partners, as well as individuals and corrrmrmities 
across the cormtry are critical to oiu shared secmity. This includes errhancing shared awareness of 
risks arrd tlrreats, building capable, resilierrt cormrrunities and fosterirrg irmovative approaches and 
sohrfiorrs through cutting-edge scietrce and teclmology. 

Hre following are higlrlights of the FY 2014 Budget. 

Preventing Terrorism and EnhanciuB Security 

Girarding agairrst terrorism was the formding mission of DHS and remairrs otn top priority. To 
address evolving terrorist threats and ensure the safety of the traveling public, the Brrdget 
safegrrards tire Natiorr’s transportation systerrrs througli a layered detection system and continues to 
support risk-based security irritiatives. includittg TSA Prey™_ Global Entry, arrd other tnisted 
traveler progranrs. The Budget supports Administration efforts to secrue maritune cargo and the 
global supply cltaitr by stierrgtheiriug efforts to prescreen and evalrrate high-risk cargo. Investnreuts 
in DHS’s intelligence and targeting progranrs coupled with the expansion of the National Targeting 
Center, supported by the Brrdget, will increase operatioiral efficiencies and eirlrarrce our ability to 
irrterdict tlneats arrd danger ous people before they reach the United States. 

Funding is included for cutting-edge R&D to address evolvutg biological, radiological, arrd rruclear 
threats. Among the iiirportant research investments is the constnrction of NBAF, a state-of-the-art 
bio-coirtaimirent facility for the study of foreign animal and emergirrg zoouotic diseases tlrat will 
replace the irradequate facility at Plirm Island. The Budget fiitrds the Sectrring the Cities (STC) 
program to protect our highest-risk cities from radiological or nuclear attack arrd continues national 
bio-preparedtress arrd resporrse efforts. The Budget also continues strorrg sirpport for state arrd local 
partners tlrrouglr the NPGP, trairring, fusiotr centers, arrd intelligence analysis and informatiorr 
sharirrg on a wide range of critical homeland secmity isstres. 

• Strengthening Risk-Based Aviation Securin’: TheFY 2014 Budget supports DHS’s effort to 
employ risk-based, intelligence-driven operations to prevent tencaist attacks and to reduce the 
vulnerability of the Nation’s aviatioir system to terrorism. These secmity rneasrtres create a 
rrrulti-layered system to strerrgtherr aviation security from the time a passenger pmchases a ticket 
to arrival at his or her destination. The FY 2014 Brrdget: 


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o Continues expansion of trusted traveler programs, such as TSA Prev/™ ajjj Global Entry, 
wlrich are pre-screening initiatives for travelers wlio volunteer information about tliemselves 
before flying in order to potentially expedite screening at domestic checkpoints and through 
ciLstonrs. By 2014, TSA anticipates that one in four members of the traveling public will be 
eligible for expedited domestic screening, 

o Continues enhanced behavior detection in which interview and behavioral analysis 

techniques are rtsed to determine if a traveler should be referred for additional screenurg at 
the checkpoint. Analyses from pilots in FY 2013 will infoim the next steps on how laiger- 
scale implementation in FY 2014 could improve capabilities in a risk-based security 
eirviroirment. 

o Expands Seciue Flight to perform watch list rrratchirrg for passengers befor e boarding large 
general aviation aircraft. An estimated 1 1 million additional Secrtre Flight Passenger Data 
sets are expected to be submitted by general aviation operators per year. 

o Supports, as part of its multi-layered security strategy, the Federal Flight Deck Officer and 
Flight Crew progranr as a fully reimbtrrsable program rrnder FLETC’s existing authorities. 

o Prioritizes TSA’s missiorr-critical screening ftmctions, and proposes the transfer of all exit 
lane staffing to local airports pursuant to federal regulatory arrthorities. Airports will be 
responsible for irttegratirtg e.xit laire secmity irtto their per utreter secmity plans, which are 
assessed regularly by TSA. 

Enhaucing huermtional Collaboration: To most effectively cany out oirr core missions, DHS 
continues to engage countries around the world to protect both national and economic secmity. 
The FY 2014 Budget supports DHS’s strategic partnerships with international allies and 
enlianced targeting and information-sharmg efforts to interdict tlireats and dangerous people and 
cargo at the earliest point possible. The Secretaiy’s focus on inteniational partnerships includes 
elevating the Office of International Affairs to a stand-alone office and a direct report. The 
FY 2014 Budget; 

o Supports the Immigration Advisoiy Program and the contmued growth of the Pre-Depaifure 
Vetting, which have experienced a 156-percent increase in the ninnber of no board 
recommendations suice 2010. Tlu-ougli these programs, CBP identifies high-risk travelers 
who are likely to be inadmissible into the United Stales and makes recommendations to 
commercial cairiers to deny boarding. 

o Continues to modernize the IT capability for screening visa applications to support tlie 
expansion of Visa Security Progr am (VSP) coverage at existing overseas high-risk visa 
adjudication posts. The VSP represents ICE’s front line in jffotecting the United States 
against terrorists and criminal organizations by preventing foreign nationals who pose as a 
tlueat to national secmity fi-om entering the United States, hi FY' 2014, VSP will enhance 
visa vetting by increasing automated data exchange with tlie Department of Stale and CBP’s 
National Targeting Center, ICE will leverage modernization to increase investigations of 
visa applicants who pose a potential higli risk for terrorism and are attempting to travel to 
tlie United States. 


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o Supports the bilateral Beyond tlie Border Action Plan with Canada, including CBP’s pre- 
inspection efforts in rail, land, and marine enviromnents. Pre-inspection is a precursor to 
precleajance, which supports DHS’s extended border strategy tluough the identification and 
prevention of terrorists, criminals, and other national secmity threats before they enter tire 
United States. Pre-inspection/preclearance also helps protect U S. agricultrue from the 
spread of foreign pests, disease and global outbreaks. 

Supporting Surface Transportation Security: The surface transportation sector, due to its open 
access architecture, has a fundamentally different operational environment than aviation. 
Accordingly, DHS helps secme siuTace transportation infiastmctme tluougli risk-based security 
assessments, critical infrasfructtvre hardening, and close partnerships with SLLE partners. The 
FY 2014 Budget supports DHS’s efforts to bolster these efforts. Specifically, the Budget: 

o Includes the NPGP, described in more detail on the following pages. This proposal focuses 
on building national capabilities focused on preventing and responding to threats across the 
country, including the smface transportation sector, through Urban Search and Rescue 
teams, canine explosives detection teams, and HAZMAT response as well as target 
hardening of critical transit infrastructure. 

o Fimds smface transportation security inspector and canine teams who work collaboratively 
witli public and private-sector partners to strengthen security and mitigate the risk to om' 
Nation’s transportation systems. 

o Supports compliance inspections tluoughout the freight rail and mass transit domains, 
critical facility secmity reviews for pipeline facilities, comprehensive mass transit 
assessments that focus on high-risk transit agencies, and coiporate secmity reviews 
conducted in multiple modes of transportation to assess secmity. 

o Fmids 37 Visible Intenuodal Prevention and Response (VtPR) teams, including 22 multi- 
modal Teams. VTPR teams are composed of personnel with expertise in inspection, 
behavior detection, security screening, and law enforcement for random, unpredictable 
deployments tluoughout the transportation sector to prevent potential terrorist and criminal 
acts. 

o Helps secure critical infrasU uctiu e and key resources located on or near the water tluough 
patrols, enforcing secmity zones and secmity escorts of certain vessels (e.g., vessels 
containing hazardous cargo) in key U.S. ports and waterways. 

Strengthening Giobal Supply Chain Security-: The FY 2014 Budget continues to support the 
Administration’s Global Supply Cham Secmity Strategy, which provides a national vision for 
global supply chain security that is secme, efficient, and resilient across air, land, and sea modes 
of transportation. The Budget: 

o Supports increased targeting capability thiougli enlrnuced automated systems providing CBP 
with real-time information to focus its enforcement activities on higher-risk passengers and 
cargo. 


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o Supports the consolidation of CBP’s separate cargo and passenger targeting locations, wliich 
will promote increased targeting efficiencies and reduced delays of travelers and cargo. 

o Strengthens the Container Security Initiative, enabling CBP to prescreen and evaluate high- 
risk containers before they are shipped to the United States. 

o Continues support to improve the coordination of international cargo seciuity efforts, 
accelerate secinity efforts in response to vulnerabilities, enstue compliance with screening 
requirements, and strengthen aviation security operations overseas. 

o Supports ongoing assessments of anti-terrorism measures in the ports of our maritime 
trading partners through the Coast Girard International Port Security Program. 

o Supports enhanced system efficiency tlirongh continued development and deployment of the 
International Trade Data System. This important resource provides a single automated 
window for submitting trade information to the federal agencies responsible for facilitating 
iutemational trade and secirriug America’s supply chain. 

Research, Development, and Innovation (RD&I) at S&T: The FY 2014 Budget includes 
$467 million for RD&I, a $200 million increase from FY 2012 enacted levels. This ftmding 
includes support for unclassified cybersecurity research tliat supports the public and private 
sectors and the global Internet infrastructure. It also allows S&T to resume R&D in areas such 
as land and maritime border security; chemical, biological, and explosive defense research; 
disaster resilience; cyberseciu ity; and coimtertenorism. 

Support to SLLE: The FY 20 14 Budget continues support for SLLE efforts to understand, 
recognize, prevent, and respond to pre-operatioual activity and other crimes tliat are preciusors 
or indicators of terrorist activity thr ough training, technical assistance, exercise support, secur ity 
clearances, cormectivity to federal systems, technology, and grant funding. The Budget 
supports effotfs to share iritelligeuce and infonnatiou on a wide range of critical homeland 
security issues. The Budget continues to huild state and local analytic capabilities through the 
Natiorral Network of Fusion Cerrters, with a focus on strengthening cross-Deparfment arrd cross- 
government interaction with fiision centers. It also elevates the Office of State and Local Law 
Enforcement to a stand-alone office. The Budget: 

o Enables DHS to continue to assess capabrlity development arrd performance inrprovements 
of the National Network of Fusion Centers through an amiual assessment, collection of 
outconres-based perfomrance data, and targeted exercises. Resources also enable the Office 
of hitelligeiice and Airalysis, in parfnership with the Office for Civil Riglits and Civil 
Liberties and the Privacy Office, to provide privacy and civil rights and civil hberties 
training and technical assistance support for fiision centers and their respective liaison 
officer programs. Additionally, unique partiiersliips with FEMA, NPPD, USCG, and ICE 
have faciUtated additional analytic training for fiision center analysts on a variety of topics. 

o Continues to support SLTT efforts to counter violent extremism, including the delivery of 
Building Commimities of Trust initiative roimdtables, which focus on developing tnisf 


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between community leaders and law enforcement officials so they cooperatively address the 
challenges of crime and terrorism. 

o Expands, in partnership with the Departnrents of Justice (DOJ), Education, and Healtli and 
Hiunan Services, ongoing efforts to prevent future mass casualty shootings, improve 
preparedness, and strengthen security and resilience in schools and other potential targets 
while working witli partners at all levels of government. 

Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Tlrreat Detection: Coiurtering biological, truclear, atrd 
radiological tlireats requires a coordinated, whole-of-govemment approach. DHS, tlirougli the 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) arrd tire Office of Health Affairs, works in 
partnership with agencies across federal, state, and local governments to prevent and deter 
attacks using radiological and nuclear (rad/nuc) weapons through nuclear detection and 
forensics progranrs arrd provides medical atrd scientific expertise to support bio-preparedness 
and response efforts. 

Tire FY 2014 Budget supports the following efforts; 

o Global Nuclear Detection Architecture (GNDA): DNDO, in coordination with other DHS 
Components, the Attorney Gerreral, and the Departments of State, Defense, atrd Energy, 
leads the continued evohrtion of the GNDA. Tliis comprehensive framework incorporates 
detector systems, telecommunicatiorr, and persoimel, with the supporting information 
exchanges, programs, and protocols that serve to detect, analyze, and report on rad/nuc 
materials that are not in regulatory control. 

o STC: $22 million is requested for the SIC program to continue developing the domestic 
portion of the GNDA to enhance the Nation’s ability to detect and prevent a radiological or 
nuclear attack in om highest-risk cities. 

o Tramfonimtional R&D: Funding is requested to develop and demonstrate scientific and 
technological approaches that address gaps in the GNDA and improve the performance of 
rad/nuc detection and technical nuclear' forensic capabilities. R&D investments are made on 
the basis of competitive awards, with investigators in all sectors — government laboratories, 
academia, and private irrdustiy — encouraged to participate. 

o Rad/Nuc Detection: Sirpports the procrrrement and deployment of Radiation Portal 
Monitors arrd Hurrtan Portable Radiation Detection Systems, providing vital detection 
equipment to CBP, USCG, and TSA to scan for rad/nuc threats. 

o BioWatch: Contirrues operations arrd niaiutenance of the federally managed, locally 
operated, natiorrwide bio-smveillance system desigrred to detect the release of aerosolized 
biological agents. 

o NBAF: The Budget provides full funding for the crarstruction of the main laboratory at 
NBAF when coupled with the increased cost share from the State of Kansas. This 
innovative federal-state partnerslrip will support the fir'st Bio Level 4 lab facility of its kind, 
a state-of-the-art bio-contaimnent facility for the study of foreign animal and emer ging 


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zoonotic diseases that is central to the protection of the Nation’s food supply as well as our 
national and economic security. 

In partnership with the State of Kansas, DHS is committed to building a safe and secure 
facility in Manhattan, Kansas. The main laboratoiy facility includes enhanced safety and 
secmity features to ensure research conducted within the facility will be contained, 
ultimately protecting the sunounding region and tlie Nation’s food supply. These feahues, 
which are incorporated into the current NBAF design and address safety recommendations 
of the National Academies of Sciences, include specialized air and water decontamination 
systems, new technologies to handle solid waste on site, and structvual components to 
strengthen the laboratory against hazardous weather conditions. 

Frmding is also provided for life and safety in&astmcture repairs at Plum Island Animal 
Disease Center while NBAF is being built, to ensure an appropriate h ansition of research 
from Plmn Island, New York, to Manhattarr, Kansas. 

Securing and Managing Our Borders 

The Budget continues the Administration’s robust border security efforts, while facilitating 
legitimate travel and trade. It sustains historic deployments of persoimel along U S. borders as well 
as the continued utilization of proven, effective surveillance technology along the higliest-hafficked 
areas of the southwest border to continue achieving record levels of apprehensions and seizures. In 
support of the President’s executive order on travel and tomism, the Budget fimds a record nimiber 
of CBPOs througli appropriated funds and proposed increases to user fee rates, to expedite travel 
and trade while reducing wait times at more than 300 POEs along the border and at airports and 
seaports across the coimtry . Increased POE staffing of 1 ,600 CBPOs funded through appropriations 
and 1.877 CBPOs fimded through user fee increases will have a direct impact on the economy. On 
the basis of a study conducted by the National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism 
Events - University of Soutliem California, initial estimates indicate that for eveiy 1.000 CBPOs 
added, the United States can anticipate a $2 billion increase in gross domeshc product. That 
research indicates that these additional CBPOs may result in approximately 1 10,000 more jobs and 
a potential increase of $6.95 billion in gross domestic product. 

To secme the Nation’s maiitinie borders and 3.4 million nautical square miles of maritime territory, 
the Budget invests in recapitalization of USCG assets and provides operational flinding for new 
assets coming on line, including National Security Cutters (NSCs). Fast Response Cutters (FRCs), 
Response Boats-Medimn, Maritime Patrol Aircraft, and Command and Control systems. 

• Law Enforcement Officers: The Budget supports 21,370 BPAs and a record 25,252 CBPOs at 
POEs who work with federal, state, and local law enforcement to target illicit networks 
trafficking in people, drugs, illegal weapons, and money and to expedite legal travel and trade. 
Tliis mcludes fiitids from proposed increases to inspection user fees, 

• Trove! and Trade: In 2012, President Obama armounced new administrative initiatives tluough 
Executive Order 13597 to increase travel and tomism throughout and to the United States, and 
DHS plays an important role in this work. As discussed in the higlilights section, DHS is 
continuing to develop new ways to increase the efficiency of our port operations and to make 
international travel and trade ea.sier. more cost-effective and more secure. 


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Technology: Funding is requested to support the contimred deployment of proven, effective 
sruveillance technology along the highest trafficked areas of the southwest border. Funds will 
be used to pr octne and deploy couunercially available tecluiology tailored to the operational 
requirements of the Border Patrol, the distinct terrain, and the population density within 
Arizona. 

Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS): DHS will take over operations of TARS begriming in 
FY 2014. TARS is a multi-mission capability that supports both tlie counterdnig and air 
defense missions, providing long-range detection and monitoring of low-level air, maritime, and 
smface narcotics traffickers. 

Targeting and Analysis: The Budget includes additional investments in CBP’s targeting 
capabilities, which will enable CBP to develop and implement an enhanced strategy that more 
effectively and efficiently divides cargo and travelers according to the potential threat they pose. 

POE Infrastructure: CBP, working with its various partners including GSA, continues to 
modernize and maintain border infiastructure that both facilitates trade and travel, and helps 
secure the border. In FY 2014, CBP will work with GSA to complete the last phase of the 
Nogales-Maiiposa inspection facility arid initiate the site acquisition and design for tire 
southbound phase of the San Ysidio modernization project. Additionally, CBP will work with 
GSA to mitiate construction of a new bus processing tenninal at the Lmcoln- Juar ez Bridge aird 
rerrovation of the passenger and pedestrian processing facility at tire Converrt Street inspection 
facility in Laredo, Texas. Begiimiirg in late FY 2013 aird continuing in FY 2014, CBP will 
assmne responsibility for the buildiirg operatioirs, mainteuairce, aud repair of the land port 
inspection facilities from GSA to streamline administrative processes and improve the 
responsiveness to CBP tirission requirements, Fiirally. CBP proposes legislative authority in the 
FY 2014 Budget to accept donations from the private sector. 

CBP Air aitd Marine Procurement: Ftmding is requested for two KA-3.30CER Multi-Role 
Enforceirrent Aircraft (MEA), which provide direct support to CBP efforts to secure our 
Nation’s borders. Unlike the older, less-capable aircraft they are replacing, MEA has the 
capabilities to detect, track, and intercept general aviation tlueats; detect and track maritime 
tlueats over a wide area; and support groimd interdiction operations tluougli a variety of sensors 
and advanced data and video down-link. 

Collect Customs Revenue: Funds are requested to support CBP’s role as a revenue collector for 
the U.S- Treasmy; customs revenue remains the second largest source of revenue for the Federal 
Govermnent- CBP relies on bonds to collect duties owed when importers fail to pay and efforts 
to collect from the importer ar e not successful. This funding will support improvements to 
increase tlie efficacy of CBP’s bonding process, including the delegation to a centrahzed office 
the responsibility for developing and implementing Single Transaction Bond (STB) policy, 
approving bond applications, reporting on activities, and monitoring results. These resom ces 
will fimd the automation of STB processing and record keeping and provide effective iiitemal 
controls that protect tlie duties aud taxes (more tlian $38 billion in 2012) collected by CBP. 
Specifically, CBP will automate and centralize into one location processing of all STBs, 


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resulting in enhanced program oversight, consistent processing, and reduced write-offs and 
delinqnencies. 

• Protect Trade and Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement. Fmiding is requested to support 
intellectual property and commercial trade fraud investigations within ICE’s National 
Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center (IPR Center). Witli 21 partners and the 
expertise of the Federal Government’s lar gest law enforcement agencies, the IPR Center brings 
together the full range of legal authorities and law enforcement tools to combat intellectual 
property theft, including medical regulation; patent, trademark, and copyright protection; border 
enforcement; organized crinre investigations; and tmdercover operations. ICE will also iircrease 
collaboration with CBP tluough a joint fraud eirforcement strategy to coordinate commercial 
fraud enforcement operations. The FY 2014 Budget also supports CBP’s errforcement programs 
to prevent tr ade in counterfeit and pirated goods, and to protect consumers and national security 
fr om harm from cormterfeit goods througli special enforcement operations to increase IPR 
seizures and referrals for crinrinal investigatiou. In addition, the FY 2014 Budget supports 
teclmology arrd training to increase the efficiency of targeting IPR irrfringing merchandise. 

• USCG Recapitalization: The FY 2014 request fully funds a seventh NSC; supports patrol boat 
recapitalization through tire FRC acquisition; continues acquisitions of the Offshore Pahol 
Cutter and a new polar ice breaker; and provides for critical upgrades to comnrand, control, and 
aviation sustaimnent. The total request for USCG Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements 
is $95 1 million. 

• USCG Operations: The FY 2014 request funds nearly 50,000 full-time persormel and nearly 
7,000 reservists to maintain safety, seciuity, and stewardsliip of our Nation’s waters and 
maritime borders. Fimds will support a frill range of Coast Guard cutters, aircraft, and boats to 
address threats from inside the ports, within customs waters and out on the high seas. 

Enforcing and Administering our Immigration Laws 

In the area of immigration, the Budget supports the Administration’s unprecedented efforts to 
more effectively focus tire enforcement system on public safety threats, border security, and the 
integrity of the immigration system while streamlining and facilitating the legal immigration 
process. Initiatives such as Defened Action for Cliildliood Arrivals and greater use of 
prosecutorial discretion, where appropriate, support DHS efforts to focus finite resources on 
individuals wlio pose a danger to national security or a lisk to public safety, and other high- 
priority cases. At tire same time, the Budget significantly reduces inefficient 287(g) task force 
agreements, while supporting more cost-efficient initiatives like the Seciue Communities 
program. Nationwide implementation of Secure Conmumities and other enforcement 
initiatives, coupled witlr continued collaboration with DOJ to focus resources on the detained 
docket, is expected to result in the continued increase in tire identification and removal of 
crimitval alieirs and other priority individuals. 

The Budget provides the resources needed to address this cliaugrng population, while continuing 
to suppoil Alternatives to Detention, detention reform, and immigrant integration efforts. 

Resoiuces ar e also focused on monitoring and compliance, promoting adherence to worksite- 
related laws, Fonn 1-9 inspections, and enhancements to the E-Verify progr am. 


17 




38 


Secure Commtmilies: In FY 2013, the Department completed nationwide deployment of the Secure 
Communities program, which uses biometiic information and seiwices to identify and remove 
criminal and other priority aliens found in state prisons and local jails. Secure Communities is an 
important tool in ICE’s efforts to focus its inunigration enforcement resources on the highest- 
priority individuals who pose a threat to public safety or national seciuity, and the Budget continues 
support of this program. ICE is committed to ensuring the Secure Communities program respects 
civil lights and civil liberties, and works closely with law enforcement agencies and stakeholders 
across the country to ensure the program operates in the most-effective maimer possible. To this 
end, ICE has issued guidance regarding the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in appropriate cases, 
including in cases involving witnesses and victims of cihne, implemented enhanced training for 
SLLE regarding civil rights issues, and released new guidance that limits the use of detainers to the 
agency’s enforcement priorities and restricts the use of detainers against individuals arrested for 
minor misdemeanor offenses such as traffic offenses and other petty crimes, among other recent 
improvements. The Budget also includes $10 million for 73 ICE attorney positions that will 
continue prosecutorial discretion reviews of new cases to ensm e that resources at tlie Executive 
Office for Immigration Review and ICE are focused on priority cases. 

• Iniimgration Detention: Under this Administr ation, ICE has focused its immigration 
enforcement efforts on identifying and removing priority aliens, including criminals, repeat 
immigiation law violators, and recent border entrants. As ICE focuses on criminal and other 
priority cases, the agency continues to work to reduce the time removable aliens spend in 
detention custody, going from 37 days in FY 2010 to fewer than 32 days in FY 2012. 

Consistent with its slated enforcement priorities and guidance to the field, ICE will continue to 
focus detention and removal resomces on those individuals who have criminal convictions or 
fall under other priority categories. For low-risk individuals. ICE will work to enliance the 
effectiveness of Alternatives to Detention, which provides a lower per-day cost than detention. 
To ensme the most cost-effective use of federal resources, the Budget includes flexibility to 
transfer fimding between immigration detention and the Alternatives to Detention program, 
coimnensurate with tlte level of risk a detainee presents. 

• 2S7(g) Program: The Budget reflects the cancelation of ineflrcieut task force officer model 
agreements, reducing the cost of the 287(g) program by $44 million. The 287(g) jail model 
agreements, as well as programs such as Secure Conmumities, have proven to be more efficient 
and effective in identifying and removing criminal and other priority aliens than the task force 
officer model agreements. 

• Detention Reform: ICE will contimre building on ongoing deterrtion reform efforts in FY 2014. 
In FY 2013, ICE implemented its new Risk Classification Assessment rrationwide to improve 
transparency and imiformity in detention custody and classificatioir decisions and to promote 
identification of vulnerable populations. ICE will continue to work witlr DOJ to reduce the 
average length of stay in detention by working to secure orders of removal before the rel ease of 
criminal aliens frorrr DOJ citstody. In addition, ICE will corrtinue irnpleraerrtation of the new 
transfer directive, which is designed to minimize long-distarrce trairsfers of detainees tvithin 
ice's detention system, especially for those detainees tvith family members in the area, local 
attorneys, or pending imnrigration proceedings. ICE will also continue implementation of 
revised national detention standards designed to ma ximiz e access to cormsel, \isitation, and 
quality medical and merrtal health care in additional facilities. Finally, DHS arrticipates that the 


18 



39 


rulemaking applying the Prison Rape Elimination Act to DHS confinement facilities will be 
finalized in FY 2013 and implemented in FY 2013 and FY 2014. 

• Worksite Enforcement: Requested funds will continue the Department’s focus to promote 
compliance with worksite-related laws through criminal prosecutions of egregious employers, 
Form 1-9 inspections, civil fines, and debannent, as well as education and compliance tools. 

• E- Verify: The Budget provides $114 million to support the continued expansion and 
enliaucement of E-Verify, tire Adininistration’s electronic employment eligibility verification 
system. This fiuiding will also continue support for the expansion of the E-Verify Self-Check 
program, a voluntary, free, fast, and secure online service that allows individuals in the United 
States to confirm the accinacy of government records related to their employment eligibility 
status before formally seeking employment. These enhancements will give individuals 
unprecedented control over how their social security number s are used in E-Verify and will 
farther strengthen DHS’s ability to identify and prevent identity fraud. In FY 2014, U S. 
Citizenship arrd Irmnigr ation Services (USCIS) also plans to phase in an errharrced ertrollment 
process for E-Verify that reduces the enrollment burden on the employer and the Federal 
Government, and that will provide irrore-detailed user irrfoimatiorr for compliance assistance 
activities. Additionally, USCIS will ftrralize the requirements for the electrorric 1-9 and its 
srrpporting processes for E-Verify. Tlrese enlraircernents will deploy in phases in FY 2014 aird 
subseqrrent years. 

•- Verification Information System (VIS): The Budget includes $12 million to fimd the VIS 
Modernization initiative, a major redesign of the system that supports E-Verify that will 
transform the current E-Verify system, arrd itrrprove usability and overall ease of operations. 

*• Immigrant Integration: The Budget includes $10 million to corriinrre support for USCIS 
inrrrrigrant irrtegration efforts — a key element of tire President’s immigration principles — 
through funding of citizenship and integration program activities including competitive grants to 
local irrrmigrant-seiving orgarrizatiorrs to strengtlrerr citizerrship preparation programs for 
peraranent residents. 

• Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE): The FY 2014 Budget continues support 
for USCIS SAVE operations arrd enlrancements to assist local, state, arrd federal agencies in 
determining the irmnigration stahrs of benefit applicants. Thi.s effort is fimded througli the 
luunigratiorr Exanrinatious Fee Accouirt. 

• USCIS Business Transformation: The Budget continues tire multiyear effort to transform 
USCIS from a paper-based filing system to a customer-focused electrorric filing system. This 
effort is furtded tluough the Inmrigration Examinations Fee Accormt. In FY 2013, USCIS will 
deploy additional furrctionality into the agency’s Electronic Immigration System (ELIS) to 
allow pr ocessing of 1 million customer requests arumally. USCIS is committed to adding 
fiuictionality and benefit types until all workload is processed tlrrough ELIS. 

Safeguarding arrd Securing Cyberspace 

Tire Budget supports initiatives to seciue our Nation’s information and financial systems and to 

defend against cyber threats to private-sector and federal systems, the Nation’s critical 


19 



40 


infiastractiire, aiid the U S. economy. It also supports the President’s executive order on 
improving critical infiastiuctine cybersecurity and tlie presidential policy directive on critical 
infrastnicture security and resilience. Taken together, the Administration’s initiatives 
strengthen the security and resilience of critical infrastructure against evolving threats tlu ough 
an updated and overarching national framework that acknowledges the linkage between 
cyberseciffity and seeming physical asset.s. 

Included in the FY 2014 Budget are enhancements to the National Cybersecurity Protection 
System (NCPS) to prevent and detect intrusions on govenunent computer systems, and to the 
National Cybersecurity and Coimnunications Integration Center to protect against and respond 
to cyberseemity threats. The Budget also leverages a new operational partnership between ICE 
and USSS through the established network of USSS ECTFs to safeguaid tire Nation’s financial 
payment systems, combat cybercrimes, target transnational child exploitation including large- 
scale producers and distributors of child pomogiaphy, and prevent attacks against U.S. critical 
iirfrastiiictme. 

• Federal Network Security: $200 milhon is included for Federal Network Seemity, which 
manages activities designed to enable federal agencies to seeme their IT networks. The Budget 
provides funding to further reduce risk in the federal cyber domain by enabling contmuous 
monitoring and diagnostics of networks in support of mitigation activities designed to 
strengthen the operational security postme of federal civilian networks, DHS will directly 
support federal civilian departments and agencies in developing capabilities to improve their 
cybersecurity posmre and to better thwait advanced, persistent cyber threats that are emerging in 
a dynamic threat enviromnent. 

• NCPS: $406 million is included for Network Secvuity Deployment, which manages NCPS, 
operationally knorvn as EINSTEIN. NCPS is an integrated intrusion detection, analytics, 
infomiation-shaiing, and iutnision-prevention system that supports DHS responsibilities to 
defend federal civilian networks, 

• VS-Compiiter Emergency Readiness Team (XJS-CERT): $ 1 02 million is included for operations 
of US-CERT, whicli leads and coordinates efforts to improve the Nation’s cyberseemity 
posture, promotes cyber infoimation sharing, and manages cyber risks to the Nation. US-CERT 
encompasses the activities that provide immediate customer .support and incident response, 
including 24-hom support in the National Cyberseemity and Coimnunications Integration 
Center. As more federal network traffic is covered by NCPS, additional US-CERT analysts are 
required to ensme cyber tlueats aie detected and the federal response is effective. 

• SLTT Engagement: In FY 2014, DHS will expand its support to the Multi-State Infoimation 
Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC) to assist in providing coverage for all 50 states and 6 
U.S. territories in its managed seemity services progiani. MS-ISAC is a central entity through 
which SLTT governments can stieiigthen their security posture tlnough network defense 
services and receive early warnings of cyber threats. In addition, the MS-ISAC shares 
cyberseemity incident information, trends, and otlier analysis for seemity plaiming. 

• Cybersecurity R&D: The FY 2014 Budget includes $70 million for S&T’s R&D focused on 
sfrengthening the Nation’s cybersecurity capabilities. 


20 



41 


• Cyber Investigations: The FY 2014 Budget continues to support ICE and USSS efforts to 
provide computer forensics support and training for investigations into domestic and 
international criminal activities, including computer fraud, network intrusions, financial crimes, 
access device fraud, bank fraud, identity crimes and teleconununications fraud, benefits fraud, 
anns and strategic teclmology, money laundering, counterfeit pliarmaceuticals, child 
pornography, and human trafficking occurring on or througli the Internet. USSS ECTFs will 
also continue to focus on the prevention of cyber attacks against U.S. financial payment systems 
and critical infrastructure. 

Ensuring Resilience to Disasters 

Uie Depaifrnent’s efforts to build a ready and resilient Nation focuses on a whole conmiunity 
approach to emergency management by engaging partners at all levels to build, sustain, and 
improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all 
hazards. In tire event of a tenorist attack, natural disaster, or other large-scale emergency, DHS 
provides the coordinated, comprehensive federal response while working with federal, state, local, 
and private-sector partners to ensm e a swift and effective recovery effort. 

To support the objectives of the National Preparedness Goal (NPG) and to leverage limited grant 
funding in the current fiscal enviromnent, the Administration is again proposmg the NPGP to create 
a robust national response capacity based on cross-jurisdictional and readily deployable state and 
local assets, with appropriate adjustments to respond to stakeholder feedback received in 2012. 
While providing a structure that will give grantees more certainty about how funding will flow, the 
proposal continues to rrtilize a comprehensive process for assessing regional and national gaps, 
identifying and prioritizing deployable capabilities, and requiring gr antees to regularly report 
progress in the acquisition and development of these capabilities. 

The Budget also fimds initiatives associated with the NPG; FEMA’s continued development of 
catastrophic plans, which include regional plans tor response to earthquakes and hunrcanes and 
medical countermeasiue dispensing; and training for 2 million emergency manager's and first 
responders. 

Stale and Local Grants: The Budget includes $2.1 billion for state and local grants, consistent with 
dre amoimt appropriated by Congress in FY 2012. Tliis ftmding ■will sustain resources for fire and 
emergency management programs while consolidating all other grants into the new, streamlined 
NPGP. In FY 2014, the NPGP will: 

• Focus on the development and sustaiimient of core national emer gency management and 
homeland security capabilities. 

• Utilize gap analyses to determine asset and resource deficiencies and infonn the development of 
new capabilities tlirough a competitive process. 

• Build a robust national response capacity based on cross-jurisdictional and readily deployable 
state and local assets. 


21 



42 


Using a competitive, risk-based model, the NPGP will use a comprehensive process for identifying 
and prioritizing deployable capabilities, limit periods of performance to put funding to work 
quickly, and require grantees to regularly report progress in the acquisition and development of 
these capabilities. 

• Firefighter Assistance Grants: The Budget provides $670 million for Firefighter Assistance 
Grants. Included in the amount is $335 million for Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency 
Response (SAFER) Grants to retain and hire firefighters and first responders, and $335 million 
for Assistance to Firefigliter Grants, of which $20 million is provided for Fire Prevention and 
Safety Grants. The Administration re-proposes $ 1 billion for SAFER grants as part of the First 
Responder Stabilization Fluid, which was originally proposed in the American Jobs Act. 

‘ Emergency Management Perfonname Grants (EMPGs): Also included in the Budget is 

$350 million to support emergency managers and emergency management offices in eveiy state 
across the country. EMPG supports state and local governments in developing and sustaining 
the core capabilities identified in the NPG and achieving tneastuable results in key functional 
areas of emergency management. 

• DRF: A total of $6.2 billion is provided for the DRF. Of this, $586 million is included in the 
Department’s base budget with the remainder provided through the Budget Control Act budget 
cap adjustment. The DRF provides a significant portion of the total federal response to victims 
in presidentially declared disasters or emergencies. Because of recently passed legislation. 
Native American hibes can now request presidential major or emergency declarations. Two 
Uibes, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Navajo Nation, have already received 
declarations in 2013. 

• National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP): The NFff is fully funded by policy fees. This 
progr am helps to reduce the risk of flood damage to existing buildings and infi astructiue by 
providing flood-related grants to states, cormnunities, and tribal nations. The FY 2014 Budget 
reflects implementation of the Biggert- Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012. The Act 
improves fiscal sotmdness by phasing out subsidies for stnictures built before tlieir flood risk 
was identified on a Flood Insiuance Rate Map. In addition, the Act establishes a reserve fund to 
be used for tire payment of claims and claiins-handling expenses as well as principal and interest 
payments on any outstanding Treasury loans. The Budget includes a $3.5 billion mandatory 
budget authority, of which $ 1 00 million will be used for thr ee interrelated mitigation grant 
programs to increase America’s resiliency to floods. 

• Training/Exercises: The Budget includes $165 million for training and exercise activities to 
support federal, state, and local officials and first responders. In FY 2014, the Department 
expects to train more than 2 million first responders and, rmder the revised National Exercise 
Program, will conduct more than a dozen exercises across the comitry to help improve national 
preparedness. The Budget also srqtports conducting a Spill of National Significance exercise, 
and continues development of equipment and techniques that can be used to detect, track, and 
recover oil in ice-filled waters. 

• Emergency Management Oversight: The Budget includes $24 million in base resources for the 
Office of the Inspector General to continue its Emergency Management Oversiglit operations. 


22 



43 


• litciden! Management: Tlie Budget enables the Coast Guard to achieve Full Operational 
Capability for the Incident Management Assist Team, providing an immediate, highly 
proficient, and deployable suige capacity to Incident Commanders nationwide for response to 
tlireats and other disasters. 

Maturing and Strengthening the Department and the Homeland Security Enternrise 

St. Elizabeths Campus: The Budget includes $92,7 million to support construction at the 
St. Elizabeths Campus. Cmrently, die Department’s facilities are scattered in more than 50 
locations thiougliout the National Capital Region, affecting critical conununication and 
coordination across DHS Components, USCG will move to St. Elizabeths in FY 2013, To support 
the incident management and command-and-control requirements of our mission, the Department 
will continue development of the DHS Consolidated Headquarters at St. Elizabeths Campus. The 
requested funding will support Phase 2 renovation of the C enter Building Complex for the 
Secretary’s Office and key headquarters fimctions for coiimiand. control, and management of the 
Department. 

Data Center Consolidation: The FY 2014 Budget includes $54.2 million for data center 
consolidation funding, which will be used to rrrigrate FEMA, USCIS. TSA, and CBP to the 
enterprise data centers. A recent study performed by the Department’s Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer analyzed 10 of the first completed migrations to enterprise data centers arrd detemimed that 
an average savings of 14 percerrt, about $17.4 million in aimual savings, had been achieved. 

CONCLUSION 

The FY 2014 budget proposal reflects this Administration’s strong cormnitinent to protecting the 
hotrrelarrd arrd the Americarr people through the effective and efficient use of DHS resources. As 
outlined in my testimony today, we will continue to preserve core frontline priorities across the 
Department by cutting costs, sharing resources across Components, and streamlining operations 
wherever possible. 

Thank you for inviting me to appear before you today. I look forward to answeruig your questions 
and to working with you on the Department’s FY 2014 Budget Request and other homeland 
security issues. 


23 


44 


Secretary Janet Napolitano 





Jaiiet Napolitauo was swoni ill a- ■ j _ ’ '■ i secietaiy of the Departmeut of 

Homeland Secwit)-, Prior to joining the Obama Administration, Napolitano was mid-way 
tlu ough her second tenn as Governor of the State of Arizona. Wlnle Governor, 

Napolitano became the first woman to chair the National Governors Association, where she was 
instrumental in creating the Public Safety Task Force and the Homeland Security' Advisors 
Comicil. She also chaired the Western Goveinors Association. Napolitano previously seived as 
the Attorney General of Arizona and the U.S. Attorney for the Distr ict of Arizona. 


Napolitano’s homeland security' backgroimd is extensive. As U.S. Aftoniey. she helped lead the 
domestic terrorism investigation into the Oklahoma City Bombing. .As Arizona Attorney 
General, she helped wite tire law to break up hiuuan smuggling rings. As Governor, she 
implemented one of the first state homeland security sb ategies in the nation, opened the first 
state coimter-teiTorism center and spearheaded efforts to trarisfonii immigration enforcement. 
She's also been a pioneer in coordinating federal, state, local and bi-national homeland secmity 
efforts, and presided over lar ge scale di.sa.ster relief efforts and readiness exercises to ensure 
well-crafted and fmictional emergency plans. 


Napolitano graduated from Santa C lara University in 1979, where she won a Tnmtan 
Scholarship, and received her Jmis Doctor (.I.D.) in 1983 fiom the University' of Vuginia School 
of Law. After law .school .she seived as a law clerk for Judge Mary M. Schioeder of the U.S. 
Coint of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit before joining the law firm of Lewis and Roca. 


45 


CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION: OPERATIONAL COSTS 

Mr. Carter. Thank you, Madam Secretary. We are pleased to 
have you here today. 

As you know, fiscal year 2013 request short-changed CBP oper- 
ations including failing to cover pay and benefits of the workforce. 
Addressing that shortfall put the subcommittee in a real tough 
spot. That was all last year. In order to fully fund personnel and 
operations, we had to make trade-offs in acquisitions, IT, and other 
initiatives. 

The bottom line is DHS’s budget needs to accurately and legiti- 
mately propose funding to cover known costs. I want your personal 
assurances that fiscal year 2014 budget request include funds nec- 
essary to cover known operational costs for CBP including fully 
funding the essential needs of its front-line personnel, border patrol 
agents, CBP officers, air and marine interdiction agents. 

Do I have your assurance on that issue? 

Secretary Napolitano. Mr. Chairman, I would love to give you 
that assurance, but we are dealing here with an era where, for ex- 
ample, if sequester were to continue past the beginning of the fiscal 
year, we are going to continue to have impacts on CBP [U.S. Cus- 
toms and Border Protection] given the way sequester was drafted. 

So while I would like to give you that assurance and we will do 
everything we can in that regard, I cannot give you a 100 percent 
guarantee. 

Mr. Carter. Well, I understand that. And I think that is an hon- 
est appraisal because I have looked at your budget and I do not see 
how you could guarantee it to be honest with you, but I wanted to 
see what you had to say about it. 

And, you know, I noted something that I think it is important 
for us to remember and I do not think I have to remind you, but 
I am going to. Almost the first series of statements that you made 
you called yourself a law enforcement agency, right? 

You are about enforcing the law. That is our first and foremost 
priority in this job is to enforce the law that exists today. If it is 
a bad law, we are going to work at fixing it. But until it is fixed, 
you get the law you got and you got to enforce it. 

And in many ways, you have my sympathy on that issue. I have 
been there on other laws that are pretty rotten myself and I under- 
stand how that works, but that is not our job to question. It is our 
job to do. 

And so in looking at this, the money just starting with CBP and 
it gets a lot worse in other places, especially with the Coast Guard, 
I have real concerns about the starting point on what we are doing 
here today. 

Quite honestly, I hate to come back to those reports, but that is 
why we want to know the thinking of the people who help put this 
thing together. It is critical for my team of people, our team of peo- 
ple, and Mr. Price’s team and my team to know what you were 
thinking and what these people who you have given this responsi- 
bility to were thinking in proposing the numbers in this proposal 
you have given us today. 



46 


So from that standpoint, I am not going to beat that horse any- 
more or I am going to try not to. Okay. If you want to say some- 
thing, go ahead. 


REPORTS, REQUIRED 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

We want to be as transparent as possible with the committee and 
work you through our thought process. I would note that we have 
just for this subcommittee alone 227 reports that are required. 
That does not even include the authorizing reports. 

Report writing has become almost a whole section of the depart- 
ment. But we will move to get the reports. There are 16-some odd 
that were specified to be due May 1. We will move heaven and 
earth to get them to you earlier. But I just ask the chairman to 
recognize that reports unfortunately were not sequestered. 

Mr. Carter. No. That is life, isn’t it? I believe that your list 
counts monthly, quarterly, and quarterly reports separately. It 
seems a little bit of an exaggeration. We have been through all this 
before. 

If you are saying that monthly budget execution reports and 
quarterly acquisition reports are too onerous, we probably have a 
bigger problem than I thought. These are the very same reports I 
would think that you would demand to manage your department. 

Secretary Napolitano. Many of the reports that I think the com- 
mittee has specified it wants really rely on being able to know 
what your fiscal year 2013 numbers are. Now, the fiscal year 2013 
numbers were not available until a couple of weeks ago. That also 
has some effect. 

I appreciate the fact this committee is having a prompt hearing 
after the release of the budget and I hope we can follow up with 
Chairman Mikulski and Chairman Rogers and get back to some 
kind of regular order in the budget and appropriations process. It 
would make all of our jobs much easier. 

CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION OFFICERS 

Mr. Carter. I have been preaching regular order to many people 
for a long time. It is the backbone of being in Congress. So I am 
for that. 

But to finish up on CBP, the budget proposes to bring on 1,600 
additional CBP officers in 2014 using appropriated funds. The tail 
for that increase comes years later. 

After all the issues DHS has had to maintain staffing increases 
over the years, can you assure the subcommittee that DHS will 
support this increase in the out years? 

Secretary Napolitano. The answer is our out-year budget does. 
And as I mentioned, Mr. Chairman, in my statement, the Presi- 
dent’s proposal is for roughly 3,400 more port officers, 1,600 of 
which are appropriated, the remainder paid for through fees. 

detention beds: number requested 

Mr. Carter. Moving on to something else which is something 
that I have already gotten in the middle of in the last three weeks 



47 


is 34,000 detention beds. I found the logic that has been argued to 
this committee very peculiar over this issue. 

Last year, you sat before this subcommittee and you testified 
that you did not need the capacity of 34,000 ICE detention beds 
mandated in the law. Yet, earlier this year, ICE released detainees 
because they were operating at an extremely high level reaching as 
many as 37,000 detainees in custody and with an average daily 
population for the first quarter of 34,640 detainees. 

With that, under that consideration, you still think you do not 
need 34,000? 

Also, let me ask you this. You still think that number and the 
fact that the big storm that was created by the release of these de- 
tainees across the country from coast to coast, newspapers were 
screaming about it, TVs were blaring about it and talk show hosts 
were going crazy, under that circumstance, how do you argue that 
you do not need 34,000 beds? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, if I might, the President’s request 
is for 31,800 beds. The reason for that is we are proposing to make 
greater uses of alternatives to detention, which are cheaper. The 
bed cost that we estimate will be about $119 per day. 

Mr. Carter. Well, let me ask a question 

Secretary Napolitano. If I might, Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Carter [continuing]. On that just a second. You and I talked 
about this earlier. You told me you would tell me how many of 
those people were put on that alternative to detention, but I have 
never gotten that information. 

Secretary Napolitano. We will supply it. But if I might, I think 
Representative Price made a very valuable point to this committee, 
which is we ought to be managing the actual detention population 
to risk, not to an arbitrary number. 

Of those released, there were very few, a handful of so-called 
level one offenders. But when you dig down into those cases, you 
will find, for example, a 68-year-old who had 10 plus years after 
he committed an offense and was living with his family in New 
Mexico. So some of those cases, on a case-by-case basis, are clearly 
understandable . 

IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT 

The department, ICE was facing a perfect storm when these re- 
leases occurred. We did not know we were going to have a budget. 
They were estimating we were going to continue under the CR and 
the CR as sequestered. And so with that and given the way that 
sequester worked account by account by account, reductions in 
ERO [Enforcement and Removal Operations] were required. 

But as we look at it, stepping back and looking at it, really the 
policy decision for the committee is whether we stick to an artificial 
number of beds or do we simply require that certain levels of de- 
tainees be in beds and that we have those beds available. 

[The information follows:] 



48 


Response: As of March 25, 2013, the number of aliens released for budgetary rea- 
sons from February 9, 2013, through March 1, 2013, was 2,226. ^ ICE continues to 
seek removal on these cases as appropriate. Released individuals were placed on 
various types of supervision as illustrated in the following table. 

DETAINEES REEEASED FROM FEBRUARY 9, 2013, THROUGH MARCH 1, 2013 


Categoiy 


Number 

Released 


Alternatives to Detention 102 

Bonded out 171 

Order ot recognizance 1,640 

Order ot supervision — final order 137 

Paroled 172 

Other (terminated, turned over to another law enforcement agency, or relief granted by immigration judge) .... 4 


Total 2,226 


Terminated refers to alien immigration cases that completed proceedings before 
the Department of Justice’s Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR) and the 
alien was released from custody. 

Mr. Carter. I have heard this argument. You and I have had 
this argument before. I have also talked to the folks at ICE and 
they follow the President’s instructions. 

But here is the problem I have got with this. Right now, in fact, 
ICE has 36,000 detainees in custody at this time and 96 percent 
of them meet the priorities set by this Administration for detention 
according to the priorities that you set. 

So, I mean, it is curious that almost the rules start to change in 
the middle of — and, by the way, I love this argument about we re- 
leased these people in anticipation, but it was very convenient that 
that was right during the Administration’s the sky is going to be 
falling campaign and I still question that action because it cer- 
tainly fell right within the pattern of the world is coming to an end 
if you have a sequestration vote. 

Secretary Napolitano. The 31,800 that we request, we believe, 
will house all mandatory detainees as all level ones and twos. And 
as I said, level threes are misdemeanants and only certain 
misdemeanants. And those, we think, are not — they are not re- 
leased to the general population. They are put in a different type 
of supervision. It can be an ankle bracelet. It can be intensive su- 
pervision, what have you. 

Mr. Carter. I am glad with alternatives to incarceration. How- 
ever, let me point out that you released ten level ones in this re- 
lease that you did and quickly after it became a national issue 
rounded them all up again which at least somebody was thinking. 

But I wonder if it had not been a storm on the horizon from the 
public whether those ten level one violators would still be on the 
street. 

Secretary Napolitano. There is no doubt 

Mr. Carter. My time is running out. 

Secretary Napolitano. Oh, okay. 

Mr. Carter. I just want to point out that, you know, I am going 
to be very cautious about this 31,800 request. 

Okay. Mr. Price, at this time, I yield to Mr. Price. 


^ICE initially reported the release of 2,228 aliens. Upon a review, two cases were found to 
be duplicates. 



49 


BUDGET CUT IMPACTS: OVERALL 

Mr. Price. Thank you. 

Madam Secretary, let me return to the question of sequestration 
which you touched on in your testimony. I would like to have you 
elaborate. 

Sequestration has been in place for 42 days. However, your de- 
partment did not receive your final 2013 appropriation until late 
March. At that time, the Department planned to reevaluate seques- 
tration impacts to see what adjustments needed to be made in its 
March 1 sequestration plan. 

Based on OMB’s March 1 report, DHS is taking a $2.8 billion re- 
duction, and that includes funding contained in the Sandy supple- 
mental. It exempts, as it should, of course. Coast Guard military 
pay. 

Two point eight billion dollars, that is a significant amount. 
There is no doubt it will have a lasting impact on the department’s 
critical missions and we have a huge stake in getting this federal 
budget on a different footing by the start of fiscal 2014. 

Sequestration does not address the main drivers of the deficit at 
all and, yet, we are saddled with this and we have to deal with it 
and you have to deal with it. It is a reality that we have got to 
deal with. 

So let me ask you a series of related questions. How did the en- 
actment of the 2013 bill — and I commend the subcommittee chair- 
man and full committee chairman for including the DHS bill pro- 
duced under the regular order, including that in the CR — affect se- 
questration as experienced by DHS? 

For example, originally TSA thought it would need to furlough 
employees, but backed off from that assessment in late February. 
Given that the sum of the funding levels for that agency for 2013 
are still below 2012, are furloughs back on the table for that agen- 
cy? 

What about CBP? There have been some mixed reports about 
whether we might or might not be able to avoid CBP furloughs. 

What about that statutory requirement to maintain 34,000 de- 
tention beds? With that sitting there, what kind of shifting of se- 
questration impacts might that require of you? 

And let me just say in general that I applaud your efforts, the 
efforts of other cabinet secretaries and agency heads. Applaud the 
efforts to mitigate this impact, but I know those cuts have to come 
from somewhere and your discretion is limited. 

Some apologists for sequestration have taken to saying these 
days that, oh, well, this does not have to be so bad. And whenever 
a cut is made, they accuse you or the President of a political moti- 
vation. 

Well, as a matter of fact, sequestration is designed to be unac- 
ceptable. It is designed to be a meat ax. It was supposed to force 
us to a more rational budget plan. Unfortunately, that has not hap- 
pened. 

But these cuts have to come from somewhere. And, sure, you are 
going to be asked to put out fires to avoid furloughs there, to avoid 
this or that which has a highly visible impact, but then you are 
going to have to shift to other areas. 



50 


And I want to know, as you get all this criticism and have to 
avoid this cut or that, what are those less visible areas? What are 
those less visible areas that are nonetheless critical that we ought 
to be worried about because these cuts are going to come from 
somewhere and we need to know where? 

And simply playing it politically and pretending that these fires 
can all be put out with no consequence, I think, is highly mis- 
leading. 

So what can you tell us about your current strategy? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, Representative Price, we are a per- 
sonnel heavy department. That drives our budget. We are trying to 
work through the fiscal year 2013 numbers we were finally given. 
The negotiators were able to put back in some more money for 
CBP, some more money for grants. We are working now with the 
Office of Personnel Management, the government-wide office, to see 
how that plays out. 

But on March 1, pre budget, if I might, we were looking at sig- 
nificant furloughs and reductions in overtime. So now we are work- 
ing to mitigate those and we do not have a final answer yet for our 
employees. That is a stress factor that needs to be taken into ac- 
count. 

But I think in order to mitigate, we will be asking the Congress 
for some reprogramming because as you observed, we were given 
very little discretion on how to — which accounts money went into. 
So as we unpack that, we believe that money needs to be moved 
around. 

So we will under the fiscal year 2013 as enacted be coming back 
to the Congress for some reprogramming. And once that occurs, I 
think we will be able to get some final answers. 

Mr. Price. What are those less visible accounts that are nonethe- 
less critical that we ought to be worried about? I mean, it seems 
in a number of departments, for example, it is all too easy to put 
out this fire and that and then shift the cuts, let’s say, into re- 
search. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well 

Mr. Price. That is taking place a lot of places. Is it going to hap- 
pen with DHS? 

Secretary Napolitano. Things like that, some of the acquisitions 
get postponed or slowed down. There may not be a reduction in 
force. But as people retire, we may leave vacancies and not hire 
new agents or officers. 

So that is not readily apparent, but the plain fact of the matter 
is, for example, take CBP, take port officers, that part of CBP. We 
had a significant shortage of port officers to begin with. 

What we are already seeing in the major international airports, 
the ones that have international flights, are wait times signifi- 
cantly higher than last year’s wait times for March and April. So 
we anticipate that that will continue, particularly if CBP does not 
get the budget the President has requested. 

Mr. Price. That still does not add up to $2.8 billion, I am afraid, 
and so we will look forward to continuing to exchange information 
about this, about what these impacts will be. 

Secretary Napolitano. We will be happy to give you an inven- 
tory, but it ranges across the department. And as I said, some are 



51 


personnel savings, some are equipment savings, some are program 
identifications and reductions. 

[The information follows:] 

Response: The Department provided a report separately on its post-sequestration 
operating plans to the Appropriations Committees on April 26, 2013. 

Mr. Price. Thank you. 

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Carter. Chairman Rogers, I now recognize you for ques- 
tions. 

BUDGET CUT IMPACTS: COAST GUARD, CUSTOMS AND BORDER 

PROTECTION 

Mr. Rogers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

I want to ask you about two pieces. One is cuts to Coast Guard 
and, two, I wanted to ask you about the CBPs particularly at the 
Miami Airport which I happened to become acquainted with. 

First, you propose to cut critical Coast Guard front-line personnel 
by over 826 military billets, cut the Coast Guard recapitalization 
programs by almost 40 percent, and decommission various cutters 
and aircraft while at the same time increasing headquarters’ fund- 
ing and increasing the science and technology division by 83 per- 
cent. 

In addition, you propose to slash current and future capabilities 
for drug interdiction for the Coast Guard and customs and border 
protection. CBP Air and Marine procurement is reduced by $87 
million. No Coast Guard aviation assets are proposed despite the 
decommissioning of eight HU-25s and two C13Hs. 

We have rejected that type of budget slashing of front-line oper- 
ations in the past and I do not see any reason why we won’t do 
it again. 

But I really wonder what was in your mind because just, for ex- 
ample, on drug interdiction, the country is overrun with drug prob- 
lems. The deaths from addiction to prescription medicine exceeds 
the number of people killed in car wrecks, mainly OxyContin. 

And then the manufacturer changed the formulation of 
OxyContin to where it was not crushable and, therefore, you could 
not crush it and shoot it up and get the 12-hour release into a sin- 
gle jolt. But that patent now expires, has expired, and Canada has 
six generic manufacturers of the old, original, crushable OxyContin 
which has hooked and killed thousands of kids in our country. 

And I am wondering whether you have interdicted any of that 
new generic drug coming out of Canada and what will happen with 
the reduction in the Coast Guard assets that you are proposing 
that would be used to stop this kind of problem coming from Can- 
ada. 

Secretary Napolitano. If I might, and I share your concern 
about OxyContin, we have not in our drug interdictions been pick- 
ing up any measurable degree of OxyContin or other prescription 
drugs, the generic, for example. 

But if I might, and I will just tick them off, you asked why are 
we increasing headquarters. Well, we are located in 50 plus dif- 
ferent facilities around the National Capital Region. The Coast 
Guard is moving to the new facility at St. Elizabeths and will have 
moved by Thanksgiving. 



52 


The proposal is to keep moving forward on that project and that 
was put in the headquarters’ budget. Every other item in the head- 
quarters’ budget, as you will see, has gone down as it went down 
last year, travel, training, conferences. You name it, it has been re- 
duced. 

So what we are talking about is finally getting this department 
a consolidated headquarters, which will assist us in the long term 
in performing our mission. 

The increases to the Science and Technology [Directorate (S&T)] 
are due primarily to the NBAF, and every group that has looked 
at the issue of biological threat has concluded that the current level 
four lab we have at Plum Island is inadequate and it will not be 
adequate in the long term. 

There was a peer-reviewed competition for the lab. Kansas is 
now putting in over $320 million to partner with us. So at some 
point, you know, we had to bite the bullet, so to speak, and that 
went in the S&T budget. But that is the increase there. 

With respect to the Coast Guard, the Commandant’s number one 
priority is the completion of the NSC [National Security Cutter] 
fleet. The budget includes the cost of NSC 7 and that is his number 
one priority. And, by the way, those ships require fewer personnel 
than some of the older ships that we are planning to decommission. 

We have a slightly different production path for FRCs [Fast Re- 
sponse Cutters] than the Congress has seen or has approved, but 
it ends up with the same number of FRCs. So that is just a budget, 
you know, in which year do you take the construction for the Fast 
Response Cutters. 

With respect to the billets. Chairman Rogers, the billets are 
mostly billets that are either onshore, administrative, or unfilled 
billets at this time anyway. 

Finally, we are working very hard with state and local officials 
and are able to leverage them in a much better way than perhaps 
8 years ago, 7 years ago. So the kind of task forces and Intel-shar- 
ing agreements and things we have ongoing now are much more 
robust and we can depend more on our state and local partners. 

ARIZONA BORDER SURVEILLANCE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 

Mr. Rogers. Well, I understand, but I am really puzzled on how 
you would want to come to us and request that we cut 40 percent 
of Coast Guard acquisitions and an $87 million cut to CBP Air and 
Marine when we have got this terrible drug problem not only on 
the Canadian border but, of course, the Mexican border, with the 
drug wars on the southwest border. 

And speaking of which, in January of 2011, you froze the activi- 
ties of what was then called the SBInet 

Secretary Napolitano. Right. 

Mr. Rogers [continuing]. And replaced it with what was called 
the Arizona border technology plan to buy off-the-shelf technology 
that could be deployed immediately 

Secretary Napolitano. Uh-huh. 

Mr. Rogers [continuing]. To meet Border Patrol’s clear mission 
needs and, yet, here we are 27 months later. Very little of that 
technology has actually been deployed. Only the procurement for 
thermal imaging devices went out on time. The major awards have 



53 


not been made including continued delays for remote video surveil- 
lance systems and integrated fixed towers. 

Am I correct that it has been four years almost — 27 months — I 
am sorry — since we have had any significant activity? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, if I might, Mr. Chairman — Mr. 
Chairman, Mr. Chairman, I do not know how that works — but in 
any event — I will just call you both chairman. 

Mr. Rogers. Yeah. 

Secretary Napolitano. In any event, I said stop on SBInet so 
that we could avoid throwing good money after bad, I said go back 
to the drawing board and in each sector develop a technology plan 
that works for the officers in that sector and meets geographical, 
topographical, whatever challenges. 

That was done. Those were reviewed. They are all in place. The 
plans have been submitted to Congress. The Arizona procurement 
is well underway and that technology — I was just down on that 
border at the end of last week — is being purchased and deployed 
as we speak. 

We are also, by the way, Mr. Chairman, moving more assets 
down to south Texas, which is the one area of the border right now 
that we are seeing some increase in traffic and we want to turn it 
back. 

Mr. Rogers. Well, the idea was with the Arizona border tech- 
nology plan was that you could buy off-the-shelf technology quickly 
and put it in place quickly and, therefore, solve the mission more 
expeditiously and, yet, it has been two and a half years. 

Why couldn’t you buy that off-the-shelf stuff and put it in place 
in a week? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah. That is because when we said off 
the shelf, that is kind of a misleading phrase, quite frankly. These 
things do not translate immediately from, say, the war theater in 
Afghanistan to what we have down on the border. And some of 
these things need to be ordered and then built even though they 
are mobile. 

But that process is well underway and I anticipate, if anything, 
it is going to be speeding up very rapidly. 

REIMBURSABLE AGREEMENTS: AIRPORT PILOT PROGRAMS 

Mr. Rogers. Well, I should hope so. 

And quickly, Mr. Chairman, and finally, the Customs and Border 
Protection offices, particularly at our international airports, I am 
familiar with the Miami Airport which I think is the biggest in vol- 
ume of international 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, I think that is true. 

Mr. Rogers [continuing]. Material transport 

Secretary Napolitano. Uh-huh. 

Mr. Rogers [continuing]. And, yet, the waiting time there is up 
to four hours. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes. 

Mr. Rogers. And those companies are now beginning to move 
offshore that otherwise would — because they cannot stand that big 
time delay. I am told that the mayor has money to pay for more 
CBP agents. It will cost you nothing. They will give the money and 



54 


hire them in order to get this thing expedited because the city sees 
a looming economic problem. 

And I think we authorized five locations in the fiscal 2013 
bill 

Secretary Napolitano. That is correct. 

Mr. Rogers [continuing]. To allow private companies to pay 

Secretary Napolitano. Uh-huh. 

Mr. Rogers [continuing]. For CBP personnel. Have you picked 
those five airports yet? 

Secretary Napolitano. We are in the process. I was just down 
in Miami myself and I spent the better part of a day with the air- 
port authorities, local authorities. But if I might, we are in the 
process of selecting the five pilots for a reimbursement type part- 
nership. 

In the President’s 2014 budget proposal, it would open it up be- 
yond five so that we would always have the ability to seek that 
kind of reimbursement. It also provides, as I mentioned before, for 
the 3,400 new CBP officers, many of whom I think would end up 
deployed at places like Miami, LAX, JFK where we have a lot of 
international arrivals. 

And, finally, with respect to ports, the land ports themselves, it 
would enable us to go into partnerships with local authorities for 
things like land exchanges — they build the building, in-kind con- 
tributions and so forth. 

So the whole idea is to increase our capacity in terms of our own 
personnel, but also increase our ability to seek reimbursement or 
partnerships with others. 

REIMBURSABLE AGREEMENTS: UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 

Mr. Rogers. Well, whatever. But reducing personnel, CBP per- 
sonnel at an airport like Miami and there are several, of course, 
like Miami, international 

Secretary Napolitano. Uh-huh. 

Mr. Rogers [continuing]. Hubs is going to cause some really eco- 
nomic difficulties for the country because the waiting times are just 
unacceptable and, yet, we read at the same time you are finalizing 
an agreement with the United Arab Emirates to accept reimburse- 
ment to establish pre-clearance operations in Abu Dhabi. 

The airlines are up in arms because that operation would only 
benefit Etihad Airlines, a state-owned foreign carrier which has 
three flights to the U.S. each week and, yet, we cannot get help for 
American airlines, American 

Secretary Napolitano. If I might 

Mr. Rogers. Yeah. 

Secretary Napolitano. This really goes into a more holistic, if I 
can use that word, strategic plan. We believe it is better for the se- 
curity of the country if we can push our borders out. 

And one of the areas where it would be helpful to push our bor- 
ders out, where we could check more passengers prior to even get- 
ting on a plane is in the Mideast. So Abu Dhabi has volunteered 
and they are a pilot in some respects. I think Dubai, assuming Abu 
Dhabi works, might be in the queue, but we are negotiating these 
pre-clearance agreements, which basically take our personnel and 



55 


we do the security clearance and so forth before they even head to 
the United States. 

Why the Middle East? Because for obvious reasons, for tactical 
and strategic concerns, much better for us to do our work overseas 
than here. 

Mr. Rogers. Well, I would rather you take the personnel in Abu 
Dhabi and put them in Miami. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, indeed. But I will tell you compared 
to what Miami needs, it is a drop in a bucket. And what we really 
need is for the GBP budget as requested, with all of the elements 
in it that I described, to be supported by the Congress because I 
agree with you. We have a personnel shortage there. 

Mr. Rogers. Thank you. 

Mr. Carter. Mr. Cuellar. 

GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS ACT REPORT 

Mr. Cuellar. Mr. Chairman, thank you so much. 

Madam Secretary, thank you for being here with us. 

Let me just follow up. I am going to ask you performance, the 
GPRA report that is called for you to turn in. But let me ask you. 
Let me just follow up what the chairman was referring to. I think 
it is the Section 560 of the H.R. 933 which is the 

Secretary Napolitano. The pilots. 

Mr. Cuellar [continuing]. The pilot programs, the public/private 
partnership. It does call for five. And any way we can work with 
you to extend that to cover more, we would appreciate it. We are 
extremely interested. It is not only the airports and not only the 
seaports, but the land ports is certainly one. 

As you know talking to some of the folks, we are in the process 
of turning it into a partnership. I would not just say one port, but 
would cover the Laredo district, the Laredo, McAllen, Brownsville 
area as one consortium to do that. There are cities that are ready 
to put money there. Literally they are working on putting some de- 
posits, ready to show that it is good faith. 

But my understanding is what they are waiting for. Madam Sec- 
retary, I know this just passed, but guidance from DHS to be pro- 
vided a CBP for the implementation of this new authority. 

So we are ready to work with you because it is not only airports 
or the seaports, but certainly covering the largest land port down 
in the south, the City of Laredo plus the other areas. We would ask 
you to provide that guidance as soon as possible, number one. 

That only covers services under the Section 560, but in working 
with the GSA on transfers of land, I think we finally got the magic 
language that GSA has been saying that they need to actually pro- 
vide the transfer. And I think you and I have talked about this, 
transfer of properties instead of just services. 

So we are hoping that working with the chairman and the rest 
of the committee we can actually put the language in there that 
I think GSA needs, a different committee, but appropriations, so 
they can actually do the transfer. 

So I think, Mr. Chairman, we finally got that language there. So 
the 560 is on services for a pilot program and then the other is for 
transfer of lands or whatever might be on those. So we certainly 
want to work with you on that aspect. 



56 


The other thing has to do with the modernization, GPRA’s Mod- 
ernization Act of 2010, which we passed in a bipartisan way, which 
calls for statutory requirements. And I get all those numbers on re- 
ports that you all have to turn in. But I think this is probably one 
of the most important, if not the most important report because 
you have to provide your mission. 

That is the map or the guidelines for you to go ahead and talk 
about what your mission is, what your objectives are, what per- 
formance measures you are, what efficiencies you are looking at. 

And I know we were supposed to have gotten one from you yes- 
terday, but according to your folks, it is almost submitted. It is al- 
most to be submitted. We look forward to working with you on that 
because this will provide an opportunity for your department and 
Members of Congress to work together on some areas that we can 
work together. 

So what is the status of that GPRA report? 

Secretary Napolitano. My understanding is that it is moving 
swiftly through. If it has not been submitted already, it is virtually 
there. 

I know that it looks at three major areas of our mission respon- 
sibilities, aviation, resilience, I want to say immigration, and immi- 
gration. 

So I think we will be in compliance with you and get that infor- 
mation to you. 


EFFICIENCIES AND STREAMLINING 

Mr. Cuellar. Yeah. Well, we are appreciative. And I think this 
will be a way we can work together. 

The other question, because I think there will be two rounds of 
questions, but I do want to just add one more thing before I yield 
my time, I do have to commend you. There is about three or four 
pages on efficiencies and streamlining operations on your testi- 
mony. 

And I look forward because I have some ideas on those effi- 
ciencies and streamlining, but I would ask you if you can have your 
staff sit down and give us some details as to what proposals you 
have to streamline. 

I believe for fiscal year 2014, you are talking about $1.3 billion 
in savings from administrative and mission supports which covers 
travel, technology, personnel moves, overtime, purchasing profes- 
sional services, vehicle management. 

Could you ask your staff to give the committee ourselves a detail 
as to how you intend to save $1.3 billion in savings and effi- 
ciencies? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, sir. 

[The information follows:] 



FY 2014 DHS President’s Budget 
Summary of Efficiencies and Savings by Component ($000) 





ism 

r!?T»5l 


Esta 

,CE _ 

ITfsH*! 

■im 



TSA 


Esa 


Total 

Personnel and Benefits (PC&B and Overtime) 






EEH 



Bi 

m 

BIW 


MSfTB 

mm 

BEEi 

313,661 

Travel (OCC 21.0) 






mm 

1^^ 

6,345 

1,062 

2.S 

1,469 

14,763 


wm 

BB 

146,746 

Transportation of Things (OCC 22.0) 


■ESI 







■H 

m 


488 




1,877 

Rent, Comm., Util., & Misc Charges (OCC 23.0) 



1,681 

- 

17,389 

■ 



■ 

m 

■ 





63,826 

Printing & Reproduction (OCC 24.0) 



308 


- 

wm 




- 



^ 



1,926 

Advisory & Assistance Contracts (OCC 25.1) 

BHH 



1^3 





iSI 


EH 





230,515 

Other Services and Contracts (OCC 2S.2-25.8) 








BSI 







8,064 

390,937 

Supplies & Materials (OCC 26.0) 

33 


mm 





HH 



■BI 


5,433 


mm 

110,175 

Equipment (OCC 31.0} 




■■ 

mm 



IIIIIIH 

■1 




2,125 



51,672 

Land and Structures (OCC 32.0) 
















3,071 

Grants and Subsidies (OCC 41.0) 







bh 

i|HI 

mu 

IB 

m 

HI 

IH 

n 

iHH 

385 

Total 

15,601 

312,711 

64,496 

6,261 

48,143 

22,356 

367,122 

26,935 

2,667 

7,495 

6,248 

205,107 

187,562 

759 

41,328 

1,314,790 








Efficiencies Proposed in the FY 2014 DHS President’s Budget Submission By Object Class ($000) 










Advisory a 


Supplies 



Grants 





Personnel and 


Transportation 

Rent, Comm., 

Printing a 

Assisttfice 


a 


land and 

and 





Benefits(PC&Band 

Travel 

of Things 

Util, a Misc. 

Reproduction 

Contracts 

Other Services 

Materials 

Equipment 

Structures 

Subsidies 


Component 

Appropriation 

Pragram/Pratect/Activltv 

Overtime) 

|OCC2L(4 

(OCC 22.(9 

(OCC 23.0) 

{OCC 24.0) 

(OCC2S.1) 

(OCC2S.2-25.8) 

(OCC 26.0) 

(OCC 31.0) 

(OCC 32.0} 

(OCC 41.0) 

Total 

Analysis and 

Operations (A&O) 

Analysis and Operations 


f3,335) 

(545) 




(11,688) 


(33) 




(15,501] 

A&O Subtotal 



!3,335: 

(545) 




(11.688) 


(33) 





Customs & Border 
Protection (CBP) 

Salaries & Expenses (S&E) 


(56,S4S) 

(23,592) 

(958) 

(IScTO^ 

(1.246) 


(133,748) 

(59,302) 




(291,091^ 

CBP 

Automation 








(12,543) 





(12,543} 

CBP 

Facilities 








(9,071) 





(9,071) 

CBP Subtotal 



(56,548; 

(23,5921 

19581 

(15,703) 

il.246) 


(155,362) 

(59,302) 





Departmenlai 
Management and 
Operations (OMO) 

Working Capital Fund 

Office of the Secretary and 



(72) 



(6) 

(6,662) 

(7,987) 

(400) 




(15,127) 

OMO 

Executive Management 

Under Secretary for 


(5,389) 

(1.768) 


(1.681) 

(302) 

(142) 

(4,199) 

(161) 

(107) 



(13.749) 

DM0 

Management 


(3,44S) 

(141) 




(15,137} 


(24) 

(39) 



(18,786) 

OMO 

Chief Information Officer 


(8S81 

(175) 




(4,980) 

(7,183) 





(134961 

DM0 

Chief Financial Officer 


(565) 





(3,067) 


(6) 




(3.638) 

OMO Subtotal 



(10,257] 

(2.1561 


(1.681) 

(308) 

(29.988) 

119,369) 

(591) 

(146) 




DomesticNjclear 
Detettion Office 

Management & 














(ONOO) 

Administration (M&A) 
Research, Development, & 








(836) 





(836) 

ON 00 

Operations 







(4.577) 

(848) 





(5.425) 

DNDO Subtotal 








(4.S77I 

(X684) 






Federal Emergency 
Management 

Agency (FEMA) 

S&E 



(800) 


(17,389) 


(1.846) 

(10,741) 


(111) 



(30.887) 

FEMA 

State & Local Programs 



- 





(15.753) 





(15,753) 

FEMA 

U.S. Fire Administration 



(3) 




(22S) 

(886) 




(385) 

(1,S(B) 

FEMA Subtotal 




(803) 


(17.3^) 


(2.075) 

(27,380) 


(111) 




Federal Law 

Enforceme nt Trai ni n g 
CeoterlFLETC) 

saE 

Acquisition, Construction, 
Improvements, a Re lated 


(3.458) 

(7«) 

(240) 

(581) 

(147) 


(11,312) 

(2,749) 




(29,285) 


FLETC 

Expense 











(3.071) 


(3,071) 

FLETC Subtotal 



(3.4S81 

(7M) 

(240) 

(581) 

(147) 


(11,3121 

(2.749) 





Immigration and 
Customs 

Enforcement (ICE) 

saE 


(U4,674) 

(48368) 


(14,701) 


(26,227) 

(91,506) 

(28,498) 

(43,148) 



(367,12;^ 

ICE Subtotal 



(114674) 

(48.368) 


(14.7011 


(26.227) 

(91,506) 

(28,498) 

(43,148) 



(367.122) 



Efficiencies Proposed in the FY 2014 DHS President’s Budget Submission By Object Class ($000) 


Component 

i^propnation 

ProRram/Proiect/Actiirtty 

Personnel and 
Benefits (PC&e and 
Overtime) 

Trawel 

(OCC21U9 

Transportation 

ofTbii^ 

(OCC22.(g 

Rent, Comm., 

Util. & Misc. 
(OCC 23.(9 

Printing & 
Reproduction 
(OCC 24.0) 

AclwsorY& 

Assistance 

Contracts 
(OCC 25.1) 

Other Services 
(OCC 25.2-25.8) 

Sup^riies 

& 

Materials 
(OCC 26.0) 

Equipment 
(OCC 31.0) 

Land and 

Structures 
(OCC 32.0) 

Grants 

and 

Subsidies 
(OCC 41.0) 

Total 

National Protection 
and Programs 
Directorate (NPPD) 

Infrastructure Protection and 
Information Security (IPISJ 

Cybersecurity Coordination 


(181) 










(181) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

US-CERT Operations 

- 

(267) 

- 

(1.034) 



(724) 





(2.025) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Federal Network Security 


(225) 


(70) 


(930) 






(1.225) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Network Security Deployment 


(191) 

- 









(191) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Global CyberSecurity 
Management 


(162) 










(162) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Critical Infrastructure Cyber 
Protection & Awareness 

. 

(1.173) 




(2,582) 






(3.7SS) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Business Operations 

- 

(133) 




(333) 

(134) 





(600) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Priority Telecommunications 
Service 


(ISl) 




(1,939) 






(2,090) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Programs to Study & Enhance 
Telecommunications 


(101) 




(408) 






(509) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Next Generation Networks 


(30) 










(30) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Critical Infrastructure 
Protection Programs 


(30S) 




(369) 






(6741 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Office of Emergency 
Communications 


(1,083) 


(21 


(4,585) 






(5.670) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Regional Field Operations 


(282) 




(920) 






11.202) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Sector Management & 
Governance 


(297) 




(1.600) 

(XOOO) 





(2,897) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Infrastructure Analysis & 
Planning 


(200) 





(2.540) 





(2,740) 

NPPD 

IPIS 

Infrastructure Security 
Compliance 


(1,479) 





(526) 





(2,0(») 

NPPD 

M&A 

Office of the Undersecretary 


(8S) 




(894) 






(979) 

NPPD Subtotal 




(6.345) 


(1.106) 


(14,560) 

(4.924) 





(26,935) 

Office of Inspector 















General (OIG) 

700200 


1316) 

(1,062) 




(1,237) 


(52) 




(Z667} 

OIG Subtotal 



1316) 

(1,062) 




(1,237) 


(52) 




(2.667) 

Office of Health Affairs 















(OHA) 

OHA 


1373) 

(2S5) 




(6,867) 






(7.495) 

OHA Subtotal 



1373) 

(25S) 

- 



(6,867) 






(7,495) 

Science aiechnologv 















Directorate (5&T) 

M&A 


(2,0^) 

(191) 


- 


(2,340) 


(114) 




(4,714) 

S&T 

S&TSubtotal 

Research, Development, 
Acquisition, & Operations 


a069) 

(1.278) 

(1.4») 


- 


(256) 

(2.596) 


(114) 




If 



Efficiencies Proposed in the FY 2014 DHS President’s Budget Submission By Object Class ($000) 










Advisory & 


Supplies 


— 

Grants 





Personnel and 


Traitsportation 

Rent, Comm., 

Printing & 

Assistance 


& 


Land and 

and 





Benefits (PC&Band 

Travel 

of Things 

Util. & Misc. 

Reproduction 

Contracts 

OtherServtces 

Materials 

Equipment 

Strucbires 

Subsidies 


Component 

Appropriation 

Frogram/Project/Activitv 

Overtime) 

(OCC 2L(9 

{QCCTLtti 

(OCC 230) 

(OCC 24.0) 

(OCC 25.1) 

(OCC 25.2-25.8) 

(OCC 26.0) 

(OCC 330) 

(OCC 32.0) 

(OCC 41.0} 

Total 

Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) 

Aviation Security 

Surface Transportation 


(14.^) 

(1.072) 

(13647) 

(330) 


(203) 

(40,811) 

(32,821) 

(11,830) 




(113592) 


Security 

Transportation Threat 


(19) 

(18) 



(5) 


(10,710) 

(227) 




(13033) 

(Ml) 


Assessment & Credentiating 
Transportation Security 


(37) 



(9.320) 

(1.910) 


■ 



(1342^ 

(8,413) 

(2,474) 


Support 


(82) 


(14) 

(15,625) 

(25,461) 

(540) 




(53609) 

(16,447) 


Federal Air Marshals 


19.055) 

(605) 

(39) 


(31 

(5,505) 

(434) 

(806) 




TSA Subtotal 



(33.6311 

(14.7631 

(488) 


1225) 

(71.2611 

(71,336) 

(13,403) 





United States Coast 


Enterprise-Wide Support 













Guard (USCG) 

Operating Expenses (0£) 

Personnel Reduction 

Front-line Mission Support 

(1,789) 

(26) 

(1) 

(49) 


(350) 


(135) 


■ 


(3350) 

USCQ 

OE 

Staffing Reduction 
Prior-YearManagement 

(3,466) 

(30) 

(6) 

(83) 


(3217) 


(2181 


- 


{S,0») 

USCG 

OE 

Annualizations (FY 2014) 
Telecommunication and 
Information Systems 

(29,333) 

(2.306) 

(2,193) 

(2,576) 


(7.384) 


(3707) 

(112) 



(45,611) 

USCG 

OE 

Command In-sourcing 

3,412 

155 

149 



(6,535) 


191 




(3560) 

USCG 

OE 

Defense Messaging System 
Consolidate Atlantic and 

Pacific Communications Area 

(454) 

(7) 


(14) 


(435) 


(40) 




(3000) 

USCG 

06 

Master Stations 

Advance Technical Training 

(229) 

(4) 


(8) 


(239) 


(21) 




(SOI) 

USCG 

0 £ 

School Program Reduction 


(3000) 




(3000) 






(3000) 

USCQ 

OE 

Education Benefits Reduction 
Officer Accession and 






(6,000) 






(6,000) 

USCG 

OE 

Leadership Training Reduction 
Reduction of Smartphone 

(3211) 

(14) 

(1) 

(28) 


(203) 


(77) 




(3534) 

USCG 

OE 

DeviMS and Service Contracts 



- 

(3,300) 









USCG 

OE 

Government Vehicle Fleet Mix 
Non-Operational Travel 

- 


- 





(800) 




(800) 

USCG 

OE 

Reduction 

General Services 


(5.724) 










(5,724) 

USCG 

OE 

Administration Footprint 

- 

- 


(800) 









USCG 

OE 

Divest Coast Guard Housing 





- 

(7SO) 






(750) 

USCG 

OE 

HU-25 Decommissions 
Enterprise-Wide Efficiencies 

(1,917) 

(83) 


(1.655) 


(5,377) 


(320) 

(19) 



(9,371) 

USCG 

OE 

(FY 2013) 

Prior-Year Management 

(4,521) 

(22,366) 

78 

(2,284) 


(24,510) 


(814) 

(3882) 



(56,299) 

USCG 

OE 

Annualizations (FYIOIS) 
Prc^rammatic Reductions 

(5,377) 

(1,539) 

- 

(3315) 


(2,397) 


(368) 




(10,996) 

USCG 

OE 

(FY X)13) 

(3a90(B 

3<O0 

3783 

(621) 


(2.992) 


(3124) 

(112) 



(33945) 

USCG <kibtotal 



(re,7^) 

HUES)] 

(191) 

(13665) 


(59,439) 


(5,433) 

(2. 125) 



(187,561) 





Efficiencies Proposed In the FY 2014 DHS Presidenfs Budget Submission By Object Class ($000) 


Component 

Appropriation 

Prowam/Project/Activitv 

Personrwl and 
Benefits (PC&B and 
Overtime) 

Travel 
(OCC 2L0) 

Transportation 
of Things 
(OCC 22.(4 

ftent. Comm,, 

Util. & Misc. 
(OCX 23.0) 

Priming & 
Reproduction 
(OCC 24.0) 

Advisory & 
Assistance 

Contracts 
(OCC 25.1) 

Other Services 
(OCC 25.2-25.8) 

Supplies 

& 

Materials 
(OCC 26.0) 

Equipment 
(OCC 31.0) 

Land and 

Structures 
(OCC 32.0) 

Grants 

and 

Subsidies 
(OCC 41.0) 

Total 

U.S, Citizenship and 
immigration Services 
lUSCIS) 

USCtS Subtotal 

S&£ 


(759) 

(759) 











(759) 

(759) 

U.S. Secret Service 
(USSS) 

USSS Subtotal 

0£ 


(12.456) 

(12.456) 

(14.666) 

(14.666) 





(8.064) 

(8.064) 


(6.142) 

(6.142) 



{A1,32S) 

(41,328) 

DHS Total 



(313,661) 

(146,746) 

(1,877) 

(»,S26) 

(1,926) 

(230,515) 

(390,937) 

(U0.17S) 

(51,672) 

(3,071) 

(385) 

(1,314,790) 


05 




62 


Mr. Cuellar. Okay. Mr. Chairman, thank you so much. I yield 
back. 

Mr. Carter. Thank you, Mr. Cuellar. 

We go in the order that people were here at the time of the gavel. 
So Mr. Latham is next. 

BUDGET CUT IMPACTS: TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 

Mr. Latham. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. 

Welcome, Madam Secretary. 

On March 4th, you warned airline passengers that they should 
get to the airports extra early because spending cuts had already 
led to long lines in some security check points and the coming fur- 
loughs would only make the situation worse, and that is end of 
quote. 

Today we know that the flights have not been grounded, long 
lines have not materialized, and government workers have not 
been sent home en masse. And further TSA announces it does not 
expect to furlough any additional screeners in fiscal year 2013. 

Can you tell us what changed since your warnings when you said 
the sky was falling, and are you making future changes to the situ- 
ation? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, the major thing that changed is we 
got a budget and we got some additional appropriations in the 
budget after March 4th. And they were specifically for CBP. 

Mr. Latham. You said it was already happening at that time. 

Secretary Napolitano. It was because we were well into the fis- 
cal year. We did not know that we were going to get a budget and 
sequestration was already in effect. 

If I might, sequestration is still there and it is still, as Represent- 
ative Price noted, having impacts. And as Representative Rogers 
just described, the wait times at Miami, we are seeing that at 
international arrival airports across the board. And let’s not mix up 
CBP and TSA. 

Mr. Latham. Right. 

Secretary Napolitano. With respect to furloughs, we are work- 
ing to minimize any furloughs of personnel as well as reductions 
in overtime pay, but that is easier said than done given the way 
sequestration works. 

Mr. Latham. Right. 

Secretary Napolitano. So we are still working on that final 
plan. 

Mr. Latham. Talking about sequestration, when the President 
proposed sequestration and insisted on it, were you contacted as to 
the ramifications for the department before he insisted on includ- 
ing that? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, I do not want to get into who start- 
ed sequestration, so I won’t respond on that. But the answer is no 
one talked to me about sequestration. 

Mr. Latham. Okay. You said the TSA had gotten additional 
funding. 

Secretary Napolitano. No. I said CBP did. CBP got additional 
funding. 

Mr. Latham. Okay. 



63 


Secretary Napolitano. We got some more money for grants. 

With respect to TSA 

Mr. Latham. Right. 

Secretary Napolitano [continuing]. In going through, we discov- 
ered some balances in some accounts that we were going to be able 
to move to the TSO [transportation security officer] line in the 
budget. 


BORDER security: ALIEN SMUGGLING 

Mr. Latham. As you know, alien smuggling has been a problem 
on the southwest border. Can you tell us what kind of enhance- 
ments you have made in the last year or so in dealing with the 
problem and what still remains to be done? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, there are a number of enhance- 
ments, technology being one, aerial being a second, and third, we 
have been in certain areas, highly trafficked areas of the border, 
actually putting bases physically on the border as opposed to hav- 
ing agents travel out from their central — or from their head- 
quarters. 

So what we are seeing is that the traffic basically is still going 
down. We are still at 1970s levels. As I mentioned earlier, we are 
having a spike right now in the southern part of Texas, excuse me, 
in the Rio Grande Valley there. We now have, really, the ability 
to move resources and technology, an ability we really didn’t have 
6 or 7 years ago, to go ahead and get ahead of that traffic in Flor- 
ida. 

I would mention that most of that increase is not Mexican na- 
tionals. They are from Central America. They are economic mi- 
grants, and that really ties into the need for immigration reform 
because, as you know, the process for immigrating legally into the 
country is very backlogged and very cumbersome. 

Mr. Latham. That is one of the stumbling blocks so that is the 
idea of securing the border first before you get any immigration re- 
form. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah, I think, and I testified to this, if 
I might, having spent 20 years on this issue. 

I think it appropriate not to think of it in terms of a line, but 
it is really, it is really a system, a system that requires and gives 
us the ability to do more against employers who hire illegal labor — 
that is a major driver on the border — a system that opens up the 
visa process appropriately to more incoming, and then continued ef- 
forts along the border, both at the ports of entry and in between 
the ports. 

Mr. Latham. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Carter. Well, thank you, Mr. Latham. 

Before we go to Mr. Owens, I have a request to recognize Chair- 
man Rogers for a moment. 

EEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY REIMBURSEMENTS 

Mr. Rogers. Thank you. Chairman. I will be very brief. 

Madam Secretary, we had a terribly devastating tornado in 2012 
in my district in East Kentucky. West Liberty was practically 
erased. It was a terrible disaster. 



64 


FEMA was prompt, got there quickly, early on, great help. The 
County Executive now is having big difficulties with EEMA over re- 
imbursements for certain projects. If I gave you this letter that the 
administrator of the county had written EEMA, would you be able 
to look into this for me? 

[The information follows:] 



65 


04/03/2413 02:45 


(2138 P.003/005 


MCM16AN COUHTVFISCAL COOBT 

imonnaYA. C(»a£y, judseexecuto^ 

450 ra£S1tai£»UETSTfflET PHONE; (606)t43-8^»7 

VfeST [^£8:^.1(^41472 FAX: (606)743-3595 

April 2, 2013 

Mr. Craig Fugate 
Adminiatrator 

Federal Emergency Management Asanciation 
US Department of Homeland Security 
500 C Street, SW 
Washington, DC 20472 

Dear Mr. Fugate: 

As you are aware, the 20 1 2 tornados devastated the City of West Liberty and a 
large portion of Morgan County, Kentucky. All government buildings in the dty 
were either destroyed or suffoed severe and we also lost a large number of our 
private businesses, churches and family homes. FEMA was very prongtt to arrive 
on die sc^ and get the process of funding and assistance to our residents started; 
the agents on the ground were very helpilil with getting funding identified and 
forms filled, which was quickly sent to the Commonwealth of Kentucky and they, 
too, were prompt in woridng on and preparing documentation outlining our 
financial needs. 

However, after working with all of the disaster recovery efforts in our county and 
the City of West Liberty for just over a year now, we have identified a lot of gaps 
and now we feel that we are being bogged down with pqrerworki We are starting 
to feel that we are being discouraged in our efforts to se^ funding through the 
PubUc Assistance program in order to assist our recovery efforts. I assume that 
this result of this discouragement is that we will just give up and go away. But we 
cannot do that because our total losses are now close to a quarter of a billion 
dollars and we are a populatum of fourteen foousand people w4io live in one of the 
poorer counties of eastern Kentudcy. 

FEMA’s policy, as I undostand it Old as it was esqrlained to by your perstmoel, 
is to pm public agotcies and local governments back to pie-disastaconditioa The 



66 


04/09/3013 02:4S 


42198 P.004/005 


foUowing is some exanqiles of that failing to happen; The Morgan County OfBce 
Building has an insurance amount of four million dollars to repair (be building. By 
following state building codes, the reconstruction of this buildiDg is estimated at 
approxiroately $8.2 million dollars. Afl«- submitting the necessary p^ierwodc and 
forms, FEMA determined that our Public Assistance for this focility was $23.00 
and sent us a check for that amount. That is somewhat insultingl The old Court 
House has insurance coverage in the amount of three million dollars and the total 
cost of rqiairs is $4.S million and we received gsiQ &om FEMA. The Morgan 
County Water District Building has insurance of five hundred thousand dollars, it 
was completely destroyed and had a total of five thousand square feet of space 
(with an estimated cost of two hundred dollars per square foot to replace, it would 
cost one million dollars to rebuild this building). We received zero fiom FBMA. 

This list goes on and on; and we do not have time or financial infiastructure to be 
bogged down with bureaucracy. We have a total of nineteen government 
structures destroyed, twelve with major damage and eight with minor damages. 

This does not include the approximately one thousand structures damaged in 
residence, commercial and churches. Currently we are occupying two additional 
buildings for temporary office and storage space. We are not receiving any FEMA 
assistance and this total is between $1.3 to $2.0 million dollars. Our insurance 
policy allows us five hundred thousand dollars for contents, loss of income and 
tenqioraty placement. Our costs thus fiur have been well over S 1 .3 million dollars 
with invoices still being received. 

While the assistance our county and its’ residents received immediately after the 
disaster fiom FEMA was extremely beneficial, I must say that since a few weeks 
after the event, our county’s interaction with your Agency has not been good. As 
noted above, your office in Atlanta went to die trouble of sending us a check for 
$23.00 to repair and reconstruct our County Office Building. Additionally, we 
have provided your Atlanta office with a large number of documents fiom our 
insurance company showing very clearly that our policy was a building-by- 
building policy and that our facilities were and are absolutely eligible for Public 
Assistance fimding, 

Because of these issues and the lack of any reasonable response fiom your Atlanta 
office, I am asking for a meeting in Washington, DC with you, Congressman Hal 
Rogers and Senator Mitch McConnell. The support and help that our 
Congressman, Hal Rogers, has provided to ibis county has been amaang and I 
know that Senator McConnell has always supported our county in receiving die 
assistance our citizens need and deserve. I am smiding a copy of this letter to bodi 



67 


M/l)9/S013 02:49 


I2iee 9.009/009 


oftliemsoihatatimecoitvenkiittoyouaiidttemcanbesetup. IneedUs 
mwtiiig as soon as possible as I am trying to repair and rebuild our county after 
et^ieriencmgttie worst disaster in Kentucky since 1974 and our county and its 
citizens need your help. 


Thank you in advance for your attention to this letter and my request and please let 
me know if you have any questions or need additional inftnmafton prior to our 
meeting. I will cotsdinate with Congressman Rogers’ ofSce and Senator 
McConnell’s moving ftsward. 





ley, Judge Ett^dve 


CC; Hoiorable Hal Rogers 

Honorable hfttoh McConnell 
Director Oail Wright, Qeiasmi/ ADD 


nitoitKDrai FOR Voir 


68 


Secretary Napolitano. Yes, sir. Absolutely. 

Mr. Rogers. It is a tragic case. Thank you. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah, absolutely. I know the tornado you 
are speaking about. 

Mr. Carter. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

PAY SYSTEMS, DIEFERING 

Mr. Owens. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, Madam Secretary. Thank 
you for being here. 

I am going to focus on the border that usually isn’t focused on 
from a perspective. I am hearing a lot from border patrol agents 
along the northern border in my district about what they perceive 
to be a disproportionate reduction in overtime to the border patrol 
as well as, if you will, a greater number of furloughs. A lot of con- 
cern about that at every level, both from a personal but also from 
a security perspective. 

And in testimony that we have heard before, ICE seems to have 
approached it differently. Other agencies within DHS appear to be 
approaching it differently. Assuming we are working off the same 
piece of legislation, I am curious as to why that is happening. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, we may be working off the same 
piece of legislation but we are not working off the same pay sys- 
tems. Remember, these are legacy agencies that came into the de- 
partment, so they don’t have one unified pay system. 

With respect to Border Patrol, they get what is called AUO [ad- 
ministratively uncontrollable overtime] as their premium pay. They 
are not under the LEAP [law enforcement availability pay] system 
and their pay basically is just calculated very differently than other 
elements of the department and as sequestration comes into effect, 
it is account by account by account, so even if I wanted to, I can’t 
take from Peter over here to pay Paul. 

Now, with the additional money that was added in late March 
for CBP of which 96 or 97 million was specific for Border Patrol, 
we are now working that through to see how it can be used to re- 
duce any reductions in premium pay and furlough days. 

We are doing the same account by account by account, so we are 
doing the same with port officers who are paid differently. They 
came out of Customs not out of INS [Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service]. So that is the reason why there is a difference. 

And we can provide your staff with, if they would like, a detailed 
briefing of how that works. 

Mr. Owens. In the short term, about how long will your analysis 
take and when will that be communicated to the people on the 
ground? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, we sent an email, Tom Winkowski, 
the acting commissioner, sent an email to staff yesterday saying 
steady as she goes for right now. As I mentioned, we are working 
with the Office of Personnel Management, and we are going to 
have to seek some reprogrammings and 0MB has to be involved in 
that. 

I would like it to have been done 2 weeks ago because I know 
the stress level that it causes. We are moving as rapidly as we can 
to get this settled. 

Mr. Owens. We will take you up on your invitation for a briefing. 



69 


Secretary Napolitano. Okay. 

BEYOND THE BORDER 

Mr. Owens. Secondarily, can you have your staff, and I would 
not expect you to have this information in front of you, but in 
terms of implementation of Beyond the Border, the sense that we 
have, those of use who are interested in it, those of us who commu- 
nicate with our Canadian colleagues, is that Canada is moving 
more deliberately towards implementation, is funding it more di- 
rectly. That may be simply because our budget is much larger and 
it is more difficult to see exactly what DHS is doing relative to im- 
plementation. 

If someone could give us a breakdown of implementation, that 
would be very helpful. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, and I just had a meeting, a bi-lat 
with my counterparty in Canada, Minister Toews. He did not raise 
that concern by the way, and we actually have a Beyond the Bor- 
der team, that is the IJ.S. and Canadian, and they have a joint 
time frame and timeline. There are some things we want to move 
ahead on that Canada can’t move ahead on without passing legisla- 
tion through their parliament, and so we are waiting for the Prime 
Minister to offer that legislation. 

So there is give and go on both sides, but I will say overall that 
Beyond the Border is on time and we have really moved mountains 
there in the last 2 years. 

[The information follows:] 

Response: The December 2012 Beyond the Border the Border Implementation Re- 
port was provided separately to the Committee. 

Mr. Owens. And clearly if it is very important, it also will save 
us, I think, some dollars in the long run. 

Secretary Napolitano. It will generate jobs on this side of the 
border I am confident. 

REIMBURSABLE AGREEMENTS: CANADA 

Mr. Owens. One of the other things I wanted to talk to you 
about relates to the reimbursable agreements. I represent an area 
that has many small ports, creates a number of issues. Clearly, I 
think we need to be moving towards a greater use of technology in 
those ports where we can have them manned by Canadians, in 
some instances U.S. and other instances. 

But also, we run into situations where there are a lot of small 
airports that are just on our side of the border where we do have 
Canadians coming in and we need access to CBP folks in order to 
clear them, and we are having some difficulty in that process. 

The airports are willing to pay for that service. In many cases 
the available staff is a half hour to forty-five minutes away. 

We would like to see some more flexibility in that arena, so that 
in fact we can continue to enhance the utilization of these small 
airports by our Canadian neighbors. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, Representative. And that is why the 
President’s fiscal year 2014 budget requests universal authority to 
enter into those agreements. It is not limited to five pilot projects. 



70 


But these small airports between the FAA and CBP, you are un- 
doubtedly going to see a reduction in capability with sequester, you 
know, being in effect for the rest of the year. Hopefully it ends soon 
or at least by the end of the year. 

But we, like you, recognize the potential of partnerships with 
some of these smaller communities because these small airports 
are a part of their economic plan, so we will work with you on that, 
but I will direct you to that portion of the President’s budget. 

Mr. Owens. Thank you very much. I yield back. 

Mr. Carter. Mr. Fleischmann. 

Mr. Fleischmann. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Welcome, Madam Secretary. 

PERSONNEL COSTS: CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, 
TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 

Madam Secretary, as some of my colleagues have mentioned, we 
have seen conflicting reports about CBP’s plans to furlough and cut 
overtime pay for border patrol agents and there is obvious concern 
about the ability to fund the number of CBP personnel that this 
budget calls for at our ports of entry. 

With CBP’s apparent troubles making decisions about current 
personnel, as you consider making private reimbursements of CBP 
personnel, what role do you see the Screening Partnership Program 
playing at TSA as a way to manage costs? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, you have got apples and oranges in 
there. It is CBP by the way. With respect to CBP as I mentioned, 
we are in the process now of unpacking what Congress ultimately 
passed for CBP and we appreciate the additional appropriation 
there. 

And running the traps through 0PM, 0MB [Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget], and we will have to come back, I suspect, as 
soon as possible with some reprogramming requests. That is why 
there is no firm answer yet for Customs and Border Protection. 

With respect to the privatization, the SPP [Screening Partner- 
ship Program] for TSA, we have received, I think, 27 total applica- 
tions and approved, I want to say, 22 or 24; two are pending. So 
that is moving along. 

We have not had a great demand for that by airports by the way. 
It is not as if there is a queue to privatize in that arena. But for 
those that have applied, we have been moving those very quickly. 

Mr. Fleischmann. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I yield back. 

Mr. Carter. Mr. Aderholt. 

STAFFING MODEL: TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 

Mr. Aderholt. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Madam Secretary, good to have you here today and for the sub- 
committee and it is encouraging to see a resolve that has moved 
ahead with a Level 4 lab facility known as IMBAC. This is a capa- 
bility, as you know and we have discussed many times in the past 
and it is important for it appear in the President’s budget, so that 
is encouraging, I think, to all of us to see it move forward on that. 

I want to follow up a little bit with a question that Mr. 
Fleischmann has asked about the private screening. I know that 
Chairman Carter’s staff has been engaged in the Office of the CFO 



71 


at TSA in order to determine whether a review of applications from 
a private screening company really is truly comparing apples to ap- 
ples. And I am referring to comparing the cost of TSA screeners 
versus private company screeners when it comes to matters as how 
many supervisors per screeners are required, how many TSA em- 
ployees are counted or not counted in the TSA model and when 
TSA employees perhaps have more than one they do with an air- 
port. 

Can you give the subcommittee an indication of the progress in 
getting those metrics back to the committee? 

Secretary Napolitano. I will follow up with TSA after this hear- 
ing. You want the metrics on what TSA’s staffing model is? 

Mr. Aderholt. Right, and how those compare so that when you 
do a comparison, you are comparing apples to apples as compares 
to, you know, to truly get a cost of what the real cost in comparing 
the private screeners as opposed to TSA. 

Secretary Napolitano. And that is so that we can do the com- 
parison over time because as I mentioned to Representative 
Fleischmann, if we have denied any agreements, it may only be 
one, but we have been granting them, so that comparison has not 
been used as a reason for any kind of miles. 

But I think over time that is a very useful set of metrics to have, 
so let me see where we are on that. 

[The information follows:] 

Response: When comparing the costs of private screening to Federal screening, 
TSA uses actual costs from contracts which are currently in place under the Screen- 
ing Partnership Program (SPP) and looks at comparable Federal screening costs at 
non-SPP airports to obtain an “apples to apples” comparison. When assessing the 
cost of Federal screening, estimates are based on actual expenditures specific to the 
airport which directly align with the contracted screening proposal to enable com- 
parison to the actual costs of private screening. The current methodology for esti- 
mating the cost of Federal screening incorporates GAO recommendations and has 
been reviewed by DHS cost estimation experts. The estimated cost of Federal 
screening accounts for all cost elements and includes: 

• Compensation (pay and benefits, premium pay, bonuses, etc.) 

• Ancillary costs such as uniforms, facilities, and training 

• Overhead costs and Worker’s compensation 

• Increased TSA management staff if the airport already participates in SPP 

• Adjustments for liability insurance 

• Adjustments for taxes recouped 

• Adjustments for future retirement liabilities 

• Transition costs (Federal to private and private to Federal) 

• The cost of deploying TSA national deployment force as necessary 

Lastly, there are some Federal positions that are present at airports regardless 
if the airport uses private or Federal screeners and are not redundant. These posi- 
tions provide overall supervision and responsibility for security. The allocation of 
these positions is determined by established business rules. These types of staff allo- 
cations are lower at SPP airports than Federal since they are not responsible for 
personnel management of security officers. Because these Federal positions are 
present in both cases, they are not included in the cost analysis comparison. 

FEDERAL FLIGHT DECK OFFICER PROGRAM 

Mr. Aderholt. Okay. If you could follow up with that and get 
us the information on that. 

Administrator Pistole testified before Congress regarding 
changes to the TSA prohibited items list and the need for TSA to 
continually mature its risk-based security processes in order to de- 
fend against critical threats such as those posed by non-metallic ex- 
plosive devices. 



72 


During that testimony with Administrator Pistole, he commented 
on the value of the Federal Flight Deck Officer Program [FFDO] 
in positioning TSA to implement other critical needed risk-based 
measures. 

In view of the President’s proposal for the FFDO program, it 
seems reasonable to conclude that you either agree with the Ad- 
ministrator’s assessment of the value of this program in imple- 
menting significant risk-based security strategies or not the need 
for this. So I just wanted to see what your position on this was in 
moving forward. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, I think what we have done in Presi- 
dent’s budget with respect to FFDOs, which is not a risk-based pro- 
gram per se, it is just where you have a pilot you have a pilot who 
may be on a flight. 

But nonetheless, we are working through the carriers themselves 
and offering training for those who seek to be FFDOs, and I think 
that is the appropriate way to go. 

Mr. Aderholt. So you would agree with the Administrator that 
this is an important thing to move forward on? 

Secretary Napolitano. I would. I wouldn’t say it is the most im- 
portant thing if I had to rank, but it is certainly there. And as I 
said before in preparing the budget we decided that the way to go 
was to offer the training through the carriers themselves. 

Mr. Aderholt. Yeah, well, you know, the concern about it was, 
as far as the budget zeros out this program, and that is, you know, 
the thing that, you know, TSA Administrator Pistole says that it 
is, you know, there is a real value on this and there is zero in the 
budget for it, so I think that is the concern, so I just wanted to 
know where you came down as far as between the, you know, 
thinking this is something that we need to put value on or whether 
it is not something that needs to be, you know, has little value. 

Secretary Napolitano. As I said, I think to the extent we offer 
training, there is a value, but if I had to rank the programs in TSA 
according to whether they are risk based or not, this would not be 
of much value. 

Mr. Aderholt. Thank you. I yield back. 

Mr. Carter. Mr. Culberson. 

REIMBURSABLE AGREEMENTS: UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 

Mr. Culberson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Madam Secretary, I have two areas I wanted to ask about and 
then I know we are going to have a second round. Airline pilots as- 
sociations have brought to my attention that in its budget pro- 
posals CBP is attempting to establish a preclearance facility at the 
Abu Dhabi International Airport in United Arab Emirates, yet I 
am aware that the agency has not been fully funding facilities here 
in the United States and I understand also from the pilots associa- 
tion that no U.S. airline even serves Abu Dhabi. 

Could you please talk to us about why you would expand a 
preclearance facility in a foreign airport benefitting foreign airlines 
when you are short of money and no U.S. airline even serves that 
airport and you are not fully staffing, for example, the facility at 
the Houston Intercontinental Airport and other airports in the 
United States. What is the logic? 



73 


Secretary Napolitano. Well, this is — yes. The strategic goal we 
have in mind is to push borders out because our ability to minimize 
risk is maximized the further out we can go. It just gives us one 
more layer. 

This is in the initial stages of negotiation. It would be a reim- 
bursable agreement. In other words, the U.S. taxpayer would not 
be paying for it. But it would allow us for the first time in the Mid- 
dle East where we have a keen interest in making sure the trav- 
eling public is safe, to try this out. 

There are several other countries that are interested in doing the 
same thing, but again from a security strategy perspective, moving 
the borders out as well as maintaining what we have here makes 
all the sense in the world. 

Mr. Culberson. And you said you have zero cost to U.S. tax- 
payers? 

Secretary Napolitano. It would be a reimbursable agreement. 

Mr. Culberson. At zero cost? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes. That is reimbursable. 

CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION: AIRPORT STAFFING LEVELS 

Mr. Culberson. Yeah, but that is the goal, is to make it zero 
cost. 

We have an urgent need for additional agents at facilities, for ex- 
ample, at the Eastern Airport. I know others around the country, 
and I understand what you are saying about reimbursable and 
pushing the borders out. What can you tell us about increasing the 
staffing levels like, for examples, facilities at Houston and other 
airports so that there is not delay that causes people to miss flights 
when the flight’s coming in from its international origin, lands in 
Houston, transfers to another flight going overseas? You guys have 
downsized the staffing levels and it is causing a lot of folks to miss 
flights. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, we haven’t downsized staffing lev- 
els. The fact is, the traveling public has increased and we haven’t 
increased staffing levels. 

What the President is requesting in the budget is the ability to 
add 3,400 more CBP officers for the airports and the land ports, 
1,600 to be paid for by Appropriation, the remainder by an increase 
in the Immigration User Fee and the COBRA fee, a $2 increase, 
which would cover the costs of that. 

We believe we have the capacity to bring on board, train and de- 
ploy that significant number within fiscal year 2014. That will go 
a long way based on our calculations and assessment to mitigating 
lines. 

We also have Global Entry and PreCheck to expedite travelers, 
and we have piloted — I actually think one of the Houston airports 
is part of the pilot — Express Check, as well as One Stop Check to 
facilitate the movement of passengers. 

detainees: laws 

Mr. Culberson. Right. Moving on to another subject I want to 
ask you about — if Congress enacts a law that uses the word “shall”, 
what does “shall” mean? 

Secretary Napolitano. Shall means shall. 



74 


Mr. Culberson. Is there any discretion, if the law says “shall”, 
what options does that give a federal agency? I mean “shall” means 
shall. You have to do it. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well 

Mr. Culberson. It means shall. That is mandatory, right? 

Secretary Napolitano. It is intended to be mandatory. However, 
when it says “shall” and subsequently doesn’t appropriate the 
money to meet the “shall”, you have a difficult choice to make. Do 
you violate the appropriations that you were given and do you vio- 
late those laws or do you violate the underlying law? 

So every time we have a ceiling, floor, or a bed level or what 
have you, in my view that means shall, subject to appropriations. 

Mr. Culberson. Well, and if you have two laws, one that says 
you shall build a new office building or shall expand headquarters 
and another law that says you shall protect public safety when you 
are short of money, which one of those would you do first? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, obviously public safety is always 
our number one priority. 

Mr. Culberson. Particularly if it has a “shall”. It is not optional. 

Secretary Napolitano. It is just, we were founded in response to 
9/11, and public safety is our number one goal, but if you look at, 
and I think you are getting to why is there money in here for a 
headquarters for DHS. 

Our ability to connect the dots and to work in an integrated fash- 
ion is facilitated by having a headquarters where people can actu- 
ally meet and talk with each other. We are at fifty-plus buildings 
in the National Capitol Region, so to do our best work, ultimately 
we are going to need a headquarters. 

Mr. Culberson. If “shall” is not optional therefore, you have to 
make choices and you don’t have enough money to do everything 
on your plate and your top priority is protecting public safety, 
would the Department of Homeland Security be doing its job if ICE 
agents released onto the street a criminal who had been arrested 
by local enforcement authorities for assault, sexual assault, drug 
dealing or other crimes? ICE has a mandatory “shall” responsibility 
to hold those people pending the termination of their final disposi- 
tion, would the Department of Homeland Security be doing its job 
if they released criminals who had been arrested for assault of 
other violent crimes in light of the statute that says they shall be 
held for removal proceedings? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, two things. One, there were a 
handful of level ones released. That was a mistake but, nonethe- 
less, it was a mistake made because when you look at the under- 
lying facts of each arrest and you look at the actual detainee, they 
were determined not to be a danger to public safety. 

The President’s budget for ICE provides for the detention beds 
for all those who are mandatory detainees. 

Mr. Culberson. If I may, excuse me for the interruption because 
our time is limited and the Chairman has been very generous, but 
you say the agents determine the criminals are not a threat to pub- 
lic safety. I don’t see that determination language in the statute 
that mandates that ICE hold these folks. The statute is Title VIII, 
Section 1225 of the United States Code and I don’t see language 
requiring a determination that they are a threat to public safety. 



75 


The statute is very clear that an ICE agent determines, quoting 
from the statute that, “An alien seeking admission is not clearly 
and beyond a doubt entitled to be admitted. The alien shall be de- 
tained for removal proceedings.” 

There is nothing about a determination of public safety. That is 
not optional. That is mandatory or in violation of the law and have 
endangered the safety of the people of the United States that you 
are sworn to protect by releasing these dangerous criminals. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, I think we have to be very careful 
in our language here. Representative. The individuals that were re- 
leased by ICE were not released into the general population per se. 
They were put in an alternative to detention. 

We believe that alternatives to detention have become much bet- 
ter than they were years ago and, by the way, are more cost effec- 
tive and efficient. 

If a mistake was made on a particular release, we will deal with 
that and with the agent or agents involved with that mistake. 

Mr. Culberson. So a release, that in this case you admit that 
was a mistake and I am glad to hear you say that. So you agree 
that that is a mandatory obligation on the part of ICE, the stat- 
ute’s very clear, “the alien shall be detained for removal pro- 
ceedings.” That is not optional. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, again, with respect to how we man- 
age the beds, right, I think Representative Price has it right. We 
ought to be detaining according to our priorities, according to pub- 
lic safety threats, level of offense and the like, so according to the 
individual, not an arbitrary bed number. 

Mr. Culberson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for the time. 

Mr. Carter. And Ms. Roybal- Allard. 

PRISON rape elimination ACT 

Ms. Roybal- Allard. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I apologize for 
being late but I was in another hearing. 

I would like to thank you and President Obama for extending the 
Prison Rape Elimination Act [PREA] to apply to immigration de- 
tention facilities. As you know, according to DHS records obtained 
by the ACLU more than 180 cases of sexual abuse in detention cen- 
ters were reported between 2007 and mid-2011, and your extension 
of PREA will make a huge difference in protecting detained women 
from sexual assault. 

However, I understand one of the challenges that you face with 
implementing the PREA regulations is the fact that the majority 
of ICE detainees are held in state, local and privately run facilities. 

Once the regulations are finalized, how long will it take to fully 
implement these regulations at every facility and how will you as- 
sure that contract facilities are complying with the requirements of 
the PREA? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah, we have a whole implementation 
plan for PREA. It is an important value. It is important to us that 
those whom the law is detaining, the government is detaining be 
done in a safe manner. So we have a whole implementation plan. 

With respect to the private contractors, many of them are hold- 
ing inmates for other entities rights, so they already are beginning 
to deploy PREA because they have to but, nonetheless, as a fairly 



76 


large consumer in the private prison realm. That is something we 
will attempt to implement now, but also as their contracts come up 
for renewal. 

Ms. Roybal-Allard. So there will be some oversight even if it 
is based on whether or not they get a contract renewal, but that 
is part of what will be looked at 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes. 

ALIEN ABUSE AND DEATHS 

Ms. Roybal-Allard [continuing]. In determining that? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes. 

Ms. Roybal-Allard. Okay. Over the past three years at least 20 
different individuals have died in incidents involving CBP per- 
sonnel. And I personally met with several other families and their 
stories really are heartbreaking. For example, Anastasio Her- 
nandez Rojas, who is a father of five, died after being beaten and 
tazed five times near San Diego, even though video footage showed 
that he was not resisting arrest. 

Similarly, in Arizona, a man named Jose Gutierrez who was try- 
ing to reach his hospitalized U.S. citizen daughter, was beaten into 
a coma by CBP officers and suffered serious brain damage. 

The President’s immigration reform proposal recognized the need 
to address this pattern of abuse by calling for increased civil rights 
and civil liberties training for border enforcement personnel. What 
steps are you taking in response to the President’s proposal to pre- 
vent future incidents of abuse and unnecessary deaths at the bor- 
der and is this one of the priorities? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, and if I might, I think we need to 
be careful not to extrapolate from individual cases to cases as a 
whole. As you know, we process hundreds of thousands of individ- 
uals every year. 

With respect to use of force, an appropriate use of force, we ex- 
amine each and every case in which there is a death to evaluate 
what happened and whether or not the agent or agents involved 
should be subject to some sort of disciplinary measure. 

In extreme cases we involve the Department of Justice and the 
FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation] and that really can elongate 
everything because those investigations take a long time, but our 
interest is in making sure it is a safe and secure border through 
which travel and trade can occur. We want to facilitate that, but 
we want to make sure that we meet our law enforcement respon- 
sibilities there. 

Ms. Roybal-Allard. Okay, but there will be training? 

Secretary Napolitano. There is training now. There is abso- 
lutely training now, yes. 

Ms. Roybal-Allard. Thank you. 

Mr. Carter. Mr. Dent. 

CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION: AVIATION STAFEING 

Mr. Dent. Thanks, Mr. Chairman. Good to see you again. 
Madam Secretary. 

A couple of questions. Some of my airports were concerned about 
some issues as it relates to CBP. One question specifically — when 
can the aviation industry, airlines and airports, expect to get infer- 



77 


mation on the CBP staffing allocation, we can learn that issue, and 
will CBP share that information with the ports of entry about how 
many staff are allocated to their POE. 

Secretary Napolitano. Right now. Representative Dent, what we 
are trying to do is take the additional money that was ultimately 
appropriated to CBP and identify how it works, which account it 
can go in and so forth. 

We do have a staffing model that we are using and that 
underlies our request for 3,400 more port officers and will be happy 
to discuss that with your staff. 

TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL 

Mr. Dent. Thank you. I appreciate that. I like to get more up- 
dated. Some of my airports are inquiring so thank you for that. 

On the issue of CFATS, as required by, you know, the CFATS 
for regulated facilities must implement measures designed to iden- 
tify people with terrorist ties. The agency’s expectation of recurrent 
vetting may exceed the scope of the regulation. If so, this unneces- 
sarily prohibits the use of every compliant and credentialing pro- 
gram to meet the CFATS requirement, except TWIC card. 

Industry has maintained that the acceptance of other federal cre- 
dentials which vet against the terrorist screen database meet the 
CFATS requirement. What is NPPD doing to address that require- 
ment? 

Secretary Napolitano. The TWIC card requirement, if I might? 

Mr. Dent. Yeah. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, right now I’m unaware of any effort 
to change it, but I do know that there are regulations underway. 
If they haven’t been issued already, they will soon be issued on 
TWIC Readers, as well as on how people can renew their TWIC 
IDs. We have developed kind of a less expensive TWIC ID that only 
requires an individual to make one trip, so we are trying to facili- 
tate and streamline the entire process. 

CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS 

Mr. Dent. Thank you. And under CFATS, once a facility is as- 
signed final tier, it is to submit a site security plan, and the 2011 
internal memorandum that discussed various challenges facing the 
CFATS program stated the process was overly complicated, you 
know, based on recent testimony by GAO on infrastructure protec- 
tion. The Infrastructure Security and Compliance Division, ISCD, 
has improved its security plan review process, but GAO estimates 
it could take another seven to nine years to review the plans at 
thousands of these facilities that have already been assigned a 
final tier. I think we would agree that is not acceptable. 

How can the ISCD further accelerate the review process at these 
facilities? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah, we are looking at that. Obviously, 
we would like to be able to do the review more quickly than that. 

It is partially a personnel and resource issue quite frankly, but 
the CFATS program as you know got off to a rocky and slow start 
and we have had to take a number of measures to improve it, put 
it on timelines with benchmarks. 



78 


They are making and have made terrific progress over the last 
year. They are going to continue to make progress. I hope we can 
bring down that review number. 

DETENTION BEDS: POPULATION 

Mr. Dent. And finally, and I don’t know how much time I have 
left, but I will be real quick on this. With respect to ICE and deten- 
tion beds and I think Judge Carter probably already spoke about 
that issue, you know, I too, like Judge Carter, was concerned about 
the timing of the statements, pre-implementation of sequester with 
respect to the visa-certain detainees. I understand that this hap- 
pens from time to time for various reasons. Is our capacity today 
34,000 beds and do we have as many as 37,000 detainees on Sun- 
days, is that true? I am trying to get the numbers. I know you were 
requesting, I think, 31,800 beds in the budget request, and there 
are 34,000 available detention beds is my understanding. But we 
have had as many as, is it true, 37,000? 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah, detention populations ebb and 
flow, and that is one of the problems of managing with a bed num- 
ber as opposed to looking at the actual facts of a particular case 
as to whether detention is appropriate or not. 

The President’s budget is designed to make sure that all manda- 
tory detainees have a bed and all the costs that go along with being 
detained. But it is also designed to facilitate alternatives to deten- 
tion. 

And just like last year we asked for the flexibility to move 
money, you know, between those accounts in case we have a spike 
that needed mandatory detention, we were able to cover that. 

BORDER security: TECHNOLOGY 

Mr. Dent. And this is more comment than question. As we en- 
gage in this whole discussion of comprehensive immigration re- 
form, let us face it, the public doesn’t trust us when we say the bor- 
der’s operationally secured. They don’t trust us on the issue of en- 
forcement. 

How do you think we should go about verifying or certifying that 
the border is operationally secure to trigger whatever may come 
out of any immigration reform bill? What would you advise to this 
subcommittee? 

Secretary Napolitano. You know, public perceptions are difficult 
to change, but anyone who has been at that border recognizes that 
it is very different now than it was then or when illegal immigra- 
tion was illegal — I mean, was at record highs. 

I think we need to continue to look at staffing and technology at 
the border. I actually think the technology is key. I also believe, 
however, that we can relieve pressure on the border itself if we had 
more tools to deal with the two drivers of illegal immigration, work 
and employers on this side of the border. We need E-Verify or 
something of that sort, and we need greater penalties for employers 
who break the law and we need to reform the legal migration sys- 
tem. 

That all is knit together. Then that would free up resources to 
focus on the narco and others who are using that border. 



79 


Mr. Dent. What is the holdup at USCIS on developing a biomet- 
ric ID for all visitors coming into this country? I go into Disney 
World, into the Magic Kingdom, and they take a biometric ID of 
me and they take my thumb print and they process it in all of 
about 30 seconds and it is biometric and they can do it, processing 
tens of thousands of folks a day. 

Why can’t we do this? It has been years we have been talking 
about it and what would you recommend? 

Secretary Napolitano. Why can’t we do it? Because it is very, 
very expensive and because we are checking more databases than 
Disneyland is checking. 

Mr. Dent. Well, the banks, too. I mean, all right. I was going to 
say the banks and I can take money out and support 

Secretary Napolitano. They are not looking at all the things 
that we should be and must look at for security reasons. 

However, we have developed, using the dozens of databases that 
we have, a very enhanced process for measuring exit that is vir- 
tually the same as biometric, and I would be happy to get you 
briefed on that. 

Mr. Dent. That would be great. Thank you. 

Thank you. Judge. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah, sorry to go overtime. 

Mr. Carter. Madam Secretary, I have talked to my colleague, 
Mr. Price. We are going to have a brief second round, and you have 
brought up several — it is like you were reading my mind. You men- 
tioned de-verify. 

The budget request includes a modest increase in that system, 
but in the context of immigration reform which you and I have 
talked about, much more is needed. As most if not all proposals 
that we see, both the Senate and the House, include mandatory 
employment verification system which is E-Verify. 

For that reason, sixteen months ago, DHS was required to for- 
mally submit a report on the cost of mandatory E-Verify, a report, 
the basic cost data and assumptions that DHS has already pro- 
duced internally. 

In the media a couple of months ago with you and I personally, 
you pledged to me to provide me this report. You agreed that 
months before, there was a discussion, and quite honestly I could 
use it tonight okay but I don’t have it, and there are others that 
are working on immigration issues. And E-Verify, the number is 
very critical to the analysis as anyone starts to look at immigration 
reform. 

I am not trying to be a horse’s ass on this one. I am being seri- 
ous. We need this one, okay. 

Secretary Napolitano. Let me follow up on that and see where 
that is and get back to. 

Mr. Carter. We really need this. 

Secretary Napolitano. I got you. 

Mr. Carter. Give me some idea because I have got scheduled on 
my secret committee which is not so secret anymore 

Secretary Napolitano. The non-secret secret committee? 

Mr. Carter. Yeah. So anyway, you know, the very 

Secretary Napolitano. Mr. Chairman, I understand. Let me go 
track that down. 



80 


REPORT, COAST GUARD 

Mr. Carter. Okay. Thank you very much. 

And finally, I want to just mention the reports that I have heen 
trying to get back, if we could get that Coast Guard report ASAP. 
The Commandant will be in next week. 

Okay. Next week he will be in. 

Secretary Napolitano. It will certainly be in as soon as possible, 
yes, and no later than May 1. 

Mr. Carter. Well, if it is any chance we can get it before we 
have to talk to the Commandant, it certainly would be helpful. 

Secretary Napolitano. I understand. 

Mr. Carter. All right. Mr. Price. 

NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS GRANT PROGRAM 

Mr. Price. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

I will touch on two topics quickly and submit the other questions 
for the record. 

I do want to revisit the question of border security, but first I 
want to just register a strong concern about the FEMA state and 
local grant programs. 

The fiscal 2014 budget request proposes a total of $2.1 billion for 
state and local and first responder grants. 

That is a decrease of $367 million from fiscal 2013. And as you 
know, we worked very, very hard in fiscal 2013 to get that number 
up from a disastrously low number in 2012, so we have worked on 
this a long time. 

And then there is this question of reorganization. Significant re- 
structuring is proposed for the state and local grant programs in 
the broad categories and that is despite the prohibition of that kind 
of shift in the fiscal 2013 Act. 

So I want to ask you a few questions about this and you might 
want to elaborate for the record. The fiscal 2013 Act did prohibit 
the department for implementing this broad national preparedness 
grant program without an explicit authorization and it provided 
specific funding levels for the urban area grants, port and transit 
security and fire fighters and other existing programs and this was 
a broad agreement with Chairman Aderholt, then the chairman of 
this subcommittee. Chairwoman Landrieu, Ranking Member Coats 
and myself. 

We earnestly examined and discussed what we perceived as 
flaws in that national preparedness grant program concept. Each 
of these grant programs operates under different authorities, has 
its own purposes as reflected in different formulas. So they are 
challenged this year. 

So just quickly, do you plan on seeking authorization legislation 
this year for a proposed national 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes. Yes. 

Mr. Price. All right. That is to that one. 

I want you to tell me more about the rationale for this proposal. 
How different is it or is it different from the proposal Congress spe- 
cifically rejected just a few weeks ago? And are there changes that 
are responsive to some of the criticisms? 



81 


Now, I know in the past, you have talked about the desirability 
of more directly assessing risk and moving quickly to procure 
deployable assets. I wonder what the implications are for longer 
term security and hardening projects such as those that we fund 
through the port and transit grants? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, if I might. Going back to the 
amount that the President requests in the fiscal year 2014 budget, 
in terms of the actual grant dollars available, it is virtually the 
same, but we have moved some of the administrative expenses into 
other line items within the FEMA budget, so we will be happy to 
walk that through with you. 

With respect to grant consolidation, yes, we are coming back. We 
have had over 70 conferences, meetings, et cetera, with stake- 
holders since our last proposal and we have made some changes in 
that proposal as a result. We offer it to the committee and we are 
going to offer it to the authorizers for your consideration because, 
just as you said, these are legacy grant programs that came from 
different statutes, different committees. They used different for- 
mulas, et cetera, et cetera. 

What we want and what we believe is better for the country is 
to put these all under one roof, which by the way diminishes the 
administrative cost for the grantees, and so we can fairly assess 
risk across the board and really look at national capacity. 

And what I mean by that. Chairman, almost Chairman — Rank- 
ing Member Price, excuse me — is for example, we want to have the 
ability to say, you know, every locality should have a grant for its 
own hazmat team or maybe we can have a hazmat capability for 
a small region. 

Does every grantee need the same number of K-9 detection 
teams, same logic? 

So I think from an administrative perspective, a simplification 
perspective, and an ability to get us to a national capacity evalua- 
tion as opposed to grantee by grantee by grantee, consolidation 
should be evaluated. 

Mr. Price. All right. We, of course, have had the budget only a 
day, so we will look in more detail at the changes you are pro- 
posing and the rationale for them. 

There was a welter of grants at one point. We use to have many, 
many more $50 million range grants and I think it was desirable 
to clean some of that up and to consolidate some of that. 

But when you talk about legacy programs, some of these aren’t 
such ancient legacies. The Port and Transit Grants actually are 
fairly recent and they are there for a reason. They are risk based, 
and they focus on specific vulnerabilities, and I just think there are 
genuine questions as to the degree to which these efforts should be 
folded together, particularly when it is accompanied by reductions 
in funding. 

Secretary Napolitano. You know, every region is to prepare its 
own Threat Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment. It is de- 
signed to take those characteristics of the port and transit security 
grants and be able to use it more broadly, so I am hopeful. I am 
always an optimist. I am hopeful that I can begin to persuade the 
committee that consolidation in this regard makes a lot of sense. 



82 


But obviously you have more questions. We will be happy to an- 
swer those. 

Mr. Price. Right, and there are questions about an authorization 
as opposed to doing this simply through appropriations. All right. 

Secretary Napolitano. And we do intend to submit authorizing 
language. 


BORDER security: IMMIGRATION REFORM 

Mr. Price. All right. Let me quickly wrap up with a revisiting 
of this border security issue which, of course, has had you and me 
in the news accounts and as the bipartisan groups in both cham- 
bers work on immigration reform. This question of border security 
as a precondition for reform has come up and I indicated in my 
opening statement, that sets off some alarm bells because one could 
imagine that being a real obstacle to progress and almost an unde- 
finable objective for the way some might interpret it. 

I am going to ask you to submit for the record as opposed to 
doing this orally, some of the estimates that you might give us 
about your preparation for immigration reform more broadly, espe- 
cially the operations of Citizenship and Immigration Services and 
the kind of preplanning, and anticipation of expenses and organiza- 
tional needs. 

We need to know more about this, but here in just the open ses- 
sion, I want to wrap up by returning to that question of security 
as a piece of the puzzle. 

In your response to Mr. Dent just a moment ago, I heard you 
say, I believe, that border security really is both cause and effect, 
or the causal areas work both ways. You can say we don’t under- 
take broad reform until a certain level of security is present, but 
you are clearly depending on reform and all of its aspect to en- 
hance security, and so it is a matter of causal forces working both 
ways. 

You are very well positioned. I think you have a lot of credibility 
on this issue when you factor in your past life as a border state 
governor and, of course, your current responsibilities. So I want to 
give you a chance as we close here to reflect on this issue. What 
does a secure border look like? It can’t just be a matter of meas- 
uring inputs. We all talk about inputs. I talked about inputs in my 
opening statement, the number of personnel, the miles of fence, the 
sensors and all the rest. 

And we all know it is notoriously difficult to measure the output 
side. But yet we do need to have some resolution on this and I won- 
der what your current thoughts are. 

Secretary Napolitano. You know, it is tempting just to draw an 
arbitrary number out of the air and say that is the magic number, 
that is the metric and until you reach that, we can’t do reform. 

But I believe as you have said that we really need interior reform 
to get the maximum out of all of the border security that we al- 
ready have and that we are continuing to build upon, which to my 
mind is manpower and it is infrastructure. It is aerial and it is 
technology — most important, technology at this point. 

The border now is so different than the border then, always a 
work in progress, absolutely big, complicated borders. You can, you 



83 


know, you can always go down and find somebody who is unhappy 
or thinks it is unsecure or whatever. 

What I think we should be doing, however, is looking at a whole 
universe of things, apprehensions, crime rates, seizures, property 
values, things of that sort that help tell us whether the border is 
a safe and secure border zone. 

And when you look at all of those things, you will see that they 
are all trending in the right direction overall and border-wide. We 
want to continue that, and I think one of the suspicions is that 
after the ’86 Act, those enforcement issues were not universally 
pursued. 

We want to make sure we continue that, but I think some kind 
of false border security number doesn’t really get us anything in 
terms of maximizing border safety. 

Mr. Price. Well, the irony would be if this quest for the holy 
grail of total security actually stood in the way of enacting the com- 
prehensive measures that would enhance security. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, I think for those who are seeking 
immigration reform, the suspicion quite frankly is that some sort 
of false border security metric, if you can ever decide on one holy 
grail, was actually a reason never to get to reform on the under- 
lying system. 

Mr. Price. Thank you. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Carter. Mr. Culberson. 

detainees: laws 

Mr. Culberson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Secretary Napolitano, first, I want to thank you for your admis- 
sion that that was a mistake to release those individuals that had 
committed a crime and endangered the public. The American peo- 
ple appreciate that. The Congress appreciates it and I thank you 
also. If we could, here today, I think it would be very helpful to 
make sure that everyone listening and our immigration officers out 
there listening know that they are hearing it from you and from 
the Congress that when the law says “shall”, that is not optional, 
right? 

Secretary Napolitano. I think we have already had that discus- 
sion. 

Mr. Culberson. I just want to make sure I understand clearly 
that when you are talking about Title VIII, Section 1225, you agree 
that is not optional. 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, you are absolutely right. The stat- 
ute uses “shall”, but as I further explained sometimes you have 
shall, but there is no way to do the shall because the resources 
haven’t been made available and I think that needs to be taken 
into account. 

Mr. Culberson. Right. But for the officer in the street, who took 
an oath to enforce the law and protect the public, this statute says 
“shall” and that is not optional correct? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, the safety of the community is 
something that always needs to be taken into account. 

Mr. Culberson. That is top priority. 

Secretary Napolitano. That is a top priority, yes, sir. 

Mr. Culberson. The top priority. 



84 


Secretary Napolitano. I would say the top priority, yes. 

OPERATION STREAMLINE 

Mr. Culberson. Okay. Very good. Thank you. I appreciate that. 
I deeply appreciate that. That is important for the public to hear. 

I also want to be sure with my friend, Henry Cuellar here, my 
good friend Judge Carter, our new chairman, congratulations, Mr. 
Chairman, that we, to reiterate and to reenforce the terrific, part- 
nership that we have in Texas, with Mexico, the long history we 
have, the friendships we have, Henry, the work that we have done 
over the years. Judge Carter, we look forward to working with you 
and continuing to strengthen a very successful initiative in Con- 
gressman Cuellar’s district that we have supported in a bipartisan 
way. Operation Streamline. No better way to ensure public safety 
than to enforce the law. It is working beautifully. 

And I wanted to ask you if you could, to talk about the expansion 
of Operation Streamline and working with Congressman Cuellar, 
Judge Carter and I and the Texas delegation in ensuring that the 
law is enforced, obviously with common sense and a human heart, 
but that the law is enforced. 

If you would talk to us about working with us and making sure 
that we expand that very successful program Operation Streamline 
up and down the border, starting with Texas? 

Secretary Napolitano. Well, I think Streamline may have actu- 
ally started in Arizona, if I might, however, it is a very good pro- 
gram. It has been effective. There are other, we call them con- 
sequence delivery programs because there should be a consequence 
for breaking the law and immigrating illegally. 

But there are others that are similar to Streamline that we think 
are also very promising and don’t take up as much judicial time, 
but yeah, I would say that Operation Streamline is very helpful. 

Mr. Culberson. And I hope you look to Judge Ludlum and her 
work in the Del Rio sector as a role model for that. 

Thank you very much. 

Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Carter. Mr. Cuellar. 

VEHICLE DISMOUNT AND EXPLOITATION RADAR SYSTEMS 

Mr. Cuellar. Mr. Chairman, thank you so much. 

Could you tell us, are you all planning to order more VADER 
radar systems? I know that — right. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yeah, I think it is a very promising tech- 
nology. It is one that comes to us out of Afghanistan, so we are in 
the initial stages of testing on how it works. 

Representative Cuellar, it doesn’t really — it is very good in some 
areas of the border. In other areas of the border, it is not that help- 
ful because you have a lot of, you know. South Texas, for example, 
where you have a lot of those south seeders and the other brush 
that impedes sight, but in areas that are more open, it is a very 
promising technology. 



85 


COMMUNITY LEADERS, SCHEDULED MEETING WITH 

Mr. Cuellar. Okay. Well, we certainly want to work with you 
on that particular area. 

Number one, the other question I have has to do with the Presi- 
dent’s budget because it talks about cutting the number of deten- 
tion beds from 34,000 to 31,800, and some of us have, of course, 
we want to work with you on that. 

But at the same time if you are looking at alternatives to deten- 
tion which is again what we want to keep the low risk folks — and 
they supported this alternative by, I think it started under Presi- 
dent Bush. The problem is that I think there is also a reduction 
in the alternative by 25 percent, so we got to do one or the other, 
and you know, we will be happy to work with you on this alter- 
native to detention because I understand it does serve a particular 
purpose on that. 

The other thing I would ask also is, I guess this has to do more 
with down to the border, and I am one of those, I was born on the 
border. I have lived there and it is now the wild, wild west that 
people paint it to be. It is certainly not like that. My wife and my 
two kids are there, and my family, my mom, dad, everybody lives 
there. It is not the wild, wild west that people paint it, but we do 
need to do some work without a doubt. I mean, I think the problem 
is people get to the stream, one, they call it the wild, wild west, 
and then the other side, you know, they call it a perfect heaven 
that nobody’s coming across. 

And I think you and I are both that it is probably closer to the 
middle, that more in the practical aspect of it. 

But one thing I do ask because I know that I was with you the 
last time you were at the border several months ago, I think it was 
last year, and we asked if you could talk to some of the other 
stakeholders or the business community and all that and you 
couldn’t do it. This last time you sent out a press release and you 
said you were going to be in Arizona and Texas and then, you had 
an unannounced visit and I asked Congressman Vela, Ruben Hino- 
josa, then you were going to be there. I didn’t know you were going 
to be there, which is again, you don’t have to notify us. I have seen 
both Republican and I)emocratic Secretary of States do that to us 
which is fine. 

But the problem that I do have is that then you, the day before 
or the day after you were in Houston and you had a press con- 
ference there and you had met with several business folks and 
other folks, and that puts some of us in a very difficult situation 
with being on the border because besides you going in and talking 
to your men and women, which you need to do. 

But there are other stakeholders, other people, communities, so 
I would ask the next time you go to South Texas, the border, I 
would ask you to make time to talk to the other community leaders 
that quite frankly want to sit down and spend some time and be 
supportive of the work that you do. 

Secretary Napolitano. Indeed, and we do try to keep Congress 
on notice when I am traveling. Representative Shiela Jackson Lee 
actually was in Houston. 

Mr. Cuellar. I saw her in the photograph. 



86 


Secretary Napolitano. Right, and it was primarily designed to 
meet with business leaders and there were NGO [non-govern- 
mental organization] representatives there to talk about the, kind 
of, business side of immigration as it were, but I meet with dif- 
ferent groups, depending on where I am. It is hard to get a sched- 
ule where you meet with everybody all in one visit. 

But by way of comparison, when I went to Douglas, I had a 
roundtable with all the police chiefs and the next chiefs county 
sheriff and so forth to hear what they were seeing on the ground. 
So it does vary each time I go. 

That is primarily driven by schedule. 

Mr. Cuellar. Correct. Yeah. No, I understand. I am just asking 
if you could work on your schedule. The third visit you make down 
there, if you can just spend some time with the other folks. 

Secretary Napolitano. We will work with your office on that. 

BORDER PATROL AGENTS 

Mr. Cuellar. Yes, ma’am. Last thing, Mr. Chairman, on this 
one. I think you have, and I want to try to have as many men and 
women on the border, border patrol and I know it is been up and 
the largest amount we have, but I know at headquarters the last 
time I talked to you had about 250 border patrol stationed here at 
headquarters. I don’t know how many CBP officers, probably over 
200 from what I remember last time, and I understand they serve 
a purpose working here at headquarters. I understand that. 

But I would ask you if you could just tell us if you can try to 
send as many of them. I do understand they serve a purpose, but 
I was wondering if you can send as many of them down to the front 
line, you know, we would appreciate having them. It is going to be 
in our headquarters, number one. 

And number two, do they get overtime just like the front-line 
people when they are over here? Is that automatic overtime for bor- 
der patrol? 

Secretary Napolitano. No, it depends on whether they are Bor- 
der Patrol, port officers and what level they are in the system. 

And with respect to moving people to the actual border, I would 
point you to another part of the President’s budget where we are 
asking again, this is the second year, the ability to close nine inte- 
rior border stations so we can move those agents right to the bor- 
der. 

Congress rejected that last year, but that is the kind of thing we 
need to be able to do. 

Mr. Cuellar. Right. And if you can just — I do understand that, 
but I do understand, the folks here at the headquarters, I am talk- 
ing about headquarters, so again I know they are here for training 
and I understand they serve a purpose but the more we can have 
away from headquarters down as the front line, a lot of us down 
there at the border would appreciate that, but I want to say thank 
you. You have bee more 

Secretary Napolitano. But look at the interior stations as well. 

Mr. Cuellar. Yes, I agree. It is going to be a balance approach 
and I appreciate the good work that you are doing. Thank you very 
much. 

Secretary Napolitano. Thank you. 



87 


Mr. Carter. Mr. Frelinghuysen. 

DISASTER RELIEF FUND 

Mr. Frelinghuysen. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I always asso- 
ciate high noon with Texas, Mr. Chairman and I know that the 
Secretary has been here for quite a long time and I want to express 
my appreciation to her and the good people on FEMA that were on 
the ground, in the New York, New Jersey, Connecticut region in 
the aftermath of hurricane Sandy. I think it is a tribute to the good 
work that they did. A lot of people’s immediate needs were met, ob- 
viously. 

The Disaster Relief Fund is pretty important to us. I know there 
is $6.2 billion in there. I looked at the allocation for Hurricane 
Sandy. I believe it is in the $1.2 billion region. I don’t think that 
is going to be enough. I hope that you might take a look at that 
because we have about 40,000 families just in my state. New Jer- 
sey, which are displaced, living with relatives and hotels and there 
are some, pretty immediate needs. I just want to put in a plug. We 
will welcome you back any time to our neck of the woods. 

We admire the work you do and especially the work that FEMA 
has done for a variety of issues. Your department was created out 
of September 11th, 2001 and we still suffer, you know, from that 
mightily, and we appreciate what you do. 

But if you could take a look at the Disaster Relief Fund and un- 
derstand that our needs continue to be great and the more money 
we get out on the street to alleviate people’s pain and suffering 
would be extremely beneficial. 

Secretary Napolitano. Yes, and I enjoy — it was terrible cir- 
cumstances to be in New Jersey. The people were great to work 
with and just very impressive and probably were handling this dis- 
aster. 

Two points I would make. One is, Sandy relief efforts are not just 
in FEMA’s budget but they are also in HUD. 

Mr. Frelinghuysen. And the Army Corps as well. 

Secretary Napolitano. Exactly, right. 

And secondly, we currently have a large surplus as it were, un- 
used balance, better way to put it, in the DRF, so if the FEMA ex- 
penses exceed what we proceed, we do have a cushion. 

Mr. Frelinghuysen. Good. Well, I appreciate that. Again, thank 
you, Mr. Chairman. Sorry to be late. I had other hearings. 

Thank you. Madam Secretary. 

AMMUNITION 

Mr. Carter. Thank you, Mr. Frelinghuysen. 

Madam Secretary, as we close the hearing, a couple of other 
things I wanted to talk to you about just for the record. I want to 
correct the record, first. 

Our research shows that only 187 of the 2,228 detainees released 
by ICE recently are 8 percent of the number, were placed on formal 
alternatives to detention. We still have no definitive answer from 
the Department of Bonds or on their own recognizance, but neither 
of those are alternatives to detention so I think that just needs to 
be made clear. 



88 


There is an issue out there that is almost the king of the 
blogosphere. The number one question in all of the town halls that 
I have been in in the last two weeks, it has been whenever I have 
come back to Congress and the chairman of this department, I 
have had numerous members from out of the country come in with 
this is the same issue. I think you know what it is. It is that the 
DHS is buying up all the ammunition in the United States. Now, 
people can smile at that, but there are people who are seriously 
concerned about that. 

We have got to get accurate numbers to be able to report this to 
people because I am telling you, every stop, and I did at least ten 
public gatherings when I was home, it was first. It was the biggest, 
most concern in my area. And a lot of those have said the same 
thing. Can you get us information — and some of this we have got- 
ten — this has gotten some of us, but how many rounds of ammuni- 
tion has DHS purchase each fiscal year since 2009? 

Secretary Napolitano. It averages about 150 million. 

Mr. Carter. At a buy component. In other words 

Secretary Napolitano. Oh, you want it split up. 

Mr. Carter. By bullet, okay. So I mean, if it’s 

Secretary Napolitano. Seventy million for CBP. 

Mr. Carter. Nine millimeter, we won’t know how many nine 
millimeter. 

How many rounds of ammunition has DHS utilized each fiscal 
year by component. I mean, how much have you used? 

The reason I question is because when we are looking at the pre- 
liminary numbers that I got — I don’t know whether you are an ex- 
pert, but I have been around guns all my life, and I didn’t — I went 
and shot to qualify with sheriffs deputies. 

A thousand rounds is a pretty chunk of bullets for guys to have 
a year and the numbers I saw were closer to 1,500 to 2,000. I may 
be. Talking the Sheriff, I mean, the Chief of Police in Austin. We 
were discussing this. Maybe even, you have a liberal shooting pol- 
icy which I am in favor of, quite honestly, to make sure that these 
are very accurate shooters. 

I don’t, but I like them. Can you also tell us about the training 
regime by each department? If you got mugged and called security 
or gun-toting folks, it would just be very helpful because I want to 
write a letter to everybody that is asking a question about this, and 
so are all my colleagues, so you are talking about both sides of the 
aisle, every member of Congress is getting these questions that we 
are going to try to compose in an intelligent letter that will hope- 
fully solve this rumor which is very important to our people. 

So that is just 

Secretary Napolitano. We will provide any assistance we can. I 
think we have gotten a lot of correspondence, too. I know we have 
done a lot of briefings. There is a two-page white paper that we dis- 
tributed. The way I explain it to people. Your Honor, Judge, is it 
is an up-to contract. It is a 5-year contract. It is called strategic 
sourcing because we get an 80-percent reduction in the per-bullet 
cost by buying it this way. 

And we train not just within DHS but other law enforcement 
agents as well. And as I said, I think our average is about 150 mil- 



89 


lion rounds per year. And I believe in some of our units you have 
got to qualify several times per years. 

So whatever information we can give you, we will plug it in. 

[The information follows:] 



90 


RESPONSE; The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has many law enforcement and 
security-related missions. 

• DHS has approximately 72,000 agents and officers 'that carry one or more firearms in the 
conduct of their missions, including Border Patrol Agents, Customs and Border 
Protection Officers, Secret Service Agents, Federal Air Marshals, Federal Protective 
Service Officers, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agents and Officers. 

• Each of these agents and officers is required to quality four times each year on any 
weapon issued to him or her. Typically agents and officers qualify on pistol as well as 
rifle or shotgun. Agents and Officers typically are allotted 200 rounds for qualification 
and preceding practice. Some specialized agents or teams also will participate 
periodically in advanced firearms training. 

• The United States Coast Guard, a Component of DHS, consists of more than 41,000 
uniformed members of the military. 

• DHS also houses four training sites that comprise the Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Center (FLETC), which trains more than 70,000 federal, state, local, and tribal law 
enforcement personnel every year. 

• DHS Components have some of the most stringent qualifying requirements in the Federal 
Government compared to the military or state and local law enforcement. This can be 
attributed, in part, to the nature of its missions such as the Secret Service protection of the 
President, Federal Air Marshals’ operation on airplanes, and the rugged conditions that 
members of the Border Patrol face. 

DHS’s purchase of ammunition has remained relatively constant since 2006,^ 

• DHS buys approximately 1 20 million rounds of ammunition per year of all calibers and 
types and fires approximately the same number of rounds per year, almost exclusively in 
training. In FY20I2 DHS ordered 103,178,200 rounds and used 116,227,781 rounds.^ 


' National Finance Center Job Series data from 2/9/2013 71,998 employees includes Series 0083 (police), 1801 
(General Inspection, Investigation, Enforcement and Compliance-ICE, TSA, and FPS only), 181 1 (Criminal 
Investigating), 1895 (Border Patrol Enforcement) 1896 (Customs and Border Protection), and 0080 (Security 
Administration, FPS only) 

^ FPDS.gov spending data retrieved 2/22/2013 
^ DHS data call to Components November 20, 2012 



91 


• The budget and spending data for FY 2013, to date, indicate DHS is on pace to buy 
roughly the same amount this fiscal year as in previous years."* 

• The Department has had only minor fluctuations to its buying patterns, with an increase 
in purchases due to the addition of more than 2000 Border Patrol Agents each year from 
FY 2006-FY 2009. Purchases peaked in FY 2010, and have since decreased and leveled 
off." 

• DHS has a roughly 2-year supply of ammunition on hand to manage training and 
operational posture needs because delivery from manufacturers can take 6 months to a 
year. At the beginning of FY 2013, DHS had 263,733,362 rounds on hand." 

DHS has a variety of contracts that it uses to purchase ammunition efficiently. DHS utilizes its 
size to drive down the cost of goods and services by combining its requirements across the 
Department for everything from computer equipment to ammunition. DHS has saved 
$1.7 billion dollars under its Strategic Sourcing Program since 2005. By combining the 
requirements of the entire department, DHS has been able to leverage its buying power and 
secure very competitive prices from manufacturers. 

• DHS has strategically sourced contracts for .40 caliber, .38 caliber, 9mm Luger, 

.223 Remington, and 12ga shotgun ammunition. Each contract is an Indefinite 
Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDlQ)-type contract with various contract ceilings and 
periods of performance of up to 5 years. These contracts are not purchases, but rather 
lock in the price, specifications, delivery costs, and other requirements for the period of 
performance. DHS only orders off the contracts as needed and pays for the ammunition 
on delivery. Total orders may not exceed the negotiated ceiling of rounds. DHS is only 
required to buy a minimum that represents about 1 month of the projected DHS 
requirement. 

• The largest of the contracts are the .40 caliber and the .223 Remington contracts. These 
contracts have lifetime (5 years) ceilings of 450 million and 165 million rounds, 
respectively. 

• DHS has used similar contract vehicles in the past. In 2008 and 2009, DHS competed 
and awarded three contracts for .40 caliber ammunition of varying grains with ceilings 
totaling 466 million rounds over 5 years. DHS has moved almost exclusively to 1 80gr 
bullets for its .40 caliber ammunition, so these contracts have been allowed to expire and 
their requirements combined to the single vehicle referenced above. 

• The price per round under the current DHS .40 caliber duty ammunition contract is 
$0,243, which represents more than an 80-percent savings over some retail prices and an 
average savings of 57 percent. 

• The ammunition that is procured is of extremely high quality, and is lot-tested to monitor 
quality. 


FPDS.gov spending data retrieved 3/21/2013; budget data retrieved in DHS November 20, 2012 data call 
* FPDS.gov spending data retrieved 2/22/2013 
" DHS Data call to components November 20, 201 2 



92 


• Field Offices, Border Patrol Stations, and training facilities order off these contracts for 
delivery directly to the field based on their needs. Components also may set up smaller 
contracts for specialized or unique needs. 

• Shelf life of the ammunition is not of particular concern because of an effort to rotate 
training ammunition (oldest ordered first) and to cycle ammunition issued to officers in 
the field for use in one out of their four required practice and qualifying sessions each 
year. 

DHS uses its duty rounds for training in most cases. 

• DHS officers and agents are engaged in work around the country at remote border 
locations and small field offices. Delivering and storing different types of ammunition 
for training and operational use creates complex logistical challenges, and could 
potentially create an officer safety issue if the wrong ammunition is used in the field. 
Given the low price that DHS is able to negotiate on its ammunition contracts, officers 
and agents generally use the same types of rounds for both purposes. 

• DHS uses hollow-point pistol ammunition in most duty situations, which is standard 
practice in law enforcement, to limit potential collateral damage. DHS agents and 
officers have a variety of less than lethal weapons, and only use firearms when use of 
deadly force is required and legally authorized. 

• At FLETC, all the ammunition used is for training purposes, and FLETC orders specific 
training ammunition such as Commercial Leaded Training Ammunition and low-lead or 
“green” ammunition, and closely monitor it to make sure it is not removed from FLETC 
facilities and accidentally used for operational purposes. 

• DHS also is investigating whether industry can make an even less expensive training 
round, but it also will need to be readily identifiable (i.e., a different color) so that there is 
little chance of confusing the rounds. 

• DHS also has considered ways to use less ammunition without jeopardizing officer 
preparedness. All training expenses are being closely scrutinized given the current 
budget sequestration. 

DHS has been transparent about its activities. 

• Every contract solicitation and award has been advertized on www.fedbizopps.gov with a 
full description of the contract vehicle and details about the ceilings and period of 
performance. 

• In limited cases, procurement sensitive information such as proprietary information and 
bid information has been redacted in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation. 

• The DHS Office of Legislative Affairs (OLA) and the Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement Office of Congressional Relations have responded to inquiries from more 
than 100 congressional offices by phone and email. 



93 


• To date, DHS has received 19 letters from Members of Congress and has responded to 14 
of those letters; the remaining 5 have all been received in the last month, and DHS 
actively is working to respond to them. 

• DHS OLA has provided extensive information on this topic to the Congressional 
Research Service, the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and the 
Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigation. 



94 


Mr. Carter. Okay. I appreciate it. And I will get Ms. Plate to 
do some of that work for you. 

Finally, you are not — ^you don’t have 2,700 or 27,000 tanks that 
you have? 

Secretary Napolitano. Not that I know of 

Mr. Carter. Okay. Well, that’s being recorded. 

You do have some M-wraps. 

Secretary Napolitano. We do. 

Mr. Carter. And they were given to you by the Marine Corps 
to try out, and they were proven not to be very effective. 

Secretary Napolitano. They are not ideal for the environment in 
which we deal, yeah. 

Mr. Carter. These are some of the other questions that are cer- 
tainly in this blog 

Secretary Napolitano. I understand. I get some of the same 
questions. 

Mr. Carter. Yeah, I just wanted to know the record so if any- 
body happens to be watching this, they can know we are checking 
on this. 

Thanks for being here. I want to say that, you know, in my view, 
this is one that may be falling down on the job and unfortunately, 
you got to make this budget work. You got to crunch into it and 
you’ve got to take the information you are going to provide me and 
I am grateful you are going to do that so we can try to make intel- 
ligent decisions on your department. 

I think you know, if you don’t know. I am a law enforcement guy 
and I am going to do everything in my power to see that you have 
what you need to meet your mission, your primary mission of de- 
fending this nation. And you are as important as any of our mili- 
tary components, and I am going to do everything within my power 
to do that. 

However, we after having information to make intelligent deci- 
sions and so I would ask that you do that and we are going to have 
to work on some of these harsh cuts in some of the areas we are 
dealing with. 

And we will be all shaking it out and quite honestly we may see 
some different numbers, too, so I don’t Imow what’s going to hap- 
pen. But we are going to work together and I appreciate it if you 
would do that. 

Secretary Napolitano. We’ll work with you, Mr. Chairman. I 
really appreciate the time, you know when your staff, and Rep- 
resentative Price, you and your staff spend on DHS matters. 

Mr. Carter. Thank you. Madam Secretary. Subcommittee is ad- 
journed. 

[Questions for the record follow:] 



95 


QUESTIONS FOR THE RECORD SUBMITTED BY 

THE HONORABLE John Carter 

Secretary Janet Napolitano 

Committee on Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Homeland Security 
FY 2014 DHS Budget Request 
April 11,2013 


FY 2014 Efficiencies and Savings in the FY 2014 Budget Request 

Question: Please provide a table that reflects, for each component of the Department, the 
amount of savings proposed in the fiscal year 2014 budget as a result of programmatic and 
administrative efficiencies, as well as those taken in fiscal year 2013, compared to fiscal year 

2012 funding levels. Please subdivide these reductions by professional services, administrative 
savings, and other efficiencies, and include detailed totals for these categories and for each 
component. Please indicate whether there are any operational impacts to these reductions. If no 
detailed estimates are available, please identify those that are simply rough estimates. 

Answer: Please find on the following pages tables that display the Savings and Efficiencies 
incorporated into the FY 2014 and FY 2013 Congressional Justifications respectively. As the FY 

2013 Appropriations Act had not been passed when the FY 2014 President’s Budget was 
submitted, the FY 2014 table includes efficiencies proposed in the FY 2013 President’s Budget. 
These efficiencies are not expected to have significant operational impacts. 


I 




Department of Homeland Sc«irity - FY 2014 Congressional Justificatian 


Savings and Efficiencies 



ComjHiiif 1)! 

ARWiprialion 

PPA 

Penumei and 
KcKSts (PC&B mid 
Overtime) 

Travel 

(OCC2l.«> 

Tnuepoitiitiu 
n uf Things 
(OCC 224) 

Real, Comm., 
U(il. & Mrtc 
(OCC 23.0) 

Pfinlir^ & 
RepnidiKtion 
(OCC 24.0) 

Advisory & 
Assistaniui 

CoDtraoU 
<OCC 25.1) 

Other 

(OCC 25.2- 

25.81 

.Supplies 

& 

■Malerials 

(OCC 

Erjiapme nt 

(OCC 31.0) 

Luih) and 
Slmcluivs 
(OCC 32.0) 

Sutwidics 

(OCC 

Total 


Art:tty>iLs and 

On; ra line. 



-XW) 

(5451 




01.688) 






(15.60II 

AaOSidMoUi 



om 

(5*f 

. 



(11*68) 






(I5.6«I) 


















CHI' 

Satuics &. HiixiKcs 


(5634X1 


(958) 

( !5,70J) 

0316 


053.748) 

{593(E) 




(291.897) 


COl' 

AuUatuUei 















Clii* 

t'acilii;* 








(9i)71) 





(9.971) 




i36i48» 

(23J92) 


(15.7TO) 

0246) 







(312,711) 


















OMO 

wc:r 



la 




(6.662) 






05.127) 


OMO 

<)Si-:m 


<5, WO 

0.7681 




/i.ni 


061 






OMO 

USM 


(5.M5) 

(140 




^ 






(18.786) 


DMO 

<10 


{S5SI 

0751 




(4.980) 

(7.185) 





(13.196) 


DMO 

CK> 


15651 





(5,067) 


(6) 




(3.638) 

DMO SuMoty 



(10257) 

(2156) 



m) 

(29,98*1 

(19369) 





(64.496) 


















dnDo 

MAA 








(836) 







DNIKJ 

KD«0 














nNOO&UMMal 











HHHB 

HHHl 

mmiiig 














miHim 


■miH 

■Hi 



SJili 



ISWI) 


(173W) 


HHBSSI 


. 







SM )' 







miiiiiiiiiiiM 


HHlH 

HUHRI 



■DOESS 



USl A 



0. 




(229) 

SSSS^^ 




■ESI! 

■BdES 

FCMA SttiMout 




m 


073891 


■■■SIS] 




. 














HHH 







ll.KK- 

SAt-: 


(5.45K) 


I?*)) 



- 

^HHDSES 


HHHH 


■HmB 

■DDS!^ 


ti.inx’ 

ACIAHC 









SS^n 


HHBSBS 

T’ 

■KKSZS 

rLETCSMbiuiui 



i>m 

<7WI) 

- 

(581) 





. 


. 


1 











HH^Hi 




I 

SftI-. 



(4li.V8i 


(U?l)li 


(26227) 

01.51)6) 

(28.498) 



- 

fl'AMWI 

ICESubVX^ 



01**74) 

(48J68) 


04.701) 


(2M27) 

(91506) 


(43.1481 






Department of Homeiand Security - FY 2014 Congressional Justification 
Savings and Efficiencies 


TramportiMia Kent, Cui 
anfThia^K USU. >£ S 
(OCC224») <OCC2, 


Sipplk; 

& E<;|UipR)ent , 
M^erials (OCC3I.O) ' 
(OCC *' 











DepartineDt of HonuJand Securi^ - FY 2014 Coiigressional Justification 
Savinas and Efficiencies 



CoiDiionent 

Appruprialiun 

PPA 

Peisoonei and 
B«Brfllg (PC&Baad 

Overtime) 

Travel 
(OCC 21 

Transporlatiii 
aofThin^ 
(OCC 22.«> 

Rent. Comm.. 
Utt.A Msc 
(OCC 23.0) 

Priiitii^ & 
Rcpruduclion 
(OCC 24.8) 

Adv isory A 

Asses lance 

Contracts 
(OCC 25.1) 

Other 
Services 
(OCC 25,2- 
2541) 

!kip|dies 

& 

Materials 

(OCC 

C^ipment 
(OCC 31.0) 

Ltnnl and 
Structures 
(OCC 32.0) 

CraeUs 

Subsidies 

(OCC 

Totjd 


















uscx: 

Of- 

linKnnK mdc Sif^urt 
PciKxntI KcihK&n 

0/>74) 

<261 

(1) 

(471 








(2.235) 


USCG 

OIS 

Ituh Ijw M&iin*St9|)on 
Stalfne Rcttuclim 

a<aa> 

(301 


(83! 








(5.042) 



OK 

Knf Year Maa^nKiu 
AniMal>et(U(tt{KY 2014) 


<2.31161 

(2,l«1 

(2-5761 


<7.3841 


(1.707) 

<1121 



(45.611! 


U.StXi 

OK 

IVkonmaiR.'alni and 
InfAroabcA SyStraiS COOHRUXl 
r'llSCOM) InMiurcini! 



147 

68 


<63351 






(2360) 


USCG 

OK 

IX'lcRxc Messatras System 

J-UKl 

(71 


041 


<4851 








l.!SC'(.i 

OK 

OoiBOWate AtbMic and Pacific 
CXnnnunicaUxin Area Muster 

<117) 

(41 


(K1 


avfi 








USCXi 

OK 

Adyunev TvchOLul Truinin; 
School Pnctani Keduciiiia 


OlK.-l 




IKOCXll 






(2,000) 


us(:(i 

ok: 

FrhiiciUia (Icaelks Rrehx-nn 






(fcXXW) 






(6.000) 


uscx: 

OK 

Olliccr AccesciiA und 

1 atudershio i'nuDMS Rcductim 

02S1I) 

041 

(1) 

(28) 


!2(l3t 






(I.611I 


U«-Ci 

(>»■ 

KvducuiD of Snanphne 
IXvvckUBdScrvvc Kunuisis 




(.l-KXIi 








(3.309) 


USCXi 

OK 

CioyemncniVchkk l-ltelMU 








<8U1) 




(800) 


Lfscf: 

OK 

M<xi-Opc>afi<nal Iravc 1 
kcduCIiiMi 


(25.7241 










(25.724) 


ustx; 

OK 

(iSA luuptin 




(8(I0l 








(800) 


u-sc-fi 

OK 

IMcsl (Ansi Ouunl Housinr 












(750) 


l)S(Xi 

OK 

tlU-2S IVcuaunsiiMins' 


(>ni 


(16.55) 


1 5 3771 








u.s<-(,; 

OK 

limeiprue-Wiih: unicknevs 
<KY 21)1.11 


(22.VAI 

78 

(2.2H41 


(243101 






(56.299) 


UStXi 

OK 

Pnuf YtarMafujcmcBi 
Annuuh/aliunji OY ^i:ll 

(5.177) 

( 1.53VI 


(1-M51 


(2..3y7l 


(3681 




(10.9961 


WO] 

OK 

Pnigrutrenunc Rcductiuos 
(KY’01.1) 

(i().y()()l 

IJ/20 

17S1 

162(1 


(2.9V2) 


,1 IIAI 




<32.9451 

U.<iCGSaMM^ 



iT^VM 

(51^4) 

(i9l) 

(12A651 


<39.4391 


(5433) 

<2.t25) 




t 















1 USC'IS 

SAK 


rVi'l\ 












USCISSvbuM 



i-m 












1 















1 U.SS.S 

Opcraiinu Klwnscs 


m£«§2 

i UAfAl 





<81)611 


(6.142) 



(41.3281 




(12^: 

(I4fi66) 





<8.060 


(6.142) 



(41328) 

_i 















OHSTot^ 



QtWTi 

06e,f*6i 

- 



(1.920 


<390.937) 

<H0.17S) 

(51.672) 

(3.071) 

(385) 

(1334.776) 


<X) 

00 


4 




99 


E>epartnient of Hotneiand Securi^ - FY 2013 Congressional Justification 
Savings and EaUdencies 



AM>ro|>riattan 

Gcoeial Qlkieacies 

Eaceijnse Wnk EIHtieni'ks/ Adrdn 
S«ving 

Mgrel/Tech. 

EfficuDctes 

M (iBSigcmEirt 

EmdeitcEs 

TOTAL. DMO 


tt7.4Sn 

H2.B66 


U0JA41 

DMO 

osai 

l7J.” 

12.001 


(9,323) 

OMO 

USM 

I&374 

l9.024ti 

(lS„398i 

DMO 

CFO 

I’.WO 

<780 


(3.120) 

DMO 

C!0 

111.42? 

0.001 


(12,42,3) 







TOTAl-ASO 


OJW 

<W14 

(9«W 

(3745!) 







TOTAI,.OTG 



<J451 









TOTAL-OBI* 



Oa«74 

«4W 

<l«4.««l» 

CSP 

Salaries & Esnensr? 


<12A1.D 

■ 386 

(126 5)7) 

c:b)’ 

uTpIt 





CBP 

Aiiionalm 


112.543 


(12,543) 

CBP 

Faci!*'; 



15.000 

(5,000> 







TOTAI.-ICE 




(1J9.7J41 

(a7^3i 

ice 



i6R.J29 

(129.724 

1237,6031 







TOTAL-TSA 



(S3.(J1 


tmjBT) 

TSA 

Avialicfi -SactJrtv 


01.790 

l67,!30 


TSA 

Sislace 


(I.52S 

I9,.502 


TSA 

TI'AC 


■ 5.749 

(2.9134 


TSA 

S(aH>an 


■ 33.38.5 

■12.1943 


TSA 

P.LMS 


1 10,679 

(4.546) 








TOTAL -ISOJ 


02.94SI 

(9«J»9 


aoo.240) 

USCG 

Owralwa b.wnsr^ 


i.5ft.2'» 


(100.240) 





. 


TOTAL-liSSS 



(US 


(37.7141 

osss 

Sajws & BxiKnu? 


(145 

(37,569) 

(37,714) 



















NPPD 

a-is 

f2.<.CD>i 

; 14, 309, 

(34S; 

(37,6791 







TOTAL . CfflA 

_ 

f5.W«) 

(1.424-, 

- 

(7,2Mi| 







TOTAL. nWA 


Ol.Ttfli 


(3: 

(3!,7(»)l 



■■■■■■■ntRi 



(18,187): 







PEMA ^ 

Kisk Mar. 

. 

. 



BIIIIIIIIIHIIIEgjQgilllll^^ 


■■BHEKOSjl 










TOTAL, era 




OOl 

(361 







TOTAI.-mSTT 


11.9451 









(6,8’Op 

pi.p-n- 

ACIRF- 



■ <.07t) 

■ ’.071) 







TOTAL. S*T 


• 

• 

««) 


s&r 

Mi A 



i56<i 

(S631I 







TOTAL. RNDO 



• 

• 



t>NDO 




■SSSS^^ 














■■■■E&ZDBSSHHB 


HHH^D^CZEI 



(8!i3.277)l 


5 




100 


Acquisition Management 

Question: The Office of the Chief Procurement Officer (OCPO) has grown in recent years, in 
large part by focusing on building the DHS acquisition workforce, in particular with 
competencies in systems engineering, program management, logistics and business cost 
estimating. OCPO’s budget justification describes a more disciplined process for tracking, hiring 
and deploying acquisition professionals, and more resources to training, internship programs, and 
the management of the DHS Acquisition Professional Career Program. Please provide, by DHS 
agency or component, data on the numbers of acquisition personnel numbers and their positions; 
training spending; and systems investments. 

Answer: Attached please find the requested information on the number of acquisition personnel 
at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). This information was obtained from the Federal 
Acquisition Institute Training Application System (FAITAS) 2. FAITAS 2 is a web-based 
training registration and certification system that DHS built in partnership with the Federal 
Acquisition Institute. In addition to these functions, DHS uses FAITAS 2 as its primary tool for 
identifying and tracking its acquisition workforce (AW) members. While FAITAS 2 represents a 
significant improvement in the Department’s ability to identify the acquisition workforce, the 
system relies upon DHS employees identifying their status as acquisition workforce members, 
and DHS continues to work to improve the accuracy of the system, In December 2012, DHS 
commenced a department-wide FAITAS 2 AW validation effort, where Components were 
requested to review and update, as necessary, FAITAS 2 data for all AW members in their 
Component, This effort helped to improve workforce data and more importantly identified 
additional system enhancements to improve workforce data integrity. DHS is also enhancing 
FAITAS 2 to allow AW members to identify the acquisition program to which they are assigned 
and the role they serve. 

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, DHS spent approximately $10.1 million on centrally managed 
acquisition workforce functions, including course development and delivery, and general 
acquisition workforce management efforts. During FY 2012, DHS delivered 215 in-resident 
classes and trained over 6,000 students to include training approximately 1 ,000 students in DHS 
on-line acquisition courses. 


6 



DHS Acquisition Workforce Population by Function and Component 



Busine.ss-Cost 

Estimating 

Contracting 

Education, 

Training and 

Career 

Development 

Industrial 

Contract 

Property 

Management 

Life Cycle 

Logistics 

Production, 

Quality and 

Manufacturing 

Program 

Financial 

Management 

Program 

Management 

Program 

Systems 

Engineer 

Purchasing 

Science and 

Technology 

Manager 

Systems 

Engineering 

Test and 
Evaluation 

Career Field 

Not Identified 

Overall Totals 
per 

Component 

USM 















893 



V, 



' 

' 


48 

1 

, 


14 


I 

142 

■ESsSI 






■bbb 

2 

9 

—jllllllll^^ 


bbihb 

'BBBfli 


5 

20 











23 






3 

29 



24 

4 


2 


6 

129 




bbbb 

BBDIH 

BflBB 

■^■j: 

■bisljlil 

1 

53 

5 


> 


1 

J6 

— 


— 

1 


2 


■ESSI 





HBB 

bih^e 

BBnBB 

bbebb 

bbebb 

BBB 

bbbbb 

bihb 

bbbbi 

bebb 


HBSS9 


1 






1 







2 



8 

HBBBEB 





19 

bbb^h 

B^B 

bbebb 

BBBB 

IIBBBB 

BBEBB 

33 



5 

■ 


1 



14 


1 


1 


1 

24 





^^■BB 

BBH 

^^bbb 

bbb^b 

bbeh 

bbebb 

bbb 

BBBBB 

bii^bb 

BBBB 

bbobb 

10 

B^KUtU 


■■W 






mmm 


1. 

fll^BB 



5 

226 

■Ksa 


fll^B 



^IBI 

bbebh 

^bbb 

^BBB 

ebbbb 

bbb 

bbbbb 

bbbb 

BB^Bi 

bbbb 

■BH| 



6 

' 


3 


> 

42 





1 

5 


mmisoM 






II^^^Bi 

I^BBB 

BBEBB 

bbb 

hbbB 

■BBB 

bibbb 

2 

3 


HHHI 



BI^B^Bi 



BB^H 

BBBB 

eb^bi 





1 

1 

■EZMI 

■uai 


BHBHBfl 

BB^^H 

HDBI 

BB^^B 

BB^B 

BBBB 

ebbbb 

bbb 

BIBBBi 


1 


33 

EE!3M 



34 

13 

mm 

2 

■n 

■H 

7 

BERE 


— 


BnggB 

inM 

li'lihtliHI 

HHH 

■■■ 


■■BBi 

Bi^E 

bbhi 

2 

53 


bbb 

■SB 


w^m 

HOB 




■SOI 

78 

6 

mm 

6 

■(■1 

besb 

1 

BCT 

19 

6 

3 


mBsmn 




12 


3 

2 

4 

52 


3 




bbbb 

bbrbb 

ism 

m 

WM 

8 

2 

' 


16 

■m 


BHE 

5 

6 

1 

67 

606 

crgsM 


■■fl 


BHHHI 

■■ 

bhbhi 

■BM 

HIHI 

■bbb 

HB 

■■■ 

^■Bf 

bbi^ 

■BB 

1 

IvMiJiiM 

9 

166 

IS 


5 

1 

18 

111 

_ 3 

2 

4 

BB 

6 

52 

BBEM 

EilESi 




^■BBB 

BIH 

B^BH! 

(■BH 

HOI 

bbbih 


bbhb 


bbbb 

bbm 

II^^Hi 

ISIB 


13 

3 


• 


2 

■n 


ni 

3 


2 

12 

BB^^ 

cmH 


HDH 



jj^Hli 

BBBHi 

■■B 


bhh 

mm 

^bhb 

■bbb 

1 

11 

22 

li^m 


10 

1 


2 


12 

99 



48 

5 

34 

18 

229 

■S9B 


204 

14 

4 

18 


52 

337 

3 

88 

6 

9 

22 

11 

836 

t'BSfillcM 


138 

5 

1 

4 

2 

19 

mmm 

2 

■1 

1 

7 

5 

54 

469 

MUHUtM 

18 

KSBB 

57 

35 

178 

49 

72 

111 

45 


40 

104 

61 

353 

2795 


HDH 

HSHI 



■BBI 


BBF^B 

— 


3 

6 

6 

4 


159 

IBEB 









■1 

404 

167 

230 

175 

1028 

9318 


7 


101 





102 


Question; Please update the information provided for last year’s hearing regarding the 
Department’s current baseline capabilities to manage the Department’s acquisition portfolio 
management for these organizations, any remaining gaps in needed capabilities from that 
baseline, and how your requested budget for acquisition staff, training and systems investments 
will fill such gaps. 

Answer: The Department has continued to improve baseline capabilities to manage our 
acquisition portfolio to centralize the acquisition processes within the agency. The Department’s 
acquisition management framework is growing stronger through the refinement of our policy, 
processes, procedures, and placement of people with the right skill sets in the program offices. 
Our goal is for every major program to be implemented in an efficient and effective manner. 

The Department’s enterprise-wide acquisition framework is a key element of DHS’s integration 
strategy, and we have taken a number of steps this past year to strengthen it and the FY 2014 
budget supports these critical efforts. 

Since its inception in 2003, the concept of portfolio management has evolved across the 
Department. In 2010, the Secretary formalized the Enterprise Architecture (EA) framework. 

The EA framework is segmented into a series of mission and functional portfolios that allow the 
Department to better account for and manage its $60 billion budget. 

The Under Secretary for Management (USM) has focused on addressing baseline capability gaps 
within the department-wide acquisition management infrastructure to ensure that the structures, 
processes, systems, and people are in place to effectively manage acquisition investments. While 
GAO has recently acknowledged the Department’s significant progress to integrate these areas, 
there is still work to be done. The following highlights the progress to close organizational 
capability gaps and how the requested budget will sustain that progress. 

In 2010, as a means to fortify the acquisition program management structure, the USM created 
the Office of Program Accountability and Risk Management (FARM) to serve as the principal 
executive office to oversee all acquisition programs. FARM has addressed organizational 
capability gaps by improving the quality of the cost estimating function, maturing business 
intelligence and enhancing Depai'tmental governance over major acquisition programs. 

In addition, the Department understands that to mature portfolio management, we must improve 
our acquisition workforce. The Department assessed our current capabilities to understand the 
acquisition core competencies required for powerful risk mitigation teams that can execute 
consistent and high quality acquisitions. In FY 2012, the Department conducted a DHS-wide 
survey to assess the status of the acquisition workforce. We identified areas where acquisition 
workforce improvements have been achieved and steps for further improvement. The overall 
objective is to establish core skill sets that the acquisition workforce needs at the entry level and 
then to establish how to mature those skills over the course of the employee’s acquisition career. 
The focus for 2013 and 2014 is on the Program Manager. This is one of the most critical 
positions for effective and efficient acquisition execution. The Department is partnering with 
DOD through an inter-agency working group to research Program Manager competencies as they 
relate to certification. 

The continued improvement of the DHS acquisition process and workforce continues to be a 
major management priority in FY 2014. The Under Secretary for Management is leading an 


8 



103 


effort to improve the overall acquisition process by reforming the early requirements 
development process and enhancing our ability to manage the implementation and execution of 
acquisition programs. 


Staffing for DHS Departmental Management 

Question: Please provide the Committee with a table showing your current on-board FTE levels 
for each Departmental office within Office of the Secretary and Executive Management (OSEM) 
and Under Secretary for Management (USM), broken down by appointment type for appointees, 
what is anticipated for the end of fiscal year 2013 and what is requested for fiscal year 2014. 

Answer: 


1 Current on-boards within OSEMAJSM Offices as of December 3 1 , 20 1 2 (PP26) 

OSEM 

/USM 

Office 

Appointment 

Type 

Appointment Type Description 

Total 

OSEM 

Assistant Secretary 
For Policy 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

124 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

42 



03 

Competitive-Term, Taper, Indefinite, 
SES -Military Term Or Emergency 

2 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES - 
Noncareer 

5 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

7 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

15 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

3 

Assistant Secretary For Policy Total: 

198 

OSEM 

Citizenship and 
Immigration 

Services 

Ombudsman 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

22 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

10 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

1 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

1 



09 

Excepted-Temporai'y, SES -Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

1 

Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman Total: 

35 

OSEM 

Executive 

Secretariat 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

34 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

16 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

1 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

1 


9 








104 


Current on-boards within OSEM/USM Offices as of December 31, 2012 (PP26) 

OSEM 

/USM 

Office 

Appointment 

Type 

Appointment Type Description 

Total 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

4 

Executive Secretariat Total: 

56 

OSEM 

Immediate Office of 
the Deputy Secretary 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

2 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

1 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

4 

Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary Total: 

7 

OSEM 

Immediate Office of 
the Secretary 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

1 



06 

Excepted-Permanent SES-Noncareer 

3 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

2 

Immediate Office of the Secretary Total: 

6 

OSEM 

Intergovernmental 

Affairs 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

8 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

1 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

2 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

2 

Intergovernmental Affairs Total: 

13 

OSEM 

Office for Civil 

Rights and Civil 
Liberties 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

64 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

26 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

3 



07 

Excepled-Conditional 

1 



09 

Excepled-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

5 

Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Total: 

99 

OSEM 

Office of Legislative 
Affairs 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

18 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

5 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

3 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

4 

Office of Legislative Affairs Total: 

30 

OSEM 

Office of Public 
Affairs 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

15 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditionai 

4 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

1 


10 




105 


Current on-boards within OSEMAJSM Offices as of December 31, 2012 (PP26) 

OSEM 

/USM 

Office 

Appointment 

Type 

Appointment Type Description 

Total 



08 

Excepted-lndefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

11 

Office of Public Affairs Total: 

31 

OSEM 

Office of the Chief 
of Staff 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

1 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

1 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES - 
Noncareer 

2 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

1 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

8 

Office of the Chief of Staff Total: 

13 

OSEM 

Office of the 

General Counsel 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

44 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

10 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

55 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

18 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

28 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

15 

Office of the General Counsel Total: 

170 

OSEM 

Office of the Privacy 
Officer 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

30 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

10 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

1 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

1 

Office of the Privacy Officer Total: 

42 

OSEM Total: 

700 


USM 

Chief Financial 
Officer 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

185 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

46 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

17 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

1 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

26 

Chief Financial Officer Total: 

275 

USM 

Chief Human 

Capital Officer 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

168 


11 




106 


1 Current on-boards within OSEM/USM Offices as of December 3 1 , 201 2 (PP26) 

OSEM 

/USM 

Office 

Appointment 

Type 

Appointment Type Description 

Total 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

32 



03 

Competitive-Term, Taper, Indefinite, 
SES-Military Term Or Emergency 

4 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

3 



07 

Exccpted-Conditional 

9 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

1 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

11 

1 Chief Human Capital Officer Total: 

228 

USM 

Chief Information 
Officer 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

213 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

140 



03 

Competitive-Term, Taper, Indefinite, 
SES-Military Term Or Emergency 

3 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

1 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

3 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

3 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

1 

Chief Information Officer Total: 

364 

USM 

Chief Procurement 
Officer 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

369 



02 

Competilive-Career-Conditional 




03 

Competitive-Term, Taper, Indefinite, 
SES-Military Term Or Emergency 

■ 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

2 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

20 



08 

Excepted-Indefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

2 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

9 

Chief Procuremenl Officer Total: 

560 

USM 

Chief Security 

Officer 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

180 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

61 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

2 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

2 

Chief Security Officer Total: 

245 

USM 

Immediate Office of 
the Undersecretary 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

12 


12 




107 


Current on-boards within OSEMAJSM Offices as of December 31, 2012 (PP26) 

OSEM 

/USM 

Office 

Appointment 

Type 

Appointment Type Description 

Total 


of Management 






02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

2 



06 

Excepted-Permanent, SES-Noncareer 

3 



08 

Excepted-lndefinite, Excepted- 
Limited (More Than 1 Year) 

1 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncareer 

2 

Immediate Office of the Undersecretary of Management Total: 

20 

USM 

Chief Readiness 
Support Officer 

01 

Competitive-Career, SES Career 

99 



02 

Competitive-Career-Conditional 

26 



07 

Excepted-Conditional 

2 



09 

Excepted-Temporary, SES-Time 
Limited-Noncarcer 

2 

Chief Readiness Support Officer Total: 

129 

USM Total: 

1,821 

Grand Total: 

2,521 

* 


* Includes Working Capital Fund reimbursable positions 



Office 

Anticipated 

FY 2013 

Requested 

FY2014 

OSEM 

Immediate Office of the Secretary 

6 

6 

Deputy Secretary 

7 

5 

Chief of Staff 

13 

13 

Executive Secretary 

55 

55 

General Counsel 

112 

108 

Civil Rights Civil Liberties 

97 

97 

Public Affairs 

30 

26 

Legislative Affairs 

28 

28 

Privacy Officer 

42 

45 

CIS Ombudsman 

32 

30 

Policy 

194 

201 

Intergovernmental Affairs 

14 

14 

TOTAL OSEM 

630 

628 

USM 

Immediate Office of the Under 

Secretary for Management 

17 

17 

Office of the Chief Readiness Support 
Officer 

124 

100 

Office of the Chief Human Capital 

no 

114 


13 







108 



Officer 



Human Resources Information 
Technology 

20 

24 

Office of the Chief Procurement Officer 

327 

353 

Office of the Chief Security Officer 

245 

254 

Office of the Chief Financial Officer 

212 

208 

Office of the Chief Information Officer 

283 

274 

TOTAL USM 

1,338 

1,354 

TOTAL DMO 

1,968 

1,982 


Please note that these projections do not include Reimbursable positions. The FY 2014 budget 
requests for positions were calculated using the cost module based on the assumption that ail 
were Competitive-Career positions. 


International Presence 


Question: Please li.st all Departmental personnel located overseas (even on temporary 
appointment) in fiscal year 2012, fiscal year 2013 planned and year to date, and fiscal year 2014 
planned, to include the component they represent, a brief description of the function they 
serve/the capabilities they provide, and the funding for that position to include salary, benefits, 
housing, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) and other 
expenses. Where personnel are not funded by the component they represent, please also note the 
Department or DHS component that supports that cost. 

Answer: 

Please see accompanying spreadsheet providing requested information. 

DHS Leadershin/Management Position Vacancies 

Question: Please list by office and position all director-level positions and higher across DHS 
that are vacant or held by individuals in an acting capacity. 

Answer: The table below identifies vacant positions (as of May 8, 2013) that are SES or 
equivalent and have been identified at the ‘Director’ level and above. The ‘Director’ designation 
is a subjective term and DHS Components may not apply the same criteria when creating 
position titles. Many of these positions are now in the final stages of the hiring process. 


Component 

Subcomponent 

Position Title 

CBP 

Office of Air & Marine 
Operations 

Executive Director, Operations, Air and 

Marine 

CBP 

Office of Field Operations 

Deputy Assistant Commissioner, Field 
Operations 

CBP 

Office of Information & 
Technology 

Executive Director, Cargo Systems Programs 
Office 


14 






FY2014 Questions for the Record 

House Appropriations Committee Hearing with the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Secretary 
April 11 , 2013 

QFR #5 - International Presence 

Please list all Departmental personnel located overseas (even on temporary appointment) in fiscal year 2012, fiscal year 2013 planned and 
year to date, and fiscal year 2014 planned, to include the component they represent, a brief description of the function they serve/the 
capabilities they provide, and the funding for that position to include salary, benefits, housing. International Cooperative Administrative 
Support Services (ICASS) and other expenses. Where personnel are not funded by the component they represent, please also note the 
Department or DHS component that supports that cost. 

Response: 

The following pages contain a listing of all DHS personnel located overseas broken out by DHS component for fiscal year 2012, fiscal year 2013 
planned and year to date, and fiscal year 2014. The below key provides greater detail of what is included in each column. 

- Location Country 

- Location City 

- Number of Federal Employees 

- Component Name 

- Office Function (e.g. Immigration Services, Container Security Initiative; Investigations; etc.) 

- Reimbursing Agency, if applicable. 

- Object Class Code 11 & 12: FY12 Salaries, Benefits and Allowances. 

- Object Class Code 11 & 12: FY13 (10/1 to 4/30) Salaries, Benefits and Allowances. 

- Object Class Code 11 & 12: FY13 (5/1 to 9/30) Projected Salaries, Benefits and Allowances. 

- Object Class Code 11 & 12: FY14 Projected Salaries, Benefits and Allowances. 

~ Object Class Code 21: FY12 Travel; FY13 Travel (10/1 to 4/30); FY13 Travel (5/1 to 9/30); FY14 Travel (non-PCS). 

- Object Class Code 23, 25, 26, 31: FY12 Rents, Services, Utilities, Supplies, Subscriptions, Contracts, and Equipment. 

- Object Class Code 23, 25, 26, 31: FY13 (10/1 to 4/30) Rents, Services, Utilities, Supplies, Subscriptions, Contracts, and Equipment. 

- Object Class Code 23, 25, 26, 31: FY13 (5/1 to 9/30) Rents, Services, Utilities, Supplies, Subscriptions, Contracts, and Equipment. 

- Object Class Code 23, 25, 26, 31: FY14 Rents, Services, Utilities, Supplies, Subscriptions, Contracts, and Equipment. 

- FY12 Internationa! Cooperative Admin. Support Costs (ICASS) and Capital Security Cost Sharing (CSCS) Costs. 

- FY13 International Cooperative Admin. Support Costs (ICASS) and Capital Security Cost Sharing (CSCS) Costs. 

- FY14 International Cooperative Admin. Support Costs (ICASS) and Capital Security Cost Sharing (CSCS) Costs. 


109 



110 













Ill 













112 
















113 
















115 



















116 














































119 





















FEMA • International Presence 


Location 

Fed 

Component 

Office Function 

Outeide Agency 

FY12 

FY12 

FY13 To 

Date 


FY13 

Planned 

FY13 

Planned 

FY14 

FY14 

1 

gjumiii 




Reimbursement 

KUSSBIi 


iimgigiii 


KBBBil 

BS3SIII 

HGB3SII 

ESSI 


Brussels 

2 

FEMA 

OPPA-IAD-NATO 





BBSS 

$ 51,235 


BBSS 





FEMA 

OPPA-IAD-USEU 




GI^SE 

iiyUUj^ 


EESm 

$ 

$ 

CASS Washington Costs (70xx) 





■n 








cscs 













Total 


2 




S 283,670 

$ 740,794 

$ 182,022 

S 151,502 

$ 125,470 

$ 517,994 

S 115.835 

S 39,316 


zzi 



















FEMA- International Presence 


Location 

Fed 

H 



FY12 

FY13 To 

Date 

FY13 

Planned 

FY14 



K&EBii 

ISSSSi 

OCC21 

OCC21 

Belgium 

Brussels 

■ 

FEMA 

OPPA-IAO-NATO 


$ 6,000 


1,000 

B 


$ 63,000 



m 

FEMA 

OPPA-IAD-USEU 




4,000 

B 


S 

ICASS Washington Costs (70xx) 





■i 

■1 



CSCS 




IjjlHIIIIIIIIII 

■■■I 

IIIIIH 



Total 


2 




$ 14,000 

$ 

5,000 

$ 

6,000 

$ 63,000 


123 





















FEMA - Internationa! Presence 




■ 

Office Function 

Outside Agency 

Reimbursement 

FY12 

FY12 

FY13 

To 

Date 

FY13 

To 

Date 

FY13 

Planned 

FY13 

Planned 

FY14 

FY14 

[IHHlHi 

091 

llgggl 

909 

ESSI 

1339 

IK&S9II 

OCC26 


n 

jBefgium 

Brussels 

2 

FEMA 

SiBISfiSSI 


i9im 

HBH 

HB 

wm 

$ 15,000 

999 

BB 


FEMA 

^^SESBSI 


mgg 

BBSS 

HB 

HB 

H9SS 


Hi 

M 

jlCASS Washington Cc 

sts (70xx) 













jcscs 

□EIZI 





r 1 





-Total 2 ^ 30,000 $ 10,000 $ - $ - $ 30,000 $ 10,000 $ - $ 


















FEMA ■ International Presence 


Location 

Fed 


■ 

Outside Agency 

Iteimbursement 

m2 

FY12 

FY13 

m3 

FYi4 

FY14 





ICASS 

BSSIl 

lissi' 


Belgium 

Brussels 

2 

FEMA 

pPPA-IAD-NATO 







SB 




FEMA 

Dppa-iao-useu 


S 52,0(X 




Hi 

HB 


■ 










pcs 











Total 


2 




$ 104,000 

S 60,000 

$ 104,000 

$ 67,176 

$ - 

S 


125 




















FLETC - International Presence 


Location 

Fed 

■ 

Office Function 

Outside Agency 

FY12 

PY12 

FY13TO 

Date 

FY13TO 

Date 

FY13 

Planned 

FY13 

Planned 

FY14 

FYM 




IH 


Rembursement 

OCCll 

mssM 

wmm 

;|||ggg|g||| 

OCCll 

BS9 

jjjjjjjjgggQII 

iiBai 

Botswana 

Gaborone 

1 

=LETC 



$ 132,737 

S 39,320 

S 66,369 

$ 19,600 

imiiiiigii 

$ 39,320 

mu 

S 39,320 

fhajland 

Bangkok 

1 

_ 



$ 122,556 

S 35,233 

$ 61,278 

$ 17,617 

S 122,556 

$ 35,233 

$ 122,556 

$ 35,233 

ICASS Washington Costs 




1 







CSCS 




1 








S 255,293 S 74,553 $ 127,647 $ 37,217 $ 255,293 $ 74,553 $ 255,293 $ 74,553 


Total 


2 
































FLETC - International Presence 


Location 

Fed 

■ 

Office Function 


FY12 


FY13 

Planned 

FY14 


City 







IKI33III 

OCC21 

Botswana 

Gaborone 

■ 

_ 

,aw Enforcement 
Training 


$ 11,474 

S 10,562 

$ 19,030 

$ 19,043 

fhaifand 

Bangkok 

■ 

FLETC 

.aw Enforcement 
Training 


$ 

S 


$ 10,000 










E! 










Total 2 5 11.474 $ 10,562 $ 19,030 $ 29,043 


127 



















FLETC- international Presence 


Location 

Fed 

■ 

Office Function 

Outside Agetcy 

FY12 

FY12 


FY13 

To 

Date 

FY13 

Planned 

FY13 

Plann 

ed 

FY14 

FY14 


City 




Rein^bursement 

OCC25 


Krail 


OCC25 

EHI 

OCC25 

BSSII 

Botswana 

Gaborone 

■ 

=LETC 

3 iUuSIHIIliill^l 


S 55,015 


$ 25,536 


$ 51,072 


$ 56,179 


Thailand 

Bangkok 

1 

FLETC 

Law Enforcement 
Training 


S S3,87( 


$ 30,559 




[Ml 


ICASS Washington Costs 












CSCS 




\mmm 

iMHI'HB'HHi 

: 1 




Total 


2 




S 108,885 

s - 

S 56,095 

s * 

$ 112,249 

S - 

S 119,624 

$ - 


128 




























FLETC • International Presence 


Location 

Fed 

■ 

Office Function 

Outside Agency 

FY12 

FY12 

FY13 

FY13 

FY14 

FY14 


City 





■sail 

'1111^31 

Hyssm 



gggi 

Botswana 

Gaborone 

■ 

FLETC 

Law Enforcement 
Training 


S 58,801 


S 50,929 


$ 50,929 

■1 

Thailand 

Bangkok 

■ 

FLETC 

^^^^umiiiiiiiiiii 


S 15,885 


■Mil 



■i 











■Hi 

pcs 





■■1 


ZZ] 





Total 2 5 88.874 $ 47,601 $ 78,194 S 16,716 S 78,194 5 16,71$ 


129 




















130 











131 


























132 




























134 













135 




























136 











137 





















NPPD • Internationa! Presence 


Location 

Fed 

■ 

Office Function 

Outside Agency 

FY12 

FY13ToDate 

FY13 

Planned 

FY14 

FY12 

FY13 

To 

Date 

FY13 

Planned 

FY14 


jjjgjimi 




Reimbursement 

BSS391 


■aw 

I8Q2QI 

QQQII 

ESSEI 


QQIQI 

WWW 

C&SI 

OCC21 

OCC21 

Australia 

Canberra 

1 

NPPD 

Liason Officer 





iHBES 






__ 

N/A 

N/A 

United 

Kingdom 

London 

1 

NPPD 

Liaison Officer 


$ 112,781 


$ 60,145 

$ 38,494 






N/A 

N/A 

N/A 










■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 









II 











Total 


2 




$ 203,846 

S 118.025 

$ 103,652 

$ 66,306 

s - 

5 

5 - 

S 

5 13,913 

5 

$ 

$ - 


138 





























FY12 

FY13 To Date 

FY13 Planned 

FY14 

FY12 

fY13 

FY14 

ESS 



iSTTSTl 

iwsn 



BTTOl 



mQ^i 

HOyHi 

IB!BS 

rm 

S 6,139 


gggi 


IH 

mg 

img 

ms 

gglgg! 

jy^gj 

mgg 


wm 

m 

S 4,801 


$ 2,597 


mji 

nm 

N/A 

N/A 

S 32,006 

$ 2.931 

$ 14,936 

S 1,241 

N/A 

m 

■1 













□ 














$ 10,940 

$ - 

$ 5,451 

$ - 

$ 7,401 

s - 

s - 

$ - 

S 64.012 

S 5,861 

S 29.872 

S 2.482 

$ ■ 

S - 


139 










140 


s ^ 

a 


_ 


II 

c 

s 

1 1 


![ 



■g e 

in a 

^ s 


1 ? 



3 1 ^ 
s: 


1 

3 

S 3 



H! 

■ 


« S 



HI 

1 S 

B‘ B 

1 

i £ 

s' s 



■ 

■ 

f 


1 


■ 

i 



§ 

2 


1 1 
1 1 

1 

I 

L 

1 

■8 

t~ 1 

.J 

1 1 1 
III 

111 

i 

1 

1 

1 1 
i_l 

j 

. 1 
1 1 
1 ? 

Li 

1 

1 

% 


1 

1 




s c 



- 

a 

1 

■ 

n 

HI 

11^ 

■ 

1 

I 

1 

If 

III 

IL 

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1 


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1 1 

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5 y 



















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143 














S&T - International Presence 




Fed 

Component 

Office Function 

Outside Agency 

FY12 

FY12 


FY13TO 



FY14 

FY14 


■ 








Date 






■ 







■■ 


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mu 




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1 


Manage S&T 
cooperalton with 
European Fortners 


S 98.673 

S S2.981 

■ 

S 44,713 

■ 

$ 27.986 

m 

S 64,240 

CASS Washington Costs 
;70xx) 













C5C5 













Total 


1 




$ 98.6?8 

S 52.981 

S 65,568 

5 44,713 

S 41.437 

S 27,986 

$ 107,067 

S 64,240 


144 

















S&T ' International Presence 


145 














S&T - International Presence 


.ocation 

Ted 

■ 

Office Function 

— 

FY12 

FY12 

FY12 

FY12 

FY13 To 

Date 

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un 

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FY13 

To 

Date 

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London 

1 

■ 

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sooperation with 
European Partners 

■ 

S 75,572 

■ 

$ 2,49< 

$ 691 

$ 37,169 

1 


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1 

$ 30,000 

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$ 30,0)0 

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S 75,572 

$ 302)00 

5 2,494 

5 691 

$ 37,169 

$ - 

5 742 

$ - 

S 38,500 

$ 30,000 

S 2,000 

$ soo 

5 80,000 

$ 30,000 

$ 3,000 

$ 1,000 


146 





















S&T- International Presence 


147 

























149 














150 

















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175 
















176 


Component 

Subcomponent 

Position Title 

CBP 

Office of Information & 
Technology 

Executive Director, Enterprise Networks & 
Technical Support 

CBP 

Office of Intelligence & 
Investigative Liaison 

Dep. Assistant Commissioner, Intelligence & 
Investigative Liaison 

CBP 

Office of International Affairs 

Deputy Assistant Commissioner, International 
Affairs 

CBP 

Office of International Trade 

Executive Director, Trade Policy and 

Programs 

CBP 

Office of Technology 

Innovation & Acquisition 

Deputy Asst, Commissioner, Technology 
Innovation & Acquisition 

CBP 

Office of the Commissioner 

Commissioner 

CBP 

Office of the Commissioner 

Director, Policy and Planning 

CBP 

Office of Training & 
Development 

Deputy Assistant Commissioner, Training & 
Development 

CBP 

U.S, Border Patrol 

Chief Patrol Agent (El Centro) 

CIS 

Office of Field Operations 

Deputy Associate Director, Office of Field 
Operations 

CIS 

Office of Field Operations 

District Director, Field Services (San 

Francisco, CA) 

CIS 

Office of Management 

Deputy Associate Director, Office of 
Management 

CIS 

Office of Refugee, Asylum & 
International Operations 

Associate Dir, Refugee, Asylum & 

International Operations 

CIS 

Office of Refugee, Asylum & 
International Operations 

Chief, Asylum 

CIS 

Office of the Director 

Chief of Staff 


Office of the Director 

Chief, Administrative Appeals Office 


Office of the Director 

Chief, Immigrant Investor Program 


Office of the Director 

Chief, Office of Communications 

CIS 

Office of the Director 

Deputy Chief, Office of Transformation 
Coordination 

CIS 

Service Center Operations 

Deputy Director, Service Center (Lincoln, 

NE) 

CIS 

Service Center Operations 

Director, Service Center (Laguna Niguel, CA) 

DNDO 

Immediate Office 

Director, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office 

FEMA 

FEMA Regions 

Regional Administrator (Region I Boston) 

FEMA 

FEMA Regions 

Regional Administrator (Region 11 New York) 

FEMA 

FEMA Regions 

Regional Administrator (Region VIII Denver) 

FEMA 

Mission Support Bureau 

Chief Administrative Officer 


15 






177 


Component 

Subcomponent 

Position Title 

FEMA 

Mission Support Bureau 

Chief Information Officer 

FEMA 

Office of External Affairs 

Director, External Affairs & Communications 

FEMA 

Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer 

Deputy Chief Financial Officer 

FEMA 

Protection and National 
Preparedness 

Assistant Administrator, Grant Programs 

FEMA 

Protection and National 
Preparedness 

Deputy Assistant Administrator, Grant 
Programs 

EEMA 

Response and Recovery 

Director, National Disaster Recovery 

Planning Division 

FEMA 

Response and Recovery 

National Incident Management Assistance 
Team Leader 

FLETC 

Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Center 

Assistant Director, Chief Financial Officer 

I&A 

Office of the Deputy Under 
Secretary for Analysis 

Deputy Under Secretary for Analysis 

I&A 

Office of the Deputy Under 
Secretary for Analysis 

Director, Border Security Division 

I&A 

Office of the Deputy Under 
Secretary for Analysis 

Director, Cyber-Infrastructure Intelligence 
Division 

I&A 

Office of the State and Local 
Program Office (SLPO) 

Director, Operations (SLPO) 

I&A 

Office of the Under Secretary 

Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis 

ICE 

Office of Enforcement & 
Removal Operations 

Assistant Director, Enforcement & Removal 
Operations, Law Enforcement Systems & 
Analysis Division 

ICE 

Office of Enforcement & 
Removal Operations 

Assistant Director, Enforcement and Removal 
Operations, Field Operations 

ICE 

Office of Enforcement & 
Removal Operations 

Assistant Director, Operations Support, ERO 

ICE 

Office of Enforcement & 
Removal Operations 

Assistant Director, Secure Communities & 
Enforcement 

ICE 

Office of Enforcement & 
Removal Operations 

Field Office Director, Phoenix, AZ, ERO 

ICE 

Office of General Counsel 

Chief Counsel, New York, ICE 

ICE 

Office of Homeland Security 
Investigations 

Deputy Assistant Dir, Financial, Narcotics & 
Public Safety 

ICE 

Office of Homeland Security 
Investigations 

Special Agent in Charge (Detroit) 

ICE 

Office of Homeland Security 
Investigations 

Special Agent in Charge (El Paso) 

ICE 

Office of Homeland Security 
Investigations 

Special Agent in Charge (San Antonio) 


16 




178 


Component 

Subcomponent 

Position Title 

ICE 

Office of Homeland Security 
Investigations 

Special Agent in Charge (San Juan) 

ICE 

Office of Information & 
Technology 

Deputy Chief Information Officer 

ICE 

Office of International Affairs 

Senior Advisor, International Affairs 
(Incumbent Only) 

ICE 

Office of the Assistant 

Secretary 

Chief of Staff 

ICE 

Office of the Assistant 

Secretary 

Executive Director, Management and 
Administration 

MGMT 

Office of Chief Readiness 
Support Officer 

Director, Headquarters Management and 
Development 

MGMT 

Office of the Chief 

Information Officer 

Executive Director, Office of Applied 
Technology (Chief Technology Officer) 

MGMT 

Office of the Chief 

Procurement Officer 

Director, Oversight and Strategic Support 

MGMT 

Office of the Chief 

Procurement Officer 

Executive Director, Program Accountability 
& Risk Mgmt Office 

NPPD 

Cybersecurity and 
Communications (CS&C) 

Assistant Secretai'y for Cybersecurity and 
Communications (CS&C) 

NPPD 

cs&c 

Director, Enterprise Performance 

Management 

NPPD 

CS&C 

Director, Federal Network Security 

NPPD 

Office of Infrastructure 
Protection 

Director, Sector Outreach and Programs 
Division 

NPPD 

Office of the Under Secretary 
for NPPD 

Deputy Under Secretary for Cybersecurity for 
NPPD 

NPPD 

Office of the Under Secretary 
for NPPD 

Director, Human Resources Management 

NPPD 

Office of Biometric Identity 
Management (OBIM), 
formerly known as US-VlSfT 

Chief Technology Officer, OBIM 

OCPD 

Operations Coordination & 
Planning Directorate 

Director, Plans Division 

OGC 

Office of the General Counsel 

Associate General Counsel for General Law 

OGC 

Office of the General Counsel 

Associate General Counsel for Technology 
Programs 

OGC 

Office of the General Counsel 

Chief of Staff 

OGC 

Office of the General Counsel 

Deputy General Counsel 

OGC 

Office of the General Counsel 

General Counsel 

OHA 

Office of Assistant Secretary 
for Health Affairs 

Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs/Chief 
Medical Officer 


17 






179 


Component 

Subcomponent 

Position Title 

OHA 

Office of Assistant Secretary 
for Health Affairs 

Deputy Director, Health Threats Resilience 

OS 

Assistant Secretary for Public 
Affairs 

Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs 

OS 

Office for Civil Rights and 

Civil Liberties 

Officer for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 
(CRCL) 

OS 

Office of the CIS Ombudsman 

Deputy Director, CIS Ombudsman 

OS 

Office of the Executive 
Secretary 

Executive Secretary, Operations & 
Administration 

OS 

Office of the Privacy Officer 

Chief Privacy Officer 

POLICY 

Assistant Secretary for 
International Affairs 

Deputy Assistant Secretary for International 
(Policy) 

POLICY 

Assistant Secretary for 
International Affair 

DHS Attache to Kabul, Afghanistan 

ST 

Research & Development 
Partnerships 

Director, Research & Development 

Partnerships 

TSA 

Deputy Federal Security 
Directors 

DFSD - Cat X (Hartsfield Atlanta 

International Airport), Atlanta, GA 

TSA 

Deputy Federal Security 
Directors 

DFSD - Cat X (La Guardia International 
Airport), New York, NY 

TSA 

Deputy Federal Security 
Directors 

DFSD - Cat X (Phoenix International 

Airport), Phoenix, AZ 

TSA 

Deputy Federal Security 
Directors 

DFSD (Operations)- Cat X (LAX Airport), 

Los Angeles, CA 

TSA 

Federal Air Marshal Service 

Director, Security Services & Assessments 
Division 

TSA 

Federal Air Marshal Service 

Regional Director, Western Region, Office of 
Field Operations 

TSA 

Federal Air Marshal Service 

Supervisory Air Marshal in Charge, Boston 

Field Office 

TSA 

Federal Air Marshal Service 

Supervisory Air Marshal in Charge, Los 

Angeles Field Office 

TSA 

Federal Security Directors 

FSD - Cat 1 (San Antonio International 

Airport), San Antonio, TX 

TSA 

Federal Security Directors 

FSD - Cat X (Atlanta International Airport), 
Atlanta, GA 

TSA 

Federal Security Directors 

FSD - Cal X (Dallas/Ft, Worth International 
Aiiport), Dallas, TX 

TSA 

Federal Security Directors 

FSD - Cat X (Denver International Airport), 
Aurora, CO 

TSA 

Federal Security Directors 

FSD - Cat X (John F, Kennedy Airport), New 
York, NY 

TSA 

Federal Security Directors 

FSD - Cat X (Seattle-Tacoma International 
Airport), Seattle, WA 


18 





180 


Component 

Subcomponent 

Position Title 

TSA 

Office of Chief Counsel 

Assistant Chief Counsel for Field Operations 

TSA 

Office of Global Strategies 

Director, Global Compliance Division 

TSA 

Office of Global Strategies 

Regional Director (Middle East/Africa) 

TSA 

Office of Human Capital 

Executive Director, Labor/Employee 

Relations & Executive Programs 

TSA 

Office of Information 
Technology 

Deputy Asst. Administrator for Information 
Technology/Deputy CIO 

TSA 

Office of Intelligence & 
Analysis 

Senior Intelligence Advisor 

TSA 

Office of Security Operations 

Deputy Director, Operations Performance 
Division 

TSA 

Office of Security Operations 

Director, Mission Support Division 

TSA 

Office of the Assistant 

Secretary 

Special Advisor to the Assistant Secretary for 
TSA 

USCG 

United States Coast Guard 

Chief Procurement Law Counsel & Chief 

Trial Attorney 

USCG 

United States Coast Guard 

Director, International Affairs and Foreign 
Policy Advisor 

USCG 

United States Coast Guard 

Senior Procurement Executive/Head of 
Contracting Activity 

USSS 

Office of Administration 

Component Acquisition Executive 

usss 

Office of Strategic Intelligence 
& Information 

Deputy Assistant Director, Sli'ategic 

Intelligence & Information 

USSS 

Office of Strategic Intelligence 
& Information 

Special Agent in Charge (Protective 

Intelligence & Assessment Division) 

usss 

Office of the Director 

Chief of Staff 


NOTE - tSA has an allocation of 165 Transportation Security Executive Service (TSES) 
positions, including 4 positions held for political appointees. TSA periodically reallocates their 
positions, with DHS approval, based on mission needs. 


DHS Leadership/Management Position Vacancies 

Questions: CBP has been without a Senate-confirmed Commissioner for four years. Since that 
time, the Administration has nominated the same individual twice, ignoring bipartisan opposition 
to that nominee - an issue that the organization has not faced in many years, if ever. When will a 
CBP Commissioner be nominated? When will a permanent Deputy Commissioner be named? 

Answers: The Administration is currently considering candidates for nomination. We have 
confidence in Thomas Winkowski’s ability to lead the organization until CBP has a new 
Commissioner. 

Thomas Winkowski assumed the role of Deputy Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, performing the duties of the acting Commissioner on March 30, 2013. While 


19 








181 


Deputy Commissioner Winkowski is performing these duties, Kevin K, McAleenan is serving as 
acting Deputy Commissioner, effective March 30, 2013. 

Bonuses 


Question: Please list all OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO SES bonuses provided in 2012 by 
position, office and amount. 

Answer; 


Component 

Position 

Bonus 

Amount 

1 OSEM/CRCL Subtotal: 

$30,880 


Director, Equal Employment Opportunity & Diversity Director 

$12,530 


Deputy Officer, Programs and Compliance 

$10,200 


Director, Programs Division 

$8,150 

OSEM/Deputy Secretary Subtotal: 

$8,985 

1 Counselor to the Deputy Secretary 

$8,985 

OSEM/Executive Secretary Subtotal: 

$10,916 

1 Deputy Executive Secretary, Operations and Administration 

$10,916 

OSEM/CIS Ombudsman Subtotal: 

$7,893 

1 Deputy Director, CIS Ombudsman 

.$7,893 

OSEM/Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs Subtotal: 

$6,784 

1 Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs 


OSEM/Office of General Counsel Subtotal: 



Associate General Counsel for Regulatory Affairs 



Associate General Counsel for Operations and Enforcement 

$11,130 


Associate General Counsel for Ethics 

$8,000 


Associate General Counsel for Intelligence 

$8,790 


Associate General Coun.sel for General Law 

$8,100 


Deputy Associate General Counsel for Legal Counsel 

$12,376 


Managing Counsel 

$10,170 


Principal Deputy General Counsel 

$14,376 

OSEM/Policy Subtotal: 



Attache to London 

$12,579 


Assistant Secretary for Strategy, Planning, Analysis & Risk 

$12,580 


Deputy Assistant Secretary for Counterterrorism Policy 

$8,214 


Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Affairs 



Deputy Assistant Secretary, Screening Coordination Office 

$11,672 


Executive Director for Analysis 

$10,292 


Executive Director for Strategy and Planning 


OSEM/Privacy Officer Subtotal: 


1 Deputy Chief Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Officer 

$7,900 1 


20 








182 


Component 

Position 

Bonus 

Amount 


Deputy Chief Privacy Officer 

$8,100 


USM/CFO Subtotal; 

$66,016 


Chief Financial Officer (Current CFO retains SES career rights 
for performance award consideration) 

$14,376 


Deputy Director, Office of Budget 

$8,829 


Director, Financial Operations 

$7,628 


Director, Financial Management 

$11,356 


Director, Internal Control & Risk Management Division 

$8,275 


Director, Resources Management Transformation 

$7,539 


Director, Departmental GAO/IG Liaison Office 

$8,013 

USM/CHCO Subtotal: 

$72,345 


Chief Human Capital Officer 

$11,681 


Chief Learning Officer 

$8,651 


Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer 

$8,250 


Executive Director, Enterprise Leader Development Programs 

$8,985 


Executive Director, Balanced Workforce Program Mgmt, 

Office 

$8,610 


Executive Director, Policy and Programs 

$8,415 


Executive Director, Human Capital Business Systems 

$8,859 


Executive Director, Diversity and Inclusion 


USM/CIO Subtotal: 



Deputy Chief Information Officer 



Director, Enterprise Business Management Office 



Director, Enterprise System Development Office 



Director, Office of Applied Technology 

$8,382 


Executive Director, Customer Relationship Management 

Division 

$8,553 


Executive Director, Information Sharing 

$8,319 


Executive Director, Information Technology Services Office 

$8,346 

USM/CPO Subtotal: 

$61,748 


Chief Procurement Officer 

$11,681 


Deputy Chief Procurement Officer 

$10,400 


Director, Procurement Policy and Oversight 

$11,593 


Director, Office of Small & Disadvantaged Business Utilization 

$11,356 


Director, Enterprise Acquisition and Information Technology 

$8,168 


Executive Director, Office of Procurement Operations 

$8,550 

USM/CSO Subtotal: 

$38,585 


Chief Security Officer 

$11,681 


Deputy Chief Security Officer 

$9,439 


Chief, Counterintelligence & Investigation Division 

$8,321 


21 




183 


Component 

Position 

Bonus 

Amount 


Chief Personnel Security Officer 

$9,144 

USM/Immediate Office Subtotal: 

$31,225 


Chief of Staff 

$10,559 


Senior Advisor to the Under Secretary for Management 

$8,985 


Senior Counselor to Under Secretary for Management 

$11,681 

USM/CRSO Subtotal; 

$29,818 


Chief Readiness Support Officer 

$12,579 


Director of Asset & Logistics Management 

$8,695 


Director, Administrative Operations 

$8,544 

Grand Total: 

$599,439 


Question: Please list by office and pay grade level the number of non-SES employees who 
received a bonus or quality step increase (qsi) in 2012, the total bonus/qsi expenditures for the 
particular office and pay grade, and the total number of employees in the office and pay grade. 

Ansvrer: Please see tables below, which include performance-based bonuses. Please note that 
when the number of bonuses/QSI exceeds the number of employees in a specific Grade this is 
due to an employee receiving multiple bonuses or a bonus and QSI in the calendar year. 


OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012- Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

OSEM / 
USM 

Office 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
bonuses / 
QSIs 

Total 
amount of 
bonus/QSI 

Office of the Secretary and Executive 
Management 

641 



469 

$807,134 

OSEM 

Assistant Secretary 
For Policy 


Total: 180 



Total: 120 

$218,040 

EX-04 

1 





GS-07 

5 


GS-07 

1 

$2,227 

GS-09 

15 


GS-09 

5 

$8,368 

GS-11 

18 


GS-11 

11 

$18,918 

GS-I2 

28 


GS-12 

24 

$38,054 

GS-13 

20 


GS-13 

13 

$25,983 

GS-14 

38 


GS-14 

28 

$44,846 

GS-15 

52 


GS-15 

37 

$71,379 

SL-00 

3 


SL-00 

1 

$8,265 


OSEM 

Citizenship and 
Immigration 

Services 

Ombudsman 


Total: 33 



Total: 29 

$24,189 

GS-07 

1 





GS-09 

3 


GS-09 

1 

$750 

GS-11 

4 


GS-11 

3 

$1,750 


22 






184 


OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012- Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

OSEM/ 

USM 

Office 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
bonuses / 
OSIs 

Total 

amount of 
bonus/QSI 



GS-12 

4 


GS-12 

6 

$4,169 

GS-13 

11 


GS-13 

9 

$5,476 

GS-14 

5 


GS-14 

5 

$6,864 

GS-15 

5 


GS-15 

5 

$5,180 


OSEM 

Executive 

Secretariat 


Total: 54 



Total: 52 

$60,159 

GS-07 

7 


GS-07 

6 

$5,791 

GS-09 

6 


GS-09 

4 

$3,000 

GS-11 

9 


GS-11 

8 

$9,200 

GS-12 

7 


GS-12 

8 

$8,792 

GS-13 

9 


GS-13 

8 

$11,600 

GS-14 

9 


GS-14 

11 

$10,559 

GS-15 

7 


GS-15 

7 

$11,217 


OSEM 

Immediate Office of 
the Deputy 

Secretary 


Total: 5 



Total: 1 

$1,900 

EX-02 

1 





GS-12 

2 





GS-13 

1 


GS-13 

1 

$1,900 

GS-15 

1 






OSEM 

Immediate Office of 
the Secretary 


Total: 3 




■kiessi 

EX-01 

1 

■ 


1 

■EIEQSI 

GS-15 

2 






OSEM 

Intergovernmental 

Affairs 


Total: 1 1 



Total: 9 

$33,719 

GS-07 

1 


GS-07 

2 

$9,369 

GS-09 

2 





GS-13 

4 


GS-13 

3 

$10,096 

GS-14 

3 


GS-14 

3 

$10,097 

GS-15 

1 


GS-15 

1 

$4,157 


OSEM 

Office for Civil 
Rights and Civil 
Liberties 


Total: 96 



Total: 83 

$124,062 

GS-01 

1 





GS-04 

1 





GS-07 

3 





GS-08 

4 


GS-08 

4 

$3,250 

GS-09 

5 


GS-09 

2 

$2,750 


23 



185 


OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012- Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

OSEM/ 

USM 

Office 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
bonuses / 
QSIs 

Total 
amount of 
bonus/QSI 



GS-11 

2 


GS-11 

1 

$1,750 

GS-12 

2 


GS-12 

2 

$2,250 

GS-13 

8 


GS-13 

7 

$7,364 

GS-14 

37 


GS-14 

37 

$56,292 

GS-15 

33 


GS-15 

30 

$50,406 


OSEM 

Office of 

Legislative Affairs 


Total: 27 



Total: 23 

$73,250 

GS-08 

1 


GS-08 

1 

$1,450 




GS-09 

2 

$11,400 

GS-11 

7 


GS-11 

4 

$10,850 

GS-12 

2 


GS-12 

1 

$1,450 

GS-13 

1 


GS-13 

1 

$1,500 

GS-14 

6 


GS-14 

6 

$13,100 

GS-15 

10 


GS-15 

8 

$33,500 



OSEM 

Office of Public 
Affairs 


Total: 28 



Total: 0 

$0 

GS-07 

3 





GS-09 

3 





GS-11 

2 





GS-12 

2 





GS-13 

4 





GS-14 

7 





GS-15 

7 






OSEM 

Office of the Chief 
of Staff 


Total: 11 



Total: 2 

$3,800 

GS-07 

2 


GS-07 

1 

$1,900 

GS-09 

1 





GS-11 

1 





GS-12 

2 





GS-13 

1 





GS-14 

3 


GS-14 

1 

$1,900 

GS-15 

1 





1 

OSEM 

Office of the 

General Counsel 


Total: 153 



Total: 102 

$166,044 

EF-00 

1 





GS-01 

1 





GS-02 

1 






24 



186 


OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012- Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

OSEM/ 

USM 

Office 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
bonuses / 
QSIs 

Total 
amount of 
bonus/OSI 



GS-03 

1 





GS-04 

6 





GS-07 

4 


GS-07 

1 

$1,000 

GS-09 

5 





GS-11 

5 


GS-11 

4 

$4,099 

GS-12 

9 


GS-12 

7 

$6,156 

GS-13 

8 


GS-13 

4 

$5,613 

GS-14 

35 


GS-14 

18 

$20,978 

GS-15 

74 


GS-15 

66 

$113,698 

SL-00 

3 


SL-00 

2 

$14,500 


OSEM 

Office of the 

Privacy Officer 


Total: 40 



Total: 47 

$100,072 

GS-04 

1 


GS-04 

1 

$1,485 

GS-n 

4 


GS-11 

3 

$7,026 

GS-12 

6 


GS-12 

9 

$21,475 

GS-13 

11 


GS-13 

10 

$22,561 

GS-14 

8 


GS-14 

11 

$20,125 

GS-15 

10 


GS-15 

13 

$27,400 


Under Secretary for 
Management 


Total: 

1769 



Total: 1490 

$1,921,200 


USM 

Chief Financial 
Officer 


Total: 266 



Total: 204 

$265,732 

EF-00 

1 





EX-04 

1 





GS-01 

1 





GS-03 

3 





GS-04 

7 





GS-07 

15 


GS-07 

10 

$6,886 

GS-09 

24 


GS-09 

12 

$6,866 

GS-11 

12 


GS-11 

13 

$12,969 

GS-12 

35 


GS-12 

26 

$25,428 

GS-13 

27 


GS-13 

21 

$21,313 

GS-14 

96 


GS-14 

84 

$119,990 

GS-15 

44 


GS-15 

38 

$72,280 


USM 1 Chief Human | | Total: 220 i | | Total: 189 | $254,982 


25 




187 


OSEMAJSM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012- Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY201 2 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

OSEM/ 

USM 

Office 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
bonuses / 
OSIs 

Total 
amount of 
bonus/QSI 


Capital Officer 

GS-04 

11 


GS-04 

3 

$786 

GS-05 

4 


GS-05 

3 

$1,359 

GS-07 

5 


GS-07 

4 

$2,108 

GS-08 

4 


GS-08 

9 

$1,602 

GS-09 

9 


GS-09 

3 

$4,653 

GS-11 

15 


GS-11 

13 

$13,604 

GS-12 

1 1 


GS-12 

11 

$10,547 

GS-13 

39 


GS-13 

29 

$30,463 

GS-14 

83 


GS-14 

75 

$108,725 

GS-15 

39 


GS-15 

39 

$81,135 


USM 

Chief Information 
Officer 


Total: 356 



Total: 309 

$398,823 

GS-01 

1 





GS-04 

1 





GS-05 

1 


GS-05 

1 

$1,008 

GS-09 

3 


GS-09 

2 

$2,016 

GS-II 

5 


GS-11 

6 

$7,024 

GS-12 

18 


GS-12 

10 

$13,067 

GS-13 

76 


GS-13 

68 

$82,813 

GS-14 

149 


GS-14 

136 

$177,092 

GS-15 

101 


GS-15 

85 

$109,802 

SL-00 

I 


SL-00 

1 

$6,001 

1 

USM 

Chief Procurement 
Officer 


Total: 551 



Total: 492 

$539,386 

GS-02 

1 





GS-03 

1 





GS-04 

8 


GS-04 

1 

$250 

GS-05 

1 



1 

$1,000 

GS-06 

2 



2 

$1,800 

GS-07 

37 


IhlbltVl 

18 

$9,875 

GS-09 

26 



26 

$10,285 

GS-11 

101 



101 

$41,204 

GS-12 

65 



55 

$49,302 

GS-13 

45 

■ 


40 

$43,291 

GS-14 

73 

■ 


72 

$92,237 

GS-15 

188 

■ 


173 

$281,142 

SL-00 

3 



3 

$9,000 


26 




188 


OSEMAJSM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012- Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

OSEM/ 

USM 

Office 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
bonuses/ 
QSls 

Total 
amount of 
bonus/QSI 


USM 

Chief Security 
Officer 


Total; 241 



Total: 178 

$263,754 

GS-04 

1 





GS-05 

2 


GS-05 

1 

$1,100 

GS-07 

4 


GS-07 

3 

$4,200 

GS-09 

12 


GS-09 

12 

$16,269 

GS-11 

7 


GS-11 

2 

$3,300 

GS-12 

39 


GS-12 

26 

$33,496 

GS-13 

93 


GS-13 

69 

$90,970 

GS-14 

58 


GS-14 

50 

$82,693 

GS-15 

25 


GS-15 

15 

$31,726 


USM 

Immediate Office of 
the Under Secretary 
for Management 


Total: 13 



Total: 09 

$9,220 

EX-02 

1 





GS-07 

2 


GS-07 

1 

$700 

GS-11 

1 


GS-11 

1 

$1,000 




GS-12 

1 

$1,000 

GS-13 

1 


GS-13 

1 

$1,000 

GS-14 

5 


GS-14 

2 

$1,270 

GS-15 

3 


GS-15 

3 

$4,250 


USM 

Chief Readiness 
Support Officer 


Total: 122 



Total: 109 

$189,303 

GS-04 

1 





GS-06 

1 





GS-07 

1 





GS-09 

1 


GS-09 

1 

$742 

GS-11 

4 


GS-11 

1 

$742 

GS-12 

12 


GS-12 

10 

$12,175 

GS-13 

34 


GS-13 

33 

$50,339 

GS-14 

46 


GS-14 

43 

$71,534 

GS-15 

21 


GS-15 

20 

$50,771 

SL-00 

1 


SL-00 

1 

$3,000 


1 Grand Totals: | | 2,410 H 1^959 | $2,728,334 


27 



189 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for Cy2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QSl 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSl 


CBP 


Total: 

60,046 



Total: 37,011 

$59,252,208 


GS-01 

15 


GG-05 

6 

$4,445 

GS-02 

53 


GG-07 

22 

$18,563 

GS-03 

51 


GG-09 

5 

$2,275 










GS-01 

3 

$2,675 




GS-02 

7 

$4,670 




GS-03 

17 

$19,787 

GS-04 

123 


GS-04 

34 

$30,142 

GS-05 

618 


GS-05 

130 

$85,126 

GS-06 

76 


GS-06 

42 

$34,850 

GS-07 

2282 


GS-07 

1092 

$1,036,372 

GS-08 

38 


GS-08 

23 

$14,214 

GS-09 

1659 


GS-09 

1044 

$1,171,997 

GS-10 

1 





GS-11 

4467 


GS-11 

3055 

$3,860,911 

GS-12 

32864 


GS-12 

19902 

$32,679,415 

GS-13 

10455 


GS-13 

7291 

$11,951,546 

GS-14 

3141 


GS-14 

2531 

$4,307,896 

GS-15 

838 


GS-15 

792 

$1,992,986 

GL-05 

144 


GL-05 

1 

$1,000 

GL-07 

795 


GL-07 

12 

$10,750 

GL-09 

1237 


GL-09 

94 

$96,425 

GG-05 

9 





GG-07 

33 





GG-09 

6 





GG-11 

34 


GG-11 

27 

$16,969 

GG-12 

407 


GG-12 

481 

$1,312,405 

GG-13 

101 


GG-13 

94 

$281,825 

GG-14 

7 


GG-14 

6 

$13,425 

WG-04 

3 


WG-04 

4 

$2,552 

WG-05 

2 





WG-06 

42 


WG-06 

16 

$13,659 

WG-07 

2 


WG-07 

1 

$334 

WG-08 

30 


WG-08 

11 

$6,870 


28 




190 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/OSI 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSI 


WG-10 

393 


WG-10 

181 

$158,106 

WL-07 

1 





WL-10 

48 


WL-10 

31 

$35,304 

WS-05 

1 





WS-10 

66 


WS-10 

52 

$68,715 

WS-12 

2 


WS-12 

2 

$4,000 

ST-00 

2 


ST-00 

2 

$12,000 


CIS 


Total: 

11,762 



Total: 8,447 

$10,376,134 

GS-02 

1 





GS-03 

12 


GS-03 

4 

$2,050 

GS-04 

48 


GS-04 

23 

$10,304 

GS-05 

533 


GS-05 

200 

$109,458 

GS-06 

202 


GS-06 

108 

$58,247 

GS-07 

1013 


GS-07 

616 

$427,089 

GS-08 

62 


GS-08 

46 

$39,424 

GS-09 

1553 


GS-09 

946 

$724,042 

GS-10 

25 


GS-10 

16 

$19,888 

GS-11 

864 


GS-11 

671 

$603,378 

GS-12 

3319 


GS-12 

2613 

$2,972,556 

GS-13 

2028 


OS- 13 

1689 

$2,429,661 

GS-14 

1406 


GS-14 

1048 

$1,803,625 

GS-15 

692 


GS-15 

465 

$1,174,896 

WG-06 

2 


WG-06 

2 

$1,516 

EX-03 

1 





ED-00 

1 






DNDO 


Total: 107 



Total: 65 

$117,971 

GS-01 

1 





GS-04 

2 





GS-12 

6 


GS-12 

2 

$2,500 

GS-13 

14 


GS-13 

3 

$5,900.00 

GS-14 

23 


GS-14 

14 

$22,775 

GS-15 

60 


GS-15 

45 

$80,771 

ST-00 

1 


ST-00 

1 

$6,025 


29 




191 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QSI 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSI 


FEMA 


Total: 

17,059 



Total: 6,291 

$7,527,219 

EX-02 

1 





EX-03 

2 





EX-04 

1 





GS-02 

7 





GS-03 

6 


GS-03 

1 

$929 

GS-04 

26 


GS-04 

2 

$1,657 

GS-05 

56 


GS-05 

9 

$3,688 

GS-06 

68 


GS-06 

23 

$38,367 

GS-07 

326 


GS-07 

121 

$143,360 

GS-08 

95 


GS-08 

54 

$49,989 

GS-09 

1100 


GS-09 

242 

$322,777 

GS-10 

3 


GS-10 

4 


GS-11 

891 


GS-11 

409 

$647,214 

GS-12 

1923 


GS-12 

1038 

$1,414,311 

GS-13 

1568 


GS-13 


$1,500,200 

GS-14 

901 

1 

nsin 

643 

$1,128,394 

GS-15 

500 

■ 

ItfelM 

382 

$862,223 

SL-00 

1 


SL-00 

1 

$500 

WG-02 

1 

1 


1 

$500 

WG-03 

1 





WG-04 

21 


WG-04 

17 

$13,900 

WG-06 

38 


WG-06 

30 

$20,578 

WG-07 

13 


WG-07 

11 

$7,675 

WG-08 

15 


WG-08 

6 

$6,700 

WG-09 

6 


WG-09 

7 

$3,770 

WG-10 

19 


WG-10 

13 

$9,021 

WG-11 

63 


WG-11 

52 

$38,755 

WG-i2 

34 


WG-12 

29 

$27,965 

WL-04 

1 





WL-06 

1 


WL-06 

1 

$1,000 

WL-08 

4 


WL-08 

2 

$1,500 

WL-09 

1 


WL-09 

1 

$600 

WL-10 

2 


WL-10 

2 

$1,456 


30 

















192 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY20 12 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QSI 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSI 


WL-11 

7 


WL-11 

5 

$4,116 

WL-12 

1 


WL-12 

1 

$1,230 

WS-04 

1 





WS-05 

2 


WS-05 

1 

$900 

WS-08 

3 


WS-08 

2 

$3,000 

WS-10 

2 


WS-10 

2 

$1,435 

WS-11 

6 


WS-11 

6 

$6,668 

WS-12 

1 





AD-00 

9337 


AD-00 

2158 

$1,253,991 

GM-14 

1 


GM-14 

1 

$1,850 

XL-08 

1 


XL-08 

1 

$1,000 

EF-13 

1 

1 




EF-14 

1 






FLETC 


Total: 

1,094 



Total: 1,024 

$897,216 

GS-03 

2 


GS-03 

1 

$600 

GS-04 

2 


GS-04 

2 

$1,700 

GS-05 

6 


GS-05 

5 

$4,000 

GS-06 

4 


GS-06 

4 

$3,900 

GS-07 

30 


GS-07 

24 

$19,899 

GS-08 

20 


GS-08 

18 

$14,820 

GS-09 

79 


GS-09 

75 

$69,043 

GS-11 

85 


GS-11 

79 

$69,109 

GS-12 

279 


GS-12 

250 

$208,060 

GS-13 

339 


GS-13 

328 

$295,306 

GS-14 

127 


GS-14 

120 

$103,390 

GS-15 

74 


GS-15 

73 

$66,389 

WG-05 

1 


WG-05 

1 

$1,100 

WG-08 

10 


WG-08 

10 

$9,000 

WG-10 

22 


WG-10 

21 

$20,600 

WG-11 

10 


WG-11 

10 

$8,000 

WL-10 

2 


WL-10 

2 

$1,700 

WS-11 

2 


WS-11 

1 

$600 


ICE 1 1 Total: 1 | i Total; 8,461 | $13,204,156 


31 

















194 


Non-OSEMAJSM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QSl 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSl 



2,861 





GS-03 

11 





GS-04 

6 





GS-05 

17 


GS-05 

4 

$1,294 

GS-06 

4 


GS-06 

2 

$1,434 

GS-07 

38 


GS-07 

21 

$10,629 

GS-08 

32 


GS-08 

21 

$10,972 

GS-09 

129 


GS-09 

66 

$40,210 

GS-10 

7 


GS-10 

4 

$3,358 

GS-11 

189 


GS-11 

108 

$76,372 

GS-12 

780 


GS-12 

548 

$470,775 

GS-13 

684 


GS-13 

540 

$624,315 

GS-14 

649 


GS-14 

531 

$644,443 

GS-15 

311 


GS-15 

237 

$384,911 

ST-00 

1 





GM-14 

1 


GM-14 

1 

$828 

GM-15 

1 


GM-15 

1 

$911 

EX-03 

1 






Office of 

Health Affairs 


Total: 78 



Total: 79 

$158,918 

EX-04 

1 





GS-09 

1 


GS-09 

1 

$1,208 

GS-11 

7 


GS-11 

7 

$9,302 

GS-12 

2 


GS-12 

3 

$6,121 

GS-13 

16 


GS-13 

17 

$26,095 

GS-14 

25 


GS-14 

25 

$49,397 

GS-15 

17 


GS-15 

19 

$36,295 

SL-00 

2 


SL-00 

2 

$7,250 

ST-00 

6 


ST-00 

5 

$23,250 

GP-15 

1 


GL-07 

1 

$2,000 


Office of the 
Inspector 

Genera! 


Total: 751 



Total: 569 

$849,453 

GS-03 

1 


GS-04 

6 

$4,207 

GS-04 

23 


GS-05 

4 

$2,550 

GS-05 

8 


GS-06 

1 

$750 

GS-06 

2 






33 




195 


Non-OSEMrtJSM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 -Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QSI 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSI 


GS-07 

12 


GS-08 

1 

$500 

GS-09 

31 


GS-09 

22 

$20,524 

GS-11 

40 


GS-11 

35 

$41,214 

GS-12 

132 


GS-12 

97 

$117,238 

GS-13 

266 


GS-13 

193 

$267,875 

GS-14 

162 


GS-14 

134 

$243,447 

GS-15 

68 


GS-15 

65 

$140,419 

GL-07 

1 


GS-07 

9 

$7,979 

GL-09 

5 


GL-09 

1 

$750 


A&O* 


Total: 823 



Total: 490 

$628,294 

GS-02 

1 





GS-03 

5 





GS-04 

13 


GS-04 

1 

$184 

GS-05 

5 


GS-05 

1 

$206 

GS-07 

16 


GS-07 

5 

$1,240 

GS-09 

25 


GS-09 

6 

$3,234 

GS-11 

50 


GS-11 

22 

$21,836 

GS-12 

128 


GS-12 

74 

$75,996 

GS-13 

164 


GS-13 

96 

$102,519 

GS-14 

254 


GS-14 

165 

$186,461 

GS-15 

155 


GS-15 

115 

$196,618 

SL-00 

6 


SL-00 

5 

$40,000 

ED-00 

1 





j 

Science and 
Technology 


Total: 469 



Total: 353 

$690,329 

GS-01 

1 





GS-02 

2 





GS-03 

2 





GS-04 

6 





GS-05 

3 


GS-05 

2 

$4,800 

GS-06 

1 





GS-07 

7 


GS-07 

5 

$7,727 

GS-08 

3 


GS-08 

1 

$2,400 

GS-09 

23 


GS-09 

17 

$25,118 

GS-11 

12 


GS-11 

7 

$12,850 


34 




196 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/OSI 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSI 


GS-12 

45 


GS-12 

41 

$56,325 

GS-13 

49 


GS-13 

38 

$56,780 

GS-14 

97 


GS-14 

76 

$129,982 

GS-15 

171 


GS-15 

134 

$263,488 

SL-00 

2 


SL-00 

2 

$10,500 

AD-00 

11 


AD-00 

9 

$21,000 

WG-06 

7 


WG-06 

3 

$3,375 

ST-00 

22 


ST-00 

14 

$90,000 

WL-06 

2 


WL-06 

2 

$2,250 

EX-03 

1 





WS-05 

1 


WS-05 

1 

$1,867 

WS-06 

1 


WS-06 

1 

$1,867 


Transportation 

Security 

Administration 


Total; 

65,289 



Total; 52,760 

$86,370,787 

EX-04 

1 





SV-02 

5 


SV-02 

1 

$500 

SV-03 

31 





SV-04 

11097 


SV-04 

6082 

$8,561,044 

SV-05 

25532 


SV-05 

22195 

$41,369,803 

SV-06 

9548 


SV-06 

8984 

$15,660,803 

SV-07 

6500 


SV-07 

6026 

$10,799,579 

SV-08 

3470 


SV-08 

2958 

$2,366,858 

SV-09 

5969 


SV-09 

3924 

$4,106,918 

SV-10 

2120 


SV-10 

1668 

$1,942,430 

SV-11 

942 


SV-II 

861 

$1,375,381 

SV-12 

74 


SV-12 

61 

$187,471 


USCG 


Total; 8645 



Total; 5,757 

$6,971,735 




GS-01 

1 

$250 

GS-02 

1 





GS-03 

1 


GS-03 

3 

$1,200 

GS-04 

42 


GS-04 

27 

$16,698 

GS-05 

186 


GS-05 

103 

$89,939 

GS-06 

273 


GS-06 

157 

$176,801 

GS-07 

728 


GS-07 

443 

$416,634 


35 




197 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 


Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QSI 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSI 


GS-08 

196 


GS-08 

147 

$224,779 

GS-09 

635 


GS-09 

385 

$412,935 

GS-10 

24 


GS-10 

12 

$15,918 

GS-11 

1010 


GS-11 

659 

$701,350 

GS-12 

1640 


GS-12 

1107 

$1,303,842 

GS-13 

1437 


GS-13 

961 

$1,414,820 

GS-14 

676 


GS-14 

488 

$868,225 

GS-15 

205 


GS-15 

153 

$354,271 

GL-09 

1 


GL-09 

1 

$934 

GM-13 

22 


GM-13 

14 

$18,275 

GM-14 

13 


GM-14 

10 

$17,106 

GM-15 

1 


GM-15 

2 

$5,580 

WG-01 

8 


WG-01 

9 

$4,900 

WG-02 

9 


WG-02 

6 

$3,648 

WG-03 

36 


WG-03 

34 

$17,483 

WG-04 

2 


WG-04 

2 

$1,560,00 

WG-05 

59 


WG-05 

43 

$28,591 

WG-06 

65 


WG-06 

32 

$31,196 

WG-07 

43 


WG-07 

33 

$26,518 

WG-08 

153 


WG-08 

132 

$99,719 

WG-09 

124 


WG-09 

84 

$71,366 

WG-IO 

496 


WG-10 

349 

$294,627 

WG-11 

102 


WG-11 

72 

$64,845 

WG-12 

22 


WG-12 

17 

$15,654 

WG-13 

3 


WG-13 

3 

$2,406 

WD-05 

9 


WD-05 

9 

$7,285 

WD-06 

3 


WD-06 

1 

$700 

WD-07 

5 


WD-07 

5 

$3,820 

WD-08 

26 


WD-08 

18 

$15,424 

WL-05 

2 


WL-05 

1 

$1,409 

WL-06 

3 


WL-06 

3 

$4,215 

WL-07 

4 


WL-07 

2 

$1,996 

WL-08 

7 


WL-08 

5 

$4,723 

WL-09 

15 


WL-09 

13 

$11,045 

WL-10 

107 


WL-10 

76 

$71,809 

WL-11 

15 


WL-11 

13 

$11,291 


36 




198 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSls 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SESA'SES) 

Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QS! 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSl 


WL-12 

4 


WL-12 

5 

$3,500 

WS-05 

2 


WS-05 

2 

$1,298 

WS-06 

4 


WS-06 

3 

$4,130 

WS-07 

1 





WS-08 

2 





WS-09 

13 


WS-09 

10 

$7,101 

WS-10 

43 


WS-10 

32 

$26,655 

WS-11 

31 


WS-11 

25 

$21,547 

WS-12 

9 


WS-12 

6 

$5,407 

WS-13 

6 


WS-13 

3 

$2,604 

WS-14 

4 


WS-14 

1 

$1,136 

WS-15 

9 


WS-15 

10 

$11,343 

WS-18 

4 


WS-18 

4 

$2,800 

WN-07 

2 


WN-07 

1 

$1,048 

SL-00 

1 


SL-00 

1 

$7,890 

AD-00 

95 


AD-00 

19 

$39,490 

AL-03 

6 






USSS 


Total: 

6,643 



Total: 4,882 

$6,735,735 

GS-02 

7 


GS-02 

6 

$1,.575 

GS-03 

10 


GS-03 

5 

$2,275 

GS-04 

38 


GS-04 

39 

$12,536 

GS-05 

21 


GS-05 

24 

$10,049 

GS-06 

20 


GS-06 

27 

$15,752 

GS-07 

64 


GS-07 

57 

$34,783 

GS-08 

178 


GS-08 

156 

$132,179 

GS-09 

141 


GS-09 

131 

$125,321 

GS-10 

7 


GS-10 

5 

$7,621 

GS-11 

359 


GS-11 

292 

$283,161 

GS-12 

436 


GS-12 

349 

$364,043 

GS-13 

2930 


GS-13 

2109 

$2,503,649 

GS-14 

625 


GS-14 

569 

$1,428,282 

GS-15 

221 


GS-15 

217 

$924,290 

GL-07 

6 


GL-07 

4 

$1,156 

GL-08 

10 


GL-08 

6 

$5,291 


37 



199 


Non-OSEM/USM Offices 

Employees on-board as of 12/31/2012 - Bonus (Awards) and QSIs 
by Component and Pay Grade for CY2012 (Excluding SES/TSES) 


Agency 

Grade 

On-board 


Grade 

Number of 
Employees who 
received 
bonus/QSI 

Total amount of 
bonus/QSI 


GL-09 

165 


GL-09 

125 

$106,814 

GL-10 

20 


GL-10 

20 

$18,373 

WG-06 

1 


WG-06 

1 

$600 

WG-08 

3 


WG-08 

3 

$2,750 

WG-14 

3 


WG-14 

3 

$2,500 

LE-01 

1101 


LE-01 

508 

$381,555 

LE-04 

166 


LE-04 

132 

$1.53,229 

LE-05 

62 


IliiiHl 

48 

$74,492 

LE-07 

22 


■ ■glM 

22 

$48,670 

LE-08 

14 


IlglM 

14 

$45,584 

LE-09 

5 



4 

$19,915 

LE-11 

1 



1 

$6,557 

SL-00 

1 



1 

$7,000 

GM-13 

2 


bisaa 

2 

$5,840 

GM-14 

1 


GM-14 

1 

$4,065 

GM-15 

1 


GM-15 

1 

$5,828 

EF-00 

1 





EF-I4 

1 










Grand Total | 

1 195,792 1 1 

1 128,273 

1 $196,050,607 


*Note: A&O is OPS Coordination & Planning Directorate and the Intelligence & Analysis 
office. 


Question: Please provide a table showing how much is requested in the fiscal year 2014 budget 
for bonuses for OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO political employees; OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO 
SES employees; and OSEM, USM, CIO, and CFO non-SES employees. 

Answer: The bonuses are included within the salaries and benefits object classes in the FY 2014 
Budget Request. The amounts shown below were calculated using the projected salaries for FY 
2014 based upon the SES/non-SES breakout. We used the OPM provided 5 percent and 1 
percent calculation levels. While there is no specific amount requested for bonuses, the following 
table provides an estimate: 


38 







200 


FY 2014 Budget Estimate for Bonuses 

Appropriation 

Political 

Employees 

SES 

Employees 

Non-SES 

Employees 

Total 

OSEM 

$0 

$462,000 

$686,000 

$1,148,000 

USM 

$0 

$318,000 

$1,003,000 

$1,321,000 

OCFO 

$0 

$100,000 

$251,000 

$351,000 

OCIO 

$0 

$72,000 

$325,000 

$397,000 

Grand Total 

$0 

$952,000 

$2,265,000 

$3,217,000 


Travel 


Question: Please provide a detailed justification for the fiscal year 2014 travel budgets for the 
Secretary, Deputy Secretary and the Chief of Staff as compared to the fiscal years 2011-13 
enacted levels and identify the travel “offsets” claimed in the budget that allow for a reduced 
request. Please also provide travel costs projected for the new direct reporting offices (Private 
Sector, State and Local Law Enforcement, and International Affairs) and compare with funding 
provided previously for those functions under the Office of Policy, Please indicate those 
instances in fiscal year 201 1 and to date where the Secretary or Deputy Secretary travel was 
provided by Coast Guard aircraft, and projected and budgeted for the remainder of the year and 
for fiscal year 2014. 

Answer: 


Travel Budget 

Amount in (SOOO's) 

Office 

FYll 

C.R. 

FY 12 Revised 
Enacted 

FY13 

Enacted 

FY14 

Request 

Office of the Secretary 

2000 

2427 

1485 

1515 

Office of the Deputy Secretary 

697 

518 

372 

339 

Chief of Staff 

380 

339 

169 

226 


Reduced levels in the FY 2013 Enacted and FY 2014 Request are a result of Executive Order 
1 3.'589 directing agencies to reduce travel from FY 2010 levels by no less than 20%. Further 
reductions in FY 2013 Enacted are a result of fewer trips taken and utilization of Amtrak and 
Gov’t Car where possible. 


39 





































201 


FY 2012-FY 2014 Travel Funding Levels 


Office 

2012 Actuals 

2013 Euacted 

2014 Request 


Travel Amount 

Travel Amount* 

Travel Amount 

International Affairs 

399,201 

238,508 

451.000 

Private Sector Office 

54,360 

54,000 

37,000 

State and Local Law Enforcement 

72,058 

70,000 

52,000 


Please see Executive Aircraft Usage and Funding Fiscal Year 2013 Report to Congress as of 
April 25, 2013 for travel on Coast Guard aircraft. Includes all trips billed as of April 29, 2013. 


Remaining Projected Travel Provided by USCG 


FY13 

(May-Sept.) 

FY14 

Office of the Secretary 

$432,132 

$1,071,863 

Office of the Deputy Secretary 

$51,928 

$121,464 


Question: Please provide a breakdown of the official and non-official the travel thus far taken by 
the Secretary, Deputy Secretary and Chief of Staff in fiscal year 2013, listing dales, destinations, 
purposes and costs (to include direct and indirect) by trip, as well as the balances remaining in 
their travel budgets for the current fiscal year. 

Answer: Please see the tables on the following pages. 


^ Visa Waiver Program fully transitioned to Office of International Affairs in FY2013. However, travel in FYi3 is 
substantially reduced as a result of reductions planned as a result of sequestration. 


40 





FY 2013 Trips to Date^ 


Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost* 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 

T ransportation)^ 

SI 

10/05/2012 

10/05/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
Arizona where she was joined by U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection 
(CBP) Deputy Commissioner David 

V. Aguilar and CBP Commander of 
Arizona Joint Reid Command Jeffrey 
Self to express their condolences to 
the family of Border Patrol Agent 
Nicholas J. Ivie. Secretary 

Napolitano, Deputy Commissioner 
Aguilar and Commander Self also 
met with federal, stale and local law 
enforcement officiais at the Brian A. 
Terry Border Patrol Station in Bisbee 
for a briefing on the ongoing 
investigation, and surveyed the U.S.- 
Mexico border at Naco where the 
incident occurred. 

Sierra Vista. AZ; 
Bisbee, AZ 

$39,159 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

10/06/2012 

10/13/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 

Lyon, France to meet with 

INTERPOL officials to discuss the 
Department’s collaboration with 
international partners on increasing 
cybersccurity. combating 
transnational crime, and preventing 
human trafficking. Secretary 

Napolitano met with Secretary 

Paris, France; 

Lyon, France; 

Sofia, Bulgaria; 
Ankara, Turkey; 
Istanbul, Turkey 

$114,564 

USCG 

$6,950 

$544 


“ Includes all trips with USCG costs billed as of 4/29/2013 
^ Includes only costs for trips taken 


41 


zoz 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost* 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 

(Communications^ 

Transportation)^ 




General of INTERPOL Ronald Noble 
to sign ajoint statement on border 
management; a joint statement on the 
INTERPOL Complex for Global 
Innovation research and development 
facility; ajoint statement reaffirming 
a mutual commitment to combating 
human trafficking; and a DHS Blue 
Campaign Co-branding Agreement 
enabling DHS and INTERPOL to 
work together on training and 
awareness materials, share existing 
resources and best practices, 
strengthen support for victims, 
increase regional partnerships, and 
enhance cooperation on combating 
human trafficking. While in Lyon, 
Secretary Napolitano also met with 
senior staff, division directors and 

U.S. officials stationed at INTERPOL 
and visited the French National Police 
Academy, where she delivered 
remarks highlighting the 

Department’s partnerships with the 
international community to share 
information and best practices and 
collaborate on joint investigations. 
Secretary Napolitano then traveled to 
Paris, where she met with Minister of 
the Interior Manuel Vails to discuss 
shared security goals, information 
sharing and global supply chain 
security. She also met with General 
Secretariat for Defense and National 
Security Francis Delon to discuss 
collaboration on cybersecurity. and 







42 


203 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 
Transportation)^ 




science and technology. The 

Secretary then met with senior 
advisors to French President Francis 
Hollande, Paul Jean-Ortiz and 

General Benoit Puga, to discuss 
information sharing, shared interests 
in securing borders and cyberspace, 
and preventing transnational crime 
and terrorism. Secretary Napolitano 
traveled to Sofia, Bulgaria and met 
with President Rosen Plevneliev and 
Prime Minister Boyko Borisov in 
Bulgaria to discuss the Department's 
collaboration with Bulgarian partners 
on information sharing, law 
enforcement, cybersecurily, 
counterterrorism, and border security. 
Secretary Napolitano also signed an 
Agreement on Preventing and 
Combating Serious Crime with 
Bulgarian Deputy Prime Minister and 
interior Minister Tsvetan Tsvetanov. 
The Secretary also met with 

Bulgarian non-governmental 
organizations, and visited the 

Bulgarian National Coordination 

Center for Border Security and Sofia 
Airport to survey border management 
and passport control operations. 

Secretary Napolitano then traveled to 
Ankara, Turkey where she met with 
counterparts to discuss the 

Department’s collaborsrtion with 
international partners on enhancing 
information sharing and combating 







43 


204 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 
Transportation)^ 




transnational crime, while 
strengthening economic ties. The 
Secretary met bilaterally with Deputy 
Prime Minister Be^ir Atalay to 
discuss collaboration on effective 
border management and (he 
facilitation of legitimate travel and 
trade, while promoting economic 
prosperity. She also met with 

Minister of Customs and T rade 

Hayati Yazici, Minister of Interior 
idris Naim §ahin. Minister of 
Transport, Maritime Affairs and 
Communications Binali Yildinm. and 
General Director of the Turkish 

National Police Mehmet Kiligiar. 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
Istanbul, Turkey where she met with 
Turkish private sector representatives 
and local business leaders to discuss 
initiatives to facilitate trade and 
travel, while strengthening security. 
Secretary Napolitano delivered 
remarks to the Turkish Foreign 
Relations Board, underscoring the 
Department of Homeland Security's 
commitment to working closely with 
Turkish partners to address shared 
threats while facilitating legitimate 
trade and travel. While in Istanbul, 
Secretary Napolitano also visited the 
port of Istanbul, shipping facilities 
along the Bosphorus, and Turkish 

Coast Guard and Maritime Authority 
security operations. 







44 


205 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc- Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 

T ransportation)^ 

S! 

10/27/2012 

10/28/2012 

Persona! 

Albuquerque, NM 

$34,407 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

11/01/2012 

11/01/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
Bridgeport, CT and New Yoric, NY to 
oversee Hurricane Sandy Relief 

Efforts. In Bridgeport, the Secretary 
visited a Red Cross Shelter, 
participated in a FEMA Briefing, and 
visited a Disaster Recovery Center 
with Governor Malloy, Senior 
Lieberman, Senator Blumenlhal, Rep 
Couitney, Rep De Lauro, and Rep 
Murphy. In New York, the Secretary 
saw damage in the Rockaways, 
visited Battery Tunnel in Manhattan 
with Mayor Bloomberg, Gov Cuomo, 
and Senators Gillibrand and Schumer. 
She additionally participated in a 
Recovery Briefing at the Emergency 
Control Center. 

Bridgeport, CT; 

New York, NY 

$9,384 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

11/02/2012 

11/02/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 

Staten Island, NY to view Hurricane 
Sandy relief and recovery efforts 
where she visited a Shelter and 
participated in an ops briefing at 

Susan Wagner High School and 
visited with the Red Cross/National 
Guard. 

Staten Island, NY 

$8,345 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

11/03/2012 

1 1/03/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
Charleston, WV and Long Island, NY 
to oversee Hurricane Sandy relief and 
recovery efforts. In Charleston, WV, 
the Secretary participated in an Ops 
Briefing at the National Guard Joint 
Ops Center, held a st^ewide video 
briefing, and visited the National 

Guard JOC. In Long Island, the 

Charleston, WV; 
Long Island, NY 

$14,097 

USCG 


so 


45 


206 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 

T ransportation)^ 




Secretary participated in a briefing, 
met with Firefighters in Island Park 

FH, toured the West End, 

Massepequa, and Lindenhurst 
neighborhoods, and participated in 

State and Local Ops Briefing at 
Massapequa FH. 






SI 

11/04/2012 

11/04/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
Monmouth County and Hoboken NJ 
to review Hurricane Sandy Relief and 
Recovery Efforts. Secretary 

Napolitano reiterated the ongoing 
support of DHS, FEMA. and the rest 
of the federal family as local 
communities continue to respond to 
and recover from the storm. In 
Monmouth County, NJ, Secretary 
Napolitano visited a shelter at 
Monmouth University and the FEMA 
Emergency Operations Center and 

Point of Distribution site at the Holy 
Family School where she met with 
Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno, 
U.S. Representatives Frank Pallone 
and Rush Holt, Union Beach Mayor 
Paul Smith and other state and local 
officials to view response and 
recovery efforts. Secretary 

Napolitano then traveled to Hoboken, 
NJ, where she visited a food pantry at 
the Hoboken Elks Club and the 

FEMA mobile Disaster Recovery 
Center with Governor Chris Christie, 
Senators Frank Lautenberg and 

Robert Menendez, U.S. 

Representative Albio Sires, Hoboken 

Monmouth County 
NJ; Hoboken. NJ 

$8,687 

USCG 


$0 


46 


207 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 

T ransportation)^ 




Mayw Dawn Zimmer and other state 
and local officials to discuss 
coordination among federal, state and 
local partners on response and 
recovery efforts throughout the 
region. 






S! 

11/05/2012 

11/05/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to New 
York, NY, Coney Island, NY, and 
Rockaway Beach, NY to view 

Hurricane Sandy recovery and relief 
efforts. In New York, NY, the 

Secretary visited the Staten Island 
FerryTermlnal and South Ferry 

Subway Station with Representatives 
Nadler and Turner, City Department 
of Transportation Commissioner 

Janette Sadik-Khan, Senator 

Schumer, and USCG CAPT Gordon 
Loeble. In Coney Island, the 

Secretary visited the Seagate 
Community and the Coney Island 
POD/DRC where she participated in a 
briefing. In the Rockaways, the 
Secretary visited a DRC and viewed 
damage with .Assemblyman Phil 
Goldfeder, and Representatives 

Meeks and Turner. 

New York, NY; 
Coney Island, NY 

$8,087 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

11/06/2012 

n/06/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to Long 
Island, NY to oversee Hurricane 

Sandy Relief and Recovery Efforts 
where she visited the South Seatbrd 
neighborhood and the Nassau County 
Command Center where she met with 
employees and participated in a brief 
with state and local officials including 

Long Island, NY 

$8,539 

USCG 


$0 


47 


208 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost* 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Ex[^n$es 
(Communications, 
rransportation)'^ 




Congressman King, Congressman 
Israel, and Senator Schumer. 






SI 

11/11/2012 

11/13/2012 

Secretary NapoHtano traveled to NY, 
NY, Staten Island, NY, Brooklyn, 

NY, and Boston, MA for Veterans 

Day to view Hurricane Sandy relief 
and recovery efforts. In New York, 

NY, the Secretary delivered remarks 
at the Mayor’s Veterans Day 

Breakfast and delivered remarks and 
participated in a wreath laying at the 
opening ceremony of the Madison 
Square Park Veterans Day Ceremony 
and Parade. In Staten Island, the 
Secretary met with Local Officials at 
the Father Capodanno DRC, visited 
the Mt Manresa Jesuit House DRC 
and Shelter, visited the TS Kennedy 
and met with member of the DHS 

Surge Force. In Brooklyn, the 

Secretary hosted a FEMA Corp 
meeting and visited the lOF. In 
Boston, the Secretary delivered 
remarks at the Northeastern 

University Veterans Day Ceremony, 
met with Noithea^em University 
(NU) President Aoun and visited the 
DHS S&T Center of Excellence at 

NU. She additionally visited the 

USCG Sector Boston where she 
participated in a brief and delivered 

New York, NY; 
Staten Island, NY; 
Brooklyn, NY; 
Boston, MA 

$13,318 

USCG 


$178 


48 


209 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost* 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 

T ransport ation)^ 




remarks at an All Hands and wrapped 
up her time in Boston with a Harvard 
Student Event with Governor Doyle. 






SI 

li/15/2012 

11/16/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to Long 
Island, Staten Island, and New York, 
NY and Middletown, NJ to oversee 
Hurricane Sandy Relief Efforts. In 
Long Island, the Secretary met with 
local officials and visited a DRC in 
Long Beach. Secretary Napolitano 
traveled with POTUS to Staten Island 
where they visited Miller Field DRC 
and visited a neighborhood in Staten 
Island. In New York, NY, the 

Secretary visited a Red Cross Office 
and met with Secretary Donovan and 
Senator Schumer. She additionally 
participated in a Naturalization 
Ceremony. 

Long island, NY; 
Staten Island, NY; 
New York, NY 

$10,797 

USCG 


$107 

SI 

11/19/2012 

11/21/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
London, UK to participate in the G6 
plus 1 Session on Radicalization and 
Cooperation in North Africa and the 
Sahel. The Secretary held 6 bilats 
with German Interior Minister 
Friedrich, Spanish Interior Minister 
Diez, Italian Minister Cancellieri, UK 
Home Secretary May, UK Dep’t for 
Transport Secretary McLoughlin, and 
IMO Secretary Sekimizu, She also 
held a signing with Commissioner 
Kroes, met with Ambassador Susman, 

London, UK 

$71,794 

USCG 

$5,900 

$324 


49 


210 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 
Transportation)^ 




and met with DHS Embassy ^aff. 






SI 

I i/30/2012 

12/02/2012 

Personal 

Danville, Oakland, 
CA 

$48,770 

USCG 


$0 

S! 

12/08/2012 

12/08/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to Long 
Beach, CA along with the USCG 
Commandant in response to the death 
of USCG Chief Petty Officer Terrell 
Horne where she had an Executive 

Staff meeting, a private meeting with 
the Crew, and delivered remarks at 
the memorial service. 

Long Beach. CA 

$0 

(mission 

of 

opportun 

ity) 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

12/12/2012 

12/14/2012 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
Nogales, AZ and Mexico City, 

Mexico. In Nogales, the Secretary 
participated In an Operational Brief 
with Forward Operating Base 
leadership. In Mexico City, the 
Secretary participated in two bilats 
with Secretary of Interior Osorio and 
Secretary of Finance Videgaray, met 
with DHS employees at the Embassy, 
and received a Fusion Center and 
Security Brief. 

Nogales, AZ; 
Mexico City, 

Mexico 

$55,544 

USCG 


$96 

SI 

12/21/2012 

12/28/2012 

Personal 

Albuquerque, NM 

$32,338 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

01/04/2013 

01/13/2013 

Persona! 

Albuquerque, NM 

$33,731 

USCG 


$0 


50 


211 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 
Transportation)^ 

SI 

01/25/2013 

01/25/2013 

The Secretary traveled to Richmond, 
Virginia to participate in a Gun Safety 
Roundtable with VPOTUS and 
Secrttary Sebelius, Senator Kaine, 
and Congressman Scott. 

Richmond, VA 

$0 

(traveled 
on AF2) 

N/A 


so 

SJ 

01/29/2013 

01/29/2013 

Secretary NapoHtano traveled to Las 
Vegas with POTUS and Secretary 
Salazar for POTUS speech on 
Immigration Reform. 

Las Vegas, NV 

$0 

(traveled 
on AFl) 

N/A 


$0 

SI 

01/30/2013 

01/30/2013 

The Secretary traveled to New 

Orleans to participate in the NFL's 
Superbowi Security Brief with 

Federal, State, and Local 
representatives. 

New Orleans, LA 

$23,362 

USCG 


$0 

SI 

02/02/2013 

02/05/2013 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to San 
Diego and El Paso, TX. In San 

Diego, the Secretary viewed border 
security operations at the SW border 
and held a roundtable with federal, 
state, and local law enforcement. In 

El Paso, TX the Secretary Inspected 
border security ops at the Southwest 
border, met with stale and local 
stakeholders, and discussed the 
Department's on-going efforts to 
secure the border while facilitating 
lawful travel and trade. 

San Diego, CA; El 
Paso, TX 

$45,544 

USCG 


$92 

SI 

02/16/2013 

02/17/2013 

Pereonal 

New York, NY 

N/A 

Amtrak 


so 


51 


ZIZ 



Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 
Transportation)^ 

SI 

02/19/2013 

02/20/2013 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to 
Nogales, A2 to meet with Senator 
Carper where they participated in an 
aerial overview of the West 

Dcsert/Bear Valley FOC, held a 
meeting at the Mariposa Port of Entry 
with CBP leadership, and met with 
Nogales City Leadership. Secretary 
Napolitano traveled to Ft. Lauderdale 
and Miami FL with Representative 
Debbie Wasscrman Schultz to see 
customs and security operations at 

Port Everglades and Miami 

International Airport, and to discuss 
the Department’s on-going efforts to 
facilitate lawful travel and trade. In 

Port Everglades, the Secretary 
participated in a Roundtable with 
airport and airline leaders. In Miami, 
the Secretary visited the airport and 
met with Mayor Gimenez, 

Chairwoman Sosa, MDAD Director 
and American Airlines. 

Nogales, AZ; 

Ft. Lauderdale, 

FL; 

Miami. FL 

$49,902 

USCG 



S! 

03/05/2013 

03/05/2013 

Secretary Napolitano traveled to New 
York, NY to give the lATA Key Note 
Address and provide remarks at the 
NYPD Shield Event. 

New York, NY 

N/A 

Amtrak 


$435 

SI 

04/02/2013 

04/02/2013 

On April 2. Secretary Napolitano 
traveled to Drexe! University to 
announce seven colleges and 
universities competitively selected to 
participate in the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) Campus 
Resilience Pilot Program (CR Pilot). 
DHS will work with the seven 
selected colleges and universities to 

Philadelphia, PA 

N/A 

Amtrak 


$207 


52 


213 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 
Transportation)^ 




collaborate with federal, state and 
local stakeholders and identify new 
innovative approaches to promote 
campus resilience — directly 
supporting the goals of the President’s 
Plan to Reduce Gun Violence, and 
making educational institutions safer 
and more prepared. Secretary 
Napolitano also met with local DHS 
employees and with Philadelphia 

Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey 
to discuss common efforts to reduce 
gun violence, and the federal 
government’s ongoing efforts with 
partners at all levels of government to 
support state and local law 
enforcement to implement measures 
to prevent, protect, respond, react, and 
recover from potential future mass 
casualty events. 






SI 

05/09/2013 

05/09/2013 

On May 9, Secretary Napolitano 
traveled to New York City where she 
met with business community leaders 
to discuss the need for commonsense 
immigration reform. She also 
attended the inaugural Forbes 

Women’s Summit, where she 
participated in a panel discussion 
regarding the role of women in 
shaping policy. 

New York. NY 

N/A 

Amtrak 


$469 

S2 

iO/Ol/2012 

10/02/2012 

Deputy Secretary Lute led a DHS 
delegation in bilateral discussions 
during the semi-annual meeting of the 
Security Cooperation Group (SCO), 

Munich, Germany 

$40,969 

USCG 

$0 

$669 


53 


214 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
ExiM;nses 

(Communications, 

transportation)^ 




the US-German cooperative 
relationship on counterterrorism, law 
enforcement and homeland security 
matters. S2 was accompanied by a 
delegation of eight DHS 

CyberSecurity Policy experts and 
staff. The Deputy Secretary provided 
remarks to international students 
attending the George C. Marshall 
European Center for Security Studies 
and met with leaders from the NATO 
School in Oberammergau. 






S2 

10/11/2012 

10/12/2012 

Deputy Secretary Lute led a DHS 
delegation to attend the funeral 
ceremony of Border Patrol Agent 
Nicholas J. Ivie. 

Provo, UT 

$38,923 

USCG 


$46 

S2 

10/14/2012 

10/16/2012 

Deputy Secretary Lute met with 

Cyber industry leaders and 
participated in the opening bell 
ceremony at NASDAQ in recognition 
of CyberSecurity Awareness Month. 
Deputy Secretary Lute participated in 
a roundtable discussion with industry 
leaders and two members of 

Congress. Deputy Secretary Lute 
conducted meetings with the Provost 
of Cornell NYC Tech on the topic of 
CyberSecurity. 

New York, NY 

N/A 

Gov’t 

Car 


$872 

S2 

12/12/2012 

12/14/2012 

Deputy Secretary Lute visited the 

New York Field Operations Center 
supporting Hurricane Sandy recovery 
operations. Deputy Secretary met 
with members of the Surge Capacity 
Force supporting DHS Hurricane 

Sandy recovery operations. Deputy 
Secretary visited the City of Newark’s 

New York, NY 

N/A 

Gov’t 

Car 


$862 


54 


215 




Traveler 

Start Date 

End Date 

Purpose of Travel 

Destination 

Gov’t 

Aircraft 

Cost' 

Aircraft 

State 

Dept. 

Fees 

Misc. Travel 
Expenses 
(Communications, 
Transportation)^ 




Emergency Operations Center (EOC). 
Deputy Secretary provided remarks at 
the Security Investor Conference on 
the topic of CyberSecurity. 






S2 

01/31/2013 

02/03/2013 

Deputy Secretary Lute attended the 

49'" Annual Munich Security 
Conference in Munich, Germany as a 
member of the US delegation led by 
the Vice President. Deputy Secretary 
was the member of an international 
panel discussing issues of 
CyberSecurity and CyberCrime. 

Deputy Secretary met with the 

German Minister of the Interior and 
the U.S. Ambassador to Germany. 

Munich, Germany 

N/A 

Commer 

cial 

Carrier 


$1,115 

S2 

03/27/2013 

03/28/2013 

Deputy Secretary Lute provided 
remarks at the Eastern District Court 
Naturalization Ceremony in 

Brooklyn, NY, welcoming 280 new 
citizens to the United Stales. Deputy 
Secretary Lute met with industry 
leaders to discuss public/privaie 
collaboration on CyberSecurity 
related initiatives. 

New York, NY 

N/A 

Gov’t 

Car 


N/A 

COS 

12/12/2012 

12/14/2012 

Staffing the Secretary on a trip to 
Arizona and Mexico City 

Nogales, AZ; 
Mexico City, 

Mexico 

N/A 

USCG 


$2,429.20 

cos 

2/4/2013 

2/5/2013 

Staffing the Secretary on a trip to San 
Diego and El Paso 

San Diego, CA; El 
Paso, TX 

N/A 

USCG 


$1,482.05 


Remaining Balance in Travel Budget for FY13 as of April, 29, 2013 

Office of the Secretary | $794,734 


55 


216 





Office of the Deputy Secretary 

$224,187 

Chief of Staff 

$79,027 


Question: Please provide a table that shows all the funds expended by OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO political employees for travel in 
201 2. Include the name of each traveler, purpose of travel, location(s) visited, and total cost. 


Answer: 


Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Albert, Brian M 

Meetings/Official Business 

07-Mar-12 

10-Mar- 12 

San Diego, CA 

$1,768.18 

Albert, Brian M 

Meeiings/Official Business 

IO-Sep-12 

!2-Sep-12 

Mexico City, Mexico 

$1,513.97 

Anderson, Audrey 

Training; Eagle Horizon 
Exercise 

20-Jun-12 

20-Jun-I2 

Berryville, VA 

$127.41 

Anderson, Audrey 

Program/Site Visit 

lO-Sep-12 

I i -Sep- 12 

Atlanta, GA 

$649.29 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced the Secretary 

!9-Jan-,l2 

20-Jan-!2 

New York, NY; Orient, NY; New York, 
NY 

$666.21 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced the Secretary 

25-Feb-12 

29-Fcb-12 

San Jose, Costa Rica 

$1,726.95 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced the Secretary 

13-Apr-12 

16-Apr-I2 

San Jose, CA; Los Angeles, CA 

$1,742.87 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced die Secretary 

I4-May-12 

22-May- 12 

Tel Aviv, Israel 

$6,109.65 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced the Secretary 

0!-Jul-12 

03~iul-I2 

Colorado Springs, CO 

$1,118.32 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced the Secretary 

t4-Jul-l2 

15-Jul-12 

Williamsburg, VA 

$203.27 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced the Secretary 

04*Oct42 

13-Oct-12 

Ankara, Turkey 

$4,691.39 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced the Secretary 

31-Oct-12 

04-NOV-12 

Hartford, CT; Staten Island, NY; 
Hoboken, NJ 

$3,048.12 

Angelo, Matthew R 

Advanced Uie Secretary 

14-NOV-12 

16-NOV-12 

New York, NY 

$1,260.49 


56 


217 





Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Be^ Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Bernstein, Jarrod 

Accompany the Secretary 

27-Aug-I2 

27-Aug-12 

New York, NY 

$130.07 

Bernstein, Jarrod 

Accompany the Sairetary 

lO-Sep-12 

lO-Sep-12 

New York, NY 

$135.07 

Bernstein, Jarrod”* 

Accompany the Secretary 

11 -Sep- 12 

ll-Sep-12 

Washington, DC 

$207,93 

Bersin, Alan D 

Specch/Presentaiion 

03-Feb-12 

i3-Feb-12 

San Diego, CA; Tucson, AZ 

$921.92 

Bersin, Alan D 

Accompany the Secretary 

27-Feb-12 

29-Fcb-12 

Guatemala City, Guatemala; San Jose, 
Costa Rica 

$535,68 

Bersin, Alan D 

Accompany the Secretary 

01 -Mar- 1 2 

02-Mar-!2 

Ottawa, Canada 

$815.70 

Bersin, Alan D 

Meetings/Official Business 

07-Mar- 12 

il-Mar-12 

San Diego, CA 

$981.17 

Bersin, Alan D 

Meetings/OfficiaJ Business 

14-Mar-I2 

i6-Mar-]2 

Mexico City, Mexico 

$1,326.97 

Bersin, Alan D 

S peech/Preseniation 

11 -Apr- 12 

]3-Apr-12 

Providence, RI 

$1,090.91 

Bersin, Alan D 

Conference; 

Mectings/OfficiaJ Business 

14-Apr-12 

05-May- 12 

Auckland, New Zealand; Wellington, 
New Zealand; Christchurch, New 
Zealand; Melbourne, Australia; 

Canberra, Australia; Sydney, Australia; 
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Singapore, 
Singapore; Brisbane, Australia 

$17,395.80 

Bersin, Alan D 

Met^ings/Official Business 

07-May- 12 

09-May- 12 

Ottawa, Canada 

$1,514.21 

Bersin, Alan D 

Speech/Presentation 

n-Jun-12 

i5-Jun-12 

Montreal, Canada; Mexico City, 

Mexico 

$2,711.63 

Bersin, Alan D 

Program/Site Visit 

05-jun-12 

07-Jun-12 

Jacksonville, FL 

$1,063.01 

Bersin, Alan D 

Speech/Prestmtation 

20-Jun-12 

30-Jun-12 

Ottawa, Canada; San Diego, CA 

$2,151.31 


^ This trip crossed fiscal years and is the return trip from New York, NY. 


57 


218 



I'raveier 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Bersin, Alan D 

Accompany the Secretary 

10-Jul-I2 

13-Ju!-!2 

Brasilia, Brazil: Sao Paulo, Brazil: 

Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 

$1,037.59 

Bersin. Alan D 

Speech/Presentation 

22-Jul-I2 

26-Jui-12 

Aspen, CO; San Antonio, TX 

$1,876.09 

Bersin, Alan D 

Program/Site Visit 

I5-Aug-I2 

I9-Aug-12 

Tapachuia, Mexico; Tuxtla Gutierrez, 
Mexico; Mexico City, Mexico 

$1,974.37 

Bersin, Alan D 

Speech/Presentation 

23-Aug-i2 

26-Aug-12 

San Diego, CA 

$1,119.12 

Bersin, Alan D 

Program/Site Visit 

I4-Sep-I2 

19-Sep-12 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Kabul, 
Afghanistan 

$5,185.03 

Bersin, Alan D 

Speech/Presentation 

24-Sep-12 

28-Sep-12 

Copenhagen, Denmark 

$455.43 

Bersin, Alan D 

Accompany the Secretary 

11 -Sep- 12 

12-Sep-12 

New York, NY; Montreal, Canada 

$188.43 

Bersin, Alan D 

Accompany the Secretary 

29-Sep-12 

30-Sep-12 

San Diego, CA 

$1,084.84 

Bersin, Alan D 

Conference 

27-OCI-12 

IO-Nov-12 

Rome, Italy 

$5,634.47 

Bersin, Alan D 

Conference 

Ol-Oct-I2 

02-Oct-12 

San Diego, CA 

$710.32 

Bersin, Alan D 

Accompany the Secretary 

07-Oct-12 

I3-Oci-l,2 

Paris, France; Sofia, Bulgaria; Ankara, 
Turkey; Istanbul, Turkey 

$2,502.36 

Bersin, Alan D 

Speech/Presentation 

17-Oct-12 

22-OCI-12 

Tucson, AZ; San Diego, CA 

$1,876.08 

Bersin, Alan D 

Conference 

13-N0V-12 

t5-Nov-i2 

San Diego, CA; Oakland, CA 

$43.60 

Bersin, Alan D 

Accompany the Secretary 

1 2-Dec- 12 

14-Dec- 12 

New York, NY; Mexico City, Mexico 

$1,307.89 

Bersin, Alan D 

Speech/Presentation 

13-NOV-12 

I5-NOV-12 

San Diego, CA: San Francisco, CA 

$986.58 

Boogaard, Peter 

Accompany the Secretary 

30-Jan-12 

01 -Feb- 12 

Indianapolis, IN 

$466.04 

Boogaard, Peter 

Accompany the Secretary 

11 -Nov- 12 

I3-Nov~12 

New York, NY; Boston, MA 

$936.52 

Borras, Rafael 

Program/Site Visit 

24-Jan-12 

24-Jan-12 

Shepherdstown, WV 

$75.17 

Borras, Rafael 

Program/Site Visit 

27-Mar- 12 

Ol-Apr-12 

Seattle, WA; Astoria, OR; San 

Francisco, CA 

$2,985.89 

Borras, Rafael 

Speech/Presentation 

06-Jun-!2 

07-Jun-12 

Charlotte, NC 

$660.54 

Borras, Rafael 

Program/Site Visit 

12-Jun-12 

i4-Jun-12 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

$1,836.91 

Borras, Rafael 

Speech/Presentation 

18-Jun-!2 

20-Jun-12 

Jacksonville. FL; Glynco, GA 

$1,179.08 

Borras, Rafael 

Program/Site Visit 

12-Jui-12 

13-Jui-I2 

San Juan Puerto Rn.i> 

$687.39 


58 


219 




Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Deslinulion 

Total Cost 

Borras, Rafael 

Speech/Presenlation 

08-Aug-l2 

lO-Aug-12 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

$1,389.79 

Borras, Rafael 

Program/Site Visit 

23-Sep-!2 

26-Sep-12 

Kodiak, AK 

$635.97 

Borras, Rafael 

Program/Site Visit 

02-Oct~12 

02-0ct-12 

New London, CT 

$39.68 

Callahan, Mary Ellen 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

01-Feb-I2 

05-Feb-12 

San Francisco, CA; Los Angeles, CA 

$1,266.08 

Callahan, Mary Ellen 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

06-Feb-12 

08-Feb-!2 

Brussels, Belgium 

$2,697.41 

Callahan, Mary Ellen 

Accompany the Secretary 

02-Mar- 12 

02-Mar- 12 

Ottawa, Canada 

$123.93 

Callahan, Mary Ellen 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

20-Mar-I2 

22-Mar- 12 

San Francisco, CA 

$1,629.19 

Callahan, Mary Ellen 

Conference 

30-Apr-12 

01-May'12 

Charlottesville, VA 

$231.91 

Callahan, Mary Ellen 

Meetings/Official Business 

21-Jun-J2 

21-Jun-12 

Ottawa, Canada 

$1,191.33 

Carusone, Pia 

Program/Siie Visit 

13-Aug-12 

15-Aug-12 

Jacksonville, FL; Key West, FL 

$1,416.64 

Carusone. Pia 

Accompany the Secretary 

26-Aug-12 

27-Aug-12 

New York, NY 

$334.43 

Carusone, Pia 

Accompany the Secretary 

02-Scp-12 

02-Sep-I2 

New Orleans, LA 

$65,18 

Carusone, Pia 

Program/Site Visit 

20-Sep-12 

20-Sep-12 

Mount Weather, VA 

$79.65 

Carusone, Pia 

Program/Siie Visit 

lO-Ocl-12 

IO-Oct-12 

Dundalk, MD 

$68.55 

Catron, Marsha 

Speech/Presentation 

27-Sep-12 

28-Sep-12 

Madison, WI 

$668.50 

Chandler. Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

20-Jan-i2 

20-Jan-12 

Atlantic City, NJ 

$11.93 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

Ol-Feb-12 

03-Feb-12 

McAllen, TX 

$1,309.31 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

18-Feb-12 

21 -Feb- 1 2 

Phoenix, AZ; Tucson, AZ; McAllen, 

TX 

$621.72 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

27-Feb-i2 

29-Feb-12 

Mexico City, Mexico; Guatemala City, 
Guatemala; San Salvador, El Salvador; 
San Jose, Costa Rica; Panama City, 
Panama 

$554.45 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

03-Apr~12 

04-Apr-I2 

Phoenix, AZ 

$263.42 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

12-Api-12 

17-Apr-12 

Artesia, NM; Albuquerque, NM; Los 
Angeles, CA; Santa Barbara, CA; San 
Jose, CA 

$1,215.64 


59 


ozz 




Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

!7-May-12 

23-May-12 

Munich, Germany; Jerusalem, Israel; 

Tel Aviv, Israel; Amman, Jordan 

$2,850.34 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

03-Jun-12 

04-Jun-12 

New York, NY 

$398.58 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

20-/un-I2 

23-Jun-I2 

Copenhagen, Denmark, Paris, France; 
Brussels, Belgium 

$1,451.46 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

02-JuM2 

03-Jul-I2 

Denver, CO; Colorado Springs, CO; 
Boise, ID 

$244.93 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

10-JuM2 

13-Jui-12 

Brasilia, Brazil; Sao Paulo, Brazil; 

Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; 

San Juan. Puerto Rico 

$1,044.10 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

05-Aug-l2 

09-Aug-12 

Reno, NV; Anchorage, AK 

$1,559.29 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

02-Sep-I2 

02-Scp-12 

Bay St. Louis, MS 

$46.43 

Chandler. Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

lO-Sep-12 

i2-Sep-12 

Philadelphia, PA; New York, NY; 
Montreal. Canada 

$877.89 

Chandler, Matthew M 

Program/Sile Visit 

23-Sep-12 

25-Sep-]2 

New York, NY 

$647.09 

Chandler. Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

05 -Oct- 12 

05-Oct-12 

Sierra Vista, AZ 

$46.43 

Chandler. Matthew M 

Accompany the Secretary 

12-Dec- 12 

14-Dec- 12 

Nogales, AZ; Phoenix, AZ; Mexico 

City, Mexico 

$588.96 

Chuang, Theodore 

Conference 

17-Nov-ll 

20-Nov-] ! 

Atlanta, GA 

$1,287.37 

Chuang, Theodore 

Program/Sile Visit 

01 -Feb- 12 

02-Feb'12 

New Orleans, LA 

$871.47 

Chuang, Theodore 

Training; Eagle Horizon 
Exercise 

19-Jun-12 

I9-Jun-12 

Berryville, VA 

$99.91 

Chuang. Theodore 

Speech/Presentaiion 

20-Aug-!2 

20-Aug-12 

Chicago, IL 

$415.13 

Chuang, Theodore 

Program/Site Visit 

23-Sep-12 

25-Sep-12 

Tucson. AZ 

$1,434.62 

Colburn, Christopher 

Accompany the Secretary 

09-Mar- 12 

09-Mar-12 

New York, NY 

$199.19 

Colburn, Christopher 

Accompany the Secretary 

24-Jan-12 

26-Jan-]2 

Davos, Switzerland 

$1,095.43 

Contreras, January 

Speech/Presentation 

31-oct-n 

04-Nov-ll 

Phoenix. AZ; Tucson, AZ 

$1,380.60 

Contreras, January 

Speech/Presentation 

I8-Jan-12 

J9-Jan-i2 

Los Angeles, CA: San Jose, CA 

$1,267.29 

Contreras, January 

Conference 

21-Jan-12 

2 1 -Jan- 12 

San Jose, CA 

$144.78 

Contreras, January 

Program/Site Visit 

08-Feb-12 

U-Feb-12 

Cincinnati, OH; Cleveland, OH 

$1,181.21 

Contreras, January 

Speech/Presentation 

15-Feb-12 

i6-Feb-12 

Albuquerque, NM 

$708.58 

Dao, Jacklyn 

Advanced the Secretary 

n-Jul-J2 

14-jul-I2 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

$1,705.68 

Dao, Jacklyn 

Advanced the Secretary 

03-Oct-12 

ll-Oct-12 

Sofia, Bulgaria 

$3,850.09 

Dao, Jacklyn 

Advanced the Secret^ 

02-NOV-12 

03-NOV-12 

Charleston, WV 

$783.73 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

13-Jan-12 

14-Jan-i2 

Copenhagen, Denmark 

$3,287.85 


60 


IZZ 







Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

06-Feb-12 

08-Feb-12 

London, United Kingdom; Brussels, 
Belgium 

52,645.75 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

Ol-Feb-12 

03-Feb-12 

San Francisco, CA 

$981.83 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

20-Mar- 12 

22-Mar- 12 

San Francisco, CA 

$817.54 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

i7-Apr-12 

26-Apr-12 

Tunis, Tunisia; New Delhi, India; 

Tokyo City, Japan; Tbilisi, Georgia; 
Luxembourg 

$3,826.10 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

07-May- 12 

09-May- 12 

London, United Kingdom 

$2,483.87 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

02-May- 12 

03~May-12 

New York, NY 

$590.30 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

10-Jun-I2 

12-Jiin-12 

New York, NY 

$919.11 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

l5-Jul-!2 

I9-Jul-12 

London, United Kingdom; Rome. Italy; 
Brussels, Belgium 

$5,510.48 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

08-Aug-12 

09-Aug-I2 

San Francisco, CA 

$910.42 

De Vallance. Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

08-Sep-!2 

16-Sep-12 

Beijing, China; Shanghai, China; Hong 
Kong, Hong Kong 

$5,927.41 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

30-Sep-I2 

30-Sep-12 

Munich, Germany 

$532,51 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

01 -Oct- 12 

02-Oct-12 

Munich, Germany 

$679.98 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

n-Oct-12 

n -Oct- 12 

Provo, UT; Salt Lake City, UT 

$429.48 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

ll-Oct-12 

li-Oct-12 

Provo, UT; Salt Lake City, UT 

$34.26 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

14-Oct-12 

16-OcM2 

New York, NY 

$873.45 

De Vallance, Brian M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

12-Dec-12 

I4-DCC-12 

New York, NY 

$895.45 

Decker, Danielle 

Conference 

2i-May-i2 

24-May- 12 

Columbus, OH 

$896.04 

Decker, Danielle 

Program/Site Visit 

22-Aug-12 

27-Aug-12 

San Diego, CA 

$1,378.86 

Decker, Danielle 

Program/Site Visit 

I8-Sep-12 

19-Sep-12 

Minneapolis, MN 

$857.65 

Degroff, Amanda 

Meetings/Official Business 

12-Nov-!2 

30-NOV-I2 

New York, NY 

$4,462.39 

Fong, Ivan K 

Conference 

19-Mar-12 

19-Mar-12 

Charleston, SC 

$34.26 


61 


zzz 




Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

mmsiiEim 


Destination 


Fong, Ivan K 

Program/Site Visit 





Fong, Ivan K 

Training; Eagle Horizon 
Exercise 



Berryville, VA 


Fong, Ivan K 

Training 



Uniontown, PA 


Fong, Ivan K 

Conference 



Brunswick, GA 


Gross-Davis, Leslie M 

Program/Site Visit 

25-Sep-12 


San Diego, CA; Seattle, WA 


Gross-Davis, Leslie M 

Program/Site Vi.sit 

21 -Sep- I 2 

21 -Sep- 12 

New York, NY 


Grossman, Seth 

Conference 

12-Jan-I2 

t3-Jan-12 



Grossman, Seth 

Program/Site Visit 


23-Feb-l2 



Grossman, Seth 

Program/Site Visit 


01 -Apr- 1 2 

Boston, MA 


Grossman, Seth 

Program/Site Visit 

21 -May- 12 

22-May- 12 

Los Angeles, CA 


Grossman, Seth 

Accompany the Secretary 

14-Jun'I2 

16-Jun-12 



Grossman. Seth 

Program/Site Visit 

I2-Sep-I2 

13-Sep-12 

Atlanta, GA 


Grossman, Seth 

1 IPIII 

27-Sep-12 

27-Sep-l2 



Grossman, Seth 


18-Sep-12 

19-Sep-12 

Sacramento, CA 

■HKE9I 


Conference 






Advanced the Secretary 

23-Feb-12 

28-Feb-12 

Guatemala City, Guatemala 

$2,202.25 



16-Mav-12 

24'Mav-12 

Amman, Jordan 

$4,479.54 

Guliani, Neema S 

Program/Site Visit 

IO-Jun-12 

13-Jun-I2 

Natchez, MS 

$1,747.01 

Guliani, Neema S 

Program/Site Visit 

20-Sep-12 

21 -Sep- 12 

Kansas City, MO 

$1,070.22 

Hadziselimovic. Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

I9-Jan-12 

26-Jan-12 

Davos, Switzerland 

$3,817.67 

Hadziseiimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

!9-Jan-12 

26-Jan-12 

Davos, Switzerland 

$955.01 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

16-Feb-I2 

28-Feb-12 

McAllen, TX; Guatemala City, 

Guatemala 

$4,598,04 

Hadziseiimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

lO'Apr-12 

17-Apr-12 

Roswell, NM; Albuquerque, NM; Los 
Angeles, CA 

$2,017.00 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

28-Apr-!2 

06-May- 12 

Brisbane, Australia 

S6. 158.72 

Hadziseiimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

ll-May-!2 

12-May-12 

New Orleans, LA 

S762.44 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

16-May- 12 

24-May- 12 

Amman, Jordan 

$4,376.93 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

17-iun-12 

24-Jun-12 

Paris. France 

$4,612.62 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

Ol-Jul-12 

03-Jul-12 

Denver, CO 

Si, 132.03 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

05-Jul-12 

!3-Jul-12 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 

$4,786.45 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advmiced the St^relary 

04-Aug-12 

07-Aug-i2 

Kodiak, AK 

$2,138.66 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

06-Sep-12 

I2-Sep-12 

New London, CT; Montreal, Canada 

$3,634.93 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

04-0ct-12 

14-Oct-12 

Ankara, Turkey; Istanbul, Turkey 

$3,828.52 


62 


223 





Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Beg^n Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

02-NOV-I2 

06-NOV-12 

Islip, MY 

$1,556.58 

Hadziselimovic, Dina 

Advanced the Secretary 

07-Dec-12 

08-Dec- 12 

Los Angeles, CA 

$692.37 

Hake. Davis 

Program/Sile Visit 

26-Sep-12 

28-Sep-l2 

Idaho Falls, ID 

$1,247.07 

Harper, Daniel J 

Program/Site Visit 

I7-Jan-12 

20-Jan-12 

Glynco, GA 

$820.02 

Harper, Daniel J 

Training; Eagle Horizon 
Exercise 

19-Jun-12 

20-Jun-12 

Winchester, VA 

$124.93 

Harper, Daniel J 

Conference 

20-Jul-i2 

25-Jul-12 

Reno, NV 

$1,698.99 

Harper, Daniel J 

Program/Site Visit 

04'Nov-i2 

I8-N0V-I2 

New York, NY 

$4,831.64 

Hartman, Katrina 

Advanced the Secretary 

03-Oct-12 

1 1 -Oct- 12 

Lyon, France; Paris, France 

$3,424.75 

Hartman, Katrina 

Program/Site Visit 

05-Jun-12 

07-Jun-12 

Brunswick, GA 

$1,095.51 

Hartman, Katrina 

Advanced the Secretary 

18-Jun-12 

24-Jun-12 

Brussels, Belgium 

$4,089.90 

Heyman, David 

Program/Site Visit 

22-jan-12 

23-Jan-12 

Ottawa. Canada 

$1,334.29 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Secretary 

23-Jan-l2 

26-Jan-12 

Davos, Switzerland 

$1,513.13 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

31-Jan-]2 

03-Feb-]2 

San Francisco, CA 

$1,982.82 

Heyman, David 

Speech/Presentation 

09-Fcb-l2 

!0-Feb-12 

Seattle, WA 

$1,800.97 

Heyman, David 

Program/Site Visit 

19-Feb-12 

29-Feb-12 

Tokyo City, Japan; Bangkok, Thailand: 
Beijing. China; Shanghai. China 

$9,033.86 

Heyman, David 

Conference 

01 -Apr- 12 

06'Apr-12 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Abu 
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 

$1,094.76 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

17-Apr-12 

24-Apr-12 

Tunis, Tunisia; New Delhi, India; 

Tokyo City. Japan 

$4,225.26 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

30-Apr-12 

03-May- 12 

Charlottesville, VA; New York, NY 

$1,457.98 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

07-May- 12 

09-May-12 

London, United Kingdom 

$2,616.17 

Heyman. David 

Meetings/Official Business 

24-May-I2 

24-May- 12 

Toronto, Canada 

$1,207.53 

Heyman, David 

Program/Site Visit 

04-Jut-12 

05-Jul-l2 

New York- NY 

$783.92 

Heyman, David 

Speech/Presentation 

30-May- 12 

31 -May- 1 2 

Ottawa, Canada 

$1,375.87 

Heyman, David 

Meeting/OfficiaJ Business 

04-Jun-12 

09-Jun-12 

Ankara, Turkey: Istanbul, Turkey 

$3,576.19 

Heyman, David 

Speech/Presentation 

16-iun-]2 

24-Jun-l2 

San Francisco, CA: Los Angeles, CA 

$1,140.73 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

22-Jui~I2 

29-Jul-12 

Aspen, CO 

$4,380.22 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

08-Sep-I2 

15-Sep-!2 

Beijing, China; Nanjing, China; 

Shanghai, China: Hong Kong, Hong 
Rons 

$5,464.13 

Heyman, David 

Program/Site Visit 

27-Aug-l2 

30-Aug-12 

Miami, FL; Key West, FL; Guantanamo 

.$43.60 


63 


fZZ 



Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 





Bay, Cuba; Miami, FL 


Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

30-Sep-12 

30-Sep-12 

Munich. Germany 

S664.81 

Heyman, David 

Meetings/Official Business 

IO-OcM2 

11 -Oct- 12 

Key West, FL; Miami, FL 

$1,719.06 

Heyman, David 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

OI-Oct-12 

02-Oct-I2 

Munich, Germany 

S735.31 

Heyman, David 

Conference 

07-Nov*12 

O 8 -N 0 V-I 2 

Colorado Springs, CO 

S9.34 

Heyman, David 

Conference 

19-NOV-12 

2 O-N 0 V-I 2 

Halifax, Canada 

$432.13 

Heyman, David 

Conference 

Ii-Dec-12 

13-Dec- 12 

Brussels, Belgium; Abu Dhabi, United 
Arab Emirates 

$6,644.14 

Hill. Alice 

Program/Site Visit 

23-Jaii-12 

25 -Jan- 12 

Houston, TX; Brownsville, TX 

$1,695.69 

Hill, Alice 

Accompany the Secretary 

20-Jan-12 

20 -Jan-i 2 

Atlanta, GA; Islip, NY 

$46.19 

Hill. Alice 

Speech/Presentation 

08-Mar- 12 

09-Mar-12 

Scottsdale, AZ 

$1,026.46 

Hill, Alice 

Speech/Presentaiion 

29-Mar- 12 

30-Mar- 12 

Seattle, WA 

$866.42 

Hill. Alice 

Speech/Presentation 

19-Apr-I2 

21 -Apr- 12 

Los Angeles, CA 

$763.85 

Hill, Alice 

Conference 

12-Apr-I2 

i3-Apr-i2 

Lexington, VA 

$481.42 

Hill, Alice 

Program/Site Visit 

04-Jun-I2 

06-Jun-32 

Colorado Springs, CO 

$9,34 

Hill, Alice 

Speech/Preseniation 

I9-Jun-12 

22-Jun-!2 

Cambridge. MA; New Orleans. LA 

$1,401.67 

Hill. Alice 

Program/Siie Visit 

30-Jul-12 

01-Aug-i2 

Atlanta, GA; Brunswick, GA 

$1,164.65 

Hill, Alice 

Program/Site Visit 

29-Aug-12 

3I-Aue-12 

Denver. CO 

$1,526.53 

Hill, Alice 

Speech/Presentation 

12-Sep-12 

13-Sep-12 

Jacksonville, FL 

$435.85 

Hill, Alice 

Conference 

23-Oct-12 

27-Oct-12 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 

$3,098,09 

Hill, Alice 

Speech/Preseniation 

I5-NOV-12 

I 7 -N 0 V-I 2 

Los Angeles, CA 

$1,171.06 

Hill, Alice 

Speech/Presentaiion 

06-Dec- 12 

0?-Dec-l2 

Jupiter. FL 

$626.66 

Hoelzle, Jennifer 

Meetings/Official Business 

27-Jan-!2 

30-Jan-12 

Tampa. FL 

$701.07 

Hoelzle, Jennifer 

Meetings/Official Business 

19-Jan-12 

22 -Jan-l 2 

San Jose, CA; San Francisco, CA 

$1,467.33 

Hoelzle, Jennifer 

Speech/Preseniation 

17-Mav-I2 

I8-May-12 

Houston, TX 

$1,001.92 

Hoelzle, Jennifer 

Program/Site Visit 

lO-Jun-12 

13-Jun-12 

Brunswick, GA 

$1,324.29 

Hoelzle, Jennifer 

Conference 

I7-Jul-12 

22-Jul-]2 

Chicago, IL 

$917.01 

Hoelzle, Jennifer 

Meetings/Official Business 

lO-Jut-12 

15-Jul-12 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

$1,978.99 

Joseph, Leonard 

Program/Site Visit 

19-Mar- 12 

22-Mar- 12 

Alexandria, LA; Port-Au-Princc, Haiti 

$2,026.79 

Kielsmeier, Lauren 

Program/Site Visit 

15-Feb-I2 

16-Feb-12 

Miami. FL 

$1,121.63 

Kielsmeier, Lauren 

Program/Site Visit 

24- Feb-12 

24-Feb-12 

Long Island City, NY 

$9.34 

Kielsmeier, Lauren 

Conference 

12-Dec-12 

13-Dec- 12 

Madison, W1 

$890.74 

Kroloff, Noah 

Meetings/Offieial Business 

Ol-Feb-12 

03-Feb-12 

McAllen, TX 

$9.34 


64 


225 



Traveler 

Purptffie of Travel 

I^gin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Kroioff, Noah 

Accompany the S^retary 

25-Mar-12 

28-Mar- 12 

Phoenix, AZ; Mexico City, Mexico 


Kroloff, Noah 

Meetings/Official Business 

29-Apr-i2 

01-Mav-12 

Corpus Christi, TX; McAllen, TX 


Kroioff, Noah 

Accompany the Secretary 

17-May- 12 

23-May-12 

Munich, Germany; Jerusalem, Israel; 
Amman, Jordan 


Kroioff, Noah 

Accompany the Secretary 

03-Jun-l2 

05-Jun-12 

New York, NY 


Kroioff, Noah 

Program/Site Visit 

05-Sep-!2 

07-Sep-12 

Corpus Christi, TX 


Kroioff, Noah 

Accompany the S«:retary 

iO-Sep-12 

12-Sep-12 

New York. NY; Montreal, Canada 


Kroioff, Noah 

Accompany the Secretary 

23-Sep-l2 

25-Sep-12 

New York, NY 


Kroioff, Noah 

Meetings/Official Business 

12-N0V-I2 

I4-N0V-I2 

McAllen, TX 


Kroioff, Noah 

Accompany the Secretary 

I2-Dec-I2 

14-Dec- 12 

Phoenix, AZ; Mexico City, Mexico 


Kuban, Sara A 

Accompany the Secretary 

31-Jan-i2 

Oi-Feb-12 

Indianapolis, IN 


Kuban, Sara A 

Meeiings/Official Business 

16-Mar-12 

16-Mar-12 

New York, NY 


Kuban, Sara A 

Conference 

29-Mar-12 

03-Apr-]2 

Phoenix, AZ 


Kuban. Sara A 

Accompany the Secretary 

26-Aug-I2 

27-Aug-12 

New York. NY 


Lee, Jennifer 

Conference 

I7-Sep-12 

20-.SCP-12 

Tampa, FL 


Lopez, Alfonso 

Program/Site Visit 

O8-N0V-I2 

24-N0V-I2 

New York. NY 


Lute, Jane H 

Conference 

13-Jan-]2 

!4-Jan-12 

Copenhagen. Denmark 


Lute, Jane H 

Meetings/Official Business 

06-Feb-12 

08-Feb-]2 

London, United Kingdom; Brussels, 
Belgium 


Lute. Jane H 

Mcetings/Official Business 

01 -Feb- 12 

03-Feb-]2 

San Francisco, CA 

$885,83 

Lute. Jane H 

Meetings/Ofllcial Business 

20-Mar- 12 

22-Mar- 12 

San Francisco, CA 

$767.54 

Lute, Jane H 

Meeiings/Official Business 

t7-Apr-12 

26-Apr-12 

Tunis, Tunisia; New Delhi, India; 

Tokyo City, Japan; Tbilisi, Georgia; 
Luxembourg 


Lute, Jane H 

Meetings/OfliciaJ Business 

07-May- 12 

09-May-12 

London, United Kingdom 


Lute, Jane H 

Meetings/Official Business 

02-May- 1 2 

03-Mav-12 

New York, NY 


Lute. Jane H 

Meetings/Official Business 

22-Jul-12 

31-Jui-12 

Denver. CO; Aspen, CO 


Lute, Jane H 

Meeiings/Official Business 

lO-Jun-12 

12-Jun-]2 

New York. NY 


Lute, Jane H 

Meetings/Official Business 

15-Jul-I2 

19-Jul-]2 

London, United Kingdom; Rome, Italy; 
Brussels, Belgium 


Lute, Jane H 

Meeiings/Official Business 

08-Aug~12 

09-Aug-12 

San Francisco, CA 


Lute. Jane H 

Program/Sile Visit 

08-Sep-I2 

!6-Sep-]2 

Beijing, China; Shanghai, China; Hong 
Kong, Hong Kong 


Lute, Jane H 

Program/Site Visit 

08-Sep-i2 

16-Sep-i2 

Beijing, China; Shanghai, China; Hong 
Kong, Hong Kong 



65 


226 




Traveler 

I^irpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Lute, Jane H 

Meetings/Oftlcial Business 

30-Sep-!2 

30-Sep-12 

Munich, Germany 

S5 10.51 

Lute, Jane H 

Meelings/Official Business 

01-C)ct-12 

02-0ct-12 

Munich, Germany 

S680.98 

Lute. Jane H 

Speech/Presentation 

1 l-OcM2 

ll-Oct-j2 

Provo, UT; Salt Lake City, UT 

S429.48 

Lute, Jane H 

Speech/Presentation 

I4-Oct-12 

l6-Oct-l2 

New York, NY 

$883.95 

Lute, Jane H 

Meetings/Official Business 

12-Dec- 12 

14-Dec-12 

New York, NY 

$873.45 

Markey, Betsy 

Program/Site Visit 

19-Jan-12 

24-Jan-12 

San Jose. CA: Las Vegas, NV 

$1,660.28 

Markey, Betsy 

Speech/Presentation 

29-Jan-12 

30-Jan-12 

Tampa. FL 

$737.61 

Markey. Betsy 

Speech/Preseniation 

23-Mar- 12 

24-Mar-12 

Milwaukee, W1 

$556.52 

Markey, Betsy 

Speech/Preseniation 

l7-Mav-!2 

18-Mav-12 

Houston, TX 

$1,435.12 

Markey, Betsy 

Program/Siie Visit 

11 -May- 12 

1 4-May- 12 

San Francisco, CA 

$88.18 

Markey. Betsy 

Speech/Prescniation 

20-Mav-12 

2!-Mav-12 

Charlotte, NC 

$585.66 

Markey, Betsy 

Speech/Presentation 

20-Jun-12 

22-Jun-12 

Seattle, WA 

$1,045.11 

Markey, Betsy 

Conference 

13-Jun-12 

15-Jun-12 

Orlando, FL 

$885.10 

Markey, Betsy 

Program/Siie Visit 

03-Jun-l2 

04-Jun-12 

Albany. NY 

$9.34 

Markey, Betsy 

Meetings/Official Business 

17-Jul-12 

19-Jul-12 

Chicago, IL 

,$919.35 

Markey, Betsy 

Meeiings/OfticiaJ Business 

ll-Jul-!2 

13-Jul-]2 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

$1,171.13 

Markey, Betsy 

Accompany the Secretary 

14-Jul-I2 

15-JuM2 

Williamsburg, VA 

$218.90 

Markey. Betsy 

Program/Siie Visit 

22-Aug-12 

24-Aug-12 

San Diego, CA 

$1,399.99 

Markey, Betsy 

Program/Site Visit 

18-Sep-12 

]9-Sep-12 

Minneapolis, MN 

$929.78 

Markey, Betsy 

Speech/Presentation 

27-Sep-12 

28-Sep-]2 

Madi.son, Wf 

$607.04 

Markey. Betsy 

Speech/Presentation 

t6-Oct-I2 

17-Oct-l2 

Salt Lake City, UT 

$847.87 

McCullough, Brianna 

Advanced the Secretary 

24-Feb-12 

28-Feb-12 

Mexico City, Mexico 

$2,186.65 

McCullough. Brianna 

Advanced the Secretary 

05-Jul-i2 

I3-Jul-12 

Sao Paulo. Brazil 

$4,728.94 

McCullough. Brianna 

Advanced the Secretary 

04-Oct-I2 

06-Oct-12 

Tucson, AZ 

$886.37 

McCullough, Brianna 

Advanced the Secretary 

31-Oct-l2 

04-NOV-I2 

Hartford, CT; Staten Island, NY; 
Hoboken, NJ 

$1,908.62 

McCullough, Brianna 

Advanced the Secretary 

I5-NOV-12 

16-NOV-12 

Newark, NJ 

$1,224.71 

McCullough, Brianna 

Advanced the Secretary 

09-Dec-I2 

15 -Dec- 12 

Mexico City, Mexico 

$2,801.80 

McNamara, Philip A 

Speech/Presentation 

12-Jan-I2 

i3-Jan-12 

Pittsburgh. PA 

$1,428.03 

McNamara, Philip A 

Program/Site Visit 

24-Apr-i2 

27-Apr-l2 

Los Angeles, CA; San Diego, CA 

$1,435.01 

McNamara, Philip A 

Accompany the S«;retary 

20-Jun-!2 

23-Jun-12 

Copenhagen, Denmark; Paris, France; 
Brussels, Belgium 

$1,414.31 


66 





Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Be^ Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

McNamara, Philip A 

Conference 

31 -Oct-12 

3 i -Oct- 12 

Baltimore. MD 

$48.93 

McNamara, Philip A 

Program/Site Visit 

26-Sep-!2 

28-Sep-12 

Idaho Falls, ID 

$1,374.01 

McNamara, Philip A 

Program/Site Visit 

22.0ct-l2 

24-Oct-12 

Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Miami. FL 

$883.74 

Napolitano. Janet A 

Speech/Presentation 

23-Jan-I2 

26-Jan-12 

Davos, Switzerland 

$507.18 

Napoiitano, Janet A 

Program/Site Visit 

18-Feb-12 

21 -Feb- 12 

Scottsdale, AZ; Tucson, AZ; McAllen, 
TX 

$86.93 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Meetings/Official Business 

27-Feb-l2 

29-Feb-12 

Mexico City, Mexico; Guatemala City, 
Guatemala: San Salvador, El Salvador; 
San Jose, Costa Rica; Panama City, 
Panama 

$96.93 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Specch/Presentation 

03-Apr-12 

04-Apr-12 

Phoenix, AZ 

$70.18 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Speech/Presentation 

12-Apr-12 

17-Apr-12 

Artesia, NM; Albuquerque, NM; San 
Jose, CA; Los Angeles, CA 

$85.18 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Speech/Presentaiion 

30-Apr-I2 

06-May- 1 2 

Honolulu, HI; Wellington, New 

Zealand; Canberra, Australia; Brisbane, 
Australia 

$ 444.43 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Specch/Presentation 

03-Jun-12 

04-Jun-12 

New York, NY 

$70.18 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Speech/Presentaiion 

I7-May-12 

23-May-i2 

Munich, Germany; Tel Aviv, Israel; 
Jerusalem, Israel; Tel Aviv, Israel; 
Amman, Jordan 

$546.43 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Conference 

20-Jun-12 

23-Jun-]2 

Copenhagen, Denmark; Paris, France; 
Bru.ssels. Belgium 

$355,18 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Program/Site Visit 

02-Jul-12 

03-Jul-i2 

Denver, CO; Colorado Springs, CO; 
Boise, ID; Des Moines, lA 

$ 99.68 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Speech/Presentation 

10-Jubl2 

I3-JU1-I2 

Brasilia, Brazil; Sao Paulo, Brazil; 

Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; 

San Juan. Puerto Rico 

$420.93 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Program/Site Visit 

30-Jul-12 

09-Aug-12 

Reno, NV ; Anchorage, AK 

$163.93 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Speech/Presentation 

26-Aug-I2 

27-Aug-12 

New York. NA 

$40.18 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Program/Site Visit 

02-Sep-12 

02-Sep-I2 

Bay St. Louis, MS; Slidell, LA 

$11.93 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Speech/Presentation 

10-Sep-i2 

i2-Sep-12 

Philadelphia, PA; New York, NY; 
Montreal, Canada 

$81.18 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Speech/Presentation 

07~Oct-12 

13-Oct-12 

Paris, France; Lyon. France; Paris, 

France; Sofia, Bulgaria; Ankara, 

Turkey; Istanbul, Turkey 

$555.43 

Napolitano, Janet A 

S peech/Presentation 

29-Oct-12 

30-Oc(-]2 

New York, NY 

$34.26 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Program/Site Visit 

J5-NOV-12 

I 6 -N 0 V-I 2 

New York, NY 

$118.43 

Napolitano, Janet A 

Program/Sile Visit 

11 -Nov- 12 

I 3 -N 0 V-I 2 

New York, NY; Boston, MA 

$189.43 


67 


228 



Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

Napoiitano, Janet A 

Meetings/Official Business 

I 9 -N 0 V-I 2 

21 -Nov- 12 

London, United Kingdom 

$335.93 

Napoiitano, Janet A 

Meetings/Official Business 

12-Dec-12 

i4-Dec-i2 

Nogales, AZ; Scottsdale, AZ; Mexico 
City, Mexico 

$105.43 

Nosanchuk, Matt 

Conference 

10-Sep^l2 

13-Sep-12 

Brunswick, GA; Glynco, GA 

SL602.68 

Oiavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

iO-Jan-12 

il~Jan-12 

Orlando, FL 

$9.34 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

03-Feb-12 

03-Feb-]2 

Tampa, FL 

$442.87 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

09-Feb-12 

1 t -Feb- 12 

Atlanta, GA 

$748.15 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

I6~Mar-12 

17-Mar- 12 

Raleigh, NC 

$1,057.73 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

26-Mar- 12 

28-Mar-! 2 

San Jo,se, Costa Rica 

$1,743.47 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

04-Apr-!2 

06-Apr-12 

Los Angeles, CA 

$1,660.28 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

26-Apr-12 

26-Apr-12 

Orlando, FL 

$312.13 

Olavarria. Esther M 

Meetings/Official Business 

!5-Mav-12 

18-May-!2 

Washington, DC 

$950.37 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Meelings/Official Business 

05-Jun-12 

07-Jun-12 

Washington, DC 

$1,091.70 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Meetings/Official Business 

17-Jun-12 

I8-Jun-I2 

Washington, DC 

$ 755.43 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Meetings/Official Business 

I2-Jul-12 

13-Jul-i2 

Washington, DC 

$791.63 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Conference 

18-Jul-I2 

18-JU1-12 

Washington, DC 

$620.37 

Olavarria, Esther M 

Program/Siie Visit 

17-Sep-12 

22-Scp-12 

San Salvador, El Salvador; Tegucigalpa, 
Honduras; Guatemala City, Guatemala 

$2,809.54 



04-Dec- 12 

04-Dec- 12 



Olavarria. Esther M 


20- Dec-12 

20-Dec- 12 

New York, NY 

$470.19 

Page, Abigail A 

Advanced the Secretary 

26-Feb-12 

02-Mar-12 

Panama City, Panama 

$2,512.33 

Page, Abigail A 

Advanced the Secretary 

24-Mar- 12 

26-Mar-12 

Phoenix, AZ 

$777,52 

Page, Abigail A 

Advanced the Secretary 

31 -May- 12 

04-Jun-12 

New York. NY 

$1,247,72 

Page, Abigail A 

Advanced the Secretary 

1 i-Jul-I2 

14-Jul-i2 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

$1,788,68 

Page, Abigail A 

Advanced the Secretary 

27-Sep-l2 

30-Sep-l2 

San Diego. CA 

$841.67 

Page. Abigail A 

Advanced the Secretary 

07-Oct-12 

l4-Oct-l2 

l.stanbul, Turkey 

$4,412.62 

Page, Abigail A 

Advanced the Secretary 

O 8 -N 0 V-I 2 

12 -N 0 V-I 2 

New York, NY 

$1,330.69 

Parker, Jalvnda 

Training 

I3-Aug-12 

14-Aug-12 

Atlanta, GA 

$683.20 

Parker, Jalynda 

Training 

25-Sep-!2 

27-Sep-12 

Salt Lake City, UT 

$1,093.03 

Peacock, Nelson 

Program/Site Visit 

28-Mav-12 

Ol-Jun-12 

Mission Viejo, CA: San Diego, CA 

$269.36 

Peacock, Nelson 

Accompany the Secretary 

05-Aug-12 

09-Aug-12 

Reno, NV; Kodiak, AK; Anchorage, 

AK 

$1,885.62 

Peacock, Nelson 

Program/Site Visit 

26-Sep-12 

28-Sep-12 

Idaho Fails, UT 

$1,337.01 

Peacock. Nelson 

Program/Site Visit 

22-Oct-12 

24-Oct-l2 

Ft, Lauderdale, FL; Miami, FL 

$925.44 

Pressman. David J 

Meetings/Official Business 

13-Jan-12 

15-Jan-]2 

Copenhagen, Denmark 

$3,188.98 

Pressman. David J 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

Ol-Feb-12 

05-Feb-12 

San Francisco, CA 

$1,399.17 


68 


229 




Traveler 




Destination 


Pressman, David J 




San Francisco, CA 


Pressman, David J 




San Francisco, CA 



Program/Site Visit 



Tunis, Tunisia; New Delhi, India 

$3,343.55 


Meetings/Offieial Business 

I3-Mav-12 





Meetings/Official Business 

13-Mav-12 

!4-Mav-12 



Pressman, David J 




Montgomery, AL; Birmingham, AL 


Pressman, David J 

Conference 

29-Jun-I2 

ll-Jul-I2 

Madrid, Spain 


Pressman, David J 


20-Sep-!2 

21-Sep-12 

Kansas City, MO 

■■mBSi 


Conference 

13-Oct-l2 

21 -Oct- 12 

Yangon, Myanmar 



Conference 


■■nsssEi 

Las Vegas, NV 



Conference 


17-Feb-12 









Ouijas, Louis F 

Meelings/Official Business 

mm/asssnsa 




Ouijas, Louis F 

Program/Site Visit 

17-Apr-12 

^^MRTS!9l!a 


—riTm 1 ■ 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Program/Site Visit 


13-Apr-12 




Speech/Preseniation 

28-May- 12 

3t-MaV'12 

Dallas, TX; Glynco, GA 

$1,839.28 



07-Mav-I2 

lO-Mav-12 

San Antonio, TX 

$1,168.75 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Conference 

13-Jun-12 

23-Jun-12 

Nashville, TN 

$2,416.44 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Conference 

27-Jun-J2 

01-Jui-t2 

Dallas, TX 

$1,457.57 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Program/Site Visit 

10-Jun-i2 

H-Jun-12 

New York. NY 

$759.40 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Program/Site Visit 

03-Jul-I2 

06-;ul-l2 

Philadelphia, PA; New York, NY 

$1,139.80 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Spcech/Preseniation 

21-Ju!-I2 

24-jul-12 

Little Rock, AR 

$1,099.24 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Meetings/Official Business 

iO-Aug-12 

11 -Aug- 12 

Charlotte, NC 

$959.66 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Program/Site Visit 

I3-AUE-12 

14-Aug-12 

Birmingham. AL 

$1,178.0! 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Speech/Presentation 

17-Sep-12 

19-Sep-I2 

Las Vegas, NV 

$1,552.27 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Speech/Preseniation 

lO-Sep-12 

11 -Sep- 12 

Ocean City. MD 

$479.06 

Ouijas. Louis F 

Speech/Presentation 

27-Sep-12 

30-Sep-I2 

San Diego, CA 

$2,057.96 

Ouijas, Louis F 

S peech/Presentation 

08-Oct-12 

lO-Oct-12 

Long Beach, CA 

$1,422.37 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Speech/Presentalion 

01 -Oct- 12 

03~0ct-l2 

San Diego, CA 

$1,562.14 

Ouijas, Louis F 

Speech/Preseniation 

ll-Dec-i2 

14-Dec- 1 2 

Kansas City, MO 

$1,862.18 

Ramanathan, Subhasri 

Program/Site Visit 

25-NOV-12 

28-NOV-12 

Pasco, WA 

$9.34 

Ramanathan, Sue 

Program/Site Visit 

24-Apr'i2 

27-Apr-12 

Los Angeles, CA; San Diego, CA 

$9.34 

Ramanathan, Sue 

Program/Site Visit 

lO-Jun-12 

13-Jun-I2 

New Orleans, LA; Houston, TX 

$9.34 

Ramanathan, Sue 

Program/Site Visit 

25-Jui-I2 

27-Ju!-l2 

Newark, NJ; Boston, MA 

$1,179.22 

Ramanathan, Sue 

Program/Site Visit 

11 -Aug-12 

18-Aug-12 

Seattle, WA; Kodiak, AK; Valdez, AK; 

$3,850.63 


69 


230 








Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Be^ Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 





Anchorage, AK 


Ramanathan, Sue 

Program/Site Visit 

10-Sep*12 

12-Sep-12 

Houston, TX 

SL044.19 

Ramanathan, Sue 

Program/Sile Visit 

OI-Oct-12 

02-Oct-12 

Philadelphia, PA 

$365.93 

Saad, Fayrouz 

Conference 

05-oct-n 

08-Oct-U 

Detroit, MI 

S914.19 

Sandweg, John R 

Program/Site Visit 

27-Sep-12 

30-Sep-12 

Idaho Falls, ID; Bozeman, MT 

$1,778.76 

Sandweg, John R 

Speech/Presentation 

I8-Sep-12 

19-Sep-12 

Sacramento, CA 

$1,114.83 

Sandweg, John R 

Meelings/Official Business 

21-Dec-n 

01 -Jan- 12 

Corpus Christi, TX; Phoenix, AZ 

$1,575.49 

Sandweg, John R 

Conference 

I2-Jan-12 

15~Ja£i-i2 

Salt Lake City, UT; Phoenix, AZ 

SL225.79 

Sandweg, John R 

Accompany the Secretary 

18-Feb-12 

21 -Feb- 12 

San Diego, CA; Phoenix, AZ 

$391.69 

Sandweg, John R 

Conference 

19-Mar- 12 

23-Mar- 12 

Frankfurt Am Main, Germany; 

Stuttgart, Germany; Berlin, Germany 

$74.22 

Sandweg, John R 

Accompany the Secretary 

23-Mar- 12 

28-Mar- 12 

Phoenix. AZ; Mexico City, Mexico 

$2,640.99 

Sandweg, John R 

Meetings/Official Business 

20-May- 12 

22-Mav-i2 

Los Angeles, CA 

$1,244.85 

Sandweg, John R 

Conference 

14-Jun-12 

14-Jun-12 

Boston, MA 

$9,34 

Sandweg, John R 

Meetings/OfFicial Business 

22-iun-i2 

26-Jun-]2 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates 

$9.34 

Sandweg, John R 

Meecings/Official Business 

I4-Jul-12 

18-JU1-12 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates 

$9.34 

Sandweg. John R 

Meclings/Official Business 

28-JU1-12 

02-Aug-12 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates 

$6,807.34 

Sandweg, John R 

Program/Site Visit 

04-Aug-12 

12-Aug-12 

Phoenix, AZ; Los Angeles, CA; 

Phoenix, AZ 

$2,541.23 

Sandweg, John R 

Accompany the Secretary 

05-OCI-12 

08-Oct-12 

Sierra Vista, AZ 

$626.73 

Sandweg. John R 

Accompany the Secretary 

12-N0V-12 

14-NOV-12 

London, United Kingdom 

$1,144.93 

Sandweg, John R 

Mcetings/Ofneial Business 

17-E)ec-I2 

20-Dec- 12 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates 

$3,812.99 

Schlanger, Margo J 

Program/Site Visit 

11-Dec-II 

12-Dec- 11 

Harlingen. TX 

$1,123.62 

Schlanger. Margo J'^ 

Program/Sile Visit 

25-Mar-12 

26-Mar- 12 

Washington, DC 

$1,192.52 

Schlanger, Margo J 

Program/Site Vi.sit 

15-Apr-12 

17-Apr-12 

Washington, DC 

$1,486.36 

Schlanger. Margo J 

Program/Site Visit 

09-May- 1 2 

lO-May-12 

Washington, DC 

$1,014.11 

Schlanger. Margo J 

Program/Site Visit 

lO-Jul-12 

14-Jl1-12 

Washington, DC 

$1 ,447.76 

Schlanger. Margo J 

Program/Site Visit 

01 -Aug- 12 

02-Aug~12 

Washington, DC 

$999.10 

Schlanger. Margo J 

Program/Site Visit 

01 -Aug- 12 

01 -Aug- 12 

Washington, DC 

$9.34 

Schlanger. Margo J 

Program/Sile Visit 

28-Aug-I2 

28-Aug-12 

Boston, MA 

$753.54 

Schlanger, Margo J 

Program/Site Visit 

24-Sep-12 

24-Sep-12 

Washington, DC 

$682.12 

Sherry, Margaret 

Program/Site Visit 

17-May-12 

18-May- 12 

Chicago. IL 

$446.1! 

Sherry, Margaret 

Program/Site Visit 

04-Jun-12 

04-Jun-12 

Indianapolis, IN 

$448.60 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

27-Feb-I2 

02-Mar- 12 

Mexico City, Mexico; Guatemala City, 
Guatemala; San Salvador, El Salvador; 

$1,301.27 


Traveler's duty station is Detroit, MI. 


70 


231 



Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 





San Jose, Costa Rica; Panama City, 
Panama 


Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

23-Mar-12 

26-Mar-12 

Phoenix, AZ 

S525.57 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

12-Apr-12 

I7-Apr-12 

Albuquerque, NM; Los Angeles, CA; 

San Jose, CA 

S981.04 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

30-Apr-!2 

05-May-12 

Wellington, New Zealand; Canberra, 
Australia; Brisbane, Australia 

$1,570.43 

Shlossman, Amy 

Meelings/Official Business 

20-Mav-12 

21-Mav-12 

Chicago, IL 

$118.43 

Shlossman, Amy 

Meetings/Official Business 

20-May- 12 

21-Mav-12 

Chicago, IL 

$173.73 

Shlossman, Amy 

Meetings/Official Business 

22-Jun-12 

26-Jun-12 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates 

$9.34 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

10-Ju!-12 

I3-Jui-12 

Brasilia, Brazil; Sao Paulo, Brazil; 

Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

$1,123.93 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

26-Aug-I2 

27-Aug-12 

New York, NY 

$364.43 

Shlossman, Amy 

Program/Site Visit 

27-Sep-12 

27-Sep-12 

Chicago, IL 

$383.13 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

24-vSep-12 

25-Sep-]2 

New York, NY; Ronkonkoma, NY; 

Islip, NY 

$848.49 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

07-Oct-I2 

14-Oct-12 

Paris, France; Lyon, France; Paris, 
France; Sofia, Bulgaria; Ankara, 

Turkey; Istanbul, Turkey 

,$2,651,54 

Shlossman. Amy 

Meetings/Official Business 

21-Oct-12 

22-Oct-12 

New York, NY 

$862.65 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

lO-Nov-12 

I3-NOV-12 

New York, NY; Boston, MA 

$753.44 

Shlossman, Amy 

Accompany the Secretary 

15-NOV-12 

16-NOV-12 

New York, NY; Newark, NJ 

$454.94 

Simmons. Caroline 

Accompany the Secretary 

25-Feb-12 

29-Feb-12 

San Salyador, El Salyador 

$1,737.20 

Smith, Douglas A 

Conference 

22-Jan-l2 

25-Jan-12 

Houston, TX; Las Vegas, NV; Los 
Angeles, CA 

$9.34 

Smith, Douglas A 

Program/Site Visit 

12-Feb-12 

16-Feb-12 

San Diego, CA; Laredo, TX; Miami, FL 

$3,082.91 

Smith, Douglas A 

Meetings/Official Business 

18-Jan-12 

19-Jan-12 

Orlando, FL 

$570.38 

Smith. Douglas A 

Accompany the Secretary 

23-Jan-i2 

26-Jan-12 

Davos, Switzerland 

$1,287.93 

Smith, Douglas A 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

Ol-Feb-12 

03-Feb-12 

San Francisco, CA; San Jose, CA 

$783.37 

Smith, Douglas A 

Speech/Presentalion 

28-May- 12 

Ol-Jun-12 

Bangkok, Thailand 

$2,625.80 

Smith. Douglas A 

Speech/Presentation 

27-Apr-12 

30-Apr-12 

Chicago. IL 

$444.37 

Smith, Douglas A 

Speech/Presentalion 

17-Apr-12 

25-Apr-12 

Tunis, Tunisia; New Delhi, India; Los 
Angeles, CA 

$4,393.54 

Smith, Douglas A 

Speech/Presentation 

12-Jun-12 

13-Jun-I2 

New York, NY 

$612.02 

Smith, Douglas A 

Conference 

24-Jun-12 

26-Jun-12 

Seattle, WA 

$1,558.89 

Smith, Douglas A 

Speech/FVesentation 

22-Jun-12 

22-Jun-12 

Detroit, MI 

$542.87 


71 


232 




Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 

vSmith, Douglas A 

Program/Site Visit 

06-jul-12 

06-jul-12 

Memphis, TN 

$898.12 

vSmith, Douglas A 

Meetings/Offici^ Businras 

!2-Jul-I2 

13-Jul-12 

Detroit, MI 

S855.93 

Smith, Douglas A 

Speech/Presentalion 

31~JuM2 

Ol-Aug-12 

Boston, MA 

$524.81 

Smith, Douglas A 

Accompany the Deputy 
Seerctary 

08-Sep-12 

16-Sep-12 

Beijing, China; Shanghai, China; Hong 
Kong, Hong Kong 

$5,761.58 

Smith, Douglas A 

Accompany the Secretary 

27-Aug42 

27-Aug-12 

New York, NY 

$160.07 

Smith, Douglas A 

Conference 

25-Sep--i2 

27-Sep-12 

Charleston, SC; New York, NY 

$1,733.92 

Smith, Douglas A 

Conference 

24-Sep-i2 

24-Sep-12 

New York, NY 

$258.87 

Smith, Douglas A 

Speech/Presentation 

15-Oct-l2 

l6-Oct-12 

Los Angeles, CA 

$1,000.17 

Smith, Douglas A 

Program/vSiie Visit 

18-Oct-!2 

19-Oct-12 

Charleston, SC 

$1,179.38 

Smith, Douglas A 

Conference 

30-Oct-12 

30-Oct-12 

New York, NY 

$9.34 

Smith, Douglas A 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

0i-Nov-I2 

01 -Nov- 12 

New York. NY 

$9.34 

Smith, Douglas A 

Meetings/Official Business 

07-NOV-12 

08-NOV-12 

Los Angeles, CA 

$1,325.37 

Smith, Douglas A 

Accompany the Deputy- 
Secretary 

14-Dec- 1 2 

14-Dec- 12 

New York. NY 

$331.87 

Spires, Richard A 

Program/Siie Visit 

26-Apr-12 

27-Apr-12 

Colorado Springs. CO 

$1,016.48 

Spires, Richard A 

S peech/Presentalion 

l5-Apr-!2 

16-Apr-12 

Cambridge. MD 

$261.63 

Spires, Richard A 

Conference 

27-Aug-l2 

29-Aug-12 

Williamsburg, VA 

$392.23 

Spires, Richard A 

Conference 

28-OCI-12 

30-OCI-I2 

Williamsburg, VA 

$26.93 

Spires, Richard A 

Meetings/Official Business 

18-OCI-12 

18-Oct-12 

Ottawa, Canada 

$1,113.15 

Sielmarski, Chris 

Conference 

28-Mar- 12 

29-Mar- 12 

Toronto, Canada 

$11.93 

Stroud, Michael 

Program/Sile Visit 

24-Apr-12 

26-Apr-12 

Los Angeles, CA 

$942.67 

Stroud, Michael 

Program/Site Visit 

10-Sep-I2 

12-Sep-i2 

Houston. TX 

$1,336.20 

Stroud, Michael 

Program/Sile Visit 

25-Sep-12 

27-Sep-12 

San Diego, CA: Seattle, WA 

$1,790.36 

Stroud, Michael 

Program/Site Visit 

21 -Sep- 12 

23-Sep-]2 

New York, NY 

$234.92 

Stroud, Michael 

Accompany the Secretary 

24-Sep-I2 

24-Sep-12 

New York, NY 

$113.44 

Stupak, Philip M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

Ol-Feb-12 

04-Feb-i2 

San Francisco, CA 

$1,201.32 

Stupak, Philip M 

Atxompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

20-Mar- 1 2 

22-Mar- 12 

Palo Alto, CA 

$1,370.41 

Stupak, Philip M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

I7-Apr-I2 

26-Apr-12 

Tunis, Tunisia; New Delhi, India; 

Tokyo City, Japan; Tbilisi, Georgia; 
Luxembourg 

$3,958.48 

Stupak, Philip M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

15-Jul-12 

19-Jul-I2 

London, United Kingdom; Rome, Italy; 
Brussels, Belgium 

$6,871.33 

Stupak, Philip M 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

08-Sep-i2 

]6-Sep-12 

Beijing, China; Nanjing, China; 

Shanghai, China; Hong Kong, Hong 

$6,232.77 


72 


233 




Traveler 

Purpose of Travel 

Begin Date 

End Date 

Destination 

Total Cost 





Kong 


Waters, Erin 

Meetings/Offjcial Business 

I2-N0V-I2 

26-N0V-I2 

Lincroft. NJ 

$2,233.10 

Wein, Matthew 

Program/Site Visit 

22-Feb-12 

26-Feb-12 

Tampa, FL 

S775.09 

Wein, Matthew 

Program/Site Visit 

27-Jun-12 

27-Jun-12 

Tampa, FL 

S569.42 

Wein, Matthew 

Program/Site Visit 

13-Aug^12 

21 -Aug- 12 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Kabul, 
Afghanistan 

$5,359.19 

Wein, Matthew 

Program/Silc Visit 

30-OCI-I2 

()4-Nov-12 

Tampa. FL 

S9.34 

Wexler, Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

25-Feb-12 

29-Feb-l2 

San Salvador. El Salvador 

$1,779.80 

Wexler, Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

27-Aor-I2 

05-Mav-12 

Canberra, Australia 

$6,201.21 

Wexler, Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

i5-Mav-t2 

16-Mav-12 

New London, CT 

$906.31 

Wexler, Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

08-Jul-i2 

15-Jul-12 

Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 

$2,381.27 

Wexler. Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

09-Sep-12 

lO-Sep-12 

Philadelphia, PA 

$504.19 

Wexler, Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

03-Oct~I2 

14-Oct-12 

Paris, Prance; Istanbul, Turkey 

$5,805.65 

Wexler, Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

O2-N0V-I2 

O3-N0V-I2 

Charleston, WV 

$909.59 

Wexler, Rebecca K 

Advanced the Secretary 

14-NOV42 

i6-Nov-12 

New York, NY; Belford, NJ 

$1,251.54 

Wong, Heather 

Accompany the Secretary 

09-Mar- 12 

09-Mar- 12 

New York, NY 

$159.19 

Wong, Heather 

Accompany the Secretary 

30-Apr-12 

05-May-]2 

Honolulu, HI; Wellington, New 

Zealand; Canberra, Australia; Brisbane, 
Australia 

$2,242.66 

Wong, Heather 

Accompany the Secretary 

!4-Jun-12 

17-Jun-12 

San Francisco, CA 

$2,377.04 

Wong, Heather 

Accompany the Secretary 

24-Sep-12 

24-Sep-]2 

New York, NY 

$65.18 

Wong, Heather 

Accompany the Secretary 

29-Sep-12 

.30-Sep-]2 

San Diego, CA 

$864,60 

Wong, Heather 

Accompany the Secretary 

07-Oct-12 

i3-Oct-12 

Paris, France; Sofia, Bulgaria; Ankara, 
Turkey; Istanbul, Turkey 

$2,991.67 

Wong, Heather 

Accompany the Deputy 
Secretary 

15-N0V-I2 

I6-N0V-I2 

New York, NY 

$462.44 


73 


234 




235 


Question: Using the format provided last year, please identify for the Immediate Office of 
Secretary and the Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary, any base funding in the fiscal 
2014 request for costs to reimburse other government entities for the use of their own plane 
travel by the Secretary and Deputy Secretary. Please identify the funding in the base for 
reimbursement in fiscal year 2012 and anticipated for fiscal year 2013. 

Answer: 



FY14 

Anticipated 

Secretary 

$1,297,675 

Deputy Secretary 

$197,821 


In support of the travel for the Secretary and Deputy Secretary, DHS uses planes from the I 
Coast Guard, MilAir, and FAA. 



FY12' 

FY13^ 

Secretary 

2,051.703 

1,080,330 

Deputy Secretary 

.361,153 

129,820 


'Cost Billed for Gov't Aircraft Usage 

^Projected Cost for Gov't Aircraft Usage based on Usage to Date for FY13 


Contracts 


Question: Please provide a list of the sole source contracts executed by OSEM, USM, CIO 
CFO in 2012. Organize the list by contractor, purpose, dollar award, full performance valu 
contract start date, contact end date, and reason for issuing a sole-source contract. 

Answer: Please see the tables on the following pages. 


74 





le Source Contracts Executed by OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO in FY12 

'ate 

'ned 

ntrac 

Itart 

ate) 

Estimated 
Ultimate 
Completio 
n Date 

Vendor 

Name 

Produc 

t 

Service 

Code 

(PSC) 

Product or 
Service Purpose 
Description 

Reason for 
Other Than 
Full and 
Open 

Competition 

Action 

Ohligatio 

n 

Base and 
All 

Options 

Value 

18/12 

06/24/12 

American 

Arab Anti- 
Discriminatio 
n Committee 

U008 

Education/Trainin 

g- 

Training/Curricul 
um Development 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$3,500 

$3,500 

15/12 

08/31/13 

American 
Society for 
Testing and 
Materials 

7630 

Newspapers and 
Periodicals 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$23,520 

$23,520 

12/11 

02/11/12 

Brimtek, Inc. 

5825 

Radio Navigation 
Equipment, 

Except Airborne 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$7,500 

$7,500 

15/12 

04/15/12 

Chronos 

Technology 

Ltd, 

5825 

Radio Navigation 
Equipment, 

Except Airborne 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$4,722.15 

$4,722.15 

11/12 

06/10/13 

Continuent, 

Inc. 

7030 

ADP Software 

Sap Non- 
competition 

$36,000 

$36,000 

'29/12 

07/05/12 

Global 

Computer 

Enterprises, 

Inc. 

R418 

Support- 

Professional: 

Legal 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$320,115. 

13 

$320,115. 

13 

'28/12 

05/27/12 

Hewlett- 

Packard 

Company 

7045 

ADP Supplies 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$22,575 

$22,575 

19/12 

04/20/12 

Horn of 

Africa Rescue 

U008 

Education/Trainin 

g- 

Only One 
Source - 

$4,300 

$4,300 


236 



Sole Source Contracts Executed by OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO in FY12 

Procurement 

Instrument 

Identifier 

(PHD) 

Date 
Signed 
(Contrac 
t Start 
Date) 

Estimated 
Ultimate 
Completio 
n Date 

Vendor 

Name 

Produc 

t 

Service 

Code 

(PSC) 

Product or 
Service Purpose 
Description 

Reason for 
Other Than 
Full and 
Open 

Competition 

Action 

Obligatio 

n 

Base and 
All 

Options 

Value 

HSHQDC12P000 

54 

06/28/12 

04/30/13 

International 
Association of 
Privacy 
Professionals, 

The 

7630 

Newspapers and 
Periodicals 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$3,900 

$3,900 

HSHQDC12P000 

47 

04/12/12 

04/17/13 

Intuit Inc. 

7030 

ADP Software 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$0 

$3,500 

HSHQDC12P(X)0 

80 

06/18/12 

06/30/12 

Lulac Institute 
Inc 

U008 

Education/Trainin 

g- 

Training/Curricul 
urn Development 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$4,500 

$4,500 

HSHQDC12POOO 

11 

01/04/12 

02/15/12 

Mantech 
Information 
Systems & 
Technology 
Corporation 

D399 

IT and Telecom- 
Other IT and 
Telecommunicati 

ons 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$2,745 

$2,745 

HSHQDC12P000 

73 

05/30/12 

06/23/12 

Naleo 

Educational 

Fund 

U008 

Education/Trainin 

g- 

Training/Curricul 
um Development 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$3,500 

$3,500 

HSHQDC12P000 

72 

05/27/12 

07/10/12 

National 
Council of La 
Raza, Inc. 

U008 

Education/Trainin 

g- 

Training/Curricul 
um Development 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$7,500 

$7,500 

HSHQDC12P001 

02 

08/15/12 

08/31/13 

National Fire 
Protection 

7630 

Newspapers and 
Periodicals 

Only One 
Source - 

$27,500 

$27,500 


76 


237 




Sole Source Contracts Executed by OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO in FY12 

Procurement 

Instrument 

Identifier 

(PHD) 

Date 
Signed 
(Contrac 
t Start 
Date) 

Estimated 
Ultimate 
Completio 
n Date 

Vendor 

Name 

Produc 

t 

Service 

Code 

(PSC) 

Product or 
Service Purpose 
Description 

Reason for 
Other Than 
Full and 
Open 

Competition 

Action 

Obligatio 

n 

Base and 
All 

Options 

Value 




Association, 

Inc. 



Other 



HSHQDC12P000 

65 

05/17/12 

05/17/12 

National 

Journal Group 
Inc. 

9905 

Signs, 

Advert! .sing 
Displays, and 
Identification 

Plates 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$0 

$4,000 

HSHQDC12P000 

94 

07/25/12 

09/29/13 

Netcentric 

Technologies 

Inc. 

7010 

ADPE System 
Configuration 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$45,274.2 

0 

$45,274.2 

0 

HSHQDC12POOO 

10 

12/28/11 

12/31/12 

Oasis 

7030 

ADP Software 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$8,000 

$8,000 

HSHQDC12P000 

37 

03/20/12 

03/19/17 

Pistolstar, Inc. 

D319 

IT and Telecom- 
Annual Software 
Maintenance 
Service Plans 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$13,000.0 

0 

$39,000 

HSHQDC12P000 

50 

04/13/12 

04/26/12 

Prosci, Inc. 

U009 

Education/Trainin 
g- General 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$3,479.40 

$3,479.40 

HSHQDC12P000 

55 

04/24/12 

04/30/13 

Tecolote 
Research, Inc. 

7030 

ADP Software 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$12,500 

$40,000 

HSHQDC12P000 

69 

06/21/12 

09/26/13 

Terrapixel 

7030 

ADP Software 

Brand Name 
Description 

$143,700 

$143,700 

HSHQDC12P000 

26 

02/14/12 

02/14/12 

Tranben, Ltd. 

R713 

Support- 

Management: 

Only One 
Source - 

$3,000 

$3,000 


77 


238 




Sole Source Contracts Executed by OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO in FY12 

Procurement 

Instrument 

Identifier 

(PHD) 

Date 
Signed 
(Contrac 
t Start 
Date) 

Estimated 
Ultimate 
Completio 
n Date 

Vendor 

Name 

Produc 

t 

Service 

Code 

(PSC) 

Product or 
Service Purpose 
Description 

Reason for 
Other Than 
Full and 
Open 

Competition 

Action 

Obligatio 

n 

Base and 
All 

Options 

Value 






Transit Benefit 
Vouchers 

Other 



HSHQDC12P000 

87 

07/02/12 

07/01/13 

Victory Media 
Inc. 

R701 

Support- 

Management: 

Advertising 

Only One 
Source - 
Other 

$0 

$30,790 

*Note: All listed actions are Purchase Orders 


78 


239 




240 


Question: Please provide for the record a list of all OSEM, USM, CIO and CFO contracts, 
grants and other transactions where work is performed outside of the United States. 

Answer: There are no actions to report where work was performed outside of the United States. 

Question: Organize by contractor, purpose, dollar award, full performance value, as well as 
contract start and end date. 

Answer: There are no actions to report where work was performed outside of the United States. 

Reception and Representation 

Question: Please provide a summary chart that shows the amount of reception and 
representation expenses provided to each DHS agency in fiscal years 201 1 and 2012, fiscal year 
2013 to date, and requested in fiscal year 2014. Please also include a table that displays what 
each agency spent for reception and representation in fiscal year 2012, and how much funding 
has been obligated to date in fiscal year 2013, and an explanation for each expenditure. 

Answer: Please see the tables on the following pages. 


79 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Distribution 

Fiscal Years 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 (Requested) 

Component** 

FY2011 CR 
Funding Level 

FY 2012 CR 
Funding Level 

FY 2013 
Enacted 

FY 2014 
President’s 
Request 

Office of the Secretary & Executive Management 

$ 60,000 

$ 51,000 

$ 45,000 

$ 51,000 

Office of the Under Secretary for Management 

3,000 

2,500 

2,250 

2,500 

Analysis and Operations 

5,000 

4,250 

3,825 

4,250 

Customs and Border Protection 

45,000 

38,250 

34,425 

38,250 

Immigration and Customs Enforcement 

15,000 

12,750 

11,475 

12,750 

Transportation Security Administration* 

14,119 

10,640 

15,357 

8,500 

Unite States Coast Guard 

20,000 

17,000 

15,300 

17,000 

United States Secret Service 

25,000 

21,250 

19,125 

21,250 

National Protection and Programs Directorate 

5,000 

4,250 

3,825 

4,250 

Office of Health Affairs 

3,000 

2,500 

2,250 

2,500 

Federal Emergency Management Agency 

3,000 

2,500 

2,250 

2,500 

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center 

12,000 


9,180 

10,200 

Science and Technology 

10,000 

8,500 

7,650 

8,500 

Domestic Nuclear Detection Office 

3,000 

2,500 

2,250 

2,500 

Total 

$223,119 

$188,090 

$174,162 

$ 185,950 


*Please note that TSA receives 2 year funds. Thus, TSA carried over funds from each FY into the next FY. 
**C1S receives ORR funds from CIS activities generating revenue, and thus is not included above. 


80 


241 



Below are two tables, one for FY 2012 and one for FY 2013 through the second quarter. 


Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Eventfs) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 

Office of the 
Secretary and 
Executive 
Management 

Official Gifts 

10/11/2011 

Mementos 

Sterling Silver 
Cufflinks 

$195 

$195 

SI /Germany 

1 1/1/2011 

Official Meeting 

Refreshments 

$17 

$17 

S2 Cyber Event 

1 1/1/201 1 

Official Meeting 

Meals 

$225 

$225 

Official Gifts 

11/3/2011 

Mementos 

Blankets 

$162 

$162 

Official Gifts 

11/7/2011 

Mementos 

Jewelry Items 

$409 

$409 

Official Gifts 

1 1/8/201 1 

Mementos 

Pewter Items 

$100 

$100 

S 1/Bulgaria 

1 1/8/201 1 

Official Meeting 

Refreshments 

$8 

$8 

Official Gifts 

1 1/9/2011 

Mementos 

Jewelry Item 

$136 

$136 

S2/ Assoc of 
European Airlines 

11/10/2011 

Official Meeting 

Meals 

$184 

$184 

S2/Assoc of 
European Airlines 

11/10/2011 

Official Meeting 

Sales Tax Refund 

($13) 

($13) 

Official Gifts 

11/10/2011 

Mementos 

Commercial 

Appraisal of Gifts 
Received by the 
Secretary 

$200 

$200 

Slovenian VWP 
Negotiations 

11/14/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast / Lunch 
Delivered 

$542 

$542 

Official Gifts 

11/14/2011 

Mementos 

Flowers for Norway 
Terrorism Memorial 

$167 

$167 

Sl/DNI 

11/16/2011 

Official Meeting 

Meals 

$10 

$10 

Swiss VWP 
Negotiations 

11/17/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast / Lunch 
Delivered 

$282 

$282 

Meeting Supplies 

11/18/2011 

Supplies 

Coasters 

$238 

$238 


81 


242 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FV 2012 by Comnonent 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Official Gifts 

11/21/2011 

Mementos 

Blankets 

$606 

$606 

Official Gifts 

11/22/2011 

Mementos 

Pens and Cufflinks 

$775 

$775 

Official Gifts 

11/28/2011 

Mementos 

Pens 

$175 

$175 

Official Gifts 

11/28/2011 

Mementos 

Books 

$47 

$47 

Sl/EU 

1 1/28/201 1 

Official Meeting 

Refreshments 

$11 

$11 

S 1/Malaysia 

11/28/2011 

Official Meeting 

Refreshments 

$8 

$8 

Official Gifts 

1 1/29/201 1 

Mementos 

USSS Hats and 

Jackets 

$303 

$303 

Official Gifts 

11/29/2011 

Mementos 

USCG Hats and 

Jackets 

$145 

$145 

Official Gifts 

12/8/2011 

Mementos 

Book Tip-In Page 

$10 

$10 

SI /Canada 

12/12/2011 

Official Meeting 

Refreshments 

$12 

$12 







SI /Turkey 

12/14/2011 

Official Meeting 

Refreshments 

$10 

$10 

Official Gifts 

12/15/2011 

Mementos 

Return of Two Hats 

($24) 

($24) 

SI /Mexico 

1/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$12 

$12 

Norwegian VWP 
Negotiations 

1/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast / Lunch 
Delivered 

$879 

$879 

SI /El Salvador 

1/9/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$16 

$16 

S 1/Mexico 

I/1I/20I2 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$16 

$16 

S 2/Germany 

1/11/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$202 

$202 

Official Gifts 

1/24/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Boxes for Future 
Events 

$314 

$314 

Official Gifts 

1/24/2012 

Mementos 

Pewter Items 

$50 

$50 


82 


243 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


S2/EU 

1/24/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$5 

$5 

S2/Gennany 

1/30/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$11 

$11 

S 2/India 

1/31/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$6 

$6 

S 1/Mexico 

2/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$12 

$12 

S2/Gennany 

2/6/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Sales Tax Refund 

($16) 

($16) 

Official Gifts 

2/9/2012 

Mementos 

Commercial 

Appraisal of Gifts 
Received by the 
Secretary 

$200 

$200 

Official Gifts 

2/13/2012 

Mementos 

Leather Padfolios 

$473 

$473 

Official Gifts 

2/16/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrap Supplies 

$10 

$10 

Official Gifts 

2/16/2012 

Mementos 

Glass Sculptures 

$470 

$470 

Canadian 

Delegation 

2/16/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch at Mount 
Vernon Room 

$84 

$84 

DHS Workshop 
with German 

Interior Ministry 

2/21/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast / Lunch 
Delivered 

$74 

$74 

SI /Netherlands 

2/22/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$210 

$210 

S 1 /Mayor of 

Chicago 

2/22/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$5 

$5 

S 1/Guatemala 

2/22/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$12 

$12 


83 


244 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


SIAVCO 

2/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$5 

$5 

Official Gifts 

2/23/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrap Supplies 

$225 

$225 

S2/Sweden 

2/27/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$11 

$11 

Official Gifts 

2/28/2012 

Mementos 

Books 

$38 

$38 

S2/EU 

2/28/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$12 

$12 

SI /Italy 

3/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$10 

$10 

S2/Gennany 

3/9/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$5 

$5 

Official Gifts 

3/13/2012 

Mementos 

Return of Two Books 

($22) 

($22) 

S 1 /Israel 

3/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$12 

$12 

S2/EU/DOS/DOJ 

3/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$50 

$50 

Official Gifts 

4/10/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Shirts 

$94 

$94 

Official Gifts 

4/10/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Cufflinks 

$380 

$380 

Official Gifts 

4/10/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Lapel Pins 

$100 

$100 

Official Gifts 

4/10/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Bags for Future 
Events 

$280 

$280 

Official Gifts 

4/10/2012 

Mementos 

Four Pewter Items 

$304 

$304 

Official Gifts 

4/12/2012 

Mementos 

Gifts for A/S Travel 
to Asia 

$300 

$300 

Official Gifts 

4/16/2012 

Mementos 

Commercial 

Appraisal of Gifts 
Received by the 

$255 

$255 


84 


245 





Swiss Delegation 
Official Gifts 
Official Gifts 
Official Gifts 
SI /Australia 
Official Gifts 
Official Gifts 
Official Gifts 
Official Gifts 





Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2012 bv Component 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 





(Germany) Visit 



Meeting Supplies 

5/22/2012 

Supplies 

Press Conference 

Table Cloth Dry 
Cleaning 

$36 

$36 

Official Gifts 

5/24/2012 

Mementos 

Return of Four Books 

($173) 

($173) 

Official Gifts 

5/24/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Coins and Pre- 
Production Piece 

$2,975 

$2,975 

UAE Delegation 

5/30/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch for Delegation 

$70 

$70 

Official Gifts 

6/7/2012 

Mementos 

Glass Sculptures 

$200 

$200 

Official Gifts 

6/18/2012 

Mementos 

Jewelry Item 

$275 

$275 

Official Gifts 

6/19/2012 

Mementos 

Books 

$49 

$49 

Japanese 

Delegation 

6/20-6/21 

Official Meeting 

Lunches and Dinners 
for Delegation 

$1,547 

$1,547 

Official Gifts 

6/22/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrap Supplies 

$206 

$206 

Official Gifts 

6/22/2012 

Mementos 

Padfolios 

$473 

$473 

S 1/World Customs 
Organization 

Meeting 

6/23/2012 

Official Meeting 

S 1/World Customs 
Organization 

Breakfast 

$150 

$150 

Official Gifts 

6/25/2012 

Mementos 

Jewelry Items 

$127 

$127 

Official Gifts 

6/25/2012 

Mementos 

USCG Coins and Pre- 
Production Piece 

$1,670 

$1,670 

S2 Meeting 

7/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$4 

$4 

Meeting Supplies 

7/2/2012 

Supplies 

Glasses 

$312 

$312 

Official Gifts 

7/9/2012 

Mementos 

Delivery Fee 

$10 

$10 

Official Gifts 

7/10/2012 

Mementos 

Glass Sculptures 

$730 

$730 

Official Gifts 

7/13/2012 

Mementos 

Pen/Pencil Sets 

$265 

$265 


86 


247 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Official Gifts 

7/13/2012 

Mementos 

Book 

$10 

$10 

Meeting Supplies 

7/18/2012 

Supplies 

Umbrellas for VIP 
Escorting 

$264 

$264 

Meeting Supplies 

7/18/2012 

Supplies 

Flameless, Battery- 
Operated Tea Lights 

$36 

$36 

Official Gifts 

7/19/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Packaging 

$92 

$92 

Official Gifts 

7/20/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Packaging 

$21 

$21 

Meeting Supplies 

8/1/2012 

Supplies 

Dinner/Reception 

Supplies 

$321 

$321 

S2/Global Wireless 
Solutions 

8/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Luncheon 

$45 

$45 

SI /Australia 

8/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$135 

$135 

Meeting Supplies 

8/8/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Beverage Tubs, Ice 
Bucket, etc. 

$537 

$537 

Official Gifts 

8/8/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrap Supplies 

$372 

$372 

Meeting Supplies 

8/10/2012 

Supplies 

Dinner/Reception 

Supplies 

$195 

$195 

Official Gifts 

8/10/2012 

Mementos 

Gifts Supply Order 
for Visa Waiver 
Program Office 

$2,706 

$2,706 

Meeting Supplies 

8/14/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Pipe-and-Drape (S 1 - 
Hosted Dinner) 

$90 

$90 

Sl/Iftar 

8/14/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dates/Nuts for Iftar 

$89 

$89 

Sl/Iftar 

8/14/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

SI “Hosted Iftar Event 

$2,800 

$2,800 

Sl/Iftar 

8/14/2012 

Meals and 

Rental of Table 

$15 

$15 


87 


248 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2012 bv Component 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 




Refreshments 

Cloths for Prayer 

Room 



Meeting Supplies 

8/20/2012 

Supplies 

Return of Votive 
Holders and Number 
Holders 

($54) 

($54) 

Official Gifts 

9/3/2012 

Mementos 

Pens 

$500 

$500 

Official Gifts 

9/6/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrap Supplies 

$20 

$20 

Official Gifts 

9/6/2012 

Mementos 

Glass Globes 

$144 

$144 

Official Gifts 

9/6/2012 

Mementos 

Chelsea Clocks 

$808 

$808 

Official Gifts 

9/7/2012 

Mementos 

Ruthenium Pens 

$250 

$250 

Official Gifts 

9/7/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrap Supplies 

$23 

$23 

Meeting Supplies 

9/7/2012 

Supplies 

Return of Place Cards 

($8) 

($8) 

Meeting Supplies 

9/7/2012 

Supplies 

Beverage Tubs, Ice 
Bucket, etc. 

$175 

$175 

Official Gifts 

9/7/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrap Supplies 

$37 

$37 

S2/C1C1R 

9/10/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

S2-Hosted Reception 
for China Trip 

$101 

$101 

SI Delegation 

Dinner 

9/10/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

SI Dinner for 
Delegation in 

Montreal, Canada 

$838 

$838 

Meeting Supplies 

9/11/2012 

Supplies 

Serviettes for 

Meetings 

$385 

$385 

Official Gifts 

9/11/2012 

Mementos 

Glass Sculptures 

$240 

$240 

Official Dinner 

9/11/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

S2-Hosted Official 
Dinner with Chinese 
Counterparts 

$1,920 

$1,920 

Total 

$48,956 

$48,956 

Office of the 

Total 

$0 

$0 


88 


249 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Eventfs) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 

Under 

Secretary for 
Management 




Analysis and 
Operations 

SI International 
Delegation Meeting 

10/6/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Canadian Delegation 

$84 

$84 

Coins Awarded 

8/22/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Coins 

$96 

$96 

Meeting With UK 
Senior Liaison 
Officer 

8/30/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Luncheon 

$142 

$142 

Total 

$322 

$322 

Customs and 

Border 

Protection 

Meeting with 
Brazilian Minister 
of Foreign 

Relations 

10/12/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$1,697 

$1,697 

Meeting with 
Delegation from 
Brazil 

10/12/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$82 

00 

Meeting with 
Officials from 
Canada Border 
Services Agency 

10/17/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$1,348 

$1,348 

International Chief 
of Police 

Conference - 
French Officials 

10/23/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$135 

$135 

CBP's Immigration 
Advisory Program 
Visited by Qatar 

10/27/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$233 

$233 


89 


250 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2012 by Comnonent 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Delegation 






Meeting with 

NTEU Officials 

12/5/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$28 

$28 

LEWG, Rome, 

Italy 

12/6/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$500 

$500 

Protocol Supplies 

12/7/2011 

Mementos 

Supplies 

$150 

$150 

LEWG, Ottawa, 
Canada 

12/9/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$407 

$407 

Meeting with 

Russian Delegation 

12/12/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$1,364 

$1,364 

Meeting with 

Canada Delegation 

12/12/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$114 

$114 

Meeting with 

Canada Delegation 

12/13/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$220 

$220 

Meeting with 

Canada Delegations 

12/13/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$425 

$425 

Reception in Honor 
of Commissioner 
Bersin 

12/30/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$2,000 

$2,000 

LEWG Reception 

1/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$500 

$500 

Meeting with 
Canadian 

Delegation 

1/25/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$213 

$213 

Meeting with 
Canadian 

Delegation 

1/25/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$2,506 

$2,506 

Protocol Supplies 

1/31/2012 

Mementos 

Supplies 

$350 

$350 


90 


251 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Change of 

Command 

Ceremony 

2/8/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$618 

$618 

CO AC - Trade 
Ouarterly Meeting 

2/21/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$50 

$50 

3-Day working 
session - US- 
Canada Cross- 
Border 

Collaboration 

Initiatives 

2/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$195 

$195 

Meeting with 
Panama Delegation 

2/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$271 

$271 

Bi-National 

Beyond and Border 
Action Plan Town 
Hall CO AC 

Meeting 

2/28/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$40 

$40 

RCMP Summit in 
Massena, NY 

3/12/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner and 
Refreshments 

$888 

$888 

CBP-GACC Joint 
Training Program 
with Delegation 
from the General 
Administration of 
Customs from 

China 

3/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$1,254 

$1,254 

Grand Opening 

3/22/2012 

Meals and 

Refreshments 

$2,200 

$2,200 


91 


252 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Ceremony of the 
New Welton 

Station 


Refreshments 




Protocol Supplies 

3/22/2012 

Mementos 

Supplies 

$500 

$500 

K9 Graduation of 
the Government of 
Mexico 

3/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$548 

$548 

1000th Session BP 
Academy 

Graduation 

Ceremony 

4/12/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$111 

$111 

RCCDG Meeting - 
Canada Delegation 

4/24/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$65 

$65 

RCCDG Meeting - 
Western 

Hemisphere 

Countries 

4/25/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$1,250 

$1,250 

European Taxation 
and Customs Union 
Delegations 

5/4/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Morning Break and 
Lunch 

$696 

$696 

BVPP Joint 

Regional Risk 
Assessment 

Kickoff 

5/18/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast/Lunch 

$184 

$184 

Signing of Joint- 
Statement by World 
BASC Org. and 

CBP 

5/30/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$20 

$20 


92 


253 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


International 

Visitor Programs - 
Protocol Supplies 

6/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$374 

$374 

LEWG Reception - 
Hague 

6/7/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$250 

$250 

Dubai Customs 
Delegations 

6/11/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$1,113 

$1,113 

Bi-National 

Working Group 
(BWG) Meeting 

6/28/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$807 

$807 

Panama 

Delegations 

6/28/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast/Lunch 

$280 

$280 

Independence Day 
Reception - 
Amsterdam & 

Hague 

7/2 & 
7/3/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$500 

$500 

Protocol Supplies 

7/16/2012 

Supplies 

Supplies 

$860 

$860 

RCMP Graduation 

8/13/2012 

Mementos 

Framed Pair of USBP 
Spurs Mounted Show 
Box for RCMP 

$282 

$282 

China Customs 
Delegations 

9/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$1,152 

$1,152 

Meeting with Vice 
Minister of China 
Customs 

9/13/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$739 

$739 

RCMP Meeting 

8/31/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$73 

$73 

Israel Delegations 

9/3 & 

Meals and 

Dinner/ 

$2,087 

$2,087 


93 


254 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FV 2012 bv Component 

Component 

Name 

Name of Eventfs) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 



9/7/2012 

Refreshments 

Refreshments/ 

Transportation 



Protocol Supplies 

9/13/2012 

Supplies 

Supplies 

$215 

$215 

Protocol Supplies 

9/13/2012 

Mementos 

Official Gifts 

$5,955 

$5,955 

Protocol Supplies 

9/28/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Coins 

$1,994 

$1,994 

Total 

$37,843 

$37,843 

Immigration 
and Customs 
Enforcement 

HSI Briefing for 
Foreign Liaison 
Officers 

1 1/30/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$188 

$188 

ICE Stakeholders 
Holiday Party 

12/15/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Food and Beverage 

$3,298 

$3,298 

ICE/ERO Non- 
Goyernmental 
Organizations 
Meeting 

12/15/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light refreshments 

$81 

$81 

Luncheon with 
STAFDEL and 
Panamanian 

Officials 

Concerning DHS 
Programs in Central 
America 

1/18/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Food and Beverage 

$1,332 

$1,332 

Meeting to Discuss 
Interior 

Repatriation 

Initiative and 
Biometrics 

Collection Project 

2/2/2012 

Meals and 
refreshments 

Food and Beverage 

$383 

$383 


94 


255 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FT 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


in Mexico 






Community 

Outreach with 

NGOs to Discuss 
Concerns 

2/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light refreshments 

$38 

$38 

Meet and greet with 
the Screen Actors 
Guild 

3/6/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$11 

$11 

Deputy General of 
Special Organized 
Crime Agency 
(SOCA) Meeting 
with ICE Director 

3/21/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$12 

$12 

Discuss Joint Cases 
for Upcoming 
Executive Steering 
Committee Meeting 
with Tax 
Administration 
Service 

3/12/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner Meeting 

$805 

$805 

Two Day Training 
Seminar for 

Foreign, State and 
Local Law 
Enforcement 

Officers in 

Massena, NY 

3/27/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$196 

$196 

Protocol Office 

4/4/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Wrapping 

$36 

$36 


95 


256 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Supplies 






ICE Meeting with 
the Columbian 
National Police 

5/7/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Coffee and Pastries 

$60 

$60 

Ribbon Cutting of 
the National 

Security 
Investigations 
Division and 

Export Enforcing 
Control Center 

5/8/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$97 

$97 

Meeting for 201 2 
Mexican Interior 
Repatriation 

Program and 

Interior 

Repatriation 

Initiative 

7/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$356 

$356 

Community 
Roundtable for 
Houston Area 
Stakeholders 

7/27/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$150 

$150 

HSI Buffalo Title 

19 Seminar for 
Foreign, State and 
Local Enforcement 

7/27/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$91 

$91 

NY Field Office- 
Secure 

8/9/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$89 

$89 


96 


257 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Communities 
Outreach Meeting 






Awards for Mexico 
Customs Officers 
for Completion of 
Joint us/Mexico 
Customs 

Investigator 

Training Course 

8/23/2012 

Mementos 

Mementos/ Awards 
(Individual Plaques, 
Coins and Shadow 
Boxes) Presented to 
Mexican Customs 
Officers Recognizing 
Completion of a Joint 
Training Course. 

$2,869 

$2,869 

Place Settings for 
Refreshments for 
Dignitaries Meeting 
with the ICE 

Director or 

Assistant Director 

9/11/2012 

Supplies 

Purchase of 1 2 China 
Place Settings 
(Expected Life of 20 

Y ears) for Serving 
Refreshments to 
Dignitaries Who 

Meet With ICE 
Director. 

$1,400 

$1,400 

Meeting with 

Chinese Delegation 

9/13/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$58 

$58 

Meeting for ICE 
Director and 

Princess Madeleine 
of Sweden 

9/21/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$53 

$53 

HSI Training 
Provided by 
Australian Federal 
Police 

9/26/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$325 

$325 


97 


258 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
f' Y 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Total 

$11,928 

$114»28 

Transportation 

Security 

Administration 

Promote R&D of 
Liquids, Aerosols, 
and Gels (LAGs) 
Screening 
Technologies 

10/25- 
26/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$795 

$795 

US-lndia Aviation 
Security Working 
Group 

1/20- 

23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$318 

$318 

Lunch for India’s 
Secretary to the 
Ministry of Civil 
Aviation 

1/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$140 

$140 

Lunch with 

European 
Commission 
Directorate-General 
for Mobility and 
Transport 

4/3/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$420 

$420 

Gulf Cooperation 
Council 

5/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Morning 

Refreshments and 
Lunch 

$343 

$343 

LAGS Stakeholder 
Meeting 

6/19/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$322 

$322 

Gift for State 
Department 
Employee for 
Advocacy and 

7/24/2012 

Mementos 

Large Globe 

$94 

$94 


98 


259 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Eventfs) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Negotiating with 
the European 
Commission on 
Aviation Security 






Luncheon for 
Chinese Delegation 
and Director 

General Song of the 
Civil Aviation 
Authority of China 

9/17/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$449 

$449 

Total 

$2,881 

$2,881 

United States 
Coast Guard 

Commandant Flag 
Mess Event 

10/1/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with NOAA 
Administrator 

$8 

$8 

Vice Commandant 
Flag Mess Event 

10/8/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with Diversity 
Advisory Board 
Members 

$15 

$15 

Lunch Meeting 

10/14/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$80 

$80 

Commandant Flag 
Mess Event 

10/21/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with 
Commander, Naval 
Forces Canada 

$60 

$60 

Commandant 
Representative Gift 

11/1/2011 

Mementos 

Plaques Presented to 
Outgoing CG 
Foundation Board 
Chairman 

$107 

$107 

Commandant Flag 
Mess Event 

1 1/2/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast with 

Senator Wicker and 
Staff 

$15 

$15 


99 


260 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Commandant Flag 
Mess Event 

1 1/3/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast with Rep. 
Guinta and Staff 

$22 

$22 

Deputy 

Commandant for 
Operations Flag 
Mess Event 

11/3/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with Russian 
Marine Pollution and 
Salvage 

Administration 

$108 

$108 

Commandant 
Representative Gift 

1 1/8/201 1 

Mementos 

Coasters 

$1,100 

$1,100 

Commandant 
Representative Gift 

11/21/2011 

Mementos 

Plaque for 

International 

Maritime 

Organization 

$46 

$46 

Commandant 

Reception 

11/21/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

International 

Maritime 

Organization 

Reception hosted in 
London 

$1,070 

$1,070 

Commandant 
Representative Gift 

12/1/2011 

Mementos 

Commandant 

Enscribed Pen/ Ink 
Refills 

$53 

$53 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gift 

12/30/2011 

Mementos 

Official CCG Custom 
Dessert Tins 

$529 

$529 

Congressional Visit 

1/27/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with Senator 
Landrieu and Staff 

$46 

$46 

U.S. Navy League 

2/6/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with Senior 
Leadership of the 

Navy League of the 

$68 

$68 


100 


261 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 





United States 



DEA/DOJ Visit 

2/17/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with DEA 
Administrator 

Leonhart 

$36 

$36 

Congressional Visit 

3/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Official DHS Polo 
Shirts, Mugs, etc. 

$32 

$32 

Colombia Trip 

Gifts 

3/21/2012 

Mementos 

Engraved Plates 

$222 

$222 

Commandant 

Dinner 

4/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Reception for U.S. 
Ambassador in 

Bogota, Columbia 

$916 

$916 

14th District 
Commander Dinner 

4/3/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner Held for 

Pacom and 
CINCPACFLT 

$23! 

$231 

RDML Thomas 

Trip to Russia 

4/10/2012 

Mementos 

Brass Letters 

Engraved for Senior 
Leadership in the 
Russian Ministry of 
Transport 

$25 

$25 

Vice Commandant 
Change of Watch 

4/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner for Vice 

Service Chiefs at 

VCG Quarters 

$158 

$158 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gift 

4/26/2012 

Mementos 

Brass Letters 

Engraved for the 

Chief of the Thai 

Royal Navy and the 
Chief of Defence 
Forces for the Royal 

$95 

$95 


101 


262 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2012 by Component 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 





Thai Armed Forces 



Commandant 

Representational 

Gift 

5/19/2012 

Mementos 

Gourmet Gifts 

$589 

$589 

Vice Commandant 
Change of Watch 

6/16/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Truck Rental to 

Provide Temporary 
Food Storage 

$725 

$725 

Vice Commandant 
Change of Watch 

6/18/2012 

Supplies 

Tent Rental for the 
Change of Watch 
Ceremony's 

Reception 

$1,075 

$1,075 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gift 

6/29/2012 

Mementos 

Brass Letters 

Engraved on Plaque 
for Presentation to 
Canadian Official on 
50th Anniversary of 
Canadian CG 

$37 

$37 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gift 

7/3/2012 

Mementos 

Coin Boxes 

$650 

$650 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gift 

7/5/2012 

Mementos 

Special Agent Badge 

$110 

$110 

Grand Haven Coast 
Guard Festival 

7/31/2012 

Mementos 

Gift Lamp 

$294 

$294 

CGC JUNIPER 

Visit to Canada 

8/7/2012 

Mementos 

JUNIPER Chart Art, 
Hats, Coffee Mugs 
and USCG Coffee 

$487 

$487 


102 


263 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 





Table Books 



Lunch on CGC 
BERTHOLF 

8/7/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Senators Landrieu, 
Murkowski and 

Begich 

$82 

$82 

Commandant 
Refreshments for 
Future Events 

9/4/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$817 

$817 

Supplies for 

Serving 

Refreshments on 
China Trip 

9/4/2012 

Mementos 

Refreshment Serving 
Supplies 

$135 

$135 

Barrow, Alaska 
Lunch 

8/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Delegation Lunch at 
Barrow, AK 

$141 

$14! 

Mexico Trip Gifts 

9/5/2012 

Mementos 

Engraved 

Pussywillows on 
Stationery 

$47 

$47 

Mexico Trip Gifts 

9/5/2012 

Mementos 

Seashell Box Oval, 

Pen 

$139 

$139 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gifts 

9/5/2012 

Mementos 

Plaque for General 
McKinley 

$45 

$45 

Mexico Trip Gifts 

9/5/2012 

Mementos 

Phil SMMR Grace 

Set 

$50 

$50 

VCG 

Representational 

Gift 

9/10/2012 

Mementos 

Engraved USCG Gift 
Box for CNO Mexico 

$100 

$100 

Commandant 

Representational 

9/13/2012 

Mementos 

Egg Pendants and 
Lockets 

$325 

$325 


103 


264 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Gifts 






Comniandant 

Representational 

Gifts 

9/21/2012 

Mementos 

Porthole Desk Clock, 
Clock Chart Weight, 
Porthole Desk Set 

$941 

$941 

VCG 

Representational 

Gifts 

9/24/2012 

Mementos 

Shaving Mugs with 
VCG Comdt. Flag, 
Cutter and Pen 

$2,801 

$2,801 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gifts 

9/21/2012 

Mementos 

Plaque for Major 
General Jose Leon 
Riafio 

$49 

$49 

Commandant 

Representational 

Gifts 

9/24/2012 

Mementos 

Coast Guard 
Foundation History 
Books 

$450 

$450 

Total 

$15,131 

$15,131 

United States 
Secret Service 

Director's Holiday 
Reception at USSS 
Hdqtrs 

12/6/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$664 

$664 

Former PPDA^PD 
SAIC's Luncheon 

12/7/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$536 

$536 

Director's Holiday 
Reception for 

Federal & Private 
Sector Law 
Enforcement 
Officials 

12/8/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$5,390 

$5,390 

American 
Embassy-Rome - 
Foreign Law 

12/13/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Food and 

Refreshments 

$1,000 

$1,000 


104 


265 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event{s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Enforcement 

Holiday Function 






Holiday Reception 

12/19/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$11 

$11 

Holiday Reception 
for Melwood/ 
EMCOR/GSA 
Employees 

1/4/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$71 

$71 

DHS-ESG 

Reception 

I/I5/20I2 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$518 

$518 

Liaison with Miami 
University Students 

3/9/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light Refreshments 

$25 

$25 

PRC Meeting 

3/13/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast and 
Luncheon 

$327 

$327 

PRC Meeting 

3/14/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast and 
Luncheon 

$406 

$406 

PRC Meeting 

3/15/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast and 
Luncheon 

$399 

$399 

Law Enforcement 
Exploring Meeting 

4/12/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Luncheon 

$141 

$141 

2012 Association of 
the Former Agents 
of the USSS Board 
of Directors 

Meeting 

4/18/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Luncheon 

$194 

$194 

Business 

Executives for 
National Security 

4/19/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Luncheon 

$194 

$194 


105 


266 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Meeting 






Total 

$9,876 

$9,876 


President’s National 
Security Telecom 

12/8/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$312 

$312 

Under Secretary 
Beers International 
Travel 

12/15/2011 

Mementos 

DHS/NPPD Coins 

$2,005 

$2,005 

S2 Hosted 

Enduring Security 
Reception 

1/19/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$960 

$960 

DHS Hosted 

Meeting with Los 
Angeles Mayor 

2/28/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$399 

$399 

For Official 

Meetings and 
Functions by the 
NPPD D/US 

9/25/2012 

Supplies 

Name Plate Holders 
and Water Pitchers 

$434 

$434 

Total 

$4,110 

$4,110 

Office of 

Health Affairs 

Total 

$0 

$0 

Federal 

Emergency 

Management 

Agency 

Coins for 
International 

Visitors 

3/30/2012 

Mementos 

FEMA Coins 

$518 

$518 

International 

Visitors 

4/6/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Clock 

$129 

$129 

Israeli Delegation 

7/9/2012 

Meals & 
Refreshments 

Box Lunches 

$60 

$60 

International 

8/10/2012 

Mementos 

Coffee Mugs 

$249 

$249 


106 


267 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Visitors 






International 

Visitors 

8/10/2012 

Mementos 

Padfolios 

$488 

$488 

Total 

$1,444 

$1,444 


Meal Tickets 

10/1/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals for Visiting 
Dignitaries/High 
Ranking Guests 

$580 

$0 

Lunch 

2/10/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Luncheon for Senator 
Chambliss and his 
staff (DHS staff paid 
for their meals out of 
pocket) 

$500 

$500 

Advisory Council 
Meeting 

2/28/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Reception for 

Members of the 

FLETC Advisory 
Council 

$284 

$284 

Advisory Council 
Meeting 

2/29/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light 

Snacks/Refreshments 
for FLETC Advisory 
Council 

$139 

$139 

Defense 

Investigative 
Enterprise WG 

4/24/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast/Lunch 

Meals 

$456 

$456 

Office of State and 
Local Law 
Enforcement 
(OSLLE) 

Reception 

5/22/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments for 
Reception 

$888 

$888 


107 


268 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


OSLLE Meeting 

5/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch Buffett 

$318 

$318 

OSLLE Meeting 

5/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$106 

$106 

Official Gifts 

9/10/2012 

Mementos 

Coins 

$2,056 

$2,056 

Meal Tickets 

9/19/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals for Members 
of House Committee 
on Homeland 

Security 

$0 

$11 

Official Gifts 

9/21/2012 

Mementos 

Assorted 

DHS/FLETC 
Mementos 
(DHS/FLETC Glass 
Sets, Shirts, Pens, and 
Paperweights) 

$2,409 

$2,409 

Meal Tickets 

9/30/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Deobligated Unused 
Meal Tickets 

($569) 

$0 

Total 

$7,167 

$7,167 

Science & 
Technology 

Bilateral Meeting 

10/3/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Working Lunch 

$64 

$64 

Bilateral Meeting 

10/20/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Working Lunch 

$259 

$259 

Bilateral Meeting 

10/20/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Working Dinner 

$280 

$280 

Bilateral Meeting 

10/26/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Working Lunch 

$78 

$78 

Bilateral Meeting 

10/27/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Working Lunch 

$94 

$94 


108 


269 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Bilateral Meeting 

11/8/2011 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Working Lunch 

$57 

$57 

Bilateral Meeting 

12/1/201 1 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$95 

$95 

Refreshments for 
Visiting Dignitaries 

2/2/2012- 

5/31/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$56 

$56 

Breakfast for 
Bilateral Meeting 

2/15/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$115 

$115 

Lunch for Bilateral 
Meeting 

2/15/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$273 

$273 

Dinner for Bilateral 
Meeting 

2/15/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meals 

$747 

$747 

Bilateral Meeting 

4/2/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$95 

$95 

Bilateral Meeting 

4/3/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$95 

$95 

Bilateral Meeting 

4/4/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$95 

$95 

Bilateral Meeting 

4/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$58 

$58 

Workshop 

4/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$64 

$64 

Bilateral Meeting 

4/16/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$62 

$62 

Bilateral Meeting 

5/31/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$158 

$158 

Bilateral Meeting 

7/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$80 

$80 


109 


270 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2012 by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Refreshments for 
Visitin^[ Dignitaries 

9/11/2012- 

9/30/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$1.50 

$150 

Bilateral Meeting 

9/17/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$174 

$174 

Total 

$3,149 

$3,149 

Domestic 

Nuclear 

Detection 

Office 

DNDO Executive 
Steering Committee 

4/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$16 

$16 

Architecture and 
Plans Directorate 
Classroom 
Presentation 

7/5/2012 

Mementos 

Pens for International 
Law Enforcement 
Academy Students 
(non-DHS) 

$655 

$653 

Delegation Visiting 
from Israel 

7/10/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$52 

$52 

Total 

$723 

$723 


USCIS is not included in the Rep Fund report because it uses revenue from its fee account and not appropriated resources for Official 
Reception and Representation. USCIS had authority to use up to $10,000 from its Immigration Examination Fee account for Official 
Reception and Representation per public law. 


Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 

Office of the 
Secretary and 
Executive 
Management 

A/S Bersin with 
Brazilian 

Delegation 

10/19/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$399 

$399 

Meeting Supplies 

11/9/2012 

Meals and 

Coffee Creamer 

$3 

$3 


HO 


271 





Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 




Refreshments 




SI with 

AmeriCorps 
Members Working 
Sandy Recovery 

11/11/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$312 

$312 

Official Gifts 

11/19/2012 

Mementos 

Vase 

$95 

$95 

S2 and Government 
Counterparts on 
Extremism 

11/25/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$45 

$45 

Official Gifts 

11/29/2012 

Mementos 

Desk Sets 

$402 

$402 

Mementos 

11/29/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Coins 

$1,790 

$1,790 

Agreement 

Signings with 
Counterpart 

Nations 

11/29/2012 

Mementos 

Pens 

$1,644 

$1,644 

SI Meeting with 
Homeland Security 
Advisory Council 

11/29/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$100 

$100 

Official Gifts 

12/3/2012 

Mementos 

Cast Plant Replicas 

$303 

$303 

Official Gifts 

12/6/2012 

Mementos 

Colonel Lilleton 

Folios 

$767 

$767 

A/S Bersin Meeting 
with General of 
Swiss Federal 

Police 

12/6/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$105 

$105 

Official Gift 

12/10/2012 

Mementos 

USCG Gift Box 

$25 

$25 

Official Gifts 

12/13/2012 

Mementos 

Indian Kachina 

Dancer Glass 

$580 

$580 


111 






Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 





Sculptures 



Official Gift 

12/14/2012 

Mementos 

Bowl 

$116 

$116 

Official Gifts 

12/14/2012 

Mementos 

DHS Trays 

$232 

$232 

SI Farewell 
Reception for 
Senator Lieberman 

12/19/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$900 

$900 

Official Gift 

12/20/2012 

Mementos 

USCG Book 

$30 

$30 

Official Gift 

12/20/2012 

Mementos 

USCG iacket 

$7,5 

$75 

Asst, Secretary 
Bersin Lunch 

1/9/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with Indian 
Delegation 

$70 

$70 

S2-Sponsored 

Dinner 

1/9/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

S2-Sponsored Dinner 
with German State 
Secretary Fritsche 

$500 

$500 

Official Gift for 
Mexican 

Ambassador 

1/16/2013 

Mementos 

Painting of DC 

Bridge 

$159 

$159 

Official Gifts 

1/16/2013 

Mementos 

Commercial 

Appraisal of Gifts 
Received 

$100 

$100 

SI -Hosted 

Breakfast 

1/24/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Hosted Breakfast 
with Senator Carper 

$24 

$24 

Official Gifts 

2/4/2013 

Mementos 

Indian Glass 

Sculptures of an 

Eagle, Buffalo, and 

Red Tailed Hawk 

$450 

$450 

Asst, Secretary 
Bersin Lunch 

2/6/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

w/International 
Association of Chiefs 

$700 

$700 


112 


273 




Department of Homeland Security 
Offlcial Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 





of Police 



Visa Waiver 

Program 

Negotiations 

2/6/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch for 

Negotiations with 
Japan Preventing 

Crime Committee 

$789 

$789 

Coffee 

2/8/2013 

Supplies 

Bulk Coffee Purchase 
for Official Meetings 

$62 

$62 

COS-Hosted Lunch 

2/8/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch with Senator 
Carper 

$90 

$90 

Official Gifts 

2/11/2013 

Mementos 

Blankets 

$295 

$295 

Paper 

2/25/2013 

Supplies 

Paper and Plaeecards 
for Official Meals 

$18 

$18 

SI -Hosted Dinner 

2/25/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner w/ the Depts. 
of Health & Human 
Services, Agriculture, 
Governors 

$630 

$630 

S 1 -Hosted Lunch 

3/12/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

w/lnternational Civil 
Aviation 

Organization 

$45 

$45 

Total 

$11,855 

$11,855 

Office of the 
Under 

Secretary for 
Management 

Total 

$0 

$0 

Analysis and 
Operations 

Total 

$0 

$0 

Customs and 

Meeting with | 1 1/12/2012 | Meals and | Lunch and Dinner 

$1,323 

$1,323 


113 


274 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 

Border 

Protection 

Government of 
Mexico Transition 
Team 


Refreshments 




Meeting for NCR 
Law Enforcement 

10/23/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$810 

$810 

Law Enforcement 
WG- Canada 

12/13/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$400 

$400 

Law Enforcement 
WG- Italy 

12/13/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$500 

$500 

S 1 , Mexican 

Senator and US 
Ambassador 

Meeting 

12/14/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$112 

$112 

Cl meeting with 
Mexico 

Government 

Officials 

1/16/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Social Event 

$345 

$345 

Law Enforcement 
Working Group 
(LEWG) - Belgium 

1/18/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Reception 

$500 

$500 

C2 Meeting with 

Panamanian 

Government 

Officials 

2/15/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$319 

$319 

C2 Meeting with 
Panamanian 

Officials 

2/15/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$276 

$276 

Protocol Supplies - 

2/19/2013 

Supplies 

2 Cases Coffee; 2 

$600 

$600 


114 


275 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2013 (through March 30. 2013) bv Comnonent 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Commissioner’s 

Office 



Carafes; 6 Cases 

Water; Paper 

Napkins, Cups, etc. 



Total 

$5,185 

$5,185 

Immigration 
and Customs 
Enforcement 

Meeting with 
Director, Mexican 
SAT and 

Delegation 

1/16/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Coffee Service 

$59 

$59 

Mexican 

Contingent and 

DHS Working 

Group 

1/17/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Luncheon 

$716 

$716 

Criminal 

Intelligence 

Advisory Group 

2/3/2013 



Meals and 
Refreshments 

Light 

Refreshraents/Lunch 

$1,355 

$1,355 

Total 

$2,130 

$2,130 

Transportation 

Security 

Administration 

Meeting with 

Senior Level 
Officials from 
Vietnam 

10/18/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$193 

$193 

Meeting with 
Australia’s Director 
Transportation 
Security 

11/5/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$104 

$104 

Meeting with Dutch 
Ministry of 

Security and Justice 

1 1/6/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$105 

$105 

Meeting with 

12/10/2012 

Meals and 

Refreshments 

$20 

$20 


115 


276 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Evcnt(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Philippine 

Delegation 


Refreshments 




Meeting with 
Philippine 

Delegation 

12/10/2012 

Mementos 

Engraved Cube 

$70 

$70 

Meeting with 

Philippines 

Administrator 

12/10/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$84 

$84 

Delegation from 
Saudi Arabia 

1/17/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Reception for Saudi 
Arabia Delegation 

$84 

$84 

Host Delegation 
from Germany 

2/19/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments for 
Meeting with German 
Delegation 

$55 

$55 

Eastern Caribbean 
Civil Aviation 
Delegation 

3/13/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments for 
Meeting with 
Delegation 

$45 

$45 

Israel Aviation 
Security Working 
Group 

3/20/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments & 

Lunch 

$115 

$115 

Total 

$875 

$875 

United States 
Coast Guard 

Deputy 

Commandant for 
Operations Visit to 
Greece 

1 1/1/2012 

Mementos 

Engraved Compass 
Chartweights 

$310 

$310 

Deputy 

Commandant visit 

w/Panamanian 

Officials 

11/15/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$390 

$390 


116 


LUl 




Department of Homeland Security 
Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 
FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 


Component 

Name 

Name of Eveiit(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Commandant Visit 
to Singapore 

1 1/19/2012 

Mementos 

USCG Glass 
Paperweights 

$244 

$244 

Official Receptions 
in Commandant's 
Quarters 

11/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$764 

$764 

Commandant Visit 
to Singapore 

11/27/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$1,537 

$1,537 

Dep Sec General, 
Supreme Council 
for National 

Security 

1/14/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Coffee and Pastry 
Service 

$60 

$60 

Inauguration Day 
Meeting for Joint 
Chiefs of Staff 

2/7/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$642 

$642 

Black Engineer of 
the Year Awards 

2/8/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Reception Held Prior 
to Stars and Stripes 
Awards Ceremony 

$1,500 

$0 

NOAA 

Administrator Gift 

2/25/2013 

Mementos 

Large Coin w/ Box 
and Brass Plate, 
Departing Gift for Dr. 
Lubchenco 

$58 

$58 

Dr. Lubchenco 
(NOAA 
Administrator) 
Reception 

3/8/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Evening Reception 
with Hors d'Oeuvres 

$875 

$875 

Total 

$4,880 

$4,880 

United States 
Secret Service 

American 

Embassy-Rome 

12/6/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$1,000 

$1,000 


117 


278 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2013 (through March 30. 2013) bv Component 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Law Enforcement 
Function 






Center for Identity 
Meeting 

12/11/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast 

$512 

$512 

Israeli Delegation 
Meeting- Working 
Lunch 

3/6/20)3 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$175 

$175 

Total 

$1,687 

$1,687 

National 
Protection & 
Programs 
Directorate 

Law Enforcement 
Meeting with DC 
Area Officials 

11/16/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$704 

$704 

Total 

$704 

$704 

Office of 

Health Affairs 

Total 

$0 

$0 

Federal 

Emergency 

Management 

Agency 

Search and Rescue 
Workshop 

1/13/2013 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch and 
Refreshments 

$950 

$950 

Total 

$950 

$950 

Federal Law 
Enforcement 
Training 

Center 

Future Meetings 
with Dignitaries 

11/15/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Meal Tickets for 

Future Events 

$580 

$0 

National Summit 
on Multiple 
Casualty-Reception 

12/11/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Refreshments 

$219 

$219 

Total 

$799 

$219 

Science & 
Technology 

Cybersecurity 

Broad Area 

Announcement 

Kickoff 

10/10/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$1,134 

$1,134 


118 


279 




Department of Homeland Security 

Official Reception and Representation Obligations and Expenditures 

FY 2013 (through March 30, 2013) by Component 

Component 

Name 

Name of Event(s) 

Date of 
Event 

Purpose of Event 

Description of Items 
Purchased 

Obligations 

Expenditures 


Annual Meeting 
with Singapore 
Ministry of Home 
Affairs 

10/15/2012 

Mementos 

Plates and Glass 
Awards 

$249 

$249 

Meeting with 
Australia Defense 
Science and 
Technology 

12/3/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$696 

$696 

Meeting with 
Australia Defense 
Science and 
Technology 

12/3/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Breakfast and Lunch 

$355 

$355 

Meeting with 
Canada’s National 
Defense Counselor 

12/20/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Lunch 

$144 

$144 

Total 

$2,578 

$2,578 

Domestic 

Nuclear 

Detection 

Office 

International 

Appreciation 

Dinner- Atomic 
Energy 

10/10/2012 

Meals and 
Refreshments 

Dinner 

$90 

$90 

Total 

$90 

$90 


119 


280 




281 


Financial Management System Modernization 

Question: The fiscal 2014 request includes funds for the Financial Systems Modernization 
effort. What are the next components who are in the “queue” for modernization? What is your 
estimate for the cost for remaining modernization projects? 

Answer^ For FY 2014, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) will implement their approved Course of 
Action (COA) for financial systems modernization that determined transitioning to a shared 
service provider (SSP) is the preferred path forward. USCG plans also include their customer 
Components, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the Domestic Nuclear 
Detection Office (DNDO), DHS and USCG have briefed the Office of Management and Budget 
and the Department of the Treasury on their plans. 

For FY 2014, funding for financial systems modernization efforts will include funding for 
USCG, TSA, DNDO, and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center including its customers. 
Intelligence and Analysis and Operations Coordination and Planning. Also, by the third quarter 
of FY 2014, OHA will have completed their transition to CBP as their new SSP. 

Other Components will continue their planning and evaluation efforts in FY 2014. Immigration 
and Customs Enforeement (ICE) is working on an alternatives analysis and plans to begin 
modernization in FY 2015. Planning efforts include ICE’s customer Components, U.S. 
Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Science and Technology Directorate, the National 
Protection and Programs Directorate, and DHS Headquarters. The Federal Emergency 
Management Agency will also continue planning efforts in FY 2014 for future financial system 
modernization. 

The President’s Budget requested $29.5 million for the Coast Guard and its customer 
Components. DHS OCFO and Components continue to evaluate the costs of this project in light 
of new government-wide guidance regarding the use of shared services and standardized 
requirements for financial systems. 


DHS-Wide Audit 


Question: Please provide the status of a clean, unqualified audit of the DHS budget to be 
conducted by an independent party. 

Answer: In November 2012, DHS obtained a qualified opinion on all financial statements. In 
FY 2013, the Depaitment is actively pursuing an unqualified (clean) audit opinion which may 
also be retroactive for FY 2012. If this goal is achieved, a retroactive opinion will mean that FY 
2012 is the first year DHS would have received an unqualified (clean) opinion. 

Workinn Capital Fund 

Question: The request includes a substantial increase to the Working Capital Fund (WCF), 
including $975.3 million and 542 FTE. Please justify the enormous growth of the WCF since 
fiscal year 2012 (which included $522.7 M and 394 FTE). 


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282 


Answer: The WCF FY12 Revised Enacted level, as approved by the HAC and SAC on October 
1, 2012, adjusted for actual Component consumption of services. This is the same funding level 
used for the FY 201 3 Annualized CR for the WCF. In formulating the FY 2014 request, the 
WCF started with the FY13 Annualized CR level of $633M as the base. Added to the base were 
adjustments for pay inflation, efficiency reductions resulting from the DHS Campaign to Cut 
Waste Initiative, administrative adjustments, and non-recurring data center migration (DCM) 
resulting in an overall reduction of $88M, which determined the FY14 current service level of 
$546M. 

The change in funding from the FY 14 current service level to the FY14 request is predominantly 
due to to an increase to the WCF totaling $412M to bring in activities currently operating outside 
the WCF and funded by the Components through interagency agreements. Moving these services 
to the WCF will increase efficiencies and reduce costs for the Department. 

Before activities are added to the WCF, OCFO and the Working Capital Fund Governance Board 
(WCFGB), which is comprised of .3 permanent CFO members and 7 revolving members from 
the components, perform a business case review. The business case review determines whctlicr 
the initiative meets the WCF criteria for efficiencies, economies of scale, and/or cost savings 
over the long term. The Board then votes on whether or not to add the activities to the WCF. 

The charts below show the additional costs and FTE: 


FY 2014 ($ in millions) 

Current Services Level 

$546 

Current WCF Activity Increases 

$63 

Existing Programs New to the WCF (currently paid outside the WCF) 

$412 

New Activity Approved by the WCFGB 

$1 

Total President’s Budget Request 

$1,022 


In the table above, the “Current WCF Activity Increases” represent requests due to expanding 
services and changes in consumption or requirements. The expanded services are currently being 
funded via Interagency Agreements outside of the WCF and will not have an impact on 
component budgets, with the exception of one new requirement for an increase to GSA Rent for 
occupancy at a training center. The “Existing Programs New to the WCF” consist of activities 
that were approved to be included in the WCF for FY 2013. Due to the Continuing Resolution, 
the FY 2013 approved activities will be deferred until FY 2014. The WCF will be the 
centralized funding mechanism and will not affect the Components appropriated budgets. The 
“New Activity Approved by the WCFGB” is one new requirement not currently being funded 
elsewhere. This activity meets the criteria for inclusion in the WCF, which provides cost savings, 
transparency, and economics of scale. 

The change in FTE of 412 to 564 includes the conversion of 101 FTE from contractors to 
Federal employees through the DHS Balanced Workforce Strategy, a reduction of 9 FTE due to 
rightsizing in FY 2012, and 60 FTE associated with activities the new to the WCF in FY14. 
Fifty-five of these FTE were previously funded in other accounts. 


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283 



A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

E-D 

DHS WCF 
Activities 

FY12FTE 

FY12FTE 

Rightsizing 

Mission 

Support 

FY12 DHS 
Balanced 
Workforce 
Conversions 

FY13 CR 
FTE 

(A-rB-hC) 

FY14FTE 

Delta 

Total 

412 

(9) 

101 

504 

564 

60 


Question: The fiscal year 2014 request again proposes to fund HSPD- 1 2 centrally through the 
WCF - and each component has requested funds for that purpose. Those costs should be offset 
by savings within each component's Office of Security and “economies of scale” throughout the 
Department - since these responsibilities ate being consolidated. Please provide a listing by 
component of the offsetting savings for fiscal year 2014. Please also describe in detail the 
metrics and “system dashboard” being developed to facilitate reporting to components. 

Answer: In FY 2013, OCSO will continue to provide HSPD-12 related services via Inter- 
Agency Agreements (lAAs) to DHS Components in support of implementation efforts for card 
issuance. Beginning in FY 2014, the HSPD-12 will transition into the WCF as it moves forward 
into the operations and maintenance phase of the program lifecycle. This is in direct support of 
PIV Card Issuance Facilities (PCIF) management activities. 


Component 

FY13 Planned 
Collection (lAA) 

FY14 President’s 
Budget 

Delta 

CBP 

.5,872,706 

5,693,973 

-178,733 

FLETC 

274,192 

261,262 

-12,930 

ICE 

3,.542,273 

3,375,228 

-167,045 

TSA 

7,109,440 

6,774,176 

-335,264 

FEMA 

2,122,272 

2,022,191 

-100,081 

NPPD/Direct 

122,712 

116,925 

-5,787 

NPPD - Visit 

103,070 

0 

-103,070 

FPS 

I27„591 

121, .574 

-6,017 

OHA 

23,.375 

22,27.3 

-1,102 

OPS and I&A 

207,457 

197,673 

-9,784 

OIG 

65,646 

62,550 

-3,096 

S&T 

135,382 

128,998 

-6,384 

DNDO 

35,940 

.34,245 

-1,695 

USCG 

0 

0 

0 

USCIS 

1,924,898 

1,834,125 

-90,773 

USSS 

955,902 

910,824 

-45,078 

DHS - HQ 

.377,145 

359,360 

-17,785 

Total 

2.3,000,000 

21,915,377 

-1,084,624 


The Identity Management System (IDMS) “system dashboard” was developed to track card 
issuance for each Component under the metric categories of Total PIV Card Issuance, Total 
Entities in the IDMS, Total Active Entities in the IDMS, and Total Active PIV Cards for Active 
Entities in IDMS. 


122 





284 


Question: DHS established a working group comprised of all components within DHS to 
discuss streamlining the PIV card issuance process for contractors. What were the 
recommendations of that working group? Has a revised policy been issued to address the 
concerns and recommendations? If not, when will that policy be issued? 

Answer: The process for issuing PIV cards to Contractors supporting multiple contracts was 
discussed during DHS HSPD- 1 2 Council meetings and it was recommended that Contractors 
have only one active DHS PIV card and Components not re-issue a PIV card if Contractors 
already have an active (unexpired) card. 

The DHS governance documents, the PIV Card Issuer (PCI) Operations Plan and Procedures 
Reference Book (PRB), are being updated to include the HSPD-12 Council recommendations. 

The next version of the governance document is scheduled for release on or about September 2, 
2013. It will include language that DHS PIV Card Issuance Facility (PCIF) Managers must 
comply with the issuance, re-issuance, and the PIV card topology requirements. 

Data Center Migration 

Question: The fiscal year 2014 request calls for $.34.2 million for data center consolidation to 
migrate FEMA, USCIS, TSA and CBP to the Enterprise Data Centers. Please describe how you 
are using existing funding in fiscal year 2013. What is the impact of sequestration? 

Answer: Planned dispersal of FY 2013 data center migration funding is shown below. 


FY 2013 Migration Funding Breakdown 


Component 

Project/Tasks 

Final 

($ in millions) 

CBP 

Multiple system migration projects from Newington data center 
systems to DCl and DC2; projects include: 

CDP - Common Delivery Platform, VTL and F5 BOM, 

Security Enclave, WAN Optimization, E2E, and draw down for 
DCl and DC2 

Project Management. Planning and Engineering 

$24,680 

Subtotal 

$24,680 

TSA 

Continue TTAC Operations Centers’ consolidation activity; 
-Secure Flight 

-Transportation Vetting System (TVS) 

-Other 

$12,755 

Subtotal 

$12,775 

USCIS 

Complete migration from Technology Engineering 

Consolidation Center (TECC) Facility (Manassas, VA); TECC 
Phase 2 Migration 

$16,297 

Service Center Consolidation (Systems distributed throughout 
the USCIS Enterprise Program) includes: 


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285 



-Service Centers (CA, TX, NE, VT) 

-Records/Benefits Centers (MO) 

-NCR HQ (DC) 


Subtotal 

$16,297 


Total 

$53,732 


Footnote: $64,797 million was originally requested in the FY 2013 President’s Budget for Data Center Migration. 


The sequestration reduction delays the migration of the CBP Newington data center into the 
DHS consolidated data centers. Delaying this migration also pushes out the return on investment 
for the consolidation effort and increases the amount of unoccupied rack space in the data 
centers. 

Question: Should this funding not be available in fiscal year 2014, what would be the cost and 
operational consequences for these agencies and DHS? 

Answer: Most of the current large consolidation efforts (e.g., CBP Newington Data Center, 
USCIS Service Centers) are split between fiscal years and are relying on continued funding in 
FY 2014 to complete the overall effort. If the funding is unavailable, it impacts ongoing projects 
and project planning, which will be caught “mid-stream”. These projects may not be able to go 
forward until the funding is confirmed. Overall, a decrease in FY 2014 funding will push major 
migration activity out, and may cause some additional sites to not fully consolidate. 

Question: With completion of data center migration for FEMA, CBP, TSA and USCIS, are there 
remaining data center migration efforts required? If so, please indicate agencies, and a timeline 
with funding required for completion of ail migration. 

Answer: DHS migration funding has been planned to complete major consolidation activity 
principally from the identified primary legacy sites. The FY 2014 funding request is designed to 
accomplish this. However, there will continue to be minor activity in out-years as DHS and its 
Components continue to consolidate their data centers. OCIO is working with the Components to 
identify all sites to be consolidated, and OCIO will oversee the high-level long term plans of 
Component-funded identified projects. 

This includes the USCG plan to consolidate some of its outlying data center sites to its primary 
data center (OSC Martinsburg), which will be principally planned and funded by USCG. 

FY 2014 migration funding is designed only to complete major migration efforts from primary 
legacy sites. Any follow-on consolidation efforts will primarily be identified by the Component 
owners and OCIO will continue to facilitate and encourage this activity to determine any funding 
requirements. 


Information Technology Security 

Question: Through its Information Security and Infrastructure activities, the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer supports multiple information and data networks for DHS. While all the 
design is intended to improve security from external threats or system failures, and improve 


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286 


performance and connectivity within the Department, there will always be a risk of “insider 
threats” to DHS systems. Please describe the programs and efforts in place to assure internal 
security, with associated funding. 

Answer: Within DHS, the Counterintelligence Programs Division (CIPD) of the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis (l&A) is the only funded program with the responsibility for “Insider 
Threat”, however many of the efforts and technologies maintained by OCIO support that 
mission, including tools, processes, and expertise to monitor, detect, and respond to security 
events protect against malicious activity from external or internal actors. 

The Cyber-Threat Analysis Center (CTAC) and Focused Operations efforts. Trusted Internet 
Connection (TIC) controls. Policy Enforcement Points between Components, Security 
Operations Center (SOC) functions, and system-level controls and continuous monitoring work 
to identify attempts at exfiltration of protected data, detect escalation of privilege, and manage 
inappropriate data access and storage rights enforcement to assure security of information from 
external and internal threats alike. These capabilities and controls are designed to and will detect 
anomalous behavior of malicious insiders as well as outside actors with compromised insider 
credentials. 

The DHS OCIO has a lead role in the transformation of the Committee on National Security 
Systems (CNSS) which is responding to shortcomings identified by the Wiki-Leaks incident. 

The DHS CIO co-chairs the committee and the DHS Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) 
is driving multiple efforts to address the top five priority areas, which are Removable Media, 
Reducing Anonymity, Insider Threat, Enterprise Audit, and Access Control. The DHS CISO 
serves at the Subcommittee level, in Architecture, and in Mobility & Wireless Security to 
establish increased standards and raise the capabilities and assurance posture of all NSS 
including those National Security networks and systems within DHS. Representatives from DHS 
serve in all aspects and efforts of the various Working Groups. 

Inter-Agency and Intra-Denartmental Agreements 

Question: Please update the data provided last year regarding any new or amended memoranda 
of agreement (MOAs), memoranda of understanding (MOUs), or other formal agreements 
established within DHS between components and between components and the interagency, 
including a concise description. Again, this list should be broken out at the component level and, 
for each, list relevant agreements (1) between the component and other DHS entities and (2) 
between the component and other departments and agencies. 

Answer: Please see accompanying spreadsheet providing all Department MOAs, MOUs, and 
lAAs through April 30, 2013. 


Non-Pay and Fuel Inflation 

Question: Please provide the fiscal guidance issued to the components for non-pay and fuel 
inflation adjustments for fiscal year 2014. If guidance was not issued for non-pay and fuel 
inflation, please explain the rationale. 


125 



287 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and tntra-D^aitmentat Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DMO) 


Office 

inter-Agency/Intra-Departmental 

Agreements 

Description 


OCRSO 

Army Corps of Engineers. Construction 
Engineering Kesearch Laboratory 

Com^Mitcr database and environmental services, including 
chccMist. 

US Army/Army Corps of Engineers, 
Construction Engineering Research 
Laboratory 

FEMA Office of Environmental and Historic 
Planning 

Updatirtg esmronmental planning dixuments, instructions, 
ar>d procedures 

FEMA 

Renewable Energy Support 

Provide expert analysis and assistance hi identifying and 
Imc^ementing renewable ^ergy technologies 

Department of Energy/National Renewable 
Energy Laboratory 

Agency Asset Management System 

customize and acce^ the Agency Asset Management System 
(AAMS) for internal screening of personal property. 

•US General Services Administration 

Records Management 

STORAGE AND TRANSFER OF DHS RECORDS 

NARA 

Functionaf Reaiignmerit OCRSO to OCIO 

USM Realignment of the OCRSO/RPM functions to the OCIO 
Organization 

Under Secretary for Management/OCIO 

Functional Realignment OCRSO to OCHCO 

USM Realignment of the OCRSO/RPM functions to the OCHCO 
Organization 

Under Secretary for Mariagement/OCHCO 

Functional Realignment OCRSO to OSM 

USM Rcaii^ment of the OCRSO/Directives Program functions 
to the immediate Office of the Under Secretary for 
Management 

Under Secretary for Management/front 
office 

Memorandum of Agreement between the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer and the U.S, 
Customs S Border Protection. 

international Mail Screening Program 

U.S. Customs & Border Protection 

Intra-Agency Agreement (Transit Services) 

Provide Regional Transit Subsidies benefits 

Department of T ransportation 

Inter-Agency Agreement/Reimbursabie MOA 
(Executive Dining Facility) 

Provide personnel bdlets for Executive Dining Facility Food 
Service Operations 

USCG 

Inter-Agency Agreement 

Facilitation Services to support OCRSO's "Re-imagining" 
process 

USCG 

MOA By and Among the Office of the Deputy 
Mayor for Planning and Economic 
Development, QSAand OHS 

Establishes the Parties' respective rotes, responsibilities and 
commitments in connection with the development of the 
northern portion of the St. Elizabeths East Campus 

Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning 
and Economic Oeveiopment, GSA and DHS 

MOA Between DHS and Space and Naval 
Warfare (SPAWAR) Systems Center Atlarstic 

Engineering analysis for the development of security access 
control requirements for the new OHS HQ Facility 

SPAWAR 

MOA Among 6SA, Advisory Council on 

Historic Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 
Office, National Capital Planning Commission 
and DHS Regarding the Development of the 
USCG Headquarters at St. Elizabeths National 
Historic Landmark 

Expanding the limit of Disturbance slightly east to the west 
foundation of Building 5 of the Center Building in order to 
implement an appropriate system to protect and support the 
building. 

GSA, Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, OC Historic Preservation 

Office, National Capital Planning 

Commission and OHS 

MOA Among GSA, Advisory Council on 

Historic Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 
Office, National Capital Planning Commissiort 
and DHS Regarding the Development of the 
USCG Headquarters at St. Elizabeths National 
Historic Landmark 

Amendment to MOA Exhibit 2 (Construction Staging Plan) to 
nclude Child Care Play Yard construction area. 

GSA, Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 

Office, National Capital Planning 

Commission and DHS 

MOA Among GSA, Advisory Council on 

Historic Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 
Office, National Capital Planning Commission 
and DHS Regarding the Development of the 
Rehabilitation and Adaptive Reuse of 

Buildings 31, .33, 34, 37, 49, 71 and a Portion 
of Building S6 at St. Elizabeths National 

MOA to ensure continued compliance with NHPA, including 
Sections 106 and 110(f) 

GSA. Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, OC Historic Preservation 

Office, National Capital Planning 

Commission and OHS 

MOA Among GSA, Advisory Council on 

Historic Preservation, OC Historic Preservation 
Office, National Capital Planning Commissiori 
and OHS Regarding the Devolapment of the 
tehabiiitation and Adaptive Reuse of 

Buildings 31, 33, 34, 37, 49, 71 and a Portion 
of Building 56 at St. Elizabeths National 

MOA expanded to Include rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of 
NKl Contributing Building S2 (ke House) 

GSA, Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 

Office, National Capital Planning 

Commission and DHS 






288 


Department of Homeland Security 
inter-Agency and Intra-Departmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations {DM0) 


Office 

Inter-Agency/Intra-Departmentai 

Agreements 

Description 



MOA Among GSA, Advisory Council on 

Historic Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 

Office, National Capital Planning CommisHon 

and DHS Regarding the Development of the 
interagency Security Committee (ISC) Level S 
Perimeter Security Improvements at St. 

Elizabeths National Historic Landmark 


GSA, Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 

Office, National Capita! Planning 

Commission and DHS 


MOU Between Genera! Services 

Administration and DHS to Guide the 
Consolidation of OHS Headquarters Elements 

MOU to set forth and define rtte roles/responsibiiities of 

GSA/DHS regarding constAdation of DHS national 

headquarters elements in the Natiorrat Capital Region 
(Overarching MOU), 

GSA 


MOU Between General Services 

Administration National Capita! Region and 
DHS Concerning Oversight of funds Received 
Through the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 

MOU to set forth and define ttw roles/responsibtlities of 
GSA/DHS regarding funds received by OHS pursuant to the 

ARRA Act of 2009. Specifically incorporated by reference into 
any Reimbursable Work Authorization received by GSA from 
OHS fcN* a portion of the multi-phased project to develop the 

St. Elizabeths Campus for the new OHS national headquarters. 

GSA 


MOU Between General Services 
Administration's Public Buildings Service 
National Capital Region and DHS 

Agreemmt that sets fcHth/defines rc^s and responsibilities for 
the acquisition of office furniture and related services 
(furniture management services, move services, and furniture 
disposition services). Covers all phases of the Headquarters 
Consolidation 

GSA 


MOU Between General Services 

Administration National Capital Region artd 
OHS for the Nebraska Avenue Complex 

MOU to set forth and define the roies/responsibililies/financial 
obligations of G5A/0HS for the master planning, development 
and/or redevelopment, design, construction, rnovirg, and 
occupancy for future design and construction of NAC projects. 

GSA 


Programmatic Agreement Among GSA, 
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, DC 
Historic Preservation Office, Federal Highway 
Administration, National Capital Planning 
Commission and DHS Regarding the 
Redevelopment of St. Elizabeths National 

PA per Sections 106 and 110 of the National Historic 
Preservation Act, implementing regulations, and provisions 
authorizing negotiation of a programmatic agreement to 
resolve adverse effects from certain complex project 
situations. 

GSA, Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, DC Historic Preservation 

Office, Federal Highway Administration, 
National Capital Planning Commission and 
DHS 


Memorandum of Agreement between the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer and 

Operations Coordination and Intel & Analysis 
for the Shared Services. 

To provide Shared Services for Mail Operations, Transit 

Subsidy. Parking, Sedan Service, Federal Occupational Health, 
Postage and Mt. Weather Rent in FY2013 

Operations Coordination and Intel & 

Analysis (l&A}(0P5) 



Mail Operations Provide safe mail service to OHS employees in 
the NCR. To limit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical. Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CROS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier service and delivery of safe mail to OHS Headquarters 
and Component HQ facilities in the NCR. 




Transit Subsidy -Provides a subsidy to Federal employees who 
commote to and from work on a regular basis using rapid 
transit, puUic or commuter buses, commuter rail, 
ncorporated van pools, or any combinatiort of the above, law 
and Executive Orders require the implementatior^ of 

Commuter Transit Subsidy Program at federal agencies. DHS 
participation in the Employee Transit Subsidy Benefit Program 
s not optional. Without a transit benefits program DHS would 
not be in compliance with Executive Order 131S0, "Federal 
Workforce Transportation*. April 21. 2000; and Title 26, Code 
of Federal Regulations, Section 1.132-9, "Qualified 
Transportation Fringes". 







289 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-Oepartmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations {OMO) 








290 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and intra-Departmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DMO) 


Office 

Inter-Agency/Intra-Departmenta! 

Agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/ 

Department 


Office of the inspector Genera! for the 

Shared Services. 

Mail Operations Provide safe mail service to OHS employees in 
the NCR. To Nmit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical, Bioiogrcal, Radiologicai, Nuclear and 
Ex|:dosives anaefcria the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CRDS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier service and deRveryofsafemailto OHS Headquarters 
artd Component HQ fedlities in the NCR, 




Postage for OfRclai Mail: Provide funding for all out-going 
Official Mail Postage metered at the Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CRDS). The funding for postage is independent 
of the Mail Operations due to the fluctuating cost of postage 
and usage by the components. 39 CFR 310.1 {Private Express 
Statue) prohibits the use of entities other than the United 

States Postal Sovice to d^ver fetters to second parties. 



Memorandum of Agreement between the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer and the 

Federal Emergency Management Agency for 
the Shared Services. 

To (M-ovide Shared Services for Mail Operations. Sedan Service 
and Shuttle Service in FY20i3 

Federal Emergency Management Agency 


Mail Operations Prowde safe mail service to OHS employees in 
the NCR. To Hmit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical, Nological, Radiological. Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CRDS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier service and delivery of safe mail to OHS Headquarters 
and Component HQ facilities in the NCR. 




Sedans Service -Provide a reliable method of transportation to 
ensure on-time for meeting and engagements. Ensure that the 
serMce allows senior officials the ability to maximiie 
effectiveness and efficiency of their time and provide a setting 
that allows them to conduct official business while in transit 
that would not be available on public transportation. 




Shuttles Services -Ensures employees have access to DHS 
locations across the National Capital Region. Provide a reliable 
and predictable schedule for employees to plan and conduct 
meetings. Administer shuttles services for all OHS employees at 
vanous component and Headquarters locations throughout 
the NCR. 



Memorandum of Agreement between the 

Chief Readiness Support Officer and the 
Transportation Security Administration 

To provide Shared Services for Mail Operations and Shuttle 
Service in fV2013 

Transportation Security Administration 



Mail Operations Provide safe mail service to OHS employees in 
the NCR. To limit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Oeitvery Site {CRDS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier service and deiivery of safe mail to OHS Headquarters 
and Component HQ facilities in the NCR- 




buttles Serrices -Ensures employees have access to DHS 
ocations across the National Capital Region. Provide a reliable 
and predictable schedule for employees to plan and conduct 
meetings. Administer shuttles services for all OHS employees at 
various component and Headquarters locations throughout 
the NCR. 



Memorandum of Agreement between the 

Chief Readiness Support Officer and the 

Office of Health Affairs for the Shared 

Services. 

To provide Shared Services for Mail Operations. Transit 

Subsidy, Parking, Sedan Sendee, Federal Occupational Health 
and Postage in FY2013 

Office of Health Affairs 







291 


Department of Hom^and Security 
Inter-Agency and tntra-Departmentai Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DMO) 


Other /^ency/ 

Department 

MaH Operations ftwide safe mail service to DHS employees in 

the NCR. To liniit and avad the rtek of possible life threatening 

exposure to Chemical, Ndopca), Radiological, Nuclear and 

Exi^osives attack wa the m«l. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
OeliveryStte (CUDS) for reception, sawning, processing, 

courier service and d^ery of safe mail to OHS Headquarters 

and Component HQfadHties in the NCR. There is a separate 

and distinct MOU to provide 'Laboratory Screening of 

Departmental Mail' hir Biolo^ai Detection Services 

(SioWetch). 

Transit Subsidy -Provides a subsidy to Federal employees who 
commute to and from work on a regular basis using rapid 
transit, puUtc or commuter buses, commuter rail, 
incorporated van poofs, or any combination of the above, law 
and Executive Orders require the implementation of 
Commuter Transit Subady Program at federal agencies. DHS 
participation in the Employee Transit Subsidy Benefit Program 
is not optional. Without a transit benefits program DHS would 
not be in compliance with Executive Order 13150, "Federal 
Workforce Transportation", April 21, 2000; and Title 26, Code 
of Federal Regulations, Section 1.132-9, "Qualified 
Transportation Fringes". 

Parking -Provide parkir^ for OHS Headquarters employees at 
various locations in the downtown Washington. DC area. 

Park>r>g is provided In commercial parking garages to OHS 
Federal employees iMth disabilities, car and vanpools, 

Headquarters executives, and employees consistcrttly required 
Sedans Service Provide a reliable method of transportation to 
ensure on-time for meeting and engagements. Ensure that the 
service allows senior officials the ability to maximize 
effectiveness and efficiency of their time and provide a setting 
that allows them to conduct official business while in transit 
that would not be available on public transportation. 

Federal Occupational health Clinic (FON}- improve the health, 
safety, and productivity of the Federal workforce within Che 
National Capital Region. OHS has health clinics located at the 
7thao Street $W, and the Nebraska Avenue Complex{NAC). 

The clinics are able to provide health care services such as, 
immunizations, health screenings, flu shots and health risk 
appraisals. The program also administers the Automated 
External Defibrillator (AEO) program throughout DHS facilities 
m the Natioital Capital Region. 


inter-Agency/Intra-Departmental 

Agreements 


Postage for Official MaU: Provide funding for all out-going 
Official Mail Postage metered at the Consolidated Remote 
OeKvery Site (CROS). The funding for postage is independent 
of the Mail Operations due to the fluctuating cost of postage 
and us^c by the components. 39 CFR 310.1 (Private Express 
Statue) prohibits the use of entities other than the United 
States Postal Service to deliver letters to second parties. 


Memorandum of Agreement between the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer and the 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office for the 
Shared Services. 


To provide Shared Services for Mail Operations. Transit 
Subsidy, Parking, Sedan Service, Shuttle Service and Federal 
Occupational Health and Postage in FYZ013 


[Domestic Nuclear Detection Office 


Mail Operations Prowde safe mail service to OHS employees in 
the NCR. To limit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CRDS) for reception, screening, processing, 
couricrscrviceand delivery of safe mail to DHS Headquarters 
and Compon^ HQfadfities in the NCR. 









292 


Department of Homeland Security 
inter-Agency and Intra-Departmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations {DM0] 


Office 


inter-Ag^^/lntra-Departmentar 

Agreements 


Memorandum of Agreement between the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer and the 
Federal Law Enforcement training Center for 
the Shared Services. 


(Memorandum of Agreement between the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer and US-VISIT 


Description 


Other^CT^/ 

Department 


Trwisrt Subsidy -Provides a sub»dy to Federal employees who 
commute to attd from work on a re^lar basis using rapid 
transit, pubHc or commute’ buses, commuter rail, 
incorporated van pools, or any combination of tho above, law 
artd Excaitive Orders require the implementation of 
Commuter Transit Subsidy Ffro^am at federal agencies. DBS 
participation in the EmrrioyeeTran!^ Subsidy Benefit Program 
Is not optional. \Mthout a transit benefits program OHS would 
>e in compiiartcewith Executive Order 131S0, "Federal 
IWorhforce Transportation", April 21, 2000; artd Title 26, Code 
lof Federal Regulations, Section 1.132-9, "Qualified 


Parking -Provide parking for DHS Headquarters employees at 
I various locations in the downtown Washington, DC area. 
Parking is provided in commercial parking garages to DHS 
Federal emi^oyees with disebilities, car and vanpools, 
jHcadquarters execudves, and employees consistently required 
work hours outside of core business hours. 


Sedans Service -Prendde a reliable method of transportation to 
rc on-time for meeting and engagements. Ensure that the 
jservice allows senior ofRcials the ability to maximize 
jcffectiv^ess and efTiciency of their time and provide a setting 
that allows them to conduct official business while in transit 
that would not be available on public transportation. 


Shuttles Services -Ensures employees have access to DHS 
locations across the National Capital Region. Provide a reliable 
and predictable schedule for employees to plan and conduct 
meetings Administer shuttles serwees for all DHS employees at 
various component and Headquarters locations throughout 
the NCR. 


Federal Occupational health Clinic (FOH)- improve the health, 
jsafety, and productivity of the Federal workforce within the 
National Capital Region. DHS has health climes located at the 
7th&0 Street SW, and the Nebraska Avenue CompiexiNAC). 
!Thc clinics arc able to provide health care services such as, 
limmunizations, health screenings, flu shots and health risk 
jappraisafs. The program also administers the Automated 
External 0dlbrillator(A£0) program throughout DNS facilities 
the National Capital Region. 


Postage for Official Mall; Provide funding for afl out-going 
Offiaal Mail Postage metered at the Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CROS). The funding for postage is independent 
of the Mall Operations due to the fluctuatir^g cost of postage 
and usage by the components. 39 CFR 310.1 (Private Express 
Statue) prohibits the use of entities other thar; the United 
States Postal Service to deliver letters to second parties, 


To provide Shared Services for Mail Operations in FY2013 


federal Law Enforcement Training Center 


Mail Operations Provide safe mail service to OHS employees in 
[the NCR. To limit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
[exposure to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CRDS) for reception, screening, processing, 

er service and delivery of safe mail to DHS Headquarters 
jand Compoftent HQfacilities in the NCR. 


jTo provide Shared Services for Mail Opcratbns, Transit 
Subsidy, and Sedan Service in fY2013 



293 


Department of Home^nd Security 
inter-Agency and intrs-Departmentat Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DM0) 


Office 

Inter-Agency/Intra-Oepartmental 

Agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/ 

Department 


for the Shared Services. 

Mail Operations Prowde safe mad service to DHS employees in 
the NCR. To limit and avnd the risk of possible life threatening 
eirposure to Chemical, Bioio^al, Radidogicai, Nuclear and 
Ex(dosivesattad( via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CRDS) for reception, screerting, processing, 
courier service and delivery of safe mail to DHS Headquarters 
and Comportent HQfadlities in the NCR. 




Transit Subsidy -Prowdes a subsidy to federal employees who 
commute to and from work on regular basis using rapid 
transit, public or commuter buses, commuter rail, 
incorporated van p<^s, oranycombinationof theabove. Law 
and Executive Orders require the implementation of 

Commuter Transit Subsidy Pro^m at federal agencies. DHS 
participation in the Employee Transit Subsidy Benefit Program 
is not optional. tMthout a trandt benefits program DHS would 
not be in compliance mth Executive Order 13150, "federal 
Workforce Transportafion", April 21, 2000; and Title 26, Code 
of Federal Rcgiiations, Section 1.132-9, "Qualified 
Transportation Fringes". 




Sedans Service -Provide a reliable method of traospoitation to 
ensure on-time for meeting and engagements. Ensure that the 
service ailovrs senior officials the ability to maximize 
effectiveness and effideney of their time and provide a setting 
that allows them to conduct official business while in transit 
that would not be available on public transportation. 



Mcntorandum of Agreement between the 

To protrtde Shared Senhee for Mail Operations in fY2013 

U.S, Immigration & Customs Enforcement 


Chief Readiness Support Officer and the U.S. 
Immigration & Customs enforcement for the 
Shared Services. 

Mail Operations Provide safe mail service to OHS employees In 
the NCR. To limit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nudear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CROS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier service and delivcryof safe mail to OHS Hcadquaners 
and Component HQ facilities in the NCR. 



Memorandum of Agreement between the 

To provide Shared Service for Mail Operations in FY2013 

U S. Customs & Border Protection 


Chief Readiness Support Officer and the U.S. 
Customs & Border Protection for the Shared 

Services. 

Mail Operations Provide safe mail service to OHS employees in 
the NCR. To limit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical. Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CROS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier service and delivery of safe mail to OHS Headquarters 
and Component HQ facilities in the NCR. 



Memorandum of Agreement between the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer and the 
National Protection and Program Directorate 
for the Shared Services. 

To provide Shared Services for Mail Operations, Transit 

Subsidy. Parking, Sedan Service, Shuttle Ser'dee, Federal 
Occupational Health. Postage and Mt. Weather Rent in FY2013 

National Protection and Program 

Directorate 


Mail Operations Provide safe mail service to OHS employees in 
the NCR. To limit and avoid the risk of possible life threatening 
exposure to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site (CROS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier service and delivery of safe mail to DHS Headquarters 
and Component HQfadlities in the NCR. 











294 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and tnUa-Departmerrtat Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations {DM0} 












295 


Department of Homeiand Security 
Inter-Agency and In^a-Departmenta! Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DMO) 


Office 

Inter-Agency/Intra-Departmental 

Agreements 

Desertion 

Illllllllll^^ 


Shared Services. 

Mail Operations Piw^ safe mail »fvice to OHS employees in 
(he NCR. To limit and avoid the ri^ of possible life threatening 
eiq}o»tre to Chonical, Biological. Radioiogical. Nuclear and 
Explosives attack via the mail. Operate a Consoiidated Remote 
Delivery Ste {CRDS) for reception, screening, processing, 
courier servnee and defivery of safe mail to OHS Headquarters 
and Component HQfacAities in the NCR. 


Tran^ Subsidy -Provides a sjfasdy to Federal employees who 
commute to and from vvwk on a regular basis using rapid 
transtt, public or commuter buses, commuter rail, 
incorporated van po^, or any combination of the above. Law 
and Executive Orders require the implementation of 

Commuter Transit Sub»dy Program at federal agencies. DH5 
participation in the Employee Transit Subsidy Benefit Program 
is not optional. Without a transit benefits program DHS would 
not be in compliance with ExKutive Order 131S0, "Federal 
Workforce Transportation”, April 21, 2000; and Title 26, Code 
of Federal Regulations, Section 1.132-9, "Quatifjed 

Parking -Provide parking for OHS Headquarters employees at 
various locations in the downtown Washington, DC area. 

Parking is provided in commercial parking garages to DHS 
Federal employees mth disabilities, car and vanpoois, 
Headquart^s executives, and employees consistently required 

Sedans Service -Provide a reliable method of transportation to 
ensure on-time for meeting and engagements. Ensure that the 
service allows senior officials the ability to maximize 
effectiveness and efficiency of their time and provide a setting 
that allows them to conduct official business while in transit 
that would not be available on public transportation. 

Shuttles Services -Ensures employees have access to DHS 
locations across the National Capital Region. Provide a reliable 
and predictable schedirie for employees to plan and conduct 
meetings. Administer shuttles services for aft OHS employees at 
various component and Headquarters locations throughout 

Federal Occupational health Clinic (FOH)- improve the health, 
safety, and productivity of the Federal workforce within the 
National Capital Region. OHS has health clinics located at the 
7th&D Street SW. and the Nebraska Avenue Complex(NAC). 

The clinics are able to provide health care services such as, 
immunizations, health screenings, flu shots and health risk 
appraisals. The program also administers the J^tomated 
External Defibrillator (AEO) program throughout DHS facilities 

Postage for Official Mail; Provide funding for all out-going 
Official Mail Postage metered at the Consolidated Remote 
Delivery Site fCRDS). The funding for postage is independent 
of the Mail Operations due to the fluctuating cost of postage 
and us^e by the components. 39 CFR 310.1 (Private Express 
Statue) prohibits the use of entities other than the United 

States Postal Service to deliver letters to second parties. 

OCHCO 

Annual Empioyee Survey Tool 

Provides for an interactive reporting at>d action planning tool 
to host employee survey data and survey-related services for 
DHS HQs and Components. 

OPM 

PAS - Personnel Accountability System 

DHS enterprise-wide personnel accountability system to 
account for the entire DHS workforce in the event of disasters 

and ementencies. 

FEMA 

Treasury Executive institute 

Provides 5E5 training scries/forums to develop and reinforce 
the skills and knowledge of SES nwmbers, GS-i4s and GS-15s in 
the areas defined by OPM as Executive Core Qualifications. 

(RS/Treasury Executive Institute 

=EMA Emergency Management Institute 

Online Training 

Provides fw the design and development of six new online 
courses to support the Secretary's Employee Preparedness 
Initiative. 

FEMA/Emergency Management Institute 






296 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-Depaitmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DM0) 


Office 

Inter-Agency/Intra-Departmenta! 

Agreements 

Oescription 


■ 

NFC Payroll and Processing 

Provides payrc^^KTSonnd sy^em support, EmpowHR 
c^rations and maintenance serwces, web-based time and 
attendance hosting, and other misedfaneous agency-specific 
tasks as reoue^ed aruj autlwrized by DHS. 

LiSDA/National Finance Center 

■ 

USAJOBS 

OHS ismandatedtoudlizeUSAJOBSw^idi provides a central 

secure platform to assist in streamfining the federal 
government's over^l turing process and acts as a portal for 
federal recruitment for ali government positions. 

0PM 

■ 

Enterprise Human Resources Integration 
(EHRl) 

Provides electronic personn^ file tools and services in 
comjrfiance with OPM's Enterprise Human Resources 

Integration Irfitiathre and official personnel file records 
man^ement schedules. 

0PM 

1 

HR Line of Business (HRLoB) 

DHS is required to participate in OPM's HR Line of Business 
Initiative which provides for a government-wide, modern, cost- 
effective, standardized and interoperable HR solution and an 
Infrastructure to support pay-for-pcrformance systems, 
modernized HR systems, and core functionafity necessary for 
the strategic management of human capital. 

0PM 

■ 


Provides continued support services from FFROC for a 

Business Case Analysis fofiow on for tiansition plan 
implementation for acquiring an enterpnse learning 
manasemeni system (IMS). 

OHS Science and Technology 

1 

USA Staffing 

Provides software licenses to an online tool that allows OCHCO 

staffing specialists to post vacancy announcements, receive 

applications, produce certificates of referral, and select 

candidates for Nre based on management selections. 

0PM 

■ 

FLETC HR Services 

FIETC provides space and certain support services (i.e.. 
Information Technology) to OCHCO employees that have been 
hired to perform human resources operational services for 

OHS Headquarters and are currently working at the Glynco, GA 

facility. 

FLETC 

■ 


Provides subject matter expertise in policy, scientific, medical, 

and psychiatric areas to effectively implement the OHS Drug- 

Free Workplace Plan. 

HHS 


Framework Buildout and Communications 

Provides support to the DHS Leader Development framework 
build out through development and planning of an integrated 
implementation plan which combines program deployment 
with a multi-year change management strategy. 

Commercc/Natlonal Technical Information 
Service 


Cognos Reporting Tool 

Provides licenses and software consulting services to prototype 
CBP's Cognos reporting tool to address OCHCO Human Capital 
Business Systems' reporting requirements. 

cap 


Adayana e-TrainIng 

Provides Department-wide e-TrainIng professional services via 
0PM Program Management Services as part of the President's 
e-Gov initiative. 

0PM 


Plateau 

Provides Ptatcau/Success Factors Annual IMS SaaS, migration, 
hosting and other professional services support. 

0PM 


Skilfsoft 

Provides enterprise-wide Skillsoft content library licenses and 
maintenance via 0PM Program Management Services as part 
of the President's e-Gov initiative. 

0PM 


0PM SL/ST Services 

Provides staffing and consulting services to assist DHS in the 
assessment and referral fistsofeandidates for the senior level 
and scientific and professional job opportunity 
announcements. 

0PM 


3rug Free Testing 

Provides pre-employment as well as rarrdom drug testing for 
those individuals who are required to undergo drug testing at 
HQ 

Department of Interior 






297 


Department of Homeland Securrtv 
Inter-Agency and tntra-Departmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DM0) 


Office 


Description 



Competency Assessment for Mission Critical 
Positions 

Provide Woifdorce Analysis, comp^ency assessment and gap 
analysis services for 8 mission aitical occupations 

0PM 


OCHCO Subject Matter Expert Services 

The pwpose of tWs MOU bto (Mwnde expert guidance, advice 
ar>d recommendations on a variety of strat^ic and tactical 
issues facing the OCHCO. Emiriovee wilt draft proposals 
corMiernir^ substantive functions of the OCHCO on various 
policy and propammatic areas. Employee vsriil advise the 
OCHCO on the status of meeting goals and objectives and on 
the impact or potential impact of new laws, policies and 
changir^ requirements the Department may face on human 

resources matters. 

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 


Terrorist Screening Center (TSC) 

Provides human resources support to the TSC for OHS . 

Federal Bureau of Prison (FBI) Terrorist 
Screening Center (rec) 


MOUfordetailee 

The purpose of this MOU is to assist the Assistant Director with 
program maOers associated with building the Consumer 
Response recruiting and hiring program. 

Consumer Financiai Protection Bureau 

(CFPB) 


Health & Safety 

The FY14 budget requested to realign the Occupational Safety 
and Health (OSH) departmental function from the Office of the 
Chief Readiness Support Officer (OCRSO) to the Office of the 
Chief Human Capital Officer (OCHCO). Establishing the 
Department OSH Office within OCHCO for overall OHS OSH 
policy and program functions and accountability, and a 
separate safety office under the OCRSO for direct support to 
National Capital Region offices will improve the quality of DHS 
OSH performance and enhance overall OCHCO hinctions. 
Ultimately, the realignment will increase accountability, 
improve efficiencies, and reduce risks by aligning OSH 
resources with the most suitable functional channels. Until 
this change is effected through the appropriation process, the 
personnel have been detailed to OCHCO. 

DHS Office of Chief Readiness Support 

Officer 

OCSO 





High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HlOTA) 
Program 

Background Investigation and adjudicative services for HlOTA 
program personnel. 

Office of National Drug Control Policy 
(ONOCP) 


Federal Protective Services 

Background investigation and adjudicative services for f PS 
personnel. 

National Protection and Programs 

Directorate (NPPO) - Federal Protective 
Service (FPS) 


St. Elisabeth's Personrtet 

MOU outlining the operational and administrative 
responsibilities between CRSO and CSO for St. Elisabeth 
security personnel. This non reimbursable detail will end after 
FY 2013 as the request to formally transfer these personnel is 
requested tn FY 2014 

OHS/DMO/CRSO 


State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector (SLTPS) 
Sackwound Investigations 

State and local personnel sponsored by OHA for 81 services 

OHS/Officc of Health Affairs (OHA) 


Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 
(HSPO-12) 

Infrastructure and Personal Identity Verification (P1V) card 
issuance support for HSPO-12. 

Ail DHS Components 


Special Security Officers (SSO! 

Special Security Officers (SSO) services for SCtF Support 

DHS/DMO/OSEM 


ntegrated Security Management System 
(ISMS) 

Infrastructure and maintenance support to the web-based 
personnel security case management tool. 

DHS Headquarters, US Customs & Border 
Protection (CBP), Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), 

Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), 

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
(ICE), US Citizenship and Immigration 

Service (CIS), and Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Center (FLETC). 


Outgoing Agreements 




background Investigations 

Background mvestigation services. 

Office of Personnel Management (0PM) 






298 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and intra-Departmenta! Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DMO) 


Office 

inter-Agency/Intra-Departmentai 

Agreements 

Description 



Data Center Hosting and O&M 

Enterprise Data (^nter Hosting and O&M for security systems 

OHS/DMO/OCIO 


Administrative Shared Services 

Admin services such as Mail, Occupational Health services, 
Sedan Services, Siuttie services, tran^ subsidy, etc. 

OHS/DMO/USM 


Civii Applicant Service (CASl 


Department of Justice/Jomt Automated 

Booking System 


Configuration and Security Tracking System 

(CASTS) 

Database operation artd maintenance to support transfer and 

receipt of requests for SCI facilities. 

U.S, Air Force (USAF), 53rd Computer 

System Squadron (CSS) 


Criminal Justice information Services (CJIS) 
Electronic Eingerprinting Services 

Electronic fingerprint checks provided through the FBI. 

Department of Justice (OOJ)/ Federal 

Bureau of Investigation (Fai)/CJIS 


Security Guard Services 

Contract guard services at toe ROB and Nebraska Avenue 
Complex (NAC). 

DHS/NPPD/Federai Protective Services (FPS) 


EEDSiM 

Various IT Requiremertts 

GSA/FEOSiM 


Joint Integrity Case Management System 
(J1CM5) 

Electrwiic case management data tracldng system for alleged 
employee misconduct fiwn inception to end-result. 

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) 


National Crime Information Center (NOC) 
Telecommunications 

Security saeentng services and maintenance of the NClC 
terminal at the NAC. 

Department of Justice, 

JMD/OCIO/Operations Services 


PiVCard Printing a Security Design Services 

Production and shipment of OHS HSPO-12 PIV cards. 

U.S. Government Printing Office 
(GPO)/Securitv & Intelligent Documents 
(SID) Strategic Business Unit 




U.S. Health and Human Services, Division of 
Acquisition Management - S 

Strategic Acquisition Service 

Program Support Center 




U.S. Treasury Franchise Fund, Bureau of the 

Public Debt (BPD) 


Space artd Naval Warfare (SPAWARj 

Program management, engineering services, and a 
sustainment program in support of the DH5 Access Control 
System and Intelligence Community Badging System. 

Department of Navy Space and Naval 

Warfare 

Systems Center (SPAWARSYSCEN), Atlantic 

OCFO 

Employee detail to OONt 

Employee detail to ODNI from PASE 

DON! 


l&A Audit Activities 

CFO/OFM will assist l&A with analysis services and funds 
control process improvements 

l&A 

OCiO 

Iridium Secure Satellite Telephone 

Iridium Secure Saleliite Telephone 




COMSEC Facilities at Mt. Weather 

FEMA 


COMSEC Equipment & Devices 

COMSEC Equipmerrt & Devices 

NSA 


OHS Enterprise Network Services 

HSON and CLAN Operations and Maintenance Services 

GSA 


EMSS SIMs 

Procure, Activate and provide annual service for EMSS SIMs 

Defense Information Systems Agency (OISA) 


OISN subscription services 

Classified circuit services to OHS HQ sites 

Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) 


Grev Phone 

Secure phone services 

Cintelco Intelligent Communications 


Transition to Irtternet Protocol Version 6 
(IPV6) 

lAA supports OHS Enterprise- Wide Network Services Project to 
plan and design the OneNet upgrade to the Internet Protocol 
Version 6. 

CBP 


Network (OneNet) Steward 

SiqTports OHS Network (OneNet) Steward. 

CBP 


NT!A Annual Fee 

Supports OHS cost of spectrum martagement operations and 
services 

Department of Commerce, National 
Telecommunications and Information 
Administration(NTIA) 


CBP -Data Center Support 

^sterns Applications supported at Data Centers 1 & It 

CBP 


ONDO - Data Center Support 

Systems Applications supported at Data Centers 1 & II 

ONOO 


FPS - Data Center Support 

Systems Applications supported at Data Certters 1 & It 

FPS 


FEMA - Data Center Support 

Systems Applications supported at Data Centers 1 & II 

FEMA 


CE - Data Center Support 

Systems Applications supported at Data Centers 1 & li 

CE 


NPPD - Data Center Support 

Systems Apfrfications supported at Data Centers 1 & 1) 

NPPD 


S&T- Data Center Support 

Systems Applications supported at Data Cetrters I & ii 

S&T 


TSA- Data Center Support 

Systems /M^plications supported at Data Centers 1 & it 

TSA 


USCG- Data Center Support 

Systems /^iplicaiions supported at Oau Centers 1 & II 

USCG 


USetS- Data Center Support 

Systems ^plications supported at Data Centers 1 & 11 

USCIS 


USVlSiT- Data Center Support 

Systems Applications supported at Data Centers 1 & II 

USVlSIT 













299 


Department of Homeland Security 
inter-Agency and Intra-Departmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations {DM0) 

































300 


Department of Homeiand Security 
Inter-Agency and !ntra-De(nrtmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (DMO) 


Office 

inter-Agency/Intra-Dc^artmental 

Agreements 

Desertion 

Other Agency/ 

Department 


CBP 

Consuhing Sendee forit^ Reese 

CBP 


ODNI 

MOU Salary R&mtHHsmerrt Paul Frosell 

ODNI 


EGOV - Disaster Management MOA 

MOA beKmen DHS OCIO ESDO and FEMA to support 

Enterprise Web setwees and to<^ 

FEMA 


EGOV - eRulemaking MOA 

OMB-mandated MOA between EGOV Managing Partner and 
Partrejpating Agmeies 

EPA 


EGOV • Beneftts.Gov MOA 

OMB-marrdated MOA between EGOV Managing Partner and 
Participating Agencies 

WBOR 


EGOV - Integrated Acquisition Environment 
Loans & Grants MOA 

OMB-mandated MOA between EGOV Managing Partner and 
Participating /^endes 

GSA 


EGOV - Budget formulation & Execution Line 
of Business MOA 

OMB-mandated MOA betw^n EGOV Managing Partner and 
Parlicipatir^ jMendes 

EOUCATfON 


EGOV - Financial Management Lire of 

Business MOA 

OMB-marufated MOA betw^rr EGOV Managing Partner and 
Participating ^ettcies 

TREASURY 


EGOV - GooSpatial MOA 

OMB-mandated MOA between EGOV Managing Partner and 
Participating Agencies 

INTERIOR 


□HSMGMT 

Employee and cygsnizational fontkyis detailed to OCIO from 
OCRSO 

OCRSO 


CBP - IT Program Management Training 
Program 

OMB-rtKiuested, deparmient-wide fT training led by OHS OCiO 
and CBP OIT 

CBP 


COMSEC CAROS 

Database svrtem in support of COMSEC COR Operations 

GSA 


COMSEC DCS Courier Services 

Secure courier services reaulred for COMSEC 

USSTRATCOM 


COMSEC SKL System 

Supports Simple Key System for COMSEC 

US Army 


COMSEC VACM 

Mandatory Crypto Equipment Upgrade by WHMO and NSA 

USAF 


OY2 QMS Class-4 PKI Services HSHQDC-ll-X- 

00S71 

ENSS provides Defense Message System (OMS) Clas$-4 PKI 
services 

US Army, Pentagon Telecommuncations 
Center 


HSDN SlPRnet Connectivity Services XUHABD 

ENSS OHS HSDN to DoD SlPRnet (located at the Oarksville Data 
Center) 

Defense information Systems Agency (OISA) 


OiSA iWICS Circuit LAN-C disaster recovery 
XUHA8C 

ENSS CLAN Operations and Maintenance Services 

Defense information Systems Agency (OISA) 


Configuration Management Tool 

HSDN and CLAN Operations and Maintenance Services 

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) 


CIA fAA for Detailee G. Perez 

HSDN and CLAN Fed support 

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) 


CLAN Sl-52 Approved Laptops for Executive 
Travel Team (C-LAN Fly Away Kit Solution) 

CLAN Operations and Maintenance Services 

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) 


FFROC Services to CISC (MITRE) 

Independent Technical Expertise and Guidance for OHS 
Information Systems Security 

S&T 


USOA 

Information Sharing Environment - Support for NIEM 

Agriculture Domain 

PM-ISE 


USCIS Public Facing Web site 

ESOO/Akamai 2013 Hosting 

USCIS 


USCIS Web Content Development 

ESDO/Web Content Management as a Service iWCMaaS) 

USCIS 


USCIS Self Check Oeveloment 

ESOO/Self Check E-Verify 

USCIS 


USDS Self Check O&M 

ESOO/Self Check Sustainment 

USCIS 


USCIS VerifIcation/OAT 

ESOO/Verification OAT Program OTaaS Qoud Services 

USCIS 


USCIS DataBase Development 

ESOO/USCIS 08 Development 

USCIS 


USCIS LETS O&M 

ESDO/USCIS LETS Sustainment 

USCIS 


USCIS AVAPiT Development 

ESDO/USCIS AVANT Development 

USCIS 


CRCL MicroPact Hosting OSM 

ESOO/CRCL Sustainment 

CRCL 


FEMA WCM Service 

ESOO/Web Content Managemerri as a Service IWCMaaS) 

FEMA 


FEMA Public FacingWeb Site 

ESOO/Akamai 2013 Hosting 

FEMA 


FLETC Web Content Oeveiopment 

ESDO/Web Content Management as a Service IWCMaaS) 

FLETC 


FLETC Public Facing Web Site 

ESOO/Akamai 2013 Hosting 

FLETC 


SATask Management O&M 

ESDO/Task Management System Supporting Applications 
Sustainment 

i&A 


&A Share Point Development 

ESDO/lPDS II Oeveiopment Project 

l&A 


CE Public Facing Web Site 

ESOO/Akamai 2013 Hosting 

ICE 


NPPD Share Point Support 

ESDO/ESTT Sustaintnetrt 

NPPO 


NPPO PSA Activity 

ESDO/PSA Oeveiopment 

NPPD 


TSA Site Oeveiopment 

ESDO/Web Content Manag^ent as a Service (WCMaaS) 

TSA 


JSCG Public Facing Web Site 

ISDO/iUcamai 2013 Hostirtg 

USCG 


USSS Public Facing Web Site 

ESOO/Akamai 2013 Hostir% 

USSS 


5ST Public Facging Web Site 

ESOO/Akamai 2013 Hostiryt 

saT 


Committee on National Security Systems 

CNSS annual dues 

NSA 

WCF 

■EMA Migrations 

Migration efforts to DC2 

FEMA 


NPPO Migrations 

Miration efforts to OC2 

NPPO 







301 


Department of Homeiand Security 
Inter-Agency and intra-Departmentai Agreements 
Departmental Management and Operations (OMO) 


Office 

Inter-Z^ency/intra-Oepartmental 

Agreements 

Description 



NASA Facilities 


NASA 


USSS Migrations 

Migration e^Mts to OC2 

USSS 


USSS Data Center Support 

Systems ^oKcathms sivported at Data Centers 1 & II 

USSS 


Office of Procurement Operations-incoming 

Provide procurement services 

USDS 


Office of Procurement Operations-outgoing 

001 provide assessnterA senrices to OPO 

DOi 


eGov Integrated Acquisition Environment 

Vehicle to fond OHS' ^re of support costs 

General Services Administration, Integrated 
Acquisiton Environment Program 
Management Office 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise License /^eement for CISCO 

CBP 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise license Agreement for OSCO 

FEMA 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise license Agreement for CISCO 

ICE 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise license /^reement for CISCO 

S&T 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise lic«ise Agreement for CISCO 

TSA 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise License Agreement for CISCO 

USCG 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise Liceise Agreement for CISCO 

USSS 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise License Agreement for CISCO 

FLETC 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise License Agreement for CISCO 

OIG 


CISCO License Collections 

Enterprise License Agreement for CISCO 

CIS 

OSEM 

Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 

The Office for Civil Rights and Civil liberties provides oversight 
and training support to the ICE Secure Communities program 
to ensure that the Department's immigration efforts comply 
with all applicable civit rights statutes and ConstiKitional 
requirements. 

ICE 


Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 

The Office for CMI Rights and Civil Liberties provides oversight 
to the ICE 287(gl program to ensure that the Department’s 
immigration efforts comply with all applicable civil rights 
statutes and Constitutional requirements. 

ICE 


Office of the Executive Secretary 

The Office of the Executive Secretary provides detailee support 
to Science & Techrtology on a reimbursable basis to provide 
technical expertise and serve as the Director for the Office of 
the Executive Secretarv of S&T, 

Science & Technology (S&T) 


Office of Policy 

The Office of Policy receives reimbursable detailed support bv 
providing law enforcement expertise and OOJ reach-back to 
the Air Domain Awareness and Global Supply Chain Security 
Requirements Planning Teamsfrom the Department of Justice. 

Department of Justice 


Office of Policy 

State of Uniori 

Executive Office of the President 


Office of Policy 

Reimbursable agreement with Coast Guard for FOIA support. 

U.S. Coast Guard 


Office of Policy 

The Office of Policy provides detailed support to OHA on a 
reimbursable basis to support strategic direction, organization, 
and daily operation of OHA Health Threats Resilience Divisions 
Programs. 

Office of Health Affairs 


Office Of Policy 

The Office of Public Affairs provides reimbursable detailed 
support to the Office of Policy's Strategy, Planning, Analysis & 
Risk office on matters related to the Quadrennial Homeland 
Security Review, 

Office of Public Affairs 


Office of Policy 

The Office of Policy provides reimbursable detailed support to 
OONI/ ADliE Office of Naval Intelligence by conductin public 
and private sector outreach, intelligence and information 
sharing, operational and technology coordination, and 
deployment of the ADME State and Local law 
Enforcement/Fusion Center (SLTTJ Information Sharing 
initiative and the Private Sector Information faring Initiative. 

ODNI/ l&A 


OSOMB 

The Office Chief Informaiton Officer and the Enterprise 
Development Office provides security and operations and 
maintenafKe for Office of the Otizenship & Immigration 

Services Ombudsman's CAAOl and OCA system 

OCIO/ESDO 






302 


Department of Hwneiand Security 
inter-Agency and intra-Departmental Agreements 
Departmental Management and (derations (DM0) 


Office 

Inter-Agency/Intra-Oepartmentai 

Agreements 

Description 

1 


CISOMB 

The Officeofd)eQtuensWp& Immigration Services 
Ombudun^i is providing a reimhurseabie full-tirne detail to 
the Immediate Office of the Secertary in support of the 
Counselor to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary 

SEC 


CISOMB 

The National Arehives and Record Administration will provide a 
facility for the Office of the Cititenship & Immigration Services 
Ombudsman 2013 Anmial Conference 

NARA 


CISOMB 

The Office of the Gwiera! Osunsel provides use of the 
Regulatory Affairs Management System to the Office of the 
Citizenship & Immigradon Services Ombudsman to facilitate 
review and dearence of DHS and Intcrangency regulatory 
actions through the Department of Homeland Security 

OGC 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Onjoset provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

National Protection and Programs 

Directorate (NPPD) - Federal Protective 
Service (FPS) 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides iegal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

NPPD - Infrastructure Security Compliance 
Division (ISCD) 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides iegal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

NPPD - National Cyber Security Division 
(NCSO) 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

NPPD -US VISIT 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

Science & Technology (S&T) 


Office of the Genera! Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

Office of Health Affairs 


Office of the Genera! Counset 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNOO) 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

, Intelligence & Analysis (l&A) 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

DHS offices by detailing attorneys on a reimbursable basis. 

Operations Coordination and Planning 
(OPSl 


Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailirrg Honor's Attorneys on a rotational and 
reimbursable basis. 

United States Coast Guard (U5C6) 

Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

DHS offices by detailing Honor's Attorneys on a rotational and 
reimbursable basis. 

Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA) 

Office of the Genera! Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing Honor's Attorneys on a rotational and 
reimbursable basis. 

U.S, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) 

Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel provides legal counsel for 

DHS offices by detailing Honor's Attorneys on a rotational and 
reimbursable basis. 

U.S. Citizenship and immigration Services 
(USCISJ 

Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsd provides legal counsel for 

OHS offices by detailing Honor's Attorneys on a rotational and 
reimbursable basis. 

Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) 

Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel processes Freedom of 
Information Act (FOIA) submissions fiar DHS HQ and DHS 
Components, in coordination with the United States Coast 

Guard Administrative Law judges. 

United Stales Coast Guard (USCG) 

Office of the General Counsel 

The Office of the G^eral Oiunsel processes Firtancial 

Disclosure submissions for DHS HQ and OHS Components, in 
coordination with the United States Army's Financial 

Disclosure Management System. 

United States Army 






303 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and intra-Departmental Agreements 
A&O 















































304 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-Oepartmental Agreements 
Office of Inspector General (OfG) 



fnter-Ageney/Intra-OepartmentalA^eements 


DHS - OiG and tauehlin Air Force flAF) Base 


Provide funifing commiunent for the Dnice of the 
Seeretary of Traraportation {OST} customer 
agreement the U.S. Department of 

OHS -016 and U.S. Oepartment of Transportation (DQTl Transportatioru 


Provide funding omimitment in support of 

OHS - OIG and the Department of the Treasury, ^nancial management and travel services for the 

Administrative Resource Center {ARC}, Bureau of the DHS-016 with the Department of the Treasurv, 

Public Debt (BPD) ARC-BPO. 



DHS 'OiG and the Department of Defertse (DoD), Provldefundingcomfnitmentinsupport of tuition 

Domestic Dependent Elementary and Secondary Schoots for DKS-OIGem^yees eligible dependents 
(OOESS) attending DDES5 schools located in Puerto Rico. DoO-OOESS 



DHS -OIG and Federal Qccupallortai Health {FOHj 


DHS - OIG and U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OP 


Provide funding commitment In support of 
leased fleets for the Office of Investigations with 

OKS -OIG and Genera! Service Administration IGSA) Fleet the General Service Administration. DKS-GSA 



OHS • OIG and OHS-Chlef Administrative Office (CAO) 

OIG to provide funding commitment for shared 
services (mall services) with OHS-Chlef 
Administrative Offke fCAO}. 

DHS - 016 and General Service Administration 

iProvide funding commitment for overtime utility 
(OUT) cost for program equipments (24/7, 36S) 
for Boston MA, Denver Co, San Diego CA & 
Tucson AZ. 



iOHS • OIG and General Service Administration 


Provide funding commitment to support and 
manage the redistribution and delivery of excess 
furniture and equipment widtGSA. GSA 










































OiS to petfixm contract independent 
public accountants^ integrated Audit of the DHS' 
FY 2Qt3 Consolidated &tandai statements and 
internal coM^ over ft»ndal retorting. 


Co(H>erativewoHdi%agrKm8nt between OHS 
OKS and CBP whereby CBP wiB augment OIG 
investigations of border-^ated criminal 
msKHidwt by CW employees and contractors 
tlvough the detail of COP Office of internal Adairs 

OHS-016 and U^. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) |iA) agents to DHS 0^5 Office of Investigations. DHS-CBP 


Aebnbursable A^eement between CSP and OHS 
016 to use CBP radio frequencies, Over'The>Air> 

Preying support, 24x7 tacticaicommunkatians 
services (novided by GBP's Communications 

OHS-015 arid U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Center Operatiwis. DHS*C8P 


i^reement to prevent duplication of effort and 
emure the most effective, efficient and 
apprt^riaie deployment of resources between 
the USBTS and the 16 in the Investigation of 
emplovee and contractor misconduct, and other 

OHS-OiG and Under Swretary for Border ard mlsccmduct or fraud involving USBTS programs 

Transportation Security (USBTS) aitdopcratlorts. 




DHS-USMS 


r^reement wtwreby OCtS may arhniruster 
polygraph examinadons for DHS 016. Office of 
investigatiom. OHS-OCIS 



















306 


TNs MOU estaUisIttsanci ddineates the missfon 
of the San Diego Border Cra-ruptlon Task Force 
{SDBCTF).ThiS MOU fomulites the relationships 
between the Managing Agencies in order to 
fost«- an efficteflt and coh^ve ur^t capable of 
coordinating the investigation of aiieged border 
DHS-OIG, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI}, and the corruption associated with entry into the United 

United States Attorney's Office (USAQ) States through San Di^ and itnpemi Counties. DMS-OiS, FBI, USAO 

Nice is in agreement with OKS-OtG to pFo\dde a 
'matd) iisf report to DHS-OIG, a list of names of 
incHviduats or businesses that have filed claims 

DHS-OIG and National Ifjsurance Crime Bureau (NICB) after Hurricwe&ndy DHS-OIG/NICB 


CA and DHSMDIG enter into this MOU for the 
purposeofsharingvisadata 


Agreement to iMromote effideneles in the arena 
of allegation intake and ensure the most 
effective, efficient and appropriate deployment 
of resources between U-S. iCE OPR and U.5. CSP 
iA and the IG In the intake process through 
automation of system-to-system technology 


Agreement to formaliie policies, procedures, and 
responsibilities related to the US Dept of 
Education OIG providing forensic support and 
expert testimony on behsif of OHSOIG. DHS -DoEd 





Agreement for services related to the electronic 
processing and storage of forensic Information 
(fingerprints) associated with the Identification of 
suspects and offenders to promote efficiency in 
the sharing of law enforcement Information 
between U.S. DoJ and the IG. DKS-DOJ 


DHS-OIG and the Recovery Accauntabiilty and 
Transparency Board 


Agreement to formalize policies, procedures, and 
responsiblfities related to the RATB processing of 
Investigailve records queries on behalf of DHS 
OIG, to include the temporary detail of one (1) 

OHS OIG FTE to the RATB. DHS-RAT8 



DH5-OIS and Office for Civil Rights and Civil Ubertics 
(CRCL) 


The purpose of this MOA fs to establish terms and 
conditions goveri^ng assistance, in the form of 
temporarity detailed agents provided fay the DHS- 

DHS-OiGand the U.S. Department of Education (OoEO) 016 to the U.$. Department of Education. DHS-OKS/OoED 


The purpose of this TTA is to document the 
adrfition of the DHS OIG into the current FYll 
Science and Technology p&T) Enhanced Analysis 
niot • Kronnex.7fHS memwandUm reflects good- 
faith, non-brnding agreement between DHS-5&T 
and DHS OIG to pursue common objectives and tc 
execute their programs towards these mutually 
beneficial objectives. 

















307 


Department of Homeland Security 
intef'Agency and Intra-Departmentai Agreements 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection 


I inter-Agency/tntra-OepartmenUi 

1 Agreements 

Oesci^ptton 

Other t^iency/ 

Department 


Piov^ (be guidelines goverrang tnieraUton beewtai ICE's Ofike of IcivestigaiioDS 
and the U.S. Boeda PatroL 

ICEOLUSBP 

Afloenanm co muu Between «.Bunice at 
Invesiigaikms and the U.S, Border Patrol dated 
ll/16/2aM, dS!clive02«)2;2007 


ICEOI, IKBP 

Bolder Enforceircnt .Security Task Farce 
(BEST) 

Created in 200S to address threat erOK-bonier atime. BEST is a proven flexible 
pdatfonn from which OKS invesiigates and ingat (ransaatioiMl oinanal oiganizfilions 
and any emerging threat elten^ting id explDk vMlondailities at the nation's borders. 
Focuses on evoy ekinent of the enforcancot process, (rominuidiction to prosecution 
and rentcval, with the goal trf eliinnating the top {eadenlupandsuppanuig 
inh'asitucnire tliai sustains cross-border criinnal orgaitiziiians. 

ICE, CBP, USCG, DEA, BATFE, FBI, USPIS, NOAA. 
RCMP, CBSA 

Intepated Cross-border Maritime Law 
Enforcetwmt (derations 
(lCMLEOK''Shiprider") 

conduct Joint patrol operadoits in undbpuied areas of the sea « intecnal waters along 

the intertnitionsl boundary between Canada and the UiAed Stales {defined as "shared 

waterways"). The US. Coui Gnnd is m chai^ of tinpleineiiling (his agreement for 

DHS. ICE's role is to investigate crimiml actirity occmiifig on (lie U.S. side. CBP's 

role is to provide Agents fw Icaiiung aadpailtcipatioii in joioi patioi operatiuna. CBP 

8txl ICS provide the ctoss-rfeugitatKm (raiiiiig fltite 19) and certiTication to RCMP 
participants. 

USCG, CBP. ICE. RCMP. CBSA 

Intesaied Border EnAmmni Teams (!BET) 


USCG, CBP, ICE. RCMP. CBSA 

MeiwraiiduinofUndetsteiuIing ameung U. S. 
DepariiiwH of Homeland Security and U. S. 
Oepartment of the Interior end U. 5. 

DeiMitineiit of Agrietilmre KegartNng Secure 
RatSio Cninminicftiion 300S 

Radio eomtTnmieations have long been an operational challenge between Border Patrol 
Agents in the field and llieir (oca) law eufoicenvnis pailnets. In tmai locatknu. Agents 
and Law Ettforeetrwii Officeis have hod to conduct operations primBOly inuMKured 
radio trsnsmissions. Discussions between the Secretaries of the Departineni of 
Homeland .Seeurity and ilie Deporlmeiit ^ Itiicrior liave mkeii (liace regarding a Joint 
effort to brelee the coimninication gapa and to imvidr radio iiueropetalnlity 

DHS, CBP. DO), NPS, FWS. BIA, Bl.M, BOR. USDA. 
USFS 

MOV betweeit CBP and U.S. Postal Inspeciiort 
Service 2008 

The USPIS and CBP Iittve entered into this Meiimanduin of Uhdetsfanding ("MOU"} 
inordertoelfectuateA protocol for tlic inspection lehides InivfijUy craiupoiling 
domestic Ikuted States (rail by CBP during tlio course of their border pioiaetion 
fuKiion, and the haiKliing of United Slates Mail wludi. dating (bb bispevtioDpmcr.ss, 
CBP personnel reasonably believe contain narcotics. This interagency cooperaiton will 
facilitate practical procedures to ensure (he United States Mail isafTMikd (he 
appropitateproleclion pursuant to Federal (aw. while ennuing the mails are not used as 
a vehicle to raciliiate the rranapoisationof illegai druss. 

CBP, USPS 

Cross Bonier Crime Forum (CBCF) 

and Urnced States OrgaiiiRdOimc Threat Assessramt. This assessmni concluded 
tfu t <.'mss4)urttrr criminal nctiritieu by organized crinar are, at preociu, a serious 
riiotigh Ihml iliat ilie U.S. and Canada noLM secure their eoasrat areas. DHS now co- 
chaics this gioup ftrusing on idetuifyiiig and Ksolving (ICE) obstacles aiH) 
in^limcnts lo uoss-bixtb^ccDpeTatton in law cnforceinmi. Adtbesses cros.s-border 
challenges such as ssTaiggling. organized crime, rmsa maikeiing fraud, ctainter- 
tmoristn, etc. 

USCG, CBP. ICE, POUCY. RCMP, CBSA 

MOU j tetems DHS and DOI And USDA 
Regarding Crioperacive National SetUTiiy and 
Counterterrorism Efiorts on Federal Lands 

along the United States' Bordets 


DHS, CBP, OBP. DOL NPS, USFWS, BIA, Bl.M, BOR, 
USDA, USPS 

MOU/2008 


CBP. CBSA 

Office of Field t^crarions ivgarding the 
coliocaiion in Nssv Erie Border Kitrot .Station 
iocated in Erie PA 2009 

SwtbT Stachui (£RP) and rtn; Ejic.PenRsyininia ONke of Field Operartuiu 

(ERIliriil collocate in the new Bnder Pattol Station (BPS) at 7851 Traut Drive. 
Fairview. PeRnsyivania 164)5. 

DBP. OFO 

Exi faiige of Currency Se irure Information 

hiipose of this MOL) is to idcnliiV the redes and irapmsibffitKs of the paiticipanls with 
respect, to (Ik exchangeofcvtmicy tnzure nifcnnarioa and to assist each participant in 
he invesfigatiun or prosecution oT money bmmleiii^ am! terrorist acHvity Pricing 
arfence.«. This dneument is scheduled to be »^Md by ICE Dnector Mut Morton on 
Wednesday. November 10. 2010 and (ates effect upon 

ICE. CBP. CBSA 










308 


StandBKi Operating Procediue for Coordinaietl 
Air and Macwe Operaliorts in the Great Lakes 
Reciro 

Tbit SOP and its annexe* esiablisti opEniiacnlgoiddiaBsftr the PeiticipanU as 
conqxments within the Dejiarctaait erf* Homeland SecinRy (DBS). This SOP applies to 
coordinated air and merilizne opeialiotis in die ak^iaa and waters subject to the 
iitrisdiclion of the United Stales in and ovor the patla and ireriiine approaches within 
the Great Lakes region geographically bordered by Lake at the Woods, MK to 
MaMcna.NY 

USCG Ninth District. CBP OAM Nonhem Regi<ai,CBP 
OBP Swanton Sector. CBP OBP Buffalo Sector. CBP OBP 
Detroit Sectcu', CBP OBP Grand Forks Sector. CBP OFO 
Buffalo Field (Xfice, CBP OFO Chicato Field CMTice. CBP 
OFO Detroh Field Office, CBP OFO Seattle Field Office 

MOU beiweeo ibe lEBP aod the Botean of 
Land ManagetneDt. Naikmal Park Service. U-S- 
Fisb and Wildlife Service, Bureau of lodiem 
Alfairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Law 
Enforcement Service, U.S. Forest Service, 
NatnraJ Resourcra Ccaiservalkm Servke, and 
U.S. Enviromnostai Pcoiecdon Agency. 

To provide general ptocedures tot die me <f pitdk laiid. 

Numercms, please see name. 


To integrate Oj^ and SOO vessels icM cow fisveskte Program. 

OAM 

MOU Between OBF and ICb, Otlice at 
Invesiigations (ICE-OI) 

to juDvide guidance « aUeraciKms between OBP and iCEOL 

fCE-OI 

MC)U BeiWMSi the DHS and the Depattn»nl of 
Health and Human Services 

Provida guidance on Iwv UHS should han^ certain smtaCiORS mvovluig senous 
commimicflble and ouaraniinable deettsM. 

Department of Health and Human Services 

Memarandumol Undersiantling Regarding 
Secure Radio Comirainicaiion 

Provides guidance cm the use ot unite latbo cominiuHcatioas between UKS and other 
agencke. 

U.S. Ueparimenl ol the Inienot and llie U.S. Uepatment ot 
Agriculture 

Sector and tlie U.S. Air Forced ‘J^th Security 
Forces Squadron Laughlin AFB, TX elTective 

imnm 

OulUnes a FrarrKWurk of cooperation and imtuaDy beneficial sui^ion activities beiween 
tbeUSBPtuidtheUSAF 

USBP, DoD USAF 

MOU between CBP and ICE regarding 

Delainee Ground Transport effective 4/13/2010 

Sets forth the terms by which CBP tmd ICE will improve detainee ^ound 
transpoiialion services 

CBP, ICE 

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and 
Expiosives regarding eTRACE Intemst Based 
Firearms TracniR Application 

Esiablishs an intnagency ngreenmit govemaif! ilie access and ufilizaiion of eTrace. 

USBP. ATF 

mOU between me U.S. border Filrolaml iiie ' 
Deparmwnt of Energy's Office of Secure 
Trmwponaiion 

esiaousbs certain (socedures and provide gmasoce and opetatiowi ctantication 
ceg^xlutg the transportation of Govaument owned nuclear traferiala dirough U.S. 
Border Patrol Clieekooints by DOE Office of Secure Transportation 

USBP, DOE OST 

MOU Between iIk DO), Imnugration and 
Naturalaalien Service and the DO], National 
Park Service effective 9/13/2002 

Establishes general pioceduics under which INS approved and desisted NPS 

Rangns wilt inspect, m behalf of the INS, applicants for admission to Ilie IMiled 

Slates arriving ftoraCairtida at Coal Haunt, Mootans which is located within iheNPS’ 
Glacier National Park and is part of the Woierion-Glaeier liHemationtl Peace Park 

INS. DOI NPS 

MOU Between irts'arw BAii* regaraing the 
Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 effective 
9/7/1989 

DefliKS the atlerageiKy enforcemrai efforts of BATF and INS in targeimg vioiaitois of 
l8USC922(gX5) 

INS. BATF 


Addresse* the duues and ntsponsihilines oi uie USBH / Asstsunt duel assigned in the 
Texas Border Security Operations Center 

CBTTDSIPTTexSTJPS 

Coirtiiiwd Antl'Drug Fbrce Team fCATI 

uxe LUafies border Vairoi otaiton provities ceie agent to me team, i ms agent i»s 
cross-desigruied aulhority to cite individuals, seize and TOT iOegaJ narcotics to the 
State ofLouisians in Calcasieu Pariah, LA. 

Calcasieu Parish SO. Lite Chatles PD . USBP 

SiraicKic CPnimuid Center 

WewWetni vu u pemutied to Bouse oHicers and More ntuiptnent .n NLL in ibe event 
of a disastet or emergency. 

New Orleans PD, USBP 

liTnTTi'ffH'— 

Addnsses the duties and nspootdHiitKS «t tbs USUP / AssisuiU CTnet assigned to the 
Texas Border Security OperaiioRs Cemer 

CBP, USBP. Texas DPS 

MOU between DHS/HSI and CBP/USBP 

Adchessrs the ifunes and responnbifiiies ol ilie USBP Assistant t'liief .assigned to the 
Bulk Cash Smugislinc Center in Burtingion, Vermont 

ICB, USBP 

Bolder ViWetwe Protwote 


u^Bi' uei itiooecior i axus uepi ol yubttcbntety. 
variou.s local LEA located wiihin the Del Rio Area of 
Resooinibiliiy 

loiRl OpttfliioiM iRtellieence Center 

Collecting infnrmaitofi from Slate/Local LEA* located in Texas for the puqxisc nf 
(liiweininaitou wtlbiii tlie Del Rio Sector 

usBi' oei Kid sector lexas uepi ot moiic baieiy. 
various local LB>\ located wiiliiniheDelRioArenof 
Resixuislbilitv 

ODP/Sotiihweai Border/SEDENA initiative 

AMtst the GoM in (heir efforts to combat TCOs. fnaease Border Security 


Amistad InteiKsrnce Center 

Sharme of uifotmation periaiiimfi to the irafficking of iiatcolics 

DEA. Local LEAS within tiie DRT AOR. 

Integrated Tatgeiins Unii 

^ovide advanced (frgetmg nfo on identified TCO memben and antx-iates. 

USBP Del Rio Sector. OFO, HIS. GoM 

DEA Memorandum of AgreemerS 


USBP Del Rio Sector and DEA OfSce 

HSI Memtsandum of Agrenneni 

Referrals of investigative Rads and providing resutts to csrh other. 

USUI' Del Kio Sector hagle Ktss/Uel Kio/Saii tUKonio 
SACandKACs 

Texas bepLofTSiSticialeiy Menuiandumoi 
AgreecneM 

IMvets License Image Reirievil System usage 


texisiliiaitORsi! Guard Memorandumof 
A0-ecmeia 

i exas naunnal guara peemdes Actm Uuly .Znatyste to assist n Law bnfbrcemeni 
Counter- OnigAciiyities 

USBP Del Rio Sector and Texas National Guard 

HSI Memorandum of Agreement 

Eagle Pass awl Del Kso HSi Udices provide Hbi Agent to Del Kro Sector Uisrupt 

IMts 

USBP Del Rio Sector Eagle Pits,* and Del Rio HSI Offices 

Laugltiin AFB Meinoramiumof Agtecment 

LAFB and DRT/SOD will coopciaictegardaiganyiliegalaiten apprehensions and any 
addil ioiiai assistance that can be povided by ORTACH) Co the base. 

USBP Del Rio Sector Special Opemlions Division and the 
47tl> Security Forces Scgiadron. Laughlin AFB, Texas 

Meinoranduin ot Understanding Texas 
fntetoperabilily Cfranne! Plan 

permisaions and guidelines fw use ol inutual radio chawiels by'Fednai. 
State and Local agencies in Texas 

Customs and Border I'rutcction and I'exas Depaifmutt ot 
Public Safety 

McinorancftmiorAgieeiiKHt between Middle 

Rio Grande DevxlopineniCmiitcil 911 PS. \PS 
and Customs and Border Protection 

C^Ilines fraiTKwoik (if cooperation Mil siHVori tieiweeo Uie Del Rro Sector and 
MKGDC 91 1 Public answering system hansfeiTiug of calls to BIC cegaKluts 
undocuinMilcd saibjecis. 

Del Rio Sector and MidtSe Rio Grande DerclopnMiii 

Council (Diminilt, Edwards, Kinney, La Salle, Maveiick, 
Real. Uvalde, Val Verde. Zavsla Cknmiies) 9! 1 OperatiwB. 

Border Patrol El Pa.su .Sector Headrjuatfets and 
loiw Task Force Nctth <JTF-N) 

A^eemm'lM runlediMe ot the bi Kaw .sector .'ipectaiGperafomsutvuioafNGUI 
Muster Ronin. located ai 8003 LocMiecd Drive, El Paso. TX in Ibe evetn the curreut 
ITF-N faciliiy becomes utnisaUe. 

USBP. JTF-N 

MOU between U.S. Botdet Patrol’s Latetto 
Sector and tit? .Alice Police Depatmteiit 
effective 7/3/2012. 

Alitc Ponce i/tiSJRrtinfrwtfSilBoiue lri loinuau saiti agency ri.i. oceitseo 
frequencies in Border Paiti^coTivnuiikaritni assets lofociKiaie tactical conmunicaiion 
utteropeniiiiliiy aincuig LRT and Mlirr bw etfocciuna w cnxtsnicy senice agenci&s 
in the LRT area of tcspoiwibiJiiy. 

USBP Laretb Sector /.Alice piliee Deparimeni 

MOU between US. Border lAtirol's Laredo 
Sector and ilie Aia-sco-sa County .Sheriffs Office 
effective 7/5/2012. 

icensed fcecfuencies in Bonier Patrol coimwiifeafian assets to rsciMate tactical 
conuminicatioi) inieropcrability atmng LRT end Mber lew enfotcemnUfiT eintcgency 
ceivice ageiif ies in the IRT area of rcHwuMbiBly- 

USBP Laredo .Sector / Atascatn County .SlKtiffs 

Dtpariment 
































309 


MOU between US. Border Paired's Laredo 
Sector ond ihc Broots Ccwuy Sheriffs OQice 
efre«ive7«/20U 

feequiscies in Border Patrol cotnnBinicaiion ssseti to fedl^aie tactical cantminicBticiQ 
onaoperability among IKT and other bw Enfoictonit or energency service ageneiM 
in the UlT area ef tesponsibiltoF. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Brooks County Sbaiffi Dqartniren 

MOU between U.S- Boeder PntroVs Laredo 

Sector and the Dmurit County SbaifPs Office 

effecfive7/5/2012. 


USBP Laredo Sectw / Dimmit County Sheriff's 

Dretattmeni 

MOU between US. Border Patrol's Laredo 

Sector and the Duv^ County Sheriffs Office 

effective 7/5/3012. 

frequencies or Border Patrol conenuiBcatiDn assets to faciHiaie tactical eonmunicatkiii 
iueroperahitily aiiKing LRT and other law enfoRemcoi or enETgeiicy service agcocies 
in the IJIT area MrespMudb'dity. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Ihml County Sheifft Dejartment 

MOU between U.S. Bonier Patrols Laredo 
Sector and the Fleer Pcdice Departmnx 
effe«jve7S/2012. 

WHl wtflortte i.Ki loinaaussMagflicy rut. ucenseo 
frequencies in Bolder Pabol convnuncaikm assets » fecBnafe lactiesl rwnasmicalioD 
imert^ser^ty atnang LRT tod other few cnforceiient oremagency service agencies 
in the LRT area of lesmsibiliCY. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Freer PoHce Departraenl 

MOU between U.S. Border Patrol's Laredo 
Sector and the Frio CoaiHy Sheriffs Oflice 
effective 7/5/2012, 

fre^Rides in Bortfer Patrej conmauarenitm assets to faciliute Qcticai cDnuTBitucaiion 
interoperability ainmg LRT and other few enfoKanent or enwgency service agtaxHes 
in the LRT area of responsibility. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Frio County Sheriffs Office 

MOU between U.S, Border Patrol's Laredo 
Sector and the liin Hogg County Sheriffs 

Orace effective 7/5/2012. 

I'lM CbUtUy S'Rerdl's Ullibe wut auiiionze cn i to iteiaii mio agency cui> 

licensed frequencies in Border Patndcomnumcalion assets to facilitate tactical 
cominunicRttMt inUiopersbitiiy among LRT and other few eofbtcetnent or emergency 
service agencies in the LRT area irf responsibility. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Jim Hogg County Sheriffs Offke 

MOU between U.S. Border Patrol's Laredo 
Sector and the Jim Wells County ShwifPs 
Office effective 7/5/201 2. 

JUh WtlBL'bUlHy hltfrilli Ufltce wiij auinorree cm lotnsiaii ssni agency rc.c 
iiceiaed frequenefes in BdccIh' P atrol comninicaiian assets to facitilare tacdcal 
comnwnicalion mtecqwrability ainHig LRT andoihafew enforoeneni or emergency 
service agencies in Ute LRT area of resoonribitiiY. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Jim Wells County Sheriffs Office 

MOU between U.S. Border Patrol's Laredo 
Sector and (he Lnredo Fire Deportmonl 
effective 7/5/2012, 

frequencies in Border Patrol cotnmiracation assets to fecilitaie taettua! comnuimcation 
interoperebilily among LRT and other few enforcerani w emugency service agencies 
in the LRT area of responsibility. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Laredo Fke Departtnsnt 

MOU between US. Border Patrol's Laredo 
Sector and the Laredo Police Deparlinenl 
efTective7/5/2012. 

frequeocies in Border Patred comnuiucation aseels to facilitate uctica! commumcBiioii 
interoperability among LRT and tdhei law enforcencni or emergency service agencies 
in the LRT area of tespaosibUiiv. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Laredo Police Depattntent 

impiaaiiSMii 

LaSkllt Ulliii WUl 4U1MHU LRT iiia agency iiiriwco 

frequencies in Border Pairot comtainication assets to fadlitate tactical communication 
inleroperobility among LRT and other few enforcement or emergency service agencies 
in the LRT area of resooiuibiJilv. 

USBP Laredo Sector / LaSalfe County Slieriffs Office 

MOU between U.S. Bordet Patrols Laredo 
Sector and the Live Oak County Sheriffs 

Office effective 7/5/20a 

iicnistd frequencies in Border Patrol coininiOKaiimi assets to facilitate tactical 
communication interoperability am«s LRT and other few et^otcenenl or envrgency 
service agencies in (he LRT area of responsibility. 

USBP Laredo Sector /Live Oak County Sheriffs Office 

MOU between US. Bonier Patrols Laredo 
Sectee and the McMullen County Sheri/Ts 
Office effective 7/3/2012. 

M/MUlHft l.'feBiy bBiJUTs (JlhoTJW! SOUWrjJi LRi 16 uEilaTFsaio agency 
licensed frequencies in Border Patrol coimunicaiion assets to facilitaie (acfical 
ccRnmurticatioR interoperability among LRT and other law cnfoiceinent or emergency 
service agencies in the LRT area of respwwibilily. 

USBP Laredo Sector / McMullen County ShetilTs Office 

MOU between U.S, Border Patrols Laredo 
Sector and the Medina County Sheriffs Office 
effberive 7/5/2012, 

MWifti LbUWy iMftiri Ullffi tWI nilllffU/ LR I 16 msiau saio agency re ■_ ucertsec 
frequencies in Border Pairot cemmunicaiion assets lo facilitate tactical ctxnmunication 
tn(eraperabiliiy snung LRT and other law enforcetnetri or emergmy service agenriea 
id ilie LRT area of rcscunsibilliv. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Mediiw Cotmiy Sheriffs Office 

MOU between US. Border PahoO Laredo 
Sector and the Roma Pdice Deparitnmi 
effective 7/.5/3013. 

frequencies in Boeder Patrol ccsranuncMion assets to facitilare tactical communiniion 
iniercqwabiliiy among LRT and wbes few enfutcennK or etmgmey setviw agencie.t 
in the LRT area of responsibility. 

USBP Lwedo Sector / Roma Police Depatiiwai 

MOU between US. Bottler Psirofs Laredo 
Sector and (he Starr County Fite Department 
effeeiive 7/5/2012. 

freriuencies fe Border Patrol commuiucaiina assets to facilitate lactieai comniuuication 
inteiopetabiKty among LRT and other few rnforetnirM or emergency setvicc agencies 
in the LRT «tw of resewnsihility. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Starr County Fire Dep.irlinent 

MOU beivreen US. notder Pslitii's Laredo 
Sector and the Starr County Sheriffs Offict: 
effective 7/S/2012, 

STIfrL'MiUJfSWrnii'UlliW WillHUIMrtWLirf IhSUiait satakgflKy ri.i. uctiiseu 
frequeiKles ut Border Patrol coinmuiucaiion assets to facilitate latsicai comininimiion 
interopcTObiliiy among LRT and other fewriiforcenwnt nr emergency service agencies 
in the Utr am of respontibility. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Stair County SlrerifFa Office 

MOU between US. Border Paiwl's Laredo 
Sector and the Texsts E^arksand Wildlife 
cfrective 7/5/2012. 


USBP Laredo Sector /TexM Pniks and Wildlife 

MOU between US. Bordet Patrols Laredo 

Sector and the 7'exas Mexican Railway 

Cojnpany effective 7/5/2012. 

ikcAsed frequencies in Border Paonl communication asseu to facilitate tactical 
rorntrauiicaikHt interoperability among IRT and other few cnroreemenl nr emergency 
service agendea in the LRT area M responsibilily. 

USBP Laredo Sector /Texas Mexican Raiirray Cranpany 


hcotsed frequencies m Bordiir Partn) tomnuiDcaitan assets to facilitate tactical 

USBP Laredo Sector /IfeioR Pacffic R»'froad Cermnapy 

service a^ieies b» Ifte 1 JIT area cd mpmsibiKly. 

MOU between US. Border Patiolb Lacetto 

Sector and the Webb County Sheriffs Office 

effective 7/5/2012. 

fhquwmes in Border Patrtd camcwiiimioo asseu to facilitate tactical reiiiunuucaiitm 
inleropetabilily among LRT and tribei tew enforvenwni or tirwiseney service agencte 
in dse LRT area of cesponribiliiv. 

USBP Laredo Sector / Webb County Sheriffs Office 

MOU between US. Border Pafrol's Laredo 
Sector and dw Zapifa County Fite DepHrimctii 
efftcltve 7/5/2013. 

frequencies in Boeder Patrol comnunicafion assets to faeditate tactical conurainicaCjon 

inieroprrabihty among LRT and ether few esfoTcenvot or emergency service agencies 

in the LSI area of tesoMwibiliiv. 

USBP Laredo Sector /Zapata County Fire DrfxirfmciH 

MOU between US. Bordet Patrols Laredo 
Sector ujid lire Zapata Couiuy SlsrifTs Office 
effccliYe7tf/2012. 

IVe^tmcies in Boeder PaKtK commanresKion assets to iiidIttQte RKtical commuoiention 
iiifen^erability ainoiig LRT and oilier tew «ifurcemeM or ciircgeiKV ser we agetides 
in the LRT area of rexponsibihiy. 


MUU ootwecttavimnesota state ttsttoi ana tne 
US. Border Patroi; Grand Forks Sector; 
Intemafionai Falls Siaiton 

CBP provides free office rfsec to the Miiwesoia Stale Patroi 

CBP/MinnraMa State Patrol 

MOU between DNR and (lie U.S. Border 
fbiirol; Grand Fwks Sector; Duluth Station 

CBP pr ovktes free trffice spate to DNR 

CBPfiJNR 


Tius FAaffows ilie US. DotvJcr Fatnd to M (heir anwriKibRes with fuel inside 
Voyafieur’s National Park. 

CBP/DOl 

MOU itctrvecii Mumeswa state t^trol ana liic 

U.S. Dratler Patrol; Giwwi Forks Sector; Scefor 
HOS 

SfiiHiesola .Slate [^(rolisaUnwtttglheU.S. Bwder Patn^ access to (heir mdio 
irquency. 

CBP/Miiuiesoia State Patrol 
















310 



US. MaisbaVs Service in Nonb Dakota is aHowing die US. Border Fatral access to 
tbeir rarSo Brequarcy. 

CBPAJ.S- MaishaTs Service 


R(B!!auCoiuttyLaw&EMSiiaUowiDgdwU.S. Botflw Panol access lo their radio 
ftequcncy. 

CBP/Rweau County Law iSt EMS 

MUU oeiwces j^aKe ot me wooas couniy law 
and the U.S. Border Patrol; Grand Forks 

Sector; Sector HQS 


CBP/Lnke of ite Woods CouBly Law 



CBP/Koochichtng Corauv Law 

Muu Deitwen Lane uoaray Law »a tne u.s. 
Bender Grand Forks Sector, Sector 

HQS 

T ate County Law ts allowii^ the US. Boeder access to their lacfio fret^uency. 

CBPA-ake County Law 

MOU octweeti Lass County Law and (tie US. 
Bwder Patrol; Gisod Rsks Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Cass Cousty Law is alinwing die US. Border Padtd access to their rarSo frequency. 

CBP/Cass County Law 


Clearwater County Law is allowing the US. Border Patrol access CO their radio 
frequency. 

CBP/ClearwalerCi3umy Uw 

Muu oetween Kunonro county utw nna itje 
U.S, Bordet Patrol; Grand Porks Sector; Sector 
HQS 

Hubbard County Law is allowing the U.S. Border Patrol access to their radio 
fteqaency. 

CBP/Kubbatd County Law 

MUU between Maiinomen county Law and the 
U.S. Border Patrol; Grand Forks Sector: Sector 
HQS 

Mahnomen County Law is allowing the U.S. Border Paiitd access to their radio 
frequency. 

CBP/Malutomen County Law 

MO'DlwJwenTJook County Law and the U.S. 
Border Patrol; Grand Forks Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Cot^ Cauniy Utw is allowing dw U.S. Border Paired access (o their radio frequency. 

CBP/Cook County Law 

MOU fsetween PoflcL'dinly ijiw'aikl'tlie"U"S. 
Border Patrol; Grand Forks Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Polk County Law is allowing the US. Border l^nol acces to their ladki frequency. 

CBP/Polk County Law 

MOU Between canton county Law ana toe 

U.S. Border Patrol; Grand Forks Sector; Sector 
HQS 

Carlton County Law is allowing da: U.S. Bccder Patrol access to their radio frequency. 

CBP/Carlton County Law 


Clay County Law Is allowing the US. Border Patrol access to their rado fiequetu^y. 

CBPftriayCounty Law 


NotimnCisuniy Law is allowing the U.S. Border Patrol access to their radio frequency 

CBP/Nornian County Law 

MOU twiwcen stecKBr county Law ana i»e 

U.S. Border Patrol; Grand Forks Ssetor, Sector 
HQS 

Becker County Law is atiowing the U.S. Border Patrol access to their radio frequency. 

CBP/Becker County Lew 

MLtu necweeii Penmi^ioii L.oumy Law ana uic 
U,S. Border Patrol; Qraud forks Sector; Sector 
HQS 

Pettmiigton County Uw is allowing Ok U.S. Bm-der Patrol acce» to Ukb ratSo 
frequency. 

CBP/Peiaiiitgion County Law 

MOU oetween nast oratitl torks PU Law anS ' 
the U.S. Border Patrol; Grand Forks SMior; 
SccwHQS 

East Cirand Forks PD Law is allowing the U.S. Boeder Patrol acces-s to their radio 
frequency. 

CBP/Basi Grand Porte PD Law 

HUU''belvv«n’rwd'"H»rl>di't'Pl3 Law' (indite 
U.S. Border Palwl; Grand Forks Sectot; Sector 
HQS 

Twn Hatbots PD Law is atlowiiig iIk U.S. Border Patrol access to tlieir radio 
frequency. 

CBP/r-M>Harbora PD Law 

HW'iie^wwh'WatTdattPU wwai»iiM u.s. 
Border Patioi; Crend Fdiks Sector; Sector 

HOS 

Wanoad PU Law is ahow ins tlw US. Border Patrol access to iteii' radio fvetiiiency. 

CBP/Wairwid PD Law 

MOU I'tl'wen) Icu^u Vi) Law and itic u.S. ' 
Border ^ol; Gcaitd Forte Sector; Sector 

HQS 


CBP/Roseau PD Law 

MOU Oetween uuibtn yi> i.aw tinu tite li.s. 
Btnifec Parrol: Gtpnd Fisrte Seciur; Sector 

HOS 


CDPlDttfutft PD Law 


WKKKKKIt^^ 

CBP/Virtanja PD Law 

Muu oetween cio({iici rv caw aitci nte u.». 
Border Paiml; Grand Forte Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Cluquei PD Law is allowing the US. Ourder Pawol access to their radio frequency. 

CBPtTloqaetPDLaw 


Bemidji PO Law is allowing the US. Bonier Patnd access to their radio fretiuency. 

CBP/B«midjiPD Law 

MOU Dclwccn (jrano k^cw vv Law ano me 
U-S- Btirifer Grand Forks Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Grand Rapids PD Law is aRowiog the US. Border Parrot access (o their radio 
frequency. 

CBPtCrand Rapids PD Law 


f^rk Rapids PD Law is ailovfmg Ak U.S. Border Patrol access to their radio frequency. 

CBP/Patk Rapids PD Law 

MUU oetween Moorneaa ru uawanaine u.s. 
Border Patrol; Grand Forks Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Moortiead PD Law is allowing the US. Boeder Paired access to their radio frequency. 

CBP/Moothead PD Law 

fdUu between Uetroi! LainwPIjXawsutdite" 
U.S. Bofiier Patrol; GraiKl Forte Sector. Sector 
HQS 

Detroit Lakes PD Lww is allowing the US. Boixlet Pairotaccew to their radio 
frecweticy. 

CBP/Deitoif Ukes PD Uw 

MOU tieiween UilStrt PU 1 jiw and tiie U.S. 
Border ftitrol; Graixl Forte Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Gitberi PO Law is utktuiiy’ the US. Bonier i^Kid access to (Ikw radio frequency. 

CBP/GilbmPD Law 

MOU between hwleth Pu Law and it* U.S. 
Bordfl" Patrol: Giand Forks Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Evelcih PD Law Is allowing the U.S. Border Psind access to their radio frequency. 

CBP/Evekih PD Law 

kaOUtietivecn Htfilttiig PU Law andflve U-S. 
Border' Patrol; Grand Forte Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Hibhinu PD (.aw is allowing the US. Border I^WRd amss to thefr rathu frequency. 

CBP/Hibbuig PD Law 

i^U'6'^ween L'lusltoim caw ana the U.S. ' 
Border Patrol; Grand Forte Sector; Sector 

HQS 

Chisholm Law is aHnwitig liie US. Border Patrol access to their raifio frequency. 

CBP/CI«tsholm Law 

MUUnetweeii Leech Lake tribal PQ Law and 
fte US- Border Patrol; Grand Forks Sector; 
Sector HQS 

;.eecb i.oke Trihtil PD Law is aliowine the US- Border Petrol access to tlieir radio 
tequency. 

CBP/Leeci) Lake Trilral PD Law 




















311 


MOU between wtute inoaj ru Lav ana 

the US. Border Patrol; Gnnd Fork* Sector, 
SeclwHQS 

White Esrlh Tribal PD Law is allowing tteUS.BixdeTPaD^acGUsioibeir radio 
(rerwenev. 

CBPAMate Earth Tribal PD Uw 

Mkxiuahdutnol UDdastaisiiiie United States 
Btseder PatrdBis Bend Sector and Brewster 
County Sheriffs Office 

Opmikm "Lone Star" created to combaieopeiBlioDaland intdhgence asaets to address 
exktmg and en^gms Ihi^ts is tbe Bend area. 

Brevster County -5i«iiffs Office 

Park Service, lhated Stales D^itmnl of 
ftuerior and United Stales Customs and Border 
Prateciim, United States Depaiunmi of 
Homeland Security 

Class B Peat of Bury at Boqo^ Oossbig. Kg Bend Naiima] Park 

Nsttionsl Park Service. CBP Office ofFieJd Operations, 
CBP Office of Border Patrol 

M<Xt tegturdkg Aiimfl (ULA) 

Incuisiofs/lnteTdictions 

Provides notobcatun' gadAtxs rod fniocal i^atik^ ULA aKurstoRsAnienbctitms 
within the Yuma Sector AOR 

US HokIb- rtilrtd. Yuma SecKff and Homeland Security 
Inwsti^tions (HS!) 

MOU between IBBP and City of Wedaeo 

Provides guidelines forEMT ttaiiuittaliioconioiiiecity 


MOU between USBP and ERO 

ftovides RUtdelines for the um c^HlOCOV in RGV 

DHS and Removal Op»aiioiB 

MOU between USBP RGV and USFWS 


US. Fish and Wa^s Service 


lYovides terms and conditions of the GtcmftyatTaneetTcolbiwnCDIB and USCS for 
the siiariiig of clearly defined types of nfo usng Ae CDTB DU Siisple Mail Transfer 
Protocol 

DOD/DISA 

MOU btwn NSA/CSS and USCS for Title 31 
Conaiater Maiohinj? Activity 


DOD/NSA 

MOA btwn USCS Air and Mariite IntenSctLon 
Division and FOMA (now NGIA) 

UnnersiaiKluig Ulwn USUh/Au' ea Marine inteiruciioii uiviskxi um ivatioiai imagery 
and Mapping Agency (now NQIA) reguding teecipl and use of NlMA's unclissified 
geospatial diKila! data along llw US borders 

DODMMA 

MOU btwi DHS/CDP and the DOEVO^iceof 
Naval Intelligence as well as Ilie DHS/Coost 
Guard inteUigettce Coordination Center 

CBP to provide copies c4' AMS daiaona periodic basis 

DOD/ONI & DHSAiSCG 

MOU btwn DOJ/DEA & DHSCDP regarding 
Sharing of License Plate Reatfa Data 

Support (lie missions ofDEA and DHS establitliing terms and condiiions for sharing 
the Parties' license [date reader data and io authorize further dissenikiatton 

DOJ/DEA 

MOU otwn UbA amt uou5 regarttmg itw 
Placement of USCS Drug Intetligence 

Personnel Overseas 

Ensures safely, eificiMicy, cooperalitn and cotnmutucolktn btwn DBA and USCS at all 
levels. 

DEA 

HUU'BW)K "HHnS"DHSA,'BP oh Access to 
Advance Passenger Infornation Data, 1-94, i- 
94W, and 1-95 &ta and Ct»]nierterTOT»m 
Selector Information 

Agteeinait w/FBI for access to 1-94. i-94W. and 1-95 data to support FBI support it* 
coinierien'orism, intelligence, and law enforcement investigatory imsstotis 

FBI 

MOU btwn USCS & FB 1 for Use of TECS 
w/addendum 

uociimenisagreement oiwn uauo iihar-Bl tor tls4i!>i i trCb. prdte^iiih STiELS dnia 
and adherence to cominon procedures for lire effective sliaring of sensitive LE 
inforituiion. Addeiiduin permiis FBI to obiaio informition for FC! and internatioflAl 
lertorism investigations 

FB! 


Documents agreement btwn ctSK s i yi tor the use oi i tsuh. protecuon ol i eco ooia 
and the ttSierence to canuron proeeduifs for llw effectiw sharing of sensitve LE and 
related infOTRStion 

Depattinent of Tnuury Office of Tcnoriim & Fiiiaiwial 
Intelligence 

MemorarKSum ol Uiidersisndmg, signed June 
25.3009 

Access to Advfliice Passenger inleemaiion Date, l-va, i-U4W, and 1-9.^ Data, and 
CouRierlcrroriam Selector Information 

DHS, CBP. FBI 

Letter oi Aulbomation. aigAed iuly 1 , 2UtAi, 
renewed January 18, 2012 

Access to Automated Tacgetiiig Sysieiu • Passengs 


Memorandum ol undersiaiuiuig, signed July 
14,2009 

UseoETECS 

LdP, uepioi irrftsuryuiiiccoi i eiTorism ano maniiai 
Imeliiitence 

Memorandum ot Understanding, signed 
Febniarv9,20l0 

.Access to data from itie Electronic System for Travel Autlwruaiioii (ESTA) 

DHS, CBP, NCTC 

Memorandom ot Undetsianding. sigied June 
23.2011 

Access to data from the Advance Passenger infonmtion System 

DHS, CBP. NCTC 


To provide an FBI pcnomiel to CBP begiiminR March 26. 2012. 

CDP, FBI 

Counleiimorism Cenler. signed January 26, 

201 1 and February t, 201 1 

Sharing DHS data with hKlTC during a period of exigoii ihteat. 

DHS. NCTC 



— B 




assEsuncDt 

to provide an FBI personnel lo CDP begiming Januarv 3. 2012. 

CBP, FBI 


10 ptovioe aavtee andcounei to the rtsstsiani LomRis»Kn«r o( tne (Jiiice oi 
imeffigpnee and Invcsdgalive Liaison oo a vniety cf hi^ity complex and seitsiti ve 
inleiliiirnK and investigative issues of oirical ingrotlaiice to CBP. 

CBP. DOJ 

LeRer ot .AiHAnxeatiom tMwn CBP and me 
l<ju« Interaiienov Task Force West 

foaliow JlAi^-W^ameato vRwrbia frmAiMaanw^Cpnnarrttl bnvBnuneni. 
TECS, Slid lUitoimiedTiRgeiinK SyMnn-Inbound module. 

CBP, .HATF-W 

MOU btwn CBP, and Financial Ornss 
Entbrceineni Network 

Ibovides dw lenos mtder vrhishCBPpattic^les in the program that FieCEN ERaiotain 
to pnimi qualifying «ganization (o obtain direef eleciroRic access to nformiion 
c(4!ec<ed pursusint to the reporting autbority ccotainc in the Baidc Secrecy Act. 

Financial Crimes Enforccroeiit Neisvork. CBP 

Letter of Exchange btwn U.S. Department of 
EnergyandCBP 

KJE^requests inat jwvide aumomaiiwi to auow'iheDOUTto expand tts access to 

certain data in CBPs .AuloimtedTargrlbig Systeia to DOE hasiais asstnged to NTC- 
C. 

CBP. DOE 

Dept of Energy - Pacific Northwest Niiiiunal 
Laboratory 

Nai-lniiusiw iitsimiimi (Nil) Diviskm widiin of IMd Ops tunc to sdeamline and 
iiisprove project iiwnaecmeiif {Hoeweses, fiscal (rompatecy. fcamloic mutational needs 
info Hcfionable requirements, help inopiemrnt a robun lest and evahiation program for 
all hfii tehenoiogies psior to def^oymoi. ef^jv% depioy lechiiotocks. and sustain 
and eoititnualiy irnpotve tkploytd letiaioKeies. CBP is miuesiuig (hi PNNL provide a 
compehensive suite of indrpenitenl leMaigcapabRitiBs and (Uttctions (requirements-, teat 
rluas test persuiinel, test faefiiTfl:s.ies(eip>tp[nmi,l«(vaiiipai@U. etc.) required by the 
'‘hi Division to achieve its mission. 

Dept of Energy 

DHS • Science & Teclmology 

Tbe Syiiems Engineeruig and l>s^otn»eiR bstitute (SEOI)stME provide guii/iinct for 
updating infomiarioii Teeluiokigy reqoinmwHs, taking utdo consitieiatioii system iiseis. 
Visa Waiver FrioiyaiiifVWPlnKndmr oalioiis. CongiassimaiaudDHS' iieuchites, aixl 
end-.s(aie mission needs. At (he same dnr. the SEDlstoU also provufc the ESTA 1^0 
witir assisiauce in oxuluclioi^ crkical pathona^rses by edenufyii^ critical task driven 

IV r^lafory latUNage. task depmdRKics and sdedde ccastraintv and lircAaiions. 

Jept of Homeland Security 





















312 


IMied Stales of Amicaa and (he Oowimicnt 
of the Uailed Anb Emiates ce Air Traitspori 
Preclcsrance 

FiRnial agreunem aiggied in Washiogtiui. DC cn d/lSiTZOSB bcuweni the US and UAE 
for ak I^imaoce in Abu Dhal»; at^^Oatnnasioner 

United Arab Emirates 

latKngencv Ajseement # HSBP1011X00151 

rbis lAA prowles OHS Teat & Evehndm eecvkes by iba Naiiiml Assessmeot 

Support CeDlfl’, Nava! Surface Warfare Center, C^ane tndana. Period of FeifonsBDce 
ia is bare year phts ftmr opiim yens. Tou! offing of the lAA k S3.9m, 

NAWC, Crane Division 

!nierJige!ncyAjseMnH»#HSBP1011X00066 

bavirocnKniai Mitigatioo Measures to aaast m reciniEty oi (lie soaotan eYoognoni and 
the Lease Loi^Nosed Bat. FOP 03/2213010 to 03/31/2015; Total Price of lA: 
$1,621,500 

US Fish and WB^ife Service (USFWS) 

loceraaencv AgKsment # HSBPlOilXOOiSO 

tmvffonineniil Mitigattce Measotes to assist m lecovay oi me soflonn mnetMin ana 
Uw Lesser Loi^Nwted Bat, POP 0303/20X0 Io03«l/ffll5; Total Price of lA 
$3,035,500 

National Park Service 

InterageBcy A^eeroenl # HSBP1010XOD5 16 

sobsequemiysuppcHt of Block-} PMO to eDsnrecantractorpfoviiied services are 
delivered oa (ioB, vrithio faadgei. andvridiin scope, POP 04101/201 1 (a 03/31/2012: 
Total Price of lA’ $5,729,454. B4. No ecM exiasiaft mod lo exislms agreenent in 
Fspcess to be completed before end of March 2032. 

DCMA 

Interagsiicy ARtsefnent #HSBPn09)K)1625 

This lAA ptovt^ DHS the use ofSSC Pacific resources, ana rondwtsabie basis and 
as nutuatjy agreed to further the techucai aaiessmeni. evahiatiofi, openitons cesearch, 
demcnsiialiat. training, exercise, deplayimitt and intention of comnunicaiioiis and 
surveillance systems to ireet die needs rtf the IHIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY. SPACE /UJD NAVaL 
WARFARE SYSTEMS CENTER PACIFIC, SAN 

DIEGO, CA 92152-5001 

fmeragency Agreemeni #HSBP10!OX0017S 
P00K)3 United States Coast Guard 

The assignment of a Coast Cjuaid Office, to serve as the System Solution Division 
Dkeclor and as the Project Manager fix Ibelntegiaied Fixed Towers Proicc!. 

US Coast Guard 

InterageBcy Aflreemenl HSBPIOI 0X00014 

applicable systems and training funcikmaliiy. FAA has cheafailicy to c^imize the 
develf^nxnt and delivery of traumg in a cost efricicnt manner liwou^i its cunent 
infrastructure base located at the FAAb academy. Ttus use of Govetnmntt resources 
in ir ainbig and teciuiical knowledge Niminatts (he (kiptieotnn of effort and provides 
eflicicru use of federal resources. 

Federal Aviation Adininislralion Acaden^ 

Interagency Agteemem HSBP12CnXQn54 


Naval Air Sysiem Command, 47110 Liijencraniz Road, 
Patuxent River. MD 

IWerajeneyAgreenieni HSBPl 209X01590 

ZL,:.'i]iia!;j!?jga 

Federal Avialion Admiiiisiratiai. Logistics Center 
(FAALC) 

MOU l^garding Cooperaiive National Security 
and CouniRKiTorismEnotU On Pedaial Lauda 
along tite US Bordets (0-2006) 


DHS. Deptofbiterior aiidDeptof Agriculmra 

Acting Tltfougti the U.S. Geological Survey 
and t!w Depaiimni of HoiisIbikI Security 
Pertaining to Geospalial Informaitoii end 
Rfinote Smaing for Homtiatxl Security (3- 
2006) 

Nition-wide coopeiale to create and provide a congiatible, eoirpleineniary, nationally 
consistent set of geospeiial and miioie sensing data and infonnition requirvmenis to 
nvet (he nationb bORielaod sectiriiy needs 

DHS, Dept of huerior, and USDS 

Intertigency ABreemetii Between US. C\a(ofn( 
& Bonier Protectron 
i^xIU.S. Foroai Service (2011) 

IJtnWf TOf R H M {dHdHlWd By tW FiWeH Service m suppori ok iiie\2 B'f’ rtlHilbH.'' 11® 
worksball be limited to imintaining and improving the opentingeoudiiion of the rend 
way s)x(ein wiithn ptopetty nunaged by (lie Forest .$eivire anti used by CDP in 
nerformance c^ its mission responsibilities. 

U,S, Forest Service* (USFS) 

Imetageiicy Agteemem bctweeir CBP aix! (lie 

US Fiai) Olid Wildlife Service (2009) 


USFWS 

(meragency Agreement between Ol'LA and 
CBP.FM&E(20IO) 

Defines the funclicmt relationship and responsihiliftes between OTIA and CBP/FMJtE 
for the wcitfilcal planning, budgeting, ptepataiion and execution of Real Estate Serrii-cs 

CBPOTiik and CBP OA FM&E 

Reaoutce Mitigation .Uitieinied willr 
ConMruciioR and MaimeRance of Border 
Security InTmiitucnire along the Bwdrt of the 
IWted Sinies and Mexico (1-2009) 

Agencies agee fondnitiute inlets, cooidinate andpoavide (K-hnical auisiaiice. (5- 
vm MOA) 

DOI 

MOA for Enviconmenial Coaidmiion and 
Review{l-2008) 

la laciltstcNEl'A documents anucon^ance. tneagenciKagiee loprompUyrtvfciv" 
l^ans and tlDCUtnenis. (xovide lecfnical assistance and sveandine compliance 
processes. (Expires Dec 2012) 

DOl 

DHS S&T (FFRUC SEPl SuRwt - MITRE ) 


DHS S&T 

fEUtdance to IBIS CBP OTIA. 

DHS S&T (FFRDC Support - HSl) 




DOE^NL will provide Test and Evahiation support to OTIA 

DOE/PNNL 

Naral Surface Warfate Center Dalhgren 
Division (N.SWCDD) 

As die Design Agent, they were dcsigmied os the fechnica) lead for both [be Northern 
Bordet DeniMi«T8lion Project arelibeOpwArchiiectinafOAJCOP- ForthcOpen 
Architeciuie. the scope Mweekinctudes the had^ lequitemems, design ajxJ initial 
Cransilion plaiuiing to sn OA COP and subsequent hardware and roftwaie u^ipoct. 
Finally, ibis SOW inchides ttchnica] siqiptnt for iixideliiig and (eating of new 
(echi»logic% Nonhcni Border DemniMtcaMm systnm etigiiKeiing. program 
management sujqmri to there activilies. and enmnodities {HKctaise and Subject Matter 
Exp«tis(SME}procumTcm ropport as needed. 


DHS S&T (C&V LFAD. WAS) 

ensure successful developtnent and inyfanHitatwn of e^aiiced bortter seewity 
capabibiies. Four tasks to support CtittBcauno & Accreditauou elforlS', Low F Iviug 
Aiivrnft Detection .Sensor <iim-iadar)Techi«dr^Testnig and Evahiatnit; Wide .Aeiial 
S'ui vcitbiBce System; and Subteci Matter effwis. 

DHS S&T 

Nafioia! Air & Space ImeiUgEnce Center 
{N,ASIC) 

bMSIC wdi ccinAict its prov«i AGI utfegraud exphulaltan capabilities which are 
dkectlyappiirobte to Uic C8P, IHfS IfiAand USCG tfirtsu analysis afong the 

Nmhcni Bolder of the United States inctnding the Great Lakes, in ami acoujKl the 
target hvniioniii ilie Great lakes. Fh^KVAdnnceilTa^nica! Cxp/oitatton Division 
(DEMjrecoiiuDctKbreduucaliiseii^e^inretBtgsiirilhOHS {A.-\.CBP. t'SCG.siid 
Diher npisopriate agRity Detroh Border PnileetKO persmitel to delerinnr tow AGI 
enpabiffttes can be eDip{<Qt»f (u aikfcess MkS C8P pnffifem sets. 

NASIC 














313 


IJS Coasi Guard Watch Sapwvisor 

To oKure cuceessful operaiioo of the NB]D Opemkaiai hx^raiioo Center (QIC), the 
>{«rttc«niof Homelatid Secarty U.S. Chitons and Bordet PnseciioR (CBP). 

Office of Technology Innovatiofi and AaptUtion to establish an 

inieragoK^ Agreement (lAA) with the Umted Stales Cout GobrI (USCG) to provide s 
LCDR (CMVCG Offiew to the Operaiicna) Bse^on Centor, tecaled at Selfridge Ait 
bfalionai Gu»d Base, Michigan to serve as IbeOIC Supervisor. 

u:k:g 

DHS S&T (Marituns Radar De^oyj^! & 
Support) 

imiaU one tORtHime survalfance radaer at tirosse Hwt. Mteiugan atui provide ii&M 
sum>t»> at bMh Out! (stand and Grosse Pete. 

DHS S&T 

MIT/IX Hamscom 

of Customs and Bonier Prowetion Tins tadades putic^uig in the review of 

open-system struxinds, for both high-levei etatsnis of the DHS enterprise sttchileetute, 
and for the tactical ^etns that catty seruor data and a romitwn operatiemai jwiure to 
the DHS user consuimity. 

HANSCOMAFB 

Video Iisageiy Explatation System (MuUi- 
Archival and AiBlysis Systwti; MAAS) 

To prowde equipment tetpitred to st^porl two imageiy eaploiiation workstatiDiB at the 
Unmanned Aucraft SyMemOpwationsCsww- North Dakota (UASOC-ND) and four 
weskstattoos at the Air and Marine Opoaiions Centac (AMOC) in Riverside. CA. The 
ctailracns shall also provide subject matter cxpoiise lo r^tione inatallaiion and 
Kmduef trainine f« system occtbIiws and governneoi oetvratk eDgineers, 

NQA 

NASOOT&EforOIC 

Operational Aasessinini (EOA) of the Northern Border Program Operational 
(niegroiion Center (OIC) mcladutg planning, conduct, analysis, uid reporting. The 
NASC shall conduct and retort nqui^ Operatitma! T&E (OT&E) activities in 
accordance with Depaiiiwra of Hwnrfwid'Swairity (DHS) andCuscoms and Bortlet 
Protection's (CBP’s) TAB guidelines. 

Naval Surface Warfaie Center (NSWC). Crane Division 
National Assessment Support Center (NASC) 

1 ecmticat Mgmeehl® sui^xhi aervtces (NiV4i 
Air Warfare Censer Aueraf! Divisiwi 
(NAWCAD) - Special Cottmutucalions 
Requirenwtiis Division (SCRD)) 


Navv 

Base services {.tor uiuities, tcieplwii^ 
inaiptemuice orders, ajxt jairiioriaJ, lawn cote 
and snow removal 

To obtain jonilorul, telephoive, utility, and ffiainieiiance support from the SelTcidge Air 
National Guard Bose. 

Selfridge Air Natioitai Guard Bass 

SPAWARSy^em Center Pacific (SSC-Pac): 
NBD Tasks 

mission of SPAWAR System Center Pacific. Several tasks ore under the scope cf this 
lAA including Maritime OettctiiMi, Law Enforcement Tectinlcal Collection, atxl a Usei- 
Centered Desijp Project. 

Navy 

DHS S&T (C&A, LFAD, WAS) 
HSBP1010XOO2Q6 

ensure lucc^sful devetopinem end iinfgemntaiim) of eidtanced borda sacuiity 

capabilities. Four tasks to support Cetlincation & Accreditniion eflbfts; Low Flying 

Aircraft Deiwlion Sotsor (non ndar) Technology Testing and Evaiuaikn; Wide Aerial 

Surveillance Systemi and Subject Matter efforts. 

STATUS: 

Comoleted Bose Period and cuireiuly exercisuig llw Ist Option year. 

DHS S&T 



NASIC 

US Const Guard Watch Supervisor 
HSBPltillXfi00C>9 

To ensure siiceesslbl opertiioii of the NBIDOperaiionnl fntegraiioi* Coder (OIC). the 
Dcpattment of Homeland Security (DHS). US. Customs and Boeder Prctecliott (CBP), 
Office (A Ttehnology Innovafion and ikceiutsiiioR (OTLV) seeks to cstabKsh an 
Interagency Agrromefli (lAA) with the United States Coast Guard (IKCG) to provide « 
LCDR {0-4)/CG tDffieer toilie Optraiioiial fntegran'm Center, taraied at Sdfridge rdr 
Narional Guard Base, Mndiigaii to«r« as the OIC Ihtatch SupervKor. 

sr.vrus; 

lAA PoP couxdsted. 

USCG 

DHS S&T (Maritime Radar Urployment & 
Support) Usnpl2(nx01368 

supputi at both Gull LitaiKl kikI Grrsc Puini. 

STATUS; 

The !AAacti«) was tenniivtied. 

DHS S&T 

HanscomAFB:Mrr/LL HSBPI01CIX01797 

ofCusTotm and Border fVerertion (CBP). This includes participating in Uie rtvinv of 
opcn-syunRSiaiKtards. for bothhiglt-fevvi elencnis of die DHS enterprise architecture, 
and for the tactical systems dai cmy sensor rfaraandaeuiaiMi nperaiionat picruie to 
toe DHS user cormsi^y. 

STATUS; 

lAA adtoesses CBP): Atod for vkiro an^Vtic sototiofls. 

HanscomAFB 

Tociinjcnl Engineering Support Servim (Nawrl 
Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division 
(NAWCAD) - Special Communicationc 
Requirements Division (SCRD)) 
HSBPlOnXOOCQ? 

imsian to deploy tuid provide additional real-time FMV rideortowidadt receivers to 
eitotmce and expand bifortmllMi sharing among CBP's e^eraiional congioneiHs end 
soppoil CBP's overall nucion. 

STATUS: 

lAA executed os planned. Rei^iremenis net. 

Navy 




lAA between CBP OTW and DHS SAT 
HSBPIOS2XC0094 

sensitivity and le^ioivse of .senaa sysMns used to detect crass border tinuielx. Includes 
the collection of geophysical survey data from 100 iwfesof high threat cross border 
tunnel areas and a sensor guidebook oritBuirt tkteciion sensor types that work best in 
iheseareasandfhccmndeiKelevHcduse^raclL . 

CBPtfrf.-kaiid DHS S&T 

Meireif andum of UnJetjtatsding (MOU) 

The purpose of this .Agieemnii is to set (Mb twits by whtdi CBP and fCE Viill provide 


be iiiqileincmed to; Sfreainlinf mDveineMOf<let»Me^Rediiceovvra!l detainee ground 

beisveei! U.S. Custoire and Bottler Protecrioo 
(CBP) and U.S. fininigratiuJ! and Custaitis 
Enfwceinent (ICE) reg.Tj'ding Detainee Ground 
Tsaiisport 

tramportatimt costs; Enable better iiuttagcnKUt (tf dte mt-KKend itatawee 

ICE 

lirogram iixiRa^ineiU of aeegitsiiims (BraNu^ crnas-agatcy Rquiiements. 





314 


The DepvQsail of (be bjterior (DOO w31 pnviite guud ■srrice. maritime 
irattsponalioo. and traD^riatim of ftm^satuoadf inw iSegatly entered 

Interagency AgreaneM Between U.S. Cosions the LMed States in the isKuids s Kqis sanosiKbi^ the sooth Florids Peninsula. IXII 
and Btcder ProteaiM arrf the Nadonai Park wfllprovideovtMhe-wateitno^ortaiioBialCey Wert Floridi or any other bcaiion 

ServtteDepartnsntofthelmerior trajmallyagrceduponbyDOIandlocali^wiasiJMwesoflheBP. Whenthese 

HSBP1052X00093 dataases haw been transponed to ll« rmmaHy agreed i^wilocaiiOT. DOIperscmnel National Park Service (NPS). Department of the Interior 

wttl aggfer custody rf all detajnees and thett pcraml eifecH lo ttte BP. (DPI) 

M&K ot at) KvSS towers ana cows a bifl ra^ Dom 

d(sign/cciu(nietia)i/i«inte»Bice astd decocmssioi^ The mrenl ceiling is S63M 
FAA HSBP10I2X00125 with ' 


set the sc(^ and budgetsStsRis; bi progress, used for new mwtr crmstmciion at 
Nog^es Station and C2 mo^EainnE fitr Nogales, hbco, Douglas. Sonoita, Ajo 
Stations 


data submitted by nmOacior, review conlractor^ sparing modd and reconwiendations; 
establish a basehse based oo ibe cootiactcr^^Mring reconxwndaiioi»; and uuvel in 
supptxi of required ILS : 




FOR THE EXCHANGE OF AUTOMATED 
COMMERCIAL ENVIRONMENT DATA 
BETWEEN US. CUSTOMS AND BORDER 
PROTECTION ON BEHALF OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND 
SECURITY AND 


Customs and Border Protection, Imnugiaiton itnd Cusioms 
Enforcement, Consuncr Product Safety Commission, Food 

InteragencyFusioii Center Agreemeiu; To advance (be tnissicn rtf sharing information, Safety bvpection Service, Animal and Plant Health 
Import Safety CotransrcislTstgeling and tools, and rewuicesstiioag federal agencies wnihauthoeity governing the safiwy of ImpeMioo Service, Environtnenial Ptoteciion Agency, 

AiwlysUCwii erMOU ptodncu irtyoiied into the Iftiiled Stales. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safely Adminbiration 

FBl-Cfimiiial Justice Information Services Conduct crioiinat history background checks on Oistoms Broker license applicsNs who 

Divisioti have passed the examination to eosute they are of good mwal eheotcter. FBI 

























315 



Over the Ail Rdtepng (OTAR) 
BWerprise Opeiatioiis Cwaer 


Over the Air Rek^ing (OTAR) 


IDHS - S&T DkectoiaK 


DHS-U-S. Coast Guard (USCG) 


jCoast Guard - COTHEN 
j2X'!2-0338 (IiBerageDcyAgreemeirt) 



I CoBSt Guard vessels and Aircraft Usage fee to pBtlieipMeMftdn the COTHEN | 

nMworl!;inc)udiagQTAR««rviceg.Overtheagdfaff>oMicAandTe<to»ie^sappon. {PHS-U.S. Coast Gaard (USCO) 


DHS - US. Coast Guard (USCG) 

COTHH^ nerwttdt. [dHS - US. Coast Guard (USCG) 


^istcHTS and Border Proieciioo r^ardoe services foe the high 

iieqieiicy (HF) Cusiocas Over-tbe>ikato) EDforcaneiU Networit: (COTHEN) from the 
NLK-X:. 


iDtermittent or emergency use COTHEN nawotfc 


DHS - US. Coast Guard (USCG) 


ArmyCwpofBtpiMers 


Over the Air Rekeying (OTAR) 

DefM. of Labor - Office of Labor Racketeering and Fraud 

Over the Air RekeyinR (OTAR) 

Dept of Tteaeury 010 

Over the Air RekewtR (OTAR) 

Dept, of Agfieuiture 0!G 


Over the Air Rdceying (OTAR) 


pepf. of Deferwe Criminal JnvMtigaiive Service 



Over the Air Rekeytng PTAR) 


Over the Air Rekeyim (OTAR) 


Over tlte Air Rekeyiitg (OTAR) 



iDepi.ofVeieiajisAffairsOEG 


] DOT, fwiTona! HighwayTtsnsporietion System 
AAnittUiratioii 



































316 


Meiimraodum of AgreeaienJ (MOA) Beiween 
The Department of HomeJand Secuaity Office 
of the CMef Infonratioa Officer (OCIO), 
Eirfeiimse System Developnjeoi OOice (ESDO 
And Customs sod Bradei Protection. Office 
infansition and Teclmoiogy 

DHS leverages ibe lidiastrucnire as a Senix laaS sonce ^sUed under OSA's 
Sebeduie 70 as a Bbudeet Purdtase Agreemmt 3PA). TIseirse, GSA. is the 
acciedtting autitoricy to the Cloud Seiwe Provider (CSP) laaS Oovemmsnt Su|^t 
Services ^S). and is responstble to nsari^ dwto C^Ps maimain Ibeii 
Ceciiftcafkn and AccretRlation fCAA) and ai8i» to the coninuous rnDt^toimg and 
compliance of the CSP% laaS GSS. MGMT/OQOfESDO Secostty has reviewed the 
CAA/ATO package (e.g. Security Plat. Sccinily Asstssnml Report, etc.), perfonnrd 
a Risk Assesmeat of the ContnAs and PUn <f Action and Miiestofus (POAAMs) 
^ued (Bi a FIPS'IRB categCHizaticncd'Ciniflda^^^ Low, Bitegriiy; Modeiatet 
AvaOabilicy; Moderate) and in ctmleict of die dauAnfonaalion being delivered via this 
environnenc as being "public" data. BasedaDilnsRnkAssesaimn(RA],ESDO 
acceped GSA‘s CAA on October lOlK 2011. Similaily, ESDO pertoined a risk 
Bss^unem of to WCMaaS plaitom as a ssviee oftotng. 

DHSWXilOlCBPVDIT 

N i fS Wtijitf 'FiM Tm WebUoilitig 

To Hk United States Customs SBorcfer 
Protection 

Apeemeai supporting bwtisg of CBP.gov aod perighenl wA sites available to to 
public. 

NaiioDalTrobmca] Infonrmtion Service 

lAA iietwera ICE M>d CBPtBBdS 

CXX3N0S IRer Licenses, Upjpades. Systran Mamusttnee 


lAA btaween ICBWFTTU and CBPSEMS 

FACTS foventoryManasement System OW 

JCEWTTU 

lAA between ICEWTTU and CBP®EMS 


SCEWFTTU 

lAA between ICB\OCSO mKlCBP\BEf.K 

JICMS 

ICEiOCSO 

lAA between ICEVCIPD andCBP«EMS 

JiCMS 

ICEICIPD 

!AA between ICE»PR and CBP\BEMS 

JICMS 

ICEKIPE 

Deparirneni of Veterans Affairs 


VA 

Infera;OTtcy AgreejnenlAJver llte Air Rekeyins 


OeparimetU of Echictiiion 

interasency AgreemwifOver the Air Rriw^^S 

Ov« to Air Rekeyirw (OTAR) 

Fedwa) Housing Finance ARemry OIG 

Interagency Agreenienl/Over the Air Rekeying 

Over the Air RekeyIng (OTAR) 

Peace Corps 

InterageiKy Aj^eetrentfOvei (lie Air Rekeyinfi 

Over to Air Rekeying (OTAR) 

Depniiiniuit of Commerce 

Wireless Tecbndogy Pr^ram 


Defense Inforrmiton Systems Agency 




Deparimeiii of Homeland Security, CBP, BP 
San Diego Sector, 0AM Soulhwest and FBI 
Los Angeles regarding radio access to (Ik DHS 
CBP San Diego Maritim Cemmumcations 
SysMia 

The purpose of this MOU is to memorialize the guidance for sharing secure encrypted 
radio consttutHcaiion end voice itaffK exclusively among CBP and the ic^eciive law 
enforcemeix officers parieied with to Los Angeles-Lcaig Beach regional coordinating 
itvchsnisincotvtiststil whbiliegoalsandpriiictplesielfliedtomritune bolder security. 

DHS. CBP, BP San Diego Sector. O&M Southwew and 

FBI Los togeies. 

Memorandum of Underatanciing am«^ the 
O^riinent of Konxland Security, US CBP. 

US BP Son Diego Sector, Komsiand Swuiiiy 
Investigations. ImmigtaliaTis and Cutitoms 
Enforcenwtl Los Angles, UnlledSiales Coast 
Ouard Secw LA>Loiig Bead), US CD? Office 
of Fiehl Otwrations Lw Angeles. Orante 
Cooniy SiterfiTs Deiwiineni, Long Bead) 

Police Depticltnent, Los >\iig<Ies Port 

Audiority. and Los Angeles Pulicc Department, 
0AM Southwest and FBI Los Angeirs. 

The puipose of this MOU is to iminorialize the guidance to sharing secure encrypted 
radio comnwiricaiion and voice traffic exclusively among COP aod the re.epKlive law 
eiitocemcflt officers {Diteivd with the Los Aiigelcs*Lra)g Beach regional tnordimiing 
imhauistn consirtani wiiii the goab and priiiripfes r^ed to maritime border security. 

DHS. CBP. BP San Diego Seolor, Homeland Security 
Invesiigaiioiis. ICE Loi rViiglis, Unlttfil States Coast Guard 
Secor LA-Long Beach. Office of FMdOperationa Los 

Orange Owitty Sheriffs DepartnieHi, Long Beach 
Police Drpaninrn). Los Angeles Port AuiliorKy. and Lw 
Angeto Police Departnvnt, OAM Sonthweit ami FBI Los 
Angeles. 

MOU between CBP/CSPO ,W(1 DHS/OCIO 

lyovules porttolio govetnance services trornGabneOe Galtegos. L>H5/Ul,1t>. tllccbvc 
5/16/2032 through 12/19/2012, 

DHS/OCIO 

HSTS02-I0-X-Djy)007 



H.SC023.12-X-RAZaoa 

iiup(enviHft(ioii«KitH.-cess to me u.a. i..ut'.vuioi«nie<i inTgetiMg^ysKindaiA-n) 
Softw.-ite Program to the USCO Consiwalch Branch and USCG Intelligence 
Corrdinadcin Center. 

usex; 

F-I.\^\-10-LMAQM-I88 

1. oantry 4 iuppoft • uetivrry oi nvitiionsecuntyiecnnoiopy ntinzcdPy UMtv's Ui. 
Cu.storrat and Border Protection (o improve the recipient govcituiKnih capability to 
analyze airtine passenger intonKicon. 

DOS 

HSHWVr-52-X.fXXJOi 

Overstay VsKdaiion six! Vetting and Dio^apMc Ekit Eidnnremenls Support - Provide 
!)vastay Validafton and Vetting and BiograidHC Exit Enhancements support. 

DHS 

HSCErC-12-X-00005 

UKS/iCk lor NUi b Data boKware - CUPproMsioa ol tonttaefor support lor sysfemt 
deyelcpinenf, operaiion and mnintcRance of to NlTfE Cteia System 

ICE 

HSCEMD-n-X-00014 

IFS) not contained within AFI ihnl rcBBUaiegrarmrm to ICE CBP useumrait of 
be nalrih'ty ^kvnngitigDHS OnrF^l snd OHS Active Dinctoiy to tCEsysiem 
aaessioAFL 

ICE 

HSHQDC-5O-X-{)0361 


DHS 

Armory AmmunSion Managerneiji^iKl other 
Related SCTviees (SIA) 

Provide Armory and Anununiitoi rebted services to CBP 

ICE 



DHS/ FLETC 

MOU uovetmng tiic Assigtiiitent oi UeiaiKti 
Insiniciots between United Slates Customs 
Service amlFLETC 

Detail of eSP (nsmiciims to FLETC (AKA 

DHS/ FLETC 

MOU Governing the Assigmnent of Detailed 
(ittlctictots 

Ik flssjgiimnii of rupansibitiiies, wrak assiguiiMs, evahmtiw. tocipiiw, leave, 
nttiiGor ediica<ionAx|ieiKiif e requBemtos. setecrion process, nnviiig uiiruws. 

R.ETC 

MOU is tinted 1/3/1996. ^ 

MOU for the SponsoTJlap and Operntioi) of llte 
Consolidated Federal Law Enfortetneni 

Trainmg Center 

ofMamgemeiii iuitl Budget, to PosifXfice Depatmem. to Snithsoitiaii liuututioii, 

Iw DepavliiKui of State, the Dcpaitinnu td to Tlmsaiy, and to U.5. Qvil Service 
Cniiuiiiuion. This was estabKsfiedioprowdetoageaeies wiibiulequate, modem 
Ncifirie.v for in'SCtvice trauwtg, and (o ceaidBct cmiffinu tn^erwe tinuung, to various 
awenTorccmenlpeTSomwl mmeftotiveandoeoRNncalnaiinei. MOU L dated 
September 30. )97a 

Jepatnnent «f Interior, the Department of Justice, the 

Office of Maiiogeinent and Budget, llte Post Office 
Jfparimeni, the Smiflisoiusn Dtstiiuticij. ilm Department of 
Stale, to Dcpaitinimt of the Treasury, awl to US. Civil 
Service Commissioo 


















317 


MOU Re^rdins she AdmaiiMiatim of Bonto' 
Patrol Training 

Patrol Aceden^ and the FLETC Biradei tocaiablMinBPAtobehiMtedby the 

FLETC at its Aitesia, NM liainiog site. It dIki defB» a strategy for transitioning 
Border PBtrnI traising to the Aitesia Parillty fiettFLETCsCharlesion. SC md 

Glynco, GA sites 'Miere the FLETC hrsted that inniiig. The hfiXI is dajed 
08/20/2004. 

FLETC 

MOA: EMS Field EAicatioD 

providers and students. EMS providets lopirea venue to ensure exposure to paiinu 
comtcis in order to gainor nBintiansk)lis.TlHeiM>R)aagreuneM formalins fee 
reJattoRsta^ between the reainly and the AlC aUmnig ATC EMS providers car students 
to ride with county paramedics. Tfx ride-tirae b for fidd afoeaiion and skin 
rauntenance. 

JeHerswi Cotmty Emergency Services Agency (JCESA) 

MOU; Local H^cian Advisor 

Advkior (LPA) for the CBP .ATC TUi an con undersunding creates tlie required Urdt 
Iwi'ween DHS EMS mediral ^rectjoc). {atmdedby federal physiciaiu, and their local 
EMS physician partoen in icconlaDEe with The Oflke Health Affaire (OHAl 
Strategic Plaa 

Robert E Jones HI. M.D. 

lA; Services for Wildlife Reaoval 

lias agreement provides Ira the removal ol L'anada Geese «i the canons ot the 
Advanced Trair^ Center 

USDA ' Dept of Agneuhure, Auhtal and Plant Health 
inspecticn Swvices 

lA: Services and Perscsinet requaetl to t^ate 
a Medical Clinic 


Federal Oecupaiioiial Health Services 

Border Protection Office of Ttaning and 
Developtnent wish Bureau of Alct*ol, Tobacco, 
Firearisis, and Explosives regarding the cost of 
the Security Guards. 

ihhrhhihiiii 

BATFE 

MOA between US Customs and Border 
Protection, Office of Ttnining and Ifevelopment 
with Bureau of Alcohol. Tobacco, Firearms, 
and Explosives regarding ilic use of tlie Canine 
Center Front Royal, 

The use of the land at Caniis Center ^di Royal and {be atkiwancecif BATFE (o have 
[IS Training Center and Kenneb onsite at CCPR. This also includes the reiirbursmeni 
for partial utility costs each year. 

BATFE 

Overarching MOU between DHS and USDA 
with Article 4 specific aj^ieodix that outlines 
the training of CBP employees. 

MOU between the DK.S and USDA, DHS Agreement • BTS-03-001, signed 
02/28/2003. HSA of 2002 transferred certain agricultural import and entry inspection 
foiKtions to ilK Secretary DHS ftom the Secretary c^ Agriculture. Attided- Training 
- USDA shall supervise irainiiig of DHS employees to carry out foimtksu transfetTHl 

USDA - Dept of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health 
Enspecfioi) Services 

USCG Boat Forces SPCLE Vessel Support 

Total life cycle vesrel support for USCG SPCLE vessels. 

USCG 

HI 1 II — 1 


USCG 

UKigM|sm|sFmi^ymg™m^^^| 

Life cycb support fw JMTC irairang vessels. 

USCG 


Life cycle support for HITTRON training vesseb. 

USCG 

FBI GITMO Vessel Support 

Scheduled and unscheduled maintenance on FBI VIP vessel. 

FBI 

NOAA Right Whafe Vessel Support 

Scheduled and unscheduled maintenance on two NOAA fisheries vessels. 

NGAA 

AgreemembtwD Sista end local otikials- St ' 
)^u\s CouDiv Fin Rescue Vessel Sumnci 

Scheduled and unscheduted inaintenaoce on one rescue vessel. 

Si Johns Crainiy. FL 

biSiiiWlliiiWBiliiiiiai 

Scheduled aid auscheduled maimenanee on three first responder vessels. 

City of St Augustine. PL 



III B— 













FBMA 

UUP <0 provuie «w entotcemrm support to (vemue proteciwn ot lives aiiu pro|wny oi 
flood cvacuaterlareas. in^ess/egreosccuitiol in evaetiated areas, and any other law 
enfoicemeni duties as ossiipied in Minot. ND. 

OAM. FEMA 

FEMA 


OAM, FEMA 

FEMA 

CHP will support bfcMA Kegioii 1 Kegtoiial KCSpOiscc C'oortuKHioii (.ctwvr ui support 
of Huiricaiie Irene. 

OAM, FEMA 

FKklA 

CUP w iU pcovidea lutol assets available (or deploynvnt ui .support ot Humcane 

Irene. 

OAM, FEMA 

FEMA 

KTItbfH'MUfVKd li3ii(flUMi^!l|t/Aiy'oii2rs‘Uliff^il (IR l-kMAdnriSfer lesixnise (n~ 
KunH'auc freiw widun ihe State of Vennuil. Specifa- uskiiigs will U- proriikd by the 
FEMA ^raliras* section in concert with agency asset availability and the type of 
service needed 

OAM. FEMA 

lAA between CBP IMM ami US. Army FtU 
Aviatkn 

To recapitalize the UH-6Cb\ Model helicoptm to UH-60L Motirl helicopters 

OAM. Army 

Agreeinent lor Ute Loan oi Army MaCeriel 

betwren CBP OAM and U.S. Atn^ Aviatirm 

and Mk^fie Omvnai^ 

To loan sixteen (Jb)UH-6QA Model helh'opters to CBP 

CBP, iWno' 

tAA betveessi CBP and USAF Aeronautical 
Systems Kg Safvi Office 

To OMWge USCG/CBP Manned Cover Surveaianre Aira aft Program 

CBP, US.AirFcece 

Federal Protective Service and the Oistoms and 
Bonier Protection, CKBce of Aii and Marine 
Rcgardir^ lAe of the Corsolidated Training 
Facility, Alexandria, Virginia 

The use of the Condolicated Training Facility fee the short tenn advanced, in-service, 
and aKency-spcciTic tratnine is si the best iideresf of hrah parties. 

CBPandFPS 

U..S'. Gustww and Bordw Froteenon, us. 

Coast Guard, U S, fmrrigration and CtisKiitw 
Engcaceineiil SeiiiO)' Guidance TeainCliniiei' 

Dk charter eslablislies a Seniot Godance Team <1 Tint«a<a: itear-tcrm atid long- term 
operalioiKi) iitlegiaiioii, cfferiiTeiiess. awl efficiency- 

CBP, USCG, and fCE 

Standard Operating Ptocedure.s for Coordinated 
Air ami Maritime Law Enfoveentem Operations 
Between U.S. Di.sforrKatKt Bordet Protection. 
Office of ;Air and Marine - Miami ;Air and 
Marine Brandi, Jacksonville Air and Marine 
Branch, Caribbean Airand Maritse Branch; 

U.S. Clisionis and Bolder Pioieclion. U.S. 
Border Patrol, Miami Sretot; U.S. imirapation 
and Customs BiTotcemrai, Homeland Security 
fnvratigarions. Office of the Special Agent in 
Charge. Miami Florida; and U.S. Coast Guard. 
.Seventh Disiricl 

file SOP establishes operational guidtlines for the pwliHpam as comportecMS with 

3HS fur coordinated air and nBritime law mfonmnmt operations in (he iiitspiice and 
vvater.c subject to tlw juiudiction of lim US a Md over the pons awl approaches (n 
Sourihoii Florida. Ihierio Rin>. mid (he US Vn^ Idauds. 

cap. USCG. and iCE 



















318 


InsEBigraijcn aodCusinos Enforcement (ICE) 
Homriand Security Inwsttgatkms (HSI) and 
US. Custcens and Border Protection (CBP) 
Office of Air and Marine (OAM)reganling 
CBP OAM Support to ICE HSi EWereover 
Operaticsis 

The MOD sets the terms by which CBP OAM wilsiippoH ICE HSI undercover 
opaalions. 

CBP and ICE 


I'te SUP estsbitshes tundardized pnetsses to streandme tCErecptesu In' CBP OAM 
support. 

CBP and ICE 

CBP Air and Maiineand US. Coast Guard 
Convnmi Ibumnoed Akcnft Systems loini 
Proatam Office ClHrter 

innmiT-r7n-|1T^iV7'jr7J'q 

CBPandUSCG 

Coast Guard and C^ons and Border 
Protection for Uinented Auctafi SysIeiDs 
CoBaboratioQ 

The MOA outlkes ati<» m die pbnnmg. prngram and lehcnical anslyses. 

development, testing and demonstrating, acqriHtien, andr^ations cdtaunajmed 
aircrah syMKine. 

CBPandUSO) 

Metnwandum of Agtreraeui (MOA) BciweeB 
the US- Coast Guard and US. Customs and 
Border Protection. Air and Marine Operations 
Center (AMOC) Rcfiaiding Dain Sharing 

The MOA esiabliihes the details involved with the imnsgsnKnt, (^lenlion. and security 
of the connection and data exchange between the AMOC and USCC. 

CBP and USCG 

li.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
Mariae Vessel Management Council (MVMC) 
Chatter 

tUso known os liie DHS Boat Managunertf couiKdl, (he MVMC was established to 
review and coordinate the joini rasDagemBtu and govemance tisuea oaiocatied with 
t^tatitMial and requiiemeiiisgeneiaiion and oversight fbrilie DHS imrincveNluboat 
useit, and to develop the tnui efliectiw and econoinicti imriDe vessle/boai pro^m. 

CBP. USCG, ICE, and DHS MRnagenwm Directorate 

Marshal Service, Witness Security Division ant 
U.S, Customs and Border Prolectiou, Office of 
Air aud Marine regarding Air Support 
Operatioia 

The Bgreenvnt esiabbUies the fnnvworic uider wMdi CDP OAM win provide aerial 
support for WSD's autlioraed nusaions. 

CBP and U.S. Msrshils Service 

Coniinenial United Stale# NORAD Repon - 
First Air Force RQ (Air Forces Northern) 
(CONR-1 AF{AFNORTH)) and Customs and 
Border Protection, Office of Air and Marine 
(CBP OAM) t\ir and Marine Operations Center 
(AMOC) Mamorandumof A^eMn!iit(MOA) 

Die agreetnem seeks to maximize ilw ability of the parties to work logeilier to secure 
air sovereignly and air defense of the Ccnfinenial Hailed Stales and conibat aviation* 
related crimina! and lerrorin activiiies. 

DOD. CONR-AFNORTH 

Depariinenl of Defense, Office of tite Aasisiani 
Secretary of Defense (Netwotis and 
Informetion Integration) and U.S. Customs and 
Border Proteotjori 

Die agreement aesiabisihes the polietea and procedures under which CBP is granted 

access to the Precise Positioning Service (PPS) Y*code of (he Global Paaitionirg 

Syaiem(OPS) to support CBP UAS inasiom. 


i— i 


FAA 

Memoraiiclum of Undeistandins (MOU) 
beitceeu U$. Cu.stoim aud Bordet Protection. 
Office of Air and Marine (OAM) and the 
DepariuKM of Eiiogy. Naitoits) Nucieat 
•Secuitty Adminisifaiioii (DOE NNSA) 

Tbe purpose is ro prepare ikaiks and inoceudrcs loslniv ivsources to carry out assigned 
rcspatsibilities iikI other eseniiit functiMW in support natioiml security. 

DOE NNSA 

U.S.Oepatlineni of HnmeMnd Secutiiy, U.S. 
Ctietotw and Border Protection, Office of /\ir 
and Marine and Navn) Surface Warfan; Center. 
Crane Diviakin 

Thepjirptise is <a eoDabtvare tut technical dcvvktpttiuital and opemtiuiial evaiuntionii of 
mutual iittcresi. 

DOD, NSWC 

Mnnoraiidiim of Agrmnent betwent U.S. 
Ctuto»« and Bordet Pmicetion (CBP). Office 
of Air ckI Marine <OAM}afKl US. 

Departnamt of the f)rrny. Fnrl Oium CaiTiron 
to Support OAM Uhiniiinn) .Aitcrafi Syrtem 
(UAS) Fli^i Operations at Whreler'Sacfc 
i\tmv Airfiehl Fort Dium. Nevr VchR 

The purpose is to imxiinizerbepiQbabib'tyofdrtcctaigillc^ibaRlei'crossecsihat pose 
R threat tootw Nation's Nontieasienr Border. 

DOD. Army 

Customs and Border Ptoieciion (CBP). OflSce 
of Air aod Mtuioe (OAM) and the ‘ISth Space 
Wing (SW) to Sup5nri Planning for OAM 
Unmannerf Akciafl S^trm (UAS ) Flight 
OpnatfOM at Cape Camven] Air Force 
SlatiMjfAFS) 

The purpose is to determine the fessibiKey of s«{iporteigOAM UAS flight openiCions at 
Cape iknavnal APS. 

DOD, iAir Rjrcc 

hclwcnt the £>^>artfneiu of Defmse and U.S. 
Customs and Border Pcoiecrion. iVir and 

Marine Operti!io!» Conceiiung Mutual Support 
in Perwiniwl Recovery PoKcy, Plaming. 
Ttaiiung, Opecoiioas. and Research and 
Deveiopmeni 

ITic porpoee is to establish areas of cooenco interest with re^d to implementing 
national policy for peuannel recoveiy and to pledge future cooperatKo ia iisiiters 
uiYolvuiKpcrsniuKl rtcoery. 

DOD, OKtee of the Secretary of Defense 

U.S-D«parimei« of Homeland Security, US. 
Lhistoms and Border Ptoteclior. Office of >\ir 
and Marine and Deputy Utdersecrciary- of 
Defense. .Advancerl .Systems atut Concepts. 
Special Capahililies Office 


DOD, AS&C 

MeniDrantfUinof.Agreeineal between U.S. 
Cusmnrsand Border Proievlion. Ait aiu) 

Maiiue and (Ik Department of the Navy. Naval 
Sea Systems Comnand. Force Advanced 
Warfare Concept Teefuwlogy PtoRtam 

The a^eciiteni cxp.ojids <?ie retoricHisliip belwcen CBPQ.\M ajul N.\mEA Fucce 

Advanced Warfare CtsKepi Technology (RACT) (hutgramio develop ami deploy 

advanced radar icctswlogy. 

DOD. Navy 



DoD-USN 

fflTffiil’ffItTWiliilW' 



Naiionai .Aeronautics and Space Adinmjsirafion 
(NA5.A) 

MUUtamvesDgaictiiepossiMMyoicJSt'ttsinstnr PLAbAouciatt meoumnee 
(tacidnp sysiemNAMIS. 

NASA , 












319 


AIMD Norfolk 

MOU for repuii of APS-14S ludv congioeats 




FEMACBP 

Understanding (MOU) ere U.S. Cuscons and 
BwxJer Protection (CBP). OfB« of Air and 
Marine (OAM), a compcocni of (he 
Department of Horrelaixl Security {DHS) and 
(be Urated Slates Itapartisent of (he Interior 
(DOl) eocointH&sss all subocdiniie bureaus, 
serwees aix} offices. 

The partkapaiUs, through diis Memmandum of Utdoslaiidiiig (MOU). seek to 
cstabMi a framework urefcr which CBPWAM wD provide ueria] suppal to DOl 
authorized law enftHrcement rnsstons. InaddUion.dffiagceenwH will alco Eaciliiaie 
comdiimfian between DCX and its subordiflMe reginoa. and CBP/OAM aud its 
subordmaie Air Branches, to facihiale the joim planning and eucuiim of DOLOAM 
law anforcemeiU misicDS. 

DOl 

the OlTke of Air andMarioe (OAMJ and the 
Office of Informaltcffi Tectoobgy (OIT) 
regarding Information Tedinoioey Specialist 
Services 

MOA seek to establishes roles, xe^wnsibiEliGS, and the reinbuimiEnt of two federal 
ptwilions for OIT that will be pennasemly ussfpied to suRioit OAM full time. 

orr 

the Office of Air and Marine (OAM) and US . 
Bords Patrol (USSP) tegBr^ng tls daiies and 
respcmsibilities of Bader I^tro! Agents 
assigned to the Air and Marine Operations 
Center (AMOC) 

(MOA) establishes the ^idNiixwandrespooril^tiesforOAMsnd USBPto 
elTeciivalv provide Border Patn^ attmt support to die AMOC. 

USBP 

MCU beiweii AM(JC and 56ih Range 
Mtmaement Office (RMO) 

Matuigement and Operation of the ^r ana Maruie Operation Surveiilaiice System 
(AMOSS) iiutolled at the S6di RMO at Luke APB, AZ. 

DOD. CBP 

MOU between AMUC and'iid Marine Aircraft 
Wins {3D MAW) 

Managemsiil and Operation ol the An and Marne t^mtimi Surveillance iSy«ein 
(AMOSS) installed at the 3D MAW ai Mvamar NAS, CA. 

DOD, CBP 

MOU between AMOC and Department of 
Defense. Program Ofliee 

Management and Operation ol the Air and Marsie L^anoo Survetilance System 
(AMC^S) insialled at DoD ArlingltmOne. Arlmg«». VA. 

DOD, CBP 

Muu oeiwecD nMiA; ana ivotin /urerican 
Aerospace Defertse Command/Uniied Slates 
Notibcrn Coiiffliand 
(NORAD/USNORTHCOM) 

Managerneni and C^raiion of (he Air and Marine Opeiatioa Suiveillmce System 
(AMOSS) iiutalled at Peietsrm AFB and Cheyenne Mountain at Ct^ado Spiiiigs. 

CO. 

DOD. CBP 

MOU between AWUC and loini TasHtfirce 
North (JTF-N) 

Management and Uperaixmol the Air and Marine operation sutveaianccSyslem 
(AMOSS) installed at Join) Task Puce North at B Paso, TX. 

DOD. CBP 

MOU between AMOC and Western Air 
Defense Sector (WADS) 


DOD. CBP 

MoU between and Kasiern Air Befetae 

Sector (CAI^) 


DOD, CBP 

iiHHiEilHiii 

Management and Operation of the Air and Maruie Opemtion Surveihanee .System 
(AMOSS) msialied at Air Forces Nonhern el Tyndall AFB, FL 

DOD. CBP 

MOU betweanAMUC ana operations 
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) 


USCC.CBP 

CBP/AMOC and USCQ Unclassified CenutKO 
Opetnting Picture (UCOP) Iniereonneciion 
Security Agrsemni (ISA) 

System (AMOSS) data, which is provided to ibe USCG UiKiassdled Coitmui 
Operating Picture (UCOP) as a data feed. In exchange AMOC will receive raw 
Automatic Identification Sv^em (AJS) data. 

USCG.CBP 

N 

Management and Operation of the Air and Marine C^eraiion SurveiUance System 
(>idrfOSS) VCN-R installed at USCG Corpus Chiisli Air Siaiioii. TX 

USCG, CBP 

MOU beiwMn AMOC and united States coast 

Ouard Air Statitm Miami, FL 

Manageirenl and Operaticn ol the Air and Marine Operation SurveiUance System 
(AMOSS) VCN-R installed at USCG Miami, FL. 

USCG, CBP 

MOU Betvreeo CuPfUAWAMrA; and 
CMUhKiircO Uiiittil Slates NORAD Region 

Fifsl Air Pone HQ (CONR-1 AF) 

Sliared ttsponsibility for securing air sovereignty and air defeis* of the Coniumiial 
United State*. 

.AMOC and 13oD 

MOO uemeii cbi'ammaukk k, ana fist 

Air Fbice/CONUS NORAD Region (1 AF 
CONR) 

snatviigUHHVKhrAM/FM AKtNxne Radio ftcpeiinAmrnb(y'(AkiU\)mouiiied(o~' 
TMhetedAetaviat Radar Sites (TARS): B-Htt D-4I, B-42. B-43, B-l l, 045, B-94.& 
B-98. 

AMOC and DoD 

MOA between CBP/OAM/AMOf.' and 

Nelionat Ouant Breau J3 Couiiter^UB Division 

Ouitines responsibifities of Ail National Guard pmoniKl aiiached to (he AMOC in 
support of coutitttdruK aod (.-oanier-natcolerrorisin mission. 

AMOC and NOB-,13 Counterdrug Division 

MOU ortween ciuy(.>i\MAW(]LY.yanuieeo 
Air Sl Marine Drench and CahYomra Highway 
ftiftol 

The safe operatiui) of airmfi fromsuppoting agencies in (he sameenvboruivni. 

AMOCfSfln Diego Air & Marine Branch and Caliromin 
Hitdiwuy Patrol 


OffsfiMt radar coveiage and (light advisories. 

AMOC and USCG 


Radio communicitions and aircmfl deconflirtion 

OAM, AMOC. and USCG 


Outlines responsibilities for handsig ofT targets beiwer n ilie two centers stemlessly. 



Cooniuiatioii between ikFRCC and AMOC for civil search and rescue operations 


HSBPIOI I XOOtOO - Defence Confncl Audit 
Agency (DCAA) 

Aovisionai utJUng Kate Kcvvews on CBP contract uufnhn HSBPItllUCtjOOui (Base 
ftfwdorPerfnnnince March 1. 3011 through Seprembn 30, Hin and four Option 
Yem extcncbig Id Scpfnr^ei' 30. 2015). 

Defeuse Coitract Audit Agency 

HSBP1012X00090- Oefense Contract Audit 
Agciicv (DCAA) 

tocwTedcoH audit suj^Mrt oniut'cvinKael iwiiiDer H.5l3riwauviiuir tuase Keriod' 
of PeifetsaaiKe May 1.2012 tluough Seplenta 30. 2012 and four Option Years 
extending to AprU 30. 301?). 

Defense Cottfraci Audit Agency 

DHS - CBP OA PrinlinR and Graphics Sendees 

tYiiUing Procurement Snvices 

DHS-Printiog Depanment 

iCE - CBP OA Printing and Graphics Services 

Wntmg Procurement Services 

DHS-Printing Department 

DHS - US. CiCizensK^Mw) linmyina'ion 
Services (USCfS)- CBP OA 

Alien Fites - Files arc used to docuimit (he ptocessHig or hisiory ot an >Uien us 
described by the InungiaiKHi and NationalUy Aa. 

USCTS-Reeotds Division 

usas-cBpm 

Mail Sui^xin Services 

DHS-AtiDeparlmeiits 

DJIS CBP OA 

CuiwoMaied Kemore Uehvery SiM<CKLR>). Ptoente screenii^ ioi meui services 
provkitd to ihe Natiomd Oi|Sia> Region. 

^HS^\il Deparfmenis 

DHS - MOU Trusted Traveler Program (CBP 
OA) 

ksiablished the obiiganoos and ^owcoisiKit wtii tie lottowedhy Ufci and U.S. 

Cover iwient Piiiiting Office (CPG) m amnectioD wRh the pioducfHn and distr ibution 
ofTtusiedTiaveler lYoBaro(TTP)eaHb. 

Goveciimpw PriiHiiiR Office 




PuctfoRieoTtiisI Fund 

pays (D ICE a porlKKi of die Puerlo Rko Trust Fund 


NIMMMP Support and Services 

pays to Ctn'xm Bt linmigiaiiDii Snvices for mait SRVkes 


National RiricSnvice-C8P 0.A Rental 
Asreenieiit Skagwav. lUaska Housurg Units 

rent reimbuiseiiieiK fix houss^ units « Aiaska 

Deiwrmieiii ot fnieriorfiSlaiioin! Park Service 

1-ood and Drug .Aduunisttatroii-CBP li.K Rental 
AgreenKW Space 

wmmmBommmm 

Uepailmetil ol Healtti and Human Sewtees/Food Slid Drug 
Xthranistntiion 

1 A wrth bOt tor Fedttavxler 
HSBP10J0X0O372 

^tfrraveler O&M Support 

3^»atinKni of rnieriiw 

r.^ with DfUTor FetlJravelcr 




HSBPH09X01565 


[F^ravda O&M Su^tt 


(Dtpatliwm of tiUtrior 


































LAuitxcB iuppiy ctiaas services ^eaticftiiy pwiwsmg^Ma asQ rnnDvmg icents} on 
bdialf of Edforceiiient Removal Oflke oa CBP UUronns coHisci with Vanity pair 
ICE CBP OA UnHiOTB Sdulions 


unuonDS cnam semces spccuicaiiy porcMss^ado ana remowig i(etns> < 

bet»!f of FedersU ProtectioR Sen^ «> CBP Uiiforms contran with Vanity Fair 
National Programs and Protectiim Directotate Sc*ili«K 


Security <DH5)Sira(ee!c Souictng masdainy IMIianiCcMKraei (Procuremenl 
AdnvimtrBiive Lead Time). UmbrnB sappty cfasrin semces qteciftcaily 
Transportation Security Atimim^iian !»iic}]Bring<add aodremovmg ^ems) 


PriscB Inifascriw jFWeraJ Prison &idustries (Vehicfe Upfil Semces) 


Pqiartmept of Interim 

DHS/ Immigteiion Caaoros Brforcement 


DHS/E[tforcen»i« Removal Office 


DHSfi^deral Piotecitwi Service 

DHS/Federal Air Maiabala 


Dqwrtnigtt of Justice 

PHS/Ofrice of ilie CMet Financial Officer 

National iVchives and Records Administcation INARA) 



GSA-CBP MOU ratified on 7O2G0J 1 



lAA HSBP101COC00079 Tor NFS inbudd (he BoquilbsOosring facility &. CBP to 
[Raridrcqfu^meM (Drertaxery screen boRler-orasscn. provide CCTV & periodic rile 
monilorif^ iiiraled htangntton hiw aifommnt services.. St coordinate surveiHance 
WihNPS. MOA dated July 23. 2013 <CBP-NPS)selsow(apera(mgpaiaiiBfersof(he 
Class B Fwt & NPS pays for potwr ft. CBP pays for leko service. 

Moderntaation & cecottsltuclion of i3ib Amtriad l^un LPOB 


GSA’ PoWic ItniMiR^ Service (3^). CBP 


tbtilcd Slates DcpwtiriHK of rnterior. National Parfc SerWee 
NPS 


BY AND BETWEEN THE U.S. 
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND 
SECURITY, ACTING BY s\ND THROUGH 
U-S. CUSTOMS .AND BORDER 
PROTECTION i\ND AUTHOR12ED 
RFBRESNTATiVES (FieW Operations 
Facitiiies Piogram MaiMgentcnl Office), 
rANDTHE U.S. GENERAL SERVICES - 
ADMINISTRATION, ACTING BY ;AND 
THROUGH THE PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
SERVICE .AND -AUTHOHIZED 
REPRESENTATIVES fCapiWi Federally 
Owned ftojccis /i. Small Projects) 


U-S. CiLsiontsaRd Border Proirction (CBP) Fkid Oprr^ioiu Facilities Progrnm 
M.-magemnii Office (FOF PMO}and Oltke oTPirM (^wationafOl^) Joined the U.S. 
General Semces .AcIministrariGn(GS.A)toxiBn(iiePn>fec( Managemiu Memorandum 
of UidersiaiKfmgfPM MOU)(oiiT^ovecol)abon<tveeffi>iu throughoul all phases of I 

_ the project (tnnagetnera lifecyttte. (QSA 

fotmaiizn die telaliortri^ 

litployment of several iosecu nwd m eMiiii4CiiTia> cme. 


uv^ loniaiiiDn uk teeunosn^t o erv i ieeo wtsr ana tee us rarest oeincc to confu 
rite preparation for ilte execaiionof mitiiaty coBsn»e(mnfZIH>) |iro)eci and road 
rmMenance cn Farest Service land. 



UrBfed.SfalesDqmrlntew of Agriculture. US Forest 
Service 




































321 



Apeemeal between DOI/EOUSA uut C3P for services associated with condensiation Dcparuttent of lusiice, Execntive Office of the United 

aid litifiation actwns raytired far foe construction of the bar iter fence. States Aiiomey 

Provide con^ctim nsoaeensH SRvkes foe Harpes Fcny (interim work) USAcmy Cocjk of En^eers 


aipera Rary (Provide constmelimi mansgenatBa sendees for Harpers Ferty (expanded wwk) USArmy Corps of Btgawew 

(MOU) with 

orr Leasing adminis tratwa and civil of maintenanee (OftM) of tdl LMR towers Office of inforroation and Tedinotogy 

AgT«mmtwiin tosut^iatiu^desipMioBdenuneUKgrtzuyoear 
JAAwiih US Geologica! Survey -Criizly Bear popuiationm the Cabinet- Yaak Ecosystem PopukliontBTelsiiftliisapeciea are directly 

Siudv lelsled to inauitenance and use i^T! in ctilBii nonhon border leeiona. United Slntu Gei^oeical Survey 

— — ' TTiW ' gw t U ' iui aiLiMUiugKi i' ieWBig ' ann^ ' Siies. im ’ ue i M nBf t i Mue i ti mge ■ 

(AR03-a3-02-737}, two artifact scatters tocaied iteer Ftesital Wash (AR03-Q5 -02-39$ 
and -415), sn arlifaci scatter with rock piles (ARO3-0S-O2-7S1X snd a 'Tieid house" 
site (ARO3-0S-O3-326) located near the eastern side of the Sui Rafael Valley. The 
work would be coitfileledby Coronado Naiimwl Foreat (CNF) otdiaeologisu. wtw 
would lead SHPO and Tribal comuliaiion. 


lAA Willi Federal Aviaiioii Adninisiraiion - jlAAfornsUiing the relationship between CBP and the FAA f« services to maintain, 
Towct Maintenance. Ri^air, and in^roveinentajtepair and eonsiruci towers for survaliance. The lAA covets rilSectora. 


MOU agreemenl with IB wc.. on a vanuy ol tssaea cetated to consttuction niKt 
mainienaitce of levee systems aintg the Southwest Border 


MOU aBreeinnit wiiri USACb lo mvide cousiruciiai insoaeeineni services 




Tlie Federal Aviation Administraiion 



officialsiii specific foiidioiial areas. CBP and KGAC n0l woik togeliiei' toftether to 
MOU for the Gomiuntw of Kuwait (MOU build ao organizairon and appaiaitu able to sssfain Kuwait ChsloiRS iHxkrnieat km 
Ye3rs!7&}a) pre^ms into the future. 



























322 


[0 8 WetpoDs of Ma&t Desuuclicsk (WMD)iBcidml m Ihe Uded States or against any 
U.S. intcrat, the Parties rccognixB the need for feArai agencies with counter WMD 
MOD btwn (he Federal Bureau of Invmigarkpn capabilitiestocooidinaicimdsharctnfcnH^a&WKlTesaurcK. This MOU ideniifies 
and (he lhaied Slates CustCTHis and Border die FBI WMD Directorate andU^.CBPMntOpmtioosDiicctaiale areas of 
ProteclKHi for Weapons of Mass Destiucthtn tnterc^ability that may be called opon topenciK, irit^ale. and/or respond (o a WMD 
Sutton ibreat or inctdmi or special evaas. FBI, CBP 




Research Trade Transparency System 
[DARTTS) 


jOata Slioring wittiin DHS. CBP sends ell AES trade data to ICE’S DARTTS Aliich 
lanalyzes the data for trade aitomaltea. (DARTTS uses other data sources also.) 


MOU Between DHS-CBP and DoD-IPMG llnfortratlion sharing fg WMD deiecliop. lurael delectioft. and other technical programs[ 











323 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agenev and hrtra-Departmental Agreements 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE} 


Odier Agency/ 
Department 







324 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-Oepartmentai Agreements 
Transportation Security Adirdnistration 

Office of GItriial Strategies 


lnter'/^«Ky/lntra-Dc^artmentat Agreemenb 

Description 

Other Agency/ 

Department 

Organization of American States 

To allow TSA to prwMe assistance to OAS member 
states in developing and modernizing their civil aviation 
security htfraslructure in the managerial, operational 
at>d tedtnlcal areas. 

Department of State 

U.S. Africa Command 

To detail a OH5/TSA p&sonnel to USAfRlCOM to provide 
specialized expertise and unique technical knowledge, 
and make essential contilbutions to facilitate 

USAFRICOM rnis»on accomplishments. 

Department of Defense 

International Civil Aviation Organization 

TSA personnel ^1 provide specific assistance in areas of 
personnel, training, equipment, or services for ICAO. 
Technical assistance provided by TSA at the request of 
ICAO may include teriinicai and managerial expertise to 
assist the ICAO member states in developing, improving, 
and operating their aviation security infrastructure, 

standards, procedures, training and equipment; provide 
training for ICAO or personnel of ICAO Contracting 

States. 

international Civil A\rfation Organization 

MOD Agreement 

To establish a Senior Civil Aviation Advisor in the 
Homeland Security Attach^ OWce at the U.S. Embassy In 
Kabul. Afghanistan. The advisor wilt support efforts to 
establish a sustainable international commercial aviation 
capacity In A^hanistan, vrith a spedai emphasis on 

Kabul International Airport (K8L). 

Department of Homeland Security 

Safe Skies for Africa 

Upon request from DOT, TSA will perform aviation 
security surveys, training, analysis of aviation security 
plans and other activities intended to enhance aviation 
security on the continent of Africa, and specifically In the 
named Safe Skies countries. 

Department of Transportation 

MOU Agreement 

To detail a TSA OGS personnel to OHS Office of 
International Affairs (OIA) on a non-reimbursable detail 
as the TSA Liaison, serving as a principle analyst and 
technical expert to the Assistant Secretary of OIA on ait 
matters concerning international transportation 
security. 

MOU Agreement between TSA office of Global 
Strategies and DHS office of International Affairs 

Department of State/Vemen 

Provide technical assistance in the area of civil aviation 
security to the Republic of Yemen, through OHS/TSA 
Aviation Security Sustainable International Standards 
Team (ASSIST) program. TSA will work with appropriate 
aviation security (AVESEV) officials of the Governemenl 
of Yemen to build a sustainable, viable and risk-based 
national AVSEC program. 

Department of State/Offlce of the Coordinator 
or Counterterrorism 

MOD Agreement 




Office of Security Policy and Industry Engagement 


Name of the inter-agency/intra-departmental 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/Department 

DHS Science and Technology 

Contractor support for management, administration 
and monitoring the use of the Scientific Advisory 
Group as a research and analysis asset for the 
Catastrophic Qiemicai Releases of TIH Materials 
from Rail Tank Cars Modeling Improvement 

Initiative 

OHS -Science and Technology 

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center 

Supports training of the TSA approved Commercial 
Vehicle Counterterrorism Instructor Training 

Program. The period of performance concluded on 
07/18/2012. 

DHS - Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Center 








325 


Information Sharing and Analysis Center (ISAC) and 

SuDDorts manaBement of the information Sharing 

DOT Federal Transit Administration 

Tank Car Structurai Vulnerability Assessment Project 



Graniteviiie S.C. Accident Study 

Gather and analyze empirical data detailing the 
actual behavior and dispersion of TTH (60 tons of 
chlorincjthat occurred asthe result of a freight rail 
accident in Graniteviiie. S.C. 

US Army Edgewood Chemical and Biological 
Command (ECBC) 

Annex to the Memorandum of Understanding Between 
the Department of Homeland Security and the 
Department of Transportation Concerning 

Transportation Security Administration and Pipeline and 
Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Cooperation 
on Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Transportation 
Security 

Provides the framework for collaboration and 
cooii^ration on matters of security specific to 
pipeline and hazardous materials transportation by 
pipeline. Specifically, the Annex commits both 
agencies to coordinate their programs and activities 
in order to improve transportation security while 
minimizing duplication, disruptions and costs 
imposed on transportation stakeholders and the 
niihlir 

DOT - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 

Safety Administration 

DHS Science and Technology Directorate 

Supports research, analysis and evaluation of 
Fedtrak, a highway security sensitive material 
tracking system development by Kentucky 
Transooflation Center, 

DHS - Science and Technology Directorate 

Federal Emergency Management Agency 

Cfariftes the roles and responsibitlties between TSA 
and FEMAfor management, Implementation, and 
oversight of the surface transportation security 
grant oroerams. 

OHS - Federal Emergency Management 

Agency 

Information Sharing Access Agreement 

The ISAA between TSA and DHS NPPO oulines an 
agreement between two organizations wherby each 
will share certain types of Sensitive But Unclassified 
(SBU) information dealing with critical infrastructure 
assessments and inspections. 

OHS NPPO 










326 


Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Corp of 
Engineers (USACoE) 

Construction and construcdon management services 
for ^ f^ine Academv 

United States Army, Corp of Engineers 

OHS, United States Coast Guard (USCG) 

Procure and train canines md USCG canine handlers 
to function as an elective Explores Detection 

Canine lEDC) teams. 

Department of Homeland Security 

Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board 

Oetailee to serwasttie Chief of Staff to the 

Executive Direct and provide spedfic advice and 
counsel on subjects such as: strategic planning, 
program man^ement, vision, guidance and reslove 
issues with external stakehoiders. 

Recovery Accountability and Transparency 
Board 

Office of the Director of National Intelligence 

Oetailee to serve as Supervisory interagency 
Coordination Officer to support NCTC mission. 

Office of the Director of National 
inteilisence/Nationai Terrorism Center 


Office of Security Capabilities 


Name of the inter-agency/intra-departmental 
agreemerrts 

Description 

Other Agency/Department 

Transport Canada 

i 

Develop Advanced imaging Technology (AIT) 
Automated Target Recognition (ATR) solutions to 
Improve detection of prohibited items through the 
dpiiverv of an enhanced ATR canaballtv. 

Transport Canada 


Office of Security Operations 


Name of the inter-agency/intra-departmental 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/Oepartment 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Affirm existing operational reiationships and mutual 
interests between TSA and FBI, and to set forth 
terms for cooperation and mutual support between 
TSA Explosives Operations Branch (EOB) and FB! 
laboratory Division, Explosives Unit. 

Federal Bureau of investigation 

National TVansportatfon Safety Board 

Affrm existing operational relationships and mutual 
interests between TSA Explosives Operations Branch 
and NTS6, and to set forth terms for cooperation 
and mutual support between TSA EOB and NTSB to 
advance their shared goal of ensuring the security 
and safety of the nation's transportation systems 
and infrastructure. 

National Transportation Safety Board 

United States Secret Service 

Pursuant to the authority contained in 31 U.S.C 

1535 and 1536, Public Law 94-S24, and National 
Special Security Directive 46 (NSPD 46)/Homeland 
Security Presidential Directive 15 (HSPO 15), the U.S. 
Secret Service (USSS) and the Transportation 

Security Agency (TSA) hereby agree that the TSA will 
provide assistance and services to the U^S during 
the 2012 Presidential Campaign. (Now expired.) 

United States Secret Service 

MOA between TSA and Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority (MBTA) 

The purpose of this agreement Is to establish the 
parties respective obligations relating to TSA’s foan 
of four (4) Muiti-Mode Threat Detectors (MMTDs), 
by Smiths Detection, a portable Explosive Trace 
Detection (ETD) system to MBTA. 

TSA Office Security Capabilities 

MOU between TSAand US Army Network Enterprise 
Technology Command/9th Army Signal Command 
{N£TCOM/9th ASC) Mititary Auxiliary Radio System 
(MARS) Support to TSA 

Army MARS provides High Frequency (HF) support 
to TSA. Support gives TSA use of frequencies and 
callsigns to enhance our contingency 
communications. MOU signed 7 July 2006 and 
reviewed annuallv. 

JS Army Network Enterprise Technology 
Command/9th Army Signal Command 
{NETCOM/9th ASC) Military Auxiliary Radio 
System (MARS) 


Office of Chief Counsel 


Nameoftheinter-agency/intra-departmental 

agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/Oepartment 

The Office of Director of National Intelligence 

TSA detail to provide Legal Counsel 

The Office of Director of National Intelligence 









327 


Office irf Human Capital 


Name of the inter-agency/intra-departmentei 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agenev/Deoartment 



Department of Transportation 

Federal Aviation Administration 

Recruitment Booth Trartsportation and Storage 



SHIMS Database 

Department of Labor 

Federal Occupational Health 

Flu Shots, Welkare Program 

Health and Human Services 

Department of Homeland Security 

Medical Liaision Offers (MLO) Program 

Department of Homeland Security 


Chief Administrative Officer 


Name of the inter-apncy/intra-departmental 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agenev/Department 


TSA fleet vehicles leased from G5A 

General Service Administration 

UNICOR VMIS - Mobile Asset Management 

Vehicle asset management system 

Federal Bureau of Prisons Industries 


Airport inventory support 

Naval Air Systems Command 



Department of Homeland Security 

AJ Lease and Facility Management 

Annapolis Junction faeJiity 

US Army Core of Engineers 

CSOC lease and Facility Management 

Colorado Springs facility 


AJ Lease and Facility Management 

Annapolis Junction facility 


Freedom Center Lease and Service Agreement 

Freedom Center space artd IT services 

Department of Homeland Security-National 
Protection & Programs Directorate 

Transit Benefits with Department of Transportation 

Employee transit benefits 

Department of Transportation 

Transit Benefits with Health and Humar? Service 

Employee transit benefits 

Health and Human Services 


Chief of Staff 


Name of the inter-agency/lntra-departmental 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/Oepartment 

Genrai Services Adminsitration 

1 

TSA Detail to serve as Strategic Engagement and 
Outreach Director for the Office of Executive 

Councils 

General Services Administration 


Chief financial Officer 


Name of the Intcr-agencv/intra-departmental 
agreements 

Oesaiplion 


DHS Working Capital Fund 

Fund Government-wide and OHS-wlde activities 1 

iDeDartmentofHomeiandSecuritv 1 


Vetting and Credentlaling 



Name of the fnter-agencv/intra-departmental 
reements 



pesign/build^mplement MAPPER system to 

Customs and Border Patrol • MAPPER System [accommodate SF message transmissions. Icustoms and Border Patrol 


U.S. Army Corp of Engineers - Annapolis Junction, MD [Annapolis Junction lease 


United States Maritime Administration - iAA not Provide sponsorship for foreign national students at [United States Maritime Administration 

recognized by OIA/TWIC. {the Maritime Academy I 


Technology infrastructure Modernization Program (TIM), 
TIM ' DHS-Office of Science & Technology 




















328 


United Statei Coast Guard {USCG) - Administrative Law 
Judge {TWiC) 

Utilize USCG OAU services to perform adjudicatory 
and case marugementfimcfionsfor TWiC and HME. 

United States Coast Guard 

Watchiist Service ISA Secure Flight ICO 

Describes the technical details of Secure Flight 
receiving the Wateh Li^ from Watchlist Service 

TSA Secure Flight 

OHS Watchlist Service 

Watchlist Service TSA Secure Flight ISA 

Establi^es incfi^ual and org»^zational security 
responsIMIMes for the protection and handling of 
watchHst mformation between CSP Watchtls Service arrd 
Secure FBght 

TSA Secure Flight 

OHS Watchlist Service 

Secure Flight and G£S Web Services ICO 

Agreement between CBP 6ES and SF for the 
transmission of the Trusted Traveler list 

TSA Secure Flight 

Customers and Border Protection (CBP) Globa! 
Entry 


Office of Inteiilgence 


Name of the inter-agency/intra-departmenta! 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agenev/Department 

O&M for Classified IT systems 

O&M for Classified IT systems 

Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command 

Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) for our 

Crisis Management System (CMS) 

Crisis Management System (CMS) 

Defense Information Systems Agency/Space 
and Navai Warfare Systems Command 

The Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Special 
Communications 

Requirements (SCR) Division 

Tasked by the 

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) of the 
Department of Homeland Security (OHS) to provide 

an 

analysis of current TSA capabilities in the areas of 
intelligence, risk management and operations 
communications processes, and Infrastructure, The 
TSA Assistant Administrator for Intelligence has a 
requirement for the analysis of projects at a variety 
of locations 

within and outside the continental U.S. and its 

territories 

Navai Air Systems Command 

Customs and Border Control 

CBP has enhanced its security measures through the 
creation of new targeting rules, modifications of 
existing rules and by conducting intelligence driven 
special operations. 

Customs and Border Control 


Office of Risk Based Security 


Name of the (nter-agency/intra-departmentat 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agenev/Department 

Office of the Director of National Intelligence 

Establishes TSA Precheck screening procedures for 
eligible TS*SCI holders for all iC ^encies 
volunteering to participate. 

7 iC members participating including OHS HQ, 
TSA, USCG 

US Department of Defense 

Establishes TSA Precheck screening procedures for 
eligible OoO and USCG employees. 

Agreement also Includes eligible US Coast 
Guard employees 

Administrative Office of the US Courts 

Establishes TSA Precheck screening procedures for 
eligible Federal Judges and Tax Court Judges. 

Agreement also includes Tax Court Judges 

International Association of Chiefs of Police 

Establishes TSA Prccheck screening procedures for 
eligible members of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police 


Congressional Medal of Honor Society 

Establishes TSA Precheck screening procedures for 
all living Congressional Medal of Honor recipients. 



Office of Training and WorWofce Engagement 


Name of the Inter-agency/rntra^departmental 



agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/Department 















329 


The National Technical Information Service (NTIS) and 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
Department of Homeland Security Memorandum of 
Understandine fMOUl 

Information Management Services; NTIS Online and 
Multimedia Sendees; Training Servitss. 

The National Technical Information Service 
(NTIS) 

OHS interagency Agreement(s) with FLETC 

TSA assisted acquisition f/^s) with FLETC for training 
and support costs atthe TSA Academy irt Glynco, 6A. 

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center 
(FLETC) 

Office of Personnel Management 

Career (Caching, Leader^ip Assessment & 
Deveiooment. Federal Executive institute 

Office of Personnel Management 

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) 

Federal Training 

DHS - Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Center 


Office of Civil Rights and Liberties, Ombudsinan 
and Traveler Engagement (CRL/OTE) 


Name of theinter-agency/Intra-departmental 
agreements 

Desolption 

Other Agenev/Deoartment 

Terrorist Watchlist Redress Procedures 

Sets for the mutual understanding of the Parties to 
establish and implement a coordinated redress 
process to respond to individual complaints about 
adverse experiences during terrorism screening that 
relate to the use of Information contained in the 
government's consolidated database of Known and 
suspected terrorists, known as the Terrorist 
Screening Database or TS08. 

OHS: TSA, C8P, NPPD (US-VIStT), CRCL, 

Privacy, Screening Coordinatoin Office 

Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Terrorist Screening Center, 
Department of State, Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence, the National 
Counterterrorism Center, Central inteitigence 
Agency, Department of Defense, and 

Cojisumer Financial Protection Bureau 

To detail a TSA personnel to serve as Acting 

Associate Ombudsman and may: serve as a liaison 
between CFPB and consumers, depositories, or non- 
depositories and apply conflict resolution and 
problem-solving skills to assist in resolving individual 
and systemic issues; develop basic protocols, 
policies, and procedures for the Ombudsman's 

Office; develop an outreach plan and materials to 
make potential visitors aware of the Ombudsman's 
Office's services; analyze data and other information 
for patterns or trends; write reports to analyze 
systemic issues and make recommendations; and 
fulfill other duties as assigned. 

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau 


Office of Information Technology 


Name of the Inter-agency/lntra-departmental 
agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/Department 

Defense Information Systems Agency (OISA) forTSA Red 
Switch Service 

Secure voice communications within TSA & OHS 

HQs, T50C, and Site A locations to include- DISA 
Working Capital Fund for the Defense Red Switch 
Network: Red Switch upgrades 

Defense information Systems Agency (OISA) 

Department of the Air Force, Ogden Air logistics Center for 
Red Switch Depot Support 

Secure voice communications within TSA & DHS HQs, TSOC, and 
SHe A locations to include- ORSN Depot Fee; Management of 
vendor {Raytheon-Red Switch Equipment); Equip Spare & Repai 
processing fee for all Rxine of equipment 

Department of the Air Force Headquarters 
Ogden Air Logistics Center (AFMC) Hill Air Force 
Base 

OIT/EAO - DHS-Office of Science & Technology 

fAA With DHS for FFROC (MITRE) EA support 

Department of Homeland Security - S&T 

DH5-CiO 

lAA with OHS CIO for EA Repository Too! (EART) as a 
Service 

Department of Homeland Security - CIO 

DHS Enterprise System Development Office (ESDOl 

ESDO will provide these services as part of its Web 
Content Management as a Service offering in 
support of the TSA.gov site. 


OGS GRADS 

GRADS provides global data collection, risk analytics, 
reporting and data consolidation. 


OSCCCMS 

CCMS proindes correspondence tracking, storage, 
retrieval, vetsion management, search capabilities 


Office of Global Strategies/GRADS 

Terms of agreement for the SharePoint platform 
infrastructure and support to GRADS - Global Risk 
Artaiysis and Deci»on Support. 

Department of Homeland 
Security/TSA/OIT/OED/SharePoint 












330 


Office of Special Counsel/CCMS 

Terms of agreement for the SharePosnt platform 
infrastruchire and support to CCMS - 
CorresDondenra Qmtrol Manwement System 

Department of Homeland 
Security/TSA/OlT/OEO/SharePoint 

Office of Human Capita 1/eTA KRONOS 

Terms of ap«ement fortheTSA Operating Platform 
(TOP) infrastructure and support to eTA/KRONOS. 

Department of Homeland 
Security/T3A/01T/OEO/TOP 

OHS Security Operations Center\ OHS Computer Security 
inciderit Response Center 

The scope of tWs document ts to outline general 
service deasiptiorts. n^es and responsibiiities, and 
the service level offerings provided by the DHS SOC 
are available only to OHS Components, computer 
systems and lAM segments connecting directly to 
the DHS OneNe^ and DHS locations and personnel 
using OHS furnished equipment both within the 
United States and abroad 

Department of Homeland 
Security/TSA/OIT/OED/TSANet 

Office of Property Management (0PM) 

0PM and OIT Share responsibility for the 
accountability of IT equipment. 0PM ensures 
property accountability through the management 
and implemerrtation of property policies, 
procedures, Information resources and inventory 
accountability. OIT is responsible for acquiring, 
installing, life cycle management, and information 
spcuritv of IT technoloav. 

Department of Homeland 
Security/TSA/OIT/OEO/TSANet 

fBi (NCIC, NLETS, LEO, LEO FA, CIS) 

TSA has a mandate to process name-based criminal 
background checks as wen as crime case data entry to 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)'s National Crime 
information Center (NCIC) and National law 

Enforcement Tdecommunications System (NLETS) 
databases. TSA is also required to process dearances for 
the law Enforcement Officers (LEO) Fiying Armed (LEO 

FA) program. Criminal Justice Information System (CHS) 

Department of Homeland 
Security/TSA/OIT/OED/FPRD/LEMS 

Office of Security Policy & industry Engagement/IACMS 

Terms of agreement for the TSA Operating Platform 
(TOP) infrastructure and support to lACMS. 

Department of Homeland 
Security/TSA/OIT/OEOAOP 

Office of Security Poilcy & Industry Engagement/KSMS 

Terms of agreement for the TSA Operating Platform 
(TOP) infrastructure and support to KSMS. 

Department of Homeland 
Securlty/TSA/OtT/OED/TOP 

Office of Information Tecfinology 

Terms of agreement for TSANet infrastructure and 
suDDort to TOP. 

Department of Homeland 
Securitv/TSA/OIT/OEO/TOP 


Office of Acquisition 






331 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-Oepartmental Agreements 
United States Coast Guard 























































332 


DMR DOD Reimbursable for MERHCF 


DHS/CG 

PM US PACCOM fD14j 

Funds used to furd trans^xirtatjon cost. 

OHS/AFRICOM 


Functe to cover AD9/il pay and allowances. 

DHS/AFRiCOM 

WA Holding/Gen. Logistic 

To fimush and in^i two dedicated 20 amp 
separate and two 16 twist lock receptacles in LAN 

room. 

DHS/NDU 

Selective Service Systems 

To pnndde Annual Training and Inactive Duty 
costs. 

SSS 

VW Defense Sec Coooeration Agency !DSCA) 

To jMDvi^ support for die Security Cooperation 
Mission and Associated Capital Security Cost 
Sharing. 

DSCA 


To support arniual training and drill cost. 

NSA 

IF FMS CASE OA-P-GAS 

To purdiase spare ship parts and provide training. 

DOO/NAVY 

IS FMS CASE PI-P-SBV NAVICP 

To provide diesel fuel, petroleum, oil and 
lubricants, rommurrications and other 
eouipments, and radio navigation equipment. 

DOD/NAVY 

IX FMS CASE S4-P-HSX 

To provide other boats and aaft, ship spare parts, 
and ualning. 

DOD/NAVY 

9X FMS Case MX-P-SCF 

To provide Technical Training. 

DOO/NAVY 

25 NAVICP FMS Case 

To purchase spare parts and supplies for Arch 
angel Response Boat. 

DOO/NAVY 



DOO/NAVY 

6601 Naval Escort (D-13j 

To provide contracted services for Coast Guard 
support of the CGN 37 Repackage shipments. 

DOO/NAVY 

AA2Q Transcom Billets (OC) 

To provide USCG billet. 

000/NAVY 

AA2G CG Auxillarist Portuguese interpreters (OC) 

To support APS AUX Interpreters travel and per 
diem. 

OOD/NAVY 

AA3C Fleet Forces Comm (OC) 

To provide travel expenses and supplies and 
equipment to support a defense force 
detachment. 

000/NAVY 

AA4A USECOM Billet (06) (UNT) 

To provide USCG billet. 


AA4F COMNAVEUR (UNT) 

To provide funding for travel expenses for TCA 
Events. 

000/NAVY 

AA4N US7RANSCOM BILLET 

To provide USCG billet. 

DOO/NAVY 

AMP CNE(05) BILLET 

To provide USCG billet. 

OOD/NAVY 

AA4QTAC EVENT CG-01-CON-6R 

South America Port Security and Safety Working 
Group Phase I. 

DOD/NAVY 

S6 FMS Case GW>-UC 

To provide procurement for foreign military sales. 

OOD/NAVY 

BE BELIZE 


000/NAVY 

B5 FMS CASE LE-P-BAD 

To provide general purpose for equipment, 
training, and other Tech Assistance. 

DOO/NAVY 

C6 NAVY PACER GOOSE (OCO) 

Ice Breaker Support. 


C9 FMS CASE CS-P-BAA 

82 foot patrol boat spare pans. 

DOO/NAVY 

CA NAVICP FMS CASE); CI-P-SA8 

To purchase spare sNp part and provide training. 

OOD/NAVY 

2010 MOA with Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation F( 

To provide roles and re^nsibilitles of 
COMOPTEVFOR and CG when COMOPTEVFOR is 
indicated as the independent Operational Test 
Authority for Acquisitions. 

000/NAVY 

CP NAVYPAC FLEET (D14) 

Administrative operating funds. 

OOD/NAVY 

D5 FMS Case AC-P-UC 

For procurement for foreign military sales. 


OA 6DIP Defense Attach^ Personnel 

USCG biilet for Defense Attache personnel. 

DOD/NAVY 

DE USN NSWG DET Kodiak Bldg. Maint 

Facility improvement charges. 


OF USN NSWG DET Kodiak Suppiies/Service 

Inter-service support agreement to support 
ntemet and cable service, Xerox lease, Siprnet 
service, T1 lines, and cell phones. 

OOD/NAVY 

OJ USN NSWG DET Kodiak Suppiies/Service 

Support of utility charges at Naval Special Warfare 
Center, Detachment Kodiak. 

OOD/NAVY 

DT USN NSWG DET Kodiak Housing 

To provide funding for Navy lilies living in 

Coast Guard housing in Kodiak Maska. 

OOD/NAVY 

FS CG Biliets-Consolidated Cryptologic Prog.(CCPl 

To provide funding for Military and Oviiian Coast 
Guard billets. 

DOD/NAVY 

E6 FMS CASE CS-P-SAE 

To provide sMp spare parts and other technical 
trainii%. 

DOO/NAVY 






























EIXA Def logistics Agency - ELC Baltimore 

Domestic Specific Emitter Identificatfon OSE! Reim 

ES NETSAFA (DCO-Q 

FGEMSCASE LE-P-LAA 


FJ COLUMBIA (DCO-I) 


|fP MEXICO 


{fV FMS case H4-8-8AA 


GB NAVSEA ESM Equip. 


GE Elec- Equip. MaInt./SPAWAR 


GF Navy Medical 

GM IFF/Tacan Maintenance 


GU FMS CASE CS-P-GTM 

6U GUYANA 

GV FMS CASE CS-P-GAZ 

GZ FMS CASE SS-P-LAA 


HG FMS CASE BG-P-5AH 
HF Sec. Asst.- Nigeria FOS (JAA) 


ISO KEY RESOLVE 
IQ FMS CASE HA-P-GAQ 
J6 FMS CASE PN-P-8AJ 


J7 SE-P-BAA ISIANO OF SEYCHELLES 
J8 FMS CASE DQ-MA8 


iA Sec. Asst. Conus Training 
JB Sec. Asst TAFT-NAVICP 
JClTth Naval Support (D-l?) 

JFMFPU Fuel Cards (D7) 

JZ NAVICP Case -Guyana 

K2 FMS CASE VC-P-LAC 


KG NAVAIft KEYWESTTRUMflO POINT (07) 

Kl FMS CASE KE-P-RAA 

,KY FMS Case ES-P-SAS 


!lp FMS case LI-P-GAC 


|lX NAVIC FMS Case HO-P-LBH Honduras 
MF FMS ADMIN 


MFPUUA US NAVY SSBN/MFPU 


MR US NAVY-TIMOR-IESTE 

MU FMS CASE MT-P-SAB 

MX CD MX-P-12D 00610071A - MEXICO 


MP Micronesia PACOM 
N4 INTELCOORDCENGOIP 
N13 FMS CASE NI-P-5A6 


^ NAVVOl NAVY FUEL PORT ANGELES (0-13) 

;NMIC National Maritime Intdiigence Center (NMIC) 


[NS Fuel/Navel Special Warfare (Kodiak) 


333 



To kieitIfY tastes qsedfica^ requested. 

OOD/NAVY 


To provide pocuroneit 

DOD/NAVY 


ExttewdfawyeqigBes. 

DOD/NAVY 


of 9m ZODIAC and 11m WlUARO Boats. 



ToprmddeftmdBtKfer Counter Drug Program. 

DOD/NAVY 


To find travel expenses for new mission with 

Coast Guard. 

DOD/NAVY 


To pro^dde fom^ng iw storage foes of the Yemen 

contsners. 

000/NAVY 


To |»owde foe Ccast Guard for restoration 
overttad and material readiness support of Navy 
Owned Guns and Weapon systems. 

DOO/NAVY 



000/NAVY 


for reimbursement of costs associated wi th N a vy 
personnel attending Coast Guard Medical 
Treatment Facilities. 

000/NAVY 


First (garter a»t of maintenance support. 

OOD/NAVY 


For radios, spare parts, diagnostic equipment, 
tods and accessories for Navy patrol boats. 

DOD/NAVY 


To fiRtd travel expenses. 

DOO/NAVY 

1 

Traintrrg. 



Prooirement for foreign military saies. 

DOO/NAVY 


To purchase boats, truck, spare parts and provide 

training. 

DOD/NAVY 


Roliover account. 



Funds for USCG billet (03) travel costs in support 
of Exercise Key Resolve. 

DOO/NAVY 


Ship overhaul and construction. 

000/NAVY 


Procurement for foreign military sales. 

DOD/NAVY 


Purchase, transfer and management of motor life 
boats. 

DOD/NAVY 


Procurement for foreign military sales. 

DOO/NAVY 


To provide training on behalf of the U.S. Navy. 

DOD/NAVY 


To provide funding for TAFT Salaries. 



COMPACFIT Maritime Homeland Defense. 



Coast Guard transit protection system vessels. 

DOD/NAVY 

1 

This procurement for foreign military sales. 

OOD/NAVY 


This procurement for foreign military sales. 

OOD/NAVY 


Coast Guard sector Key West to provide electrical 
services. 

000/NAVY 

1 



1 

FY12 Rollover 

DOD/NAVY 


Purchase of boat, equipment, spare parts, training 
and services. 

OOD/NAVY 


Purchase of engine components, transportation 
and program management. 

DOD/NAVY 


To provide FMS Administrative support. 

DOO/NAVY 


To prescribe Rnandat resource management 
guidarKe. 

000/NAVY 


To provide USCG personnel with travel support. 

DOO/NAVY 

1 




Travel and per dierrt 

DOD/NAVY 


Transportation cost for Coast Guard and Pacific 

island nation ship riders to travel to and from US 
vessels as deployed throughout foe South Pacific 
Region. 

DOO/NAVY 

II 

To cover personnel expenses. 

DOO/NAVY 

II 




To dispense foeJ to TPS security vessels from 

MFPU Bangor. 

DOO/NAVY 

II 



J 

nspectlon j 

DOD/NAVY 1 





















































334 











































335 


RT1713 RITA CGHQfEXP. FY13) 

ktland {tcarestri^) Natkmwide Differential Global 
Po»ttonH« Sys^ns senn^. 

OOT/RITA 

RT1714 RITA CGHQ{EXP, FY14) 

Standsii i»swne1 tost. 


8J Bureau of Export Administration (8XA) - Admin Law Judge Sen 

Dvitlan s<^»ies incurred by Administrative Law 
Judge. 

OOC/NOAA 




AAIA NOAA NTL MARINE FISHERIES (OC) 

To si^jport the Mandatory Ship Reporting System. 

OOC/NOAA 

BQ MOU For Administrative Law Judge Service 

For Acbnbustrative Law Juc^ Services. 

DOC/NOAA 

C81 NOAA OiC Watch Supervisor 

To prmflde an officer to the Operational 
inte^ation to serve as the Officer in 

Charge Watdt ^.qjervisor. 

DOC/NOAA 

P2 NOAA MARINE RESEARCH (DCO| 

To faciirtate the use of general support facilities 
related to marine research and ship operations. 

DOC/NOAA 

30 OOS/EX8S 

Salary distribution to program support for the 
second quarter only. 

DOS 

Al EX0S- ALBANIA 

To extend the period of performance for one 
year. 

DOS 

AL EXBS - Training Ukraine 

Third mocKfication ^ extend the period of 
performance. 

DOS 

8A DOS BRAZIL 


DOS 

SB BARBADOS 



8H EXBS BOSNIA {OCO-ll 

To rollover funding to FY12. 

DOS 



DOS 

iCA EXBS - CAMBODIA OCO-I 

Funds to provide EXBS support to Cambodia. 

DOS 


Funding to support pilot projects to train 

government officials on how to utilize the 

Common Assessment Reporting Tool. 

DOS 

EB SERBIA 

To provide the following EXBS assistance to the 
Government of Serbia. 

DOS 

£1 DOS EGYPT 

This modification is to extend the period of 
performance for one year. 

DOS 




CA EXBS -EXBS GEORGIA 

To extend the period of performance for one 
year. 

DOS 


Roitover account. 


GP SINGAPORE TRAINING 

To provide funding for EXBS to Singapore. 


HE BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA 

To provide assistance to the Government of 

Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

DOS 

HY DOS EXBS Kazakhstan • Cl 

To extend the period of performance for one 
year. 

DOS 

KK DOS 

To assist in conduction Maritime law 

Enforcement Instructor Development Course. 

DOS 

KN DOS 

To assist in conducting small boat operations 
training. 

DOS 

KYOOS 


DOS 

MTDOS 

To provide two officers for the Export Control and 
Related Border Security Program. 

DOS 

MV DOS/EX8S Train. Philippines 

To extend the period of performance for four 
months. 

DOS 

OA EXBS OMAN 

To extend the period of performance for one 
year. 

DOS 


30S 



























ZVCG-2 INTEL BILLET 


ZQCommercfai Vessel User Fees • USC Controlled 


SG Yacht Documentation 


Responsibilities in developing/supporting an 
unafflliated volunteer management pro 


I To provide funding for salary and benefits for 
detaiiee. I 


To provide funding for ar> 0-4 billet. 

To provide funding for FY12 and FY13 for an 0-3 
billet. 


To provide funding for a GS-H, GS-12, GS-7, and 
GS-S billets. 


To provide funding for a GS'12, GS-U, G5‘3. 6S-7, 
and 6S-5 billets. 


ITo distribute funding between Coast Guard and 


(BSEE USCG Detaiiee Position - 001 - BSEE 


luSCG/DOl Aircraft Support for Joint Ops 


2012 NSF POLAR ICE BREAKER SUPPORT AND REIMBURSEMENT 


To utilize USCG Administrative law Judges 

services. DOi 

Procedures to request air support when 
conducting joint-ops if such activities are mutuallv 
beneficial and contribute to agency primary 

mission and objectives. DO! 

To govern usage of Coast Guard icebreakers for 
Coast Guard missions and scientific and 
operational support for N^. NSF 






















To provide for National Response Team (NRT) 
as»sta>ce for polution inddents in the Panama 

Agreement Between the United States Department of State, the Canal area on a cost reimbursable basis 



EstabNsh OoO Mnt Command and Control 
structure for Maritime Homeland Defense 

2004 MOA Between the Department of Defense and the Departt operations that Indude U.S. Coast Guard forces DOD/OHS 

CG-7, CG-9 and OHS Research Ss Development 
Partnerships Science and Technology - It outlines 
our roles for developing COAST through the Office 

2013 MOA with CG-7, CG-9, and DHS S&TjCoastal Operations Ar of University Programs. DHS 

Identify appraptlate capabilities, roles, and 
mlssloris and functions fw the OoO In support of 
the U.S. Coast Guard when conducting Maritime 
Homeland Defense & to conduct rapid transfer of 
OoO forces to the Coast Guard for support of MHS 

2006 MOA Between the Department of Defense and the Oepartr operations 000/DHS 


To Identify certain National Defense capabilities of 

2QQ8 MOA Between the Department of Defense and the Oepangthe U.S. Coast Guard [DOO/DHS 


Specify provision of forces between the U.S. Coast 
Guard and U.S. Navy in oH spill and salvage 

1980 Interagency Agreement Between the U.S. Navy and the U.S operations as welt as reimbursement procedures, USCG/NAVY 

To facilitate NOAA reimbursement of ^ip time to 

2011 MOA between U5CG and NOAA on the purchase of icebrea USCG. DOC/NOAA 
















338 



Directive «tal)Kdies r^Kmsil»!ities law DHS’ 
Pr^icy fw EvaJuation of Vl^nd Farms as they 
impact the Department of Homeland 
Security.-USCG to serve as principal advisor to 

DHS regarcNi^ Maltime Domain vetting and 
evahiatim of wAid turituie applications. 

JPO-LRR 


To ensure nMtaryand U.S. commercial seaport 
artd related intermodaf system readiness to 
support safe and secure deptoyment of military 
persortn^ and cargo in the event of mobilization 
or other national mergency through enhanced 
coordination and cooperation of signatory 
agencies artd or^ntzations. 

DOT'MARM), MSC, SDDC, TSA, USACE, 
USFORSCOM, USCG, USNORTHCOM, 
USTRANSCOM 

Maritime Security Risk Analysis Model (MSRAM) 

Sharing/collaborative use of security risk 
management data. 

National Guard Bureau (NG6), TSA, and 
NPPO/CFATS 

NG8 - Signed OCT 2009 by COMOT (AOM Allen) 
and Feb 2010 by Gen. McKinley; TSA - Signed May 
2010 by RAOM Zukunft attd Jamie Clarkson, 
General Manager, Transportation Security; 
NPPD/CFATS - signed Dec 2012 by ROME Servidlo 
and Caitlin Durkovish, AS for Infrastructure. 

Port Security Grant Prowam Administration (PSGP) 

Signed Sept 2012 by ROME Servidio and Elizabeth 
Harman, Associate Admin, Grants Programs 
Directorate 

FEMA 

8SEE/USCG MOA OCS-03: Oil Oischarf?e. Preparedness, and Resp 

Signed April 2012; Describes roles, responsibilities, 
and coordination b/w 8SEE and USOS for offshore 
oil spill preparedness and response. 

8SEE 

Various for In-Situ Burn and Chemical Countermeasures (Dispers 

Coast Guard Districts have MOUs w/ cognizant 
Regional Response Team members (RRT). 

RRT 

DHS/USCG MOA 

Uaisort b/w OHS and CG 

DHS Office of Operations Coordination and 
Planning 

2012 MOU between U.5. Army Corps of Cneineers (USAGE! and ( 

Outlines procedures for cross-training incoming 

C6 Sector Command Cadre and USACE District 

Commanders. 

DoD/Army 

2012 MOU between U.S. Army Corps of Engmeers (USACE) and 1 

Replaces 1985 MOA on the same topic and 
outlines procedures for marking or removing 
objects in the Navigable Waters of the U.S. that 
are determined to be either obstructions or 
hazards to safe navigation. 

OoD/Army 

15 USAiO 

Foreign Disaster Assistance 

USAID 

ASF Arctic Security Forces Roundabie 

Joint Forces Roundtable Security 

000/HQ USPACOM 

&SEE Arctic Advisor Review 

CG Technical Advisor Arctic Review 

DOi/Sureau of Safety & Environmental 
Enforcement 

COP Common Operationaf Pierre 

USCG Standard Personnel Cost {F7E) 

DHS OPS 

CS8 Chemical Safety Board - NRC 

Notification Services - NRC 

DOT/CS8 

FHA Sridfte Permit Assistance 

USCG Standard Personnel Cost (FTE) 


HUS - Hurricane Sandy Sunte ^Ivation 

Hurricane Sandy Surge Activation 

FEMA/OHS 

JC National Buoy Data Center 

USCG Staruiard Personnel Cost (FTE) 

NOAA/080C 

MPT SOUTHCOM TrainR)K Exercises 

Training & Exercises - Ammunition Support 

OOO/SOUTHCOM 


Notification Services - NRC 

DOT/NTSB 

ONDCP - National OruR Control Strategy Support 

MOCS Support - Trace Narcotic tdenrt/Verificaiion 


UNH - University Science Polar Support 

Science Support UNH 


UiPE • Joint Sve integraged Suit TechnoloRV 

CG Support Joint Sve Suit Technology 

DOD/DOO 

UT • University of Texas Science Polar Support 

Science Support UT 

State of Texas 

1981 Coast Guard and Federal Highway Administration MOU 

Coordinate the Preparation and Processing of 
Enwronmental Documents 

FHWA 

2013 interagency Agreement with the Federal Highway Administ 

Provide funding for a 6S-12 billet to the Bridge 
Pro^am 

FHWA 


























339 


Reco^izes the mutuai into^st of the two parties 
v^en regulating cenain activities in navigable 
waters oftftel^darihes the areas of Jurisdiction 
and dte r^}ona1))&ties of the two parties WRT 
the alterathm of bridges under the Truman-Hobbs 
Act; the construction, operation and maintenance 
of bridges; the closure of waterways; the 
restriction of passage under bridges; and 
coordirratiwi/considtation on projects in or 

affect!*^ navigable waters of the US. 

Coordinate the Prepa'aticm and Processing of 

USCG/USACE MOA 1981 Coast Guard and Federal Highway Admi EnvIfonmeiTtal Documents I 

Maritime e^rerational coorcBnation, planning, 
infonnation shan't^, intelligence integration, and 
re^nse activities for coordinated Departmental 

Maritime Operations Coordination {MOC} Plan re^nse^ I 




340 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-Departmental Agreements 
United States Secret Service 


other Agency/ 


Inter-^ency/lnb'a-D^arbnenta! Agreements 

Description 


Inter-agency /^reement 

To provide cyber seojrHy crime training to 
state and local law enforcement entities in 
support of the NCSD at the National 

Computer Forensics Institute (NCFI). 

DHS - National Protection and Programs 
Directorate (NPPD) 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding the Assi^ment of Detailed 
Instructor 

DHS - Federal Law Enforcement T raining 
Center (FLETC) 

Memorandum of Agreement 

DoO will provides Explosive Ordinance 
Detection (EOD) assistance to the Secret 
Service. 

DoO - Department of Defense 

Inter-agency Agreement 

To provide Cyber Analyst Crash Course 
trainingat the NCFI. 

OHS - Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA) 

Inter-agency Agreement 

To proved tor the provision of office and 
parking spaces, and supplies to support 
Protective Security Advisors (PSA) Region 
Directors in 54 meb’opolitan cities across the 
United States to serve as a liaison between 
DHS and Federal, State and Local 
governments and private sector entities. 

DHS - National Protection and Programs 
Directorate (NPPD) 

Inter-agency Agreement 

To establish limited bandwidth network 
connection for experimental evaluation over 
a commercial grade connect. 

DHS - Science and Technology (S&T) 

Inter-agency Agreement 

To incrementally fund the Electronic 
Countermeasure (ECM) System Prototype 
Testing and Evaluation. 

DHS - Science and Technology (S&T) 

Inter-agency Agreement 

To provide support of the International Law 
Enforcement Academy (ILEA). 

DOS - Department of State 

fntra-agency Agreement 

Funding for acquisition program support for 
einformation migration activities. 

DHS- Office ofthe Chief Information 

Officer (OCiO) 

inter-agency Agreement 

To reimburse the Service for approved 
personnel travel expenses incurred while 
attending U.S. Currency Training Seminars. 

FRB - Board of Governors ofthe Federal 
Reserve System 


Firearm requalification course 

FRB - Federal Reserve Board 

Inter-agency Agreement 

Firearm requalification course 

DOE • Department of Education 

Inter-agency Agreement 

Protection of the Secretary of Treasury 

Department of Treasury 

Inter-agency Agreement 

Treasury Executive Office of Asset Forfeiture 
(TEOAF) 

department of Treasury 

Inter-agency Agreement 

Reimbursement of travel expenses in support 
of International Organized Crime 

DEA - Drug Enforcement Agency 




















341 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agencv/intra-Deparl mental Agreements 
NaHonal Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) 


Description 

RDECOM Development and tmpl«nentation of 
web-based distance (earning trair^ courses. 
Development of Chemicai Security Gaining 
program. 




Other Agency/ 

Department 

ARMY, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 
ARMY, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 


inter-Agency/intra-Departmental 

Agreements 


Inter-agency Agreement 


Inter-agency Agreement 






















342 


Inter-agency Agreement 


The purpose of this Interagency Agreement is for 
enhanced Critical infrastructure Protection 
(EC1P) and Information Survey Too} (1ST) 
development, implementation and su^inment; 
Linked Encrypted Network Systems (LENS) 
operational system support; Vulneratnflty 
Assessment methodology development, analysis, 
porta! design and information analysis; support for 
Common Vulnerability (C\^, Potential Indicators 
(Pi), Protective Measures (PM) Papers information 
dissemination; and development of dependency 
and interdependency methodology and products 
from ARNL 


DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 


DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 










343 


Inter-agency Agreement 

To conduct vulnerability assessments of Q/KR 
facilities when requested by the DHS and to 
be reimbursed for related scpoises 

NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU 

Inter-agency Agreement 

Provide training requirements analysis, 
curriculum development, training implementation 
and training services to Infrastructure 
information Collection Division (iiCDHor^be 
Constel!atlon\Automated Crltk:^ Asset 
Management System (C/ACAMS) Criticai 
lnfrastructure\Key Resource (a\KR} Asset 
Protection Technical Assistance Program (CAPTAP) 
Training Project 

NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU 

Inter-agency Agreement 

To fund an Analysis of HVAC Responses to Airborne 
C8R Releases by the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology (NIST) 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS TECHNOLOGY 


Provide support for Software Assurance Metrics 
and Too! Evaluation (SAMATE) project 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS TECHNOLOGY 

Inter-agency Agreement 

Provide support to the Federal Cyber 

Service; Scholarship for Service program. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 


Biometrics- Center for identity Technology 

Research (CiTeR) Affiliate Participation 

Subscription 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 

Inter-agency Agreement 

Provide support for the National Centers of 
Academic Excellence in information Assurance 
Education Program 

NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY 


The Institute for Telecommunication Sciences (ITS) 

to provide coliaboration and support services for 

execution of essential stakeholder engagement 

and outreach activities 

NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS & INFORMATION 

ADMINISTRATION 

Inter-agency Agreement 

The purpose of this PR action is to provide funding 
in the amount of $80,897.48 to fund ongoing 
Building 603 support. Naval Station Pensacola 
Florida (NASP), for Base Operating Services (BOS). 

NAVY, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 

inter-agency Agreement 

Provide support so NPS can develop and begin a 
graduate-level cyber security-based curriculum for 
federal OHS employees involved in cyber security 
operations. 

NAVY, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 

fntra-agency Agreement 



Inter-agency Agreement 

To reimburse 0PM for various human capital 
services. 

0PM/aS/TRA!N!N6 8t MANAGEMENT 




Inter-agency Agreement 

Provide technical assistance and support services 
for the Border interoperability Demonstration 
Technical Assistance Program (BIDTAPjtn support 
of the Border Interoperability Demonstration 
Proiect(8ID-P) 

SPAWAR 

inter-agency Agreement 

To perform vetting services comparing personally 
identifiable information (PH) collected from high- 
risk chemical facilities to the PH of known or 
suspected terrorists watchlist. 

TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMIN 

Inter-agency Agreement 

To procure space for the 4 NPPD Human resources 
personnel in Atlantic City. 

TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMIN 





To provide cyber security crime training to state 
and local taw enforcement envies in support of 
the NCSD. 


US SECRET SERVICE 














344 



345 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-Departmenta! ^reements 
Office of Health Affairs 




















Component: WMD EKoDe%»e 
PPA: BioWatch 

Program: Operations Support 

Project; 1.4 Evertt ReconstnKtion 

Activity: Biologicat Event Rennstruction Tool (BERT) 


Component: WMD SoDe*Hi% 

PPA: BioWatch 

Program; Operations Support 

Project: laboratory Operations and S^ff 

Activity: Laboratory Operations (indudes Mobile Lab, Arcbtvirtg, 

_ C.. 

Component; WMD BioDefense 
PPA; BioWatch 
Program; Field Testing 
Project: APOS Development Version 


Department of Energy : Lawrence Livermore 
National Lab 


(DOE NNSA • Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab(LLNL) 


OOE'Argonne National Laboratory 


DHS - OPO - Science and Technology Directorate 


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, JOINT PROJECT 
MANAGER GUARDIAN 


HSHQPM-IO-X.00083 

iComponent; WMD BioDefense 

PPA; BioWatch 

Program: Operational Support 

Project/Activjty; BioWatch Indoor Reachback Center (BIRC) 

DOE NNSA -550 

HSHQOC-11-X-OOS69 

Component: Management & Administration 

PPA: Salaries & Expenses 

Program: Program Support M&A 

Project: Other Support 

Activity; Front Office 360 Review 

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, U S OFFICE OF 


Component; WMD BioDefense 
PPA; BioWatch 
Program; Operations Support 
Activity: J\ssay Validation 

Performer; Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANl) 


Component: WMD BioDefense 
PPA; BioWatch 
Program: Gen-3 


DOE NNSA - Lawrence Livermore National lab 


IDugway Proving Ground 


Component; WMD BioDefense 

PPA: Rapidly Deployable Chemical Detection System (ROCDS) 
Program; Program Support 
Project: RDCDS SNIFFER 


















347 



HSHQDC-12-X-00031 

HSHQDC-11-X-00259'~ 


Component: ROCK 

PPA; Rapidly Deployabte Chemic^ D^sction System (ROCDS) 
Program: Program Support 

Project: M^erial Systems An^ysis Activity Support 
Performer: US /^my Materiel S^tems Analysis 


Component: WMD & Biodeifiense 
PPA: BioWatch 

Program: Operation^ Support 
Project: 1.5.1 OeploymentCBEST) 
Activity: laboratory Operatlorts and Staff 


PH50 Liason (Hayslett) 

Component; WMD & Biodefense 

PPA; National Biosurveiliance integration Center (NBIC) 

Program; Analytical Staffing 

Activity: Detailee 

_ I 1 C Affaire 

Component; WMO BioDefense 
PPA; BioWatch 

Program; Autonomous Pathogen Detection System {APDS) 
Performer: Edgewood Chemical Biofogicai Center (ECBC) 

PPA: Food, Agriculture & Veto’inarv Defense 
Program: Food, Agriculture & Veterinary Defense 


I US Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity 
(AMSAAj 


ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENa 




Component: WMO & Biodefense 
PPA: BioWatch 
Program: field Testing 

Project; 2.1.5 Assay Evaluation of Vital Agents 
Activity: Phase I Gen-3 Testing 




Pandemic program - warehousing space for OHS Antiviral U S OEPT Of HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

Stockpile, HHS »C Perry Point, MO. Option year three. Additional 


Pop extension for Medical First Responder Coordination Program. FEMAAISFA 
























348 
















349 


Department of Hometand Security 
Inter-Agency and intra-Oepartmental Agreements 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 


Inter-Agency/Inna-Departmental Agreements 

Description 

Other Agency/ 

Department 


O&M funds for Off-Post support to the CSEPP Program 

USA Oiemlcal Materials Agency 


Provide a Personnel AccuintHiltitv System (PAS) 

Department of Homeland Securltv 

Agreement between FEMA- NED and DHS - Intel & Analysis 

Exerdcise support for a sceriarfo based exercise 

Department of Homeland Security 

Agreement between FEMA - Region 10 and OOJ - Wireless Mgmt 
Office 

Provide office and data center space Including utilities, 
faciMi« ooeration and maintenance 

Department of Justice 

MOU between FEMA and DHS - OCtO 

Funding to {^ocure hardware, software and manpower to 
support the Disaster e-gov InWadve 

Department of Homeland Security 

MQU between FEMA - Region id and USARNORTH 

Recurring funding to provide office space along with 
ooeraticms and maintenance surmort 

USARNORTH 

MOU between FEMA - Region 9 and USARNORTH 

Recurring fundmg to |»t)vlde office space along with 

operattoF\s and maintenance sui^ort 

USARNORTH 

MOU between FEMA • IMO and HHS-NDMS 

Recurring funding fo provide warehouse space along and 

inventory tradtln* 

Health and Human Services 

MOU between FEMA-OAtP and Dept of Labor 

Coordinating the Disaster Assistance Improvement Rian 

Department of Labor 

MOU between FEMA-DAIP and 0PM 

Coofdinadng the Disaster Assistance improvement Plan 

Office of Personnel Management 

MOU between FEMA-DAIP and Dept of Agriculture 

Coordinating the Disaster Assistance Improvement Plan 

Department of Agriculture 

MOU between FEMA-OAiP and Dept of Education 

Coordinating the Disaster Assistance In^rovement Plan 

Department of Education 

MOU between FEMA DAIP and SEA 

Coordinating the Disaster Assistance Improvement Plan 

Small Business Administration 

MOU between FEMA • DAIP and Dept of Interior 

Coordinating the Disaster Assistance Improvement Plan 

Sdepartment of Interior 

MOU between FEMA-OAIP end Dept of Commerce 

Coordinating the Disaster Assistance improvement Plan 

Department of Commerce 

MOU between FEMA - DAIP and HUD 

Coordinating the Disaster Assistance improvement Plan 

Housing Urban Development 

MOU between FEMA - OPPA and ICE 

Strategy & Assessment Planning 

DHS-ICE 














350 


Department of Homeland Security 
Inter-Agency and intra-Departmental Agreements 
U.S. Citizenship and immigration Services (USCiS) 


inter-Agency/Intra-Depaitmentai 

Agreements 


HSBP1010X00017 


HSBP1011X00147 


HSBP1011X00003 


HSBP1011X00112 


HSCEMS10X00007 


HSCEMS09X00031 




HSTS0310XTTC465 


Description 


A-File Management 




other Agency/ 
Department 


Department of Defense 


jDHSCBP 


Freedom of Information Act Requests pHS CBP 


Mail Management at co-located 

facilities OHS CBP 


Language Services 


A-File Management and Historical 
Fingerprint Enrollment Special Project DHS ICE 


Mat! Management at co-located 

facilities OHS ICE 


Provide the Social Security 
Administration with copies of 
immigration records 


Isocia! Security Administration 


HSSCCG12J00021 


Various 


HSSCCG12D00003 


Capture of biometric data for visa 
applications 

The United Kingdom 

SAVE queries 

Various Federal, State, and local entitles 

Capture of biometric data for visa 
applications 

Citizenship and Immigration Canada 


HURRICANE SANDY MA#40860R- 
NJ-USCIS-01 


HSSCCG1 3X00005 


Various 


HSSGCG10X00056 


HSSCCG1 0X00078 


Education support services for overseas 
staff/family 


Department of Defense 


Department of Defense 


Department of Defense/Navy 


HSSCCGl 3X00004 

Telephone Service Reimbursement 
GTMO 

Department of Defense/Navy 

HSSCCG12X00060 

Science Education Programs to Increase 
diversity in the educated pool of research 
scientists 

Department of Education 


Training for use of automatic external 
defibrillator 

Department of Health and Human Services 


Customer Surveys 

Department of Interior 

HSSCCG12X00008 

Shared parking at USCIS Headquarters 

Department of Justice 













































351 


■tstaatitcftcKftimBil 


HSSCC608X00094 


HSSCCG13X00001 


HSSCCG1 1X00025 


HSSCCG1 1X00035 


HSSCCG13X00041 


HSSCCG12X000S3 


Various support senricesfor USCIS 
international offices 


Transit subsidy benefite/servtces 


I Department of State 


Department of Transportation 


HSSCCG13X00030 


HSSCCG11X00021 


HSSCCG1 3X00032 


HSSCCG13X00027 


HSSCCG13X00007 


Support services for iockbox operations iDepartment of Treasury 


Permanent Change of Station Services Department of Treasury 


(Parking and transit suteidy toms 


Integrated security management 
system and support 


Consolidated mall servi^s 


Federal Relay Service 


DHS Attache European Union DHS 


Senior Executive leadenmip Development 
Program 


HR operations and sen«or executive 
service support OHS CBP 


HSSCCG1 1X00052 

Professional research and development 
testing for new USCIS job applicants 

OHS CBP 

HSSCCG13X00006 

Safety and health services/inspections 

DHS CBP 

Various 

IT Support for Data Center 1 and 2 
transition/migration and operating 
services 

DHS CIO 

HSSCCGi2X00049 

Microsoft Office Project as a Service 

OHS OCIO 

HSSCCG12X00050 

Email As A Service 

DHS OCIO 

MHBHHUIIi 

MS Case and Relationship Management 
(CRM) as a Service 

OHS oao 

HSSCCG12X00054 

Infrastructure as a Service to support 
delivery of IT Services 

OHS OCIO 

HSSCCG12X000S6 

Sharepoint as a Service 

DHS OCIO 






Network Implementation Plan build out of 
the Facility at Stennis for the NOC/SOC DHS OCIO 


Development, Testing As A Service (OTaaS) 
for Scheduler and Verifications 


McAfee Services 


Renewal of software licenses 


Grant agreement with Mississippi for 

REAL ID DHSFEIV 


Shared services for joint building 
occupants 


identity Management System for H5P0- 
120MS 


Integrated Security Management System 
Support 


West Law Legal On Line Subscription 

Access DHS OGC 

Access to the Civilian Personnel Reporting 
On Line System CPRO DHS: CBP 























































352 


HSSCCG11X00040 

Debt Hearings Request Adjudication 

DHS; USCG 

HSSCCG09X00052 

Technical and engineering services for 
privacy assessment on e-Verify/SAVE 
systems 

DHS 5&T 

Various 

independent engineering ^rvices 
(FFRDC support) 

DHSS&T 

HSSCCG13X00021 

EEOC Training 

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 

Various 

Fingerprint and name checks for 
employment and Immigration benefit 
applicants 

Federal Bureau of Investigations 

Various 

Equal Employment and Alternative 
Dispute Resolution Mediation and 
Orientations 

Federal Mediation/Conciliation Services 


Employee Assistance Program, Work- 



Various 

Life Services and various health service 
offerings to employees 

Federal Occupational Health 

Various 

Telecommunication services via 

Net'worx and WITS 

GSA 

HSSCCG12X00066 

Homeland Security Data Network Common 
intelligence Picture Pro Rated Portion fo 
OHS 

GSA Fedsim 

HSSCCG13X00022 

Property disposal support services 




Library of Congress 

HSSCCG11X00056 

i Research Projects 

Library of Congress 

HSSCCG10X00051 


National Archives/Records Administration 

HSSCCG09X00071 

Provide and improve research methods 
for statistical information available on 
immigration 

National Science Foundation 

HSSCCG1 1X00067 

Immigrant Survey Services 

National Institute of Health 

Various 

Design, develop and deliver various 
training classes and developmental 
assessments 

Office of Personnel Management 

HSSCCG08X00096 

Technical HR related support services 

Office of Personnel Management 

HSSCCG09X00079 

USA Staffing System Licenses 

Office of Personnel Management 

HSSCCG1 0X00039 

e-OPF support/integration services 

Office of Personnel Management 

HSSCCGI 0X00071 

Employee applicant entry level testing 
for job application process 

Office of Personnel Management 

HSSCCG1 1X00059 

Learning Management System 

Office of Personnel Management 

HSSCCG09X00036 

e-Verify and SAVE support services and 
SSA partnership 

Social Security Administration 

HSSCCG13X00028 

Establish Accounting Code for Overtime 

Pay 

United States Department of Agriculture 

HSSCCG13X00031 

FOIA Backlog Study 

US Military Academy 

HSSCCGI 1X00001 

Administration of oaths in support of 
citizenship ceremonies 

US Courts 


































































356 


Department of Homeiand Security 
Inter-Agency/Intra-Departmental Agreements 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) 


Memorandum of Understanding 


iMemorandum of Understanding 


iMemorandum of Understanding 


Inter-Agency/intra-Oepartmental 

Agreements 


Establishing Partner Organization Status 


Establishing Partner Oganization Status 


Establishing Partner Organizatiort Status 


Desor^ition 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FlETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FlETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FlETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FlETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Memorandum of Agreement 















357 


Memorandum of Agreement 
Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility US immigration & Customs Enforcement. DHS 

Management Control of /tttomey Instructors DHS, QGC 


Memorandum of Understanding 
Memorandum of /^reement 
Memorandum of Understanding 
Memorandum of Understanding 
Memorandum of Understanding 


|procorementSefVices-design,CQnsOt«:t, dose-out N6AF [S&T, DHS 


Financial Managemeit Sennces 

Establishing Partner Organization Status 
Establishing Partner Organization Status 
Establishing Partner Organization Status 



lA/OPS, DHS 

Department of Agriculture 

Department of Comnrerce 

National Security Agency 


Naval Criminal Investigative Service 


Department of Education 

Department of Health & Human Services 


Department of Housings Urban Development 

Protective Services Division 

Department of the Interior 

Department of Justice 


Department of State 


Department of Transportation 

Department of the Treasury 

Bureau of Engraving & Printing 


US Capital Police 













Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 

Nat'l Geospatial intelligence Ag, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding the Assignment of Defiled of Instructors 

National Securitv Agency, DOO 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 

Pentagon Force Protection Agency, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 

Air force Office of Special Investigations, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 

000 OiG 
























359 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assjgr>ment of Detailed of Instructors 
Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instfuctors 


Regarding the Asagnment of Detailed of Insfructors 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Office of Health, Safety & Security, DOE 


HHS, OiG 


Protective Services Division, HUD 


blG,HUO 


[Bureau of Indian Affairs, DPI 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[ Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructor 


Memorandum of Agreement 


■Regarding the Assignmertt of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


iRegarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


IRegarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detaited of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


IRegarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detaiied of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


IRegarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


[Bureau of Land Management, 001 


Bureau of Reclamation, DPI 


National Park Service, DPI 


OiG, DO! 


Office of Surface Mining Reclamation & Enf, DPI 


US Fish & Wildlife Service, DPI 


jus Park Police, 001 


Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco. Firearms & Exp, OOJ 


Federal Bureau of Investigation Police, DOJ 
Federal Bureau of Prisons, DQJ 


jOiG, OOJ 


[US Marshall? Service, DOJ 


Ofug enforcement Agency, OOJ 
POL, OIG 





360 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Bureau of Engraving & Printing, TREASURY 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of instructors 


[Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, TREASURY 


Memorandum of Agreement 


iRegarding the Assignment of Itetailed of Instructors 


||R5 Criminal Investigation Oivision, TRFASURY 


[ Memorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignmerit of Detailed of Instructors 


[Treasury Inspector General for Tax Admin, TREASURY 


iMemorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of totalled of Instructors 


US Mint Police, TREASURY 


iMemorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


[Admin Office of US Courts 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


IRegarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


[Central Intelligence Agency 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Envirofimentai Protection Agency 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


[General Services Administration, OIG 


Memorandum of Agreement 


IRegarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


[Small Business Administration, OIG 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


iUS Postal Service, OIG 


Memorandum of Agreement 


iRegarding the Assignment of Detailed of Instructors 


iFederai Reserve System 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FtETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FlETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 


US Forest Service. USDA 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Office of Security. Commerce 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 



361 


Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FlETC's Oieftenham, Maryiarrd 

Facility 

DaS,OIG. DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Qieltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Defense Logistics Agency, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Oieltenham, Mar^and 

Facility 

Nat'l Geospatial intelligence Ag, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Oieltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

National Security Agency, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Naval Criminal Investigative Sen/ice, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Oieltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Pentagon Force Protection Agency, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of Fl£TCs Oieltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Air Force Office of Special Investigations, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

US Army Criminal Investigative Service, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Defense Intelligence Agency, DOD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Dept, of Education, OIG 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Office of Health, Safety & Security, DOE 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FlETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

DOE, OIG 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Food & Drug Administration, HHS 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

National Institutes of Health, HHS 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

HHS 016 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Protective Services Division, HUD 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

HUDOtC 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Bureau of Indian Affairs, DOI 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Bureau of Land Management, DOI 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
facility 

001 OIG 



362 


Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

us Park Police, DOI 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Mar^and 

Facility 

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Exp, DOJ 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Federal Bureau of Investigation Police, DOJ 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Mai^and 

Facility 

Federal Bureau of Prisons, DOJ 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Qieltenham, Manrtand 
Facility 

DOJ 016 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

US Marshals Service, DOJ 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

001 OIG 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Diplomatic Security Service, DOS 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Federal Aviation Administration, DOT 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

DOT OIG 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Bureau of Engraving & Printing, TREASURY 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, TREASURY 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

IRS Criminal Investigation Division. TREASURY 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Treasury Inspector Genera! for Tax Admin, TREASURY 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

US Mint Police, TREASURY 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

VAOtG 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

US Capital Police 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Admin Office of US Courts 

Memorandum of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Amtrak 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, ( 
Facility 


[Central inteHigence Agency 





363 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of /^reement 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 
Memorandum of Agreement 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 
Memorandum of Agreement 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 




Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Mar^and 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham. Mar^nd 

_ Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Mar^and 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

_ Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

_ Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

_ Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

_ Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 






|Corp for Nat'l & Community Svc QIC 


jCriminal investigation Division, EPA 


General Services Administration, OIG 


[Nuclear Reguiatory Commission, OiG 


[Office of Personnel Management, OiG 


[Securities & Exchange Commission 


[Federal Reserve System 


[National Galiery of Art 


Export Import Bank of the United States 


[Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction 








364 


Memorandum of Understanding 


Memorandum of Agreement 
Memorandum of Agreement 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


Establish cooperative refation^ip regarding 
Regional Marine Law Enforcement Training Center 

(RMIETC) City of Los Angeles, California 

Regarding use of FLETCs Dteltenham, Maryland 

Facility District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Oept 

_ Use of PLETC facilities, Giynco, GA Glynn County Police Dept, Giynn County, GA 

Establishment of a joint FLETC/ECCCA C^nsdidated Eddy County Central Communications Authority, 
Dispatch Center Eddy County, NM 


jMemorandum of Agreement 


{Law Enforcement response and suppwt agreement j North Charleston Police Dept, North Charleston, SC | 


{Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Understanding 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


[Memofandum of Agreement 


law Enforcement respond and support agreement Glynn County Police Dept, Glynn County, GA 
Establish and provide emergency warning system 

services City of Artesia, NM 

Housing of students/staff at Chaileston Area 
Convention Center in the event of a hurricane or 

other natural disaster City of North Charleston, SC 

Provide staging area for GPC Storm Evaluation & 

Restoration Program in the event of a major 

_ hurricane/storm Georgia Power Company 



[Memorandum of Agreement 
[Memorandum of Understanding 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Memorandum of Agreement 


[Memorandum of Agreement 


iFire Protection & E: 
Deli' - ~ 


Administration of the Gang Resistance Education 
and Training (GREAT) Program 


Use of Facilities, Charleston, SC 

Housing of students/staff at Fort Gordon, GA in the 
event of a hurricane (CAT 3 or higher) or other 

_ natural disaster 

Regarding Security Operational Procedures at the 
Federal Complex, Charleston, SC 


Regarding Security Operational Procedures at the 
Federal Complex, Charleston, SC 


Established the relocation of the USCG Maritime 
Law Enforcment School and Boarding Team Schools 
to Charleston, SC 


Allows USCG and its contractors to maintain two (2) 
communication towers current located on FLETC- 
CHS property. 


Provides the terms for which FLETC Security will 
respond to security alarms activated w/in their 
building located on the Federal Complex 




ynn County, GA 

"nforcement Aeencv, DOJ 



Federal Bureau of Investigation, Columbia, SC 
Division 


[united States Army, Fort Gordon, GA 


Department of State 


U.S. Coast Guard, Sector Charleston 


[Commandant, US Coast Guard 


[NOAA, Coastal Service Center 




365 


Memorandum of Agreement 


Outlines responsitHlities of FUTC-CHS and ICE OTD 
to provide Section 287 (g) training for ICE designatedj 
personnel at the CHS facility 


iCE, Office of Training and Deveiopment (OTD) 


License Agreement 


jUse of Buiidirig 673 and the adjarent helicopter pad 


Omniflight 


License Agreement 


jUse of Building to store law enforcement 
{vessels and vehicles in support of Seahawk 
Interagency Operations Center 


South Carolina State Law Enforcement Division 
(SLED) 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Architect of the Capital 


Training Center Use Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, I 
Facility 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Defense Criminal Investigative Service, Baltimore 
Resident Agency 


Training Center Use Agreement 


Regarding u 
Facility 


? of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 


OHS Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 
Office of Detention and Removal Operations 


Training Center Use Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, f 
Facility 


Defense Logistics Agency 


Training Center Use Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, f 
Facility 


DOC National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, Office of Law Enforcement 
(DOC/NPAA/OLE) 


Training Center Use Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


OOP Criminal Investigation Task Force (CITF) 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
iFacility 


DOT National Highway Safety Administration 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
IFacility 


DOT, Office of Security 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


iRegarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, t 
IFacility 


VA Office of Security and Law Enforcement OS&LE 


Training Center Use Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, f 
Facility 


US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


Government Printing Office (GPQ) 


Training Center Use Agreement 


■Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
iFacility 


[Government Printing Office (GPO), Office of 
Inspector General 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


;Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, I 
Facility 


IRS Criminal Ivestigation Division, Alexandria Field 
[office 


[Training Center Use Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, I 
Facility 


IRS Criminal Ivestigation Division, Baltimore Field 
[office 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 


library of Congress 


Memorandum Of Agreement 


Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, 1 
Facility 


National Archives and Records Administration, 

Office of Inspector General (NARAOIG) 












366 


Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of Ft^TC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

National institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST) 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FlETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

National labor Relations Board (NLRB) 

Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

National Security Agency Police 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Nuciear Regulatory Commission, Office of 
Investgation 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Office of Naval Intelligence 

Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, Office of 
inspector General 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Smithsonian Institute, Office of Inspector Genera! 

(SI OIG) 

Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Smithsonian Institute, Office of Protective Services 
(SI OPS) 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Special Inspector General ffor Afghanistan 
Reconstruction (SIGAR) 

Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of FlETCs Cheltenham, Marylarrd 
Facility 

Special inspector General for Troubled Asset Relief 
Program (SITARP) 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC’s Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

Social Security Administration, Office of inspector 
General (SSAOIG) 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

U.S. Air Force 11 Security Forces Group 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETCs Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

U.S. Air Force 11 Security Forces Squadron 

Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

U.S. Probation Office U.S. District Court, Eastern 

Division of Virginia, 

Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

U.S. Marshals Service, Office of inspection (USMS 

01) 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

United States Postal Inspection Service (USPI) 

Training Center Use Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

U.S. Probation and Pretriai Services Office 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 

Facility 

U.S, Postal inspection Service, Career Development 

Division (USPiS) 

Memorandum Of Agreement 

Regarding use of FLETC's Cheltenham, Maryland 
Facility 

U.S. Trade Representative 

Memorandum of Understanding 

Set forth tenns and conditions by which OHS MGMT will 
devolve its Mission Essential Functions <M£Fs) to FlETC 
when Devolution of Operations is activated. 

OHS Management 




367 


Departt7>ent irf Homelsnd Security 
Inter-Agency and Intra-DefMrtrneital Agreements 
Science and Technology (S&T) 


Inter-j^ency/Intra-Oepartmental 

Agreements 

Descrl|itlon 

Other Agency/ 
OepivUnent 

Updated Oescrbttlan/Comments 


fRG INPUT 



inter-Agency 

MOU sets forth Ute und^tandlng between IWSSST MISn. wid 
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regarding operab'ng 
RadNet monitoring which provides EPA wHh beta and gamma 
detain near real-time to provide infonnadmsiKh as Mkiut from 
a radiological event. 

U.S. Etwironmentai Protection Agency 


tntsr-Agency 

MOU sets forth the terms and condidorts by wbid) MS S&T 
NUSTl and NYPD wili deploy, operate, and evaluatea variety of 
rad/nuc detection technolt^ies in support of developing a 
regional architecture. 

New Yof Ic City Police Department 


Inter-Agency 

MOU sets forth terms by vdiich OHSS&TfAimand PANYNI will 
provide services, personnel, and equipment In order to execute 
the Countermeasures Test Bed 

{CMTBI program efforts hi the Port of New Ywk/New Jersey 
District. 

Port Authority of New York and New 


Snter-Agencv 

The agreement sets forth the useof NUSTL's radladon sources at 
the PANYNJ for training and exercisesuoport. 

Port Authority of New York and New 


inter-Sgency 


Port Authority of New York and New 


IMer-Agency 

This MOA sets forth terms and conditions of Oaniei Cotter's 2Sf( 
support of OHS OCIO Seupatial Management Office {GMO)as 
the Geospatial Information Offeer (610) to fulfill the following 
dutites: providing strategic oversight and direction for the GMO; 
oversight of DHS activities related to the identiJkatlon, detection, 
and mitigation of purposeful interference with space-based and 
other positioning, rtavlgatlcn and timing (PNT) signals; 
development of the Geospatial Reference information 
Architecture (GIRA) with the Program Manager - (nformation 
Sharing Environment; coordination with the National Operations 
Center fer the development of the OHS Common Operating 
fteture. 

DHSOCIO/GMO 


Inter-Agency 

The purpose of this MOA is to improve the development of 
technologies and Increase knowledge to enhance the safety and 
effectivenets of first responders. 6v developinga coHaboiailve 
arrangement where federal program managers have access to 
lire, rescM). and emergency medical personnel to help establiHi 
requirements, assist in technical development, assess 
jrototypes, and consult on implementation requirements, the 
successful trattsfer of new technotegies to field use wilt be 
mproved. 

fONY 



RSO INPUT 



Inter-Agency 

Contract admittislration support for first Responder Technology 
^ogram efforts (6LANSER, Cnnerging Technologies in I) Human 
•attors/ldenlilications 2) Physical Security Systems. 

3)Declsiott Suoporl Systems). 

Jepartmertt of biterior - National 
Business Center fNBC) 





368 


inter-Agenev 

The Human Factors/BehavioralSeieneesDM^ontfDfSTSdenee 
and Technology Directoroce is advancing tfte use ofjingapfints, 
iris, and face to rapid// verify that a pem/i Is who they 
previously chimed to be or that they aren't in o woCdiAsf of 
criminals or other known offenders. USCIS currently uses 
fingerprints to check for any crhnioallistary or irtimigraSon 
violations on benefit applkants, bat these bkurtetricsoie not 
able to determine if persons ore relaied to me wiotiier. Thb 
Inter Agency Agreement supports oSoofi Sosmess ftmowstwe 
ftesearch (S8IRJ Phase HI project to devek^ and test on 
integrated and automated device fttrvaUdatiogdKfamdy 
relationship claims in immigration tti^Bcittioas. ThedewetM 
be evaluated for use in refugee romps end embassies 
worldwide. 

Department of interior - National 
Business Center (NBO 


Inter-Agencv 

The DHS Science and Technak>By sponswedSearchabie Toners 
and Printing Inks library (STPIL) pn^ectforfdrenscKtenttncaHon 
and linking cf printed fraudulent documents wW sedt to create 
searchable library for toners, inkjet ink and prifliing (impact and 
non-impact) ink In four, year-long tncremer^ of research and 
development. 

OOE • Ames Laboratory 

The Searchable Toners and Printing inks 
library (STPli) has been completed and 
transitioned to ICE Homeland Security 
Investigative Forensics Laboratory on 
January 30, 2013, 

Inter-Agencv 

The purpose of the RecX Program is to bt^id and tKt pfototn>es 
(designated Phase I ar^d Phase ti) of a new type of emergency 
spare extreme high voltage (EHV) rtetwork transformer to 
energize at U.5. electric grid substations during the recovery time 
period after high voltage transformer outages due to equipment 
failure, weather, earthquake, etc. The first protot^ 
transformer, Phase 1, will be based on currstt state of the art 
technologies and wilt include a demonstration on the grid at a 
live substation. The second prototype transformer. Phase li, will 
be significantly smaller, lighter, and easier to deploy than the 
transformer if) Phase). Specificatiofls for the Phase li prototype 
will be developed during the technology survey hi coordinatiort 
with the Government and the electrical Industry. 

DOE ■ Idaho National Laboratory (INL) 

This effort has ended. 

lnle^AMnev 

The Resilient Electric Grid (REG) will connect substations in the 
grid, utiliilng High Temperature Supercortductor (HTS) cables end 
HTS fault current lirrsilers (FCl). thereby allowing area 
substations to share excess capacity in mecgencles. Successful 
completion of the REG project will provide the foundation fora 
resilient electrical grid embedded in the existing grid which will 
be immediately transii/onabte to other criiicaffnlrastruciure. 
whert folly deployed, REG could save $100^Vear in losses due to 
normal events ($16/ye3r In NVC). REG abo has the potential to 
prevent devastatine Imeacu from (eriorlst attacks. 

TOE • los Alamos National Laboratory 
(LAND 

This lAA taps Into subject matter expertise 
at LANL to provide technical guidance and 
risk mitigation for the REG progrem. The 
Resilient Eiecirjc Grid (REG) will connect 
substations In the grid, utilizing High 
Temperature Superconductor (HTS) cables 
and HTS fault current limiters (PCI), 
thereby aKowIng area substations to share 
excess capacity In emergencies. Successful 
completion of the REG project will provide 
the foundation for e resilient eloctricatgrid 
embedded In the existing grid which will be 
immediately transitionable toother critical 
infrastructure, When fully deployed, REG 
could save SlQOS/Vear In (oases due to 
normatevsRts(SlB/yearlnNYC]. REG also 
has the potential to prevent devastating 
moacts from terrorist attacks. 








The project will continue Phase fl phig deveiopmeirt. A full-scale 
tunnel (Mug made of a single layer of Vectran fabric was 
martufactured and s ubiected to pressurized testing 

E)OE • Pacific Northwest National 
laboratory (PNNU 

The project continues plug deve(opm«nt. A 
uK-scaie three-layer Vectran tunnel plug 
was manufactured and subjected to 
pressurised testing 

(nter-Agencv 

Through prior-year OHS funding, EROCexten^iy studied the 
unprotected vulnerabilities of cable-stay bridge lower and cable 
components to terrorist threats and developed mitigation 
schemes for these threats. PVZOiO research efforts will include 
development of simplified aitd user-friendly design/analysis tools 
that will allow users wthin the bridge design and anafysis 
community to better design bridges and blast mitigation 
retrofits. 

US Army - Engineer Research and 
Development Center (ERDC) 

Numerical modeling and physical testing 
for infrastructure protection oroieets 

fnter-Agencv 

maging System for Immerme Surveiflaisce OSISJ project 
ntegrating multiple high definition cameras to create a single 
'stitched" image, providing high resolution imagery throughout a 
360 degree field of view and video analyttes opUnrized for high 
resolution video. 

US Air force- Hanscom AF8 

lust added) 

fnter-Agencv 

nraging System for immersive SwveWance (ISSJ project 

nt^ratlng multiple high definition c^eras to create a single 

‘stitched" image, providing high resohdion hnagery throughout a 

3^ degree field of view and vkteo analytics opthnlied (or high 

resolution video. 

OOE - Pacific Northwest National 
aboratorv (PNNLI 

iustaddedi 





369 


Inter-Aeencv 

Numericallv anaiyzing potential ai^KO^tes and 

creating models that help predict ttie effects of Uasts upon 
critical infrastructure. Abo investigated sa9,«iatK, and concr^ 
interactions that occur in hybrid dams tiiat contain boHi concrete 
and embankment sections and their abWy to self-he^ cracb 
induced bv lED or seistj^ acttwtv. 

DOE • Lawrence Livermore Nallonai 
LabiLLNLI 

(Just added) 

inler-Agencv 

Conducting both small and large scale Mast testing, the Unified 
Blast Analysis Tool project is creating rttodels that help predict 
the effects of blasts upon tunnels, bridges, leuees, and cwigeted 
urban high-rise environments {'uriian canyons'). These tocds 
ultirruteiy allow for better analysis of vufnerabMes and M the 
developrrtent of protective measures-This prqectwill investigate 
soil, water, and concrete mieracticHts that aca?in hyfeid dairu 
that contair) both concrete and embanlunent sections and thrt’ 
ability to self-heal cracks Induced bv lEO w swmic scdvltv. 

US Army - Engineer Research and 
Devetooment Center fEROC) 

(Just added) 

Infer-Agencv 

These funds will provide fe-depth market survey research on 
crime and intelligence analytic tools that are currently available 
from COTS and GOH sources and address the needs of the 
Threat Marragement Dhnslon of the Feder^ Protective Service 
(EPS). These funds will also provide to S&T and FPS a functional 
specification for a Threat Analyiic software package based 
specifically on the ireeds of FPS that were developed through an 
it>dependent source. This product will provide a bhieptint for Che 
development of theThreat Analysis software for FPS and 

Improve threat managemant of facilities owned or leased by the 
Qenera) Services Administration (GSA). 

US Navy - Naval Research Laboratory 
{NRLS 

(Just added) This lA is fora project In which 
we are receiving funding from an external 

Inter-AggRCv 

These funds will support the ongoing transithm actmtlesof 
SUMMIT to FEMA's National Pr^saredoess Directorate (NPD). 
Subject lAA focuses on program management, system artalysis. 
National Exercise Program (NEP) expansion and initial transition 
by providing services and tools that support the community and 
enable the next generation of preparedness. The National 
Exercise and Simulation Center (NESC) in coordination with 
FEMA's National Tr^ning, Education, and Exercises Division 
[NTEEDj, and S&T have developed and Initial Enterprise Platform 
with a phased approach by establishing various products, 
services and offerings (SUMMIT). 

Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMAI 

(Just added). S&T has an LAA with FEMA 
where FEMA Is contributing funding to 
support various products, services and 
offerings. 


ASD INPUT 



Intra4>ep8rtment8l 

Personnel exchange wa MOU; To enhance cooperation and 
Information sharing. S&T and TSA collaborate in support of the 
T5A Checked Sanage Program. 

rraittpertatfon Seeutity 
Administration (TSA) 


(ntra'Oepsrtmcntat 

Personnel exchange via MOU; To assist in drafting, developing, 
and staffing the department's devolullon plan. 

t>HS/Office of Operations 

Coordination end Planning, 

Continuity Division 


Intra-OepsrtmanMI 

Personnel exchange via MOU: To foster cooperation and 
coilabcratlon to promote common interests and priorities and to 
provide technical expertise serving as the Director for the office 
of Executive Secretary 

PHS/Office of Executive Secretariat 


totra-OcpartmentsI 

Personnel exchange via MOU; To serve as a Program Manager 
for SorderNei and NET-S prrnects as the projects are directly 
relevant to the Office of Technofegy Innovation and Acquisition, 
Customs and Bordet Protectior). 

Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) 


tntra-D«|Mrtments( 

Personnel exchange via MOU: To provide advice, direction and 

pjfdance; identify issues and r ecomrrrend solutlorts related to 

communication and change management; plan, organize and 

ead staffers towards achieving man^emenlot^ectives; assist 

with the implementation of standarifized project management 

processes to improve overall operations; and, assist with the 

development of MP Personnel Recovery (PR) architecture that 

will integrate into and support the OHS International Personnel 

’rotection and Recoveryefforls. 



Intra-Oapartmantal 

Personnel exchange via MOU: To serve as the Cargo Chief 

Systems Engineer responsible for the end-to-end facilitation, 

coordination, participation in development <rf. and review of: 

user/mission needs, operational concepts, 
unctional/performance/system/design requifenTenis, trade-off 

tudies, risk analyses, test and evaluation, and lifecycle anatyses. 

^■1 



Personnel exchange via MOU: 06C a^ees to assi^ one or more 

attorneys and/or legal staff (the assignee) to the S&T under 

pecific terms and conditiorvs to be set torth in an es tab&hed 

MOA. 

Office of General Counsel (OGC) 








370 


Intra-Oepartmental 

Personnel exchange via MOLI: To faster coliabisation for tiie 
purpose of promoting common interests and priorttteon 
acquisition processes and products «dth reflect to Mar working 
relationships for federal acquisitioR functions and inittatiyBsaict) 
as the Technology Development and Ml»ian&P|WtA«|idsiti«) 
Office (T^C), Technoiogy Security Oivisian {no}- S&T wMpratdde 
subject matter expertise on acquisitions inMatives arnl Integrate 
Sdenceand Technology Operational Research and Enhancement 
^OR£) acquisition processes ami prockicis inlo USSS. 

IMited States Secret Service 


intra-Departmenta! 

Personnel exchange via MOU: To faster coU^ioiatkMi ami to 
promote common interests and priorifiesaitbeareaof 
management and administration andserxn as a Program tealyst 
on the Executive Secretary Team wtthm the Office of Me Odef of 
Staff (OCoS). 

Domestic Nuclear Detection Office 
(ONOO) 


intra-Departmenta! 

Personnel exchange via MOU:The purpose of this MOA is to 
documetrt approval of and terms and conditions for, the short- 
term professional development detaS of spetified employees, 
CAO/IG Liaison, Finance S Budget Drvtsion, S&T, to Me OCFO, 
Departmental Goverrmient McountabHitv l^^(6AO)-OfAce of 
Inspector Genera! (OIG) Liaison Office. 

Office of Chief financial Officer 



Intra-Oepartmcntal 

Personnel exchange v^ MOU: To address the rel^nships 
between operational {i.e. daily) control and administrative and 
management controlrequlringprompt. accurate, and Miliful 
coordination between the S6T and PLCY ona daily basU. 

Office of Policy, Office of Resilience 
Poiiey 



)ntra-Dcpartmcntal 

Personnel exchange via SOW; The USCG, Operattons Component 
Liaison performs the tasks described in the SOW, Induding; 
Systems analysis, operational context baseline, requirements 
collection and development, transtlon acthrities and Research & 
Development Test & Evaluation policies and processes. 
Component outreach and relationship development 

USCoBStCuard 


Intar-Afincy 

Personnel exchange via MOU; To assist the National Virtual 
Translation Center as a business consultant to inform decision- 
making to Strengthen the NVTC business posture as a fee for 
serwceoreanlsatTon 

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 


Intsr-Agancy 

Personnel exchange via MOU: To foster collaboration for the 
purpose of promoting common interests and priorities and to 
provide expertise in formulating international policy on science, 
technology, and innovation end promoting intematlonalscience 
and technoloav coaoeration. 

The Department of State; 


Bureau of Oceeits, and mternttional 
Environmental and Seientlllc Affairs 


Inter-ABancy 

MOU to fonrsalire the relationship between the United States 
Military Academy’s Network Science Center and OHS S&T. The 
USMANSCandDHS S&T agree to providea professional 
development, mentoring, analytic and systems engineering work 
experience where cadets and faculty rttentbers have exposure to 
the S&T rnission during their scheduled break from academic 
studv. 

The United States Military Academy; 
Network Science 


Intar^Agancy 

Personnel exchange via MOU: To facilitate the smooth and 
orderly transfer of federal detaifee health care program 
responsibilities currently exercised by the HHS Health Resources 
and Services Administration (HRSA) through the Division of 
Immigration Health Services (OIHS). The MOU establishes 
procedures governing the detail of Commissioned Corps Officers 
oftheU.5. Public Heelth Service (corps), Oepartment or Health 
and Human Services (HHS) to the Department of Homefand 
Security (OHS) for an irsdefinite term of service. 

U.S. Daparlmertt of Health and 

Human Services; U.S. Public Health 




lnt«r>>^ncy 

Personnei exchange via MOU; To serve as a Special Assistartt lor 
PubHc Affairs in the Commemoratiorts Otvtsion at NHHC to 
support as needed and perform activities as directed by that 
office. Oetaiiees wiil leverage their extensive OHS Headquarters- 
level public affairs expertise to assist the operations of the NHHC 
Commemorations Oivtsiort as it departs for major public 
relations events in the near future to include the Navy's 
Commemoration of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. 

The Department of the Navy; Naval 
Hfstery and Heritage 



RDP INPUT 



Jntra-Aaencv 

MOU between DNDO AND S&T Regarding Cowdination of 
Applications for Consideration asaQuaflfied AnG-Terrorism 
Technology under the Support Anti-Terrorism by Posterity 
Effective Technologies (SAFETY) Act of 2002. The MOU 
drmalites procedures for incorporatrngieviews try DNOO into 
the evaluation process forappItc^nsforcerWnlechnofagies 
subrmtted to DNS fixconsideration as a Outvied Anti-Tetrarlsm 
lechnoloRV under the SAFETY Act. 

ONOO 




371 



Memofandum of Agreement between DIB SST and DHS ORIce 
of tntefnationai Affairs to set fcxth tta rasponsibKties of a 
reimbursable agreement regarding costs associated with a 

shared Program Analyst position suj^rdngboth the DHS OHSOffkeof International Affairs 
Attache and S&T Attache at the US Embassy tondw. (OiA) 


MOU between S&T and the US. Coast Guard (USOG) fw- 
cooperation in utilization and engagement with the DHS Centers 
of Excellence. S&T partners with USCG to Meftttfy kmg term 
complex issues that universities can address, evaluate urawerdly 
proposals, develop transition strategies, hostfecidtyand 
students and provide advice attd feedback to SBT and the C0& 
-- research priorities and progress 


MOU between S&T and the U.S. Semt Servia {U^)f6r 
cooperation In utilization amt engagement with the DHS Centers 
of Excellettce. S&T partrters with USSS to ideritify long term 
complex Issues that unryer»tles can address, evakrate university 
proposals, develop trattsiiion strategies, host faculty and 
students end provide advice and feedback to S&T and the COEs 
on research priorities and i 



MOU on guidelines lor f^oviding contractile and procurement 
services in support of design, construction and contact ciose-oiit 
work for NBAF, TSL, and PtAOC consitucilon projects. 




lA for “Ughlhouse" Collection and Methodological Support to 
Salinas, CA Police Department focusing on enhancing the 
methodological undersUrxlirtg and application of social network, 

geospatial and temporalarMlysittocollectors andanalystsof ,, ... j . , 

US Navy- Naval Postgraduate School 

histone and newly collected “lighthouse data. 


tA for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience and 
Communications CapabliHies (DR3C2): leveraging Hastily Formed 
Networks (HFN) for First Responders to exchange knowledge; 
and provide intense hands-on equipment interoperability 
training using equipment from prior funded prefect. 

US Navy • Naval Postgraduate School 

(NPS] 

lA for "Emergency Operations Center in a &ox for First 

Responders" to furthercenneprior funded profect for the City of US Navy -Naval Postgraduate School 
Monterey (CA) first responder communit 


MOU between OoOand DHSfor theeslabnshmentand 
continuation of the CSAC at Abeideen Proving Ground, including 
joint efforts, matrlxingof personnel, and joint access to 
Information generated by either agency related to chemical 

defense Department of Defense (ASD-NCfi) 


inaaM 










372 


The Centers for Disease Contra! and Prevention {COQ, Office of 
Enirfronmenta! Microbioiogv . DB«k»i of Foodtnrne, 

Waterborne, and Environmentai Oi»ase$, National 
Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases leverage its pre- 

existing sources and collections of rkin- and ^rtn-rebtad 
materials to develop bioiogicaitoxinv^idationpanels, 
hereinaft« referred to as the BTVPs. aich that it fndudes the 

plant-derived materials necessary to alltnw nMation of DHS- i^nters for Disease Control and 
developed immuno- and nucleic acid ami^KaflWi assays. Preventlor' (CDCI 



The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Uborstory 
Response Network will be responsible for providing support to 
Phase 2 on the project. Phase 2 executes ti)e Interagency 
response to a contamination scenario at Idaho National 
Laboratory. Other agencies involved wll irrdude; FBI fotetisic 
sarrrpling. CQC public health response and sampling, EPA 
environmental remediation and response, and OHS interagency 
coordination per the National Response Framework. The 
scenario was designed froma public health and law enforcement 
perspective from initial notihcation through environmental 

remediation. Phase 2 Is a demonstration and a validation Centers for Disease Control and 

■" constraints. Prevention (COC) 





373 


Inter-Acencv 

The Workgroup requires the subject matter expertise of a 
medical toxicologist to provide to ^ Group's idnitiflEafoB 

of decontamination metrics, curr«tt and defident eapabnte, 

liquids, soap/water, and operatiorsal processes iimriving ail 
three. Specifically, the subject irtaner expert wS provide atput 
ort the workgroup's "matrices* wltitdi ate annotated ^erature 
reviews (biUiographiEi) on irMlividual deconlandnation themes 
which are forwarded to the Workgroup membets to s^cit 
comments. The Workgroup's coUeclion of matrices, fterature, 
and commerrts, and meeting minutes wHI inform the 

Workgroup's fir^l recommendations to the Target f^pabinties 
WorkincGroup. 

Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention ICOCl 


iRter-Aeencv 

Within theSurveillance and Detection— Research A 

Development Program, the "IdentiRcation Ola Ba^hisLysin 
gene and characterization of the Lysn protein: A new reagent fo' 
Bacillus anthracis assays" effort supports this goal tivmtgh wdtole 
genome sequence analysis to discover a BadHus Lytin gene |or 
genes) that can be utHizedasa reagentin molenjkarMiidiesthat 
require the quantitative lysis of Bad.itusanthrads. CanrUdate 
genes shall be cloned into expressitm vectors, and the expressed 
lysin proteins shall be characterized for levels of actirity and 
protein stability. Expres»an of the cloned lysbi gene(s) shall be 
optimized, and compadson of at least three lots of purified 
orotein shall be evaluated for qualllv assurance. 

Centers for Disease Control and 
prevention (CDC) 


Inter- Acencv 

The primary goal for engagement wtth IQ.Tls thesiKcessfui 
transfer of emerging commercial te^nologysolufuns to solve 
strategic intelligence and other related homeland seairlty 
enterprise (HSE) problems. These technology solutions will assist 
5&T in achieving its charged mis^on of establishing priorities for, 
directing, funding, and corrduct'mg national research, 
development, test and evafoatioft.and procurement of 
technology and systems for: prevm^ting the Importation of 
chemical, biological, radiological, rtuclear, and related weapons 
and material; and detecting, preventing, protecting against, and 
responding to terrorist atta^; coordlnatingand integrating all 
research, development, demonstration, testing and evaluation 
activities of the Oepaiimenti and coordinating with other 
appropriate executive agencies In deveiapH^ and carrying out 
(he science and technology agenda of the Department to reduce 
duplication and Idantlly urtmet iveeds. IQT will research and 
invest In companies that have cvttlng-edge Innovative 
technologies that may provide sohttiens to capability gaps aaoss 
the HSErn areas Including but not limited to; chemical, bialogtcal. 
radiological, niKlearandexpfosivedetection and 
countermeasures; cyber security; information sharing; and 
border security, While IQT provides agencies with a broad range 
of activities tosupport this goal, IQT is not a quick-reaction 
procurement or logistics vehicle, nor will any federal agency seek 
to emolov (QT as a means 

Central fntellitence Aeenev ICfAl 


lnier-A«ency 

As a stakeholder agency S&T 1$ continuing to fund the IQT 
investment vehicle through the OA to develop atKi deliver' 
advancedtechnologrestoOHScomponerrts. These techirologies 
Include: chemical, biological, explosive and radiological detectior) 

HHH 


Inlef-ARenev 


Department of Interior 


(nter-A(sencv 

tadio commun>cati«)$ operabil^ and Interoperability cannot be 
simply implemented by fork jiTtinga solution or technotogy into 
place. The solutions roust meet the user leciuitementsand hve 
up tn expectations and specifications claimed bymamifacturers. 
n order to ensure that the equipment meets those specifications 
7HS proposes the t an outside review be conducted to verify and 
validate the receiver and transmitter specifications of por taUe 
and mobile land mobile radio equipment identified as meeting 
he mission requirements of theusercomrrumitv. 

Department of interior 


tnter-Aaenev 

Add new organizationsitrio the S&Tinslaoceof fedtraveter.cten 

Jepartmenl of Interior 









374 


The Department of Interior (DOtyNstimal Balnea Carter {NBQ 
will perform the tasb descrtbed ta this SOW toadmnisler 
previously awarded Phase III (^ittact awards to Toym Researrti 
Corp {D12PC20030) and perform Cwttract Management trt the 
aforementioned awards, as required per Federal Acqra^tion 
Regulation (FAR) 42.000. This contacting efbrtwith the 
Ospartment of Interior/Nationai Business tenter will support the 
SBIR Program with the following ob^ctives: sHimilating 
technoii^ica! innovation; strengthening the role of sm^ 
business in meeting research and development needs; fostering 
and encouraging participation by socially and economitaliy 
disadvant^ed small business concerns m tectmok^kal 
innovation: and increasing the commercial appBcahon of R&D 
ported research or R&D resrdts- 0 


The Department of Interior (DOiyNatfonal Business Center {N8C) 
will perform the tasks described in this SOW to eteoite one new 
Phase III contract toToyon Research Cmporation, and perform 
Contract Management of the aforementioned award, as required 
per Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 42.000. This contracting 
effort with the Department of Interior/Mation^ Business Center 
will support the S8IR Program with the foibwing objectives: 
stimulating technologicai Innovation: strengdiening the role of 
small business in meeting research and devebpment needs; 
fostering and encouraging participation by sociaby and 
economically disadvaritaged smab business cmcerrss in 
technological Innovation; and increasing the commemial 
_ application of R&O supported researchof R&D resuiis. Departmerst of interior 


This new lAA is being created to fund Phase il crta project under ; 
SBIR S 1-004 “low Cost Underwater Threat Detection Systems* . 
as follows: 1. Project: FarSounder “low Cost BOSoirar System for, 
Underwater Threat Oetectlwi* - DOI/NBC Contract 
M8CHC060087 - Action: Provide additional funding to support in- 
scope change to FarSounder testing to irtclude use of multiple 
targets and to extend ta^t tracks. This change will produce a 
more comprehensive and viable test environment irt which to 



DHSS8IR Program Include Stimulating technological Innovation, 
sttengtherrmg the role of small business in meeting research artd 
devtlopmertt needs, fostering and encouraging participation by 
socblfy and economically disadvantaged small business concerns 

in technolr^icai innovation, and ittcreasing the commercial Department of Interior ■ National 
licadon of RSO supported research or R&O results. Susincss Center (NBCI 











The Symposium provides a forum for detailed presenbtiotis and 
discussion of lopieal firefighter health and safety issues, 


|DHS - federal Emergency 
i wanagement Agency (f EMA) 


jlhe purpose of the MODIFICATION is to exercise Option Period 1 
for FYll for NBACC, NBAF, & PIADCSalafies & Expentes- 


DHS - Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Center (FLETC) 


jlhe purpose of this modlflcdtlon Is for Infrastructure Investment 
Plan (IIP) components including pre-design planning, design, new 
Iconstfuctlon, renovation and expansion, commissioning and 
oversight of infrastructure within theTSl campus at the Witfiam 
Hughes FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, New lersey. The 
ipian's components wit enable TSL to safety meet the TSL mission | 
by providing the proper storage for required ntaletials, and 
jconstruetion of proper taboratory and support facilities to meet 
expartding mission requirements. The ejdsting facHIlles 
jconsist of 70,000 SF of facilities and 2,600 lbs of explosive 
storage. The proposed new IIP construction consists of 95,000 SF 
w facilities end 15,300 ibs of explosive storage. The final 
jcampus will consist of a total of 165,000 SF of total facilities 
which will include; 50,000 SF office space. 93.000 SF lab space, 
22,000 5F of storage space and 16.500 lbs of explosive storage. 


|0HS - Federal law Enforcement 
TralnlngCettter (FIETC) 


[N6AF design fees lnFY2011. 


I OHS • federal lew Enforcement 
[ Training Center (FLETC) 


[Design a next-genaration biological and agricultural defense 
|facii>ty to replace the important but aging fKility at Plum Island, 
[New Vork (PIAOC). The National Oio and Agro Defense Facility 
[(N8AF) is envisioned to provide the nation with the Orst 
[integrated agricultural, zoonotic disease, and public health 
[research, development, testing, and evaluation facility with the 
^capability to addrass threats from human pathogens, high- 

I consequence zoonotic disease agents, and foreign animal 
diseases. The Department of Homeland Security ("OHS'’! Federal | 
Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) wrill perform the 
oversight tasks related to the protect management for the NSAF. 
These funds were appropriated in the Continuing Ap^priations 
Act for Fiscal Year 2011 and expllcitlydesignatedtobeusedfor 
construction of the N&AF central utHity plant. flETCwill 
provide program marsagement, support, and services (o the 
Office of National Laboratories (ONL), S&T to prepare the NBAF 
land. The gift funds will be used for the sole purpose of site 
preparation and shall not be used to construct the laboratory 
facility. In this role, FlfTCwHI be responsible for oversight aitd 
disbursement of (he funds requesled- 


DHS - Federal Law Enforcement 
[Training Center (FLETC) 


Infrastructure Investrrrent Plan (IIP) components including pre- 
design {Hanning, design, new construction, renovation and 
expansion, commissioning and oversight of infrastructure within 
the TSL campus at the William J. Hughes FAA Technical Center in 
Atlantic Cily, New lersey. The plan'scomponentswUt enable TSl 
to safely meet the TSlmissionby providing the proper storage 
for required materials, aiid construction improper Mioratory andj 
support facilities to meet the expanthnguvssion requirements. 
The existing facilities consist of 70,000 5F nf fanMiesand 2.600 
lbs of explosive storage. The proposed new UP constru^'on 
consists of 95,000 SF of new facilities and 13,900 His of explosive 
storage. The final campus >riil consist of a total of US,00Q SF of 
total ^ciilties which wUI include: SOtOOOSf office since, 93,000 
ISF lab space, 22,000 SF of storage space and 16,500 lbs of 
[explosive storage. 


lOHS- Federal law Enforcement 
[Training Center (FLETC) 




376 



This contract wi!! be executed in three phases fmwdbtg | 

independent devetopmenta) fleld testing and evaluation of 
ARFCAM and LAOS chemkral detectors, and ttuality assurance 
support far the DHS developmental testify of ARFCAM and LADS 
chemical detector. 

Sattelie Is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment of the 
bioterrorlsm using the Sioterorrism Risk Asse»m«it (8TBA) OoO - Defense Technical information 
modet. Center (DTIC) 

CBRNiAC shall provide personnel with experience leading field 

assessments with explosives detection canine teams to work on OoO - Defense Te^nicsl information 
thistasV. Center (DTIC) 


Personnel provided bv Sattelie Memorial Institute will have the 
skills and technical background necessary to successfuKy 
complete the tasks descrUsed In this SOW. itrcluding but not 
limited to the loliowlng; • Experience conducting Homeland 
Security-focused WMD risk ai>alysVs. • Extensive experience 
corrduciing risk assessments for Nuclear Power Plants. • Subject 

matter expertise related to consequences and risks from nuclear DoD • Defense Technical Information 

weapon detonalions. Center (DTIC) 

The OTIC-IAC Program Office will facilitate the coordination of 
addressing the standardltatlon and lack of operability, 

compatibility, and interoperability of equipment, such as I 

personal protective equ^ment, for the emergency respoiue OoD • Defense Technical Information I 
community. Center (DTIC) 


The objective of this task is to develop test protocols which can ! 
be used to verify the performance of commerciaHy available I 
chemical detection equipment for use bv first responders. I 


The objectives of this task are to develop e methodology and 
framework for integrating agroterrorism risk Into the C6RN risk 
assessment, to provide risk analysis support to the ICtN, and to 
and establish a path forward lor future AgTRAs. 


• Defense Technical Information 










377 


The SioResponse Operational Testing and Evaluatun eflort s 
intended test inter-agency {OHS, ERA, FBI and rMpoAse, 
sampling, ktentification, decontaminalion, and remediation 
procedures fora simulated biob^eal (anttirax)ittddent, which Is 
broken into two phases. 


jOoO - Defense Threat Reduction 
(i^ncy (DTRft) 


|The specific effort addressed is part of the WUe Area ReaMry 
Resiliency Program {WARRP) within the Chemical and 
Biological Research and Development Branch, Systems 
Approaches for Restoration project. lhe(^t)ecth«oftiieWMRP| 
effort is to provide plans, procedures, artdcapabiHlies to restore 
large urban areas with co-located mifitaryfedlMsb>(^>erational| 
status following the wridespread release of a dteridai. Mok^ical, 
radiological warfare ^ent (CBR). 


IDoO - Defense Threat Reduction 
|Agency{OTRA) 


Inter-Agency 


jinter-Agency 


Technical Support Working Group Exptosive EquIvalencvTool 
Chemical Attribution Signatures Study: Surface SampRng and 

Discovery of Chemical MtrUiutionS^rtalures from Homentade 

Nerve and Vesicant Agents conducted by Pacific Northwest 

National laboratory. 


1 0OD - Technrcai Support Working 

Group {TSWG} 


loot 


jinter-Agency 


The purpose of this Department of Hom^nd S«ur!ty 
Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy to 
provide funding to Y-12 National Security Congtiex in order to 
perform a Design BasisThreat(DBT) project for the National 
Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasure Center. The analysis 
will methodically review trvaterlals to verify informatlonon local, 
regional, and national threats such as historical infonnabon, 
credibility of threat group, types of threats made, and how local 
threat groups are defined. The analysts wBI explore and 
Interview several poterttlal agettcies and resources to establish 
local threa({s) specific to NBACC. Based on the most up-to-date 
information made available, a threat wMI he developed. i 


[doe 


Inter-Agency 


Inter-Agency 


This effort will focus on the developmeot of sampling, extraction, 
and analysis methods and dwumented procedures for the 
Iderttification of Russian VX and its chemical attribution 
signatures in several food matrices using Solid Phase Extraaion 
(SPEj. We will datermine if these chemical signatures persist in 
various food matrices, end how to best sample and analyte the 
signatures from such matrices. To do so, Russian VX syrtthesized 
using several different methods will be studied. After analysis 
and Identification of the chemical attribution signatures in each 
method, food samples will be spiked with Russian VX to study 
the Interaction of the signatures with the food matrix. The i 
matrices selected for this study are hot dogs and llguid eggs, arsd ' 
were selected after conversatiorw with the US FOA, USOA, and | 


The OKS Science and Tecftnofogy sponsored Searchebfe Toners 
and Pfirtllng Inks UbratyfSTPII.) project for forensic identification 
and linking of printed fraudulent documents will seek to create a 
searchable library for toners, inkjet ink and printing (impact and 
non-impact) ink in four, year-long increments of research and 
development. 


pOE - Ames laboratory 


Inter-Agency 


Ilntef-Agency 


llnter-^ency 


The work detailed in this proposal builds on this effort by 
focusing on (1) transport of these materials to the exterior 
rnviranmcnt.s as vrell as (2) meaiurement of deposKirm and 
resusptnsion of particulate mate riels in interior and exterior 
environments. Such data will allow (a) DHSdelectkm 
development performers to directly assess biodetector efTicacy 
and design tradeoffs, (b) be Instrument^ Hi subway transport 
and dispersion model validation, (c) allow assessment of urban 
dispertlon models, and (d) prmridecrlticallv needed data on 

depuiition and resuspension of partkulate materials. 

Maintain the PBF-632 at a readiness level for use by OKSScience 
arui Technology Chemical and Biobgicaf mbNon exercises at its 
convenience. This includes use by other agencies and 
organizations that compliment the DHS imssion. Provide some 
modilications or activities to the facility that resuh from pri<M: 
project experience that enhance the operaUonsof the foctUty 
during exercises. 

Refine the design of prototype Ffold Vacuum Extractor to make it 
more amenable for commerciafizaiion and provide Investigators 
with a simple, robust instrument. 


OOC - Argonne National Latwratory 
(ANt) 


loOE ■ Idaho National taboratocy (INI) 


(OQE ■ Idaho National taboratory (INI) 






378 


The purpose of the RecX Program is to bwtd and test imiotypes 
(designated Phase land Phase D) of a new t|tpe of emergency 
i^are extreme high voltage (EHVJ netwcwit transformer to 
energize at U.S. eiectric god substations dislng ^ recovery time 
period after high voltage transformer outages (tee to eqiripmerit 
failure, weather, earthquake, etc. The first prototype 
transformer. Phase I, will be based on oirrent state of the art 
tectmologies and will include a demonstratton on the grid at a 
live substation. Thesecond prototype transfonner. Phase H.wiil 
be significantly sm^ler, lighter, arsd easier toiiepioythanthe 
transformer in Phase 1. Specifications for the Phase H prototype 
will be developed during the technology survey in ooorcfinatkin 
with Uie Government and file eiectrical Industry. 


1.9NL and ANi. propose to carry out gas and partfete teacer 
release experiments to support stucfies of subway btedetector 
architectures. The experiments will buifd on the recteitly 
completed subway tracer tests Ir) Washh^ton DC and Boston by 
focusing now on the transport of material from asubway system 
to the outdoors, and the st^equent above grxHind cfispersHm of 
that material. 


[doe - Idaho National Laboratory (If 







379 


The threat of terrorist or afminal tse of cheimcat irarAre nerve 
agents, such as the €-agen ts and the VX agertts is of great 
concern in the United States. These Mgh prtortty CWAs can be 
produced From various synthetic pathway The abWty to 
attribute CWAs production to a partto^r s^Mieds padnaay or 
source can greatly assist iasyenforcenwit TheiMirposeofthis 
project is to determine if there are synthetics«naliires that may 
be usedtospetaficalty identify the production pathways. The 
objective is to document the Cerent routes s>d 

chemical attribution signatures fCAS) linked between ttc agents 
and their synthetic routes. Previous research with siK different 
pathways for VXard two d'lffnent pathways ibrthe G-agents 
(CB, GD, and Gt=) have identified unique tignaturesfor some of 

the routes and found that combination of mm-uniquesgrtetures 0O€ - Uwrence Livermore Nationaf 
were valuable at dlstlnguishira the different synthetic routes. lab (ilNlI _ 

National Explosives Engineering Sciences Security (NEXESS) 

Center 'Home Made Explosives Iniepated CharacteriiatiM DOE- Los Alamos National Laboratory 
Project {LAND _ 


The Basic Research Program activities conducted at LAW, LLNL 
and SNL will Include small sc^e safety characterization of 
explosives and explosive mixtures con»dered HME's as priorities 
byTSA, as well as conventiortalexi^osives to set a standard for 
HME safety testing and reporting. The rrtechanism bywdtidi tNs 
support is to be implemented is In a ProrKteitcy Test format that 

allows for the stardariflzation and baseKne characterization of DOE ■ Los Alamos National Lsboratory 
each participant's methodology tor the safely testing protocols. (LANL) 


The basic scientific goal of this work is to establish the limits of 
'detonabliity" (ability to initiate and propagate a detonation) of 

an explosive material in mixtures with Inerts and/or fuels for DOE • Los Alamos National Laboratory 
several explosive mixturesofirrterest. (LAND 


The purpose of this action is to fund LANL for Phase Hof the Post DOE -Los Alamos National Laboratory 
[Blast Evaluation effort |(LANLl | 


The pumose of this Department of Homeland Security 
Interagency Agreement Los Alamos National laboratory is to 
provide funding for the National Explosives Engineering Sciences 

Security (NEXESS) Center Home Made Explosives DOE ■ Los Alamos National Laboratory 

Characteritslion Project (LANL) 






Scholarihlpand FeltowsWp Pro, 


Th« increased funding wUI enable Ihe Office of Ur»verslty 
Proirams' to fulfiB Its mandate to convene researchers, 
educators and end users to ensure efficient allocation of federal 
research and education support. 


IThe purpose of this request is to prosdtfe funding for theTSI. 
Research Participation P' 


The purpose oftMs requisition is tofund a TBO performer in the 
amount of $2,HOS,000 for the first year of funding in a five year 
period of performance from (he award date. The purpose of this 
program is to develop, implement, and maintain a scholarshipfs}, 
f«tlowshtp(s{, intetnshipfst and visiting schoiatship program for 
the Oepartment of Homeland Security (OHS) Science and 
Technology Directorate (SAT). Theobiective of the program is to 
support individuals Interested in studying science, technology. 

engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and applying their OOE • Oak Ridge institute of Science 

Intellectual knowledge to the mission of Ihe OHS. and Educatiort (ORISE) 










38 ] 


Tlie purpose of this Department of Hom^and Seoirity 
Interagency r^reement with Sandia National Lab bto proride 
funding to Samlia National Lab in ord^ to perform Mobile 
Biometric Device NVIAP CertifiedTesIfng Support . Under the 
interagency Agreement, the Sandta NaHor^ Lab perform the 

following services; SNL will conduct soBcitatkins to indepMtdent 
laboratories accredited by (or pending acaEdiathin)the NIST 
NVIAP Biometric Laboratory AccredHation Ingram in order to 
review product certiricatlon test re»iRs artd r^ort them to DHS 
S&T HPO. All warL shall be done In aeemdance with the detailed 
_ Statement of WorK attached to this agreement 

Project will create estabnshed methods for protein atMl 
metabolite analysis for bacterial klentificadon.in addition, die 
stability of these markers over a range of storage ccmdltions as 
well as the robustness to different growth condiUotis/phases and 
selectivity to distinguish between near neighbors wMl be 
documented. 


A. The primary objective oi this project is to assist the Standards 
Oliice with the identification, review end dev^opment of 
Incident Management (IM) standards. !M standards in the areas 
of medical response preparedness, incident preparedness, 

incident management, training for first responders, and response OOE • Pacific Northwest National 
‘ recovery from all hatards/WMO events. Laboratory iPNNL) 


Chemical Attribution Signatures Study: The Evaluation of Various 

Chempmetric Methods for Checnicat Forensic Applications OOE - Pacific Northwest National 
Conducted by Pacific Northwest National laboratory. Laboratory (PNNI) 


Communications mteroperabmtv isa difncult and evolving topic, 
greatly Influenced by the rapid change of technology and the 
continual need for integration with fegacysysteiru. Challenges In 
eoulpmcnt, voice, and data Interoperabiliiv. as wellao 
governance, access rights, andsecuiltyare vital issues to 
effective public safety. Tise volume of data that is collected, 
distributed and anatyted in multiple forms, adds to the dynamic 
nature of this problem. The U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security (OKS) Science andTechnotogy Directorate (S&T) is 
holding the second in a series of workshops to define the 
opportunities, challenges, and research issues for neet- 
generstion communications Interoperabilltv (NGCI) in public 
safety. This workshop will engage end user community 
representativei, induslry and academic expects, and government 

leaders to define challenges, oppoituNtfes. arvda roadmap for DOE - Pacinc Northwest National 


ExplOSivfS Research and Development Roatfrnaplor VBIED 




Fiscal Tear 2011 Follow-On Slatement Of Work for theDHS 
Chemical Forensics Program Portion of the Chemical Forensics 
and Attribution Collaboration on Rtdnond Related Toxins - U.B. 
Sweden Coliaboraiion • Tecfmicai Annex IKKM-2008-003 to be 
conducted by Pacilic Northwest Maijoi»l laboratory (PNNI) in 
of the OHS Chemical Forensics Prr^ram (Chem 








382 


!n 2004, OHS S&T chartered the IVational VimafaaUon and 
Anaiytics Center'^ {NVAC™)at PadFic Monbwest Natton^ 

Laboratory (PNNL) to define a toDg-tenn meard) ml 
development {RA 0) agenda for vhud analyses. This agenda is 
designed to address the most pressing needs m RBD to facSitate 
advanced analytical insight through innovative techniques and 
technologies that also support the DlCopeiattan^ components 
and methcKiotc^y. NVAC has the goal id heating to countn- 
current and future terrorist attadrs in the UJ. and apund the 
globe and to prepare for and respwtd to ad manner of nature or 
martmade disasters through deployment of us» dnven 
technology. The S&T Directorate has established the 
Visualization and Analytics enterprise (VAE) through NVAC, 
university Centers of Excellerrce (COEsi, and intema^na! 
partnerships as well asa broader Visuai Anafytfcs Community 
(VAC) with government, industrial, and academic partnm from 
around the world. These institutions serve as a means to assert 
national and internationai leadership in thesdence of visual 
analytics, which can help prevent terrorist attacisvinthm the 
U.S., reduce America's vulnerability to terrorism, and ndntmize 

damage and support recovery in the event of attadsor natural DOE - Pacihe Northwest National 
disasters. Laboratory fPNNL) 


In fY2011 PNNI shall execute a research and dev^pment 
program that will lead to deployable prototypes of PIE 
capabilities in 2011. while continuing to refine the long-term 
vrsion for PIE. In additioru PNNL shall coitdnua stakeholder 
engagement and comnMit>ity-buydi>^ activities anoss the 
research enterprise. The PIE program w^ cwalst of five program 
areas: three P&O program areas wiil focus on technical advances 
[precision informattorr ddhrery, interactive iirterfaees, and model 
integration atrd dedsion support) and two program areas will 

focus on outreach and leadership (stakeh^er engagement and DOE - Pacific Northwest National 
research community coordination) Laboratory jPNNLl 


In Phase I PNNL wiii develop} the proof of concept, and In Phase 
I!, PNNL will develop the prototype. The FYH funding cycle wifi 
incremeniaily fund this actWitv to enable PNNL to accomplish 

Phase I of the effort. Phase II vMI be funded using out-year DOE • Padfic Northwest National 







383 



The primary focuses of the effort described in tWs SOW wHI be 
for DOE to review current and proposed DHSand U.S. 

Government capabilities advancing abilities associated witha 
variety of BMD initiatives, and to recommend to OHS a portfotio 
of S&T investmertts to develop and mature selected capabilities 
into production and operaliorts. A portion of this wort will 
include overseeing the OHS S&T portfolio against this threat and 
providing recommendation on source selection, funding, 
tasking, status review aivd rechitology assessments of OHS 
partt>er$. Additional wwk will IrKiude the development of 
prototypes and enabling techn^ogfes as well as providing OHS 

with assistance in transitioning selected technologies into DOE - Peciflc Northwest National 
■reduction. Laboratory (PNNL) 


The project will contirtue Phase 11 plug development. A full-scale 

tunnel plug made of asingie layer of Veciran fabric was DOE - Pacific Northwest Natiorta! 

manufactured and subjected to pressurited testing laboratory (PNNI) 









384 


lnter-A*encv 

Ultrasonic, Non-lnvaslve Detaction of Anomalous items in Sealee 
Contalnefs. 

DOE - Pacific Northwest National 
Laboratorv (PNNLI 


Inter-ARencv 

Under this scope of work, PNML sM si^pwt coAaboratlons 
between the PNNL researchers and the emR^ngOrf^ 

(DEfsnse Technology Experimental Research TRtbed} 
community (information Sciences iKtitute 09), 9il Internabwial 
(SRI), Trustworthy Cyber infrastructurefer the Power Grid 
(TDPGI collaborators). 



Inter-Agencv 

Under this scope of work, PNNL wXI develop, integrate, and 
desiov computer network traffk: analvris tertinoICKy at US-CERT 

DOE - Pacific Northwest National 
Laboratorv fPNNL) 


tnter-Agencv 

Visiiat Aitalvtics Intemationat Cottabwation 

DOE - Pacific Northwest National 
Laboratorv (PNNL) 


inter-Aeencv 




Inter-Aeencv 


DOE - Sandia National Laboratories 
(SNL) 


Inter-Asencv 

DHS S&T will fund Sandta Mational Laboratories (SNL) toiH^ovtde 
systems engineering, technlcat support, administrative support, 
end test & evaluation support (o the DHSS&t Cargo Ssoirity 
Program. 

DOE - Sandia Natiorial Laboratories 
(SNL) 


tnter-AEencv 

DOE/SNL wilt perform the (oltowing tasks descrflied in Uiis 
Statement of Work (SOW) and as directed by DHS S&T: Systems 
Engineering. Test Planning, Test ft Evaluation, Sui^ly Chain 
CONOPS development, and suppiHt uhth pilot hardware 
instailaiion and test. During the actual pilot portion of the 
program DOE/SM will mamttfn the Data Serwr, monitor the 
siloi. and assist In final documentation. 

DOE ' Sandia National laboratories 

(SNU 


Inter-Awncv 

In consultation with HFO representatives. SNL will identify and 
organiie a group of public safety/flrst responder practitioners to 
include representatives from federal. State, local and tribal 
governments and select techn^l SME to provide expert advice 
to Hf 0 on the direction and content of basic and advanced 
technoiogy biometrics and credentialing research and 
develooment oroiects. 

DOE -Sandia National Laboratories 
(SNL) 


iAte^ABcncv 

In consultation with HPD representatives, SNLwiI! identify and 
organite a group of public safety/flrst responder practitioners to 
include representatives from federal. State, local and tribal 
governmenis and select lechnicel SME to provide expert advice 

CO HFO on the direction andconterst of basic and advanced 
technology biometrics and credentialing research and 
development proiects. The principal purpose of this group will 
be to provide feedback and recotrunendations to HFO personnel 
to help ensure linkage of the direction of technology research 
and development efforts with the future public safely/first 
tesponder operational environment, diomelrics atvd 

Credentiallna Technical Workine Group Workshops. 

DOE - Sandia National Laboratories 
(SNL) 


lnter>ABencv 

National Explosives Engineering Security (NEXESS) Center Home 
Made Exoiosivet Otaracteriration 

OOE - Sandia National laboratories 
(SNIJ 


iftter-ARencv 

Reject Newton will develop the scientiRc baius (or TSA explosive 
detection technology certiFicatran requirements through 
explosive equivalence assessment, explosive blast load 
determinations, and structural response of ahcruft to onboard 
terrorist explosive blast using computational tools suppotted 
with experimental measuremertts. 

■ 


Inter-Asencv 


X)E - Sandia National laboratories 
(SNL) 


Inter-Agencv 

The desired outcome of SAWG task 3 is to instantiate a decHtort 
framework and to demonstrate its operaUlity. This manifests as 

3 teol-kli that enables TSA analysts to work within the decision 
ramework. Tools and capabilities existing at the riatlonal 
aboratories and atTSA wiUbeconRgured, programmed, and 
ntegrated such that the enterpisecan bevisualited. and the 
analytical results delivered, >n easilv interpreiahle form. 

X}£ - Sandia National Laboratories 

SNL) 








385 


Inter-Afiencv 

The DHS Directorate ot Science and TedinalogvtS&T) is tasked 
with researching and organiiing the sdentifkv englneerii^ and 
technological resources of the United States wd feveraglng these 
existing resources into technological Cotrfs to help protect tte 
homeland. The ChemIcalCountermeasuresThnistArea 
supped this effort through the Chemical Analy^ Pragranv and 
specifically, the Chemical Security Anafyss Center Project. The 
Department of Homeland Security (DKS) has esiaMshed the 
Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAQ (d assess, identify 
vulnerabiilties, arrd respond to potential diemica) threats to the 
homeland. The CSAC primary goafs ate to provide a robust 
knowledge repository of therrAuil threat infafinatlon, protMe a 
science based threat analysis, and provide a robust technical 
based reachback capability. 

DOE - Sandia National laboratories 
(aUL) 


Inter-Agencv 

The OHS, Sclerrce and Technology (S&T} CKrectorate, requests 
that Sandra National laboratories' Informahon Des^ Assurattce 
Red Team (IDART) perform additioiral red-team assessments for 
DHS funded projects at the direction of the DHSS&Tand to 
facilitate educational and resench activates at the Ngh school 
and collegiate level. 

DOE - Sandia National Laboratories 
(SNll 


Inter-Agencv 

The abjective of the IBRD Prr^ect was to provide plans, 
procedures, and capabilities to restore large iqban areas with co- 
located military facilities to operational status following the 
widespread release of a biological warfare agent (BWA) in that 
area. While the project considered a range of t^otogical warfare 
agents, it was primariiyfocusedontherelsaseofa persistent 
agent such as Bacillus anthiacts spores. 

DOE -Sandia National laboratories 
(SNL) 


Inter-Asency 


DOE - Sandia National laboratories 
(SNL) 


Inter-Aasncv 

This document describes a system study to be carried out by SNl 
as a pertof the joint Department of Defense {OoO}-, Department 
of State (DoS)- and OHS-sponsored Transellantlc Cooperative 
Biological Resiliency Demonstration (TaCBftO). The TaCBRO 
program is focuslngon how the OoOatxf other U.S. agencies will 
collectively respond to a btological event its Western Curepe that 
has the potential to Impact U.S. military basesand U.S. defettse 
assets In Western gucope. This 12-tnonth study will focus on an 
examination of existing and required policies that detail how the 
U.S. Irtteregency may respond to both infectious and non- 
Infectious biological events in an overseas environment. 

30E - Sandia National laboratories 
(SNl) 


Inter-Agency 

Under this Statement of Work (SOW), OHS S&T has tasked Sandia 
National laboratory (SNlj to support the Hybrid Composite 
Container project and all supporting technologies assoctaied with 
the Borders and Maritime Dhrtscon's Cargo Security Program. 

SNL will assist in defining the overall test tequiietnents, test 

3lans and coordination, and conducting the test and evaluation 
of the prototypes andcommeicial equipment at SNl and other 
test facilities as specified. SNl will use its expertise In red team 
aHesament and testing, environmental and operational bench 
testing, operational field testing (including US and foreign ports 
and in commercial trade lanes) and systems engineering as 
directed by OHS S&T and SSC San Diego to meet the DHS Cargo 
Security Program rteeds. Thiswifl be accomplished by drawing 
up the required resources across Sandia 

DOE - Sandia Nationa! Laboratories 

SNl) 


Inter-Agency 

The Department of frtergy (DoC) wHI provide coordirsaiion 
asking in support of researef^ development, integration, and 
demonstration of techniques and appRcalions intended to enable 
acquisition, expfoitatioo, and dondnance Command, Control, 
Communications, Computers, Informalfon, (ntelligence. 
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance {C4t/ISR) systems and 
associated infrastructures. 

H3E - Special Techrxjfgies Laboratory 





386 


Advising on the aspects of inter-modal i 
during non-intrusive inspections (Ml) of msHfnie shipping 
containers at ports' of Entry (POTs) . The Nil POE'S sites «^l 
consist of one seaport, and eioAer at an intematioitai border 
crossing iocadon. Foitowing S&T development the Nit systems 
(mobile SAFECON units) arc Forecasted to be used by Uieted 
States Customs and Border Protection (CBPloffldab in their 
import enforcement and national security dudes. The 
operational evaluation of the systems at the POE’S sail! aswst CSP | 
personnel In determining how to rrtanage Mturtthln the 
respective environments «)d use the ctrflected informahon 
their dudes. 


lDOT-Vo»e Center 


ISurfeceTransportation Program 


I POT-Volpa Center 


[To adequately address the threat of an httroducdon and 
[subsequent outbreak of ^rt-asKt-mouth disease (PMD) or other 
!high-cof>sequence Foreign Animal Diseases (FAD), Improved 
Imethods for depopulation, disposal, and decorttaminatfon ai 
required. 


Environmental Protection Agency 
(£PA) 


jTSI. support services include, but are not flmitedhs. architectural, 
^engirteerlng. design services, conshuction services, fecHities 
:management and planning and telecommunicaHons, 
|environtnental services, occupational safety and health, center 
operations and maintenance, custodial services, $«urity and 
[security guard services, mall service, contract and agreement 
)es, aviation research and grants, photi^raphy, graphic 
[design, exhibit design service, visual instrumentation aitd center 
grouftd transportation. 


[The FDA-CFSAN will participate in rlcin assay validation by: i) 
purchasing or obtainir^g the necessary laboratory equipment and j 
materials to validate assays; 2) receiving training from assay 
developer{sj on how to perform specific assays. 'Hiis training may| 
either be at FDA'CFSAN or at the assay developer's facility; 3} 
obtain necessary materiais (antUrodies, buffers, etc.) from assay 
developerfs) In order to perform validation; 4) perform assay 
valtdatjofl(s) according to predetermined protocol supplied by 
DHS; S) prepare repoft(slon results of validation. 


Under this SOW, FDACFSAN will conduct the evaluation and 
development of cultural methods for the isolation of Brucella 
spp. (speclfjeally S. melitensis and 8. abortus, which are 
especially pathogenic to humans and would be expected to be 
present In raw milk from bovines, sheep or goals) in milk 
products Identified as a high-rkk target for intentional 
' contamination. 


[The purpose of this action it to fully fund Phase II of the Post- 
■Blast Evaluation project with ATF. 


Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) . 
[ Alcohol Tobacco & Firearms (ATF) 


The performer will perform anatysis, modeling, attd tasting to 
verify the capability of the AmberJack* direction-finding antenna 
tosuppflrl the<G prototoi 


[Walk-rn health ellriK: services at PIADC. 


[ federal Occupation Health {FOM) 


Federal Occupational Health Service Center to provide NUSTl the[ 
Ifollowing services; emergenev resportse walk in care, first aid, 
[immuniaations, health care screenings and health awareness 
[programs. 


■ Fedeial Occupation Health (FQH) 


FOH services at PIAOC to maintain a full time Health Olnic. These ' 
services include serum banking, operating the ortsite health care 
providing first aid to empiovees. ghring Immunitations, 
[conducting health care saeenings, presenting health awareness 
iprograms, evaluate worker health through occupational medical 
illance program, maintaining confidential medical records 
[of employees at PIAOC. 


Ferieral Occupation Health (FQH) 


[3. 1. System engineering support shall work with DHS SKT IT 

Security to guide and direct the overall value and effectiveness of[ 

system security. The engineering support function shall provide 

[support to further refine and improve on the solution as 

technology, business neetfs, and the DHS S&T FT infrastructure 

mission evolw. 


[VTC Installation and one year warranty for WBACC. 


FTS20a3 telecommunicaticm services wMch include substantia) 
cost savings through contracts negc^iaterlby Federal rechrtobgy 
Service (fTS) to NUSTl. | 


iCSACVTCsystcm. 







387 


Based on an EPID Strategic Roadmap aid a FSS White Paper 
prepared previously by ISGP staff, the argatvzational vwrfc 
needed to plan and convener ISGP CMiference focused cni 
EPIO/FSS/SShiSuesistobe undertaken. The formAhv this 
conference needs to etnphaslie cridcal debates of wHtten p^cy 
position papers prepared by subiect-maReretperti chosen by 
the ISGP for their credentials and articulatioru The auiience is to 
be international in nature andcon^rised of representatives from 
both the technical and the policy comrauidtiesin the 

participating countries (curr»)tly, the United Slate, ftidy. HHS - Office of the Assistant Secretary 

France, Japan, Germany. Canada, and Shgapiye)- for Preparedness and Response (ASPRj 


institute for Defense Analysis (IDA) 


[institute for Defense Analysis (IPA) 


The InterAgency Board (tAB)forEquipnwntSiafldardUation and 
Interoperability {hereafter referred to as *IAB*} is a votuntary 
collaborative panel of emergency preparedness and response 
practitioners from a wide array of professional discHiBnes, 
representing ait levels of government and the vohiniary sector. 
The lAB provides a strudured forum for the exchange of Ideas 
among operational, technical, and support organlrations, to 
improve national preparedness and promote interoperability and 
compatibility among Federal, state, and local response 
communities. Based on direct field experience, lAB members 
advocate for and assist in the development and Implementation 
of performance criteria standards, test protocols, and technical, 
operating, and training requirements for all-harards incident 
response eouipment, with aspeclal emphasis on Chemical, 
Bloiogical, Radiological, Nudear, and Explosive Issues. The lAB 
also infoltOs broader emergency preparedness and response 
policy, doctrine, and practice. The lAB h a user working group 
supported by voluntary partkipatlort from various Federal, state, 
and local government and private organitstions. It is chaired by a 
member selected from the localand state ranks. A Federal 
Agency Coordinating Committee supports the lAB Chair and 
provides the interface betweert the tA6 and sponsoring Federal I 
rnnsentaccncres and departments. i 











388 


Our goals for this work are fi) enhanced performance for 
fingerprint searches of known and unknown subjects in 
state, and ioca) repositories fe^g. tenorwatidi-lbte, and criminal 
master files j; {ii} a standard for rite creatkKi and mterchange of 
enhanced latent fingerprint and paimprint feature sets: (w)»oy^ 
work-flow optlmiiarion methods fn tatent firigeriirint 
examitters; and (Iv) reduced r^nce oit latent fingerprint 
examiners. Measurement of ft} and standsrdoatian of ere 
specificaUv responsive to the 2009 N^ional Academy of Sciences 
forensic report wth regards to th^ reCDinntend^oflS on 
fingerprint biometrics by promotittg improved computer 
a^rlthm mappir^, recording, and recognirion of features m 
fingerprint images, as well as promoting fmensic fingerprint 
feature exchange through creation of rigorcnisly tested 
_ fingerprint feature standards. 


[National institute of Standards and 
TechnotogYfNISTl 


Provide performance metrics, ratho-wave propa^on data, and 
verification tests to facihlate deyelopinent of standards and 
procurement requirements for radio^requency(RFj-based 
emergency equipment fw first responders. These devices, which 
include Personal Alert Safety Systems (PASS) deidces, emergency 
beacons and locators, radios, and body-worn Personal Area 
Networks, wilt be tested for s^ul transmistion within different 
building types. Prom these tests, appropriate perfonnance 
metrics will be developed. Laboratory-based verification tests 
that support standards developrnent wi)> be developed to 
characterlte performance of the systems In a repeatable 
environment. Standardiied, lab-based test and verification 
methods will enhance the reliabiSty and imcaove procurement 
procedures for flP-based emetgettcy equipment In this 
increment, we w^tl continue to provide technical assistance on 
the revisionof NFPA 1982 (soon to be renamed NFPA 1802), 
refine and validate the tab-based test methods from prior years, 
and expand the lab-based test method to study the use of 
different RF technologies ^ interest to the NPPA. We will also 
gather additions! field-lest data as necessary to develop 
additional tests and validate results. The ultimate goal of this 
project Is the development of a framework that can be used to 
verify the performance of many types of flP-based emergency 
equipment so that responders may lake advantage of new 
wireless technology as It becomes available. 


iNational Irutitute of Standards and 
(NIST) 




The National Strat^y to Secure Cyber Space identified inherent 
security and robustness uulnerabili&es in the Domain Name 
System (ONS) arid Border Gatewray Protocol $BGP) as key issues 

where USG initiatives were necessary expedite the developmeni Nationai iitstitute of Standards and 
and deployment of vlafaie solutrorw for the public Internet Teehnotogy (NIST) 


The NIST Office of Law Enforcement Standards (a.ES)^ati 
provide a full range of support functions for the DHS S&T Test & 

Evaluation and Standards C^e{TES)-The m^or support 
functions rnay include: - Provide strategic and techrMcal adwke to 
project investigators aitd overat! standards investment plan - 
Lead coordination between DHS S&T Office of Standards and ail 
NIST standard deveioptrtent activities - Identify and fad^ate the 
formation oi scientific teams to address DHS standards needs - 
facilitate and coordinate meetings and (workshops in support of 
standard development activities - Manage and facilitate the 
proposal submission process to OHS TSO - Monitor and track all 
current and incoming DHS TES Interagency Agreements (includes 
tracking of funds through external and Internal process) - 
Monitor all TES projects performance {indudes schedule, cost 

and technical aspects) • Assist In Conformity Assessment efforts National Institute of Standards and 
and international Standards development Technology (NIST) 



The overarching goal of this starrdards project is to enhance first 
responder and Hatmat team chemical detection capabilities by 
developing a conformity assessment program for commercial 
chemical detectors. This work will help establish and improve 
the accuracy and reliability of chemical vapor measurements 
related to homclanij security, e.g. measurements of toxic 
industrial chemicals {TICs), tcnic industrial materials (TIMs), and 
chemicaf warfare agents (CWAs). It tsantidpated that the 
conformity assessment program wifi provide a cost savings to 
DHS by providing more comprehensive and reliable Information 
from certified independent equipment evatuaton. Ultimateiv, it 
will provide the end users mrwe reliable detector perfoirtsance 

information to help them choose equipment that best suits their National Institute of Standards and 
needs. Technology (NIST) 


The primary objective of this large artd ongoing project is to 
assure the technical performance and radiation safety of the 
nation's x-ray and gamman'aY security screening efforts in all 
venues in which they are deployed in support of filNng the well- 
documented gaps In transportation security, whkb have been 
highlighted in Executive and L^fathre requirements tot tOO K 
screerring of baggage, cargo, and airline passengers. This is 
accomplished through acorpus nf new standards, test methods, 
test artifacts, dosimetry protoccrfs and technical guidance 
documents, supported by an infrastructure of meirofogy and 


Nalionai fnslitute of Standards and 
Teehnotogy (NIST) 




390 


'Hie purpose of this request in the amoiHit of $^0,000 in 
collaboration with the TransportatioRSecuritv Laboiatorv(TSLj 
Trace Explosives Detection Group, Ule Natfots) institute of 
Standards and Technology (NtST) utWte tiieir expertise m 
sampling, gas flow dynamics, computational flow dynamics, flow 
visuahration, and thermal imaging to hnprave trace esqilosive 
detection instrumentation. Additionally, MIST design and 
develop a universal sampling wand with user {KBSsurefeedtiacfc 

in order for more consistent sampling of eiplasive residue from National Institute of Standards and 
various surfaces. Technologv (W1 


Federal Laboratory Consortium contribution from ttie ^mce of 
National labs, 




The purpose of this worit is to develop WS-Biomrtric Devices— a 
specification for exposxtg a biometric sensor to ^ents via web 
services. The WS-8kimetf!c Oericesspeciflcation is anticipated to 
be a suite of specification and standards, each buMing upon the 
previous. The baseline standard (Level 1) vrib hme only the 
capabilities necessary for bask device control Each successive 
level will add functionality, under the working goal that each 
level will be backwards compatible with a lower levei. The plan 
for FYll is to finalize the baseline (levei 1} WS'Blometric Devices 
specification. In parallel, the next level of hmctiondi^ (Level 2) 
can be drafted, while the WS-Uomeirk Devices specification 

itself is promulgated through a standards development National Institute of Standards and 

- rgannadonlSOO). Technology (NiST) 


This effort will be performed in three phases. Phase 1 will focus 
on performing user research and developing human 
performance requirements and considerations and ooairover 
year 1 of the 3 year project Phase IwHI focus on developing 
ana evaluating patient compartment design concepts that 
address human performance requirements and considerations 
and occur over year 2 of the project. Phase 3 will focus on 
developing e dreft set of human performance design guidelines 
that will form the basis fora future hunsan factors design 
specification for ambulance patient compartments and occur 
Softheproi ' 


This multi-year, continuing program supports the standards 
needs for all aspects of trace explosives screentng. from sampHng 
to analysis, and ultimately leads to improvements in the 
reliability and effectiveness of (race explosives detection systems 
as well as supporting development of next generation detection 
technologies. We have developed the critical infrastructure for a 
successful and comprehensive research program by establishing 
connections with key stakeholders, purchasing an extensive 
collection of currently deployed trace explosives detection 
syitems, and developing unique measurement capabilities to 
understand and test trace detection equipment, including the 
critical front-end sampling process. We have assembled a multi- 
discipilnaty team lil full time staff, 4 guest workers and several ' 
students} to support this program. ' 






391 


inter-Aeencv 

This project continues to evolve ttre biomrirtn in^iRty 
guidelines and standards by integrating key eiements of previous 
research such as aHordance and feedback mechanisms in ord^ 
to understand their contribution to triometric systems 
performance. The previous years' efforts focused on die design 
of a biometrics kiosk for collection of face, fkigerpdnt. iris and 
passport information. This kiosk integrates researdi <hi 
affordancc, feedback and symbols in order to prmrtde a testing 
platform to examine processes and procedures for independent 
or non-operator assisted biometric collecdons. Lastyear 
usability tests focused on the feedback and ins&ucdonal symbols 
for non-operator assisted fingerprint c^clkm pocesses.lhis 
project will focus an usabilrty tests for the processes for foce and 
Iris collection in a non-operator assisted em^nment. in 
addition ta the demonstration soffwarefliardwafe of the kiosk 
for Independent face and iris collection a techi^l report 
describing the usaUtIty testuig and die symb<^ wiR te produced. 
These usability tests twill ultimately develop best practice 
guidelines for procedures at>d processes for collecfoig muidpte 
biometrics in unassisted environments, ntese guideBnes wIS 
ultimately guide a usability testing standard that addresses 
multiple modalities. 

National Institute of Standards and 
Techisologv INIST) 


lnt«r-A«encv 

This project wii! result ki a consensus standard defining a 
measurement method, parameters, and calibration objects, i.e. 
phantoms, for evaluating the effectiveness of uirveiilance, i.e. 
coverage, by manualand autorrrated detection devices for 
security screening of humans. To cover mIRimeter wave, 

Infrared, and x-ray may tepuire three Independent standards or 
phantoms, or both. The purpose of this standard is to support 
qualification testing, comparative developmental testing by 
Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM), and startdardited pre- 
qualification by OEMs af whole body imagers (AITs). Use of this 
standard wlit enable cwtsistent measurement of body surface 
coverage across Government and Industry and reduce the time 
for the development-test cycle. 

National Institute of Standards and 
Technolocv iNiSTI 


InttMsencv 

This project will spur redical improvement in biometric sample 
quality approaches and mature multimodal biometric utilieation. 
This will require a multi-year program to direct and coordinate 
academic and industrial research foto quality and fusion, focusing 
on "applied biometrics" by considering issues like cost, 
efficlencv. mlssine biometrics, lesatv data as well as accuracy 

National Institute of Standards and 
Technofoev INIST) 


ln!er-A«encv 

This research project seeks to identify and develop performance- 
based design meihodolagies for buildings and mfrastiucture 
subjected to a wide variety of natural and man-made bataids. 

The focus of this effort is to develop the tools to measure the 
disaster resilience using risk-based assessment and dKisfon 
methods that are supported try acost/benefii analysis and 
performance-based design and rehabilitation methodologies. 

The tools will consider, for a wide spectrum of hatards. a hofislic 
approach to reslliertce that includes performance of structural 
and nonstructurat building and infrastructure systems, system 
damage and loss of functlonafitv following the event, the 
duration ot recovery, and associated ecottomie losses. Of 
particular interest b the need to develop performance goals and 
measures for resHletice that acccurtt for life safety, building and 
infrastructure usability/f urrctionafity during and after an event, 
and the time and costs required to resume service. Performance 
criteria and metrics for resilience will enable the devefopnsent of 
decision tools for planners and stakeholders to enhance the 
performance of buildings and Infrastructure during end after 
•xtreme events, thus reducing loss of Bfe, Injuries, and economic 

National Institute nf Standards and 
Techfsoioev (NIST) 


(nter-Agencv 

To provide technical advisory and outreach support for DHS 
cyber security program throu^ ideoUncatron of applicable 
standards, establishment of subject nea working groups, 
sarticipalkin in forums and devriopit^/tnainlalning information 
repositories pertaining to cyber security standaidsand best 
practices. 

4atiwial Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST) 


tnter-Aeentv 

Research and Policy for Infectious Disease OynatMCS (ftAdDO) 
conducted by the f ogar ty fntemalionat Center at the Naliorvai 
nstitutes of Health. 

Natiotraf Institutes of Health 




392 




Th« goal of this program is to produce fundamental research 
advances that will provide the scientific urtderpinnings for future 
visual analytics algorithms, software, and systems. To 
accomplish the necessary research, a lead university wilt be 
selected by NSF solicitation as described below to perform broad 
based research in NSF and DHS jointly selected sub-areas of 
visual analytics, additional smaller awards will be made to 
tesaarchtrs at ether InstKutlons for topics jointly selected by NSf 
and OHS. ThH research will not focus on specific appficalions 
such as Intelligence analysis but rather will seek to provide 
seminal advances that will impact ail application areas of visual 


I The NCO suppotCs the NITRO Suhcommiliee, which coordmates 
the MITRO Program, and the organitatlons that report to the 
Subcommittee. The Oeoartmeni of Homeland Security is e 
participating member of the 13-agency NITRO Programand is 
represented on the Subcommittee on Networking and 


Information Technology Research and Oevei 


The project will involve the development and facilitation of an 
event, tentatfvely titled 'V/orluhoo on Alerts and Warnings Using 
Social Media and Associated Privacy Considcratiosis.- Current 
Knowledge and Resear^ Needs', and will bring together experts 
In industry, government, academra, and the public perspective In 
the fields of alerts and warnings, privacy, and social media. The 
National Academies will assemble, irt consultation with OIC a 
workshop agenda and Rst^ participants. Including key 
stakeholders who will be invited to attend and pariicipale in the 
event focused on (he potential t^hracy impllcatJMis of issuing 

_ alerts and warnings via social media. National Science Foundation 

Cost of operating the National Nanotechnology Coordinating 
_ Office (NNCQ) for fiscal year 2(T1 1. National Seletice Foundation 


This effort is co-fund ed with NSF from a proposal submitted 
Uuough one of their research sollcitations.GMU wilt conduct a 
Workshop on Cybersecurily Incenlives (WoCI)-in coi^rKNoo 
with the leadingacadenuc hKum, the Wwkshap on the 
Economics of Information Security (WEIS). WoCi vrilt focus on 
incentives, accountability ar>d standard-setting for better 
behavior acrossail layers of cyberspace including theindlyidual 
(end-user}, enterprise, networkanddobaltevels. 













393 



The purpose of this work is to povide mana^mont sid strategic 
consulting senrices for the S&T alerts and wanmp portfoHa, 
eclfloliv around the CMAS RDTIaE woeram. 


The Vendor Management Srattch (vM{ shauprotnde Proiect 
Management Office (PMO) support for this project. 
fiobotlc Arm 


There are four main activities covered under this SOW. DHSs 
seeking to; (a} develop and transition capabilities to detect, 
identify, track and Irtterdict small nrtaritime vess^, (b) detect, 
identify, track, and Interdict small aircraft that pose a threat to 
the homeland, (c) develop and transition wide area persistent 
surveillance capabilities that enable the Homeland Security 
mission, and (d) develop and trarts'rtlon capabilities to counter 
smuggling operations. Small rrwritime vessels are the class of 
Self-Propelled S«mi-Submer«b!esfSPK),SeH-Propelte<t fuily- 
Submersibles (SPPS), Go-Past boats, and other fishirtg vessels that 
support illtcil activity. Small aircraft are characterized as ultra- 
lights and small general aviation, ftxed-wing and helicopters. 

Activities under this SOW will build from previous efforts to 
understand the breadth of technical opportunities attd 
capabilities that can be used to counter these threats. In 
addition, this effort wHI concentrate on enhancing existing 
capabilities as well as developing and transitioning new 
capabilities to mission operations. Activities will also include 
helping to shape community acquisition programs and 
developing long term techrtologv roadmaps. Additional testing 
ar^d field campalgrts may be necessary to continue to 

characteriie the threat as it evolves and to provide additional Space and Missile Defense Command 
round truth data ■ ' 


Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIAOC), under the United 
Stales Department of Homeland Security (OHS) intends to enter 
into an Interagency agreement with the National library of 
Congress for the Pederal Ubratyand Information Network 
(Ff DUNK). Thu is a continuing effort, as OHS has vtilited 
PSOlINK to provide research support to the science mission at 
PIAOC- 







394 


There are multiple activities covered under tfiis lAA. DHS a 
seeking to develop and transition capabHfdes tod^eet, identic. 

Crack and interdict small boats and stnafi akoaft d»t |K>se a 
threat to the homeland. In adcdtion, DHS is devek^iing 
information analytic technoio^es d»t an be transitmied to 
customers to enhance situational awareness. Smsdt boats m the 
class of vessels that include Self-PropeMed Senii-Subiner»bles 
(SPSS), Self'Propellsd Pully-Submersibles 6o-F«t, and 
Pangas. Small aircraft are characterized as uttca-nghts and small 
general aviation, fixed-wing and helicopters. Acttrities under this 
lAA will build from previous efforts to understand the br»Ab of 
technical opportunities and capabBiiles Mat an be used to 
counter these threats. In addition, this effort wf^conontrate cm 
enhancing existing capabilities »td devebping and transHbning 
new capabilities to missbn operations. Activities wU! ^so include 
helping to shape community acquisition pfi^r»ns and 
developing long term technology roadmaps. Addidanat tMtirrg 
and field campaigns may be necessary to continue to 
characterize the threat as it evolves and to prasHde additional 

inter-Agency groundtruth data to the developer community. US Air Force 

There are multiple activities covered under this lAA. DHS Is 
seeking to develop and transilbn capabiHries to detect, identify, 
track and interdict small small ^rcraft that pose a threat to the 
homeland. In addition, DHS is developing inicetnation analytic 
technologies that can be transitioned to customers to enhance 
situatjonal awareness. Smalt aircraft are characterized as uttra- 
iights and small genera! aviatbn. fned-wingand helicopiers. 

Activities under this lAA will build from prevbus efforts to 
understand the breadth of technical oppoitunities and 
capabilities that can be used tocoimter these threats. In 
addition, this effort wit) cortcentrate on enhancing existing 
capabilities and developing end transitbning new capabilities to 
mission operations. Activities will also include heipirig to shape 
community acquisition programs and devebping tang term 
technology toadmaps. Additional testing and field campaigns 
nnay be necessary to continue to characterite the threat as It 
evolves and to provide ad^tlonal ground tiulh data to the 


Ilntar-Airannu Idevelnnar nommunirv luS Air Force 






! In 2002, the Insider Threat Study team, composed of United 

States Secret Service (USSS) bebavbral psychobgistsand 
Carnegie Mellon University’s Computer Emergency Response 
Team (CERT) mformation security experts, collected 
approximately ISO insider threat rases that occurred in US 
critical infrastructure sectors between 1996 and 2002, and 
examined thern from both a lechnicaf and a behavioral 
perspective. A series of four reports were published as a result of 
this work. Following (he completion of IheUSSS/CERTInsider 
Threat Study, CERT contbued their research in the bsider threat 
domain. To dale, CERT has ciHlected. coded, and aiialyied 
hundreds of rases of malla'ousanetfcs against organizations by 
Inter-Agency Insiders, 






395 


Inter-Aeencv 

The goals of the DHS Cyber Security Research and Deweiopnient 
(CSRDj program are: 'To perform resevchanddevdopment 
(R&O) aimed at improving the seo^ty of eidfibig deployed 
technologies, and to ensure the security of n«weRiergi% 
systems. 'To develop newandetdiancedtechnirfiiglesforthe 
detechon of, prevention of, 8i>d response to qrber attadcs on the 
nation's critical information mfrastmcture. •To assist the 
transfer of these technologies Into the Rattonatinfra^tiOure as 
8 matterof unsenev. 

US Air Force - Research Lsborakirv 
(AFRU 


Inter-Asencv 

The objective of this effort is to bi^ upon (ms-edsttng Rl. anc 
DHS competencies and leverage umentiy hinded programs. In 
human shape and motion description, human phyiiolopcal 
monitoring, threat agent sensing, and modeling tools to provide 
the foundation for predictive human inteiit oroRbw. 

US Air Force - Research laboratory 
(AFSU 


Inter-Aeencv 

The Col will coordinate several important efforts for DHS and the 
Federal Government by aligning disruptive innos^ons from 
private industry companies with the cMrsspondingcrittcal needs 
of Federal Organizations. The Col wRI use the Rare Event gaming 
process to field test private industry techrtatoses. The Col also 
will coordinate its research efforts correspondfogwitt) the Rare 
Event Games between the service academies, primarily USAFA 
and USCGA. 

US Air Force - United States Airforce 
Academy lUSAFA) 


Inter-Asencv 

To support FlSMAactiviHes, FNS utilizes UteCyfaerScope 
application to automate the collection of FISMA-refated 
compliance data. CyberScope emjrioys Security Content 
Automation Protocol (SCAP)- based automated data feeds using 
an extensible Markup Language (XMl) fHe, wMch Is formatted 
according to several XMl Schema Definition (XSO) files that were 
defined fay a task force headed by Natiottal institutes of 

Standards and Technology (NIST). The objectives of these 
automated feeds are to: 

US Air Force - United States Air Force 
Academy (USAFA) 


fnler-Asencv 

ATC shall use existing test focHities and test Rxturesand/or 
construct new test articles and test natures on an as required 
basis to support OHS S&T EXO, TSA05T and TSl Incremental 
Newton Validation live Fire Tests Project. ATC shall support OHS 
in conducting various explosive testing on a variety of lest 
articles and test fixtures and compile and prepare data packages 
to aid In the subsequer^t validation of modeling aitd simulation 
codes being developed by DOE National laboratories for 
commercial aircraft vulnerability assessment Repeated tests 
may be required to show the repeatability of the test date and 
results. All the explosive tests will use spherical C-4 explosives or 
others as directed. 

US Armv ■ Aberdeen Test Center 


Inter-Asencv 

Phase 2 of the UtCOS project continues to support existing on- 
goirtg pilots in DOD, New Jersey and its neighboring slates. 

AROEC will lead (he effort In coordinating pilot activities among 
various area agancles throughout the pilot phases. In addlliet>. 
AROEC support OHS Ir> obtaining ^rtification and Accreditatrorr 
(C&A) for tbe UtCDS software via OoO's DoO Information 
Assurance Cbrlincalf^ and Accreditation Process (CHACAP) 
Certification. 

US Army - Armament Research 
Development and Enaineerine Center 


Inter-Asencv 

This research will Investigate how the incident management 

applications and systems used by the variovs agencies (local. 

county, state, and federal) within New Jersey and neighboring 

slates can be made UlCOS-compliant for enabling information 

sharing and interoperablfitY «t ali levels. Through these agetides 

this research will Identify the incident management systems used 

by each agency. These systems unRze both irt-housedevefoped 

applications as wall as comnsercial off-the-shelf applications. 

US Army - Arnsament Research 
Development and Endneerine Center 


Inter-Aeencv 

Electromagnetic Puke (EMP) is a broadband, high-intensity, short 
duratiort burst of electromagnetic energy that can disrupt 
electrical systems and technology circuits. The JASON study will 
'ocus on the effects o( a conventionally generated 
electromagnetic pulse (EMP), High Power Mkrourave Devices 
HPMI, and natural effects induced bv solar disturbances. 

USArmv-CECOM 






396 


Inter-ARencv 

This construction effort will support the TSLinisaon arid cwrent 
capabilities. The explosive storage area wa support tite 
laboratory which facilitates the deveCopmentaland independent 
testing & evaluation of screening techntdogies. The type and 
quantity of explosives necessary to support current tedmofc^v 
evaluations requires this increase in explosive ston^ space for 
TSl staff to safely and efficienliy carry out th^ current mis^n. 
The modificatian to the existing lAABtoaccountformarhet 
adjustments from the older design and addiUtHi of the storage 
magaiine artd resurfacing options. The cost is in nne with the 
current IGCE developed on the final deri«i bv USA^ 

US Armv - Corps of Engineers 


Inter-ARencv 




Inter-Aeencv 

The Department of Homeiartd Security (ifHS) hsseslab&hed the 
Chemical Security Anal^is Cerrter (C&ACI to assess, tdenfify 
vulnerabilities, and respond to potential chemica! forests to the 
homeland. The CSAC primary goats are to pro^e a robust 
knowledge repository of chemlc^ threat irrformation, providea 
science based threat analysis, and provide a robust technical 
based reachback capability. 

US Army- Edgewood Chemical 
Btological CenterfECBC) 


tnter-Ageficv 

The Department of Homeland Security (OHS) has established the 
Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAI^ to assess, Mentifv 
vulnerabilities, and respond to potential cheirtKal foreats to the 
homeland. The CSAC piirr»rv goab are to provide a robust 
knowledge repository of dtemical threat information, provide a 
science based threat analysis, and prowdea robust tedinlcal 
based reachback capability. This project provides foe enduring 
capability for the CSAC to continue tts rspeiate, artd to provide 
haiard and risk analysis support related to hndc chemical threats 
and threat materials. 

US Army - Edgewood Chemical 
Bioioeical Center IEC8C1 


Iflter'AKenev 

The Detection Engineering Branch (0£6), ECSC has initiated a 
working relationship with the U.S. Departmeitt of Homeland 
Security (DHS) to leverage efforts of the U.S. (OoOI-iapan {MoO) 
PACAO project to suppwt OHSmissiori by evaluating their 
need/requiremcnts fora potential dual-use item such as an 
automatic colorimetric detection capability to detect nerve, 
blister, and blood agertts to determine decontamination or 
unmasking reeds. OE9 {£CBC) wdl share with OHS various 
project informetion, documentation, and other associated 
references in accordance with non-OoO sharing process 
agreements under the PACAO MOU. In addition, the OEB (CC9C) 
will share chemical warfare agent (CWA) test scheduled during 
AQfYlMOfYlJ. 

USArmy- Edgewood Chemical 
BioioRical Center (CCBO 


Intar-AMnev 

The Edgewocd Chemical eiologlcal Center ECBC. will support the 
OHS CSAC in executing the 'Increasing Sefetyof Hatatdous 
Materials' IS1' project by providing personnel to assess the 
current baseline for safe chemical transport, use and storage, 
conduct a formal gag arsaiysis, and identify relevant metrics for 
assessing inherentiv safer technoloeies. 

USArmy - Edgewood Chemical 
Biolotrcel Center (EC8CI 


lnte^Afuncv 

Theobjeciive of this SOW is for the Edgewood Chemical 
8lolog!calOnter{£C6C) Co integrate and demonstrate Civiriart- 
Vliliiary communlcatiarss using representative software 

apollcalions and hardware. 

USArmy - Edgewood Chemical 
Bioioeieal Center (ECBC) 



The purpose of this task order is to assist the CBMS CAP in foe 

planning and cooidirsation of the Nalionat Conference on 

Sampling for Bio-Threat Agents to be h^d in March 2012 In 

Denver. Colorada, The conforencewill be planned with the 
assistance of Ed 

IS Army - Edgewood Chemical 
Bioioeical Center (ECBCI 


fnter-flRencv 

This goal of this project is to develop recommended changes for 

mprovement of toxic Irrhafaflon hazards (TIH) modeling 

methodologies by addressir^ identified krunvledge gaps in 

source emissions, dispersion ntodeiing, and consequence 

assessment of large-scale TlH mawrial releases. 

USArmy - Edgewood Chemical 
BioloRtcal Center (ECSC) 


Inter-ARencv 

his project provides the enduring capabilitv f°t f CSAC to 

continue to operate, and to i^ovide haiard and risk analysis 
upport related to toxic chenucal threats and threat materials. 

USArmy - Edgewood Chemical 
BiotoRical Center (ECBCI 


Inter-Agencv 

Systems En^rieeiiiigand Independent Analysis for First 

Responder Technolojrv 

USArmy - Enginser Research and 

Devetopment Center (ERDC) 







397 


Throufh prior-year OHS furt^r^ £R&Ce>te fl iiveiystueBetlthe 
unprotected vulnerabinties of cabie-stev bridge tower attd cable 
osmponents to terrorist threats and developed ndtigathM 
schemes for these threats. FY2Q20 research eHoitswB indude 
development of simplified and user-friendtv de^n/anatydsbx^ 
that will allow users within the bridge design and analysis 

community to better design bridges and btanmltigafiMi US Army -Engineer Research and 

retrofits. Development Center (ERDC) 


Infrastructure Protection Blast Analysisand ProteOive Measures 
project that will provide biast analysis tools, potecbveireaswes, 

and design tools to protect the Nation's highest priority critiial US Army - Engineer Research and 

infrastructure assests from blast and proiecttlc threats. Oevelopmerrt Center (ERDC) 

Removai/disposal of low-level radiaactive laboratory waste at US Army - ENGINERNG & SUPPRT 

WAOC by US Army Engineering ar»d Suw>°rt Center. CENTER 

Shipment of conlalneriied waste to an approved mixed waste 
disposal facility. The Army subcontractor has pack^ed alt of tire 
waste and It Is stored in thebasemeirt at NUSTU Thesdiedule 
delay is due to awaiting a formal response from the Nuclear 
Regulartory Commission as to whether the material Is licensed. 

(Note the regulartory Isssues here are more complicaied since 
the material is from the time NUSTL was a DOE lab and OOE Is 
self regulating. OHS however Is under the NRC.) Iftheresponse 
is negative, then the material can be sent to US Ecology, ID which 
is a cheaper option than Ersergy Solutions. When the material is 
removed, Cabrera will do an addendum to the Pinal Status 
Survey Plan to cover the storage area and a few other miscareas 
That should close out this task unless other field conditions 


five (S) CQTS radars will be leased and shipped (o the Ft. 
Huachuca Electronic Proving Crouitds (EPG) for performance and 
characterltaiion testing against people, vehicles, and animal 
targets. The testing wUi focus on radar performance in uneven 
terrain and high clutter wind-blown fofiage enwronments. The 
five vendors will rotate through EP6 one at a time and will setup, 
test, and tear-down in two (2) week intervals. Individual radar 
configuration, optimitatlon, and operation will be cortducted by 
vendor personnel, who will provide training to designated test 
team members. I 


The purpose of this MOOIflCATION is to pay for CSAC base 
support services . The common base support services include but 
are not limited to: utilities (electricity, steam, chilled water), 
communication prnjects and services, instelletiort service 
progecrs. fire and emergency response, law enforcement 
services, physical security services, audiovisual, custodial 
services, entomology (indoor/outdoor pest control, refuse 
collection, insialiaCion safety and occupation health, snow 
removal, surfaced road maintenance, transportation services, 
emergency generator support, food service support for staff 

during continuity of operations training exercises and emergency US Army • GariUonAlS Armv 
conditions. intelitgence Center 





398 


Pft is from R'Techs PM King Waters, The National Protcdion 
Center (NPCj at NSRDEC proposes to act as system integrator 
and develop an advanced PPC system DHSand 

State/local/tribal (TBD) law enforcementusen. Durkigthe USAnny-NatickSoldierResearch, 
twelve rnonth exterrsion period, NSRDECwil|Kr1«niw oversee Development and Engineering Center 
the tasks described in the SOW: (NSSOECj 



Elements of this prr^ram will collect data to stiiqiort teduMcat 

artd mission related evaluations and expenments: eslaM^ test 

and evaluation protocols and characteriieemrironmentsto 

validate solutions far operatlcmal element^ and support the 

technical rationale for poNdes and privacy issues assodated with 

these applications. USAimv-NVESD 


Trivaldl Multiplexed, Pluorescenee Based Eiqimstyes Trace 

Detector USArmy- WESD 

provide an open standards virtual tranrngsirmilation platform 
through the Training and Doctrine Command's (TRADOC) 
prototype virtual environment called Enhanced Oymamic Geo- 

Soclai Envirorrment Pr«ect (EDGE -Pi. US Army • ROECOM CE80EC 


Defense Research and Engineerirtg Network ^eraUons Sendees |US Army - Research Laboratory / Army 
(OREM) [Research Olflce(ARt/ARO) 1 


The objective of this program is to conduct reejuirements 
development, perform software systems et^liteeringMe rrycle 
analysis, design prototype software, conduct experimental 
implementation, and prepare a series of prototype and 
developmental applications for operation, induding the 
necessary security and protectior) capabihties, on systems at 
multiple levels of ciassirtcation at a number of Government 
feellities. The outcomes of this effort will be the development, 
experimentation, security, miration artd implementation of 
selected DHS information systems Into DHS data centers. 


The Special Programs Office supports the Identification, 
development and transition of tedmologles for federal, stale, 
local, tribal, and territorial first responders. The Department of 
Defense's US Special Operatiws Command's (SOCOM) vast 
science and technology pr^ram in support Of the Global War on 
Terrorism and humanitarian operations provides a conduit for 
collaboralion, information, technology exchange/development to 
rapidly field emerging technofogies and Information. This 

program provides for contrecloi support to establish a robust US Army ■ Research Laboratory/ Army 
recess between US SOCOM and OHSSiT. Research Office(ARl/ARO) 


The purpose of this AMENDMENT is to takeout the purchase of 
Blasting Cap NomEfec M7 so that they can be put on aseparate 
Toeuremenl, 



[us Army. Rock Army Arsenal 


NBACC employees working in USAMRIIOat ft Oetriefc. MO. 


Under this SOW, OoO whi provide and coordinate RVf -related 
vector studies at USAMRllD. 















399 



Develop recombirantASfV sirens by d^ion of one or more 
viral genes already described as responsible for indudng 
anenuatlon of highly virulent ASf strains. Test attenuated 
strains for their ability to induce protection against challei^e 
with homologous, wefl-characterited, virulent ASFV Rotates. 

Evaluate oattern(s5 of heterologous protectiofl amwig genetically US Department of Agriculture - 

heterogeneous ASPV streirts. Agricultural Research Service (AfiS} 

Development of a Proof of Concept Rationaiiy Designed live 
Attenuated African Swine Pever Virus Vaccines conducted by The 

United States Department of Agriculture |USDA) - Agrlealtural US Department of Agriculture - 
Research Service fARS) . Agricultural Research Service (ARS) 



OHS S&T supports PAD vaccine R&DcouMeimeasure programs 
at PIADC to strengthen the nation's abiHiyto predict and respond 
to the Incursion of a forego animal disease (FAD). The goal of 

these countermeasure programs is to develop and abtalrt USOA USDepartrnent of Agriculture - 
Center for Veterinary aiotoglcs (CVB) biok^leal product licenses. Agncuttural Research Service (ASS) 

US Department of Agriculture - 

Service Agreement for the Hitachi 7600 Electrorr Microscope Agricultural Research Service (ARS) 

This Is a new acquisition plan to obtain vaccine production 
services to support the deuelopmertt of Foot and Mouth Disease 
(FMO) vaccines for the National Veterinary Stockpile. Pursuant 
to Homeland Security Presidentlai Directive-S {H5P0-9), the 
Secretary of Homelartd Security is responsible for coordinatirtg 

the overallnstionatefforttoenhance the protection of the US Department of Agrieuiture- 
- -iticai infrastructure artd key resources of the United States. 


Under tills SOW, ARS will provide and coortUnate Foreign Animal 
Disease Research Ptoram support at PIAOC. DHS will reimburse 
ARS for these serwes including scientific and lemporarv 
scientific support salaries, scientiRccoffaboralive agreements 
(SCAI, and miscellaneous suppHes, equipment, andtravel. 


USDA ARS PADRU will conduct activities involving three primary 
research themes; (1) Diagnostics, (2) giotherapeutics. artd (3) 
Vaccine Platform. 


APHIS will provide and coordinate Agriculturat Screening Tools 
(AST) Program support at f AODl. OHS will reimburse APHtS for 
these services including scientific and temporary scientific 
support salaries, supplies, equipment, and travel. USOA will 
complete the milestones anddeKvetablessummarlied below i< 
port the Agricultural Screening Tools Portfolio. 


Pool and Mouth Disease (FMO) wrus represents a sigrrificant 
threat to the agricultural and dependent industries In the US. A 
vaccine manufacturing system that is responsive to the diversity 
of the FMD virus, capable of large-scale production ol vaccine for: 
stockpiling, and adaptable to addition^ ^ricultur^ pathogens 
would advance the Agricultural Defeirse capatnhties of DHSin 
protecting against a wide-spread FMD outbreak. The Chemkai 
and Siological Division, Office of Transition to Pioductian of Foot 
and Mouth Disease Virus Pseudovirkm Wetine Candidate Project 
supports this effort to analyze the abHitytodevefopfMOvaedne 
candidates using a tobacco iMant irartsfection process. | 



lln order to streamline cattie purchasing, DHS S&T seeks to awetdj 
(a single-award delivery order contract. The selected performer j 


Iwill deliver cattle meetii^ spetllic criteria. 


(USOepartmerytofAgriculture-APHIS { 













Pracurement t>< Animal Feed to Support Vetennary Development 
3t Plum Island Animal Disease Center (nADC) on an indefinite 

Delivery/lrtdeflnite Quarvllty Basis US Department of Agriculture ■ APHIS 

Procurement of Large Animal CSftaped Necropsy Table from 

Shank's Veterinary Equipment, Inc. US Department of Agricuiture ■ APHIS 


1 Purchase of Two ( 2 ) Category 111-3 Un-InteriupDbie Power Supply | 

Systems |us Department of Agriculture -APHiS j 


The dairy and feedlot cattle ini&stries In the US have undergone 
consolidation, with sorrte Individual dairies having over 10,000 
milking cows plus replacement animals (up to 20,000 total cattle) 
and individual feedlots having over 200,000 head on site. The 
scale of these operations presents challenges for mass 
depopulation If the need arises. Diseases such as Fool and 
Mouth Disease {FM0V>, raiSological agents, or toxins can be 
introduced Into the US cattle Industries either uninlentionally or 
intentionally and can be devastating to the cattle industry and 
the US economy. APHIS conlir^ency plans include the option of 
mass depopulation for the control artd eradication of FMOV on 
individual farms or in regions. The humane euthanasia of 
animals during a mass depopulation isctilicaland presents 
challenges In the case of cattle. There are three acceptable 
methods for euthai>asia of cattle; barbitutate overdose, gunshot 
and captive bolt (AVMA). The first two methods have practical 
and safety issues that make them unacceptable (ot mass 
depopulation of cattle. Qarbilurate overdose involves a 
controlled drug, requires restrairsi and Intravenous 
administration and presents probfems with carcass dispoaal. 
Ciinshot requlresskided maiksmen and has safety issues with 
loaded vreapons and potential ricocheted bullets. Penetrating 
captive bolt devices offer the best method for the humane 
euthanasia of cattle duringa mass depopulation. fi 


To address adequately the threat of an introduction and 
subsequent outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMO) or other 
h^h-consequence Foreign Animal Diseases (FAD), improved 
diagnostic technologies and new FAD related antibody leagents 


Under this SOW, major tasks of this lAA (detailed below) include 
the standardization and depfoymentof the FMO 3ABCNS 
antibody ELISA to the NAHLN; an inter-leboratory comparison 
study, establishment of an annual proficiency testing program loi 
FMO Serology in the NAHLN, development of contingency jrlans 
for Identification of false poHlives, a la^e negative cohort sbidy 
to determine specificity, characterization of false positives, 
adaptation of FMO Serology to two HTP platforms, and Training 
_ of HTP Serology for the WAHtW. 

Under this Statement of Work (SOW)FADDL- NAFMOVS wtR 
test the protection conferred to e field virus by different FMO 
vaccines in primo-vaccinated anhnafs. Groups of animals will be 
vaccinated, each group svith a vaccine prepared with a dif ferent 
'■•'Strain within the 


(u$ Department of Agriculture - APHIS | 









401 


Inter-Aeencv 

This Statement of Work addresses RDT4E 3$|iects of 
transportation/conveyance-reiated systems and tedinotogies to 
Include: Technologies and conce;^ of operation (CONO^that 
exhibit potential for reducing suscepdb^and viAwrabltty to 
threats in the commercial aviation and ttanspoitation 
environments: Policies and procedures for T&E that ensure th^ 
the identified solutions meet the purpose of thwarting threats 
and plains, procedures, and conduct of sperUiisd T&E; Renew 
and report on factors relating to miiumbtng the r^duaf risks 
relating to potential threats that might oisir. NAVABI's 
responsibilities will include; PlanntngfM and tnanagenKtrt of 

T&E programs to minimize the risks and ensure that new 
technologies will meet the requirenKnisoflhepropam; 
Reliability, suppartabilltv, and affordabffilv; and Prrteittial 
exploitation or compromise of critic! technologies and 

infrastructure. 

US Navy- Naval Air Warfare Center 
(NAVAIR) 


Inter-Agerscv 

The purpose of this requisition is to submit five SOWs fora 
project proposal from the Naval Postgraduate SchocA. Prrgwt 
were developed by NPS based on input provided by the 

California Homeland Security Consortium (CHSC], 

US Navy - Naval Post Graduate School 
{NPS! 


tnter-Agencv 

Achieve the program goals of Rnk Prediction v^iWi indude, but 
are not limited to: 1) developinga framework to assess the 
predictive potential of social science theory; 2} assessing the 
predictive contribution of social science and geo>spallal pattern 
extraction techniques; 3) deveiofhng aaoss-culturat transfer 
model that will support informed transfer of risk patterns deriver 
from overseas attacks to U.S. infrastrutture; 4} developing the 
data sets that meet the above research requirements; and S) 
developing an Integrated suite of atgorithms/tools to support 
raold oattern extraction, cultural translation, and risk prolection. 

US Navy - Naval Research Laboratory 
(NRL) 


Inter-Agencv 

Develooment of Canine TralnlriR Aids for HME 

US Navy- Naval Research Laboratory 
(NftU 


Inter-ARencv 

DHS is seekt;^ to develop and trantitlon capabilities to detect. 
Identify, track and interdict small maritime vessels and small 
aircraft that pose a threat to the homeland. Small maritime 
vessels are the class of Self-Propelled Semi-Submersibles (SPSS), 
Self-Propelled FuUy-Submcrsibles (SPFS), Co-Fast boats, and 
other fishing vessels that support niltit activity. Small aircraft are 
characterized as ultra-lights and smaB general aviation, fixed- 
wing and hellci>pter s Activities under this lAA will build from 
previous efforts to understand the breadth of technical 
oppoitunKies and capabilities that can be used u> counter these 
threats, (n addition, this effort will concentrate on enhanbng 
existing capabilities and devaloplr^ and transitioning new 
capabilities to mission operations. Activities will also Include 
helping to shape community acquisition programs and 
developing long term uchnnlogy roadmaps Additional testing 
and Held campaigns maybe necessarytocontinueto 
characterize the threat as it evolves and to provide additional 
eround truth data to the develooer community. 

US Navy -Naval Research laboratory 
(NRL) 


lnter-As«ncv 


US Navy- Naval Research laboratory 
(NRl) 


tnWf-Aaencv 

NRL Shall provide access to subject maRer experts and 
independent assessment support loatNise SST on the sultabUity, 
feasibility, and risks associated with the deveiopcnent, design, 
and nstine of canine tralnirur aids. 

11 — 


fnter-A«encv 

NRl will perform a top-down anatysis of infortnation flow 
through potential fused sensor architectures utiKzing 
multivariate analvdcal (echnioues 

US Navy - Naval Research Laboratory 
(NRl) 


intet->^ncv 

Predictive Screening Is focused on identifying and validating 
behavioral patterns related to lEO attacks. The goals of the 
Predictive Screening program are 1} to increase the effectiveness 
of Che behavior-based screening process, 2) to kfentify 
technology solutions to alert authorities to lED threats in real- 
time, and 3] to provide these alerts earKerin the attack cycle and 
from greater distances. 

US Navy - Naval Research laboratory 
(NRl) 





402 


Inter-ARsnev 

The Department of Homeland Secuiltyefaced with acompim 
challenge of Improving Maritime SRUrity.'nrisindtHles the 
security within highly wsible porU, along inland waterways, the 
littorals and the offshore approaches to ttte United States. 
Maritinne Domain Awareness {MDA) has emerged as one of the 
primary mission requirements for the Department d Homeland 
Security (OHS). TheUnltedStatesofAmericaisaiiiariiime 
nation, with an extremely high percentage of goods, sertAtss and 
travelers arriving and departing via maritime roides. Ctven the 
pos^biiity of terrorist activities, accid«its. and iwtural disasters, 
rt is imperative that understand ways to exertsome measure 

ol control over the maritime situation as it affects Uie UJ. 

US Navy -Naval Research Laboratory 
(NRLl 


inter-Aeencv 

The intent of this filO SOW is to develop prototype systems 
which establish Enabling Hmneiand Security Cafsbilrtles (EHCs) 
for all three OHS S4T approved MTP Technology focus Areas 
(TFAs); Wide Area Survetllarrce Port and Coasts Surveillance 
Small Boat Harbor Surveillance 

US Navy -Naval Research Laboratory 
(NRLl 


Inter-AKencv 

The Naval Research Laboralory (Nftl) wH provicte support and 
subject matter expertise to the DHS (S&T) in support of die Wind 
Turbine/ Radar Modeling Tool (WT^MT) development. WlLwMI 
lead the vertficatlon and validadon (V&^ activities on the 
WT/RMT. 

US Navy-Naval Research Laboratory 
(NRL) 


tnter-ARencv 




lnte^Aeencv 

The Optical Sciences (distort of the US Naval Research 

Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC. wIR provide twelve (12) 
months of programmatic and expert technical support to the 
LACIS (Lightweight Autonomous Chemical identification System) 
and ARfCAM (Autonomous Rapid Facility Chemical Agent 
Mortitor) Projects within Chemical and Biological Defense 

Division of OHS SST. These actlviti« wiH include assistance with 
the review of Transition Operational Test-bed Test Plans and 
assistance with interagency coNaborations on future chemical 
sensor techrsologies for indoor facilities. The latter activity will 
cortsisi of setting up a nd attending with OHS Ptogram Manager, 
aoerooriate interaeenev meetinn. 

us Navy - Navai Research Laboratory 
(Nftl) 


InUr-ARsncv 

The purpose of this effort is to provide funding for the Production 
of HME Materials effort 

us Navy • Navai Research Laboratory 
(Nftl) 


Inter-ARsncv 

There are (wo main activities covered under this lAA. OHS is 
seeking to develop and tianslttorr capabilities to detect, identify, 
track and interdict small maritime vessels and small aircraft that 
pose a threat to the homeland. Small irtatiiime vessels are the 
class of Self-Propellf d Semi-Submersibles (SPSS), Self-Propelled 
Fulfy-Submers>blcs(SPfS), 60 -fast boats, and other fishing 
vessels that support UlicKacliviiv. Small aircraft are 
characterited as ultra-lights and sntali general aviation, Rxed- 
wiflg and helicopters. Activities under this lAA will build from 
previous efforts to understand the breadth of technical 
opportunities and capabilities that can be used to counter these 
threats. In addition, this effort will cottcenlrate on enhaitcing 
existing capabHIties and devetoplng and transitioning new 
caisabiNtles to mission ooerationc. 

US Navy • Naval Research laboratory 
(Nftl) 


(nlcf-Agencv 

These funds will modify the existing deception detection training 
courseware developed for and transition to the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) to erectly rndude interviewer 
training. The objective of this effort is to expand TSA's existing 
courseware to include more detailed Instruction on interviewing 
techniques. The courseware will support die acqtdsltion and 
sustainment of the knowledge and skHls required for TSA's 
lehaviOf Detection Officers (SDOs) to effectively execute their 
casual conversations tasks 

US Navy-Naval Research Laboratory 
NfllJ 


(nter-Agencv 

This effort supports PHI fay developing video exiractiort 
algorithms lo automatically and non-invauvely detect mufti- 
cuiturai, behavior-based inditalots of deception and hisstile 
ntent. There will benochanse to the period of performance. 

US Navy - Naval Research Laboratory 
(NRll 





403 



This statemenl of wort (SOW) addresses the Phase Ml Mbw-on 
upgrade and integration work needed to prepare for 

operational evaluation. This work ^ focused on dasnfication of 
targets, lowering the false alarm rate, integiaUiigthe other 
features desired in an operational system such as real ftne 
scanning and signal processing, enhanced deleclinn and abrm 
a^orrthms, and irttegrating the system with local geographic 
Inforination systems (CIS) displays as wed as command, conhol 
and communication (CS) interfaces to provide deteOian 
information at a remote site.. 

US Navy ' Naval Research laboratory 
fNRL) 



Trace Source Alarm Anatvsls^DAlgonthm Motfllkatiofg 

US Navy -Naval Research Laboratory 

(wa.) 



This SOW addresses technotogyarul mfdnnadon sharing needs 
for the S&T homeland security mission. To eiBure successful 
development and Implementation of enhanced seairity 
capabilities, DHS/S&T w)H establish a muM-year agreement with 
the h'aval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) to provide 
technology development, testing, demortstration, proof of 
concept support, risk reduction activities, and odwr technkat 
efforts that support development and transition of tKhnologles 
to SaT customers. 

US Naw • Nava! Sea System (NAVSEA) 


inter-Anencv 

NUWC wifi work with QHSSaT and Dam Sector representatives 
to determine the dam facility to be used for the demonstrations. 
NUWC will work with the faulty owners and operators to 
understand the securely environment to be protected and to 
come up with a deployment sche.me that win demonstrate the 

ISO system's capability to detect, warn and engage in a non 
lethal manner surface attd subsurface threats intending to do 
harm to the critical infrastructure. 

US Navy - Naval Surface Warfare 
Center 



SNl for Task 3.1 (DHS Motile 8k>me(fic Operational Pllo) 
Programs) through 3.3. SPAWAfiS'fiCEN ^11 perform pie and 
post analysis of DK5 Mobile Biometric Operational Pilot 

Programs and others as directed bv the OHS. 

US Navy - Naval Surface Warfare 


Inttr-Aeencv 

SPAWAR Systems Center-Patiflc (SSC-P) will act as the pr Incipal 
systems integrator lor this eflor), defining the architecture and 
building the framework for the integrated tvslem. 

US Navy • Naval Surface WarfaVe 
Center 


Inter-Aeencv 

This scope of work inirially davefops information necessary 
during prelect formulafiofl for BMO to determine If and where 
OHSSST should play a role in eddressing sensor and surveillance 
technology shortfalls. This scope of work will assist OH5S6T in 
future efforts to determine if and where OHS S&T should play a 
role In addressing lechnologicai shortfalls associated with other 
key Homeland Security maritime mission risks considering all 
hazards. This determination will (olfow (he approach outlined 
below for identifyiirg sensor and surveillance technoiogy 
deficiencies associated with key Homeland Security maritime 
mission risks. (NOTE: The risk informed priorititalion el 
technology solutions Is threat based, scenario driven, attd will 
priorltirs related mariiime capability gaps in terms of specific 
maritime missions.) 

US Navy- Naval Surface Warfare 

Center -Crane 


Inter-Aiienev 

This scope of work will assist OHS S&T (BMD) ifiitially in 
developing the information needed to formulate protect 
proposals and execute spedfic sensor and surveillance 
technologv development and demonstration projects that have 
potential to improve security for our Nation's maritime borders 
associated with the four FYD9 iww start efforts approved by DHS 
S&T. This scope of work will alto assist BMD In future efforts 
established to identify technologv dericiencies associated with 
other key HomelatKl Security maritime mission risks considering 
aii hazards. This scope of work initially develops information 
necessary during prefect formulation for BMD to determine if 
and where OHS S&T should pfaya role In addresslitg sensor arid 
surveillance technology shortfalls. This scope of work wlH assist 
DHS S&T in future efforts (o detenrune tf and where OHS S&T 
should play a role in addressing technofogical shortfalls 
associated with other key Homeland Security marWme mission 
risks considering all hazards. This determination wilt follow the 
approach outlined betow for identif^ng sensor and surveillance 
technology deliciencies associated urith key Homeland Security 
maritime mission risks. 

US Navy- Naval Surface Warfare 
Center -Crane 


tnEer-Aaencv 

Several Oi'iS monitoringl analysis tools and technofogies were 
created under 8AA-0703. Under tfus task, two of tiiose tools in 
sarticular, dnscap and nmsgfools^wUlbe further developed to 
mtriement necteeneratun capabilities. 

US Navy - Naval Surface Warfare 

Onter Indian Head Division (NSWC- 
HO) 



404 


Inter-Aesncv 

DHS is seeking !o devebp and transAion capafaWties to detect, 
identify, track and interdict small marWmeveeete and small 
aiicraft that posea threat to the homelaad. Small manttne 
vessels are the class of SeK-PropeHed Semt-S^mef^ties^SPS}, 
Self-Propelled Fully-Submersibies fSPFS), Go-Fast boab, and 
other fishlngvessels that support afidtacHvfty. Acdt^iK ttnder 
this lAA Witt build from previous efforts to understand the 
breadth of technical opportunities and capabiblies that can be 
used to counter these threats. In addition, thb effort wOi 
concentrate on enhancing existing ca|ubStiesand devetopine 
and tran»daning new capabilities to nus^on operatians. 
Activities will also include helping to shape community 
acquisition programs and developlrtg longterm techoatogy 
roadmaps. Add'rtional testing and field campaigns may tw 
necessary to continue to characterize the threat as K evolws ant 
<0 provide additional ground truth data to the developer 
community. 

tiS Navy • Naval Undersea Warfare 
Center Division Newoort 


Inter* Asencv 

DHS S&7 requires an experienced partner with prosmn 
experience in evaluating, formulating, contracting, and 
implementing successful tethnoli^y transfer pwtner^ip 
intermediary agreements. SSC Pacific currently manages and is 
an active partkipart in CCAT, which fadlltates the transition of 
DoO-sponsored technologies to the First Responder community 
In direct support of the 1401 Program {SecHon 1401 of the 2003 
Mationai Defense Authorizatiott Law). Acriticai objective of the 
CCAT program is to accelerate the time to market for 
techrrotogies residing in government laboratories, universiDes, 
and private companies -particularly small innovattue companies 
lacking the resources and expertise to commercialize new cutting 
edge technologies, thereby meeting priority needs of the federal 
government in a timely manner, in addition to conducting 
nationwide solicitations for government delined priority 
requirements with DOD acquisition program traruition potential 
and dual use applications, the CCAT program facilitates private 
sector commerdalizatiori of government developed 
technologies. Special government programs such as the Joint 
Robotics Program, SSIfl Phase II to 111. Technology Transfer (T2), 
and the 1401 Program arelntegrated Into the soNcitalton 
program efforts. For this effort, the CCAT Team will Initiatea 
Similar proeram for OHS S&T. 

USNaw-SPAWARfAtUnticl 





||||||||||||■|■|■[| 

Inter-Aaancv 

SPAWAR Systems Carrier Atlantic will perform the tasks 
described ur this SOW. These tasks will directly support OKS S&T 
and other government stakeholders within the homeland 
security technology cornmuniiy with information technology (IT), 
systems engineering, .tnd research, test and evaluation capability 

SUODOrt. 

U$Naw - SPAWAR fAtlantlc) 


tnter-Aaencv 

SSC'PACwrII conrlnue to provide experimentaiionAesb'ng 
suoooff and technical incut lor exislinc and new contracts. 

USNaw • SPAWAR (Atlantic) 


Inter'Aeencv 

The Contracter shall create a prototype and swhite papers that 
explore a coordlrsated qualified method of communicating 
specific inforrnailon to specIBc target audiences from an 
informed, retlable, and authoritative voice through social media 
channels while taking prtvacy into account. The response to thb 
SOW shall address ail tasks which are identified and described in 
tills section. 

m 


Inter-Aaencv 

Thespedfk effort addressed b part of the Interagency fhoiogical 
Restoration Demonstration jIBRD) within the Chemical and 
Siological Research and Development Branch, Systems 
Approaches for Restoration (Hoject. The objective of the IBRD 
effort is to provide plans, procedures, and capabilities to restore 
atge urban areas with co-located mlitatv facthlies to operational 
status following the widespread release of a bMogicaf warfare 
agent (SWA). During the first three years of the program, 
science and tf chnology gaps were iderrtified and projects were 
undedto fill the most pressing these gaps. These effoits can 
le grouped into the phases of Consequence Management, 
rhaiacieriiation, Decontamination, Clearance, and Restoration. 

USNaw - SPAWAR (Atlantic) 





15 





406 


This effort will fund SSC Padflc to operstea testiied at USCG SCC 
lA/lBsncludiii|:- Provide updated concept of opera lions 
(CONOPS) documents - C2 and sensor eqidpniMtt upgrade de^n 
- Purchase required project equipment and perform irtttgratiim, 
operation, and training - Integrate testbed systems with existing 
DHS and Port Partner systems - Operate hmg range eiectrO' 
optical/infiared (EO/IR) camera - Provide a bc^ project tecftnkai 
representative onsifo at SCC lAAb to coordiiratB testbed 
activities and interface v«Hh system users -Conduct studies to 
identify the next steps for the Pr>rt Seoaity Testbed ta the area 
of advanced fusion fechtmlogy - Optme for ftihire ertgitteering 
and integration of SST approved sensor and O technologies 
{radar, camera, etc.) into the Site teeBne U 


This statement of work addresses development, testing and 
eualuatiorr (OT81E) at the port security testbed at Hie US Coast 
Guard Sector Command Center (SCC) Ids AngelesAong Seach 
{lA/lBj. A previous effort preluded the initld funding to SSC 
Pacific (or operation of the traseilne testbed capabMtiesand 
Initial development. ThiseKdrt wUI provide iRcrementai funding 
to continue evaluation of technotogies through the atd of the 
period of performance. SSC Pacific has previously supported 
OHS Sk^ by establishing the testbed and by proviifing Subject 
Matter Expertise (SME) in the assessment of maritime security 
technologies, data fusion, and information shying. Also,witMn 
the U.S. Navy, SSC Pacific Is an expert in command and control 
{C2) and sensor system intejpation. Th«r continued fovolvement 
in the area of C2, settsor, and data fusion integration is critical 
and will allow DHS S&Tand our customers to make informed 
decisions about the suitability of these technologies for 
enhancing port, harbor, and offshore survellfonce and security 
capabliities. I 


IDA will coordinate wtth MrT/Llfwho has primary data anaiysis 
responsibiiity within the radar test team) and the DHS S&T 
sponsor to identify specific areas of analysis for which IDA will 
provide focused data analysis efforts In order to provide insight 
into performance issues that might not be covered in the 
standard analysis. Such areas might include modeling tower 
motion effects on detection and cotnparii^ theoretical models 
with data, better understanding windblown clutter statistics and 
spectra for desert terrain, and quantifying windblown clutter 
effects on detection and tracking performance of the CSR 
tested. The 6ih Radar test it cuirentty underw 


I Washington Headquarters Service 
(WHS) 















408 


Surface transportation technok^ tab Htd testily and 
evaluations to support development of inte^^irt video for rtsh 

inter-^ency hour tB detection, USAf - MIT tl FFSOC 

WW)tNWiT 

Agreement between DHS S&T and CSP r^ardir^ a tempcnary 
change in duty assignment. Oetait front S&T b) CBPwlR serve as 

the primary CBPOT1A interface to die ^ToxntmnHty^Mh DHS — U3. Customs and Border 

MOU between DHS-S&T and DH5-CBP Internal and ejctemai to DHS) Protection 

Agreement between DHS S&T and KSWC fMilgren r^arAng a 
MOU between DHS S&T and Naval Surface temporary change in duty assignment. Detail from NSWC to SAT 

Warefare Center, Dahlgren, VA will serve as a Program Manager and foster cAlaboration and DON - Naval Surface Warefare Center, 

Dahteren.VA 



This is an lAA which addresses the need for the Department of 
Homeland Security (OHS), Office of Information Techrndogy 
(017), Wireless Systems Program onice (WSPO) to iswe 
an lAA with OHS Science and Techncdogy (S&T) to obtain 
acquistion assistance by addressing tKhnofogy and infbnnatron 
sharing needs (or the WSPQ programs and ensure sticcesshil 

development and implementation of border technotogy. Prom DHS Customs & Border Protection 
05/15/2012 toQ5/lA/2Q13, for SlOM. (CBP) 


The Office of Technology Innovation and Acquisition (OTIA), was 
established to manage the development, deptoyment, and 
integration of SBI acquisition programs, and integrate and 
coordinate border security programs within CBP. The OTIA 
mission is to lead operational requirements support and 
documentation as well as acquisition efforts to develop, deploy, 
and integrate technok^y and tactical Infrastruc-ture In support 
of C3P's efforts to gain and maintain effective control of U4. 
lartd border areas. Tbeanalysis wilt determine how often CBP 
must sample in particular atees m order to have confidence that 
what Isobserved is a representative, fairiy constant fraction of 
activity as a whole. It will anafyta, compare, and determine 
various means of sampling in order to determine the best (most 
effective and most efficient} ways to sample, and how random 


Tha desired impact of this task Is to enhance CBP’s situational 
awarersess of all current national level counter-tunnel capabilities 
ersd existinf gaps. Ensuring a comprehensive understanding of all 
courster-iunnel efforts will allow CBP to move forward with 
strengthening its tunnel program by addressing actual existing 
capability gaps without redundancy of work. AddiHonally, this 
(ask should also have (he desired impact of increasing 
Interagency cooperation between all national level counter- 
tunnel stakeholders. Ci 





409 



TheCBP Operational Integration and Analysis Directorate 
currently a component of the Office of Tedmologv Innovation 
and Acquisition (OTJA), has developed the New and Etneii^ng 
Technoiogy {N€T| Program to provide the CBP operafienal 
community ex-posure to new technotogy and provide a rkk 
mitigation strategy for future materiel inuest-ments tfitough the 
evaluation of promising technologies. 



intra-aeencv 

The NET program consists of independent, disaete, and tirr^ed- 
scope projects. The NET process begtro witha hAnskm Need 
Statement followed by a market rcseardr of capable 
technologies, proposal development, and approval to establlsha 
projKt to evaluate a new emerging technology. ^ evatuatirm 
plan is then developed ^d approved and an Operation*al Utinty 
Evaluation (OUE) conducted. The process ends with Hie 
disposition of the lech-nology and a final r^ort documenting the 
results. !( a technoiogy does not exist to meet an operationa! 
mission need, or has a low techmdogy readiness level, then a 
oroiectdiscontin-uation report is published. 

CBP 


intra-agencv 

SEDi shall provide Subject Matter Expertise hi support of OTIA 
goals and objectives. The overali goal for the SEDI team is to 
assist OTIA in maturlr^ their technology Innovation and 
acquisition governance organizational capabilities within CBP. 
This assistance mil occur within the corrtext of attaining OTIA's 
six strategic goals for FY 2013- 201B. 

CBP 


intr8-aa«ncv 

SEOl will assist the CSPO in adopting Agile prefect management 
and software devel-opment methodologies to improve upon a 
number of critical project perlormattce measuring aspects. 

These methcdcliges will enable the CSPOto achieve their destrei 

outcomes- 

CBP 


Intra-aaencv 

SEOl will provide acquisitiorr planning erqieftise for the E$TA fee 
analysis and the website redesign. Guidance provided will 
include research and periodic analysis on the evolving ESTA fee 
requirement. SEOl wiK provide Systems Engineering (SE) Subject 
Matte' Expert (SMEj and acquisition advice and guidance on 
diveiopingand establishing baseline business and technical 
requirements for ESTA (and Implementation, sea 
implementation, and traveie; survey database creation. SEOl will 
provide SE SME and acquisition advice and guidance for 
information technology (IT) change management, lest strategies 
for pending releases, website redesign and organizational 
structure optimization, taking into account changes brought 
about by the transition to the integrated Traveler Reengineering 
PMO. 

CBP 


lntra*8Rencv 


DNDO 


intrs'SRencv 

This ta^ extends the work of the iftAll AoA as it supports 

DNDO’s next acquisition milestone reviews. As DNDO continues 
IRAIL program activities and communications the results of the 
AoA to stakeholders, DNOOanCicipstes the need for tailoring 

AoA information products. As DNDO tailors AoA information and 
prepares communications, H intends to leverage HSSATs in-depth 
tnowiedgeof the data, analysis performed, and results of the 
AoA. 

ONOO 


(nler-a(tenc¥ 

A successful forum will be one that biings diverse participants, 
ncluding educators and polkymakers with varying 
responsibiNties in counteiing violent extremism, together to; 
define violent extrerresm m the context of schools and IHEs; 
describe how the threat manifests itself; provide infwmation on 
what schools and IffEsare doing (o address the problem; and 
discuss what Khoois and IKEscando to counter violent 
extremism moving forward. 

t is the hope of the Office ofSafe and Heaflhy Students thA 
nformation learned in this forum can be disseminated to school 
districts and INCs in order to help inform Ibeir efforts to develop 
irograms and policies aimed at preventing or addressingviotent 
extremism. 

Oeoartment of Education 







410 


intrs-aRencv 

The development of doctrinai products and die rmAant diai^ej 
to FEMA response and recovery operstfons, pofide^ and 
programs will enhance die eftident and eWecUitc deSvery of 
emergency assistance to individuals and oommurnties impacted 
bv all types of incidents and emergencies. 

FEMA 


intra-3gentv 


FEMA 


rntra-seency 

The mission of the Program Executive Office vrithin FEMA’s 
National Preparedness Directorate is to ensure tite 
implementation of Presidential Policy Direr^ve-S (PPD-8), to 
create a comprehensive approach to naUonal preparedness to 
prevent, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate 
emergencies and disasters, regardless of thw cause. To 
accomplish this, the PPO estabhshes a suite of interrelated 
documents, around whichthe KSSA) wiKstruchne its support. 

FEMA 


intr3-g*encv 

SEDI will use systems engineering, system developmertt analysis 
for program acquisition, program man^ement, and 
performance management expertise to evaluate and enable l&A 
to provide the DHS IntenigerKe {DHSO Enterprise with the 
intelligence and Information it needs to keep the Homeland safe, 
secure, and resilient. 

IftA 



SEDI virill improve the Homeland Security Enterprise ArchKeeture 
Program Management OfEicefEi^MO) and Enterprise Oata 
Management Office (EDMO) by providing independent technical 
assessments of OHS prograirs and technical and management 
advice to further mature EA and data management practices 
across DHS. 

MGMT 


int'sasencv 

SEDI will provida DHS expertise and advice in systems 
engineering, acquisition strategy, program governance, 
performance management, and independent assessments, SCOI 
wiil conduct activities in the form of aisessmenu and reviews, 
analyses and studies, and the development of white and point 
papers, technical reports and briefings. Acting as the ITSO 
technical and management advisor, SEDI win assess compliance 
with applicable DHS policies and directives (eg.. Directive 102, 
Systems Engineering life Cycle, eic.l. 

MGMT 


>ntra-«Kncv 

The independent program analyses and evaluations will use an 
obieclive, analytic approach to identify iuues and answer 
questions related to those issues. A key outcome of ihisanaivsis 
and evaluation is a set of actionable recommendations to Inform 
and facilitate decision ntaking bv PASiE and other stakeholders. 

MGMT 


intra-assncv 

SCO! will provide technical analysis and poDcy recommendations 
hat will enable ESOO to meet thoir goal of defiverii^ secure 
multi-tenant enterprise offerings, to include cloud environments 
and mobile solutions. SEDI will assist ESOO in dcfinngtfte 
mplementation of technologies supporting multi-tenancv and 
assess risks anti tradeoffs of those technologies in a manner 
raruparent to prospective tenants. SEDI will assist ESOO in 
meeting the Digital Government goal of "building a 21st century 
platform to better serve the American People.' 

MGMT 


intra-agency 

SEDI will conduct engineering assessments and provide 
independent technical assessments and IT-relaied special 
(udies; prepare technical analysis, compliance revfew; develop 
lerformance metrics and twasuremenf, and recommendatiorts 
or alignment of OHS ICAM wlh Federal and DHSreqinremenu; 
onduct current and future tedrnoli^V gap analysis based 
existing and target flCAM, DHSICAMarchUectureto infwm DHS 
CAM investments and DHS [CAM acquisitions; provide iCAM 
l/endor and Service.s capaUnUes technical analym to enable 
^Cter decision making regarding product and sendees 
cquisition to support enterprise deployinent of ICAM 
apabilities across DHS; and provide ICAM system engineering 
ubject matter expertise to irtternal and exlem;d ICAM working 

MGMT 







Accomplishment of ttus task win provide a dear definition of the 
IMS-related business processes aCTOSStteen^^se. Havii^a 
clear definition of the business processes wfl fadltate (he 
selection of an appropriate sinte of tools to support them. 
Having toots that best support the enterprise bu^ 
ase the transition from separate learning nu 


[system and performance management systens aows WS to a 
□HS enterprise TMS. The lesidt wW tie decreased cost of 
loperationandimproved efficiency in delivervof the cridial 
human capital managemetit capabBides of per forw aiCT and 
[learning man^cment. 


Genera! technical advice, guidance, and subject matter eeperttse 
for the development and implementation of FT pcrfidesand 
strategies around the areas of EBMO work, as required by the 
Director, EBMO, as part of thelargerstrat^cdirection. These 
. Include portfolio investment and mamgement. systems 
engineering life cycle, program management and %quisitlon, and! 
Information technology requirements development and technical 
advice for EBMO data management systervK. These IT policies 
and strategies will promote the use of standard practices and 
provide direction and context to Component and Headquarters 
staff. Outputs for this ol^ective may include updates to the OHS 
Systems Engineering life Cycle (SELQ, Capital Planmng and 
Investment Control (CdIC) Guide, IV&V PoQcy, and Goverrtance 
Processes. This effort focuses on prowdii^ acquisition, program, 
and infrastsrutcture advice; SEIC poRcy and practices Indudbig 
tailoring; development methodolt^ies irtcluding Agile; 
iRS/AR3/Pfi& reviews; COE&T Artalyss; and Program and 
Portfolio Martagement analysis incIvidingCMhlU 'like” 
assessments for programs. 


Intra-agencv 


[This task will provide OSA with objective and Independent, full 
ife-cycte systems engineering and acquisition management 
analysis to enable the successful development and evolution of 
strategies for the acquisition of a broad range of cyber security 
capabilities for the Federal government. Particular emphasis will 
be placed on recommending improvements for program-related 
strategic plenning, acquIsItiOA management, systems engineeringj 
and Integration, policy development, business process 
j improvement, and program management. 


jSEOI will conduct engineering assessments and provide 
independent technicel assessments and IT-related special 
studies: prepare technical analysis, compTiance review; develop 
'formance metrics and measurement, artd recommendations 
for alignment of OHS ICAM with Federal and OHS requirements; 
conduct current and future technology gap analysis based 
eslitlng and target FICAM. OHS (CAM architecture to inform OHS 
ICAM investments and DHS iCAM acquisitions; provide lOtM 
Vendor and Services capabilities technical analysis to enable 
better decHIon making regarding product and services 
acquisition to support enterprise deploynrent ol ICAM 
capabilities Mross DHS; and provide ICAM system engineering 
subgect maRer expertise to imernal and external ICAM working 
groups. 


SCDI will provide objective and indeperident systems englneerittg | 
analytical expertise and advice focusing on f PS Operations and 
Headquarters management scCvHles, to include the eleven FPS 
regions and supporting command and control infrastructures. In 
particular. SEOI will: 1) identify daily operational requirements in 
such as: law Enforcement and Response, Fadlity Risk 
jManagfment. and Threat Managdtieni; 2)devclop integrated 
[strategies and performance metrics to measure overall 
[performance of daily operations and to identify current and 
lemerging operational and systems requirements; and 3) provide . 
[recommendations for poilcy/opmalionat changes and i 

technological advances. Ail three major ol^ciives will provide 

[ clear linkage to FES processes andactivlties being based upon 
risk and effecting outcomes that demonstrate ^fettive risk , 

mitigation or management. | 





Intra-agency 


SEDI will utinieits systems en^neeni^sid c^ersecurKy 
domain expertise to pro^de technk^ assessmenb and sbate^ 

recommendations to FNS in planningand executhiga broad 

spectrum oF Federal cyber security enierprw-widea^wde^ 

ranging from the development of a Fedsat mformatian 
assurance architecture and associated performance measoresto 
the establishment of a Federal eotetftfise c^»r security 

governance structure. 


SEDI shall provide subject matt^ exfrertse in systems 
engineering, int^ration, acquisition, pro^am management, and 
cyber security to make recammertdaHons that define, develop, 
and depiov National Cybersecurity Protection %stem (NCPS) 
capabilities across the Federal Oep^ments and Agea^ss {0/Asj 
(the -gov domain). 



This task will provide NCSDand its components with ol^wttve 
and Independent, full Hfe-cycie systems engineering and 
acquisition rrtanagement analysis to enable the successful 
development and evr^utlon of strategies for the acquisition of a 
broad range of cyber security capabUhies for the Federal 
rnment Particular emphasis wHi be placed on 
recommending Improvements for program-related strategic 
planning, acquisition managernent, systems er^eeringand 
integration, policy development, business process Improveinent, 
and program management. This wtH be applied acro» tiw NCSD 
}n areas of Cyber security strategy and aichlte^re 
Ideveiopment to secure the .gov, .org. .edu. and .com dorti^ns; 
jcvber security systems des^lopment anddeploymertt for the 
iFederal enterprise: Cyber security monitoring, an^ysis, and 
Ircsponse; and Cyber security stattdards and best practice 
j devetopment. 


!The Independent review performed In this task wHI help ens 
that DHS Is assessing fatitity <hk within the chemical sector using . 
jthe best available tools, methods, and data. This is expected to 
improve DHS's ability to identify U.$. chemical facilities that may 
pose a high risk to the public. Other desired goals include 
reducing ov«r-cia$sincat>on and over-regulation of facilities that 
pose a low risk and etvsuring that arty DHS reporting 
regulrernents placed on the private sector are appropriate to the 
[risks posed tty the laeiiity. 


$E0I will use its subject matter expertise In Informetlon end 
Communication Technologv (ICT) supply chain rhk management, 
systerrvs engineering, software assurance. Information security, 
systems integration, acquisition, and program martagement to 
provide expert guidance to GCSM in defining, developing and 


intra-agenev 

This task will provide CeSwilhanafylicandresearchsupportto 
developand implement strategic cybetsecurity initiatives within 
OHS. with Federal interagency partners, and across the hometanc 
security enterprise. HSSAI analysis will enable C«$ to develop, 
integrate, and align disparate cybersecurity activities around a 
common strategic framework, arid support investment in those 
cybersecutlty capabilities oF the greatest Importance to DHS, 
civilian departments and agencies, and the homeland security 
enterprise. Additionally, thb task will ettaUeCtS to conduct 
expanded outreach and engagement with a wide array of 
cyfaersecuritystakeholdersandtodevefop. implement, and track 
performance measures to evaluate the efficacy of existing and lu 
Cute cybersecurity Irritratives. HSS,U arafysis will also inform the 
evofutioit of the cybersecurity mission area in the 2013 
CUiadrennlal Homeland Security Review, ensuring recognition of 
trends in risk, technology, and the OHS mission space. This (ask 
will also provide CfS withanatylic support to respond effectively 
to requests from DHS leadership, the National Security Staff, 
Congress, and oUier critical stakeholders. 

NPPO 

intra-agency 

The desired Impacts resuiting from this task are increased system 
capabilities necessary for the Implementation of the Chemical 
Facilities Anti-rerroci«nSlar>d8ids{CfAT$} and Ammonium 
titrate (ANj regulatory program resuftiog in reduclunsin risk to 

test and evaluation of the CFATSandAN software; KCU systems 
engineering advice For specific CFATS and AN fTappications: and 
rigorous operational testing of Cf AT$ and Ml ap^lcaltCHts. 

NPPO 







intra-asencv 

Tht desired impacts resjltlngfrom this task are Inereased 
capabilities and analytical rMults necessary the liAastniciufe 
Information Collection Division {UCD} to accomplish its 
information collection and dissemination miswn. SEDI will 
contribute to successful accomplishments of the IICD mission 
through recommendatiorts for robust budget and management 
processes^ through provision of reliable cost estinsates for IT 
applications; and through rigorous operational tesihig of key 
NPPD/IP IT applications. The scope includes tiieOiticai 
Infrastructure Technology and Architecture {OTA} Program, end 
all other programs, actiwties and resources uttd^ the direct 
manaaement of IICD. 

NPPD 


intra-agencv 

SEOi will formulate and pro^de achdce and recommendations 
that will enable US-VtStT to tramition more effectively to the 
proposed future organizational placement and design within CBP 
and ICE. The proposed approach wi^ prepare the US-ViSIT 
organization to accomplish its evolving trussion and meet Hs 
strategic goals and oblectives Ihrouxhoul this lime of change. 

NPPO 


Intrs-agsncv 

The purpose of this task is to evaluate the Siomet'tc Architecture 
Concept Evaluation {BloACE} prototype within an operationaHv 
representative environment. The BloACE prototype provides a 
biometric matching capal^lity based on core software technology 
freely available to the United States Government (based on 
pending patent), open source software, and commercial-off-the- 
shelf hardware and software. 

NPPO 


inter-DKencv 

=(CEMS Is embarking OR a strategic planning initiative that will 
produce a five-year draft Strategic Plan that will help to 
synchronize the efforts and strategies of EICEMS member 
agencies under acommon goal while avoldii^ duplicatiort. This 
task will facilitate a systematic process try which f ICEMS wHI 
answer the foiiowing questions with respect to federal 
imergency Medical Services programs and activities: Where are 
we now? Where do we want to be in fcve years? Howdo we get 
there? How do we measure our oroeress? 

)epartment of Transportation 







414 


lnler-3Kencv 

The purpose of this task is to develop a char picture of what 
recipient countries need to do to graduate froin theEXBS 
program. This will be accomplished by devrioping a strategic 
trade control enforcement Instrument UiatwHI be merged wdth a 
legacy ISN/ECC licensing and regulation assessment tool. The 
sponsor will use these instruments to evaluate the over^ 
effectiveness and commitment of TXBS recipient SMintriR 
toward that program's stated goats. This task wW focus on 
opera&>nai activities, in particular ^ enforcement of customs 
and border security-related activities aimed at 
preventinR/interdictinR the of datw^ois HeriB. 

US Department of State 


intra-aaencv 

First responder procedures, medical respoits^ evMiation plans, 
and industry protocols arrd policy are ^ developed based on 
adequate computer modeling of expected TIHdoud behaviors 
and associated consequences. Improvements in the mod^ng 
methodologies for large-scale TIH releases wRI lead to 
implementation of better plannmg, respottse, and mitigation 
strategies. 

TSA 


intra-aeencv 

Development and overs^ht of a comprehensive and integrated 
service-enabled IT architecture. SEDI wRI provide tedinicat 
engineering and oversight best iKSOices that urill advise both 

OKS and TSA and will provide the TIM PMO witit technical 
guidance and recommendations in conducting attkai path 
analyses of proposed changes in ardiitecture, to indude 
interoperability^ntegratlon solutions with DHS {and Component; 
architectures. 

TSA 


intra-awncv 

SED! will assist with the analysis and recommendatirm of 
processes for the review and approval of all TSA TTlnvestments 
and non-IT investments with IT dentents. The processes that 
determine these irwestment decisions will be strengthened by a 
TSA Enterprise Architecture that adheres to guidelines from the 
DKS EAPUO, GAO Enterprise Archrtectiu« Maturity Model 
Framework {EAUMF) and the 0MB Common Approach to 

Federal Enterprise Architecture and associated reference models 
as well as maintaining compliance with the Homeland Security 
£A. 

TSA 


Intra-aeencv 

This research and analysis effort is intended to help TSA fulfill Its 
BBS strategy by transi-tloning to an adaptive air transportation 
security system. Such a system changes relative to emerging 
threats to provide the desired efferHveness within resource and 
other constraints. The effort's prototype products and 
governance processes will be used to create a system concept for 
adaptive commercial air transponatiois security to guide 
capabilitv Improvement projects and acquisition programs. In 
particular, it will attempt to support idenli(tcatlott of candidate 
mid- term (2018-2019) Improvements to be assessed In a 
concurrent analysis of al-temallves (AoA) (TaskO in iheSOO). 
Finally, our efforts are Intended to facib'tate anongo-ing process 
of stakeholder engagement, feedback, and improvement and 
revision to the eo-vern«nce methodoloevand related products. 

TSA 


intra-aiiencv 

A tailored net assessment capability can support TSA's decisions 
on capability development and operational approaches for 
countering terrorist and other deliberate threats to the nation's 
transoortatlon systems. 

TSA 


intra-aaencv 

This effort is intended to Improve TSSRA's uliliiy within and 
beyond TSA by supporting poficy and resource-aHocation 
decisions from a risk-informed perspective, it wAH ensure that the 
next revision of the TSSRA model more clearly and accurately 
reflects TSSBA analysis results and sucdnctiy conveys TSA's risk- 
related priorities and concerns to department leadership and to 
Coneress. 

TSA 


intra-agencv 

This task will produce an independent assessment of FAMs’ 
security contribution to protect-ing U.$. commercial passenger 
aircraft, airports, and the Nation's other transportation modes. 
The Institute's assessment w^ speciRcatly focus on identifying 
what factors drive the FAMS force site and what are the risk 
mpitcations of varying FAMS force levels. The institute's 
assessment is intended toproviite FAA^ with an^ysisthat 
addresses Issues of interest to OHS Headquarters, the Office of 
Management and Budget (0M8I, and the U.5. Congress 

TSA 


intra-agencv 

This effort can impact CGHQ and local commander dedskm- 
maklng and assessment In better focusing MS80 activities to 
maximite risk-reduction. Elf ruts wilt focus on effectiveness 
estimates for a subset of MSftO activities, limited Access Area 
Inforcenienl (Fixed atrd Moving Security Zone CcAuxement ) 
lased on related MSRAM attack scenarios. 

US(£ 








415 



SEOt will prowde system] engineering and acqtiisiSon aiMce ior 
procurement of a USCG tHiS mobile networic interface; 
engineering advice for integrating OepartmeM of State (EtoS) 
requirements into the iKrSjartd pro^m mana^ment and 
systems engineering advice regarding MS imt^ementatioo and 
ongoing support. 

USDS 



Systems engineering (5E)and development efforts to assist the 
Coast Guard and designated corttractors supporting SAAS on 
cutters with the Shipboard Command anif ConiroiSyrtem (SCCS). 
the SEAWATCH system, and standalone Person^ Computer 
based systems (ships without SCCS or SEAWATCH). The 
referenced SE expertise includes any aitd all efforts to document 
and transfer the SAAS system to foe USCG or a contractor 
designated for the production, operation, and continued 
maintenance of SAAS. In addition, SEDt will provide technical 
expertise to the Coast Guard In devisii^ and deploying training 
for SAAS users. 

USCG 



Provide expert technical advice to plan, asses, coiWiorate, 
monitor, and evaluate the ongoing acquisition, syrtems 
engineering, and technical issues invc^ved in operating and 
sustaining a hIgh-visibiRty system acqidsition and pri^am 
management organitation. This task will enable the USCiS 
Transformation Program to continue the transidon to Agile 
methods and approaches in software developmettt, testing, 
contracts and acquisition, technical Architecture, testing, and 
deployment in Releases A2, A3 and beyond. 

USCIS 


intrs-a«ency 

S£0! will provide systems engineering expertise to the United 
States CitUenship and Imm^ratlots Services (USOS), Office of 
Information Technology (OIT), Iderstity, Credential and Access 
Mariagement (ICAM) Program In support of the USCIS Office of 
Transformation Coordination (OTC) and its multi-year, entet prise- 
wide Transformation Program. 

USCIS 


Intra-acenev 

SEOi will provide Systems Engineering services to the USCIS Chief 
Methodologist for the purpose of setting up a Processes attd 
Practices (PAP) Ptognm. The Program will be responsible for 
developing and communicating processes based on lean-agile 
principles, Scrum, and lean software devefopment. SEOI will 
coach USCIS stakeholders, such as members of the busirteu, OIT 
managers, and software developers in best practices for 
conducting agile reviews and all aspects ol agile methodology 
and frameworks for achieving transparency. As dewefopmerrt 
teams Implement agile practices, SEOI will observe and assess 
the teams' agile performance and provide periodic reports and 
recommendations to the PAP team. 

uses 


intra-aesncv 

The purpose of this task is to provide systems engineering 
expertise and analysis to VER as It prepares foe Afternatives 
Attalvsis Study Plan, in accordance with the requirements of 
AcQuisilion Directive 102 IAO-102). 

usas 


Intrs-anncv 


USDS 


Jnter-aRencv 

This task will lead to the refinement of the 0FN5 Team Toolkit. 
Following completion of the (ask, the OEMS Team Toolkii should 
include the latest requirements erf HSEEP and PPO-8. have 
improved educational content, and documentation clearly 
identifying and explaining the technol-ogical and utillaation 
requirements for users as well as long-term toolkit maintenance. 
Ullimately, these refinements shoitid enable FNS stakeholders to 
further their preparedness for a food-related emergency through 
(he provision ol a structured technology suite that wHI assist in 
foe devefoument of an exercise. 

us Oeoar (merit of Agriculture 



CBD INPUT 



MOA- Relative to Integrated Chemical and 
BioiOftical Forensics ProRfams 

This MOA defines the relationship between OHS and FBI in 
administering (fie Forensic Programs and is consAtent with the 
strate/ticobiectives and eoafs of the Strategic Plan. 

001 FBI tab Division. OHS S&T CBD 







416 


1 M0U for an Interagency Plan for 
Environmental Mierobiolc^ Sampling 


MOU on Transfer of Portable High 
Throughput Integrated laboratory 
Identification System (PHIUS) 


The purpose of this MOU is to utilfie existing Federal 
relationships to collaborate and estabSsha pbn for vaSdeting 
sampling protocols artd strategic used during response to 
biological threats. This MOU acknowied^^tat sigraficant 
sampling and analysis 

expertise derives frem the Centers for CUsease Canbot and 
Prevention (COC), the Federal Bureau of Imestigation (FBI], tiie 
Environmental Protection Agertcy {EPA^and the Depaitment of 
Defense (DOO). This agreement respects the exi^ng strategies, 
policies, and operating procedures of these agencies. EKb 
agency plans to put forth expertise of tb^exMng strategies 
virhile moving towards an interagency, end-to-end, validated 

sampling process for the collection and anafy^ of environmental OHS, EPA, HHS/CDC, DOf/FBI, 

__ microbiologieai samples, DQC/NIST, DOO 

The purpose of the MOU is to set forth terms by which OHS and 
EPA Intend to transfer the ownership of the Portable High 
Throughput Integrated laboratory Identincation System (PHIUS] 
units (both existing and Rttal prototype) to EPA, any residual 
equipment contained in the existing units but not incontorated 
into the final prototype, and all licenses assidated wttti computer 

software. OHS. EPA 


This MOU addresses 'mteiactlons between DoO and IMiS, and wii! 
document, promote, and advartce collaborative efforts, it also 
defines missions, authorities, responsibifties, aruf operating 
principles for oversight of cooperative efforts between OoO and 
OHS In CS Oefense. The OoD and OHS wHI coordinate their efforts 
to promote feteroperability: rrtaximiteleueraging of Research, 
Oevelopment, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) and Acquisition 
MOU on Areas of Cooperation in Chemical- efforts; minimize duplicative efforts and enhance technical 





417 


Department of HomaUnd Security 
tnter-Agency and tntra-Oepsrtmenta) Agreemenla 
Domaslic Nuciear Detection Olflce (DNDO) 




DNOO, N<tKH)(i Mjcteai Sccuntv AdnWihttatien, OTM. orilce of the Ot(ccio> of Soence «nd 
rechnolofy, Office of the Director of Nitionai IntelKgence on Coordinelien of Nelional Nudcsr 
Detection Research and Oevetopment Riogremi to execute and/or ovence major R&D p'OE’ama, 
October 2(n2 




fnvlronrnenta* Protection Agency and DHJ DtfOO on Operatwial supoor t for Airborne StarKt Off 
Racb'otgDical Oeteciion S Imagery esiebbshec framework between tPA/OCMand DHS/Dff DO for the 
pgrooie of reoueitlog the {PAcoHect anddlueminate temotely-sensedifala related to the lesponse 
IQ or iraktine foraradlologicalincldent. August 2012 


Trantformauonaiand Applied Research Directorate (TARDI and DHS CSP taboraiortei and 
Scieiwfic Services (US) defines the rotes and raspomlbHHles as they relate to research and 
devetoament of the {nhaneed Radloiogical Nucleer Irgpe c Hon and Cvaluetion (ERNIE) analysis sysittn, 




Multitfe materials forensics protects that support the devetopment and mafntertcnce of an enduring 
nation^ capabllltv to conthset comprehensive, accurate, and timely forensic analysis of those materials 
(Argonne National tab). 

Coordinate programs funding graduate levH education in nuciear (orensics-related disciptir — 


Multiple materials fotensKS protects that support the development and mainienance of an enduring 
naticmal capabinty to conihKI comprehensive, accurate, and tirnety forensic analysis of those rnaterli 



Multiple materials foretsucs projects that siKiort the devetopment and maintenance or an enduring > 
national capability Co conduct comprehensive, accurate, and timety forensic atsatysis of those tnatcriais i 
(Pacific Northwest Nationally)- I 


Multiple materi^s forensics (sojKis IISM sivport the developmeni «id maintenance of an enduring 
national capabijffy to conduct comprehemive, accurate, and Ibncfir forensic analysis of those maieriais 
(Sandia tVational tab), 






















418 


Conduct Technical Nuclear Foren^ 

MulBple materials forensics pr^ects detsimpon Hie development and maintenance of an enduring 
national capability to conduct cuji»trti«ulu^aix>gat^ and Hme^ forensic analysis of those materials 
ISavannah River National Ubk 

Department of Energy 

Conduct Technical Nuclear Forensics 

MulUpie materials forensics prefects thM siqiport tte devehtpmen: and maintenance of an enduring 

(New Brurtswiefe lab). 

Deoartment of Energy 

Conduct Technical Nudear Forensics 

Multiple materials forensics protects tfiatsi^iport the development and maintenance of an enduring 

materials. 

Nation^ Institute of ^andards and Technology 

Nuclear Forensics Pi»t-Doctor^ Fdlowshio 

Support for one post-doctorate ntglCTrengtaegorphy^elstto |»ovlde research sut^ort and 
experience, provide expertise in fbren^ resemb. 

US Department of Hw Air Force 


Establish the level of personn^ detNted from the FBI tti ORBIO and establish that the National 

Technical Nuclear Forensics Center pfTN^eKmtialfuiKthxBwl) devolve to the FBI laboratory 
DNi^tothe event of adtsaster, attadt, or calaclophettMchmidersNTNFC personnel unavailable to 
sustain operational capabHty at tHWO. 

Federal Bureau of investigation 


Accelerate the discovery of new sctntOatCT matcfials for radiation detection using a high-tnrou^put 

synthesis artd characteriiatton tocflitr to screen potentM materlafs and growing crystals of the most 

promising materials and characterirlng them as radiad«t detectors. 

Department of Energy 

Technical Support Team tor totelilgent Radiation Sensor 
System ilHSS} Advanced Technology Demonstration (A7D) 

TARDIs conductlr^ the Inteli^ent Radiation 5ensorSvMm(lflSS) Advanced Technology 

Oemanstrailon (ATO) pre^m. Ws pra^m tootses wi the development of a networked radiation 

sensor system which uses sm^t-tomn-factot tadatian detectors and advanced networking to provide a 

detection capability in locadons whm It is not ^stile to route traffic through defined choke points. 

Through coruratt HSHQDC-1(M(-(W257. 0^ Ridge Nation^ laboratorv wRI provide a Technical Suppor 

Teem (TST) to sunsort DNOO efforts In evahiatinB ttte contractors' technicai progress and to develop 

and suDPVt edirdnlslrailon of the IRSS danonstration and characteritailon. 

Department of Enerev 

Establish the Algorithm Improvement Proiram (AtP) Team 
to define the priority gamma isotopes of Interest tor 
national security and seek to evaluate how the users woulc 
llkelvobserve these Isotopes In the field. 

Identify the Isotopes of concern, HRelcbig variations expected In the Rehf. detector materials of 

Interest and sites, detector elecirmcs, statistics torthe data, background variations, source strengths. 

data collection distances, data inief(«:e requirements, documentation, and validate that the proposed 
spectrum benchmarks would improve heU pertor mance 

Department of Energv 

International Rail fIRAIl) Analysis olAfternatlyes {AoA) 
support 

Provide operations kr^act analysts of technology chiNces being considered In the international Rail 
Analy^s of Altematiws using rrtodels that were deptoyed by Oak Ridge National laboratory to 
conhictimi with Customs and Border Protection and Oomestlc Nuclear Detection Office personnel. 
These models are being adjusted to accommodate additlonaf conslderaltons for technologies under 
consfderatlwiln theAnalysbofAltomarivesalchas the joint use ofactiwand passive technologlas 
that reqtrire delus to the esh ling Concept of Operatioits to operate effectively- 

Department of Energy 

Support the Demesllc Nuclear Detection Office 
Preventative Radiological Nuclear Detection mission needs 

TNs Is a newlAA vdlh the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration 
(NNiA) Emergency (^rations Training Academy to provide support to, and susialnablllcy of, 
Preveniatiye Rad/Nuc Detection (PRND) Training, Exercises, and Sustainability awareness, and 
outreach efforts for workshops, classroom lectures, online tralnini, other (raining events, 
demonsirailmts. drills and exerclsct, and other related aciMtles as needed. 

DeoarimentofEnergv 

Establish Operation and MalntenancefO&M} and Rack 
support services between the Oepartment of homeland 
SecurtlvtOHSI/Oomeslie Nuclear Ceteetlon OlflEe (DNOO) 
and the OKS/Chlef information Officer (OO) for the Siennis 
Data Center (DCl) 

EstabHdi Opcretlon attd Mamtertance (OSlM) and Rack support services between (he Departmentof 
Homeland $ecuri tyf OKSi/Oomestic Nucleer Detection Office (DNDOt and the DHS/Chief Information 
omcer (CIO) tor (he Siennis Data Center (Da) 

US Coast Guard 

Deslgit end impfemeni an architecture tor coordinated and 
Integrated detection and Interdiction oflNIcir ridiologicai 
and nuclear meterfalsor conltgured weapons that mev&e 

This profect wKI focus on documenting the exlsiing regtonai arcMtet lure that has been ei tabilshed. 

This will Include the various components of the original plan tor the regional archilec lure and the 
equipment and human resource based components. The analysis will be focused on developing 
lessons (esrned end tdentifying remaining gaps to help define entrance locations, engagement 
procedures, and end states that could be applied to other cities. 


DataHee from Nuclear Ragulatniv Cammlsdon 

Provide technical expertise support to DNDO 



Provide technieel expertise support toONEPO 

lepviment of Homeland Secuillv 


h’ovlde Ieoh Meal expertise support to DNOO 

department of Homeland Seciiriiv 


Provide technical expertise simoon to ONOO 

Defense Threat Reduction Aeenev 



US Coast Guard 


Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSP0)-12 program for personal Idemiey verification (PfV) 
card proitram fosafeteuard OHS personnel, systems, facMties and tntormaiiotv. 

Department of Homeland Stcurltv 


uaH Sendee. Transit, Raririrtg Service, Sedan Service, and Postage 

)epanmeni of Homeiand Securitv 

Provide support (or f hate 2 of OrytAon lesllrqt of Aerial 
Measurement 

Participate In dltcusslem to des^ lest, anehne data, pnnride tools to extrapolate crain testing aitd 
review the Dnel report. 

Department of Eoerev 

To provide tectinicat Support to ONOO and Test and 

Evaluelion 

To provide technical support to the Badtpadi, handheW, vehicle- mourutd and Portal System Test 
Campefgn at the RadlologkalerMi ftoclear Test and Evaluation Center. 

DieirtTncnt of Energy 

Far the Management and Operation of Radiological and 

Nuclear Test and Evauatlon Center 

MaintsNn authorisation basis documents with annual reviews at>d updates, conduct required inspection 
and facility mt>nttnance. 

Oepartment of Energy 

To provide Test Supoort nanning 

Obtain and breakdpwm da test Raduion Portal Monitors and send He- lubes to the Nevada National 
Security Site. 

Otpertmerit of Energy 

To provide planning and execution of DNDO Test Event 

To ^ovide support for ONOO's part>ci|»tfon In the HKclt Fiafficking Radiation Assessment Program 

Departmentof Energv 

To provide technical support tor the On Dock Rail Program 

Performance enhencement s and user documentatfoa removaf of detector panels and ancillary 
equipment, m»iaie existing Rail Test Center Mwentory 

Department of Energy 

To support acHviTles fortheGryohon Test Campaign 

Paciffc Northwest Naiionai lab wiB attend, observe and assisi with test execution, data analysis, test 
planning of the Gryphon Test Campaign, 

Department of Energv 

Oepartment of Homeland Security Working Capital Fund 

lepartmervl of Komidand Security Workbtg Capital Fund AciMtles 

Department of HomHand Security 


Agreement beiweenOllS DNOO and OHS OCtO to provide funding tor OSL tolenset Service 

Deparimenlof Homalsnd Security 

0PM Conference 

To esOiMitt conference service suppoii between OHS DNDO and OPM*s Eastern Management 
Oevelopment &ncer 

JS Office of Personnel Management 

McAfee Products 



HSDN BihWoul 1801 L St 

Provide furKkng tor inslaUathm and conf^urMftnof t$ addiunal HSON workstations and network 
devices at 1801 1. St Office 

Departmentof HomHand Security 

Secure Video Tetoconferendng 

Provtoe funcRng for Seam WdeoTelecontorenclng (SVTC) to be instated, conjured and fulfy 
toncUoflirsf; In rooms at ISOl 1 St Offiw 

Department of Homefand Security 










419 


iFactBtate anti coordinate the Wrtcn^ Rwi/Wuc DOE/NNSA (NA-4^ 












420 


Answer: DHS does not issue specific guidance to components for fuel inflation with its fiscal 
guidance. In light of the multiple classes and grades of jet fuel, diesel, and gasoline utilized to 
fuel the components’ varied air, marine, and land assets, as well as the overall volatility of fuel 
inflation, it has been the practice of the Department to rely on the components, with specialized 
knowledge of the issues regarding their own transportation assets, to develop inflation estimates 
in this area. 

The fiscal guidance issued to the components for non-pay inflation for fiscal year 2014 is 
included in the Economic Assumptions section of the guidance packet: 

“Economic Assumptions 

Please use the following economic assumptions in formulating your FY 2014 
Congressional Justification: 

• 1 .0 % - Pay (Military and Civilian) 

• 1.0% -Non-pay 

Use 1 percent for 2014 civilian and military pay inflation in the Congressional 
Justifications. These funds were added to the Department’s top line and each Component 
will receive additional funds to account for this increase. The additional amounts (net 
discretionary) are shown in the attachment by Component. 

• Please include the 2014 pay increase on the Exhibit Bs as an adjustment to base 
labeled “2014 pay raise.” 

• For those mandatory fee accounts that fund personnel, the 1 % pay raise should 
also increase the top line. 

If you ai'e showing non-pay inflation in the Congressional Justification, particularly in the 
Exhibit Bs, use one percent, which is the OMB-released government-wide economic 
assumption for FY 2014 non-pay inflation,” 

Disaster Relief Fund 


Question: Your FY14 budget includes $6.2 billion in the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund, including 
$2.6 billion for the cost of disasters that have already occurred - such as the Hurricane Sandy. 
Based on the DRF Annual Report that was submitted yesterday, this is what DHS needs to 
respond to disasters during FY14 based on current spend plans and ten-year averages. But I am a 
bit confused that you are assuming no carryover from FYl 3 to FY 1 4 since the April DRF 
Monthly Report shows that you may carryover nearly $3 billion from FYl 3. Is the requirement 
$6.2 billion for FY 14 or is it significantly higher? I have two reports here - both submitted in 
the last two weeks by DHS - that are in conflict with each other. 

Answer: As evidenced in the Monthly DRF Reports, the projected end of year balance or 
carryover for the DRF varies from month to month due to shifting timelines for completing 
project awards. However, the full FY 2013 funding needs for these projects are captured in the 
FY 2013 DRF estimates. The DRF Annual Report for FY 2014 addresses the projected funding 


126 



421 


needs for FY 2014. The carryover balance from projects not completed in FY 2013 is not treated 
as new spending authority in the Annual Report since the funds cover known projects. 

Question: On January 29"’, the President signed the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013. 
Included in tliat Act were significant new authorities for FEMA that will allow for a more 
efficient recovery to providing grants for public assistance based on cost estimates. However, I 
note that the report you provided does not take these new authorities into account. I would also 
note that staff has asked repeatedly for this information and how it will impact disaster funding 
to no avail. When will you provide the impacts of this new legislation and will you resubmit 
your funding requests based how the new authorities may alter how and when you obligate 
funds? 

Answer: The Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013, which Congress passed and the 
President signed into law on January 29, included several provisions that authorized significant 
changes in the way FEMA may deliver disaster assistance. Among those provisions is the 
requirement that FEMA establish Alternative Procedures for the Public Assistance (PA) Program 
with the goals of reducing the costs of providing disaster assistance, increasing applicant 
flexibility, expediting the provision of assistance, and incentivizing the cost effective and timely 
completion of PA Projects. In addition, FEMA’s Administrator is authorized to waive notice and 
comment rulemaking in order to expeditiously implement these procedures as a pilot program. 
FEMA is currently analyzing the provision and developing guidance to clearly articulate the 
methods by which it will be implemented, and plans to issue the guidance later this spring or 
early summer. Once the guidance is released, we will work with states and applicants to 
determine interest in these new provisions, and assess potential impacts of the new legislation to 
disaster funding. 

FEMA is not planning to resubmit its funding requests, as it expects that the Sandy FY 2014 
funding request of $1 .2 billion will be sufficient. 

Question; Are you willing to resubmit both of the DRF reports so they are not in total conflict 
with each other and Congress can see the true cost of disasters are? 

Answer: FEMA is not planning to resubmit the two DRF reports. As noted above, the two 
Reports (i.e., the Congressional Monthly Report and the Annual Report) are not in conflict. The 
FY 201 3 ending year balance presented in the Monthly Report is driven in large part by the 
timing of projects awarded during the fiscal year. The end of year balance changes month-to- 
month due to shifts in project timing. The Congressional Monthly report is updated monthly to 
reflect changes in actual obligations in lieu of estimates for the current month and revisions in 
the timing of projected obligations in the future months. Conversely, the Annual Report outlines 
the funding requirements for FY 2014 separate from the funding already targeted for FY 201 3 
projects. 


Major Disaster Declarations 

Question: In September, GAO recommended that FEMA develop a methodology to more 
accurately assess a jurisdiction’s capability to respond to and recover from a disaster. What is 


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the status of this new methodology to include changing the per capita indicator? What is the 
timeline for implementation of the changes? 

Answer: We agree that a review of the criteria used to determine a state’s response, recovery, 
and fiscal capabilities is warranted. Evaluation of the need to update the per capita indicator will 
be a part of such a review, as will a holistic review of alternative metrics. FEMA is conducting 
the review internally, but the process will include stakeholders in the review and consideration of 
alternatives. 

FEMA plans to conduct a review in FY 1 3 through the second quarter of FY 1 4, and will report 
the results of the review to the GAO by the end of FYl 4. 

Question: In the same report, GAO recommended that FEMA develop and implement specific 
criteria or factors to use when evaluating requests for cost share adjustments. What is the status 
of this recommendation, to include timeline for implementation? 

Answer: FEMA is conducting a review of specific factors or criteria that may be used to support 
decision making regarding 100 percent cost share adjustments. The process will include other 
stakeholders and include consideration of alternatives. This review is expected to be complete in 
FY14. An implementation timeline will be determined upon completion of analysis. 

Question: What is the status of plans to implement goals for administrative cost percentages and 
monitor performance to achieve these goals? 

Answer: FEMA’s top priority is supporting the needs of survivors and first responders while 
being a good steward of taxpayer resources. To accomplish this, we allow Federal Coordinating 
Officers the flexibility to manage employee time and resources as necessary to meet the needs of 
each disaster. At the same time, we ensure managerial controls by establishing operational 
metrics. The Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) continuously monitors all 
administrative expenditures, across all field operations, and elevates areas of concern or progress 
to senior leaders through the FEMASTAT process. 

FEMASTAT is an analytical process used to produce recommended solutions such as updated 
doctrine and policies, training, hiring, and procurement practices. The process evaluates, among 
other things, administrative issues such as Joint Field Office staffing, overtime, travel, and other 
administrative costs in order to identify potential efficiencies and set operating 
benchmarks. These benchmarks are then folded into ORA’s and OCFO’s ongoing process of 
monitoring administrative expenditures while achieving mission objectives. 

Question: Are you concerned that we are declaring disasters with more frequencies even though 
we have invested billions to make States more prepared? 

Answer: The data shows that while 201 1 was a record year for major disaster declarations, 2012 
had fewer than half the declarations compared with 201 1 and was the lowest year for 
declaiations since 2001 . Therefore, we aren’t necessarily declaring disasters with more 
frequency, we simply respond to the disasters that occur during any given time period. While 


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our investments in preparedness make our state and local partners better able to deal with 
disasters, they do not prevent disasters from occurring. 


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Drug Interdiction and USCG Budget Cuts 

Question: I don’t have to tell you that the Coast Guard’s efforts to interdict drugs being 
smuggled from the source and transit zones are vital to our security. However, your FY14 
budget will actually diminish your current drug interdiction capabilities by decreasing personnel 
and decommissioning assets. Based on your own metrics, this budget will support the lowest 
percentage of cocaine removal in five years. Also, combined with these proposed reductions, 1 
understand the Navy is moving more and more assets to the Pacific AOR. Can you discuss how 
these cuts reduce our current drug interdiction capabilities and how the Coast will mitigate the 
impacts of the cuts? 

Answer: The President’s Budget addresses the Coast Guards most emergent recapitalization 
needs and includes nearly $1 billion for more capable, modernized assets such as the National 
Security Cutter, Fast Response Cutters, and pre-acquisition work for the Offshore Patrol Cutter. 
Funding also supports upgrades to existing aviation fleet, cutters, and shore facilities. These 
investments along with funding for personnel to operate and maintain newly arriving assets will 
enhance the Coast Guard’s ability to surge to its highest priority needs, including support of the 
drug interdiction mission. 

Coast Guard decommissions legacy assets as their replacements are brought online. In Fiscal 
Year 2014, the delivery of the fourth National Security Cutter, HC-I44A and HC-130J Maritime 
Patrol Aircraft will enhance current capabilities. The operations and maintenance costs for new 
assets are fully funded in the 2014 Request. The Budget also includes funding for the 25'” and 
26'” more capable and reliable Fast Response Cutters, which will also support CG missions. 

Question: The 2004 Mission Needs Statement created specific requirements for patrol boats, 
major cutters and fixed wings operational hours. However, the budgets over the last few years 
do not support these requirements. At what point does the Mission Needs Statement become 
irrelevant since the budget does not support the requirements? 

Answer: The capacity levels outlined in the 2004 Mission Needs Statement alone are not a 
meaningful metric of performance. In a dynamic operating environment, the CG surges 
resources to the highest priority needs based on multiple factors, including threat, risk, and asset 
capabilities. DHS and CG are conducting an acquisition portfolio review in 2013 to identify an 
acquisition portfolio that optimizes mission performance within the current fiscal constraints. 

USCG Fast Response Cutter 

Question: This budget assumes no sequester in FY 14; however, as we have seen this past year - 
sequester is a real possibility. How would your budget request - if sequestered - further erode 
our interdiction capabilities? As 1 understand it, by only requesting 2 cutters, you are 
squandering up to $30 million in savings per year - when compared to the procurement of 6 per 
year. Can you explain why you made this decision and do you plan to increase the procurement 
in the out years so we do not continue to squander savings and delay capability? 


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Answer: The Administration believes sequestration is a bad policy and has detrimental impacts 
on our economy and operations. To implement the FY 2013 sequestration cuts, the Coast Guard 
has reduced surface and air asset operational availability by nearly 25%. If a sequester were 
implemented again in FY 2014, it would further erode the Coast Guard’s ability to execute its 
missions. 

The FY 2014 Request supports the Coast Guard’s highest priority recapitalization needs and 
maintains funding for critical frontline personnel. The Coast Guard received sufficient funding in 
the FY 2013 appropriation to award a contract for 4 FRCs in FY 201 3 and, when combined with 
the President’s FY 2014 request, award a contract for another 4 in FY 2014. The base order 
under the current contract is 4 FRCs per year. 

The Department will continue to prioritize investments in acquisitions and personnel to meet the 
Nation’s homeland security needs. 

Question: The current requirement for patrol boat hours is 1 74,000 per year but this budget 
supports less than half of that requirement. Will we ever close the capability gaps from what is 
funded to what is required for patrol boat hours? Also, what areas are most impacted by these 
gaps? 

Answer: The capacity levels outlined in the 2004 Mission Needs Statement alone are not a 
meaningful metric of performance. Patrol Boat hours will increase in FY14 as Fast Response 
Cutters (FRCs) continue to be delivered to the fleet. Specifically, FRCs will add 16,2.50 hours in 
FY14. Compared to FY13, the Coast Guard is projected to add a net increase in Patrol Boat 
hours (factors inFY13 FRC hours and reduction of FY13 high tempo, high maintenance hours) 
of 9,350 hours. 

Coast Guard patrol boat hours arc used to perform a multitude of Coast Guard missions including 
search and rescue, living marine resources, drug interdiction, migrant interdiction, and ports, 
waterway, and coastal security. 


USCG Ice Breaker 


Question: Your budget includes $2 million to continue development of a polar icebreaker. The 
need for an icebreaker is well-known; however, we do have questions about what the acquisition 
strategy is for this program. What will the $2 million in this budget fund and what is the 
acquisition strategy for the program? Does it include incremental funding? 

Answer: Funding provided in FY 2013 coupled with the $2 million requested in FY 2014 will 
enable the Coast Guard to complete the required pre-acquisition activities by the end of FY 2014, 
and the Department anticipates delivering an operational .ship within a decade. The Coast Guard 
has been working closely with the Canadian Coast Guard as they complete detailed design on 
their new icebreaker. Many of their lessons learned will be vital to helping move this project 
along as quickly as possible. 


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The Polar Icebreaker replacement is still in the pre-acquisition phases, and as such a detailed 
acquisition strategy has not yet been developed. 

Question: Does the Coast Guard intend to fund a development program or procure data rights 
from a foreign source? 

Answer: The Polar Icebreaker replacement project is still in the pre-acquisition phase. A 
detailed acquisition strategy and detailed requirements have not yet been set. 

USCG National Security Cutter 

Question: The President’s budget includes funding for the seventh National Security Cutter - 
and that is about ail that is funded in this budget - but it is unclear if there is funding for #8 in the 
out years. Is the program of record for 8 NSCs still a relative requirement with the continued 
fiscal constraints and how do you balance the procurement of the cutter with the need to 
recapitalize other assets? 

Answer: Coast Guard has not changed its current Program of Record; however, DHS and CG 
are conducting an acquisition portfolio review in 2013 to identify an acquisition portfolio that 
optimizes mission performance within the current fiscal constraints. 

As outlined in the Capital Investment Plan to Congress, funding for long lead time and 
production of NSC 8 is planned for FY 201.5. Within this top line, the Department and the Coast 
Guard made decisions by looking at past investments and the relative condition of each of these 
programs. For example, there have recently been some significant investments in the Coast 
Guard’s aviation fleet, and this portfolio is more robust when compared to the offshore surface 
fleet. 

The Department and the Coast Guard made decisions by looking at past investments, and the 
relative condition of each of these programs. To better balance the requirements, acquisition, 
and budget processes, DHS will conduct a comprehensive portfolio review in 2013 that will help 
develop acquisition priorities and operational requirements achievable within the funding 
projections 


Question: The budget request does not include long lead time material for NSC #8. If you plan 
to build an eighth NSC in FY1.5, when do you need the funding long lead time material? What is 
the impact of not getting this funding? 

Answer: A request that includes acquisition of an eighth NSC would also include a proposed 
funding schedule. 


ICE - ERO Improper Payments 

Question: In March 2013, the DHS OIG found that Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
(ICE), Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) had an improper payment rate of 8.47 


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percent, much higher than any other component or program. What steps is ICE taking to identify 
risk for potential improper payments? What changes have been made to processes to prevent 
improper payments? 

Answer: The errors identified in the Improper Payments Elimination and Recovery Act audit are 
generally not improper payments made to vendors for which amounts should be collected. The 
majority of the errors are administrative gaps in document retention and completeness. ICE’s 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer is leading a cross-functional team to implement process 
changes to improve the contract quality and enhance invoice approval. 

To reduce the error rate, ICE has taken the following corrective actions in FY 2013: 

• Corrected known errors based on the FY 2012 audit that are related to differences in 
vendor information and pricing information on detention agreements. 

• Ensured invoice detail or backup documentation is available for all ERO invoices. 

• Issued interim guidance and conducted training sessions for contracting officer 
representatives (COR) regarding invoice review and approval. 

• Began a review of all detention agreements to identify additional changes needed for 
vendor information, pricing, COR designation, invoicing instructions, and other criteria. 
Review is on schedule to be completed by June 30, 2013, 

The following continued actions are planned for FY 2014: 

• Complete necessary modifications of all detention agreements by December 3 1 , 2013. 

• Ensure all wireless agreements are covered by a proper contract. 

• Continue obligation and disbursement analysis to ensure detention agreements are 
funded/obligated appropriately. 

• Continue, with program office personnel, process improvements, training, and 
communications in receipt and acceptance procedures and invoice review and approval 
procedures. 


US-VISIT Transfer 

Question; The fiscal year 2014 budget again proposes the transfer of US-VISIT functions from 
the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) to U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). However, the Fiscal 
Year 2013 Appropriations Act rejected the transfer by establishing a new Office of Biometric 
Identity Management and moving entry-exit policy and operations to CBP and overstay analysis 
functions to ICE. How does current law impact the fiscal year 2014 proposal? 

Answer: The major difference between the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations 
Act, 2013, (Public Law 113-6) and the FY 2014 budget proposal is the creation of OBIM within 
NPPD from those parts of US-VISIT not transferred to CBP or ICE. OBIM will provide 
biometric and associated biographic identity verification and analysis services to DHS 
components; Federal partners; state, local, tribal and territorial law enforcement; and 
international partners. The Department continues to support the President’s Budget proposal 
transferring all elements of US-VISIT to CBP and ICE. As an intermediate step, there are 
additional elements that Congress could consider transferring from OBIM to CBP in FY14. 


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Specifically, DHS would support transferring the Arrival Departure Information System (ADIS) 
to CBP. ADIS is an immigration-focused, biographic system and is, therefore, closely aligned 
with CBP’s core mission. Additionally, over 90% of the data in ADIS is collected by CBP 
during entry/exit operations. Operational control can be readily shifted because the current 
systems all run from the DHS Data Center. This proposal will be discussed further in an 
upcoming briefing to Senate staff 

Question: Please outline the transition plan for implementing the fiscal year 2013 law. Also, 
provide an exhaustive crosswalk from US-VISIT fiscal years 2011-2012 actuals to fiscal year 
2013 to date. 

Answer: The transition plan for implementing the FY 2013 law is well into execution. The plan 
is being carried out in phases. The first phase consisted of transferring operational control of the 
mission sets to the gaining agencies. The entry/exit policy and operations mission was passed to 
CBP and the overstay mission to ICE through memorandums signed on April 16, 2013, by 
NPPD Under Secretary Rand Beers. In the second phase, OBIM senior budget representatives 
and subject matter experts discussed cost allocations with counterparts in CBP and ICE to gain 
consensus on the composition of the appropriations to CBP and ICE. Upon reaching consensus, 
OBIM, CBP, ICE, and NPPD leadership agreed on the mission requirements to determine the 
number of full-time equivalents (FTE) that would be allocated to CBP and ICE. The third phase 
was preparing the CBP and ICE list of transferring FTEs and formally notifying the individuals 
encumbering the agreed-upon positions to begin out-processing procedures. This phase was 
completed when administrative control (payroll) was transferred to CBP and ICE effective May 
5, 2013. The fourth phase, which is in progress, is to support the operational control of the CBP 
and ICE contingents by consolidating the associated staff into centralized facilities. This will 
allow simplified command and control of the newly acquired mission sets and the staff executing 
these missions. The final phase of the transition will focus on the OBIM organization with the 
appropriate mix of staff, resources, and facilities. 

The table that follows provides a crosswalk of US-VISlT actual costs for EY 2011, FY 2012, and 
actuals-to-date for FY 2013. The FY 2013 actuals-to-date include expenses prior to the 
separation of US-VlSIT as authorized under the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 1 1 3-6). Once the transition has been completed, a final 
breakout of actual costs for FY 2013 will be available. 


134 



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The major difference between the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2013, 
(Public Law 113-6) and the FY 2014 budget proposal is the creation of OBIM within NPPD 
from those parts of US-VISIT not transferred to CBP or ICE. OBIM will provide biometric and 
associated biographic identity verification and analysis services to DHS components; Federal 
partners; state, local, tribal and territorial law enforcement; and international partners. The 
Department continues to support the President’s Budget proposal transferring all elements of US- 
VISIT to CBP and ICE. As an intermediate step, there are additional elements that Congress 
could consider transferring from OBIM to CBP in FY14. Specifically, DHS would support 
transferring the Arrival Departure Information System (ADIS) to CBP. ADIS is an immigration- 
focused, biographic system and is, therefore, closely aligned with CBP’s core mission. 
Additionally, over 90% of the data in ADIS is collected by CBP during entry/exit operations. 
Operational control can be readily shifted because the current systems all run from the DHS Data 
Center. This proposal will be discussed further in an upcoming briefing to Senate staff. 

Question: Please outline the transition plan for implementing the fiscal year 2013 law. 

Answer: The transition plan for implementing the FY 2013 law is well into execution. The plan 
is being carried out in phases. The first phase consisted of transferring operational control of the 
mission sets to the gaining agencies. The entry/exit policy and operations mission was passed to 
CBP and the overstay mission to ICE through memorandums signed on April 16, 2013, by 
NPPD Under .Secretary Rand Beers. In the second phase, OBIM senior budget representatives 
and subject matter experts discussed cost allocations with counterparts in CBP and ICE to gain 
consensus on the composition of the appropriations to CBP and ICE. Upon reaching consensus. 


135 










430 


OBIM, CBP, ICE, and NPPD leadership agreed on the mission requirements to determine the 
number of full-time equivalents (FTE) that would be allocated to CBP and ICE. The third phase 
was preparing the CBP and ICE list of transferring PTEs and formally notifying the individuals 
encumbering the agreed-upon positions to begin out-processing procedures. This phase was 
completed when administrative control (payroll) was transferred to CBP and ICE effective May 
5, 2013. The fourth phase, which is in progress, is to support the operational control of the CBP 
and ICE contingents by consolidating the associated staff into centralized facilities. This will 
allow simplified command and control of the newly acquired mission sets and the staff executing 
these missions. The final phase of the transition will focus on the OBIM organization with the 
appropriate mix of staff, resources, and facilities. 

The table on the following page provides a crosswalk of US-VISIT actual costs for FY 2011, FY 
2012, and actuals-to-date for FY 2013, The FY 2013 actuals-to-date include expenses prior to 
the separation of US-VISlT as authorized under the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-6). Once the transition has been completed, a final 
breakout of actual costs for FY 2013 will be available. 


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Question: The fiscal year 2014 requests includes CBP’s request for appropriated funding 
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Answer: See the table on the following page. 


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Question: While the Administration intends to proceed with preclearance operations in the 
United Arab Emirates (UAE), this action raises a number of concerns including the impact on 
domestic staffing levels and the cost to taxpayers. Please provide a detailed response regarding 
the timing for establishing preclearance operations, the staffing level required, where the officers 
will come from, how those officers will be backfilled prior to their deployment to the UAE, full 
cost estimate information, and the source and authority for ail funds applied to this operation 
broken out by reimbursable and non-reimbursable costs. 

Answer: Expanding Preclearance to Abu Dhabi enhances our aviation security by extending our 
borders, helping CBP to prevent terrorists, criminals, and other national security threats from 
boarding commercial aircraft bound for the United States, 

Once a final agreement has been signed between the two nations, U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) will staff the Abu Dhabi Preclearance location with 21 temporary duty (TDY) 
employees. Due to the rigors of internal hiring for the full time positions and the pre-deployment 
process for Department of State clearances, CBP anticipates replacing the TDYs with permanent 
staffing following the start of operations. 

CBP estimates costs of opening and maintaining a Preclearance location in Abu Dhabi to be 
approximately $.5 to 6 million annually which includes salaries and benefits, relocations and all 
operating costs. CBP will be reimbursed for 100 percent of non-payroll costs (travel, contracts, 
supplies, etc). In terms of payroll costs, CBP is able to receive reimbursement for services 
related to Immigration and Agriculture activities; Customs related services are not 
reimbursable. In total Preclearance anticipates that it may potentially receive reimbursement for 
as much 85 percent of the total cost in Abu Dhabi. CBP believes that Preclearance operations at 
certain airports have two notable impacts. First, Preclearance reduces overall inspection related 
costs as individuals who are inadmissible to the U.S. are denied boarding, sparring CBP the time 
and resources necessary to process them in the U.S. Secondly, by conducting inspections at a 
foreign airport, groups of havelers that would normally have waited in line for immigration 
inspections upon entry to the U.S. no longer need to leading to shorter wait-times for other 
travelers. 

In seeking this reimbursement, CBP is relying on longstanding authorities that allow it to enter 
into reimbursable agreements for immigration inspection services (8 U.S.C. § 1356(i)) and the 
preclearance of agricultural products (7 U.S.C. § 831 1 (a)). 


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432 


U.S.-Mexico Security Efforts 

Question: Under Mexican President Pena Nieto’s leadership, it is good to see that the direction 
and partnership between DHS and the Mexican government remains largely unchanged. Please 
outline major ongoing efforts with the Mexican government to further homeland security 
interests, including associated costs and staffing levels to carry out such efforts. 

Answer: Please see accompanying spreadsheet providing information supplied by CBP, FEMA, 
ICE, and USCG on ongoing initiatives with the Mexican government. 

Human Trafficking — DHS Blue Campaign 

Question: Please describe the major accomplishments of the Blue Campaign since it was 
launched in 2010? Please also detail the funding dedicated to this initiative each year, fiscal 
years 2011-2012 and fiscal year 2013 year to date. 

Answer: The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has increased its capacity to 
combat human trafficking through the DHS Blue Campaign'’'’’*. The Blue Campaign™ is the unified 
voice for DHS’s efforts to combat human trafficking. Working in collaboration with law 
enforcement, government, and non-govemmental and private organizations, the Blue 
Campaign'”'* strives to protect the basic right of freedom, and to bring traffickers to justice. 

Training 

DHS works to train those likely to encounter human trafficking on how to report the crime. This 
is intended to increase victim identification, bring traffickers to justice, and raise understanding 
of the assistance available to victims. More than 1(X),000 people likely to come in contact with 
victims have been trained to spot potential human trafficking and report it, including lawyers, 
judges, first responders, private industry, faith-based organizations, tlie general public, 
international organizations, NGOs, service providers, and state and local law enforcement. 

Federal Workforce Training 

• DHS has mandated training for DHS employees who arc likely to encounter victims of 
human trafficking, using a specialized DHS web-based human trafficking awareness 
training. 

• DHS’s contracting professionals participate in a jointly developed DHS-Department of 
State (DOS) training on the human trafficking provisions of the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation, 

• DHS provided the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) with DHS produced 
training and as a result DOT is training its more than 50,000 employees. 

Law Enforcement Training 

• DHS developed a web-based human trafficking training course that teaches law 
enforcement officers how to recognize human trafficking encountered during routine 
duties, how to protect victims, and how to initiate human trafficking investigations. DHS 
has worked with law enforcement associations, state police academies and state attorneys 
general offices to make the training widely available. 


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